Science.gov

Sample records for aging hhs action

  1. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct. When a final HHS action results in a settlement or research misconduct... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Final HHS action with settlement or finding...

  2. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct. When a final HHS action results in a settlement or research misconduct... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final HHS action with settlement or finding...

  3. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct. When the final HHS action does not result in a settlement or finding of... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Final HHS action with no settlement or finding...

  4. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct. When the final HHS action does not result in a settlement or finding of... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final HHS action with no settlement or finding...

  5. 45 CFR 91.18 - Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations. 91... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.18 Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations. Any...

  6. 45 CFR 91.18 - Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations. 91... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.18 Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations. Any...

  7. 45 CFR 91.18 - Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations. 91... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.18 Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations. Any...

  8. 45 CFR 91.18 - Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations. 91... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.18 Age distinctions contained in HHS regulations. Any...

  9. 42 CFR 93.405 - Notifying the respondent of findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions. (a) When the ORI makes a finding of research misconduct or seeks to impose or enforce HHS administrative actions, other than debarment or... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notifying the respondent of findings of...

  10. 42 CFR 93.405 - Notifying the respondent of findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions. (a) When the ORI makes a finding of research misconduct or seeks to impose or enforce HHS administrative actions, other than debarment or... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notifying the respondent of findings of...

  11. Unified agenda of federal regulatory and deregulatory actions--HHS. Semiannual regulatory agenda.

    PubMed

    1998-11-01

    The President's Executive Order 12866 and the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 require the semiannual publication of an agenda which summarizes all current, projected, and recently completed rulemakings of the Department. The agenda informs the public about regulatory actions that are under development within the components of the Department, and it provides all concerned with the opportunity to participate in this work at an early stage. The last such agenda was published on April 27, 1998.

  12. Data-driven. HHS unleashes wave of public health data so software developers can create tools to raise awareness, spur action.

    PubMed

    Conn, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    Guided by how weather data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration fuels all kinds of weather reports, maps and forecasts, HHS officials saw parallels on how to distribute health data so software developers could create tools to be used by patients and providers. "We thought that was inspiring," said Todd Park, left, HHS' chief technology officer.

  13. The HHS Mandate and Religious Liberty: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim, Adele Auxier

    2013-01-01

    "We are in a war," Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius declared to cheers at a 2011 National Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League (NARAL) Pro-Choice America fund-raiser. Secretary Sebelius was referring in part to the uproar caused by the "HHS Mandate," her agency's rule that employer-provided…

  14. Age effects on rotational hand action.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, S K M; Zhang, Wei; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2012-06-01

    We investigated age-related differences in finger coordination during rotational hand actions. Two hypotheses based on earlier studies were tested: higher safety margins and lower synergy indices were expected in the elderly. Young and elderly subjects held a handle instrumented with five six-component force sensors and performed discrete accurate pronation and supination movements. The weight of the system was counterbalanced with another load. Indices of synergies stabilizing salient performance variables, such as total normal force, total tangential force, moments produced by these forces, and total moment of force were computed at two levels of a hypothetical control hierarchy, at the virtual finger-thumb level and at the individual finger level. At each level, synergy indices reflected the normalized difference between the sum of the variances of elemental variables and variance of their combined output, both computed at comparable phases over repetitive trials. The elderly group performed the task slower and showed lower safety margins for the thumb during the rotation phase. Overall, the synergy indices were not lower in the elderly group. In several cases, these indices were significantly higher in the elderly than in the younger participants. Hence, both main hypotheses have been falsified. We interpret the unexpectedly low safety margins in the elderly as resulting from several factors such as increased force variability, impaired feed-forward control, and the fact that there was no danger of dropping the object. Our results suggest that in some natural tasks, such as the one used in this study, healthy elderly persons show no impairment, as compared to younger persons, in their ability to organize digits into synergies stabilizing salient performance variables. PMID:22236650

  15. AGE EFFECTS ON ROTATIONAL HAND ACTION

    PubMed Central

    SKM, Varadhan; Zhang, Wei; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated age-related differences in finger coordination during rotational hand actions. Two hypotheses based on earlier studies were tested: higher safety margins and lower synergy indices were expected in the elderly. Young and elderly subjects held a handle instrumented with five six-component force sensors and performed discrete accurate pronation and supination movements. The weight of the system was counterbalanced with another load. Indices of synergies stabilizing salient performance variables, such as total normal force, total tangential force, moments produced by these forces, and total moment of were computed at two levels of a hypothetical control hierarchy, at the virtual finger-thumb level and at the individual finger level. At each level, synergy indices reflected the normalized difference between the sum of the variances of elemental variables and variance of their combined output, both computed at comparable phases over repetitive trials. The elderly group performed the task slower and showed lower safety margins for the thumb during the rotation phase. Overall, the synergy indices were not lower in the elderly group. In several cases, these indices were significantly higher in the elderly than in the younger participants. Hence, both main hypotheses have been falsified. We interpret the unexpectedly low safety margins in the elderly as resulting from several factors such as increased force variability, impaired feed-forward control, and the fact that there was no danger of dropping the object. Our results suggest that in some natural tasks, such as the one used in this study, healthy elderly persons show no impairment, as compared to younger persons, in their ability to organize digits into synergies stabilizing salient performance variables. PMID:22236650

  16. 78 FR 73195 - Privacy Act of 1974: CMS Computer Matching Program Match No. 2013-01; HHS Computer Matching...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Privacy Act of 1974: CMS Computer Matching Program Match No. 2013-01; HHS Computer Matching Program Match No. 1312 AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice of Computer...

  17. 78 FR 49525 - Privacy Act of 1974; CMS Computer Match No. 2013-06; HHS Computer Match No. 1308

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Privacy Act of 1974; CMS Computer Match No. 2013-06; HHS Computer Match No. 1308 AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice of Computer Matching Program (CMP). SUMMARY:...

  18. Aging Action: A Course in Senior Advocacy in Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Advisory Council on Aging, Topeka.

    Skills useful in advocacy of senior citizens' needs are discussed in this manual. The topics included are: (1) the meaning of advocacy; (2) assertiveness training for aging-action; (3) identifying issues; (4) choosing issues; (5) developing a plan of action; (6) organizing; (7) legislative advocacy; (8) criteria to evaluate potential legislative…

  19. 25 CFR 41.6 - HHS participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION GRANTS TO TRIBALLY CONTROLLED COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Tribally Controlled Community Colleges § 41.6 HHS participation. The Assistant... College....

  20. 25 CFR 41.6 - HHS participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION GRANTS TO TRIBALLY CONTROLLED COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Tribally Controlled Community Colleges § 41.6 HHS participation. The Assistant... College....

  1. Age-Related Deficits in Reality Monitoring of Action Memories

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Lyle, Keith B.; Butler, Karin M.; Dornburg, Courtney C.

    2008-01-01

    We describe three theoretical accounts of age-related increases in falsely remembering that imagined actions were performed (Thomas & Bulevich, 2006). To investigate these accounts and further explore age-related changes in reality monitoring of action memories, we used a new paradigm in which actions were (a) imagined-only (b) actually performed, or (c) both imagined and performed. Older adults were more likely than younger adults to misremember the source of imagined-only actions, with older adults’ more often specifying that the action was imagined and also that it was performed. For both age groups, as repetitions of the imagined-only events increased, illusions that the actions were only performed decreased. These patterns suggest that both older and younger adults utilize qualitative characteristics when making reality-monitoring judgments and that repeated imagination produces richer records of both sensory details and cognitive operations. However, sensory information derived from imagination appears to be more similar to that derived from performance for older than younger adults. PMID:18808253

  2. HHS circulating regulations finalized on June 17.

    PubMed

    Blackford, H M; Davis, N A; Dodd, P M; Gagne, R G; Teutsch, W J; Wherry, B I; Wilkins, S L; Zeitlin, K A

    1986-01-01

    On June 17, 1986, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published its final regulations in the Federal Register governing the hospital Conditions of Participation in Medicare and Medicaid programs. The final regulations state that "In accordance with applicable State laws and approved medical staff policies and procedures, ...surgical technologists may assist in circulatory duties under the supervision of a qualified registered nurse who is immediately available to respond to emergencies". Coming after a dozen years of exhaustive research and debate on the conditions, HHS deleted the work "direct" as it applies to the degree of supervision required for circulating surgical technologists because, HHS states, "it will give hospitals maximum flexibility to manage their internal procedures...and will recognize appropriately the special qualifications of surgical technologists". The following article will provide you with the historical background and development of this regulation, scheduled to take effect on September 15.

  3. Teachers' Pedagogical Reasoning and Action in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkey, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Beginning teachers are entering the profession with increasing confidence in their ability to use digital technologies which has the potential to change the way teachers of the future make pedagogical decisions. This paper explores how pedagogical reasoning and action might occur in the digital age, comparing Schulman's 1987 model with the reality…

  4. The effects of an action's "age-of-acquisition" on action-sentence processing.

    PubMed

    Gilead, Michael; Liberman, Nira; Maril, Anat

    2016-11-01

    How does our brain allow us comprehend abstract/symbolic descriptions of human action? Whereas past research suggested that processing action language relies on sensorimotor brain regions, recent work suggests that sensorimotor activation depends on participants' task goals, such that focusing on abstract (vs. concrete) aspects of an action activates "default mode network" (rather than sensorimotor) regions. Following a Piagetian framework, we hypothesized that for actions acquired at an age wherein abstract/symbolic cognition is fully-developed, even when participants focus on the concrete aspects of an action, they should retrieve abstract-symbolic mental representations. In two studies, participants processed the concrete (i.e., "how") and abstract (i.e., "why") aspects of late-acquired and early-acquired actions. Consistent with previous research, focusing on the abstract (vs. concrete) aspects of an action resulted in greater activation in the "default mode network". Importantly, the activation in these regions was higher when processing later-acquired (vs. earlier acquired) actions-also when participants' goal was to focus on the concrete aspects of the action. We discuss the implications of the current findings to research on the involvement of concrete representations in abstract cognition. PMID:27431759

  5. 25 CFR 41.6 - HHS participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION GRANTS TO TRIBALLY CONTROLLED COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Tribally Controlled Community Colleges § 41.6 HHS participation. The Assistant... Education, Department of Health and Human Services, and to revise such agreement as necessary, to assist...

  6. Patricia Hartge Receives the HHS Career Achievement Award

    Cancer.gov

    In February 2012, Patricia Hartge, Sc.D., Deputy Director of DCEG’s Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program, received the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Career Achievement Award at the HHS Honor Awards Ceremony.

  7. 48 CFR 302.7100 - HHS standard templates and formats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false HHS standard templates and formats. 302.7100 Section 302.7100 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL DEFINITIONS OF WORDS AND TERMS HHS Standard Templates and Formats 302.7100 HHS standard...

  8. 48 CFR 302.7100 - HHS standard templates and formats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false HHS standard templates and formats. 302.7100 Section 302.7100 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL DEFINITIONS OF WORDS AND TERMS HHS Standard Templates and Formats 302.7100 HHS standard...

  9. 48 CFR 302.7100 - HHS standard templates and formats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false HHS standard templates and formats. 302.7100 Section 302.7100 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL DEFINITIONS OF WORDS AND TERMS HHS Standard Templates and Formats 302.7100 HHS standard...

  10. Five Years of HHS Home Health Care Evaluations: Using Evaluation to Change National Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Paul R.; Smith, Nick L.; Grob, George F.

    2012-01-01

    In 1997, American Evaluation Association member George Grob, now retired from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and currently President of the Center for Public Program Evaluation, made a testimony on Medicare home health care fraud and abuse before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging. The occasion was to announce the…

  11. Review of nutrient actions on age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zampatti, Stefania; Ricci, Federico; Cusumano, Andrea; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Novelli, Giuseppe; Giardina, Emiliano

    2014-02-01

    The actions of nutrients and related compounds on age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are explained in this review. The findings from 80 studies published since 2003 on the association between diet and supplements in AMD were reviewed. Antioxidants and other nutrients with an effect on AMD susceptibility include carotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin, β-carotene), vitamins (vitamin A, E, C, D, B), mineral supplements (zinc, copper, selenium), dietary fatty acids [monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA both omega-3 PUFA and omega-6 PUFA), saturated fatty acids and cholesterol], and dietary carbohydrates. The literature revealed that many of these antioxidants and nutrients exert a protective role by functioning synergistically. Specifically, the use of dietary supplements with targeted actions can provide minimal benefits on the onset or progression of AMD; however, this does not appear to be particularly beneficial in healthy people. Furthermore, some supplements or nutrients have demonstrated discordant effects on AMD in some studies. Since intake of dietary supplements, as well as exposure to damaging environmental factors, is largely dependent on population habits (including dietary practices) and geographical localization, an overall healthy diet appears to be the best strategy in reducing the risk of developing AMD. As of now, the precise mechanism of action of certain nutrients in AMD prevention remains unclear. Thus, future studies are required to examine the effects that nutrients have on AMD and to determine which factors are most strongly correlated with reducing the risk of AMD or preventing its progression. PMID:24461310

  12. 45 CFR 605.0 - Adoption of HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Provisions § 605.0 Adoption of HHS regulations. The regulations of the Department of Health and Human Services on Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap, 45 CFR part 84, including any amendments thereto... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption of HHS regulations. 605.0 Section...

  13. 45 CFR 605.0 - Adoption of HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Provisions § 605.0 Adoption of HHS regulations. The regulations of the Department of Health and Human Services on Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap, 45 CFR part 84, including any amendments thereto... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption of HHS regulations. 605.0 Section...

  14. 45 CFR 605.0 - Adoption of HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Provisions § 605.0 Adoption of HHS regulations. The regulations of the Department of Health and Human Services on Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap, 45 CFR part 84, including any amendments thereto... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption of HHS regulations. 605.0 Section...

  15. 45 CFR 605.0 - Adoption of HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Provisions § 605.0 Adoption of HHS regulations. The regulations of the Department of Health and Human Services on Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap, 45 CFR part 84, including any amendments thereto... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adoption of HHS regulations. 605.0 Section...

  16. 45 CFR 605.0 - Adoption of HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Provisions § 605.0 Adoption of HHS regulations. The regulations of the Department of Health and Human Services on Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap, 45 CFR part 84, including any amendments thereto... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of HHS regulations. 605.0 Section...

  17. 78 FR 5182 - Annual Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Annual Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines AGENCY: Department of... Health and Human Services (HHS) poverty guidelines to account for last calendar year's increase in prices... Federal, state, or local office that is responsible for that program. For information about...

  18. 77 FR 4034 - Annual Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Annual Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines AGENCY: Department of... Health and Human Services (HHS) poverty guidelines to account for last calendar year's increase in prices... Federal, state, or local office that is responsible for that program. For information about...

  19. 76 FR 3637 - Annual Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... was delayed, as described at 75 FR 45628. However, the level of the 2011 poverty guidelines presented... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Annual Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines AGENCY: Department of... Health and Human Services (HHS) poverty guidelines to account for last calendar year's increase in...

  20. 42 CFR 1007.21 - Other applicable HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Other applicable HHS regulations. 1007.21 Section 1007.21 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES STATE MEDICAID FRAUD CONTROL UNITS § 1007.21 Other applicable HHS regulations. Except as otherwise provided in this part,...

  1. 42 CFR 1007.21 - Other applicable HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Other applicable HHS regulations. 1007.21 Section 1007.21 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES STATE MEDICAID FRAUD CONTROL UNITS § 1007.21 Other applicable HHS regulations. Except as otherwise provided in this part,...

  2. 45 CFR 1.1 - Location of HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Location of HHS regulations. 1.1 Section 1.1 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HHS'S REGULATIONS § 1.1... of the Secretary administers are located in Parts 1-99 of Title 45. • Health regulations are...

  3. 45 CFR 1.1 - Location of HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Location of HHS regulations. 1.1 Section 1.1 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HHS'S REGULATIONS § 1.1... of the Secretary administers are located in Parts 1-99 of Title 45. • Health regulations are...

  4. 45 CFR 1.1 - Location of HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Location of HHS regulations. 1.1 Section 1.1 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HHS'S REGULATIONS § 1.1... of the Secretary administers are located in Parts 1-99 of Title 45. • Health regulations are...

  5. 45 CFR 1.1 - Location of HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Location of HHS regulations. 1.1 Section 1.1 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HHS'S REGULATIONS § 1.1... of the Secretary administers are located in Parts 1-99 of Title 45. • Health regulations are...

  6. Rhetoric to action: a study of stakeholder perceptions of aging well in two local communities.

    PubMed

    Everingham, Jo-Anne; Lui, Chi-Wai; Bartlett, Helen; Warburton, Jeni; Cuthill, Michael

    2010-11-01

    This qualitative study of local perceptions of policy goals and action in relation to aging reports 31 stakeholder interviews within 2 Australian communities exploring (a) the meaning of aging well; and (b) preferred policy actions to achieve positive aging outcomes. Findings suggest that community perceptions of aging well are broadly consistent with the goals of national and international policy frameworks in focusing on 3 dimensions--health, social engagement, and security. Further, participants believe that achievement of positive aging outcomes requires a mix of self-help, community action, and government intervention--particularly government support and encouragement for aging well initiatives. PMID:20972930

  7. The timing and precision of action prediction in the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Diersch, Nadine; Jones, Alex L; Cross, Emily S

    2016-01-01

    Successful social interactions depend on the ability to anticipate other people's actions. Current conceptualizations of brain function propose that causes of sensory input are inferred through their integration with internal predictions generated in the observer's motor system during action observation. Less is known concerning how action prediction changes with age. Previously we showed that internal action representations are less specific in older compared with younger adults at behavioral and neural levels. Here, we characterize how neural activity varies while healthy older adults aged 56-71 years predict the time-course of an unfolding action as well as the relation to task performance. By using fMRI, brain activity was measured while participants observed partly occluded actions and judged the temporal coherence of the action continuation that was manipulated. We found that neural activity in frontoparietal and occipitotemporal regions increased the more an action continuation was shifted backwards in time. Action continuations that were shifted towards the future preferentially engaged early visual cortices. Increasing age was associated with neural activity that extended from posterior to anterior regions in frontal and superior temporal cortices. Lower sensitivity in action prediction resulted in activity increases in the caudate. These results imply that the neural implementation of predicting actions undergoes similar changes as the neural process of executing actions in older adults. The comparison between internal predictions and sensory input seems to become less precise with age leading to difficulties in anticipating observed actions accurately, possibly due to less specific internal action models. PMID:26503586

  8. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct...

  9. Cross-Age Peer Mentoring. Research in Action. Issue 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karcher, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Cross-age peer mentoring is a somewhat unique and different approach to mentoring than the better-known adult-with-youth mentoring model. In cross-age mentoring programs (CAMPs) the mentor is an older youth, typically high school-aged, who is paired or matched with an elementary or middle school-aged child. Meetings almost always take place in the…

  10. [The Canadian Institute of Aging: knowledge, innovation and action].

    PubMed

    Rosa, Sophie

    2006-03-01

    Led by innovation, leadership, transparency and excellence, the Institute of Aging provides a focal point for Canadian research on aging and pursues the fundamental goal of advancing knowledge in the field of aging to improve the quality of life and health of older Canadians. The Institute has carried out a range of important national and international strategic initiatives in aging, and has become influential in leveraging funding, enhancing research capacity and creating a new impetus in research on aging in Canada. The Institute engages and supports the scientific community, encourages interdisciplinary and integrative health research and fosters not only on the creation of new knowledge, but also on the translation of that knowledge into improved health, a strengthened health care system, and new health products and services for Canadians. The IA focuses on five priority areas of research: healthy and successful aging, biological mechanisms of aging, cognitive impairment in aging, aging and maintenance of autonomy, and finally, health services and policies relating to older people. The efforts of the IA are guided by five strategic orientations: to lead in the development and definition of strategic directions for Canadian research on aging ; to build research capacity in the field of aging ; to foster the dissemination, transfer and translation of research findings in policies, interventions, services and products ; to promote the importance of, and the need for, a research community in aging ; and to develop and support capacity-building and strategic research initiatives in the field of aging.

  11. Age, Action Orientation, and Self-Regulation during the Pursuit of a Dieting Goal.

    PubMed

    Hennecke, Marie; Freund, Alexandra M

    2016-03-01

    Two studies tested the hypotheses that (1) action orientation (vs. state orientation) is positively correlated with age across adulthood and (2) action orientation aids the self-regulation of one's feelings, thoughts, and behavior during the pursuit of a dieting goal. Hypotheses were partly confirmed. In Study 1, N = 126 overweight women (age: 19-77 years) intended to lose weight by means of a low-calorie diet. In Study 2, N = 322 adults (age: 18-82 years) reported on their action orientation to replicate the association of age and action orientation found in Study 1. Study 2 corroborated only the expected positive association of age and decision-related action orientation. In Study 1, decision-related action orientation predicted higher affective well-being during the diet as well as less self-reported deviations from the diet; failure-related action orientation predicted lower levels of rumination in response to dieting failures. Action orientation partially mediated the negative effects of age on deviations and rumination (see Hennecke & Freund, ). Weight loss was not predicted by action orientation. We discuss action orientation as one factor of increased motivational competence in older adulthood.

  12. 42 CFR 73.3 - HHS select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... have been genetically modified. (d) HHS select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria..., and Recombinant Organisms: (1) Nucleic acids that can produce infectious forms of any of the...

  13. 42 CFR 73.3 - HHS select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... have been genetically modified. (d) HHS select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria..., and Recombinant Organisms: (1) Nucleic acids that can produce infectious forms of any of the...

  14. 42 CFR 73.3 - HHS select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... been genetically modified. (d) HHS select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria are...) Genetic Elements, Recombinant and/or Synthetic Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant and/or Synthetic...

  15. 42 CFR 73.3 - HHS select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... have been genetically modified. (d) HHS select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria..., and Recombinant Organisms: (1) Nucleic acids that can produce infectious forms of any of the...

  16. 78 FR 56706 - HHS Retrospective Review 2013 Request for Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... to: Promote economic growth, innovation, competitiveness, and job creation; Reduce regulatory and... that would be appropriate for review. See 76 FR 32330 (June 6, 2011). HHS has made significant...

  17. 48 CFR 301.603-73 - Additional HHS training requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GS-1102s and GS-1105s are required to complete both HHS University's classroom-based and on-line... administer acquisitions that involve electronic information technology (EIT) products or services (subject...

  18. 48 CFR 301.603-73 - Additional HHS training requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GS-1102s and GS-1105s are required to complete both HHS University's classroom-based and on-line... administer acquisitions that involve electronic information technology (EIT) products or services (subject...

  19. 48 CFR 301.603-73 - Additional HHS training requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GS-1102s and GS-1105s are required to complete both HHS University's classroom-based and on-line... administer acquisitions that involve electronic information technology (EIT) products or services (subject...

  20. Anticipatory Action Planning Increases from 3 to 10 Years of Age in Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jongbloed-Pereboom, Marjolein; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.; Saraber-Schiphorst, Nicole; Craje, Celine; Steenbergen, Bert

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the development of action planning in a group of typically developing children aged 3 to 10 years (N = 351). The second aim was to assess reliability of the action planning task and to relate the results of the action planning task to results of validated upper limb motor performance tests. Participants…

  1. Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE Breakers, and Other Inhibitors of Diabetes Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Rhoji; Murray, David B.; Metz, Thomas O.; Baynes, John

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation or glycoxidation end-products (AGE) increase in tissue proteins with age, and their rate of accumulation is increased in diabetes, nephropathy and inflammatory diseases. AGE inhibitors include a range of compounds that are proposed to act by trapping carbonyl and dicarbonyl intermediates in AGE formation. However, some among the newer generation of AGE inhibitors lack reactive functional groups that would trap reaction intermediates, indicating an alternative mechanism of action. We propose that AGE inhibitors function primarily as chelators, inhibiting metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. The AGE-inhibitory activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers is also consistent with their chelating activity. Finally, compounds described as AGE breakers, or their hydrolysis products, also have strong chelating activity, suggesting that these compounds also act through their chelating activity. We conclude that chelation is the common, and perhaps the primary, mechanism of action of AGE inhibitors and breakers, and that chronic, mild chelation therapy should prove useful in treatment of diabetes and age-related diseases characterized by oxidative stress, inflammation and increased chemical modification of tissue proteins by advanced glycoxidation and lipoxidation end-products.

  2. 5 CFR 890.908 - Notification of HHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....908 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Limit on Inpatient Hospital Charges, Physician Charges..., will notify the Secretary of HHS, or the Secretary's designee, if the plan finds that: (a) A...

  3. 42 CFR 73.3 - HHS select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... been genetically modified. (d) HHS select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria are...) Genetic Elements, Recombinant and/or Synthetic Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant and/or Synthetic Organisms... exclusion category. (e) An attenuated strain of a select agent or a select toxin modified to be less...

  4. 45 CFR 1.1 - Location of HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... located at Parts 1-1299 of Title 21. • Procurement (contract) regulations are located at Chapter 3 of Title 41. Each volume of the Code contains an index of its parts. (5 U.S.C. 301) ... titles of the Code of Federal Regulations: • Regulations having HHS-wide application or which the...

  5. 42 CFR 93.227 - Secretary or HHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Secretary or HHS. 93.227 Section 93.227 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  6. 42 CFR 93.227 - Secretary or HHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Secretary or HHS. 93.227 Section 93.227 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  7. 42 CFR 93.227 - Secretary or HHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Secretary or HHS. 93.227 Section 93.227 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  8. 42 CFR 93.227 - Secretary or HHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Secretary or HHS. 93.227 Section 93.227 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  9. 42 CFR 93.227 - Secretary or HHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Secretary or HHS. 93.227 Section 93.227 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  10. HHS announces Text4Health task force recommendations

    Cancer.gov

    Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced new recommendations to support health text messaging and mobile health (mHealth) programs. The department has been actively exploring means to capitalize on the rapid proliferation of

  11. 42 CFR 1007.21 - Other applicable HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OIG AUTHORITIES STATE MEDICAID FRAUD CONTROL UNITS § 1007.21 Other applicable HHS regulations. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the following regulations from 45 CFR subtitle A apply to grants... Procedure for Hearings Under 45 CFR part 80; Part 84—Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in...

  12. 42 CFR 1007.21 - Other applicable HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OIG AUTHORITIES STATE MEDICAID FRAUD CONTROL UNITS § 1007.21 Other applicable HHS regulations. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the following regulations from 45 CFR subtitle A apply to grants... Procedure for Hearings Under 45 CFR part 80; Part 84—Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in...

  13. 42 CFR 1007.21 - Other applicable HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OIG AUTHORITIES STATE MEDICAID FRAUD CONTROL UNITS § 1007.21 Other applicable HHS regulations. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the following regulations from 45 CFR subtitle A apply to grants... Procedure for Hearings Under 45 CFR part 80; Part 84—Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in...

  14. Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins-- Addition of Bacillus Cereus Biovar Anthracis to the HHS List of Select Agents and Toxins. Interim final rule and request for comments.

    PubMed

    2016-09-14

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is adding Bacillus cereus Biovar anthracis to the list of HHS select agents and toxins as a Tier 1 select agent. We are taking this action to regulate this agent that is similar to B. anthracis to prevent its misuse, which could cause a biological threat to public health and/or national security. PMID:27632805

  15. Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins-- Addition of Bacillus Cereus Biovar Anthracis to the HHS List of Select Agents and Toxins. Interim final rule and request for comments.

    PubMed

    2016-09-14

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is adding Bacillus cereus Biovar anthracis to the list of HHS select agents and toxins as a Tier 1 select agent. We are taking this action to regulate this agent that is similar to B. anthracis to prevent its misuse, which could cause a biological threat to public health and/or national security.

  16. Critical action research applied in clinical placement development in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily D; Kelton, Moira; Paterson, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop quality clinical placements in residential aged care facilities for undergraduate nursing students undertaking their nursing practicum topics. The proportion of people aged over 65 years is expected to increase steadily from 13% in 2006 to 26% of the total population in Australia in 2051. However, when demand is increasing for a nursing workforce competent in the care of older people, studies have shown that nursing students generally lack interest in working with older people. The lack of exposure of nursing students to quality clinical placements is one of the key factors contributing to this situation. Critical action research built on a partnership between an Australian university and five aged care organisations was utilised. A theoretical framework informed by Habermas' communicative action theory was utilised to guide the action research. Multiple research activities were used to support collaborative critical reflection and inform actions throughout the action research. Clinical placements in eight residential aged care facilities were developed to support 179 nursing students across three year-levels to complete their practicum topics. Findings were presented in three categories described as structures developed to govern clinical placement, learning and teaching in residential aged care facilities. PMID:23134277

  17. 42 CFR 420.303 - HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and... Books, Documents, and Records of Subcontractors § 420.303 HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and records. HHS will generally request books, documents, and records from a subcontractor only if...

  18. 42 CFR 420.303 - HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and... Books, Documents, and Records of Subcontractors § 420.303 HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and records. HHS will generally request books, documents, and records from a subcontractor only if...

  19. 42 CFR 420.303 - HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and... Books, Documents, and Records of Subcontractors § 420.303 HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and records. HHS will generally request books, documents, and records from a subcontractor only if...

  20. One Department Serving Rural America: HHS Rural Task Force Report to the Secretary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.

    In 2001, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) created a rural task force to develop strategies to improve HHS services in rural communities. Fifteen HHS agencies have programs serving rural communities; child- and education-related programs provide child welfare services, Head Start, health promotion and prevention services, training…

  1. 29 CFR 1614.407 - Civil action: Title VII, Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Rehabilitation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil action: Title VII, Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Rehabilitation Act. 1614.407 Section 1614.407 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued... Actions § 1614.407 Civil action: Title VII, Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Rehabilitation Act....

  2. 29 CFR 1614.407 - Civil action: Title VII, Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Rehabilitation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil action: Title VII, Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Rehabilitation Act. 1614.407 Section 1614.407 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued... Actions § 1614.407 Civil action: Title VII, Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Rehabilitation Act....

  3. 42 CFR 93.501 - Opportunity to contest findings of research misconduct and administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions General Information § 93.501 Opportunity to contest findings of research misconduct and administrative actions. (a) Opportunity to contest. A respondent may contest ORI findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions, including...

  4. 42 CFR 93.501 - Opportunity to contest findings of research misconduct and administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions General Information § 93.501 Opportunity to contest findings of research misconduct and administrative actions. (a) Opportunity to contest. A respondent may contest ORI findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions, including...

  5. The functional organization of preschool-age children's emotion expressions and actions in challenging situations.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Tracy A; Cole, Pamela M; Wiggins, Crystal N; Cohen, Laura H; Zalewski, Maureen

    2009-08-01

    Although functional links between emotion and action are implied in emotion regulation research, there is limited evidence that specific adaptive actions for coping with a challenge are more probable when certain negative emotions are expressed. The current study examined this question among 3- and 4-year-olds (N = 113; M age = 47.84 months, SD = 6.19). Emotion expressions and actions were observed during 2 challenging tasks: children waited for a gift while the mother worked, and children worked alone to retrieve a prize from a locked box with the wrong key. Angry and happy expressions, compared with sad expressions, were associated with more actions. These actions varied with the nature of the task, reflecting appreciation of situational appropriateness. In addition, when waiting with the mother, happiness was associated with the broadest range of actions, whereas when working alone on the locked box, anger was associated with the broadest range of actions. Results are discussed in terms of the adaptive function of negative emotions and in terms of functional and dimensional models of emotion. Findings have implications for the development of emotion regulation and social-emotional competence.

  6. [The nurse as an action tool in care for the aged].

    PubMed

    Brum, Ana Karine Ramos; Tocantins, Florence Romijn; Silva, Teresinha de Jesus do Espírito Santo da

    2005-01-01

    This study approaches nursing care as related to the aged. The studied situation involved health care needs of hospitalized persons, using the following central question: which is the meaning of nurses' actions when attending hospitalized aged patients without expectation of recovery and when technology is no longer that important? We aimed to reflect about hospitalized elders' needs in nursing reality. Comprehensive Sociology was used as a theoretical-methodological framework. The study was carried out at an Intensive Care Service of a Municipal Hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro-Brazil. The subjects were nurses who attend hospitalized aged persons without any expectation of recovery, who were approached through a phenomenological interview. Through a comprehensive analysis, we identified care by being together, providing at the same time physical comfort and well-being to cope with the situation as typical of nursing actions. This study indicates some contributions for nursing care, assistance, teaching and research, aimed at strengthening nurses' attitude as an action tool in care for aged patients.

  7. The HHS-HCC risk adjustment model for individual and small group markets under the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Kautter, John; Pope, Gregory C; Ingber, Melvin; Freeman, Sara; Patterson, Lindsey; Cohen, Michael; Keenan, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in 2014, individuals and small businesses are able to purchase private health insurance through competitive Marketplaces. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides for a program of risk adjustment in the individual and small group markets in 2014 as Marketplaces are implemented and new market reforms take effect. The purpose of risk adjustment is to lessen or eliminate the influence of risk selection on the premiums that plans charge. The risk adjustment methodology includes the risk adjustment model and the risk transfer formula. This article is the second of three in this issue of the Review that describe the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) risk adjustment methodology and focuses on the risk adjustment model. In our first companion article, we discuss the key issues and choices in developing the methodology. In this article, we present the risk adjustment model, which is named the HHS-Hierarchical Condition Categories (HHS-HCC) risk adjustment model. We first summarize the HHS-HCC diagnostic classification, which is the key element of the risk adjustment model. Then the data and methods, results, and evaluation of the risk adjustment model are presented. Fifteen separate models are developed. For each age group (adult, child, and infant), a model is developed for each cost sharing level (platinum, gold, silver, and bronze metal levels, as well as catastrophic plans). Evaluation of the risk adjustment models shows good predictive accuracy, both for individuals and for groups. Lastly, this article provides examples of how the model output is used to calculate risk scores, which are an input into the risk transfer formula. Our third companion paper describes the risk transfer formula.

  8. The HHS-HCC risk adjustment model for individual and small group markets under the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Kautter, John; Pope, Gregory C; Ingber, Melvin; Freeman, Sara; Patterson, Lindsey; Cohen, Michael; Keenan, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in 2014, individuals and small businesses are able to purchase private health insurance through competitive Marketplaces. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides for a program of risk adjustment in the individual and small group markets in 2014 as Marketplaces are implemented and new market reforms take effect. The purpose of risk adjustment is to lessen or eliminate the influence of risk selection on the premiums that plans charge. The risk adjustment methodology includes the risk adjustment model and the risk transfer formula. This article is the second of three in this issue of the Review that describe the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) risk adjustment methodology and focuses on the risk adjustment model. In our first companion article, we discuss the key issues and choices in developing the methodology. In this article, we present the risk adjustment model, which is named the HHS-Hierarchical Condition Categories (HHS-HCC) risk adjustment model. We first summarize the HHS-HCC diagnostic classification, which is the key element of the risk adjustment model. Then the data and methods, results, and evaluation of the risk adjustment model are presented. Fifteen separate models are developed. For each age group (adult, child, and infant), a model is developed for each cost sharing level (platinum, gold, silver, and bronze metal levels, as well as catastrophic plans). Evaluation of the risk adjustment models shows good predictive accuracy, both for individuals and for groups. Lastly, this article provides examples of how the model output is used to calculate risk scores, which are an input into the risk transfer formula. Our third companion paper describes the risk transfer formula. PMID:25360387

  9. Aging-Related Dysfunction of Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons Produces Conflict in Action Selection.

    PubMed

    Matamales, Miriam; Skrbis, Zala; Hatch, Robert J; Balleine, Bernard W; Götz, Jürgen; Bertran-Gonzalez, Jesus

    2016-04-20

    For goal-directed action to remain adaptive, new strategies are required to accommodate environmental changes, a process for which parafascicular thalamic modulation of cholinergic interneurons in the striatum (PF-to-CIN) appears critical. In the elderly, however, previously acquired experience frequently interferes with new learning, yet the source of this effect has remained unexplored. Here, combining sophisticated behavioral designs, cell-specific manipulation, and extensive neuronal imaging, we investigated the involvement of the PF-to-CIN pathway in this process. We found functional alterations of this circuit in aged mice that were consistent with their incapacity to update initial goal-directed learning, resulting in faulty activation of projection neurons in the striatum. Toxicogenetic ablation of CINs in young mice reproduced these behavioral and neuronal defects, suggesting that age-related deficits in PF-to-CIN function reduce the ability of older individuals to resolve conflict between actions, likely contributing to impairments in adaptive goal-directed action and executive control in aging. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27100198

  10. [European innovation partnership on active and healthy aging: moving from policy to action].

    PubMed

    García Lizana, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    Demographic change and aging are a common challenge in Europe. The rising number of elderly people will need support at home, and will consume more healthcare services, putting further pressure on the welfare system. Collaborative, integrated and people-centered care provision, whether in hospitals, homes or in the community, is a way forward to sustainable and efficient care systems. Innovative treatments to address chronic diseases and the functional decline of older people will enable them to live longer in better health and with a better quality of life. To fully unleash the potential of aging in the European Union, the European Commission -within its Innovation Union policy- launched the first European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP AHA). Promoting engagement and partnerships among all stakeholders in the healthcare chain is essential. This article describes the theoretical foundations, the development and expectations of the initiative, and its first actions.

  11. Study on Interactions between the Major Apple Valsa Canker Pathogen Valsa mali and Its Biocontrol Agent Saccharothrix yanglingensis Hhs.015 Using RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Dongying; Li, Yanfang; Zhao, Lingyun; Li, Zhengpeng; Huang, Lili; Yan, Xia

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of biocontrol agent Saccharothrix yanglingensis Hhs.015 action against Valsa mali, a major apple Valsa canker pathogen, was examined using a novel, sensitive (minimum detection limit 100 pg/μL) and reliably RT-qPCR technique. Prior to lesion formation, total concentration of V. mali in the bark showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) after 24 h of Hhs.015 treatment. This was more pronounced at 48 and 96 h post treatment. After lesion formation, levels of V. mali remained constant at the boundary between infected and uninfected bark tissues, although the relative expansion rate of the lesion was significantly reduced (p<0.05). Gene expression levels of endo-polygalacturonase, a marker for fungal pathogenicity, were sharply reduced while host induced resistance callose synthase levels increased significantly (p<0.05) at the boundary bark at 9 d after Hhs.015 treatment. The results showed that biocontrol agent Hhs.015 prevented infection of V. mali by inhibiting pathogen growth, down-regulating pathogenicity factor expression and inducing a high level of host resistance. PMID:27611855

  12. Study on Interactions between the Major Apple Valsa Canker Pathogen Valsa mali and Its Biocontrol Agent Saccharothrix yanglingensis Hhs.015 Using RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dongying; Li, Yanfang; Zhao, Lingyun; Li, Zhengpeng; Huang, Lili; Yan, Xia

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of biocontrol agent Saccharothrix yanglingensis Hhs.015 action against Valsa mali, a major apple Valsa canker pathogen, was examined using a novel, sensitive (minimum detection limit 100 pg/μL) and reliably RT-qPCR technique. Prior to lesion formation, total concentration of V. mali in the bark showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) after 24 h of Hhs.015 treatment. This was more pronounced at 48 and 96 h post treatment. After lesion formation, levels of V. mali remained constant at the boundary between infected and uninfected bark tissues, although the relative expansion rate of the lesion was significantly reduced (p<0.05). Gene expression levels of endo-polygalacturonase, a marker for fungal pathogenicity, were sharply reduced while host induced resistance callose synthase levels increased significantly (p<0.05) at the boundary bark at 9 d after Hhs.015 treatment. The results showed that biocontrol agent Hhs.015 prevented infection of V. mali by inhibiting pathogen growth, down-regulating pathogenicity factor expression and inducing a high level of host resistance. PMID:27611855

  13. Reasons, assessments and actions taken: sex and age differences in uses of Internet health information.

    PubMed

    Ybarra, Michele; Suman, Michael

    2008-06-01

    The Internet is transforming the way in which consumers approach their health care needs. Sex and age are influential aspects of one's health as well as disease risk and are thus integral components of the emerging picture of health information seekers. Using data from Surveying the Digital Future, Year 4, a nationally representative, longitudinal telephone survey of Americans 12 years of age and older (n = 2010), we examine the reasons for, assessments of and actions taken as a result of health information found online among men and women and older and younger people. Although we tend to think of the Internet as a young person's technology, the percent of adults 60 years of age and older is similar to that of adolescents using the Internet as a health care information resource, thus suggesting an untapped opportunity with online interventions for older adults. Nonetheless, as age increases so too does the report of frustration with the experience. Men are more likely to report a positive seeking experience than women. Differences in Internet use fail to explain these observed sex and age differences in the seeking experience. Across the spectrum of age, sex and Internet skill, Internet health information seeking appears to enhance the patient-provider relationship.

  14. Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senese, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A small group of teachers at one Illinois high school is helping to effect and promote change. Through the Action Research Laboratory (ARL), teams of teachers conduct collaborative action research to improve classroom practices. Data from the first two years of the ARL indicate that teachers are eager to participate in, and have thrived in, their…

  15. Children's bilateral advantage for grasp-to-eat actions becomes unimanual by age 10 years.

    PubMed

    Flindall, Jason W; Gonzalez, Claudia L R

    2015-05-01

    Studies have shown that infants tend to develop a lateralized hand preference for hand-to-mouth actions earlier than they do a preference for many other grasp-to-place or grasp-to-manipulate tasks, years even before direction of hand preference can be reliably determined. This observation has led to a series of studies contrasting the kinematics of grasp-to-eat and grasp-to-place actions in adults. These studies have described a robust kinematic asymmetry between left- and right-handed grasp-to-eat maximum grip apertures (MGAs) that has been interpreted as a right-hand advantage for feeding that may have led to right-handedness as observed on a global scale. The current study examines grasp-to-eat and grasp-to-place kinematics in two groups of typically developing children aged 7 to 12 years. It was found that the previously described task difference is present in both hands among younger children and that the effect does not become lateralized until the end of the first decade of life. Additional kinematics of both the dominant and non-dominant hands are described in detail to augment a growing catalogue of reach-to-grasp action descriptions for typically developing children. The maturation of the right-hand advantage for grasp-to-eat actions is discussed in terms of an inherent right-hand/left-hemisphere bias for such actions that may have influenced the development of population-level right-handedness in humans.

  16. 48 CFR 301.603-72 - FAC-C and HHS SAC certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FAC-C and HHS SAC certification requirements. 301.603-72 Section 301.603-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL HHS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career Development, Contracting Authority,...

  17. 75 FR 45628 - Delayed Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines for the Remainder of 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Delayed Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines for the Remainder of... delayed update of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) poverty guidelines for the remainder of 2010, and until the 2011 poverty guidelines are published, which is expected to occur in...

  18. 75 FR 3734 - 2009 HHS Poverty Guidelines Extended Until March 1, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... published in the Federal Register (74 FR 4199) on January 23, 2009, shall remain in effect until the... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 2009 HHS Poverty Guidelines Extended Until March 1, 2010 AGENCY... Human Services (HHS) poverty guidelines will remain in effect until updated 2010 poverty guidelines...

  19. 75 FR 28023 - Solicitation of Written Comments on Draft HHS Strategic Framework on Multiple Chronic Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Solicitation of Written Comments on Draft HHS Strategic Framework on Multiple Chronic... electronically and may be addressed to MCC@hhs.gov . Written responses should be addressed to Department of... apply) and your name. Anonymous submissions will not be considered. The submission of written...

  20. 42 CFR 420.303 - HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROGRAM INTEGRITY: MEDICARE Access to Books, Documents, and Records of Subcontractors § 420.303 HHS criteria for requesting books, documents, and...

  1. 42 CFR 93.515 - Actions for violating an order or for disruptive conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest ORI Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions Hearing Process § 93.515 Actions for violating an order or...

  2. Differential effects of age-of-acquisition for concrete nouns and action verbs: evidence for partly distinct representations?

    PubMed

    Boulenger, Véronique; Décoppet, Nathalie; Roy, Alice C; Paulignan, Yves; Nazir, Tatjana A

    2007-04-01

    There is growing evidence that words that are acquired early in life are processed faster and more accurately than words acquired later, even by adults. As neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have implicated different brain networks in the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns, the present study was aimed at contrasting reaction times to early and later-acquired action verbs and concrete nouns, in order to determine whether effects of word learning age express differently for the two types of words. Our results show that while word frequency affected both types of words in the same way, distinct learning age effects were observed for action verbs and concrete nouns. A further experiment specified that this difference was observed for verbs describing actions belonging to the human motor repertoire, but not for verbs denoting actions past this repertoire (e.g., to neigh). We interpret these data within a recently emerging framework according to which language processing is associated with sensory motor programs.

  3. 76 FR 14402 - Draft Action Plan-A Public Health Action Plan To Combat Antimicrobial Resistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Draft Action Plan--A Public Health Action Plan...), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). ACTION: Notice of availability and request for public comment... Human Services (HHS) is publishing this notice requesting public comment on the draft A Public...

  4. Improved insulin response and action by chronic magnesium administration in aged NIDDM subjects.

    PubMed

    Paolisso, G; Sgambato, S; Pizza, G; Passariello, N; Varricchio, M; D'Onofrio, F

    1989-04-01

    In eight aged non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) subjects, insulin response and action were studied before and after chronic magnesium supplementation (2 g/day) to diet. Chronic magnesium supplementation to diet versus placebo produced 1) a significant increase in plasma (0.83 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.78 +/- 0.06 mM, P less than .05) and erythrocyte (2.03 +/- 0.06 vs. 1.88 +/- 0.09 mM, P less than .01) magnesium levels, 2) an increase in acute insulin response (AIR) (4.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -1.6 +/- 0.6 mU/L, P less than .05) to glucose pulse, and 3) an increase in glucose infusion rate (GIR) (3.6 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.9 +/- 0.5 mg.kg-1.min-1, P less than .025) calculated in the last 60 min of a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic (100 mU.m2.min-1 during 180 min) glucose clamp. Net increase in AIR, glucose disappearance rate after glucose pulse, and GIR were significantly and positively correlated to the net increase in erythrocyte magnesium content calculated after chronic magnesium supplementation to diet. In conclusion, our data suggest that NIDDM subjects may benefit from therapeutic chronic administration of magnesium salts.

  5. INCENTIVES TO IDENTIFY: RACIAL IDENTITY IN THE AGE OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

    PubMed Central

    Antman, Francisca; Duncan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We link data on racial self-identification with changes in state-level affirmative action policies to ask whether racial self-identification responds to economic incentives. We find that after a state bans affirmative action, multiracial individuals who face an incentive to identify under affirmative action are about 30 percent less likely to identify with their minority groups. In contrast, multiracial individuals who face a disincentive to identify under affirmative action are roughly 20 percent more likely to identify with their minority groups once affirmative action policies are banned.

  6. Thermoclastic and cryoclastic action on calcareous building stone: durability to artificial ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germinario, Luigi; Andriani, Gioacchino Francesco; Laviano, Rocco

    2014-05-01

    were petrographically characterized through optical microscopy on thin section, followed by a geotechnical parameterization with petrophysical measurements (dry density, total porosity, MIP porosity) and indirect ultrasonic and sclerometric tests. Then, after every 20 ageing cycles, the same tests stated above were carried out; in addition, the measurement of residual strains and SEM observations were performed. With this methodology, the gradual modifications in fabric, petrophysical and mechanical properties of the tested stone were analyzed. The results revealed a high durability of the material to the conditions of ageing experimented. The main modifications of the samples concerned fabric, i.e. microcracking due to thermoclastic and cryoclastic action, which occurred only in limited areas for an uneven distribution of internal stresses. For this reason, no evident effects on the macroscopic integrity and physico-mechanical performance were noted, whereas the stone almost preserved the original strength and elasticity. Finally, the data gathered were used to suggest a method for the evaluation of the vulnerability of "pietra gentile" to freeze-thaw microcracking, based on the peculiar porosimetric distribution and the environmental conditions of weathering. New information are globally provided about a stone material that has been largely used in the Apulian monumental heritage, but has received scarce attention from the archaeometric research so far.

  7. "What If? As If", An Approach to Action Research Practice: Becoming-Different in School-Age Childcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Eva

    2015-01-01

    When doing research, or for that matter working in school-age childcare, the researcher/teacher is required to develop a plan for her/his work in spite of knowing that unexpected things will happen. This article aims to explore the relationship between the process of planning and unexpected events in childcare practice and action research. The…

  8. Effects of age and muscle action type on acute strength and power recovery following fatigue of the leg flexors.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brennan J; Conchola, Eric C; Stock, Matt S

    2015-12-01

    Short-term strength and power recovery patterns following fatigue have received little research attention, particularly as they pertain to age-specific responses, and the leg flexors (i.e., hamstrings) muscle group. Thus, research is warranted addressing these issues because both age-related alterations in the neuromuscular system and mode of muscle action (e.g., eccentric, concentric, isometric) may differentially influence recovery responses from fatigue. The aim of this study was to investigate the strength and power recovery responses for eccentric, concentric, and isometric muscle actions of the leg flexors in young and older men following an isometric, intermittent fatigue-inducing protocol. Nineteen young (age = 25 ± 3 years) and nineteen older (71 ± 4) men performed maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) for eccentric, concentric, and isometric muscle actions followed by a fatigue protocol of intermittent (0.6 duty cycle) isometric contractions of the leg flexors at 60% of isometric MVC. MVCs of each muscle action were performed at 0, 7, 15, and 30 min following fatigue. Peak torque (PT) and mean power values were calculated from the MVCs and the eccentric/concentric ratio (ECR) was derived. For PT and mean power, young men showed incomplete recovery at all time phases, whereas the older men had recovered by 7 min. Eccentric and isometric muscle actions showed incomplete recovery at all time phases, but concentric recovered by 7 min, independent of age. The ECR was depressed for up to 30 min following fatigue. More rapid and pronounced recovery in older men and concentric contractions may be related to physiological differences specific to aging and muscle action motor unit patterns. Individuals and clinicians may use these time course responses as a guide for recovery following activity-induced fatigue.

  9. Chelation: a fundamental mechanism of action of AGE inhibitors, AGE breakers, and other inhibitors of diabetes complications.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ryoji; Murray, David B; Metz, Thomas O; Baynes, John W

    2012-03-01

    This article outlines evidence that advanced glycation end product (AGE) inhibitors and breakers act primarily as chelators, inhibiting metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions that catalyze AGE formation. We then present evidence that chelation is the most likely mechanism by which ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldose reductase inhibitors inhibit AGE formation in diabetes. Finally, we note several recent studies demonstrating therapeutic benefits of chelators for diabetic cardiovascular and renal disease. We conclude that chronic, low-dose chelation therapy deserves serious consideration as a clinical tool for prevention and treatment of diabetes complications.

  10. 78 FR 27977 - National Institute on Aging; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Committee: National Institute on Aging Initial Review Group; Behavior and Social Science of Aging Review... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.866, Aging Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  11. Ten commandments for the future of ageing research in the UK: a vision for action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increases in longevity resulting from improvements in health care and living conditions together with a decrease in fertility rates have contributed to a shift towards an aged population profile. For the first time the UK has more people over age 60 than below 16 years of age. The increase in longev...

  12. Green Team Recognized with HHS Green Champion Award Honorable Mention | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Courtesy of the NCI at Frederick Green Team The NCI at Frederick Green Team received a Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champion Award honorable mention in June for the team’s plant swap initiative, begun in October 2012.  “The Green Team has been doing a great job this past year, and it is wonderful that their efforts have been recognized by the HHS through the Green Champion Awards,” said Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director of the NCI Office of Scientific Operations (OSO). 

  13. Evaluation of a regional community action intervention in New Zealand to improve age checks for young people purchasing alcohol.

    PubMed

    Huckle, Taisia; Conway, Kim; Casswell, Sally; Pledger, Megan

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a regional community action intervention to reduce access to alcohol from off-license premises by minors. The intervention focussed on: (1) monitoring alcohol sales made without age identification from off-licenses; (2) utilizing data on alcohol sales for media advocacy and direct contact with alcohol retailers and (3) working with key enforcement staff to encourage increased monitoring and enforcement of minimum purchase age legislation for off-licenses. Evaluation of this intervention used a case study design. Purchase survey data was obtained before and after intervention. Media items were monitored and included pre- and post-intervention phases. Interviews, with key enforcement staff, and document review were undertaken post-intervention. Purchase survey data showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in sales of alcohol made to young people without age identification pre- and post-intervention. Pre-intervention: 60% of visits resulted in a sale made without age identification; post-intervention this proportion was 46%. Principal component analysis of newsprint media indicated increased coverage of items advocating improved age checking for off-licenses following intervention. Interview data and document review indicate that some enforcement staff in the region implemented increased enforcement strategies including, controlled purchase operations and increased visits to off-licenses due to the intervention. Evaluation findings indicate that collaborative and intersectoral community action interventions implemented regionally can be effective in redirecting resources to achieve preventive outcomes at a population level.

  14. Evaluation of a regional community action intervention in New Zealand to improve age checks for young people purchasing alcohol.

    PubMed

    Huckle, Taisia; Conway, Kim; Casswell, Sally; Pledger, Megan

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a regional community action intervention to reduce access to alcohol from off-license premises by minors. The intervention focussed on: (1) monitoring alcohol sales made without age identification from off-licenses; (2) utilizing data on alcohol sales for media advocacy and direct contact with alcohol retailers and (3) working with key enforcement staff to encourage increased monitoring and enforcement of minimum purchase age legislation for off-licenses. Evaluation of this intervention used a case study design. Purchase survey data was obtained before and after intervention. Media items were monitored and included pre- and post-intervention phases. Interviews, with key enforcement staff, and document review were undertaken post-intervention. Purchase survey data showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in sales of alcohol made to young people without age identification pre- and post-intervention. Pre-intervention: 60% of visits resulted in a sale made without age identification; post-intervention this proportion was 46%. Principal component analysis of newsprint media indicated increased coverage of items advocating improved age checking for off-licenses following intervention. Interview data and document review indicate that some enforcement staff in the region implemented increased enforcement strategies including, controlled purchase operations and increased visits to off-licenses due to the intervention. Evaluation findings indicate that collaborative and intersectoral community action interventions implemented regionally can be effective in redirecting resources to achieve preventive outcomes at a population level. PMID:15722363

  15. Unified agenda of federal regulatory and deregulatory actions--HHS. Semiannual regulatory agenda.

    PubMed

    1998-04-27

    The President's Executive Order 12866 and the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 require the semiannual publication of an agenda which summarizes all current, projected, and recently completed rulemakings of the Department. The agenda enables the public to know about and to participate in the Department's regulations development work. The last such agenda was published on October 29, 1997.

  16. 42 CFR 93.408 - Mitigating and aggravating factors in HHS administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or nonexistence of any factor is not determinative: (a) Knowing, intentional, or reckless. Were the... misconduct an isolated event or part of a continuing or prior pattern of dishonest conduct? (c) Impact. Did the misconduct have significant impact on the proposed or reported research record, research...

  17. Protective actions of melatonin and growth hormone on the aged cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Sergio D; Forman, Katherine A; García, Cruz; Vara, Elena; Escames, Germaine; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that certain aspects of lifestyle and genetics act as risk factors for a variety of cardiovascular disorders, including coronary disease, hypertension, heart failure and stroke. Aging, however, appears to be the major contributor for morbidity and mortality of the impaired cardiovascular system. Growth hormone (GH) and melatonin seem to prevent cardiac aging, as they contribute to the recovery of several physiological parameters affected by age. These hormones exhibit antioxidant properties and decrease oxidative stress and apoptosis. This paper summarizes a set of studies related to the potential role that therapy with GH and melatonin may play in the protection of the altered cardiac function due to aging, with a focus on experiments performed in our laboratory using the senescence-accelerated mouse as an aging model. In general, we observed significantly increased inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis markers in hearts from senescence-accelerated prone 10-month-old animals compared to 2-month-old controls, while anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic markers as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase were decreased. Senescence-accelerated resistant animals showed no significant changes with age. GH or melatonin treatment prevented the age-dependent cardiac alterations observed in the senescence-accelerated prone group. Combined administration of GH plus melatonin reduced the age-related changes in senescence-accelerated prone hearts in an additive fashion that was different to that displayed when administered alone. GH and melatonin may be potential agents for counteracting oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation in the aging heart.

  18. 48 CFR 301.603-74 - Requirement for retention of FAC-C and HHS SAC certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirement for retention of FAC-C and HHS SAC certification. 301.603-74 Section 301.603-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL HHS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career...

  19. 78 FR 66653 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; HHS Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2014...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ...-04902 (78 FR 15410), the final rule entitled, ``Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; HHS Notice... Affordable Care Act; HHS Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2014''. This correcting amendment... section reference to the Affordable Care Act. On page 15495, in our discussion of estimating the value...

  20. 2 CFR 376.995 - Principal (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.995).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Definitions § 376.995 Principal (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.995). Principal means individuals, in addition to those listed at 2 CFR 180.995, who participate in HHS covered... definition at 2 CFR 180.995). 376.995 Section 376.995 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations...

  1. No Time to Waste: An Action Agenda for School-Age Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Fink, Dale Borman

    This book for persons interested in setting up high quality school-age child care (SACC) programs: (1) provides background information and a rationale; (2) describes a collaborative model of program development; (3) discusses program funding and resources; (4) considers approaches to recognizing high quality school-age child care; and (5) offers…

  2. Teachers for the Global Age: A Call to Action for Funders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin-Foltz, Betsy

    2010-01-01

    This postscript commentary challenges private and public funders to take action in support of the internationalization of teacher preparation programs by funding efforts for much needed resources, in order to prepare twenty-first-century teachers to teach with global perspectives. Specific ideas for foundations, corporate philanthropy, and…

  3. 45 CFR 74.12 - Forms for applying for HHS financial assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... report clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320, “Controlling Paperwork Burdens on the Public,” with... pursuant to 5 CFR part 1320. (c) For Federal programs covered by E.O. 12372, as amended by E.O. 12416... also 45 CFR part 100.) (d) HHS awarding agencies that do not use the SF-424 form will indicate on...

  4. 42 CFR 73.5 - Exemptions for HHS select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the select agent or toxin is reported to CDC or APHIS and to other appropriate authorities when... followed by submission of APHIS/CDC Form 4 within seven calendar days after identification. (ii) For all other HHS select agents or toxins, APHIS/CDC Form 4 must be submitted within seven calendar days...

  5. 42 CFR 73.5 - Exemptions for HHS select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the select agent or toxin is reported to CDC or APHIS and to other appropriate authorities when... followed by submission of APHIS/CDC Form 4 within seven calendar days after identification. (ii) For all other HHS select agents or toxins, APHIS/CDC Form 4 must be submitted within seven calendar days...

  6. 45 CFR 74.12 - Forms for applying for HHS financial assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... report clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320, “Controlling Paperwork Burdens on the Public,” with... pursuant to 5 CFR part 1320. (c) For Federal programs covered by E.O. 12372, as amended by E.O. 12416... also 45 CFR part 100.) (d) HHS awarding agencies that do not use the SF-424 form will indicate on...

  7. 5 CFR 5501.102 - Designation of HHS components as separate agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Pursuant to 5 CFR 2635.203(a), each of the twelve components of HHS listed below is designated as an agency... agencies for purposes of applying any provision of 5 CFR part 2635 or this part to employees of the... Administration; (8) Health Resources and Services Administration; (9) Indian Health Service; (10)...

  8. 42 CFR 51d.8 - Which other HHS regulations apply to these awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Which other HHS regulations apply to these awards? 51d.8 Section 51d.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES § 51d.8 Which other...

  9. 42 CFR 51d.8 - Which other HHS regulations apply to these awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Which other HHS regulations apply to these awards? 51d.8 Section 51d.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES § 51d.8 Which other...

  10. 42 CFR 51d.8 - Which other HHS regulations apply to these awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Which other HHS regulations apply to these awards? 51d.8 Section 51d.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES § 51d.8 Which other...

  11. 42 CFR 51d.8 - Which other HHS regulations apply to these awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Which other HHS regulations apply to these awards? 51d.8 Section 51d.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES § 51d.8 Which other...

  12. 42 CFR 51d.8 - Which other HHS regulations apply to these awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Which other HHS regulations apply to these awards? 51d.8 Section 51d.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES § 51d.8 Which other...

  13. 42 CFR 483.405 - Relationship to other HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... origin (45 CFR Part 80), nondiscrimination on the basis of handicap (45 CFR Part 84), nondiscrimination on the basis of age (45 CFR Part 91), protection of human subjects of research (45 CFR Part 46), and... Section 483.405 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  14. 42 CFR 483.405 - Relationship to other HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... origin (45 CFR part 80), nondiscrimination on the basis of handicap (45 CFR part 84), nondiscrimination on the basis of age (45 CFR part 91), protection of human subjects of research (45 CFR part 46), and... Section 483.405 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  15. 42 CFR 483.405 - Relationship to other HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to those pertaining to nondiscrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin (45 CFR Part... age (45 CFR Part 91), protection of human subjects of research (45 CFR Part 46), and fraud and abuse... Section 483.405 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  16. 42 CFR 483.405 - Relationship to other HHS regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to those pertaining to nondiscrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin (45 CFR Part... age (45 CFR Part 91), protection of human subjects of research (45 CFR Part 46), and fraud and abuse... Section 483.405 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  17. Federal financial participation in state assistance expenditures; federal matching shares for Aid to Families with Dependent Children, foster care and adoption assistance, job opportunities and basic skills training, Medicaid, and aid to needy aged, blind, or disabled persons for October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994--HHS. Notice.

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    The Federal percentages and Federal medical assistance percentages for Fiscal Year 1994 have been calculated pursuant to the Social Security Act. These percentages will be effective from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. This notice announces the calculated "Federal percentages" and "Federal medical assistance percentages" that we will use in determining the amount of Federal matching in State welfare and medical expenditures for programs under titles I, IV-A, IV-E, IV-F, X, XIV, XVI (Aid to the Aged, Blind, or Disabled), and XIX. The table gives figures for each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands. The percentages in this notice apply to State expenditures for assistance payments, IV-A child care, JOBS services, and medical services (except family planning and certain JOBS expenditures which are subject to a higher matching rate). The statute provides separately for Federal matching of administrative costs. Sections 1101(a)(8) and 1905(b) of the Act requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services to publish these percentages each year. The Secretary is to figure the percentages, by formulas described in sections 1101(a)(8) and 1905(b) of the Act, using the Department of Commerce's statistics of average income per person in each State and in the Nation as a whole. The percentages are within upper and lower limits given in those two sections of the Act. The statute specifies the percentages to be applied to Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. The action of vitamin E on the ageing of connective tissues in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Blackett, A D; Hall, D A

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the relevance of the free radical theory of ageing to age changes discernible in connective tissue parameters, a small colony of C3H/He and LAF1 mice was set up, with sample culled at intervals throughout the lifespan to provide experimental samples. To half of the stock a dietary supplement of vitamin E, a naturally occurring antioxidant, was given at a level of 2500 mg/kg of diet. Tests were carried out on culled samples to provide data on the total collagen levels of bone and skin, on thermal shrinkage temperature and maximal degree of shrinkage of tendon fibres, and on the recovery of skin from stress. Vitamin E was found to have no effect on any of the parameters measured on C3H/He mice but to exert an influence on the parameters of LAF1 mice around the age of 10 months. This influence, however, is not regarded as being relevant to the ageing of the tissues and thus no evidence can be derived for a free-radical mechanism playing a role in the ageing of connective tissues.

  19. Ergonomics strategies and actions for achieving productive use of an ageing work-force.

    PubMed

    Kumashiro, M

    2000-07-01

    In this report, a basic ERGOMA (Ergonomics in Industrial Management) strategy is proposed as a policy for corporate production and employment in countries where ageing populations and reduced birth rates are imminent, and a strategy related to this is proposed. Specifically, as a strategy at the company level, the results of survey studies aimed at the development of methods for determining job capacity, to enable effective use of the labour of ageing workers, were summarized. A number of the insights gained here are steps in the development of a foundational methodology for practical use, and in actual practice a number of these insights must be subjected to measurements. However, the theory and newly developed methodology described here are thought to represent significant changes from the approaches to job capacity diagnosis and assessment published in the past and from the stance towards utilization of an ageing work-force. The author is confident that this represents new progress in one of the ergonomics approach to dealing with the working environment of ageing workers and an ageing work-force in general. PMID:10929834

  20. [Gerontosocial work in the context of Russian culture and recommendations of Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing].

    PubMed

    Danilova, R I; Golubeva, E Iu

    2007-01-01

    The definition of gerontosocial work adopted in the majority of the European countries in the context of the Russian culture and priority trends of the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing has been discussed. In the article the interaction and differences between terms being used in social work with the elderly people in Russia have been showed; tasks and peculiarities of gerontosocial work have been defined. Peculiarities of interaction between personnel and elderly patients have been studied; the increasing requirements to the professionalism of gerontosocial workers have been proved.

  1. More than Meets the Eye: Age Differences in the Capture and Suppression of Oculomotor Action

    PubMed Central

    Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Wijnen, Jasper G.

    2011-01-01

    Salient visual stimuli capture attention and trigger an eye-movement toward its location reflexively, regardless of an observer’s intentions. Here we aim to investigate the effect of aging (1) on the extent to which salient yet task-irrelevant stimuli capture saccades, and (2) on the ability to selectively suppress such oculomotor responses. Young and older adults were asked to direct their eyes to a target appearing in a stimulus array. Analysis of overall performance shows that saccades to the target object were disrupted by the appearance of a task-irrelevant abrupt-onset distractor when the location of this distractor did not coincide with that of the target object. Conditional capture function analyses revealed that, compared to young adults, older adults were more susceptible to oculomotor capture, and exhibited deficient selective suppression of the responses captured by task-irrelevant distractors. These effects were uncorrelated, suggesting two independent sources off age-related decline. Thus, with advancing age, salient visual distractors become more distracting; in part because they trigger reflexive eye-movements more potently; in part because of failing top-down control over such reflexes. The fact that these process-specific age effects remained concealed in overall oculomotor performance analyses emphasizes the utility of looking beyond the surface; indeed, there may be more than meets the eye. PMID:22046165

  2. The Gulf War: reaction and action in institutions for the aged in Israel.

    PubMed

    Golander, H; Ehrenfeld, M; Bergman, R

    1992-10-01

    In order to learn how geriatric centres were coping during the Gulf War (1991), questionnaires were distributed to 116 unit head nurses in 16 institutions in Israel. Additional information was obtained from the directors of nursing and national supervisors in a meeting 3 1/2 months after the cease-fire. Questions focused on organization of work, behaviour of staff, patients and their families, main problems, solutions and recommendations. Data showed a very high level of commitment by staff, flexibility, initiative and creativity in meeting the emotional, physical and safety needs of the aged. Stress level was highest in the 'Scud' areas and among the aged who are mentally alert. Families visited less but increased contact by telephone. Management was supportive with guidance, transport, child care facilities, etc. They also provided beds and food for spouses of the aged residents. Major problems related to safety measures (sealing rooms, moving patients during attacks), physical exhaustion and emotional stress of staff, and reorganization of care programmes. Recommendations included development of a master plan for non-conventional attacks, preparation of buildings with structural improvements, recruitment and training of volunteers, clarification of roles of staff and education for them. PMID:1430617

  3. Regulatory action and moderate decrease in methylphenidate use among ADHD diagnosed patients aged five and under in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ju-Young; Lee, Shin Haeng; Shin, Sun Mi; Shin, Han Na; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-07-01

    In December 2009, Korean regulatory agency announced that methylphenidate, a drug used to treat attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), should not be used in children aged five and under due to the risk of sudden cardiac death. This study examined the impact of regulatory action and prescribing patterns. We conducted a time series analysis using the Korea National Health Insurance Service database. Study subjects included children under 18years old with ADHD from January 2007 to December 2011. Contraindicated use of methylphenidate was defined as use of methylphenidate at least once in children aged five and under. We selected additional control points (2007, 2008, and 2010) and compared the methylphenidate use one year before and after each point. We calculated relative and absolute reductions, and 95% confidence intervals. The total number of ADHD patients was 376,298. Overall, there was a 70.87% relative reduction (95% CI: 63.33%-79.31%) and a 0.93% absolute reduction (95% CI: 0.51%-0.60%) of methylphenidate use. The relative and absolute reductions were 27.61% (95% CI: 24.76%-30.78%) and 0.31% (95% CI: 0.21%-0.41%) in 2007; 43.58% (95% CI: 38.02%-49.96%) and 0.35% (95% CI: 0.27%-0.43%) in 2008; 46.52% (95% CI: 38.86%-55.70%) and 0.21 (95% CI: 0.15%-0.27%) in 2009; and 10.20% (95% CI: 8.32%-12.50%) and 0.02% (95% CI: 0.02%-0.07%) in 2010. Korean regulatory action led to a moderate decrease in contraindicated methylphenidate use even after the steep decline before the regulatory action.

  4. Plenty of action left in northern Europe's middle-aged offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.J.

    1994-08-15

    Northern Europe's offshore oil industry this year has begun to reveal several symptoms generally associated with middle age. Though in its prime in terms of oil production, North Sea industry has begun a dramatic slimming program. It has started a search for fresh experiences, and it has begun to revisit the big successes of its youth. The paper cites examples demonstrating these trends. The paper then discusses production, outlook for exploration, trends in the United Kingdom, development advances in the natural gas industry, exploration activities, and redevelopment projects.

  5. NCI at Frederick Team Receives 2014 HHS Green Champions Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A team of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research employees at NCI at Frederick received the Energy and Fleet Management Award, one of the 2014 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champions Awards, for comparing the costs and energy usage of two -80°C freezer technologies. This was the first scientific study to be jointly conducted by Leidos Biomedical Research’s Applied and Developmental Research Directorate (ADRD) and Facilities Maintenance and Engineering Directorate (FME).  

  6. Tandem action of exercise training and food restriction completely preserves ischemic preconditioning in the aging heart.

    PubMed

    Abete, P; Testa, G; Galizia, G; Mazzella, F; Della Morte, D; de Santis, D; Calabrese, C; Cacciatore, F; Gargiulo, G; Ferrara, N; Rengo, G; Sica, V; Napoli, C; Rengo, F

    2005-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) has been proposed as an endogenous form of protection against ischemia reperfusion injury. IP, however, does not prevent post-ischemic dysfunction in the aging heart but may be partially corrected by exercise training and food restriction. We investigated the role of exercise training combined with food restriction on restoring IP in the aging heart. Effects of IP against ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated hearts from adult (A, 6 months old), sedentary 'ad libitum' fed (SL), trained ad libitum fed (TL), sedentary food-restricted (SR), trained- and food-restricted senescent rats (TR) (24 months old) were investigated. Norepinephrine release in coronary effluent was determined by high performance liquid cromatography. IP significantly improved final recovery of percent developed pressure in hearts from A (p<0.01) but not in those from SL (p=NS) vs unconditioned controls. Developed pressure recovery was partial in hearts from TL and SR (64.3 and 67.3%, respectively; p<0.05 vs controls) but it was total in those from TR (82.3%, p=NS vs A; p<0.05 vs hearts from TL and SR). Similarly, IP determined a similar increase of norepinephrine release in A (p<0.001) and in TR (p<0.001, p=NS vs adult). IP was abolished by depletion of myocardial norepinephrine stores by reserpine in all groups. Thus, IP reduces post-ischemic dysfunction in A but not in SL. Moreover, IP was preserved partially in TR and SR and totally in TR. Complete IP maybe due to full restoration of norepinephrine release in response to IP stimulus.

  7. Age-related changes in distribution of body weight on soles of feet for selected actions and postures.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, T; Asami, T

    1997-12-01

    We investigated age-related changes in the distribution of body weight on soles of feet in 878 healthy subjects ranging from 5 to 80 years of age. By modifying Morton's Staticometer, we constructed an instrument for measuring body-weight distribution over three areas of soles of the feet, the big toe (inner forefoot), the other four toes combined (outer forefoot) and the heels for both feet, thus a total of six areas. The weights in the six areas were recorded at the completion of nine selected actions and postures. We observed that for inhaling and exhaling standing postures, generally younger subjects had a ratio close to 1:2:3 for weights recorded for the inner toe:outer toes:heels as observed by Morton, but elderly subjects had a smaller value than 3 for the heel. The body-weight distribution tended to shift from heels to outer toes across age groups, which was more distinctly observed in women than in men.

  8. Action Imitation at 1.5 Years Is Better than Pointing Gesture in Predicting Late Development of Language Production at 3 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambrana, Imac M.; Ystrom, Eivind; Schjolberg, Synnve; Pons, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether poor pointing gestures and imitative actions at 18 months of age uniquely predicted late language production at 36 months, beyond the role of poor language at 18 months of age. Data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study were utilized. Maternal reports of the children's nonverbal skills and language were…

  9. 42 CFR 93.515 - Actions for violating an order or for disruptive conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actions for violating an order or for disruptive... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest ORI Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions Hearing Process § 93.515 Actions for violating an order or...

  10. A delphi study to detect deficiencies and propose actions in real life treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    García-Layana, Alfredo; Arias, Luis; Figueroa, Marta S; Araiz, Javier; Ruiz-Moreno, José María; García-Arumí, José; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; López-Gálvez, María Isabel; Cabrera-López, Francisco; García-Campos, José Manuel; Monés, Jordi; Cervera, Enrique; Armadá, Felix; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Piñero-Bustamante, Antonio; Serrano-Garcia, Miguel Angel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Spanish retina specialists were surveyed in order to propose actions to decrease deficiencies in real-life neovascular age macular degeneration treatment (nv-AMD). Methods. One hundred experts, members of the Spanish Vitreoretinal Society (SERV), were invited to complete an online survey of 52 statements about nv-AMD management with a modified Delphi methodology. Four rounds were performed using a 5-point Linkert scale. Recommendations were developed after analyzing the differences between the results and the SERV guidelines recommendations. Results. Eighty-seven specialists completed all the Delphi rounds. Once major potential deficiencies in real-life nv-AMD treatment were identified, 15 recommendations were developed with a high level of agreement. Consensus statements to reduce the burden of the disease included the use of treat and extend regimen and to reduce the amount of diagnostic tests during the loading phase and training technical staff to perform these tests and reduce the time between relapse detection and reinjection, as well as establishing patient referral protocols to outside general ophthalmology clinics. Conclusion. The level of agreement with the final recommendations for nv-AMD treatment among Spanish retinal specialist was high indicating that some actions could be applied in order to reduce the deficiencies in real-life nv-AMD treatment. PMID:25587438

  11. A Delphi Study to Detect Deficiencies and Propose Actions in Real Life Treatment of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    García-Layana, Alfredo; Arias, Luis; Figueroa, Marta S.; Araiz, Javier; Ruiz-Moreno, José María; García-Arumí, José; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; López-Gálvez, María Isabel; Cabrera-López, Francisco; García-Campos, José Manuel; Monés, Jordi; Cervera, Enrique; Armadá, Felix; Piñero-Bustamante, Antonio; Serrano-Garcia, Miguel Angel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Spanish retina specialists were surveyed in order to propose actions to decrease deficiencies in real-life neovascular age macular degeneration treatment (nv-AMD). Methods. One hundred experts, members of the Spanish Vitreoretinal Society (SERV), were invited to complete an online survey of 52 statements about nv-AMD management with a modified Delphi methodology. Four rounds were performed using a 5-point Linkert scale. Recommendations were developed after analyzing the differences between the results and the SERV guidelines recommendations. Results. Eighty-seven specialists completed all the Delphi rounds. Once major potential deficiencies in real-life nv-AMD treatment were identified, 15 recommendations were developed with a high level of agreement. Consensus statements to reduce the burden of the disease included the use of treat and extend regimen and to reduce the amount of diagnostic tests during the loading phase and training technical staff to perform these tests and reduce the time between relapse detection and reinjection, as well as establishing patient referral protocols to outside general ophthalmology clinics. Conclusion. The level of agreement with the final recommendations for nv-AMD treatment among Spanish retinal specialist was high indicating that some actions could be applied in order to reduce the deficiencies in real-life nv-AMD treatment. PMID:25587438

  12. Acceptable Risk? The Nuclear Age in the United States. Study/Action Guide [and] Companion to Study/Action Guide for Congregations and Religious Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, PA. National Action/Research on the Military Industrial Complex.

    A study-action guide and a companion guide are intended to help citizens explore some of the challenging dilemmas of U.S. nuclear policy. The two guides place strong emphasis on group discussion and participation as well as action citizens might want to take to bring about a non-nuclear world. The companion guide is intended for congregations and…

  13. 45 CFR 91.11 - Rules against age discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rules against age discrimination. 91.11 Section 91... THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.11 Rules against age discrimination. The rules stated in...

  14. 45 CFR 91.11 - Rules against age discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rules against age discrimination. 91.11 Section 91... THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.11 Rules against age discrimination. The rules stated in...

  15. 45 CFR 91.11 - Rules against age discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rules against age discrimination. 91.11 Section 91... THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.11 Rules against age discrimination. The rules stated in...

  16. 45 CFR 91.11 - Rules against age discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rules against age discrimination. 91.11 Section 91... THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.11 Rules against age discrimination. The rules stated in...

  17. 45 CFR 91.11 - Rules against age discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rules against age discrimination. 91.11 Section 91... THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.11 Rules against age discrimination. The rules stated in...

  18. 75 FR 14174 - National Institute on Aging; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ...; Principle of Stem Cell Maturation. Date: June 1, 2010. Time: 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Assistance Program Nos. 93.866, Aging Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 17,...

  19. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. PMID:27478588

  20. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing.

  1. Emerging Perception of Causality in Action-and-Reaction Sequences from 4 to 6 Months of Age: Is It Domain-Specific?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlottmann, Anne; Ray, Elizabeth D.; Surian, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments (N=136) studied how 4- to 6-month-olds perceive a simple schematic event, seen as goal-directed action and reaction from 3 years of age. In our causal reaction event, a red square moved toward a blue square, stopping prior to contact. Blue began to move away before red stopped, so that both briefly moved simultaneously at a…

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.495 - May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify nonprofit organizations that surplus real property and related personal property is available for educational and public health... May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.495 - May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify nonprofit organizations that surplus real property and related personal property is available for educational and public health... May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)...

  4. 42 CFR 1007.20 - Circumstances in which data mining is permissible and approval by HHS Office of Inspector General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Circumstances in which data mining is permissible... CONTROL UNITS § 1007.20 Circumstances in which data mining is permissible and approval by HHS Office of Inspector General. (a) Notwithstanding § 1007.19(e)(2), a MFCU may engage in data mining as defined in...

  5. 42 CFR 1007.20 - Circumstances in which data mining is permissible and approval by HHS Office of Inspector General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Circumstances in which data mining is permissible... CONTROL UNITS § 1007.20 Circumstances in which data mining is permissible and approval by HHS Office of Inspector General. (a) Notwithstanding § 1007.19(e)(2), a MFCU may engage in data mining as defined in...

  6. 42 CFR 55a.103 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which grant application to fund?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What criteria has HHS established for deciding which grant application to fund? 55a.103 Section 55a.103 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions §...

  7. 42 CFR 55a.103 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which grant application to fund?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What criteria has HHS established for deciding which grant application to fund? 55a.103 Section 55a.103 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions §...

  8. 42 CFR 55a.103 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which grant application to fund?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What criteria has HHS established for deciding which grant application to fund? 55a.103 Section 55a.103 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions §...

  9. 42 CFR 55a.103 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which grant application to fund?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What criteria has HHS established for deciding which grant application to fund? 55a.103 Section 55a.103 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions §...

  10. 45 CFR 1303.21 - Procedures for appeal by current or prospective delegate agencies to the responsible HHS official...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... supportive of this position, including all written material or documentation submitted to the grantee under... copy of the appeal and all material filed with the responsible HHS official must be simultaneously... alleged defects and deficiencies in the delegate agency's application or in the operation of its...

  11. 2 CFR 376.935 - Disqualified. (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935). 376.935 Section 376.935 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency... SUSPENSION Definitions § 376.935 Disqualified. (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935... transactions pursuant to the statutes listed in 2 CFR 180.935, and pursuant to Title XI of the Social...

  12. 2 CFR 376.995 - Principal (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.995).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... definition at 2 CFR 180.995). 376.995 Section 376.995 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Definitions § 376.995 Principal (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.995)....

  13. 2 CFR 376.935 - Disqualified. (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935). 376.935 Section 376.935 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Definitions § 376.935 Disqualified. (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR...

  14. 2 CFR 376.995 - Principal (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.995).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... definition at 2 CFR 180.995). 376.995 Section 376.995 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Definitions § 376.995 Principal (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.995)....

  15. 2 CFR 376.995 - Principal (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.995).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... definition at 2 CFR 180.995). 376.995 Section 376.995 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Definitions § 376.995 Principal (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.995)....

  16. 2 CFR 376.935 - Disqualified. (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935). 376.935 Section 376.935 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Definitions § 376.935 Disqualified. (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR...

  17. 2 CFR 376.995 - Principal (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.995).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... definition at 2 CFR 180.995). 376.995 Section 376.995 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Definitions § 376.995 Principal (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.995)....

  18. 2 CFR 376.935 - Disqualified. (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935). 376.935 Section 376.935 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Definitions § 376.935 Disqualified. (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR...

  19. 2 CFR 376.935 - Disqualified. (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.935). 376.935 Section 376.935 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Definitions § 376.935 Disqualified. (HHS supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR...

  20. 78 FR 72321 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; HHS Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2015

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... c. Small group determination for risk adjustment d. Risk adjustment data validation e. HHS audits of... cost-sharing reduction amounts from reinsurance payments g. Audits h. Same covered life i. Reinsurance... of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2014 final rule (78 FR 15410) (2014 Payment Notice)...

  1. 42 CFR 55a.103 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which grant application to fund?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What criteria has HHS established for deciding which grant application to fund? 55a.103 Section 55a.103 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions §...

  2. Analysis of newspaper coverage of active aging through the lens of the 2002 World Health Organization Active Ageing Report: A Policy Framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Boushra; Wolbring, Gregor

    2013-12-01

    As populations continue to grow older, efforts to support the process of aging well are important goals. Various synonyms are used to cover aging well, such as active aging. The World Health Organization published in 2002 the report Active Ageing: A Policy Framework that according to the call for papers, has brought active ageing to the forefront of international public health awareness. The 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action was singled out in the call for papers as a key document promoting physical activity one goal of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework. Media are to report to the public topics of importance to them. We investigated the newspaper coverage of aging well and synonymous terms such as active aging through the lens of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity. As sources we used the following newspapers: China Daily, The Star (Malaysia), two UK newspapers (The Guardian, The Times), a database of 300 Canadian newspapers (Canadian Newsstand) and a US newspaper (The New York Times). The study generated data answering the following four research questions: (1) how often are the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity mentioned; (2) how often is the topic of active aging and terms conveying similar content (aging well, healthy aging, natural aging and successful aging) discussed; (3) which of the issues flagged as important in the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity are covered in the newspaper coverage of active aging and synonymous terms; (4) which social groups were mentioned in the newspapers covered. The study found a total absence of mentioning of the two key documents and a low level of coverage of "active aging" and terms conveying similar content. It found further a lack of engagement with the issues raised in the two key documents and a low level of

  3. Analysis of newspaper coverage of active aging through the lens of the 2002 World Health Organization Active Ageing Report: A Policy Framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Boushra; Wolbring, Gregor

    2013-12-01

    As populations continue to grow older, efforts to support the process of aging well are important goals. Various synonyms are used to cover aging well, such as active aging. The World Health Organization published in 2002 the report Active Ageing: A Policy Framework that according to the call for papers, has brought active ageing to the forefront of international public health awareness. The 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action was singled out in the call for papers as a key document promoting physical activity one goal of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework. Media are to report to the public topics of importance to them. We investigated the newspaper coverage of aging well and synonymous terms such as active aging through the lens of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity. As sources we used the following newspapers: China Daily, The Star (Malaysia), two UK newspapers (The Guardian, The Times), a database of 300 Canadian newspapers (Canadian Newsstand) and a US newspaper (The New York Times). The study generated data answering the following four research questions: (1) how often are the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity mentioned; (2) how often is the topic of active aging and terms conveying similar content (aging well, healthy aging, natural aging and successful aging) discussed; (3) which of the issues flagged as important in the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity are covered in the newspaper coverage of active aging and synonymous terms; (4) which social groups were mentioned in the newspapers covered. The study found a total absence of mentioning of the two key documents and a low level of coverage of "active aging" and terms conveying similar content. It found further a lack of engagement with the issues raised in the two key documents and a low level of

  4. Analysis of Newspaper Coverage of Active Aging through the Lens of the 2002 World Health Organization Active Ageing Report: A Policy Framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Boushra; Wolbring, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    As populations continue to grow older, efforts to support the process of aging well are important goals. Various synonyms are used to cover aging well, such as active aging. The World Health Organization published in 2002 the report Active Ageing: A Policy Framework that according to the call for papers, has brought active ageing to the forefront of international public health awareness. The 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action was singled out in the call for papers as a key document promoting physical activity one goal of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework. Media are to report to the public topics of importance to them. We investigated the newspaper coverage of aging well and synonymous terms such as active aging through the lens of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity. As sources we used the following newspapers: China Daily, The Star (Malaysia), two UK newspapers (The Guardian, The Times), a database of 300 Canadian newspapers (Canadian Newsstand) and a US newspaper (The New York Times). The study generated data answering the following four research questions: (1) how often are the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity mentioned; (2) how often is the topic of active aging and terms conveying similar content (aging well, healthy aging, natural aging and successful aging) discussed; (3) which of the issues flagged as important in the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity are covered in the newspaper coverage of active aging and synonymous terms; (4) which social groups were mentioned in the newspapers covered. The study found a total absence of mentioning of the two key documents and a low level of coverage of “active aging” and terms conveying similar content. It found further a lack of engagement with the issues raised in the two key documents and a low level

  5. [Age-specific features of hypothalamus-hypophysis-suprarenal gland action on liver cells of rats (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Muradjan, C K

    1978-01-01

    Relevant studies show that there is a reduction in the regulation of hormonal stimulation of the genetic system in the cells and tissues at old age, which results in the early appearance of the "fatigue" reaction at old age and in reduced stimulation of the ferments tested. In the hypothalamus-hypophysis-suprarenal gland system the hypothalamus has the smallest regulation range; it reveals manifest changes due to ageing.

  6. 78 FR 42086 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Arsenic in Apple Juice: Action Level; Supporting Document for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Arsenic in Apple Juice: Action Level; Supporting Document for Action Level for Arsenic in Apple Juice; A Quantitative Assessment of Inorganic Arsenic in Apple Juice; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS....

  7. Verbal Self-Instructions in Task Switching: A Compensatory Tool for Action-Control Deficits in Childhood and Old Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kray, Jutta; Eber, Jutta; Karbach, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the influence of verbal self-instructions on age differences in task switching. Task-switching ability, measured as the difference between performance in single-task blocks and in mixed-task blocks in which participants switch between two tasks (mixing costs), increases during childhood and decreases in old age. To measure the…

  8. Differential Effects of Age-of-Acquisition for Concrete Nouns and Action Verbs: Evidence for Partly Distinct Representations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulenger, Veronique; Decoppet, Nathalie; Roy, Alice C.; Paulignan, Yves; Nazir, Tatjana A.

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that words that are acquired early in life are processed faster and more accurately than words acquired later, even by adults. As neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have implicated different brain networks in the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns, the present study was aimed at contrasting reaction…

  9. Emerging perception of causality in action-and-reaction sequences from 4 to 6 months of age: is it domain-specific?

    PubMed

    Schlottmann, Anne; Ray, Elizabeth D; Surian, Luca

    2012-06-01

    Two experiments (N=136) studied how 4- to 6-month-olds perceive a simple schematic event, seen as goal-directed action and reaction from 3 years of age. In our causal reaction event, a red square moved toward a blue square, stopping prior to contact. Blue began to move away before red stopped, so that both briefly moved simultaneously at a distance. Primarily, our study sought to determine from what age infants see the causal structure of this reaction event. In addition, we looked at whether this causal percept depends on an animate style of motion and whether it correlates with tasks assessing goal perception and goal-directed action. Infants saw either causal reactions or noncausal delayed control events in which blue started some time after red stopped. These events involved squares that moved either rigidly or nonrigidly in an apparently animate manner. After habituation to one of the four events, infants were tested on reversal of the habituation event. Spatiotemporal features reversed for all events, but causal roles changed only in reversed reactions. The 6-month-olds dishabituated significantly more to reversal of causal reaction events than to noncausal delay events, whereas younger infants reacted similarly to reversal of both. Thus, perceptual causality for reaction events emerges by 6 months of age, a younger age than previously reported but, crucially, the same age at which perceptual causality for launch events has emerged in prior research. On our second question, animate/inanimate motion had no effect at any age, nor did significant correlations emerge with our additional tasks assessing goal perception or goal-directed object retrieval. Available evidence, here and elsewhere, is as compatible with a view that infants initially see A affecting B, without differentiation into physical or psychological causality, as with the standard assumption of distinct physical/psychological causal perception.

  10. The bare essentials. Release of LOM report leaves HHS to determine what should be covered by health benefits packages.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Jessica

    2011-10-10

    In the wake of an IOM report on the criteria HHS should use to determine what benefits will be "essential" under reform, various stakeholders are weighing in. The National Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems would like "enabling" services--such as language, transportation and case-management services--included, because they help make medical care more effective, says Xiaoyi Huang, left, of the NAPH. PMID:22111491

  11. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response; HHS Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise implementation plan for chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear threats. Notice.

    PubMed

    2007-04-23

    The United States faces serious public health threats from the deliberate use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD)--chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN)--by hostile States or terrorists, and from naturally emerging infectious diseases that have a potential to cause illness on a scale that could adversely impact national security. Effective strategies to prevent, mitigate, and treat the consequences of CBRN threats is an integral component of our national security strategy. To that end, the United States must be able to rapidly develop, stockpile, and deploy effective medical countermeasures to protect the American people. The HHS Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise (PHEMCE) has taken a holistic, end-to-end approach that considers multiple aspects of the medical countermeasures mission including research, development, acquisition, storage, maintenance, deployment, and guidance for utilization. Phase one of this approach established the HHS PHEMCE Strategy for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Threats (HHS PHEMCE Strategy). The HHS PHEMCE Strategy, published in the Federal Register on March 20, 2007, described a framework of strategic policy goals and objectives for identifying medical countermeasure requirements and establishing priorities for medical countermeasure evaluation, development and acquisition. These strategic policy goals and objectives were used to establish the Four Pillars upon which this HHS Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise Implementation Plan (HHS PHEMCE Implementation Plan) is based. The HHS PHEMCE Implementation Plan considers the full spectrum of medical countermeasures-related activities, including research, development, acquisition, storage/maintenance, deployment, and utilization. The HHS PHEMCE Implementation Plan is consistent with the President's Biodefense for the 21st Century and is aligned with the National Strategy for Medical Countermeasures against

  12. 78 FR 12074 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Actions Under the NIH Guidelines...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... containing an HA from the Goose/Guangdong/1/96 lineage should become an HHS Select Agent (77 FR 63783... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

  13. "I want to be 100 years old, but I smoke too much": Exploring the gap between positive aging goals and reported preparatory actions in different social circumstances.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Catrinel; Flick, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Preparing for positive aging is shaped by the social context a person lives in. The present qualitative study explores and compares representations about preparatory actions in precarious workers (i.e., with temporary job contracts and insecure pension plans) and individuals with secure pension plans living in Germany. It also examines, the discrepancy between what middle-aged persons think they should be doing in preparation and what they report doing for aging well. Findings from the analysis of the semi-structured interviews conducted here show that people who have insecure pension plans tend to see themselves as social networkers and optimists, while those with secure pension plans see themselves as social activists and careful planners of old age. All participants value an active, healthy body but manage to do little in order to attain it due to lacking time and discipline. In accordance with the socioemotional selectivity theory, perceiving a short-time perspective makes precarious individuals focus on emotional goals, while financially secure individuals value social goals. Implications for practice and policy change are discussed.

  14. "I want to be 100 years old, but I smoke too much": Exploring the gap between positive aging goals and reported preparatory actions in different social circumstances.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Catrinel; Flick, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Preparing for positive aging is shaped by the social context a person lives in. The present qualitative study explores and compares representations about preparatory actions in precarious workers (i.e., with temporary job contracts and insecure pension plans) and individuals with secure pension plans living in Germany. It also examines, the discrepancy between what middle-aged persons think they should be doing in preparation and what they report doing for aging well. Findings from the analysis of the semi-structured interviews conducted here show that people who have insecure pension plans tend to see themselves as social networkers and optimists, while those with secure pension plans see themselves as social activists and careful planners of old age. All participants value an active, healthy body but manage to do little in order to attain it due to lacking time and discipline. In accordance with the socioemotional selectivity theory, perceiving a short-time perspective makes precarious individuals focus on emotional goals, while financially secure individuals value social goals. Implications for practice and policy change are discussed. PMID:26568214

  15. Shift from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing glycine action in rat auditory neurones is due to age-dependent Cl− regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Ingrid; Löhrke, Stefan; Friauf, Eckhard

    1999-01-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine can elicit depolarizing responses in immature neurones. We investigated the changes in glycine responses and their ionic mechanism in developing neurones of the rat lateral superior olive (LSO), an auditory brainstem nucleus involved in sound localization. Whole-cell and gramicidin perforated-patch recordings were performed from visually identified LSO neurones in brain slices and glycine was pressure applied for 3–100 ms to the soma. Glycine-evoked currents were reversibly blocked by strychnine. They were mostly monophasic, but biphasic responses occurred in ∼30% of P8-11 neurones in perforated-patch recordings. In whole-cell recordings from P2-11 neurones, the reversal potential of glycine-evoked currents (EGly) was determined by the transmembranous Cl− gradient and corresponded closely to the Nernst potential for Cl−, regardless of age. This indicates that Cl− is the principle ion permeating glycine receptors, but is also consistent with a low relative (10–20%) permeability for HCO3−. The Cl− gradient also determined the polarity and amplitude of glycine-evoked membrane potential changes. Leaving the native intracellular [Cl−] undisturbed with gramicidin perforated-patch recordings, we found a highly significant, age-dependent change of EGly from −46.8 ± 1.8 mV (P1-4, n = 28) to −67.6 ± 3.3 mV (P5-8, n = 10) to −82.2 ± 4.1 mV (P9–11, n = 18). The majority of P1–4 neurones were depolarized by glycine (∼80%) and spikes were evoked in ∼30%. In contrast, P9–11 neurones were hyperpolarized. In perforated-patch recordings, EGly was influenced by the voltage protocol and the glycine application interval; it could be shifted in the positive and negative direction. For a given application interval, these shifts were always larger in P1–4 than in P8–11 neurones, pointing to less effective Cl− regulation mechanisms in younger neurones. Furosemide (frusemide), a blocker of cation

  16. Preventive effect of Vaccinium uliginosum L. extract and its fractions on age-related macular degeneration and its action mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sun-Myung; Lee, Bom-Lee; Guo, Yuan-Ri; Choung, Se-Young

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness among the elderly. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains still obscure, several researchers have report that death of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) caused by excessive accumulation of A2E is crucial determinants of AMD. In this study, the preventive effect of Vaccinium uliginosum L. (V.U) extract and its fractions on AMD was investigated in blue light-irradiated human RPE cell (ARPE-19 cells). Blue light-induced RPE cell death was significantly inhibited by the treatment of V.U extract or its fraction. To identify the mechanism, FAB-MS analysis revealed that V.U inhibits the photooxidation of N-retinyl-N-retinylidene ethanolamine (A2E) induced by blue light in cell free system. Moreover, monitoring by quantitative HPLC also revealed that V.U extract and its fractions reduced intracellular accumulation of A2E, suggesting that V.U extract and its fractions inhibit not only blue light-induced photooxidation, but also intracellular accumulation of A2E, resulting in RPE cell survival after blue light exposure. A2E-laden cell exposed to blue light induced apoptosis by increasing the cleaved form of caspase-3, Bax/Bcl-2. Additionally, V.U inhibited by the treatment of V.U extract or quercetin-3-O-arabinofuranoside. These results suggest that V.U extract and its fractions have preventive effect on blue light-induced damage in RPE cells and AMD.

  17. 75 FR 34750 - Web-Based Public Meeting To Discuss Issues Related to the Development of an Enforcement Action...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... Access and Advertising Regulation). FDA published the final rule on March 19, 2010 (75 FR 13225) and the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Web-Based Public Meeting To Discuss Issues Related to the... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Web-based public meeting; request for data, information, and...

  18. 45 CFR 91.1 - What is the purpose of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the purpose of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975? 91.1 Section 91.1 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS General § 91.1 What is...

  19. 76 FR 11798 - National Institute on Aging; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging; Notice of Closed Meeting..., National Institutes of Health, 7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 2C-212, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-402- 7700....866, Aging Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 25, 2011. Jennifer S....

  20. Dying in a rural residential aged care facility: an action research and reflection project to improve end-of-life care to residents with a non-malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Joanne; Taylor, Beverley

    2011-12-01

    This article describes a qualitative research project that explored issues around end-of-life care provided to residents dying from non-malignant diseases in two, rural Australian, residential aged care facilities. Reflective processes and action research were combined to work in collaboration with 14 aged nurses, associated staff and relatives of dying residents. Reflection featured in the research and included group reflection on practice stories, critical reflection during thematic analysis and reflection on action research cycles. Themes and subthemes emerged, indicating that aspects of end-of-life care needed further improvement. Major thematic concerns were prioritized for action and included the need for better pain management practices which will be discussed. Identifying these clinical issues was an important step in creating, implementing and evaluating actions. Participants reported varying degrees of success in attempting to improve end-of-life care.

  1. Anti-Allergic Action of Aged Black Garlic Extract in RBL-2H3 Cells and Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis Reaction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Sok, Dai-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Garlic (Allium sativum) has been used as a food as well as a component of traditional medicine. Aged black garlic (ABG) is known to have various bioactivities. However, the effect of ABG on allergic response is almost unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether ABG can inhibit immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic response in RBL-2H3 cells as well as in vivo passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). In in vitro tests, ethyl acetate extract (EBG) of ABG significantly inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC50, 1.53 mg/mL) and TNF-α (IC50, 0.98 mg/mL). Moreover, BG10, an active fraction of EBG, dramatically suppressed the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC50, 53.60 μg/mL) and TNF-α (IC50, 27.80 μg/mL). In addition, BG10 completely blocked the formation of prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 at ≥25 μg/mL. When the effect of BG10 on FcɛRI receptor cascade was investigated, BG10 significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of Syk, but not Lyn. Furthermore, BG10 dose dependently decreased the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Consistent with what has been mentioned earlier, BG10 also significantly inhibited the PCA reaction in mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that ABG suppresses the allergic response, and the mechanism for its anti-allergic action may involve suppressions of Syk, cPLA2, 5-LO, and COX-2. The anti-allergic actions of ABG, EBG, or BG10 suggest that they may be useful as functional foods for allergic diseases. PMID:24456359

  2. Anti-allergic action of aged black garlic extract in RBL-2H3 cells and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2014-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) has been used as a food as well as a component of traditional medicine. Aged black garlic (ABG) is known to have various bioactivities. However, the effect of ABG on allergic response is almost unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether ABG can inhibit immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic response in RBL-2H3 cells as well as in vivo passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). In in vitro tests, ethyl acetate extract (EBG) of ABG significantly inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC₅₀, 1.53 mg/mL) and TNF-α (IC₅₀, 0.98 mg/mL). Moreover, BG10, an active fraction of EBG, dramatically suppressed the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC₅₀, 53.60 μg/mL) and TNF-α (IC₅₀, 27.80 μg/mL). In addition, BG10 completely blocked the formation of prostaglandin E₂ and leukotriene B₄ at ≥25 μg/mL. When the effect of BG10 on FcɛRI receptor cascade was investigated, BG10 significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of Syk, but not Lyn. Furthermore, BG10 dose dependently decreased the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A₂ (cPLA₂) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Consistent with what has been mentioned earlier, BG10 also significantly inhibited the PCA reaction in mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that ABG suppresses the allergic response, and the mechanism for its anti-allergic action may involve suppressions of Syk, cPLA₂, 5-LO, and COX-2. The anti-allergic actions of ABG, EBG, or BG10 suggest that they may be useful as functional foods for allergic diseases. PMID:24456359

  3. Silver paper: the future of health promotion and preventive actions, basic research, and clinical aspects of age-related disease--a report of the European Summit on Age-Related Disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Franco, Alain; Sommer, Pascal; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Jankowska, Ewa; Maggi, Adriana; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rys, Andrzej; Szczerbinska, Kataryna; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Milewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-01

    BACKGROUND. In September 2008, under the French Presidency of the European Union and with the support of the Polish Minister of Health, a European Summit on Age-Related Disease was organised inWroclaw (Poland). At this meeting, European politicians, gerontologists and geriatricians gathered to discuss a common approach to future challenges related to age-related disease. Politicians and decision-makers from the European Union and Ministers of Health and their deputies from many European countries raised the problems and difficulties to be tackled in a growing population with a high burden of disease, and asked scientists to write a consensus document with recommendations for future actions and decisions. Scientists and clinicians worked in parallel in three different groups, on health promotion and preventive actions, basic research in age-related disease, and clinical aspects of disease in older people. Beforehand, the format of the paper with recommendations was discussed, and it was finally agreed that, for a better understanding by decision- makers, it would be divided in two different columns: one with facts that were considered settled and agreed by most experts (under the heading We know), and a second with recommendations related to each fact (We recommend). No limit on the number of topics to be discussed was settled. After careful and detailed discussion in each group, which in most cases included the exact wording of each statement, chairpersons presented the results in a plenary session, and new input from all participants was received, until each of the statements and recommendations were accepted by a large majority. Areas with no consensus were excluded from the document. Immediately after the Summit, the chairpersons sent the document both to the main authors and to a list of experts (see footnote) who had made presentations at the summit and agreed to review and critically comment on the final document, which is presented below. As regards the

  4. 41 CFR 102-75.495 - May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surplus real property and related personal property is available for educational and public health... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Educational and Public Health Purposes § 102-75.495... educational and public health purposes? Yes, ED or HHS may notify eligible non-profit institutions that...

  5. 41 CFR 102-75.495 - May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify nonprofit organizations that surplus real property and related personal property is available for educational and public health purposes? 102-75.495 Section 102-75.495...

  6. 45 CFR Appendix B to Part 5b - Routine Uses Applicable to More Than One System of Records Maintained by HHS

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Records Maintained by HHS B Appendix B to Part 5b Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... or the Civil Rights Commission, issue a subpoena to the Department for records in this system of... agencies in defending claims against the United States when the claim is based upon an individual's...

  7. 45 CFR Appendix B to Part 5b - Routine Uses Applicable to More Than One System of Records Maintained by HHS

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Records Maintained by HHS B Appendix B to Part 5b Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services... or the Civil Rights Commission, issue a subpoena to the Department for records in this system of... agencies in defending claims against the United States when the claim is based upon an individual's...

  8. 45 CFR Appendix B to Part 5b - Routine Uses Applicable to More Than One System of Records Maintained by HHS

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Records Maintained by HHS B Appendix B to Part 5b Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... or the Civil Rights Commission, issue a subpoena to the Department for records in this system of... agencies in defending claims against the United States when the claim is based upon an individual's...

  9. Reversing Cancer Multidrug Resistance in Xenograft Models via Orchestrating Multiple Actions of Functional Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Debin; Wang, Tingfang; Su, Zhigui; Xue, Lingjing; Mo, Ran; Zhang, Can

    2016-08-31

    A multistimuli responsive drug delivery system (DDS) based on sulfhydryl and amino-cofunctionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (SH/NH2-MSNs) has been developed, in which the multifunctional hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives were grafted onto the SH/NH2-MSNs by disulfide bonds for targeting delivery, controlling drug release and reversing multidrug resistance (MDR). The doxorubicin (Dox) loaded multifunctional HA derivatives modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Dox/HHS-MSNs) were enzyme and redox sensitive, which could respond to the intracellular stimuli of hyaluronidase (HAase) and glutathione (GSH) successively and prevent drug leakage before reaching the tumor tissues. The cellular uptake experiments showed that Dox/HHS-MSNs were vulnerable to be endocytosed into the Dox-resistant human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7/ADR) cells, efficiently realized the endolysosomal escape and remained in the cytoplasm. Because of orchestrating multiple actions above including active targeting, endolysosomal escape and efficient multilevel drug release, Dox/HHS-MSNs could induce the strongest apoptosis and cytotoxicity of MCF-7/ADR cells. Furthermore, a series of in vivo studies on MCF-7/ADR tumor-bearing xenograft mouse models demonstrated that Dox/HHS-MSNs possessed the enhanced tumor-targeting capacity and the best therapeutic efficacy to reverse cancer MDR. PMID:27420116

  10. The Post-Ovariectomy Interval Affects the Antidepressant-Like Action of Citalopram Combined with Ethynyl-Estradiol in the Forced Swim Test in Middle Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Vega Rivera, Nelly M; Gallardo Tenorio, Alfredo; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Estrada Camarena, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The use of a combined therapy with low doses of estrogens plus antidepressants to treat depression associated to perimenopause could be advantageous. However the use of these combinations is controversial due to several factors, including the time of intervention in relation to menopause onset. This paper analyzes whether time post-OVX influences the antidepressant-like action of a combination of ethynyl-estradiol (EE₂) and citalopram (CIT) in the forced swim test (FST). Middle-aged (15 months old) female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and after one or three weeks treated with EE₂ (1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat, s.c.; -48 h) or CIT (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 or 10 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and tested in the FST. In a second experiment, after one or three weeks of OVX, rats received a combination of an ineffective dose of EE₂ (1.25 µg/rat, s.c., -48 h) plus CIT (2.5 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and subjected to the FST. Finally, the uteri were removed and weighted to obtain an index of the peripheral effects of EE₂ administration. EE₂ (2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat) reduced immobility after one but not three weeks of OVX. In contrast, no CIT dose reduced immobility at one or three weeks after OVX. When EE₂ (1.25 µg/rat) was combined with CIT (2.5 mg/kg) an antidepressant-like effect was observed at one but not three weeks post-OVX. The weight of the uteri augmented when EE₂ was administrated three weeks after OVX. The data suggest that the time post-OVX is a crucial factor that contributes to observe the antidepressant-like effect of EE₂ alone or in combination with CIT. PMID:27153072

  11. Time to face the challenge of multimorbidity. A European perspective from the joint action on chronic diseases and promoting healthy ageing across the life cycle (JA-CHRODIS).

    PubMed

    Onder, Graziano; Palmer, Katie; Navickas, Rokas; Jurevičienė, Elena; Mammarella, Federica; Strandzheva, Mirela; Mannucci, Piermannuccio; Pecorelli, Sergio; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-04-01

    Research on multimorbidity has rapidly increased in the last decade, but evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to improve outcomes in patients with multimorbidity is limited. The European Commission is co-funding a large collaborative project named Joint Action on Chronic Diseases and Promoting Healthy Ageing across the Life Cycle (JA-CHRODIS) in the context of the 2nd EU Health Programme 2008-2013. The present manuscript summarizes first results of the JA-CHRODIS, focuses on the identification of a population with multimorbidity who has a high or very high care demand. Identification of characteristics of multimorbid patients associated with a high rate of resource consumption and negative health outcomes is necessary to define a target population who can benefit from interventions. Indeed, multimorbidity alone cannot explain the complexity of care needs and further, stratification of the general population based on care needs is necessary for allocating resources and developing personalized, cost-efficient, and patient-centered care plans. Based on analyses of large databases from European countries a profile of the most care-demanding patients with multimorbidity is defined. Several factors associated with adverse health outcomes and resource consumption among patients with multimorbidity were identified in these analyses, including disease patterns, physical function, mental health, and socioeconomic status. These results underline that a global assessment is needed to identify patients with multimorbidity who are at risk of negative health outcomes and that a comprehensive approach, targeting not only diseases, but also social, cognitive, and functional problems should be adopted for these patients.

  12. The Post-Ovariectomy Interval Affects the Antidepressant-Like Action of Citalopram Combined with Ethynyl-Estradiol in the Forced Swim Test in Middle Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Vega Rivera, Nelly M; Gallardo Tenorio, Alfredo; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Estrada Camarena, Erika

    2016-05-03

    The use of a combined therapy with low doses of estrogens plus antidepressants to treat depression associated to perimenopause could be advantageous. However the use of these combinations is controversial due to several factors, including the time of intervention in relation to menopause onset. This paper analyzes whether time post-OVX influences the antidepressant-like action of a combination of ethynyl-estradiol (EE₂) and citalopram (CIT) in the forced swim test (FST). Middle-aged (15 months old) female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and after one or three weeks treated with EE₂ (1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat, s.c.; -48 h) or CIT (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 or 10 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and tested in the FST. In a second experiment, after one or three weeks of OVX, rats received a combination of an ineffective dose of EE₂ (1.25 µg/rat, s.c., -48 h) plus CIT (2.5 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and subjected to the FST. Finally, the uteri were removed and weighted to obtain an index of the peripheral effects of EE₂ administration. EE₂ (2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat) reduced immobility after one but not three weeks of OVX. In contrast, no CIT dose reduced immobility at one or three weeks after OVX. When EE₂ (1.25 µg/rat) was combined with CIT (2.5 mg/kg) an antidepressant-like effect was observed at one but not three weeks post-OVX. The weight of the uteri augmented when EE₂ was administrated three weeks after OVX. The data suggest that the time post-OVX is a crucial factor that contributes to observe the antidepressant-like effect of EE₂ alone or in combination with CIT.

  13. Medical devices; revocation of cardiac pacemaker registry. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-11-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to revoke a regulation requiring a cardiac pacemaker registry. The registry, which was mandated by the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984, requires any physician and any provider of services who requests or receives Medicare payment for an implantation, removal, or replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker devices and pacemaker leads to submit certain information to the registry. The information is used by FDA to track the performance of permanent cardiac pacemakers and pacemaker leads and by the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) to administer its Medicare payment program for these devices. This action is being taken to implement an act to Repeal An Unnecessary Medical Device Reporting Requirement passed by Congress in 1996 to remove the cardiac pacemaker registry to eliminate duplicative and unnecessary reporting. PMID:11010690

  14. 78 FR 70310 - National Institute on Aging; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging; Notice of Closed Meetings..., National Institutes of Health, HHS). Dated: November 19, 2013. Melanie J. Gray, Program Analyst, Office...

  15. Knowing minds, controlling actions: the developmental relations between theory of mind and executive function from 2 to 4 years of age.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulrich; Liebermann-Finestone, Dana P; Carpendale, Jeremy I M; Hammond, Stuart I; Bibok, Maximilian B

    2012-02-01

    This longitudinal study examined the concurrent and predictive relations between executive function (EF) and theory of mind (ToM) in 82 preschoolers who were assessed when they were 2, 3, and 4 years old. The results showed that the concurrent relation between EF and ToM, after controlling for age, verbal ability, and sex, was significant at 3 and 4 years of age but not at 2 years of age. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that EF at age 2 significantly predicted ToM at age 3 and that EF at age 3 significantly predicted ToM at age 4, over and above the effects of age, verbal ability, and prior performance on ToM tasks. However, ToM at ages 2 and 3 did not explain a significant amount of variance in EF at age 4. Bootstrap procedures revealed that verbal ability at age 3 fully mediated the relation between ToM at age 2 and EF at age 4.

  16. The Post-Ovariectomy Interval Affects the Antidepressant-Like Action of Citalopram Combined with Ethynyl-Estradiol in the Forced Swim Test in Middle Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vega Rivera, Nelly M.; Gallardo Tenorio, Alfredo; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Estrada Camarena, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The use of a combined therapy with low doses of estrogens plus antidepressants to treat depression associated to perimenopause could be advantageous. However the use of these combinations is controversial due to several factors, including the time of intervention in relation to menopause onset. This paper analyzes whether time post-OVX influences the antidepressant-like action of a combination of ethynyl-estradiol (EE2) and citalopram (CIT) in the forced swim test (FST). Middle-aged (15 months old) female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and after one or three weeks treated with EE2 (1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat, s.c.; −48 h) or CIT (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 or 10 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and tested in the FST. In a second experiment, after one or three weeks of OVX, rats received a combination of an ineffective dose of EE2 (1.25 µg/rat, s.c., −48 h) plus CIT (2.5 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and subjected to the FST. Finally, the uteri were removed and weighted to obtain an index of the peripheral effects of EE2 administration. EE2 (2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat) reduced immobility after one but not three weeks of OVX. In contrast, no CIT dose reduced immobility at one or three weeks after OVX. When EE2 (1.25 µg/rat) was combined with CIT (2.5 mg/kg) an antidepressant-like effect was observed at one but not three weeks post-OVX. The weight of the uteri augmented when EE2 was administrated three weeks after OVX. The data suggest that the time post-OVX is a crucial factor that contributes to observe the antidepressant-like effect of EE2 alone or in combination with CIT. PMID:27153072

  17. Maternal and child assistance programs; model application form--HHS, Department of Agriculture. Notice.

    PubMed

    1991-12-01

    This notice publishes a model application form that States have the option of using in full, in part, with modification or not at all. It would be used by pregnant women or by children under 6 years of age to apply for benefits simultaneously under several congressionally specified "maternal and child assistance programs": (1) The Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act; (2) the Health Care for the Homeless grant program under section 340 of the Public Health Service Act; (3) the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Services block grand program under title V of the Social Security Act; (4) the Migrant and Community Health Centers programs under sections 329 and 330 of the Public Health Service Act; (5) the Head Start program under the Head Start Act; and (6) the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) under section 17 of the Child Nutrition Act of 1966. This notice is published in accordance with section 6506(a) of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989 (OBRA '89) (Pub. L. 101-239), which requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services, in consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture, to develop a model application form for the specified maternal and child assistance programs for publication in the Federal Register. This model application form represents a first effort to develop a joint model application form covering the programs mandated by Congress. If modifications are necessary due to changes in program requirements, or States or other user experience, they will be pursued.

  18. It barks, but will it bite? While HHS can review proposed insurance premium increases, it lacks the authority to actually stop them.

    PubMed

    Vesely, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    HHS has new authority to review proposed insurance premium increases, but no real power to stop them. But at least some states without a rate review process say they welcome any support. "We are borderline at market failure," says Michael McRaith, left, director of the Illinois Department of Insurance. "The expectation is not that rates are going to dramatically or miraculously decline. But that rates will be more stable". PMID:21322334

  19. Age-related decline in multiple unit action potentials of CA3 region of rat hippocampus: correlation with lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentration and the effect of centrophenoxine.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D; Maurya, A K; Singh, R

    1993-01-01

    Changes in lipid peroxidation, lipofuscin concentration, and multiple unit activity (MUA recorded in conscious animals) in the CA3 region were studied in the hippocampus of male Wistar rats aged 4, 8, 16, and 24 months. The lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentration were increased with age. The MUA, however, declined with age. Correlational analyses were performed for the four age groups to determine the relationship between the age-associated decline in MUA with the age-related alterations in lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentrations. The age-related increase in lipid peroxidation correlated positively with the age-associated increase in lipofuscin concentration. The age-related increases in lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentration correlated negatively with the changes in MUA. Since lipid peroxidation may affect neuronal electrophysiology, our data suggested that age-related increase in lipid peroxidation may contribute to an age-associated decline in neuronal electrical activity. Centrophenoxine effects were studied on the three above-mentioned age-associated changes in the hippocampus. The drug had no effect on all three parameters in 4- and 8-month-old rats. In 16- and 24-month-old rats, however, the drug significantly increased the MUA but concomitantly decreased lipofuscin concentration and lipid peroxidation. Correlational analyses of the data on MUA, lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentration from the centrophenoxine-treated animals showed that the drug-induced diminution in both lipofuscin and lipid peroxidation was significantly correlated with the drug-induced increase in MUA. The differential effect of the drug in younger (4-8 months) and older (16-24 months) animals indicated that the stimulation of MUA was clearly associated with concomitant decrease in lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentration.

  20. The Global Energy Crisis: Today and Tomorrow. Developing Proactive Action Student Awareness and Understanding About Finite Fuels and Alternative Energy Sources in a Global Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Richard O.

    Background information and a teaching strategy are provided to help students better understand the global energy crisis and learn to take action. An overview of the energy crisis includes a discussion of the unequal distribution of natural resources throughout the world, the finite nature of fossil fuels, and problems associated with the depletion…

  1. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  2. Call to action: continuum of care for females of reproductive age to prevent obesity and ensure better health outcomes of offspring through nutrition.

    PubMed

    Zive, Michelle M; Rhee, Kyung E

    2014-09-01

    The health and nutritional status of women of reproductive age has tremendous impact on the health of future populations; therefore, special attention should be paid to promoting women's health, especially a healthy weight at this critical time period. The purpose of the paper is to provide information on the nutritional needs of women at various stages of the reproductive age spectrum, including preconception/interconception and during pregnancy to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. The Socio-Ecological Model (SEM) is presented to help practitioners understand the importance of intervening where women of reproductive age live, work, and frequent.

  3. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  4. Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA); interpretation of "federal means-tested public benefit"--HHS. Notice with comment period.

    PubMed

    1997-08-26

    This notice with comment period interprets the term "Federal means-tested public benefit[s]" as used in Title IV of the Personal Responsibility and work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), Pub. L. 104-193, to include only mandatory spending programs of the Federal Government in which eligibility for the program's benefits, or the amount of such benefits or both, are determined on the basis of income or resources of the eligibility unit seeking the benefit. At HHS, the benefit programs that fall within this definition (and are not explicitly excerted from the definition by Section 403 (c)) are Medicaid and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).

  5. Long-Term Care in America: The People's Call for Federal Action. Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document presents prepared statements and testimony from the Congressional hearing on the federal government's role in providing long-term care for the elderly in America. Opening statements from the chairman and three members of the Select Committee on Aging focus on the financial burden of long-term care for America's elderly, the…

  6. Knowing Minds, Controlling Actions: The Developmental Relations between Theory of Mind and Executive Function from 2 to 4 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Ulrich; Liebermann-Finestone, Dana P.; Carpendale, Jeremy I. M.; Hammond, Stuart I.; Bibok, Maximilian B.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the concurrent and predictive relations between executive function (EF) and theory of mind (ToM) in 82 preschoolers who were assessed when they were 2, 3, and 4 years old. The results showed that the concurrent relation between EF and ToM, after controlling for age, verbal ability, and sex, was significant at 3 and…

  7. Action Learning as Invigoration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chivers, Terence S.

    2011-01-01

    The present account of action learning describes its adoption for pragmatic reasons by the University of the Third Age (U3A). The reason for the existence of this movement is the education of retired people. The account seeks to explain why the action learning method spread from one local U3A to another and across it to other local U3As. The case…

  8. [Comparative studies of the response of normolipemic and dyslipemic aged subjects to 2 forms of delayed-action nicotinic acid polyesters. Pentaerythrotol tetranicotinate and inositol hexanicotinate. Results of a controlled cross-over trial].

    PubMed

    Ziliotto, G R; Lamberti, G; Wagner, A; Cima, L; Genco, G

    1977-01-01

    A cross-over trial was run to compare the effects of two delayed-action nicotinic acid polyesters (pentaerythritol-tetranticotinate, PETN, and inositol-hexanicotinate, MIEN) in 59 aged normo- and dyslipaemic subjects. PETN tended to normalise the lipid picture in much the same way as nicotin acid, without a drastic effect on circulating lipids and lipoproteins. MIEN, on the other hand, had only a slight effect on total blood lipids, and appeared to be ineffective or negative with respect to the other lipid parameters. PETN proved capable of releasing active concentrations of nicotinic acid in vivo for a period of time that was sufficient to correct hyperlipaemia in age subjects. The side-effects were slight, infrequent and quickly reversible. PMID:345998

  9. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  10. Synergistic action of a triple peptide complex on an essential extra-cellular matrix protein exhibits significant anti-aging benefits.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Adam John; Al-Bader, Tamara; Kerrigan, Deirdre; Hickey, Sinead; Laloeuf, Aurelie; Rawlings, Anthony Vincent

    2010-06-01

    Basement membranes are thin structures present in the extracellular matrix that provide a supporting framework on which epithelial and endothelial cells reside. Type IV collagen is present ubiquitously in all basement membranes and plays an important role in cell adhesion, migration differentiation, and growth. These are especially important at the dermoepidermal junction (DEJ) in skin. A reduction in the levels of DEJ proteins occurs in photodamaged skin and especially Type IV collagen at the base of a wrinkle. In these studies, the ability of a triple peptide complex (TPC) to stimulate the production of collagen IV in human skin fibroblasts and its effects on photoaged skin was investigated. Fibroblasts, matured to represent "aged" cells, were stimulated for 72 h with the TPC as well as the three individual peptides constituting the complex, and collagen IV production by the fibroblasts was determined immunochemically. The results show that stimulation with the individual peptides at doses found in 1% (v/v) of the TPC did not result in soluble collagen IV production above levels detected by the non-stimulated cells. However, after stimulation with 1% (v/v) of the TPC, collagen IV was produced by the cells (1.4 ng/ng total protein +/- 0.4 SD, n = 5) when compared to control un-stimulated cells (0.32 ng/ng total protein +/- 0.1 SD, n = 5). This indicates that the combination of the individual peptides is necessary to synergistically stimulate collagen IV production. These findings suggest that the TPC could play a role in the strengthening of the DEJ through its ability to produce collagen IV. In order to determine whether these results translated into significant effects in vivo, we performed two studies. In the first four-week study, a double blind, placebo-controlled and fully randomized clinical study on 22 healthy Caucasian volunteers displaying moderate periorbital wrinkles, a significant reduction in wrinkle parameters determined by profilometry was observed

  11. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings from a study…

  12. Listing of color additives for coloring sutures; [phthalocyaninato(2-)] copper. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-04-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the color additive regulations to provide for the safe use of [phthalocyaninato(2-)] copper in coloring nonabsorbable sutures for general and ophthalmic surgery made from a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene). This action responds to a petition filed by Ethicon, Inc.

  13. Listing of color additives for coloring sutures; [phthalocyaninato(2-)] copper. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-04-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the color additive regulations to provide for the safe use of [phthalocyaninato(2-)] copper in coloring nonabsorbable sutures for general and ophthalmic surgery made from a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene). This action responds to a petition filed by Ethicon, Inc. PMID:10558496

  14. A Difference-in-Differences Approach to Assess the Effect of a Heat Action Plan on Heat-Related Mortality, and Differences in Effectiveness According to Sex, Age, and Socioeconomic Status (Montreal, Quebec)

    PubMed Central

    Benmarhnia, Tarik; Bailey, Zinzi; Kaiser, David; Auger, Nathalie; King, Nicholas; Kaufman, Jay S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The impact of heat waves on mortality and health inequalities is well documented. Very few studies have assessed the effectiveness of heat action plans (HAPs) on health, and none has used quasi-experimental methods to estimate causal effects of such programs. Objectives: We developed a quasi-experimental method to estimate the causal effects associated with HAPs that allows the identification of heterogeneity across subpopulations, and to apply this method specifically to the case of the Montreal (Quebec, Canada) HAP. Methods: A difference-in-differences approach was undertaken using Montreal death registry data for the summers of 2000–2007 to assess the effectiveness of the Montreal HAP, implemented in 2004, on mortality. To study equity in the effect of HAP implementation, we assessed whether the program effects were heterogeneous across sex (male vs. female), age (≥ 65 years vs. < 65 years), and neighborhood education levels (first vs. third tertile). We conducted sensitivity analyses to assess the validity of the estimated causal effect of the HAP program. Results: We found evidence that the HAP contributed to reducing mortality on hot days, and that the mortality reduction attributable to the program was greater for elderly people and people living in low-education neighborhoods. Conclusion: These findings show promise for programs aimed at reducing the impact of extreme temperatures and health inequities. We propose a new quasi-experimental approach that can be easily applied to evaluate the impact of any program or intervention triggered when daily thresholds are reached. Citation: Benmarhnia T, Bailey Z, Kaiser D, Auger N, King N, Kaufman J. 2016. A difference-in-differences approach to assess the effect of a heat action plan on heat-related mortality, and differences in effectiveness according to sex, age, and socioeconomic status (Montreal, Quebec). Environ Health Perspect 124:1694–1699; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP203 PMID:27203433

  15. Health care programs: fraud and abuse; revisions to the civil money penalty provisions relating to the misuse of certain names, symbols and emblems--HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1995-11-27

    In accordance with amendments to section 1140 of the Social Security Act, resulting from the Social Security Independence and Program Improvements Act of 1994, this final rule makes a number of revisions to the civil money penalty authority regulations relating to the misuse of certain symbols, emblems and names. Among other revisions, this rule eliminates the annual cap on penalties, includes the words and letters of the Department and Medicaid under the prohibition, and redefines a violation with regard to mailings. In addition, this final rule serves to remove references to Social Security and the Social Security Administration (SSA) from the HHS/OIG penalty regulations. The penalty regulations addressing the misuse of certain words, letters, symbols and emblems for SSA and its programs are being set forth in a new part of the Code of Federal Regulations published elsewhere in this edition of the Federal Register.

  16. Study of the H+HS reaction on a newly built potential energy surface using the quasi-classical trajectory method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Meng-Meng; Ge, Mei-Hua; Yang, Huan; Zheng, Yu-Jun

    2012-12-01

    The quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method is used to study the H+HS reaction on a newly built potential energy surface (PES) of the triplet state of H2S (3A″) in a collision energy range of 0-60 kcal/mol. Both scalar properties, such as the reaction probability and the integral cross section (ICS), and the vector properties, such as the angular distribution between the relative velocity vector of the reactant and that of the product, etc., are investigated using the QCT method. It is found that the ICSs obtained by the QCT method and the quantum mechanical (QM) method accord well with each other. In addition, the distribution for the product vibrational states is cold, while that for the product rotational states is hot for both reaction channels in the whole energy range studied here.

  17. Medical devices; exemption from premarket notification and reserved devices; class I. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-01-14

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its classification regulations to designate class I devices that are exempt from the premarket notification requirements, subject to certain limitations, and to designate those class I devices that remain subject to premarket notification requirements under the new statutory criteria for premarket notification requirements. The devices FDA is designating as exempt do not include class I devices that have been previously exempted by regulation from the premarket notification requirements. This action is being taken under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the 1976 amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (SMDA), and the FDA Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). FDA is taking this action in order to implement a requirement of FDAMA. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing that it is withdrawing proposed rules to revoke existing exemptions from premarket notification for two devices. PMID:11010655

  18. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  19. Action perception predicts action performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Kurby, Christopher A; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system.

  20. Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milton-Brkich, Katie Lynn; Shumbera, Kristen; Beran, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Defined as "any systemic inquiry conducted by teachers... for the purpose of gathering information about how their particular schools operate, how they teach, and how their students learn" (Mertler, 2009), "action research" is empowering and professional research done by teachers to inform and improves their own practices. Although there are many…

  1. Where is the action? Action sentence processing in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandino, Leonardo; Conant, Lisa L.; Binder, Jeffrey R.; Blindauer, Karen; Hiner, Bradley; Spangler, Katie; Desai, Rutvik H.

    2013-01-01

    According to an influential view of conceptual representation, action concepts are understood through motoric simulations, involving motor networks of the brain. A stronger version of this embodied account suggests that even figurative uses of action words (e.g., grasping the concept) are understood through motoric simulations. We investigated these claims by assessing whether Parkinson's disease (PD), a disorder affecting the motor system, is associated with selective deficits in comprehending action-related sentences. Twenty PD patients and 21 age-matched controls performed a sentence comprehension task, where sentences belonged to one of four conditions: literal action, non-idiomatic metaphoric action, idiomatic action, and abstract. The same verbs (referring to hand/arm actions) were used in the three action-related conditions. Patients, but not controls, were slower to respond to literal and idiomatic action than to abstract sentences. These results indicate that sensory-motor systems play a functional role in semantic processing, including processing of figurative action language. PMID:23624313

  2. Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA); interpretation of "federal public benefit"--HHS. Notice with comment period.

    PubMed

    1998-08-01

    This notice with comment period interprets the term "Federal public benefit" as used in Title IV of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), Pub. L. 104-193, and identifies the HHS programs that provide such benefits under this interpretation. According to section 401 if PRWORA, aliens who are not "qualified aliens" are not eligible for any "Federal public benefit," unless the "Federal public benefit" falls within a specified exception. A "Federal public benefit" includes "any grant, contract, loan, professional license, or commercial license" provided to an individual, and also "any retirement, welfare, health, disability, public or assisted housing, postsecondary education, food assistance, unemployment benefit, or any other similar benefit for which payments or assistance are provided to an individual, household, or family eligibility unit." Under section 432, providers of a non-exempt "Federal public benefit" must verify that a person applying for the benefit is a qualified alien and is eligible to receive the benefit. The HHS programs that provide "Federal public benefits" and are not otherwise excluded from the definition by the exceptions provided in section 401(b) are: Adoption Assistance Administration on Developmental Disabilities (ADD)-State Developmental Disabilities Councils (direct services only) ADD-Special Projects (direct services only) ADD-University Affiliated Programs (clinical disability assessment services only) Adult Programs/Payments to Territories Agency for Health Care Policy and Research Dissertation Grants Child Care and Development Fund Clinical Training Grant for Faculty Development in Alcohol & Drug Abuse Foster Care Health Profession Education and Training Assistance Independent Living Program Job Opportunities for Low Income Individuals (JOLI) Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) Medicare Medicaid (except assistance for an emergency medical condition) Mental Health Clinical

  3. Correlates of hot day air-conditioning use among middle-aged and older adults with chronic heart and lung diseases: the role of health beliefs and cues to action.

    PubMed

    Richard, Lucie; Kosatsky, Tom; Renouf, Annie

    2011-02-01

    Extreme ambient heat is a serious public health threat, especially for the elderly and persons with pre-existing health conditions. Although much of the excess mortality and morbidity associated with extreme heat is preventable, the adoption of effective preventive strategies is limited. The study reported here tested the predictive power of selected components of the Health Belief Model for air-conditioning (AC) use among 238 non-institutionalized middle-aged and older adults with chronic heart failure and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease living in Montréal, Canada. Respondents were recruited through clinics (response rate 71%) and interviews were conducted in their homes or by telephone. Results showed that 73% of participants reported having a home air conditioner. The average number of hours spent per 24-hour period in air-conditioned spaces during heat waves was 14.5 hours (SD = 9.4). Exploratory structural equation modeling showed that specific beliefs about the benefits of and drawbacks to AC as well as internal cues to action were predictive of its level of use, whereas the perceived severity of the effects of heat on health was not. The findings are discussed in light of the need to adequately support effective response to extreme heat in this vulnerable population. PMID:21068164

  4. Citizen's actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The role played by individual citizens as consumers of energy was examined, with emphasis on studying ways in which their action could result in energy conservation. It was shown that there are ways that energy can be conserved in this way, with citizens acting either individually or in groups. The potential savings are significant, but the actual savings may be quite small. The citizens need to be motivated to save and to believe in a conservation ethic; developing such an ethic is difficult, and perhaps not responsive to the shotgun approach now being attempted. The true course of action may be to synthesize new societal structures that provide the maximum evolution of culture within the limitation of scarce energy resources.

  5. Actionable Nuggets

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Smith, Karen; McColl, Alexander; Green, Michael; Godwin, Marshall; Birtwhistle, Richard; Norman, Kathleen; Brankston, Gabrielle; Schaub, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice. Design Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets’ effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility. Setting Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia. Participants Forty-nine primary care physicians. Methods Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants’ opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews. Main findings With Actionable Nuggets, participants’ knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians’ practices was 72%. Participants’ awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent. Conclusion Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian

  6. Bonus to reward states for high performance under the TANF program. Administration for Children and Families, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-08-30

    The Administration for Children and Families is issuing final regulations to implement section 403(a)(4) of the Social Security Act. This provision authorizes bonuses to high performing States in meeting the purposes of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Block Grant (the TANF program). We will base the bonus awards in FY 2002 and beyond on work measures (substantially the same work measures currently in effect for the FY 1999-2001 awards); measures that support work and self-sufficiency related to: participation by low-income working families in the Food Stamp Program, participation of former TANF recipients in the Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Programs (SCHIP), and receipt of child care subsidies; and a measure related to family formation and stability (increase in the number of children in the State who reside in married couple families). Bonus funds of up to $200 million each year were authorized for awards in fiscal years 1999 through 2003. This rule specifies a formula for allocating these funds in FY 2002 and FY 2003. The amount awarded to each high performing State may not exceed five percent of the State's family assistance grant. Earlier, we issued program guidance covering bonus awards in FY 1999, FY 2000, and FY 2001. We published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to cover awards beginning in FY 2002 on December 6, 1999 (64 FR 68202). In a related regulatory action, we are amending 45 CFR Part 265, the TANF Data Collection and Reporting Requirements, to reduce the burden of reporting data on Separate State Program-Maintenance of Effort (SSP-MOE) programs. This amendment will allow waivers of certain reporting requirements under limited circumstances.

  7. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do. PMID:27667859

  8. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do.

  9. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  10. Planning my actions to accommodate yours: joint action development during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marlene; van der Wel, Robrecht P R D; Hunnius, Sabine

    2016-05-01

    The planning and adjusting of one's actions in relation to an action partner is fundamental to smooth joint action. During their first years of life, children gradually become more engaged in joint actions. Here, we investigated whether and at what age children take their partner into account in their action plans to accommodate the other's actions. We focused on children's proactive planning (without prior experience) and flexible adjustment of action plans over time. In a behavioural study, we tested 96 children from four age groups (2½, 3, 3½ and 5 years) in a joint cup-stacking task. Children passed cups to their partner who had only one hand available (alternating over time) to build a tower. Children's response choices were assessed (i.e. passing the cup on the free or occupied side to their partner). The study yielded two major findings. At all ages, children proactively planned their actions in a way that accommodated their partner's actions. However, only by 3½ years did children start to flexibly integrate their partner into their action plans. Even at age 5, children only showed minimal adjustments to their action partner. Candidate processes underlying these developmental changes (e.g. inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, perspective taking) are discussed. PMID:27069048

  11. Gestational age

    MedlinePlus

    Fetal age - gestational age; Gestation; Neonatal gestational age; Newborn gestational age ... Gestational age can be determined before or after birth. Before birth, your health care provider will use ultrasound to ...

  12. 42 CFR 93.500 - General policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest ORI Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions General... findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions, including debarment or suspension, arising... to contest ORI research misconduct findings and HHS administrative actions under this part,...

  13. 42 CFR 93.500 - General policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest ORI Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions General... findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions, including debarment or suspension, arising... to contest ORI research misconduct findings and HHS administrative actions under this part,...

  14. The Take Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The Take Action Project (TAP) was created to help middle school students take informed and effective action on science-related issues. The seven steps of TAP ask students to (1) choose a science-related problem of interest to them, (2) research their problem, (3) select an action to take on the problem, (4) plan that action, (5) take action, (6)…

  15. State and Regional Prevalence of Diagnosed Multiple Chronic Conditions Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Ward, Brian W; Black, Lindsey I

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and care management of multiple (two or more) chronic conditions (MCC) are important public health concerns (1). Approximately 25% of U.S. adults have diagnoses of MCC (2). Care management of MCC presents a challenge to both patients and providers because of the substantial costs associated with treating more than one condition and the traditional care strategies that focus on single conditions as opposed to enhanced care coordination (3,4). Maintaining surveillance, targeting service delivery, and projecting resources are all important to meet this challenge, and these actions can be informed by identifying state and other regional variations in MCC prevalence (5,6). Data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to estimate prevalence of MCC (defined as two or more of 10 diagnosed chronic conditions) for each U.S. state and region by age and sex. Significant state and regional variation in MCC prevalence was found, with state-level estimates ranging from 19.0% in Colorado to 38.2% in Kentucky. MCC prevalence also varied by region, ranging from 21.4% in the Pacific region to 34.5% in the East South Central region. The prevalence of MCC was higher among women than among men within certain U.S. regions, and was higher in older persons in all regions. Such findings further the research and surveillance objectives stated in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) publication, Multiple Chronic Conditions: A Strategic Framework (1). Furthermore, geographic disparities in MCC prevalence can inform state-level surveillance programs and groups targeting service delivery or allocating resources for MCC prevention activities. PMID:27467707

  16. Less chalk more action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitriceski Andelkovic, Bojana; Jovic, Sladjana

    2016-04-01

    Less chalk more action Education should not be a mechanical system that operates according to the principles of the orders and implementation. Education should respect the basic laws of the develop and progress. Curiosity is the engine of achievement and children spontaneously and happily learn only if they get interested, if teacher wake up and stimulate their creativity and individuality. We would like to present classes that are realized as thematic teaching with several subjects involved: chemistry, geography, math, art and biology. Classes were organized for students at age from 10 to 13 years, every month during autumn and winter 2015. Better students identified themselves as teachers and presented peer education .Teachers were monitoring the process of teaching and help to develop links between younger and older students, where older students were educators to younger students. Also one student with special needs was involved in this activities and was supported by other students during the workshops The benefit from this project will be represented with evaluation marks. Evaluation table shows that group of ten students(age 10 to13 years) which are selected in October as children with lack of motivation for learning, got better marks, at the end of January , then they had it in the beginning of the semester.

  17. Androgen actions and the ovary.

    PubMed

    Walters, K A; Allan, C M; Handelsman, D J

    2008-03-01

    Although androgens and the androgen receptor (AR) have defining roles in male reproductive development and function, previously no role in female reproductive physiology beyond testosterone (T) as the precursor in estradiol (E(2)) biosynthesis was firmly established. Understanding the role and specific mechanisms of androgen action via the AR in the ovary has been limited by confusion on how to interpret results from pharmacological studies, because many androgens can be metabolized in vivo and in vitro to steroids that can also exert actions via the estrogen receptor (ESR). Recent genetic studies using mouse models with specific disruption of the Ar gene have highlighted the role that AR-mediated actions play in maintaining female fertility through key roles in the regulation of follicle health, development, and ovulation. Furthermore, these genetic studies have revealed that AR-mediated effects influence age-related female fertility, possibly via mechanisms acting predominantly at the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in a dose-dependent manner. This review focuses on combining the findings from pharmacological studies and novel genetic mouse models to unravel the roles of ovarian androgen actions in relation to female fertility and ovarian aging, as well as creating new insights into the role of androgens in androgen-associated reproductive disorders such as polycystic ovarian syndrome.

  18. Action goals influence action-specific perception.

    PubMed

    Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen; van der Kamp, John

    2009-12-01

    We examined the processes that mediate the emergence of action-specific influences on perception that have recently been reported for baseball batting and golf putting (Witt, Linkenauger, Bakdash, & Proffitt, 2008; Witt & Proffitt, 2005). To this end, we used a Schokokusswurfmaschine: Children threw a ball at a target, which, if hit successfully, launched a ball that the children then had to catch. In two experiments, children performed either a throwing-and-catching task or a throwing-only task, in which no ball was launched. After each task, the size of the target or of the ball was estimated. Results indicate that action-specific influences on perceived size occur for objects that are related to the end goal of the action, but not for objects that are related to intermediate action goals. These results suggest that action-specific influences on perception are contingent upon the primary action goals to be achieved.

  19. Action Research: Rethinking Lewin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Linda; Watkins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Explores both historical and contemporary definitions of action research. Describes the process and goals of action research in the tradition of Lewin. Presents a case study of an action-research project involving two teams in a high-technology corporation that depicts the process in action. (Author/CCM)

  20. Action Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of action learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "Action Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing Action Learning and Action Research in Context" (Cliff…

  1. Action Experience and Action Discovery in Medicated Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bednark, Jeffery G.; Reynolds, John N. J.; Stafford, Tom; Redgrave, Peter; Franz, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that markedly affects voluntary action. While regular dopamine treatment can help restore motor function, dopamine also influences cognitive portions of the action system. Previous studies have demonstrated that dopamine medication boosts action-effect associations, which are crucial for the discovery of new voluntary actions. In the present study, we investigated whether neural processes involved in the discovery of new actions are altered in PD participants on regular dopamine treatment, compared to healthy age-matched controls. We recorded brain electroencephalography (EEG) activity while PD patients and age-matched controls performed action discovery (AD) and action control tasks. We found that the novelty P3, a component normally present when there is uncertainty about the occurrence of the sensory effect, was enhanced in PD patients. However, AD was maintained in PD patients, and the novelty P3 demonstrated normal learning-related reductions. Crucially, we found that in PD patients the causal association between an action and its resulting sensory outcome did not modulate the amplitude of the feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP), an EEG component sensitive to the association between an action and its resulting effect. Collectively, these preliminary results suggest that the formation of long-term action-outcome representations may be maintained in PD patients on regular dopamine treatment, but the initial experience of action-effect association may be affected. PMID:27610079

  2. Action Experience and Action Discovery in Medicated Individuals with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bednark, Jeffery G; Reynolds, John N J; Stafford, Tom; Redgrave, Peter; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that markedly affects voluntary action. While regular dopamine treatment can help restore motor function, dopamine also influences cognitive portions of the action system. Previous studies have demonstrated that dopamine medication boosts action-effect associations, which are crucial for the discovery of new voluntary actions. In the present study, we investigated whether neural processes involved in the discovery of new actions are altered in PD participants on regular dopamine treatment, compared to healthy age-matched controls. We recorded brain electroencephalography (EEG) activity while PD patients and age-matched controls performed action discovery (AD) and action control tasks. We found that the novelty P3, a component normally present when there is uncertainty about the occurrence of the sensory effect, was enhanced in PD patients. However, AD was maintained in PD patients, and the novelty P3 demonstrated normal learning-related reductions. Crucially, we found that in PD patients the causal association between an action and its resulting sensory outcome did not modulate the amplitude of the feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP), an EEG component sensitive to the association between an action and its resulting effect. Collectively, these preliminary results suggest that the formation of long-term action-outcome representations may be maintained in PD patients on regular dopamine treatment, but the initial experience of action-effect association may be affected. PMID:27610079

  3. Action Experience and Action Discovery in Medicated Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bednark, Jeffery G.; Reynolds, John N. J.; Stafford, Tom; Redgrave, Peter; Franz, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that markedly affects voluntary action. While regular dopamine treatment can help restore motor function, dopamine also influences cognitive portions of the action system. Previous studies have demonstrated that dopamine medication boosts action-effect associations, which are crucial for the discovery of new voluntary actions. In the present study, we investigated whether neural processes involved in the discovery of new actions are altered in PD participants on regular dopamine treatment, compared to healthy age-matched controls. We recorded brain electroencephalography (EEG) activity while PD patients and age-matched controls performed action discovery (AD) and action control tasks. We found that the novelty P3, a component normally present when there is uncertainty about the occurrence of the sensory effect, was enhanced in PD patients. However, AD was maintained in PD patients, and the novelty P3 demonstrated normal learning-related reductions. Crucially, we found that in PD patients the causal association between an action and its resulting sensory outcome did not modulate the amplitude of the feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP), an EEG component sensitive to the association between an action and its resulting effect. Collectively, these preliminary results suggest that the formation of long-term action-outcome representations may be maintained in PD patients on regular dopamine treatment, but the initial experience of action-effect association may be affected.

  4. The Aging Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Haigis, Marcia C.; Yankner, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is the outcome of a balance between damage and repair. The rate of aging and the appearance of age-related pathology are modulated by stress response and repair pathways that gradually decline, including the proteostasis and DNA damage repair networks and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. Highly conserved insulin/IGF-1, TOR, and sirtuin signaling pathways in turn, control these critical cellular responses. The coordinated action of these signaling pathways maintains cellular and organismal homeostasis in the face of external perturbations, such as changes in nutrient availability, temperature and oxygen level, as well as internal perturbations, such as protein misfolding and DNA damage. Studies in model organisms suggest that changes in signaling can augment these critical stress response systems, increasing lifespan and reducing age-related pathology. The systems biology of stress response signaling thus provides a new approach to the understanding and potential treatment of age-related diseases. PMID:20965426

  5. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) A healthy ... Aging email updates. Enter email address Submit Healthy Aging news Accessibility | Privacy policy | Disclaimers | FOIA | Link to ...

  6. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Change Contrast print sign up Share Healthy Aging This category offers tips on how to stay ... with Smell Problems with Taste Skin Care and Aging Sleep and Aging Taking Medicines Talking with Your ...

  7. 44 CFR 7.924 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Affirmative action by... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 7.924 Affirmative action by recipient. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects...

  8. 28 CFR 42.724 - Remedial and affirmative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Remedial and affirmative action. 42.724... affirmative action. (a) If the Department finds that, in violation of this subpart, a recipient has discriminated on the basis of age, the recipient shall take remedial action that the Department...

  9. 34 CFR 110.15 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Affirmative action by recipients. 110.15 Section 110.15... ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.15 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome...

  10. 38 CFR 18.516 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Affirmative action by... Determining Age Discrimination § 18.516 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions that resulted...

  11. 34 CFR 110.15 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Affirmative action by recipients. 110.15 Section 110.15... ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.15 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome...

  12. 38 CFR 18.516 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Affirmative action by... Determining Age Discrimination § 18.516 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions that resulted...

  13. 44 CFR 7.924 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Affirmative action by... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 7.924 Affirmative action by recipient. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects...

  14. 34 CFR 110.15 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Affirmative action by recipients. 110.15 Section 110.15... ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.15 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome...

  15. 34 CFR 110.15 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Affirmative action by recipients. 110.15 Section 110.15... ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.15 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome...

  16. 43 CFR 17.315 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Affirmative action by recipients. 17.315... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 17.315 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects...

  17. 45 CFR 91.16 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Affirmative action by recipient. 91.16 Section 91... for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.16 Affirmative action by recipient. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects of...

  18. 45 CFR 91.16 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Affirmative action by recipient. 91.16 Section 91... for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.16 Affirmative action by recipient. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects of...

  19. 38 CFR 18.516 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Affirmative action by... Determining Age Discrimination § 18.516 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions that resulted...

  20. 43 CFR 17.315 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Affirmative action by recipients. 17.315... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 17.315 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects...

  1. 43 CFR 17.315 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Affirmative action by recipients. 17.315... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 17.315 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects...

  2. 28 CFR 42.724 - Remedial and affirmative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Remedial and affirmative action. 42.724... affirmative action. (a) If the Department finds that, in violation of this subpart, a recipient has discriminated on the basis of age, the recipient shall take remedial action that the Department...

  3. 28 CFR 42.724 - Remedial and affirmative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Remedial and affirmative action. 42.724... affirmative action. (a) If the Department finds that, in violation of this subpart, a recipient has discriminated on the basis of age, the recipient shall take remedial action that the Department...

  4. 43 CFR 17.315 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Affirmative action by recipients. 17.315... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 17.315 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects...

  5. 45 CFR 91.16 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Affirmative action by recipient. 91.16 Section 91... for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.16 Affirmative action by recipient. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects of...

  6. 44 CFR 7.924 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Affirmative action by... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 7.924 Affirmative action by recipient. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects...

  7. 38 CFR 18.516 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Affirmative action by... Determining Age Discrimination § 18.516 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions that resulted...

  8. 34 CFR 110.15 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Affirmative action by recipients. 110.15 Section 110.15... ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.15 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome...

  9. 45 CFR 91.16 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Affirmative action by recipient. 91.16 Section 91... for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.16 Affirmative action by recipient. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects of...

  10. 45 CFR 91.16 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Affirmative action by recipient. 91.16 Section 91... for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.16 Affirmative action by recipient. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects of...

  11. 44 CFR 7.924 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Affirmative action by... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 7.924 Affirmative action by recipient. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects...

  12. 44 CFR 7.924 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Affirmative action by... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 7.924 Affirmative action by recipient. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects...

  13. 43 CFR 17.315 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Affirmative action by recipients. 17.315... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 17.315 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects...

  14. 38 CFR 18.516 - Affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Affirmative action by... Determining Age Discrimination § 18.516 Affirmative action by recipients. Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions that resulted...

  15. 28 CFR 42.724 - Remedial and affirmative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedial and affirmative action. 42.724... affirmative action. (a) If the Department finds that, in violation of this subpart, a recipient has discriminated on the basis of age, the recipient shall take remedial action that the Department...

  16. 28 CFR 42.724 - Remedial and affirmative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remedial and affirmative action. 42.724... affirmative action. (a) If the Department finds that, in violation of this subpart, a recipient has discriminated on the basis of age, the recipient shall take remedial action that the Department...

  17. Children's Awareness of Actions: Getting a Hand on Consciousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fireman, Gary; Kose, Gary

    This study, which was concerned with the ways in which actions can be elaborated and can influence children's awareness of actions, examined the relationship between action and awareness during childrens' performance on the Towers of Hanoi problem. A total of 94 children between the ages of 6 and 8 years were asked to solve a three-disc version of…

  18. Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…

  19. Age Discrimination--Notice--Filing Notice of Intent to Sue Within 180 Days After the Alleged Violation Is a Jurisdictional Prerequisite to an Action Under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act. Hiscott v. General Elec. Co., 521 F. 2d 632 (6th Cir. 1975)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiltner, L. Del

    1976-01-01

    The Hiscott decision indicates that the court will require notice to meet specific standards before an individual's right to maintain a civil action under the ADEA becomes operative. It also suggests that strict compliance with the 180-day notice provision will continue to be a condition precedent to suit. (Author/LBH)

  20. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  1. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  2. Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Martha Lentz

    1993-01-01

    Describes aspects of participatory action research and considers advantages of using participatory action research in research by disabilities and rehabilitation researchers. Notes that participatory action research can be built into any rehabilitation research design but that it rests upon the recognition of persons with disabilities as integral…

  3. Putting Action in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  4. Planning as Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Gonzalez, Carmen Beatriz; Hernandez, Teresa; Kusch, Jim; Ryan, Charly

    2004-01-01

    Planning contains so much more than the written plan. Early in 2000, an invitation came from the Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN), to people experienced in action research who might want to help plan and present an action research event for elementary school science teachers in Venezuela, South America, in Autumn 2000. This article…

  5. Understanding affirmative action.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Faye J; Iyer, Aarti; Sincharoen, Sirinda

    2006-01-01

    Affirmative action is a controversial and often poorly understood policy. It is also a policy that has been widely studied by social scientists. In this review, we outline how affirmative action operates in employment and education settings and consider the major points of controversy. In addition, we detail the contributions of psychologists and other social scientists in helping to demonstrate why affirmative action is needed; how it can have unintended negative consequences; and how affirmative action programs can be most successful. We also review how psychologists have examined variations in people's attitudes toward affirmative action, in part as a means for testing different theories of social behavior. PMID:16318608

  6. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out of ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and ...

  7. Centrophenoxine increases the rates of total and mRNA synthesis in the brain cortex of old rats: an explanation of its action in terms of the membrane hypothesis of aging.

    PubMed

    Zs-Nagy, I; Semsei, I

    1984-01-01

    The rates of total and polyA+ RNA (mRNA) synthesis were measured by radioisotope technique in the brain cortex of female CFY rats. There was practically no significant difference between the young (1.5 months) and adult (13 months) rats; however, the old group (26 months) displayed a considerable decrease of the rates of synthesis of both classes of RNA studied. Centrophenoxine treatment (100 mg per kg body weight per day, for 2 months) reversed this tendency, and increased significantly the synthesis rates of old rats almost to the adult level. The results are interpreted in terms of the membrane hypothesis of aging, attributing a free-radical scavenger function of the dimethylamino-ethanol incorporated into the nerve cell membrane from the centrophenoxine.

  8. Action understanding as inverse planning.

    PubMed

    Baker, Chris L; Saxe, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Joshua B

    2009-12-01

    Humans are adept at inferring the mental states underlying other agents' actions, such as goals, beliefs, desires, emotions and other thoughts. We propose a computational framework based on Bayesian inverse planning for modeling human action understanding. The framework represents an intuitive theory of intentional agents' behavior based on the principle of rationality: the expectation that agents will plan approximately rationally to achieve their goals, given their beliefs about the world. The mental states that caused an agent's behavior are inferred by inverting this model of rational planning using Bayesian inference, integrating the likelihood of the observed actions with the prior over mental states. This approach formalizes in precise probabilistic terms the essence of previous qualitative approaches to action understanding based on an "intentional stance" [Dennett, D. C. (1987). The intentional stance. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press] or a "teleological stance" [Gergely, G., Nádasdy, Z., Csibra, G., & Biró, S. (1995). Taking the intentional stance at 12 months of age. Cognition, 56, 165-193]. In three psychophysical experiments using animated stimuli of agents moving in simple mazes, we assess how well different inverse planning models based on different goal priors can predict human goal inferences. The results provide quantitative evidence for an approximately rational inference mechanism in human goal inference within our simplified stimulus paradigm, and for the flexible nature of goal representations that human observers can adopt. We discuss the implications of our experimental results for human action understanding in real-world contexts, and suggest how our framework might be extended to capture other kinds of mental state inferences, such as inferences about beliefs, or inferring whether an entity is an intentional agent.

  9. Mosaic aging

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lary C.; Herndon, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although all multicellular organisms undergo structural and functional deterioration with age, senescence is not a uniform process. Rather, each organism experiences a constellation of changes that reflect the heterogeneous effects of age on molecules, cells, organs and systems, an idiosyncratic pattern that we refer to as mosaic aging. Varying genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors (local and extrinsic) contribute to the aging phenotype in a given individual, and these agents influence the type and rate of functional decline, as well as the likelihood of developing age-associated afflictions such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Identifying key factors that drive aging, clarifying their activities in different systems, and in particular understanding how they interact will enhance our comprehension of the aging process, and could yield insights into the permissive role that senescence plays in the emergence of acute and chronic diseases of the elderly. PMID:20110150

  10. Action and object naming in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kambanaros, Maria; Messinis, Lambros; Georgiou, Vassilis; Papathanassopoulos, Panagiotis

    2010-12-01

    Patients with schizophrenia demonstrate impaired action verbal fluency, but no study has examined verb-noun differences using picture naming. The present study compared object and action naming in 20 adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition, Text Revision; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) criteria, and 20 demographically matched healthy controls, using pictures. Overall, schizophrenic patients showed poorer naming than controls on all measures of object and action lexical semantic access and retrieval despite normal comprehension for action and object names. Results further indicated that action names were significantly more difficult to retrieve than object names in schizophrenic patients. The absence of dissociation in comprehension of action and object names but semantic errors in naming both classes suggests intact conceptual-semantic stores among middle-aged community-dwelling outpatients with schizophrenia but difficulties mapping semantics onto the lexicon. Action-naming impairments can arise from both semantic and postsemantic origins in schizophrenia. These results have implications for the neurobiology of language given the association between both schizophrenia and verb processing and frontal damage. Moreover, the issue being addressed is important for a cognitive characterization of schizophrenia and for an understanding of the representations of action and object names in the brain.

  11. Mechanisms underlying selecting objects for action.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Melanie; Laverick, Rosanna; Humphreys, Glyn W; Wing, Alan M; Rotshtein, Pia

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the factors which affect the selection of objects for action, focusing on the role of action knowledge and its modulation by distracters. Fourteen neuropsychological patients and 10 healthy aged-matched controls selected pairs of objects commonly used together among distracters in two contexts: with real objects and with pictures of the same objects presented sequentially on a computer screen. Across both tasks, semantically related distracters led to slower responses and more errors than unrelated distracters and the object actively used for action was selected prior to the object that would be passively held during the action. We identified a sub-group of patients (N = 6) whose accuracy was 2SDs below the controls performances in the real object task. Interestingly, these impaired patients were more affected by the presence of unrelated distracters during both tasks than intact patients and healthy controls. Note that the impaired patients had lesions to left parietal, right anterior temporal and bilateral pre-motor regions. We conclude that: (1) motor procedures guide object selection for action, (2) semantic knowledge affects action-based selection, (3) impaired action decision making is associated with the inability to ignore distracting information and (4) lesions to either the dorsal or ventral visual stream can lead to deficits in making action decisions. Overall, the data indicate that impairments in everyday tasks can be evaluated using a simulated computer task. The implications for rehabilitation are discussed.

  12. Mechanisms underlying selecting objects for action

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Melanie; Laverick, Rosanna; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Wing, Alan M.; Rotshtein, Pia

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the factors which affect the selection of objects for action, focusing on the role of action knowledge and its modulation by distracters. Fourteen neuropsychological patients and 10 healthy aged-matched controls selected pairs of objects commonly used together among distracters in two contexts: with real objects and with pictures of the same objects presented sequentially on a computer screen. Across both tasks, semantically related distracters led to slower responses and more errors than unrelated distracters and the object actively used for action was selected prior to the object that would be passively held during the action. We identified a sub-group of patients (N = 6) whose accuracy was 2SDs below the controls performances in the real object task. Interestingly, these impaired patients were more affected by the presence of unrelated distracters during both tasks than intact patients and healthy controls. Note that the impaired patients had lesions to left parietal, right anterior temporal and bilateral pre-motor regions. We conclude that: (1) motor procedures guide object selection for action, (2) semantic knowledge affects action-based selection, (3) impaired action decision making is associated with the inability to ignore distracting information and (4) lesions to either the dorsal or ventral visual stream can lead to deficits in making action decisions. Overall, the data indicate that impairments in everyday tasks can be evaluated using a simulated computer task. The implications for rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:25954177

  13. 76 FR 65203 - National Institute on Aging

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging ACTION: Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute on Aging Special Emphasis Panel; Mechanisms of Osteoporosis II. Date...: National Institute on Aging, Gateway Building, 7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 2C212, Bethesda, MD...

  14. Aging: overview.

    PubMed

    Harman, D

    2001-04-01

    Aging is a universal process that began with the origination of life about 3.5 billion years ago. Accumulation of the diverse deleterious changes produced by aging throughout the cells and tissues progressively impairs function and can eventually cause death. Aging changes can be attributed to development, genetic defects, the environment, disease, and an inborn process--the aging process. The chance of death at a given age serves as a measure of the average number of aging changes accumulated by persons of that age, that is, of physiologic age, and the rate of change of this measure as the rate of aging. Chances for death are decreased by improvements in general living conditions. As a result, during the past two millennia average life expectancy at birth (ALE-B), determined by the chances for death, of humans has risen from 30 years, in ancient Rome, to almost 80 years today in the developed countries. Chances for death in the developed countries are now near limiting values and ALE-Bs are approaching plateau values that are 6-9 years less than the potential maximum of about 85 years. Chances for death are now largely determined by the inherent aging process after age 28. Only 1.1% of female cohorts in Sweden die before this age; the remainder die off at an exponentially increasing rate with advancing age. The inherent aging process limits ALE-B to around 85 years, and the maximum life span (MLS) to about 122 years. Past efforts to increase ALE-B did not require an understanding of aging. Such knowledge will be necessary in the future to significantly increase ALE-B and MLS, and to satisfactorily ameliorate the medical, economic, and social problems associated with advancing age. The many theories advanced to account for aging should be used, to the extent it is feasible, to help with these important practical problems, including applications of the free radical theory of aging. Past measures evolved by societies to ensure adequate care for older individuals are

  15. Federal financial participation in state assistance expenditures; federal matching shares for Aid to Families With Dependent Children, Medicaid, and aid to needy aged, blind, or disabled persons for October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995--HHS. Notice.

    PubMed

    1993-12-20

    The Federal Percentages and Federal Medical Assistance Percentages for Fiscal Year 1995 have been calculated pursuant to the Social Security Act (the Act). These percentages will be effective from October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. This notice announces the calculated "Federal percentages" and "Federal medical assistance percentages" that we will use in determining the amount of Federal matching in State welfare and medical expenditures. The table gives figures for each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands. Programs under title XIX of the Act exist in each jurisdiction; title IV-A programs in all jurisdictions except American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands; programs under titles I, X, and XIV operate only in Guam and the Virgin Islands; while a program under title XVI (AABD) operates only in Puerto Rico. The percentages in this notice apply to State expenditures for assistance payments and medical services (except family planning which is subject to a higher matching rate). The statute provides separately for Federal matching of administrative costs. Sections 1101(a)(8) and 1905(b) of the Act, as revised by section 9528 of Public Law 99-272, require the Secretary of Health and Human Services to publish these percentages each year. The Secretary is to figure the percentages, by formulas in sections 1101(a)(8) and 1905(b) of the Act, from the Department of Commerce's statistics of average income per person in each State and in the Nation as a whole.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Supplemental Security Income for the aged, blind, and disabled; income, resources and exclusions deeming of income and resources: Medicaid program; financial requirements for categorically needy--HHS. Final rules.

    PubMed

    1984-02-15

    The Social Security Administration (SSA) is adopting as final, interim regulations on deeming of income and resources, which was published on Friday, June 4, 1982. These rules address the problem of certain individuals who require costly medical care and who under the usual Supplemental Security Income (SSI) deeming rules are ineligible for SSI and Medicaid as long as they live with their families. These rules also address the problems of individuals who remain institutionalized because returning home for less costly medical treatment would result in loss of SSI and Medicaid eligibility. The rules provide that the Secretary, in appropriate circumstances, will not apply the usual SSI rules for deeming the income and resources of certain family members to a noninstitutionalized individual. This is a temporary policy that will deal with this concern while States, if they choose, develop appropriate programs of home and community-based services under their Medicaid programs.

  17. Federal financial participation in state assistance expenditures; federal matching shares for Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Medicaid, and aid to needy aged, blind, or disabled persons for October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992--HHS. Notice.

    PubMed

    1990-11-19

    The Federal Percentages and Federal Medical Assistance Percentages for Fiscal Year 1992 have been calculated pursuant to the Social Security Act (the Act). These percentages will be effective from October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. This notice announces the calculated "Federal percentages" and "Federal medical assistance percentages" that we will use in determining the amount of Federal matching in State welfare and medical expenditures. The table gives figures for each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands. Programs under title XIX of the Act exist in each jurisdiction; title IV-A programs in all jurisdictions except American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands; programs under titles I, X, and XIV operate only in Guam and the Virgin Islands; while a program under title XVI (AABD) operates only in Puerto Rico. The percentages in this notice apply to State expenditures for assistance payments and medical services (except family planning which is subject to a higher matching rate). The statute provides separately for Federal matching of administrative costs. Sections 1101(a)(8) and 1905(b) of the Act, as revised by section 9528 of Pub. L. 99-272, require the Secretary of Health and Human Services to publish these percentages each year. The Secretary is to figure the percentages, by formulas in sections 1101(a)(8), and 1905(b) of the Act, from the Department of Commerce's statistics of average income per person in each State and in the Nation as a whole. The percentages are within upper and lower limits given in those two sections of the Act.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Federal financial participation in state assistance expenditures; federal matching shares for aid to families with dependent children, Medicaid, and aid to needy aged, blind, or disabled persons for October 1, 1988 through September 30, 1989--HHS. Notice.

    PubMed

    1987-10-28

    The Federal Percentages and Federal Medical Assistance Percentages for Fiscal Year 1989 have been calculated pursuant to the Social Security Act (the Act). These percentages will be effective from October 1, 1988 through September 30, 1989. This notice announces the calculated "Federal percentages" and "Federal medical assistance percentages" that we will use in determining the amount of Federal matching in State welfare and medical expenditures. The table gives figures for each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands. Title XIX of the Act exists in each jurisdiction, title IV-A in all jurisdictions except American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands, titles I, X, and XIV operate only in Guam and the Virgin Islands, while title XVI (AABD) operates only in Puerto Rico. The percentages in this notice apply to State expenditures for assistance payments and medical services (except family planning which is subject to a higher matching rate). The statute provides separately for Federal matching of administrative costs. Sections (1101(a)(8) and 1905(b) of the Act, as revised by section 9528 of Pub. L. 99-272, require the Secretary of Health and Human Services to publish these percentages each year. The Secretary is to figure the percentages, by formulas in sections 1101(a)(8) and 1905(b) of the Act, from the Department of Commerce's statistics of average income per person in each State and in the Nation as a whole. The percentages are within upper and lower limits given in those two sections of the Act.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Federal financial participation in state assistance expenditures; federal matching shares for aid to needy aged, blind, or disabled persons for October 1, 1990 through September 30, 1991--HHS. Notice.

    PubMed

    1989-11-30

    The Federal Percentages and Federal Medical Assistance Percentages for Fiscal Year 1991 have been calculated pursuant to the Social Security Act (the Act). These percentages will be effective from October 1, 1990 through September 30, 1991. This notice announces the calculated "Federal percentages" and "Federal medical assistance percentages" that we will use in determining the amount of Federal matching in State welfare and medical expenditures. The table gives figures for each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands. Programs under title XIX of the Act exist in each jurisdiction; title IV-A programs in all jurisdictions except American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands; programs under titles I, X, and XIV operate only in Guam and the Virgin Islands; while a program under title XVI (AABD) operates only in Puerto Rico. The percentages in this notice apply to State expenditures for assistance payments and medical services (except family planning which is subject to a higher matching rate). The statute provides separately for Federal matching of administrative costs. Sections 1101(a)(8) and 1905(b) of the Act, as revised by section 9528 of Pub. L. 99-272, require the Secretary of Health and Human Services to publish these percentages each year. The secretary is to figure the percentages, by formulas in sections 1101(a)(8) and 1905(b) of the Act, from the Department of Commerce's statistics of average income per person in each State and in the Nation as a whole. The percentages are within upper and lower limits, given in those two sections of the Act.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions.

    PubMed

    Ferri, S; Pauwels, K; Rizzolatti, G; Orban, G A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors "stimulus type" (action, static control, and dynamic control), "stereopsis" (present, absent) and "viewpoint" (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  1. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, S.; Pauwels, K.; Rizzolatti, G.; Orban, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors “stimulus type” (action, static control, and dynamic control), “stereopsis” (present, absent) and “viewpoint” (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  2. Polyphenols and aging.

    PubMed

    Queen, Brannon L; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2010-02-01

    Age-associated changes within an individual are inherently complex and occur at multiple levels of organismal function. The overall decline in function of various tissues is known to play a key role in both aging and the complex etiology of certain age-associated diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Continuing research highlights the dynamic capacity of polyphenols to protect against age-associated disorders through a variety of important mechanisms. Numerous lines of evidence suggest that dietary polyphenols such as resveratrol, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and curcumin have the capacity to mitigate age-associated cellular damage induced via metabolic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, recently acquired evidence also demonstrates a likely role for these polyphenols as anticancer agents capable of preventing formation of new vasculature in neoplastic tissues. Polyphenols have also been shown to possess other anticancer properties such as specific cell-signaling actions that may stimulate the activity of the regulatory protein SIRT1. Additionally, polyphenolic compounds have demonstrated their inhibitory effects against chronic vascular inflammation associated with atherosclerosis. These increasingly well-documented results have begun to provide a basis for considering the use of polyphenols in the development of novel therapies for certain human diseases. And while the mechanisms by which these effects occur are yet to be fully understood, it is evident that further investigation may yield a potential use for polyphenols as pharmacological interventions against specific age-associated diseases.

  3. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  4. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  5. realfriends: A Student Social Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Zoost, Steven

    2012-01-01

    "realfriends" is a social action project created by Grade 12 English students in Windsor, Nova Scotia. Its purpose was to create a face-to-face social network that would help change the school climate into a more social space. Interest in socializing is nothing new for teenagers, but these students articulated a worry that people their age may be…

  6. The aging heart.

    PubMed

    Klausner, S C; Schwartz, A B

    1985-02-01

    Pathologic studies of the myocardium and valvular structures have failed to provide convincing evidence of gross or microscopic changes that can be ascribed to aging alone. Lipofuscin accumulation and basophilic degeneration in cardiac muscle cells appear to be the most consistent findings associated with aging, but they are found in other conditions. Without doubt, pathologic changes in the myocardium, valves, and coronary arteries are found more frequently in the hearts of elderly persons, but those changes are caused by disease processes associated with an aging population rather than the aging process itself. Both the sinus and atrioventricular nodes decrease in size with age owing to a loss of cellularity. These structures become infiltrated with collagen, elastic tissue, and reticular fibers. Some have found infiltration also with fat. Amyloid deposition, basophilic degeneration of cells, and lipofuscin accumulation occur but probably do not cause functional abnormalities. Similar but less dramatic changes occur in the bundle of His and individual bundle branches. Most of the data suggests that these aging changes are not due to vascular insufficiency. Age-related changes in intrinsic mechanical function have been identified as a prolongation of contraction duration, decreased inotropic responses to catecholamines and cardiac glycosides, and an increase in mechanical refractoriness. Other possible age-related changes include alterations in relaxation, which may or may not be independent of the prolongation of contraction, and changes in the viscoelastic properties of cardiac muscle. When examined in the context of the components of a model of excitation-contraction coupling, changes in action potential duration and the function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum emerge as the most likely bases for the changes. The electrical characteristics of sinus, atrioventricular, and His-Purkinje cells as well as atrial and ventricular muscle cells change with age. The sinus

  7. Who Needs Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginger, Ann Fagan

    1979-01-01

    Affirmative action and reverse discrimination are discussed. Facts that were omitted from the court record on the Bakke case are examined. The need for encouraging minority students and women to continue to press for school admission and for lawyers to continue to press affirmative action suits is stressed. (MC)

  8. Community-Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sarah; Mattern, Mark; Telin, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes an undergraduate course entitled Public Interest Research in which students learn research methods by conducting research on behalf of one or more community organizations. Students' work is conceived of as community action learning, a combination of participatory action research and service learning, emphasizing…

  9. Preferential Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Derrick A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the philosophical rationale for preferential affirmative action presented by Daniel C. Maguire in "A New American Justice." Maintains that self-interest bars present society's acceptance of Maguire's theories of justice, as demonstrated in negative reactions to the Harvard Law Review's affirmative action plan. (MJL)

  10. Action Learning in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Action learning was introduced into China less than 20 years ago, but has rapidly become a valuable tool for organizations seeking to solve problems, develop their leaders, and become learning organizations. This article provides an historical overview of action learning in China, its cultural underpinnings, and five case studies. It concludes…

  11. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  12. Renormalized action improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references.

  13. Action Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman-Peck, Lorraine; Murray, Jane

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between action research and policy and the kind of confidence teachers, policy makers and other potential users may have in such research. Many published teacher action research accounts are criticised on the grounds that they do not fully meet the conventional standards for reporting social scientific…

  14. ACTION. Annual Report 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    In this report are described projects and activities undertaken by ACTION's volunteer programs in 1974. After an introduction that notes accomplishments of the past year, a review of domestic operations discusses such programs as VISTA, University Year for ACTION, National Student Volunteer Program, Foster Grandparent Program, and others according…

  15. Aging Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on aging parents. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include adult children, dementia and Alzheimer's disease in the…

  16. Conscious Vision in Action.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Robert; Schwenkler, John

    2015-09-01

    It is natural to assume that the fine-grained and highly accurate spatial information present in visual experience is often used to guide our bodily actions. Yet this assumption has been challenged by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis (TVSH), according to which visuomotor programming is the responsibility of a "zombie" processing stream whose sources of bottom-up spatial information are entirely non-conscious (Clark, 2007, 2009; Goodale & Milner, 1992, 2004a; Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006, 2008). In many formulations of TVSH, the role of conscious vision in action is limited to "recognizing objects, selecting targets for action, and determining what kinds of action, broadly speaking, to perform" (Clark, 2007, p. 570). Our aim in this study is to show that the available evidence not only fails to support this dichotomous view but actually reveals a significant role for conscious vision in motor programming, especially for actions that require deliberate attention. PMID:25845648

  17. Following the Action in Action Learning: Towards Ethnomethodological Studies of (Critical) Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Action learning is a pedagogical practice that helps participants learn by talking about their workplace action with fellow participants ("comrades in adversity") in their action learning set. This paper raises questions about the action in action learning, such as: how do members of an action learning set learn from and through each other? How do…

  18. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  19. Goal anticipation during action observation is influenced by synonymous action capabilities, a puzzling developmental study.

    PubMed

    Gredebäck, Gustaf; Kochukhova, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Eighteen- and 25-month-old human toddlers' ability to manually solve a puzzle and their ability to anticipate the goal during observation of similar actions were investigated. Results demonstrate that goal anticipation during action observation is dependent on manual ability, both on a group level (only 25-month-olds solved the manual task and anticipated the goal during observation) and individually within the older age group (r (xy) = 0.53). These findings suggests a connection between manual ability and the ability to anticipate the goal of others' actions in toddlers, in accordance with the direct matching hypothesis. PMID:20041233

  20. Changes in the Body with Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... action, become more important as people age. Blood Production The amount of active bone marrow, where blood ... bone marrow is less able to increase its production of blood cells in response to the body’s ...

  1. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; program integrity: exchange, premium stabilization programs, and market standards; amendments to the HHS notice of benefit and payment parameters for 2014. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-10-30

    This final rule implements provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act). Specifically, this final rule outlines financial integrity and oversight standards with respect to Affordable Insurance Exchanges, qualified health plan (QHP) issuers in Federally-facilitated Exchanges (FFEs), and States with regard to the operation of risk adjustment and reinsurance programs. It also establishes additional standards for special enrollment periods, survey vendors that may conduct enrollee satisfaction surveys on behalf of QHP issuers, and issuer participation in an FFE, and makes certain amendments to definitions and standards related to the market reform rules. These standards, which include financial integrity provisions and protections against fraud and abuse, are consistent with Title I of the Affordable Care Act. This final rule also amends and adopts as final interim provisions set forth in the Amendments to the HHS Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2014 interim final rule, published in the Federal Register on March 11, 2013, related to risk corridors and cost-sharing reduction reconciliation.

  2. Controlling Asthma New Guidelines. New Medications. New Action Plans.

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. New Guidelines. New Medications. New Action Plans. People everywhere and in every age ... I am putting the finishing touches on my new studio album that we hope to have out ...

  3. Action-Based Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansky, Amy L.; Lum, Henry Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to domain representation and planning that is fundamentally different from traditional methods; an approach based strictly on actions and their interrelationships, rather than on state-based goals and preconditions. In particular, we focus on the action-based planner COLLAGE, describe its methods for plan-construction, and contrast them with more traditional approaches to planning. Experiences with COLLAGE in realistic domains have shown that the action-based approach is not only more natural to use, but can also be more cost-efficient than traditional planning methods.

  4. Conscious Control over Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges—challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown. PMID:26113753

  5. Vitamin D and aging.

    PubMed

    Tuohimaa, Pentti

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies using genetically modified mice, such as FGF23-/- and Klotho-/- mice that exhibit altered mineral homeostasis due to a high vitamin D activity showed features of premature aging that include retarded growth, osteoporosis, atherosclerosis, ectopic calcification, immunological deficiency, skin and general organ atrophy, hypogonadism and short lifespan. The phenotype reversed by normalizing vitamin D and/or mineral homeostasis. Thus, hypervitaminosis D due to an increased 1alpha-hydroxylase activity seems to be a cause of the premature aging. In several studies, we have described that a complete or partial lack of vitamin D action (VDR-/- mice and CYP27B1-/-) show almost similar phenotype as FGF23-/- or Klotho-/- mice. VDR mutant mice have growth retardation, osteoporosis, kyphosis, skin thickening and wrinkling, alopecia, ectopic calcification, progressive loss of hearing and balance as well as short lifespan. CYP27B1-/- mice do not show alopecia nor balance deficit, which might be apoVDR-dependent or calcidiol-dependent. The features are typical to premature aging. The phenotype is resistant to a normalization of the mineral homeostasis by a rescue diet containing high calcium and phosphate. Taken together, aging shows a U-shaped dependency on hormonal forms of vitamin D suggesting that there is an optimal concentration of vitamin D in delaying aging phenomena. Our recent study shows that calcidiol is an active hormone. Since serum calcidiol but not calcitriol is fluctuating in physiological situations, calcidiol might determine the biological output of vitamin D action. Due to its high serum concentration and better uptake of calcidiol-DBP by the target cells through the cubilin-megalin system, calcidiol seems to be an important circulating hormone. Therefore, serum calcidiol might be associated with an increased risk of aging-related chronic diseases more directly than calcitriol. Aging and cancer seem to be tightly associated phenomena

  6. Immunological Aging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunosenescence is associated with an increased incidence and severity of infections with common pathogens, neoplastic disease and autoimmunity. In general, aging is associated with a decline in function at the cellular level, rather than cell loss, although thymic atrophy and ...

  7. 41 CFR 101-8.708 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Affirmative action by... affirmative action to overcome the effects resulting in limited participation in the recipient's program or... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.708...

  8. 41 CFR 101-8.708 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Affirmative action by... affirmative action to overcome the effects resulting in limited participation in the recipient's program or... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.708...

  9. 41 CFR 101-8.708 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Affirmative action by... affirmative action to overcome the effects resulting in limited participation in the recipient's program or... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.708...

  10. 41 CFR 101-8.708 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Affirmative action by... affirmative action to overcome the effects resulting in limited participation in the recipient's program or... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.708...

  11. 41 CFR 101-8.708 - Affirmative action by recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Affirmative action by... affirmative action to overcome the effects resulting in limited participation in the recipient's program or... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.708...

  12. Children Show Heightened Memory for Threatening Social Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltazar, Nicole C.; Shutts, Kristin; Kinzler, Katherine D.

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments investigated whether a negativity bias in social perception extends to preschool-aged children's memory for the details of others' social actions and experiences. After learning about individuals who committed nice or mean social actions, children in Experiment 1 were more accurate at remembering who was mean compared with who…

  13. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Action Observation in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virji-Babul, Naznin; Moiseev, Alexander; Cheung, Teresa; Weeks, Daniel J.; Cheyne, Douglas; Ribary, Urs

    2010-01-01

    Results of a magnetoencephalography (MEG) brain imaging study conducted to examine the cortical responses during action execution and action observation in 10 healthy adults and 8 age-matched adults with Down syndrome are reported. During execution, the motor responses were strongly lateralized on the ipsilateral rather than the contralateral side…

  14. Immunization Action Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Handouts for Patients & Staff A-Z ... Index Supplies Checklist Administering Vaccines Temperature Logs Adult Vaccination Topics of Interest Documenting Vaccination Translations Parent Handouts ...

  15. Postpartum Depression Action Plan

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Postpartum Depression | Postpartum Depression Action Plan Patient __________________________ Physician/NP/PA __________________ Clinic ____________________________ Phone Number ____________________ Choose one area and add other areas as you begin to ...

  16. The Action Lawyers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubenow, Gerald C.

    1972-01-01

    A description of the Serrano vs. Priest class action suit in California, challenging the system of financing education through property taxes; author touches upon the possibilities for the courts becoming change agents in the struggle for social reform. (SP)

  17. Commitment to action. Population Action International.

    PubMed

    Squires, S

    1994-01-01

    The national chair of Population Action International (formerly the Population Crisis Committee), Robin Chandler Duke, is a crusader for women's reproductive rights. She was in Bangladesh in 1971 during its civil war. Soldiers would rape young Muslim women, and their families would reject them when they became pregnant. The head of the exiled government agreed to let physicians from IPPF perform abortions on these women, which allowed families to take them back. Opposition to the abortions arose, however. This experience in Bangladesh sparked Ms. Duke's interest in population control. Her years as the wife of a US diplomat granted her access to powerful people worldwide. Her predecessor, retired US Army General Bill Draper, called Ms. Duke from his death bed in 1974 to ask her to be national chair of PAI. She served as a delegate in various international meetings, e.g., the 1980 UNESCO meetings in Belgrade. Spain and Luxembourg honored her for her work of campaigning for women's reproductive rights. She believes that rapid population growth is the most significant problem in the world today. It exacerbates poverty, environmental destruction, and political instability. She believes that universal availability of high quality, voluntary family planning services, including safe abortion, is needed to save humanity from the vicious cycle. Since family planning, sex education, and abortion are the most personal and sensitive parts of people's lives, Population Action frames family planning in the context of basic health care. AIDS complicates the issue, because contraception is no longer limited to birth control. Even though the organization realizes that sexual abstinence is the best way to avoid AIDS, it tries to educate female teenagers not to let boys coerce them to have sex. If they do, have sex Population Action advocates condom use. Ms. Duke cites the family planning successes of Indonesia, Zimbabwe, and Thailand.

  18. Commitment to action. Population Action International.

    PubMed

    Squires, S

    1994-01-01

    The national chair of Population Action International (formerly the Population Crisis Committee), Robin Chandler Duke, is a crusader for women's reproductive rights. She was in Bangladesh in 1971 during its civil war. Soldiers would rape young Muslim women, and their families would reject them when they became pregnant. The head of the exiled government agreed to let physicians from IPPF perform abortions on these women, which allowed families to take them back. Opposition to the abortions arose, however. This experience in Bangladesh sparked Ms. Duke's interest in population control. Her years as the wife of a US diplomat granted her access to powerful people worldwide. Her predecessor, retired US Army General Bill Draper, called Ms. Duke from his death bed in 1974 to ask her to be national chair of PAI. She served as a delegate in various international meetings, e.g., the 1980 UNESCO meetings in Belgrade. Spain and Luxembourg honored her for her work of campaigning for women's reproductive rights. She believes that rapid population growth is the most significant problem in the world today. It exacerbates poverty, environmental destruction, and political instability. She believes that universal availability of high quality, voluntary family planning services, including safe abortion, is needed to save humanity from the vicious cycle. Since family planning, sex education, and abortion are the most personal and sensitive parts of people's lives, Population Action frames family planning in the context of basic health care. AIDS complicates the issue, because contraception is no longer limited to birth control. Even though the organization realizes that sexual abstinence is the best way to avoid AIDS, it tries to educate female teenagers not to let boys coerce them to have sex. If they do, have sex Population Action advocates condom use. Ms. Duke cites the family planning successes of Indonesia, Zimbabwe, and Thailand. PMID:12319083

  19. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  20. Pulling out the intentional structure of action: the relation between action processing and action production in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Sommerville, Jessica A.; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    Adults and children readily construct action representations organized with respect to an ultimate goal. These representations allow one to predict the consequences of action, interpret and describe actions, and categorize action sequences. In this paper, we explore the ontogeny of hierarchically organized action representations, and its relation to infants’ ability to produce similar sequences. To do so, we examine infants’ perception and performance of a means-end sequence: pulling a cloth to retrieve a toy. Using a visual habituation paradigm, we demonstrate that 12-month-old infants understand that the initial step of the cloth-pulling sequence is directed toward the ultimate goal of attaining the toy, and use their knowledge of the causal constraints of the sequence to make this goal attribution. Ten-month-olds, however, appear transitional with respect to this understanding: their ability to identify the goal of the cloth-pulling sequence is related to their own ability to planfully solve a similar sequence. These findings are consistent with a burgeoning body of literature suggesting an intimate link between action production and perception, and suggest that this link is in place by at least 10 months of age. PMID:15629472

  1. Action, agency and responsibility.

    PubMed

    Frith, Chris D

    2014-03-01

    In a series of experiments Marc Jeannerod revealed that we have very little awareness of the details and causes of our actions. We are, however, vividly aware of being in control of our actions and this gives us a sense of responsibility. These feelings arise, first, from intentional binding which creates a perception of agency, linking an intentional action to its outcome and, second, from the counterfactual reasoning that we could have chosen some other action. These feelings of responsibility play a critical role in creating social cohesion since they allow people to be held to account for deliberate antisocial behaviour. Jeannerod's studies also showed that we are unaware of how little we know about our actions and so are happy to make up stories about the nature and causes of our behaviour. These stories often do not correspond with the underlying cognitive and neural processes, but they can be changed through instructions and through discussion with others. Our experience of responsibility for action emerges during our upbringing through exposure to our culture. This creates consensus about the causes of behaviour, but not necessarily accuracy. PMID:24036357

  2. Action and representation of action during childhood and adolescence: a functional approach.

    PubMed

    Assaiante, C

    2012-01-01

    Our scientific activity is focused on the field of action and representation of action from various adaptative situations during the life span, including pathology and extreme environment such as microgravity. The early action/perception matching, subserving the motor simulation network, is probably a major milestone for the building of action and representation of action during the course of ontogenesis. We have developed a functional approach of motor development based on a gradual mastering of coordination, adaptation and anticipation in postural control in the course of ontogenesis from babies to adolescents. This functional approach is recently associated with studies of brain structures involved in action and representation of action in children and adolescents with typical or atypical neurodevelopment. From our developmental studies, it was possible to put in light two turning points during motor development, such as 6/7 years of age and adolescence. The first step for children consists in building a repertoire of postural strategies. The second step consists in learning to select postural strategy depending on the characteristics of the task and the environmental requirements. An appropriate selection means to anticipate the consequence of the movement in order to maintain balance control and efficiency of the task. Taking into account the complexity of the parameters to control and the late maturation of anticipation and representation of action, it is not surprising that the development of postural control continues up to late periods during childhood and adolescence. PMID:22200341

  3. Age Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    The ages of rocks from the lunar highlands vary widely, even for a single rock sample. This makes it difficult to quantitatively test ideas for early lunar differentiation and formation of the crust. Lars Borg and Amy Gaffney (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), and Charles Shearer (University of New Mexico) have devised a set of guidelines to apply to geochronological data that leads to a relative ranking of the reliability of the age determined for a sample. Applying their guidelines to existing data for lunar highland rocks shows an upper limit on rock ages between 4340 and 4370 million years. This is essentially the same as the so-called model ages of the formation of KREEP (a chemical component enriched in potassium, rare earth elements, and phosphorous) and of the formation of the deep source regions that melted to produce mare basalts. The numerous ages close to 4370 million years suggests a complicated and protracted cooling of the primordial lunar magma ocean or a widespread vigorous period of magmatic activity in the Moon.

  4. Teen-Age Pregnancy: The Case for National Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattleton, Faye

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the national impact of adolescent pregnancy with emphasis on the Black community. Criticizes the mass media for exploiting sexual behavior. Proposes a national agenda incorporating comprehensive sex education, family planning services, and educational, economic, and social opportunities. (FMW)

  5. Martian ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neukum, G.; Hiller, K.

    1981-01-01

    Four discussions are conducted: (1) the methodology of relative age determination by impact crater statistics, (2) a comparison of proposed Martian impact chronologies for the determination of absolute ages from crater frequencies, (3) a report on work dating Martian volcanoes and erosional features by impact crater statistics, and (4) an attempt to understand the main features of Martian history through a synthesis of crater frequency data. Two cratering chronology models are presented and used for inference of absolute ages from crater frequency data, and it is shown that the interpretation of all data available and tractable by the methodology presented leads to a global Martian geological history that is characterized by two epochs of activity. It is concluded that Mars is an ancient planet with respect to its surface features.

  6. Martian ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, G.; Hiller, K.

    1981-04-01

    Four discussions are conducted: (1) the methodology of relative age determination by impact crater statistics, (2) a comparison of proposed Martian impact chronologies for the determination of absolute ages from crater frequencies, (3) a report on work dating Martian volcanoes and erosional features by impact crater statistics, and (4) an attempt to understand the main features of Martian history through a synthesis of crater frequency data. Two cratering chronology models are presented and used for inference of absolute ages from crater frequency data, and it is shown that the interpretation of all data available and tractable by the methodology presented leads to a global Martian geological history that is characterized by two epochs of activity. It is concluded that Mars is an ancient planet with respect to its surface features.

  7. Plutonium aging

    SciTech Connect

    Olivas, J.D.

    1999-03-01

    The author describes the plutonium aging program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The aging of plutonium components in the US nuclear weapons stockpile has become a concern due to several events: the end of the cold war, the cessation of full scale underground nuclear testing as a result of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the closure of the Rocky Flats Plant--the site where the plutonium components were manufactured. As a result, service lifetimes for nuclear weapons have been lengthened. Dr. Olivas will present a brief primer on the metallurgy of plutonium, and will then describe the technical approach to ascertaining the long-term changes that may be attributable to self-radiation damage. Facilities and experimental techniques which are in use to study aging will be described. Some preliminary results will also be presented.

  8. Understanding aging.

    PubMed

    Strehler, B L

    2000-01-01

    Enormous advances in our understanding of human aging have occurred during the last 50 yr. From the late 19th to the mid-20th centuries only four comprehensive and important sources of information were available: 1. August Weismann's book entitled Essays on Heredity and Kindred Biological Problems (the first of these essays dealt with The Duration of Life; 1). Weissmann states (p. 10) "In the first place in regulating the length of life, the advantage to the species, and not to the individual, is alone of any importance. This must be obvious to any one who has once thoroughly thought out the process of natural selection_". 2. A highly systematized second early source of information on aging was the collection of essays edited by Cowdry and published in 1938. This 900+ page volume contains 34 chapters and was appropriately called Problems of Aging. 3. At about the same time Raymond Pearl published his book on aging (2). Pearl believed that aging was the indirect result of cell specialization and that only the germ line was resistant to aging. Unfortunately Pearl died in the late 1930s and is largely remembered now for having been the founding editor of Quarterly Review of Biology while he was at the Johns Hopkins University, this author's alma mater. 4. Alexis Carrel wrote a monumental scientific and philosophical book, Man, the Unknown (3). Carrel believed that he had demonstrated that vertebrate cells could be kept in culture and live indefinitely, a conclusion challenged by others (more on this later). PMID:22351262

  9. Obesity in the ageing man.

    PubMed

    Michalakis, K; Goulis, D G; Vazaiou, A; Mintziori, G; Polymeris, A; Abrahamian-Michalakis, A

    2013-10-01

    As the population is ageing globally, both ageing and obesity are recognized as major public health challenges. The aim of this narrative review is to present and discuss the current evidence on the changes in body composition, energy balance and endocrine environment that occur in the ageing man. Obesity in the ageing man is related to changes in both body weight and composition due to alterations in energy intake and total energy expenditure. In addition, somatopenia (decreased GH secretion), late-onset hypogonadism (LOH), changes in thyroid and adrenal function, as well as changes in appetite-related peptides (leptin, ghrelin) and, most importantly, insulin action are related to obesity, abnormal energy balance, redistribution of the adipose tissue and sarcopenia (decreased muscle mass). A better understanding of the complex relationship of ageing-related endocrine changes and obesity could lead to more effective interventions for elderly men.

  10. COGNITION, ACTION, AND OBJECT MANIPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Weigelt, Matthias; Weiss, Daniel J.; van der Wel, Robrecht

    2012-01-01

    Although psychology is the science of mental life and behavior, it has paid little attention to the means by which mental life is translated into behavior. One domain where links between cognition and action have been explored is the manipulation of objects. This article reviews psychological research on this topic, with special emphasis on the tendency to grasp objects differently depending on what one plans to do with the objects. Such differential grasping has been demonstrated in a wide range of object manipulation tasks, including grasping an object in a way that reveals anticipation of the object's future orientation, height, and required placement precision. Differential grasping has also been demonstrated in a wide range of behaviors, including one-hand grasps, two-hand grasps, walking, and transferring objects from place to place as well as from person to person. The populations in whom the tendency has been shown are also diverse, including nonhuman primates as well as human adults, children, and babies. Meanwhile, the tendency is compromised in a variety of clinical populations and in children of a surprisingly advanced age. Verbal working memory is compromised as well if words are memorized while object manipulation tasks are performed; the recency portion of the serial position curve is reduced in this circumstance. In general, the research reviewed here points to rich connections between cognition and action as revealed through the study of object manipulation. Other implications concern affordances, Donders' Law, and naturalistic observation and the teaching of psychology. PMID:22448912

  11. Cognition, action, and object manipulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, David A; Chapman, Kate M; Weigelt, Matthias; Weiss, Daniel J; van der Wel, Robrecht

    2012-09-01

    Although psychology is the science of mental life and behavior, little attention has been paid to the means by which mental life is translated into behavior. One domain in which links between cognition and action have been explored is the manipulation of objects. This article reviews psychological research on this topic, with special emphasis on the tendency to grasp objects differently depending on what one plans to do with the objects. Such differential grasping has been demonstrated in a wide range of object manipulation tasks, including grasping an object in a way that reveals anticipation of the object's future orientation, height, and required placement precision. Differential grasping has also been demonstrated in a wide range of behaviors, including 1-hand grasps, 2-hand grasps, walking, and transferring objects from place to place as well as from person to person. The populations in which the tendency has been shown are also diverse, including nonhuman primates as well as human adults, children, and babies. The tendency is compromised in a variety of clinical populations and in children of a surprisingly advanced age. Verbal working memory is compromised as well if words are memorized while object manipulation tasks are performed; the recency portion of the serial position curve is reduced in this circumstance. In general, the research reviewed here points to rich connections between cognition and action as revealed through the study of object manipulation. Other implications concern affordances, Donders' law, naturalistic observation, and the teaching of psychology.

  12. Normative data and naming times for action pictures.

    PubMed

    Cuetos, Fernando; Alija, Maira

    2003-02-01

    The present article provides Spanish norms for name agreement, printed word frequency, word compound frequency, familiarity, imageability, visual complexity, age of acquisition, and word length (measured by syllables and phonemes) for 100 line drawings of actions taken from Druks and Masterson (2000). In addition, through a naming-time experiment carried out with a group of 54 Spanish students in a pool of 63 of these line drawings, we determined the best predictors of naming actions. In the multiple regression analysis, age of acquisition and name agreement emerged as the most important determinants of action-naming reaction time.

  13. ES H action plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains planned actions to correct the deficiencies identified in the Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA), January 1991, of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL -- Albuquerque, New Mexico; Tonopah, Nevada; and Kauai, Hawaii). The Self-Assessment was conducted by a Self-Assessment Working Group consisting of 19 department managers, with support from Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) professionals, from October through December 1990. Findings from other past audits, dating back to 1985, were reviewed and compared with the PTTSA findings to determine if additional findings, key findings, or root causes were warranted. The resulting ES H Action Plan and individual planned actions were prepared by the ES H Action Plan Project Group with assistance from the Program owners/authors during February and March 1991. The plan was reviewed by SNL Management in April 1991. This document serves as a planning instrument for the Laboratories to aid in the scoping and sizing of activities related to ES H compliance for the coming five years. It will be modified as required to ensure a workload/funding balance and to address the findings resulting from the Tiger Team assessment at SNL, Albuquerque. The process of producing this document has served well to prepare SNL, Albuquerque, for the coming task of producing the required post-Tiger Team action plan document. 8 tabs.

  14. Aging Secret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The canny world of advertising has caught on to the free radical theory of aging, marketing a whole array of antioxidants for preventing anything from wrinkles to dry hair to reducing the risk of heart disease--promising to help slow the hands of time. Working with genetically engineered mice--to produce a natural antioxidant enzyme called…

  15. Gay Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2009-01-01

    The oldest of the baby boomers (boomers) were age 63 in 2009 and on the verge of retirement. This cohort has had a history of making societal changes throughout its life cycle, and it is unlikely that retirement, as we know it, will remain unscathed. This article highlights two events--the Stonewall Inn riots and two prominent professional…

  16. Genotype × age interaction in human transcriptional ageing

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Jack W.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Charlesworth, Jac C.; Drigalenko, Eugene; Diego, Vincent P.; Curran, Joanne E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Cole, Shelley A.; Jowett, Jeremy B. M.; Mahaney, Michael C.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Almasy, Laura; Moses, Eric K.; Blangero, John; Williams-Blangero, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in biological ageing (i.e., the rate of physiological response to the passage of time) may be due in part to genotype-specific variation in gene action. However, the sources of heritable variation in human age-related gene expression profiles are largely unknown. We have profiled genome-wide expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,240 individuals in large families and found 4,472 human autosomal transcripts, representing ~4,349 genes, significantly correlated with age. We identified 623 transcripts that show genotype by age interaction in addition to a main effect of age, defining a large set of novel candidates for characterization of the mechanisms of differential biological ageing. We applied a novel SNP genotype×age interaction test to one of these candidates, the ubiquilin-like gene UBQLNL, and found evidence of joint cis-association and genotype by age interaction as well as trans-genotype by age interaction for UBQLNL expression. Both UBQLNL expression levels at recruitment and cis genotype are associated with longitudinal cancer risk in our study cohort. PMID:22871458

  17. Learning to take actions

    SciTech Connect

    Khardon, R.

    1996-12-31

    We formalize a model for supervised learning of action strategies in dynamic stochastic domains, and show that pac-learning results on Occam algorithms hold in this model as well. We then identify a particularly useful bias for action strategies based on production rule systems. We show that a subset of production rule systems, including rules in predicate calculus style, small hidden state, and unobserved support predicates, is properly learnable. The bias we introduce enables the learning algorithm to invent the recursive support predicates which are used in the action strategy, and to reconstruct the internal state of the strategy. It is also shown that hierarchical strategies are learnable if a helpful teacher is available, but that otherwise the problem is computationally hard.

  18. The shape of action.

    PubMed

    Hard, Bridgette Martin; Recchia, Gabriel; Tversky, Barbara

    2011-11-01

    How do people understand the everyday, yet intricate, behaviors that unfold around them? In the present research, we explored this by presenting viewers with self-paced slideshows of everyday activities and recording looking times, subjective segmentation (breakpoints) into action units, and slide-to-slide physical change. A detailed comparison of the joint time courses of these variables showed that looking time and physical change were locally maximal at breakpoints and greater for higher level action units than for lower level units. Even when slideshows were scrambled, breakpoints were regarded longer and were more physically different from ordinary moments, showing that breakpoints are distinct even out of context. Breakpoints are bridges: from one action to another, from one level to another, and from perception to conception.

  19. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  20. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  1. 45 CFR 1156.7 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination... AGE Standards for Determining Discriminatory Practices § 1156.7 Exceptions to the rules against age... to take an action otherwise prohibited by § 1156.6 if the action reasonably takes into account age...

  2. 45 CFR 1156.7 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination... AGE Standards for Determining Discriminatory Practices § 1156.7 Exceptions to the rules against age... to take an action otherwise prohibited by § 1156.6 if the action reasonably takes into account age...

  3. 45 CFR 1156.7 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination... AGE Standards for Determining Discriminatory Practices § 1156.7 Exceptions to the rules against age... to take an action otherwise prohibited by § 1156.6 if the action reasonably takes into account age...

  4. American Education: Implications from the Information Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, William E.

    This paper considers the needs of future educational systems in an age of information. Characteristics of such systems are described and analyzed. An information age educational system would stress the big picture, be experimental, emphasize skills and tools of thought and action and extend throughout life. It would have alternative delivery…

  5. Aging & Health.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    By 2050 an estimated 83.7 million Americans will be ages sixty-five and older, up from 40.3 million in 2010. The shock wave of aging Americans will have profound implications for older people, their families, health care providers, and the economy. Researchers, policy makers, health care leaders, and others are designing responses to the challenges these actuarial shifts will create. For example, delivering health care at home could help keep more older Americans out of costly emergency departments and nursing homes. But such steps require more health care providers, a broader distribution of providers than currently exists, and better use of the resources we have. PMID:27605632

  6. The Effect of Action Experience on Sensorimotor EEG Rhythms during Action Observation

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Lorna C.; Marshall, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    A recent line of inquiry has examined how an observer’s experience with action changes the neural processing of similar actions when they are subsequently observed. The current study used electroencephalography (EEG) to test the hypothesis that giving participants different types and amounts of experience with specific objects would lead to differential patterns of sensorimotor rhythms during the observation of similar actions on those objects. While EEG was recorded, three groups of participants (n = 20 in each group; mean age = 22.0 years, SD = 2.7) watched video clips of an actor reaching, grasping, and lifting two objects. Participants then received information about differences in weight between the two objects. One group gained this information through extended sensorimotor experience with the objects, a second group received much briefer sensorimotor experience with the objects, and the third group read written information about the objects’ weights. Participants then viewed the action sequences again. For participants who had sensorimotor experience with the objects, the EEG response to viewing the actions was differentially sensitive to the anticipated weight of the objects. We conclude that this sensitivity was based on the participant’s prior sensorimotor experience with the objects. The participants who only received semantic information about the objects showed no such effects. The primary conclusion is that even brief experience with actions affects sensorimotor cortex activity during the subsequent observation of similar actions. PMID:24568874

  7. Hope for Environmental Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischer, Barbara J.; DeMoor, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Environmental consciousness-raising programs tend to emphasize the magnitude of imminent ecological disasters, if humans continue on their current trajectory. While these environmental literacy programs also call for action to avoid cataclysmic ecological changes, psychological research on "learned helplessness" suggests that information…

  8. Affirmative Action Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    In order to develop an affirmative action plan at Triton College, the college President appointed a committee made up of nine representatives from the various college constituencies, the majority of which were women and minorities, to determine the objectives to be achieved and how to implement them, and to establish appropriate review procedures.…

  9. Affirmative Action for Men?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malveaux, Julianne

    2005-01-01

    If colleges are willing to consider "social engineering" and affirmative action to ensure the inclusion of White men, are they willing to do so for African Americans and other people of color? Will the Center for Individual Rights ride to the rescue of the White women who may be unfairly nudged out of positions for which they are "qualified" in…

  10. Jump into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Cohen, Ann; Meyer, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Jump Into Action (JIA) is a school-based team-taught program to help fifth-grade students make healthy food choices and be more active. The JIA team (physical education teacher, classroom teacher, school nurse, and parent) work together to provide a supportive environment as students set goals to improve food choices and increase activity.…

  11. From Awareness to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micklos, John, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    What inspires young people to become activists? Events such as wars or regime changes obviously raise high emotions. But some choose to get involved because they saw a need and felt compelled to take action. Young Americans have a long track record as activists. Among other things, they played a key role in the civil rights movement of the 1950s…

  12. Action for Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranly, Donald P.

    The origins, development, and effectiveness of Action for Children's Television (ACT) are examined in this pamphlet. The strategies used by ACT to obtain change at the congressional level and within television stations and networks include the following: a "tuneout" day when people are urged to turn off their television sets, a boycott of certain…

  13. Literacy Education Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clymer, Carol

    The Literacy Education Action (LEA) program was established in the fall of 1985 under the initiative of the president of the El Paso Community College (Texas). During 1985 and 1986, LEA concentrated on developing its own literacy tutoring program, including recruiting and training volunteers and community members with reading skills below the…

  14. Cognitive framing in action.

    PubMed

    Huhn, John M; Potts, Cory Adam; Rosenbaum, David A

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive framing effects have been widely reported in higher-level decision-making and have been ascribed to rules of thumb for quick thinking. No such demonstrations have been reported for physical action, as far as we know, but they would be expected if cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. To test for such effects, we asked participants to reach for a horizontally-oriented pipe to move it from one height to another while turning the pipe 180° to bring one end (the "business end") to a target on the left or right. From a physical perspective, participants could have always rotated the pipe in the same angular direction no matter which end was the business end; a given participant could have always turned the pipe clockwise or counter-clockwise. Instead, our participants turned the business end counter-clockwise for left targets and clockwise for right targets. Thus, the way the identical physical task was framed altered the way it was performed. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. A tantalizing possibility is that higher-level decision heuristics have roots in the control of physical action, a hypothesis that accords with embodied views of cognition. PMID:26970853

  15. Nutrition Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sockut, Joanne; Stumpe, Stephanie

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, these instructional materials integrate elementary school-level nutrition education into other disciplines--biology, sociology, physiology, mathematics, and art. Contents include four units consisting of twelve activities. Unit 1, Why You Need Food, is a self-examination of what is needed for growth, health,…

  16. Economics Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, this learning package introduces intermediate grade students to basic economic concepts. The fourteen activities include the topics of consumption (4 activities), production (5), the market system (3), a pretest, and a posttest. Specific titles under consumption include The Wonderful Treasure Tree (introduction…

  17. SYRACUSE ACTION FOR YOUTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ADDINGTON, HAROLD E.; AND OTHERS

    A PROPOSAL WAS MADE TO PREVENT AND CONTROL JUVENILE DELINQUENCY BY OPENING OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPING COMPETENCE AMONG DISADVANTAGED YOUTH. THE TOTAL COMMUNITY WAS MOBILIZED TO DEVELOP A PROGRAM TO ATTACK THE PROBLEM AT ALL LEVELS THEY WORKED FOR 18 MONTHS TO PLAN A SERIES OF CREATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS IN EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, AND COMMUNITY…

  18. From Intuition to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of principals intuitively believe that the arts belong in schools and in every child's life. Now is the time to take action on your intuition--and become an instructional leader for the arts, just as you are for every core subject. Arts-engaged principals share strategies for becoming instructional leaders for the arts.

  19. Instructional Rounds in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, John E.

    2012-01-01

    "Instructional Rounds in Action" is an invaluable guide for those involved in implementing instructional rounds as the foundation and framework for systemic improvement in schools. Over the past few years, districts across the United States, Canada, and Australia have begun implementing "instructional rounds," a set of ideas and practices for…

  20. Action Research in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Action research places a powerful tool for school improvement in the hands of teachers. By highlighting the outcomes that are possible and presenting clear steps in the research process, this book is one to encourage anyone who is seeking to implement evidence-based school improvement. Eileen Piggot-Irvine uses her Problem Resolving Action…

  1. The Shape of Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hard, Bridgette Martin; Recchia, Gabriel; Tversky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How do people understand the everyday, yet intricate, behaviors that unfold around them? In the present research, we explored this by presenting viewers with self-paced slideshows of everyday activities and recording looking times, subjective segmentation (breakpoints) into action units, and slide-to-slide physical change. A detailed comparison of…

  2. School Reform in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, A. Christine

    This study describes and analyzes the impact on student learning and the learning environment of 55 schools in Broward, Palm Beach, and Miami-Dade school districts as they implemented the schoolwide action-research framework for school improvement. Interviews, observations, document review during site visits, school framework reports, surveys,…

  3. Justifying Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helskog, Guro Hansen

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I use a general philosophy of science perspective in looking at the problem of justifying action research. First I try to clarify the concept of justification, by contrasting it with the concept of validity, which seems to be used almost as a synonym in some parts of the literature. I discuss the need for taking a stand in relation…

  4. Promoting Environmental Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowyer, John

    1994-01-01

    Outlines a lesson on the extinction process allowing students to better understand why and how species become endangered before they attempt to take action on this problem. Provides background information and describes several suggested methodologies, evaluation and enrichment ideas, six resources, and two references. (LZ)

  5. College Comedy and Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rosanna

    1977-01-01

    A few materials such as yarn and scraps of paper and cloth can provide the media for recording limitless ideas from the imaginations of students. With a little encouragement and a few suggestions of actions, emotions, exaggerations and activities students will produce a vast array of amusing characters. (Author)

  6. The Constitution in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the experiences middle school students on a field trip to the new Constitution in Action Learning Lab in the Boeing Learning Center at the National Archives can expect. There, middle school students take on the roles of archivists and researchers collecting and analyzing primary sources from the holdings of…

  7. Literacy Portfolios in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia, Sheila W.

    Intended for new and experienced teachers in grades K-8, this book takes readers through a process of thinking about how to put portfolios into action. The book models a process for making decisions about the type of portfolio, what to place in it, how to structure the interactions with it, and how to use it to evaluate student progress and report…

  8. Sustainability as Moral Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Merrily S.; Hart-Steffes, Jeanne S.

    2012-01-01

    When one considers sustainability as a moral action, there are equally complex realities at hand--climate change, resource depletion, water and land rights. One author describes this broad sense of sustainability as "the connection of specific social and environmental problems to the functioning of human and ecological systems" (Jenkins, 2011).…

  9. Programs for Urban Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Board of Young Men's Christian Associations, New York, NY.

    This booklet contains descriptions of 150 urban action programs being conducted by Young Men's Christian Associations throughout the United States. Planning principles are included to assist those who wish to adapt the programs to local situations: involvement of people in planning; use of local indigenous leadership; planning in collaboration…

  10. Affirmative Action Fallout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Race-conscious affirmative action in higher education survived a close challenge in 2003 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that race was a valid academic admission criteria in the "Grutter v. Bollinger" case. Two years later, a number of "pipeline" programs to help under-represented minorities gain admission to and complete graduate school have…

  11. Action Learning Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on adult learning issues and human resource development (HRD). "Creating a Systemic Framework for the Transfer of Learning from an Action Learning Experience" (Suzanne D. Butterfield, Kitty Gold, Verna J. Willis) discusses a study of the organizational elements that affect learning and transfer…

  12. Conjugate flow action functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-15

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  13. Angels in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of the placement of action lines to show the direction of movement. The author shows some visuals of angels and discusses in details the texture of the wings, the hair and the clothing.

  14. Holography in action

    SciTech Connect

    Kolekar, Sanved; Padmanabhan, T.

    2010-07-15

    The Einstein-Hilbert action and its natural generalizations to higher dimensions (like the Lanczos-Lovelock action) have certain peculiar features. All of them can be separated into a bulk and a surface term, with a specific (''holographic'') relationship between the two, so that either term can be used to extract information about the other. Further, the surface term leads to entropy of the horizons on shell. It has been argued in the past that these features are impossible to understand in the conventional approach but find a natural explanation if we consider gravity as an emergent phenomenon. We provide further support for this point of view in this paper. We describe an alternative decomposition of the Einstein-Hilbert action and the Lanczos-Lovelock action into a new pair of surface and bulk terms, such that the surface term becomes the Wald entropy on a horizon and the bulk term is the energy density (which is the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner Hamiltonian density for Einstein gravity). We show that this new pair also obeys a holographic relationship, and we give a thermodynamic interpretation of this relation in this context. Since the bulk and surface terms, in this decomposition, are related to the energy and entropy, the holographic condition can be thought of as analogous to inverting the expression for entropy given as a function of energy S=S(E,V) to obtain the energy E=E(S,V) in terms of the entropy in a normal thermodynamic system. Thus the holographic nature of the action allows us to relate the descriptions of the same system in terms of two different thermodynamic potentials. Some further possible generalizations and implications are discussed.

  15. Office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy

    MedlinePlus

    ... HHS/ASPE began a 2-year effort to design, develop, and pilot a national reporting system based on data from state adult protective services (APS) agency information systems. The project was funded by Prevention and ...

  16. "Aging bull'.

    PubMed

    Geelhoed, G W

    1996-12-01

    An old bull, it is said by those who know, can have his troubles. Included among these are vertebral osteosclerosis and ankylosing spondylosis; this stiffening up limits, rather than accentuates, the value and reproductive potential of a stud bull past his prime. Associated with these abnormalities, however-and not seen in age-matched cows of comparable breeds-are fascinating endocrine neoplasms suggestive of a pattern that could be productive as a model of human hereditary endocrine abnormalities. Adjacent to the thyroid gland in other vertebrates are ultimobranchial bodies that are incorporated into the lateral thyroid lobes in primates as the parafollicular "C cells' of the thyroid. These are the cells in man that give rise to medullary thyroid cancer and are associated with calcitonin secretion, useful as a tumor marker. In aging bulls of whatever breed, nearly half exhibit abnormality of these ultimobranchial bodies: 20% show hyperplasia, and 30% have frank neoplasia. These ultimobranchial tumors appear in bulls passing 6 1/2 years in age, and are absent in young bulls and all cows of any age. Calcitonin can be demonstrated in the ultimobranchial tumors from bulls, and secretion is stimulated by calcium infusion, though serum calcium remains normal. The ultimobranchial tumors themselves can range from hyperplasia through adenoma to metastasizing carcinoma-in fact, representing one of the commoner cattle cancers. Parathyroid glands taken from bulls with these ultimobranchial tumors initially show evidence of inhibited secretory activity and morphologic atrophy, but later go on to develop hyperplasia and, eventually, autonomy. Cattle forage on calcium-rich diets. Bulls appear to respond to this calcium excess from the positive balance, but breeding cows have the unique calcium deficits of the high net loss of calcium through lactation and the large requirements of calcifying a fetal skeleton. Chronic stimulation of the APUD-derived ultimobranchial bodies by high

  17. Making Tracks 1.0: Action Researching an Active Transportation Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Daniel; Foran, Andrew; Robinson, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the first cycle of an action research project. The objective of this action research was to examine the implementation of a school-based active transportation education program (Making Tracks). A two-cycle action research design was employed in which elementary school students' (ages 7-9), middle school…

  18. 10 CFR 1040.88 - Remedial and affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. 1040.88... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 1040.88 Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. (a... take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions that resulted in limited participation...

  19. 10 CFR 1040.88 - Remedial and affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. 1040.88... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 1040.88 Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. (a... take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions that resulted in limited participation...

  20. 10 CFR 1040.88 - Remedial and affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. 1040.88... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 1040.88 Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. (a... take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions that resulted in limited participation...

  1. 10 CFR 1040.88 - Remedial and affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. 1040.88... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 1040.88 Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. (a... take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions that resulted in limited participation...

  2. 10 CFR 1040.88 - Remedial and affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. 1040.88... Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 1040.88 Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. (a... take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions that resulted in limited participation...

  3. A Metadata Action Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Clancy, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The data management problem comprises data processing and data tracking. Data processing is the creation of new data based on existing data sources. Data tracking consists of storing metadata descriptions of available data. This paper addresses the data management problem by casting it as an AI planning problem. Actions are data-processing commands, plans are dataflow programs and goals are metadata descriptions of desired data products. Data manipulation is simply plan generation and execution, and a key component of data tracking is inferring the effects of an observed plan. We introduce a new action language for data management domains, called ADILM. We discuss the connection between data processing and information integration and show how a language for the latter must be modified to support the former. The paper also discusses information gathering within a data-processing framework, and show how ADILM metadata expressions are a generalization of Local Completeness.

  4. Action Planning in Typically and Atypically Developing Children (Unilateral Cerebral Palsy)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craje, Celine; Aarts, Pauline; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria; Steenbergen, Bert

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the development of action planning in children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP, aged 3-6 years, n = 24) and an age matched control group. To investigate action planning, participants performed a sequential movement task. They had to grasp an object (a wooden play sword) and place the sword in a hole in a…

  5. Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This movie produced with Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 microscope shows the growth of a hole and the atomic edge reconstruction in a graphene sheet. An electron beam focused to a spot on the sheet blows out the exposed carbon atoms to make the hole. The carbon atoms then reposition themselves to find a stable configuration. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  6. Finding minimal action sequences with a simple evaluation of actions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashvin; Gurney, Kevin N.

    2014-01-01

    Animals are able to discover the minimal number of actions that achieves an outcome (the minimal action sequence). In most accounts of this, actions are associated with a measure of behavior that is higher for actions that lead to the outcome with a shorter action sequence, and learning mechanisms find the actions associated with the highest measure. In this sense, previous accounts focus on more than the simple binary signal of “was the outcome achieved?”; they focus on “how well was the outcome achieved?” However, such mechanisms may not govern all types of behavioral development. In particular, in the process of action discovery (Redgrave and Gurney, 2006), actions are reinforced if they simply lead to a salient outcome because biological reinforcement signals occur too quickly to evaluate the consequences of an action beyond an indication of the outcome's occurrence. Thus, action discovery mechanisms focus on the simple evaluation of “was the outcome achieved?” and not “how well was the outcome achieved?” Notwithstanding this impoverishment of information, can the process of action discovery find the minimal action sequence? We address this question by implementing computational mechanisms, referred to in this paper as no-cost learning rules, in which each action that leads to the outcome is associated with the same measure of behavior. No-cost rules focus on “was the outcome achieved?” and are consistent with action discovery. No-cost rules discover the minimal action sequence in simulated tasks and execute it for a substantial amount of time. Extensive training, however, results in extraneous actions, suggesting that a separate process (which has been proposed in action discovery) must attenuate learning if no-cost rules participate in behavioral development. We describe how no-cost rules develop behavior, what happens when attenuation is disrupted, and relate the new mechanisms to wider computational and biological context. PMID:25506326

  7. Archetypes as action patterns.

    PubMed

    Hogenson, George B

    2009-06-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons by researchers at the University of Parma promises to radically alter our understanding of fundamental cognitive and affective states. This paper explores the relationship of mirror neurons to Jung's theory of archetypes and proposes that archetypes may be viewed as elementary action patterns. The paper begins with a review of a proposed interpretation of the fainting spells of S. Freud in his relationship with Jung as an example of an action pattern that also defines an archetypal image. The challenge that mirror neurons present to traditional views in analytical psychology and psychoanalysis, however, is that they operate without recourse to a cognitive processing element. This is a position that is gaining increasing acceptance in other fields as well. The paper therefore reviews the most recent claims made by the Boston Process of Change Study Group as well as conclusions drawn from dynamic systems views of development and theoretical robotics to underline the conclusion that unconscious agency is not a requirement for coherent action. It concludes with the suggestion that this entire body of research may lead to the conclusion that the dynamic unconscious is an unnecessary hypothesis in psychoanalysis and analytical psychology.

  8. Platform for Action: update.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Women's Global Leadership (CWGL) has collaborated in the preparation of amendments and strategies designed to withstand the challenges being posed to the Platform for Action of the Fourth World Conference on Women. Specific challenges include the inappropriate use of the word "universal" to modify "human rights." This implies that some human rights are less than universal. The strategy proposed is to accept the use of the word "universal" in this context only when it affirms principles of universality contained in the Vienna Programme of Action and not where its use would restrict the rights to which women are entitled. A second concern is over the use of the word "equity" rather than "equality" when referring to gender relations. The use of these terms will be carefully monitored to insure that "equity" not be used to undermine the principle of gender equality. The third concern is the efforts of some governments to hinder the integration of women's human rights throughout the UN system. Such efforts will be opposed. Fourth, the CWGL will seek the inclusion of language which recognizes the barriers that different groups of women face when trying to secure their rights. Finally, the CWGL will propose inclusion of language recognizing and protecting sexual orientation rights. The CWGL is also going to work to translate the abstract language of the Platform for Action into political organizing potential to insure that governments will follow through on their agreements.

  9. Archetypes as action patterns.

    PubMed

    Hogenson, George B

    2009-06-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons by researchers at the University of Parma promises to radically alter our understanding of fundamental cognitive and affective states. This paper explores the relationship of mirror neurons to Jung's theory of archetypes and proposes that archetypes may be viewed as elementary action patterns. The paper begins with a review of a proposed interpretation of the fainting spells of S. Freud in his relationship with Jung as an example of an action pattern that also defines an archetypal image. The challenge that mirror neurons present to traditional views in analytical psychology and psychoanalysis, however, is that they operate without recourse to a cognitive processing element. This is a position that is gaining increasing acceptance in other fields as well. The paper therefore reviews the most recent claims made by the Boston Process of Change Study Group as well as conclusions drawn from dynamic systems views of development and theoretical robotics to underline the conclusion that unconscious agency is not a requirement for coherent action. It concludes with the suggestion that this entire body of research may lead to the conclusion that the dynamic unconscious is an unnecessary hypothesis in psychoanalysis and analytical psychology. PMID:19531123

  10. Empirical microeconomics action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Tanputraman, Winson

    2015-06-01

    A statistical generalization of microeconomics has been made in Baaquie (2013), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is modeled by an action functional-and the focus of this paper is to empirically determine the action functionals for different commodities. The correlation functions of the model are defined using a Feynman path integral. The model is calibrated using the unequal time correlation of the market commodity prices as well as their cubic and quartic moments using a perturbation expansion. The consistency of the perturbation expansion is verified by a numerical evaluation of the path integral. Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are studied and their market behavior is described by the model to an accuracy of over 90% using only six parameters. The paper empirically establishes the existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (2013).

  11. Age Relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    12 June 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a group of impact craters in Aonia Planum, Mars. Remarkably, two of the craters are approximately equal in size, however, they clearly differ in age. The left (west) crater has a well-defined rim and its ejecta blanket overlies part of the less pronounced crater to its immediate east. The one with the ejecta blanket is younger. Other circular depressions in this bouldery scene are also old, eroded impact craters.

    Location near: 59.5oS, 78.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  12. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  13. On the Inclusion of Externally Controlled Actions in Action Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jessica Chia-Chin; Knoblich, Gunther; Sebanz, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    According to ideomotor theories, perceiving action effects produced by others triggers corresponding action representations in the observer. We tested whether this principle extends to actions performed by externally controlled limbs and tools. Participants performed a go-no-go version of a spatial compatibility task in which their own actions…

  14. Improving Teaching with Collaborative Action Research: An ASCD Action Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Once you've established a professional learning community (PLC), you need to get this ASCD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) action tool to ensure that your PLC stays focused on addressing teaching methods and student learning problems. This ASCD action tool explains how your PLC can use collaborative action research to…

  15. Anti-aging cosmetics and its efficacy assessment methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms of skin aging, the active ingredients used in anti-aging cosmetics and evaluation methods for anti-aging cosmetics were surmised in this paper. And the mechanisms of skin aging were introduced in the intrinsic and extrinsic ways. Meanwhile, the anti-aging cosmetic active ingredients were classified in accordance with the mechanism of action. Various evaluation methods such as human evaluation, in vitro evaluation were also summarized.

  16. Actionable Recommendations in the Bright Futures Child Health Supervision Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, J.L.; Downs, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background With the growing use of electronic health record systems, there is a demand for an electronic version of the leading American pediatric preventive care guideline, Bright Futures. As computer implementation requires actionable recommendations, it is important to assess to what degree Bright Futures meets criteria for actionability. Objectives We aimed to 1) determine the number of actionable recommendations in the current edition of Bright Futures and 2) to recommend a specific format for representing an important class of guidelines in a way that better facilitates computer implementation. Methods We consolidated all action statements in Bright Futures into recommendations. We then used two dimensions (decidability and executability) in the Guideline Implementability Appraisal v 2.0 (GLIA) to determine the actionability of the recommendations. Decidability means the recommendation states precisely under what conditions to perform those actions. Executability means actions are stated specifically, unambiguously and in sufficient detail. The results were presented in a figure titled Service Interval Diagram (SID), describing actionable recommendations, age intervals during which they are applicable, and how frequently they should occur in that interval. Results We consolidated 2161 action items into 245 recommendations and identified 52 that were actionable (21%). Almost exclusively, these recommendations addressed screening, such as newborn metabolic screening, or child safety, such as car seat use. A limited number (n=13) of recommendations for other areas of anticipatory guidance were also actionable. No recommendations on child discipline, family function or mental health met our criteria for actionability. The SID representing these recommendations is presented in a figure. Conclusion Only a portion of the Bright Futures Guidelines meets criteria for actionability. Substantial work lies ahead to develop most recommendations for anticipatory

  17. Neurobiological actions of cysteamine

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.; Fisher, L.; Mason, R.T.; Rivier, J.; Vale, W.

    1985-06-01

    Somatostatin (SS)-related peptides act within discrete brain regions to inhibit adrenal epinephrine (E) secretion, to prevent hypothermia, and to produce hyperthermia. Depletion of brain concentrations of these SS-related peptides using cysteamine (CSH) or central administration of an SS receptor antagonist increases adrenal E secretion and impairs thermoregulation. These actions of CSH and the SS receptor antagonist are reversed by administration of SS into the central nervous system. These results support the hypothesis that endogenous brain SS-related peptides are involved in the regulation of adrenal E secretion and thermoregulation.

  18. VIOLENT FRAMES IN ACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; McGrath, Liam R.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2011-11-17

    We present a computational approach to radical rhetoric that leverages the co-expression of rhetoric and action features in discourse to identify violent intent. The approach combines text mining and machine learning techniques with insights from Frame Analysis and theories that explain the emergence of violence in terms of moral disengagement, the violation of sacred values and social isolation in order to build computational models that identify messages from terrorist sources and estimate their proximity to an attack. We discuss a specific application of this approach to a body of documents from and about radical and terrorist groups in the Middle East and present the results achieved.

  19. Public affairs committee actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Public Affairs Committee will create an ad hoc committee to consider possible AGU position statements concerning the effects of nuclear war.The action was taken at the May 31, 1983, meeting of the Committee at the AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore. Present were Carroll Ann Hodges, Chairman, and members Thomas J. Ahrens, David Cauffman, Jared Cohon, Stamatios Krimigis, Robert Murphy, Raymond Roble, and George Shaw. Also attending were the current Congressional Fellow Arthur Weissman and SPR—Cosmic Rays Section Secretary Miriam Forman.

  20. Developing an action concept inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We report on progress towards the development of an Action Concept Inventory (ACI), a test that measures student understanding of action principles in introductory mechanics and optics. The ACI also covers key concepts of many-paths quantum mechanics, from which classical action physics arises. We used a multistage iterative development cycle for incorporating expert and student feedback into successive revisions of the ACI. The student feedback, including think-aloud interviews, enabled us to identify their misconceptions about action physics.

  1. Evolution in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Mike; Duggan, Adrienne; McGregor, Deb

    2014-01-01

    Evolution and inheritance appear in the new National Science Curriculum for England, which comes into effect from September 2014. In the curriculum documents, it is expected that pupils in year 6 (ages 10-11) should be taught to: (1) recognise that living things have changed over time; (2) recognise that living things produce offspring of the same…

  2. Motor Execution Affects Action Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Anne; Brandstadter, Simone; Liepelt, Roman; Birngruber, Teresa; Giese, Martin; Mechsner, Franz; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies provided evidence of the claim that the prediction of occluded action involves real-time simulation. We report two experiments that aimed to study how real-time simulation is affected by simultaneous action execution under conditions of full, partial or no overlap between observed and executed actions. This overlap was analysed by…

  3. A Paradigm of Environmental Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hungerford, Harold R.; Peyton, R. Ben

    A paradigm is proposed that would permit curriculum developers and others to specifically plan for training in environmental action as an integral and substantial component in this field. The three-part paradigm identifies and defines specific categories of action. It then identifies and illustrates the levels at which these actions can be taken.…

  4. Rethinking Actions: Implementation and Association

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    Action processing allows us to move through and interact with the world, as well as understand the movements performed by other people. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the semantics of actions as differentiated from the semantics of objects. However, as the understanding of action semantics has evolved, it is evident that the existing literature conflates two senses of the word “action”—one that stems from studies of tool use and the other from event representation. In this paper, we suggest that this issue can be clarified by closely examining differences in how the human parietal and temporal cortices of the brain process action-related stimuli. By contrasting the posterior parietal cortex to the posterolateral temporal cortex, we characterize two complementary action systems in the human brain, each with its own specialization of function. We suggest that these two systems be referred to as the parietal Action Implementation System, and the posterolateral temporal Action Association System. While the fronto-parietal system is concerned primarily with how we perform actions, and simulate others’ actions, the temporal action system is more involved with processing actions from a third-person, conceptual standpoint. Recent work in cognitive neuroscience of perception and language, as well as the neuroanatomical organization of these brain regions support this distinction. We will discuss the implications of this work for cognition-, language-, and neuroscience-based action research. PMID:26352170

  5. Must Affirmative Action Be Divisive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fineberg, Solomon Andhil

    1975-01-01

    Affirmative action is seen as causing dissension and cleavages in the civil rights coalition. Requisites suggested for winning support for affirmative action are thorough knowledge of its rationale and components, assuring whites they will not be pushed out of jobs, and a continued emphasis on the urgency for affirmative action. (Author/AM)

  6. Developing an Action Concept Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on progress towards the development of an Action Concept Inventory (ACI), a test that measures student understanding of action principles in introductory mechanics and optics. The ACI also covers key concepts of many-paths quantum mechanics, from which classical action physics arises. We used a multistage iterative development cycle for…

  7. Action Research: Trends and Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulieu, Rodney J.

    2013-01-01

    Action research continues to grow as a research tradition, yet misconceptions about what it is and is not remains, even among scholars. For example, some mistakenly believe action research is only about professional development and is not a scholarly research approach. Some assume action research must be accomplished through a collaborative…

  8. Design Evolution Study - Aging Options

    SciTech Connect

    P. McDaniel

    2002-04-05

    The purpose of this study is to identify options and issues for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel received for disposal at the Yucca Mountain Mined Geologic Repository. Some early shipments of commercial spent nuclear fuel to the repository may be received with high-heat-output (younger) fuel assemblies that will need to be managed to meet thermal goals for emplacement. The capability to age as much as 40,000 metric tons of heavy metal of commercial spent nuclear he1 would provide more flexibility in the design to manage this younger fuel and to decouple waste receipt and waste emplacement. The following potential aging location options are evaluated: (1) Surface aging at four locations near the North Portal; (2) Subsurface aging in the permanent emplacement drifts; and (3) Subsurface aging in a new subsurface area. The following aging container options are evaluated: (1) Complete Waste Package; (2) Stainless Steel inner liner of the waste package; (3) Dual Purpose Canisters; (4) Multi-Purpose Canisters; and (5) New disposable canister for uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel. Each option is compared to a ''Base Case,'' which is the expected normal waste packaging process without aging. A Value Engineering approach is used to score each option against nine technical criteria and rank the options. Open issues with each of the options and suggested future actions are also presented. Costs for aging containers and aging locations are evaluated separately. Capital costs are developed for direct costs and distributable field costs. To the extent practical, unit costs are presented. Indirect costs, operating costs, and total system life cycle costs will be evaluated outside of this study. Three recommendations for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel--subsurface, surface, and combined surface and subsurface are presented for further review in the overall design re-evaluation effort. Options that were evaluated but not recommended are: subsurface aging in a new

  9. Action verbal fluency in Parkinson's patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Inês Tello; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Coelho, Miguel; Rosa, Mario M; Castro-Caldas, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    We compared the performance of 31 non-demented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients to 61 healthy controls in an action verbal fluency task. Semantic and phonemic fluencies, cognitive impairment and behavioural dysfunction were also assessed. The mean disease duration of PD was 9.8 years (standard deviation (SD) = 6.13). There were no age (U = 899.5, p = 0.616), gender(chi-square = 0.00, p = 1.00) or literacy (U = 956, p = 0.96) differences between the two groups. A significant difference was observed between the two groups in the action verbal fluency task (U = 406.5, p < 0.01) that was not found in the other fluency tasks. The education level was the only biographical variable that influenced the action (verb) fluency outcomes, irrespective of disease duration. Our findings suggest a correlation between the disease mechanisms in PD and a specific verb deficit, support the validity of the action (verb) fluency as an executive function measure and suggest that this task provides unique information not captured with traditional executive function tasks. PMID:26083889

  10. Capillary action liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Bergström, Edmund T; Goodall, David M; Myers, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Capillary action LC (caLC) is introduced as a technique using capillary action as the driving force to perform LC in capillary columns packed with HPLC type microparticulate materials. A dry packing method with centrifugal force was developed to prepare capillary columns in parallel (10 columns per 3 min) to support their disposable use in caLC. Using a digital microscope for real-time imaging and recording separations of components in a dye mixture, caLC was found to have flow characteristics similar to TLC. Based on the investigation of microparticulate HPLC silica gels of different size (1.5-10 microm) and a typical TLC grade irregular medium, Merck 60G silica, the van Deemter curves suggested molecular diffusion as the major contribution to band broadening in caLC. With Waters Xbridge 2.6 microm silica, plate heights down to 8.8 microm were obtained, comparable to those achievable in HPLC. Assisted by an image-processing method, the visual caLC separation was converted to a classical chromatogram for further data analysis and such a facility confirmed the observation of highly efficient bands.

  11. Wave action power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, L.V.

    1982-03-16

    A wave action power plant powered by the action of water waves has a drive shaft rotated by a plurality of drive units, each having a lever pivotally mounted on and extending from said shaft and carrying a weight, in the form of a float, which floats on the waves and rocks the lever up and down on the shaft. A ratchet mechanism causes said shaft to be rotated in one direction by the weight of said float after it has been raised by wave and the wave has passed, leaving said float free to move downwardly by gravity and apply its full weight to pull down on the lever and rotate the drive shaft. There being a large number of said drive units so that there are always some of the weights pulling down on their respective levers while other weights are being lifted by waves and thereby causing continuous rotation of the drive shaft in one direction. The said levers are so mounted that they may be easily raised to bring the weights into a position wherein they are readily accessible for cleaning the bottoms thereof to remove any accumulation of barnacles, mollusks and the like. There is also provided means for preventing the weights from colliding with each other as they independently move up and down on the waves.

  12. Compulsory Attendance Policies: About Age or Intervention? SREB Focus Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, SREB state policy-makers have focused on actions to reduce dropout rates and increase high school graduation rates. Some policy-makers have suggested that raising their state's compulsory attendance age (often called the dropout age) to require students to stay in school until age 17 or 18 is an important step. However,…

  13. Willed action and its impairments.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, M

    1998-09-01

    Actions are goal-directed behaviours that usually involve movem ent. There is evidence that intentional self-generated actions (willed actions) are controlled differently from routine, stereotyped actions that are externally triggered by environmental stimuli. We review evidence from investigations using positron emission tomography (PET), recordings of movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and conclude that willed actions are controlled by a network of frontal cortical (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor area, anterior cingulate) and subcortical (thalamus and basal ganglia) areas. We also consider evidence suggesting that some of the cognitive and motor deficits of patients with frontal lesions, Parkinson's disease, or schizophrenia as well as apathy and abulia and rarer phenomena such as primary obsessional slowness can be considered as reflecting im pairment of willed actions. We propose that the concept of a willed action system based on the frontostriatal circuits provides a useful framework for integrating the cognitive, motor, and motivational deficits found in these disorders. Problems remaining to be resolved include: identification of the component processes of willed actions; the specific and differential role played by each of the frontal cortical and subcortical areas in the control of willed actions; the specific mechanisms of impairm ent of willed actions in Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and frontal damage; and the precise role of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the willed action system. PMID:22448836

  14. The minimalist grammar of action

    PubMed Central

    Pastra, Katerina; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2012-01-01

    Language and action have been found to share a common neural basis and in particular a common ‘syntax’, an analogous hierarchical and compositional organization. While language structure analysis has led to the formulation of different grammatical formalisms and associated discriminative or generative computational models, the structure of action is still elusive and so are the related computational models. However, structuring action has important implications on action learning and generalization, in both human cognition research and computation. In this study, we present a biologically inspired generative grammar of action, which employs the structure-building operations and principles of Chomsky's Minimalist Programme as a reference model. In this grammar, action terminals combine hierarchically into temporal sequences of actions of increasing complexity; the actions are bound with the involved tools and affected objects and are governed by certain goals. We show, how the tool role and the affected-object role of an entity within an action drives the derivation of the action syntax in this grammar and controls recursion, merge and move, the latter being mechanisms that manifest themselves not only in human language, but in human action too. PMID:22106430

  15. The minimalist grammar of action.

    PubMed

    Pastra, Katerina; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2012-01-12

    Language and action have been found to share a common neural basis and in particular a common 'syntax', an analogous hierarchical and compositional organization. While language structure analysis has led to the formulation of different grammatical formalisms and associated discriminative or generative computational models, the structure of action is still elusive and so are the related computational models. However, structuring action has important implications on action learning and generalization, in both human cognition research and computation. In this study, we present a biologically inspired generative grammar of action, which employs the structure-building operations and principles of Chomsky's Minimalist Programme as a reference model. In this grammar, action terminals combine hierarchically into temporal sequences of actions of increasing complexity; the actions are bound with the involved tools and affected objects and are governed by certain goals. We show, how the tool role and the affected-object role of an entity within an action drives the derivation of the action syntax in this grammar and controls recursion, merge and move, the latter being mechanisms that manifest themselves not only in human language, but in human action too.

  16. Guam Energy Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    Describes the four near-term strategies selected by the Guam Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. Each strategy addresses one of the energy sectors identified in the earlier Guam strategic energy plan as being an essential component of diversifying Guam's fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020. The four energy strategies selected are: (1) expanding public outreach on energy efficiency and conservation, (2) establishing a demand-side management revolving loan program, (3) exploring waste-to-energy options, and (4) influencing the transportation sector via anti-idling legislation, vehicle registration fees, and electric vehicles.

  17. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  18. Action potential in charophytes.

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary Jane

    2007-01-01

    The plant action potential (AP) has been studied for more than half a century. The experimental system was provided mainly by the large charophyte cells, which allowed insertion of early large electrodes, manipulation of cell compartments, and inside and outside media. These early experiments were inspired by the Hodgkin and Huxley (HH) work on the squid axon and its voltage clamp techniques. Later, the patch clamping technique provided information about the ion transporters underlying the excitation transient. The initial models were also influenced by the HH picture of the animal AP. At the turn of the century, the paradigm of the charophyte AP shifted to include several chemical reactions, second messenger-activated channel, and calcium ion liberation from internal stores. Many aspects of this new model await further clarification. The role of the AP in plant movements, wound signaling, and turgor regulation is now well documented. Involvement in invasion by pathogens, chilling injury, light, and gravity sensing are under investigation.

  19. [Neuroprotective actions of lithium].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Jeong, Mi Ra; Senatorov, Vladimir V; Christ, Lori; Leeds, Peter; Chuang, De-Maw; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has long been one of the primary drugs used to treat bipolar mood disorder. However, neither the etiology of this disease nor the therapeutic mechanism(s) of this drug is well understood. Several lines of clinical evidence suggest that lithium has neurotrophic actions. For example chronic lithium treatment increases the volume of gray matter and the content of N-acetyl-aspartate, a cell survival marker, in bipolar mood disorder patients (Moore et al., 2000). Moreover, treatment with this mood-stabilizer suppresses the decrease in the volume of the subgenual pre-frontal cortex found in bipolar patients (Drevets, 2001). To elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions of lithium, we employed a preparation of cultured cortical neurons prepared form embryonic rats. We found that treatment with therapeutic doses (0.2-1.2 mM) of lithium robustly protects cortical neurons from multiple insults, notably glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. The neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity is time-dependent, requiring treatment for 5-6 days for maximal effect, and is associated with a reduction in NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx. The latter is correlated with a decrease in Tyrosine 1472 phosphorylation levels in the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors and a loss of Src kinase activity which is involved in NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation. Neither the activity of total tyrosine protein kinase nor that of tyrosine protein phosphatase is affected by this drug, indicating the selectivity of the modulation. Lithium neuroprotection against excitotoxicity is inhibited by a BDNF-neutralizing antibody and K252a, a Trk antagonist. Lithium treatment time-dependently increases the intracellular level of BDNF in cortical neurons and activates its receptor, TrkB. The neuroprotection can be completely blocked by either heterozygous or homozygous knockout of the BDNF gene. These results suggest a central role of BDNF and TrkB in mediating the

  20. The Quench Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caux, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-01

    We give a pedagogical introduction to the methodology of the Quench Action, which is an effective representation for the calculation of time-dependent expectation values of physical operators following a generic out-of-equilibrium state preparation protocol (for example a quantum quench). The representation, originally introduced in Caux and Essler (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 257203), is founded on a mixture of exact data for overlaps together with variational reasonings. It is argued to be quite generally valid and thermodynamically exact for arbitrary times after the quench (from short times all the way up to the steady state), and applicable to a wide class of physically relevant observables. Here, we introduce the method and its language, give an overview of some recent results, suggest a roadmap and offer some perspectives on possible future research directions.

  1. Everyday robotic action: lessons from human action control

    PubMed Central

    de Kleijn, Roy; Kachergis, George; Hommel, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Robots are increasingly capable of performing everyday human activities such as cooking, cleaning, and doing the laundry. This requires the real-time planning and execution of complex, temporally extended sequential actions under high degrees of uncertainty, which provides many challenges to traditional approaches to robot action control. We argue that important lessons in this respect can be learned from research on human action control. We provide a brief overview of available psychological insights into this issue and focus on four principles that we think could be particularly beneficial for robot control: the integration of symbolic and subsymbolic planning of action sequences, the integration of feedforward and feedback control, the clustering of complex actions into subcomponents, and the contextualization of action-control structures through goal representations. PMID:24672474

  2. Congruency of gaze metrics in action, imagery and action observation.

    PubMed

    Causer, Joe; McCormick, Sheree A; Holmes, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a review of eye movements during action execution, action observation, and movement imagery. Furthermore, the paper highlights aspects of congruency in gaze metrics between these states. The implications of the imagery, observation, and action gaze congruency are discussed in terms of motor learning and rehabilitation. Future research directions are outlined in order to further the understanding of shared gaze metrics between overt and covert states. Suggestions are made for how researchers and practitioners can structure action observation and movement imagery interventions to maximize (re)learning. PMID:24068996

  3. Action-based flood forecasting for triggering humanitarian action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan de Perez, Erin; van den Hurk, Bart; van Aalst, Maarten K.; Amuron, Irene; Bamanya, Deus; Hauser, Tristan; Jongma, Brenden; Lopez, Ana; Mason, Simon; Mendler de Suarez, Janot; Pappenberger, Florian; Rueth, Alexandra; Stephens, Elisabeth; Suarez, Pablo; Wagemaker, Jurjen; Zsoter, Ervin

    2016-09-01

    Too often, credible scientific early warning information of increased disaster risk does not result in humanitarian action. With financial resources tilted heavily towards response after a disaster, disaster managers have limited incentive and ability to process complex scientific data, including uncertainties. These incentives are beginning to change, with the advent of several new forecast-based financing systems that provide funding based on a forecast of an extreme event. Given the changing landscape, here we demonstrate a method to select and use appropriate forecasts for specific humanitarian disaster prevention actions, even in a data-scarce location. This action-based forecasting methodology takes into account the parameters of each action, such as action lifetime, when verifying a forecast. Forecasts are linked with action based on an understanding of (1) the magnitude of previous flooding events and (2) the willingness to act "in vain" for specific actions. This is applied in the context of the Uganda Red Cross Society forecast-based financing pilot project, with forecasts from the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS). Using this method, we define the "danger level" of flooding, and we select the probabilistic forecast triggers that are appropriate for specific actions. Results from this methodology can be applied globally across hazards and fed into a financing system that ensures that automatic, pre-funded early action will be triggered by forecasts.

  4. Aging and Aged in Organized Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Menachem

    1989-01-01

    Examines problems of the aged in organized crime, basing discussion on organized crime bosses over age 60 operating in Italy, the United States, and Israel. Looks at problems stemming from normative system in organized crime, role of the aged, intergenerational problems, fears of the aged, excuses and justifications, standards of life, and…

  5. On "action language" in psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Calogeras, R C; Alston, T M

    1980-10-01

    The main tenets of action language are summarized in an attempt to discern the direction in which psychoanalysis might go if action language becomes the "new metapsychology." The principal roots of action language are traced to the different linguistic/language and personality-and-culture models of anthropology and to the neobehaviorist currents of academic psychology. The authors' findings support the hypothesis that action language is a form os psychoanalytic behaviorism having idealism, logical positivism, and radical empiricism as its philosophical underpinnings. Its adoption would confound the entire motivational aspect of psychoanalysis. Specifically, the authors suggest that action language falls under the aegis of Wittgenstein's family of language games. When the action language game is said to be brought to a successful resolution, the language game disappears and, supposedly, so do the patient's conflicts. PMID:7422749

  6. The Biology of Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprott, Richard L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen articles in this special issue discuss aging theories, biomarkers of aging, aging research, disease, cancer biology, Alzheimer's disease, stress, oxidation of proteins, gene therapy, service delivery, biogerontology, and ethics and aging research. (SK)

  7. Action programme for youth.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, A B

    1993-01-01

    In Nigeria, where abortion is illegal, unmarried women under 20 years of age comprises the majority of abortion patients and complications from unsafe abortion represent a major health problem among this sector. The high incidence of abortion in Nigeria reflects increased premarital sex activity in urban areas; opposition to family planning, and cultural sanctions against single parenting or forced marriage. The Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN) is working, cautiously, toward liberalization of the grounds for legal abortion; however, its major strategy is to avert the need for abortion through overcoming opposition to family planning services for young people and family life education in the schools. To reach young people, PPFN has begun providing services in medical clinics attached to vocational schools and institutes of higher education. The concept of using peers to distribute non-prescription contraceptives is being considered, and special youth clinics are planned for urban areas. About 5% of new acceptors at PPFN clinics are under 20 years of age, and attempts are being made to tailor services to the unique needs of this population.

  8. Numbers in Action

    PubMed Central

    Rugani, Rosa; Sartori, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Humans show a remarkable tendency to describe and think of numbers as being placed on a mental number line (MNL), with smaller numbers located on the left and larger ones on the right. Faster responses to small numbers are indeed performed on the left side of space, while responses to large numbers are facilitated on the right side of space (spatial-numerical association of response codes, SNARC effect). This phenomenon is considered the experimental demonstration of the MNL and has been extensively replicated throughout a variety of paradigms. Nevertheless, the majority of previous literature has mainly investigated this effect by means of response times and accuracy, whereas studies considering more subtle and automatic measures such as kinematic parameters are rare (e.g., in a reaching-to-grasp movement, the grip aperture is enlarged in responding to larger numbers than in responding to small numbers). In this brief review we suggest that numerical magnitude can also affect the what and how of action execution (i.e., temporal and spatial components of movement). This evidence could have large implications in the strongly debated issue concerning the effect of experience and culture on the orientation of MNL. PMID:27524965

  9. Action as ejection.

    PubMed

    Franco, Daisy

    2006-01-01

    The systematic analysis of acting-out episodes can be used in assessing analytic progress. Variables to be considered are the nature of the wish, the type of defense, and the degree of concreteness (versus symbolization) of the mental processes used in attempting actualization (as distinct from the resort to action). Two acting-out episodes of a borderline patient who acted out as a character trait, both occurring outside the analytic setting, are presented as illustrations. In the first one, occurring relatively early in the analysis, when split-off negative and positive self-images had to be rigidly maintained, ejection of the negative self-image was actualized via the regressive use of a symbolic equation and the mechanism of displacement, obliterating the distinction between an internal feeling and an external thing that here was literally thrown out. The later episode, occurring after the split was healed and within the context of a frustrating heterosexual involvement, contained an acted-out allusion to identification and competition with the mother. As in a dream, via associations, an unconscious wish for oedipal victory was revealed. Whereas in the first episode the goal of ejection was central, with splitting and denial the underlying defenses, it was absent from the second, in which an attempt was made to actualize a repressed infantile wish and made greater use of symbolization. It is concluded that acting-out episodes at different periods of the analysis, when systematically analyzed, can serve in assessing a patient's progress.

  10. Nonclassical Vitamin D Action

    PubMed Central

    Zittermann, Armin; Gummert, Jan F.

    2010-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that vitamin D has a broad range of actions in the human body. Besides its well-known effects on calcium/phosphate homeostasis, vitamin D influences muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nervous function, and the immune response. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency has been associated with muscle weakness and a high incidence of various chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes. Most importantly, low vitamin D status has been found to be an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. Several recent randomized controlled trials support the assumption that vitamin D can improve muscle strength, glucose homeostasis, and cardiovascular risk markers. In addition, vitamin D may reduce cancer incidence and elevated blood pressure. Since the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is high throughout the world, there is a need to improve vitamin D status in the general adult population. However, the currently recommended daily vitamin D intake of 5-15 µg is too low to achieve an adequate vitamin D status in individuals with only modest skin synthesis. Thus, there is a need to recommend a vitamin D intake that is effective for achieving adequate circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (>75 nmol/L). PMID:22254030

  11. Antimicrobial action of sanguinarine.

    PubMed

    Godowski, K C

    1989-01-01

    Sanguinarine is a benzophenanthridine alkaloid derived from rhizomes of Sanguinaria canadensis L. (bloodroot). It is a cationic molecule which converts from an iminium ion form at pH less than 6 to an alkanolamine form at pH greater than 7. Sanguinaria extract is composed of sanguinarine and five other closely related alkaloids. The safety profile of both sanguinarine and sanguinaria extract provide a broad margin for their safe use in oral health products. Sanguinarine has broad antimicrobial activity as well as antiinflammatory properties. In vitro studies indicate that the anti-plaque action of sanguinaria is due to its ability to inhibit bacterial adherence to newly formed pellicle, its retention in plaque being 10-100 times its saliva concentration, and due to its antimicrobic properties. The MIC of sanguinarine ranges from 1 to 32 micrograms/mL for most species of plaque bacteria. Long term use of sanguinaria-containing toothpaste and oral rinse products does not predispose users to detrimental shifts in oral flora. Electron microscopic studies of bacteria exposed to sanguinarine demonstrate that bacteria aggregate and become morphologically irregular. Sanguinarine-containing slow release polymer systems are currently being developed for use in periodontitis treatment applications.

  12. Mobilizing grassroots action.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Zero Population Growth, Inc. (ZPG), was very busy in 1994 spreading its message about the dangers of rapid population growth. ZPG's Field and Outreach Program is vital to the success of the organization. Organization activists staffed tables at more than 170 events in 1994, while the Speakers Network gave 159 presentations. ZPG was represented on Earth Day, World Population Day, during World Population Awareness Week, and at Cairo town meetings, as well as at the HORDE rock festival and the 25th anniversary of the Woodstock Music Festival. Campus contacts developed at these latter two concerts formed the basic for ZPG's Campus Outreach Project. In 1994, the Field department focused upon the International Conference on Population and Development to be held in Cairo, Egypt. ZPG encouraged people to get involved in conference preparations by helping to plan and implement town meetings in eleven major US cities. Members were contacted by ZPG via flyers and phone calls about meetings in their areas. ZPG activists and chapters then provided leadership for many of the meetings which drew thousands of participants and were widely praised by national leaders. Throughout 1994, ZPG's 21 chapters provided members with a vehicle for collective action and a source of information about the population conference, population growth, and wasteful consumption. Chapter activists also helped secure the signatures of thousands of people on Population Priority Petitions; the final list of names was delivered to US Vice President Al Gore in November. PMID:12289955

  13. The Development of Action Planning in a Joint Action Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulus, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The ability to act jointly with another person is a fundamental requirement for participation in social life. The current study examines the development of action planning in a joint action context. In 4 experiments, 3-, 5-, and 7-year-old children as well as a group of adults (n = 196) interacted with another person to operate a novel apparatus.…

  14. Action simulation plays a critical role in deceptive action recognition.

    PubMed

    Tidoni, Emmanuele; Borgomaneri, Sara; di Pellegrino, Giuseppe; Avenanti, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    The ability to infer deceptive intents from nonverbal behavior is critical for social interactions. By combining single-pulse and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in healthy humans, we provide both correlational and causative evidence that action simulation is actively involved in the ability to recognize deceptive body movements. We recorded motor-evoked potentials during a faked-action discrimination (FAD) task: participants watched videos of actors lifting a cube and judged whether the actors were trying to deceive them concerning the real weight of the cube. Seeing faked actions facilitated the observers' motor system more than truthful actions in a body-part-specific manner, suggesting that motor resonance was sensitive to deceptive movements. Furthermore, we found that TMS virtual lesion to the anterior node of the action observation network, namely the left inferior frontal cortex (IFC), reduced perceptual sensitivity in the FAD task. In contrast, no change in FAD task performance was found after virtual lesions to the left temporoparietal junction (control site). Moreover, virtual lesion to the IFC failed to affect performance in a difficulty-matched spatial-control task that did not require processing of spatiotemporal (acceleration) and configurational (limb displacement) features of seen actions, which are critical to detecting deceptive intent in the actions of others. These findings indicate that the human IFC is critical for recognizing deceptive body movements and suggest that FAD relies on the simulation of subtle changes in action kinematics within the motor system.

  15. Images in Action: Preservice Teachers' Action Researcher Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the gap that exists in the knowledge base for understanding the repertoire of images that preservice teachers gain as they engage in action research. Data were collected using a variety of qualitative methods: journals, metaphors, narratives, action research reports, and focus group interviews. Data were…

  16. The Action in Action Research: Mediating and Developing Inclusive Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Andrew; Frankham, Jo; Ainscow, Mel; Farrell, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The authors of this article reflect on their experiences as facilitators of an action research network aiming to provide a context for participating schools to identify and address barriers to pupils' learning and participation. Within the network, action research is seen to have different meanings for individuals within and between schools in…

  17. Emancipatory Education and Action Research. Action Research Series No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Sue, Ed.; And Others

    This book is the result of a seminar on emancipatory education and the action research projects in the Department of Didactics at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa. The book starts with questions regarding the nature of action research. This first chapter discusses the meaning of some crucial organizing concepts, asks questions…

  18. The Age Discrimination Study. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flemming, Arthur S.; And Others

    By the Older Americans Amendments of 1975, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights was directed to investigate unreasonable age discrimination in federally-assisted programs, report the findings and recommend statutory changes for administrative actions. Results of examinations of the literature, field studies and public hearings on the following…

  19. Age distribution among NASA scientists and engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.

    1989-01-01

    The loss of technical expertise through attrition in NASA and the aerospace industry is discussed. This report documents historical age-related information for scientific and engineering personnel in general and the NASA Lewis Research Center in particular, for 1968 through 1987. Recommendations are made to promote discussion and to establish the groundwork for action.

  20. Scaling affordances for human reach actions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeg Joo; Mark, Leonard S

    2004-12-01

    A methodology developed by Cesari and Newell [Cesari, P., & Newell, K. M. (1999). The scaling of human grip configuration. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 25, 927-935; Cesari, P., & Newell, K. M. (2000). The body-scaling of grip configurations in children aged 6-12 years. Developmental Psychobiology 36, 301-310] was used to delineate the roles of an object's weight (W) and distance (D) as well as the actor's strength (S) in determining the macroscopic action used to reach for the object. Participants reached for objects of five different weights placed at 10 distances. The findings of a single discriminant analysis revealed that when object weight is scaled in terms of each individual's strength and reach distance is scaled in terms of each individual's maximum-seated reach distance, a single discriminant analysis was able to predict 90% of the reach modes used by both men and women. The result of the discriminant analysis was used to construct a body-scaled equation, K=lnD+ln(W/S)/36, similar in form to the one derived by Cesari and Newell, accurately predicted the reach action used. Our findings indicate that Cesari and Newell's method can identify a complex relationship between geometric and dynamic constraints that determine the affordances for different reach actions. PMID:15664673

  1. Progressive age-associated activation of JNK associates with conduction disruption in the aged atrium.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sandra A; Lancaster, Matthew K

    2015-03-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) is critical for maintaining electrical conduction across atrial muscle. During progressive ageing atrial conduction slows associating with increasing susceptibility to arrhythmias. Changes in Cx43 protein expression, or its phosphorylation status, can instigate changes in the conduction of the cardiac action potential. This study investigated whether increased levels of activated c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is responsible for the decline of Cx43 during ageing. Right atria from guinea pigs aged between 1 day and 38 months of age were examined. The area of the intercalated disc increased with age concurrent with a 75% decline in C43 protein expression. An age-dependent increase in activated-JNK correlated with a rise in phosphorylated Cx43, but also slowing of action potential conduction velocity across the atria from 0.38±0.01 m/s at 1 month of age to 0.30±0.01 m/s at 38 months. The JNK activator anisomycin increased activated JNK in myocytes and reduced Cx43 protein expression simulating ageing. The JNK inhibitor SP600125, was found to eradicate almost all trace of Cx43 protein. We conclude that in vivo activation of JNK increases with age leading to the loss of Cx43 protein resulting in impaired conduction and contributing to the increasing risk of atrial arrhythmias with advancing age.

  2. Progressive age-associated activation of JNK associates with conduction disruption in the aged atrium

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sandra A.; Lancaster, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) is critical for maintaining electrical conduction across atrial muscle. During progressive ageing atrial conduction slows associating with increasing susceptibility to arrhythmias. Changes in Cx43 protein expression, or its phosphorylation status, can instigate changes in the conduction of the cardiac action potential. This study investigated whether increased levels of activated c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is responsible for the decline of Cx43 during ageing. Right atria from guinea pigs aged between 1 day and 38 months of age were examined. The area of the intercalated disc increased with age concurrent with a 75% decline in C43 protein expression. An age-dependent increase in activated-JNK correlated with a rise in phosphorylated Cx43, but also slowing of action potential conduction velocity across the atria from 0.38 ± 0.01 m/s at 1 month of age to 0.30 ± 0.01 m/s at 38 months. The JNK activator anisomycin increased activated JNK in myocytes and reduced Cx43 protein expression simulating ageing. The JNK inhibitor SP600125, was found to eradicate almost all trace of Cx43 protein. We conclude that in vivo activation of JNK increases with age leading to the loss of Cx43 protein resulting in impaired conduction and contributing to the increasing risk of atrial arrhythmias with advancing age. PMID:25956603

  3. Visual-Action Code Processing by Deaf and Hearing Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todman, John; Seedhouse, Elizabeth

    1994-01-01

    Studied 18 deaf and 18 hearing childrens' (aged 6.8 to 16.6 years) performance on short-term memory tasks involving production of action responses to previously paired visual stimuli. Deaf children showed superior performance on the simultaneous presentation-free recall task and inferior performance on the serial presentation-serial recall task.…

  4. Researching Multilingualism and Superdiversity: Grassroots Actions and Responsibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Li

    2014-01-01

    The articles in this thematic issue document studies of grassroots actions in promoting multilingualism across different sectors of society as well as in different social and professional domains. In doing so, the contributors raise issues of the relevance of the notion of community in the age of superdiversity and the researcher's…

  5. Object and Action Naming in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheng, Li; McGregor, Karla K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to examine the accuracy, latency, and errors of noun (object) and verb (action) naming in children with and without specific language impairment (SLI) and to determine whether children with SLI have a particularly large noun-verb performance gap. Method: Children with SLI, age-matched peers (AM), and…

  6. China Earthquake Relief: Participatory Action Work with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Emily Jie; Silverstein, Louise Bordeaux

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a community-focused participatory action project designed to promote children's resilience in the early aftermath of the cataclysmic May 2008 Earthquake in Beichuan, China. Thirty children aged 7- to 15-years-old participated in the project. The project encompassed four phases that evolved from adult-directed/initiated…

  7. Bodily action penetrates affective perception

    PubMed Central

    Rigutti, Sara; Gerbino, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Fantoni & Gerbino (2014) showed that subtle postural shifts associated with reaching can have a strong hedonic impact and affect how actors experience facial expressions of emotion. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure (MAMIP), they found consistent congruency effects in participants who performed a facial emotion identification task after a sequence of visually-guided reaches: a face perceived as neutral in a baseline condition appeared slightly happy after comfortable actions and slightly angry after uncomfortable actions. However, skeptics about the penetrability of perception (Zeimbekis & Raftopoulos, 2015) would consider such evidence insufficient to demonstrate that observer’s internal states induced by action comfort/discomfort affect perception in a top-down fashion. The action-modulated mood might have produced a back-end memory effect capable of affecting post-perceptual and decision processing, but not front-end perception. Here, we present evidence that performing a facial emotion detection (not identification) task after MAMIP exhibits systematic mood-congruent sensitivity changes, rather than response bias changes attributable to cognitive set shifts; i.e., we show that observer’s internal states induced by bodily action can modulate affective perception. The detection threshold for happiness was lower after fifty comfortable than uncomfortable reaches; while the detection threshold for anger was lower after fifty uncomfortable than comfortable reaches. Action valence induced an overall sensitivity improvement in detecting subtle variations of congruent facial expressions (happiness after positive comfortable actions, anger after negative uncomfortable actions), in the absence of significant response bias shifts. Notably, both comfortable and uncomfortable reaches impact sensitivity in an approximately symmetric way relative to a baseline inaction condition. All of these constitute compelling evidence of a genuine top-down effect on

  8. The development of attention skills in action video game players.

    PubMed

    Dye, M W G; Green, C S; Bavelier, D

    2009-07-01

    Previous research suggests that action video game play improves attentional resources, allowing gamers to better allocate their attention across both space and time. In order to further characterize the plastic changes resulting from playing these video games, we administered the Attentional Network Test (ANT) to action game players and non-playing controls aged between 7 and 22 years. By employing a mixture of cues and flankers, the ANT provides measures of how well attention is allocated to targets as a function of alerting and orienting cues, and to what extent observers are able to filter out the influence of task irrelevant information flanking those targets. The data suggest that action video game players of all ages have enhanced attentional skills that allow them to make faster correct responses to targets, and leaves additional processing resources that spill over to process distractors flanking the targets.

  9. The development of attention skills in action video game players

    PubMed Central

    Dye, M.W.G.; Green, C.S.; Bavelier, D.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research suggests that action video game play improves attentional resources, allowing gamers to better allocate their attention across both space and time. In order to further characterize the plastic changes resulting from playing these video games, we administered the Attentional Network Test (ANT) to action game players and non-playing controls aged between 7 and 22 years. By employing a mixture of cues and flankers, the ANT provides measures of how well attention is allocated to targets as a function of alerting and orienting cues, and to what extent observers are able to filter out the influence of task irrelevant information flanking those targets. The data suggest that action video game players of all ages have enhanced attentional skills that allow them to make faster correct responses to targets, and leaves additional processing resources that spill over to process distractors flanking the targets. PMID:19428410

  10. 24 CFR 984.201 - Action Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Action Plan. 984.201 Section 984... § 984.201 Action Plan. (a) Requirement for Action Plan. A PHA must have a HUD-approved Action Plan that... program is a mandatory or voluntary program. (b) Development of Action Plan. The Action Plan shall...

  11. 24 CFR 984.201 - Action Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Action Plan. 984.201 Section 984... § 984.201 Action Plan. (a) Requirement for Action Plan. A PHA must have a HUD-approved Action Plan that... program is a mandatory or voluntary program. (b) Development of Action Plan. The Action Plan shall...

  12. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders. PMID:1864252

  13. Ageing aircraft research in the Netherlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejonge, J. B.; Bartelds, G.

    1992-01-01

    The problems of aging aircraft are worldwide. Hence, international cooperative actions to overcome or prevent problems should be taken. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Netherlands Civil Aviation Department (RLD) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation in the area of structural integrity, with specific reference to research on problems in the area of aging aircraft. Here, an overview is given of aging research that is going on in the Netherlands. The work described is done largely at the National Aerospace Laboratory; much of the research is part of the forementioned cooperative agreement.

  14. Taking Action with Teacher Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Ellen; Rust, Frances O'Connell

    This collection of papers presents examples of teacher research in action. Each study grew out of teachers' questions regarding the implementation of some aspect of education policy in their schools and classrooms. After "Introduction" (Frances O'Connell Rust and Ellen Meyers), the eight papers focus on: (1) "How We Do Action Research" (Frances…

  15. Affirmative Action, or Reverse Discrimination?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansby, Ike

    1996-01-01

    Determines the impact of affirmative action programs in response to charges that they are policies of reverse discrimination. Reviewing affirmative action programs submitted by Michigan State departments, researchers determined no reverse discrimination was apparent based on low numbers of reverse discrimination complaints filed by whites. (GR)

  16. Mode of Action of Glyphosate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although glyphosate is the most used and studied herbicide in the world, the available information is not enough to fully understand its mode of action. The molecular site of action of glyphosate is the enzyme 5-enolpyruvlyshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). It is the only known compound that ...

  17. Action Research and Teacher Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeets, Karel; Ponte, Petra

    2009-01-01

    The present article reports on a case study into the influence and impact of action research carried out by teachers in a special school. The action research was an important component of the two-year, post-initial, in-service course in special educational needs, provided by Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Department of Inclusive and…

  18. Thought and Action in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rømer, Thomas Aastrup

    2015-01-01

    In much theory there is a tendency to place thought above action, or the opposite, action over thought. The consequence of the first option is that philosophy or scientific evidence gains the upper hand in educational thinking. The consequence of the second view is that pragmatism and relativism become the dominant features. This article discusses…

  19. Action Learning in the BBC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felix, Eversley; Keevill, Joan

    2008-01-01

    This account tells the story of the development of an action learning culture in the BBC between 2002 and 2007. From its early beginnings as a sporadic, unsystematic intervention with a small number of leaders scattered throughout the organisation, action learning has now become embedded in our approach to the way we develop our leaders. In this…

  20. Technology assessment and citizen action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mottur, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    Citizen participation in the nation's total social, political, economic decisionmaking processes was studied. Impediments are discussed which prevent citizens from taking effective assessment action; these include finance, organization and motivation, and information. The proposal for establishing citizens assessment associations is considered along with implications of citizen assessment action.