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Sample records for aging shift factors

  1. Metabolic Shifts during Aging and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yina; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    The heart is a very special organ in the body and has a high requirement for metabolism due to its constant workload. As a consequence, to provide a consistent and sufficient energy a high steady-state demand of metabolism is required by the heart. When delicately balanced mechanisms are changed by physiological or pathophysiological conditions, the whole system’s homeostasis will be altered to a new balance, which contributes to the pathologic process. So it is no wonder that almost every heart disease is related to metabolic shift. Furthermore, aging is also found to be related to the reduction in mitochondrial function, insulin resistance, and dysregulated intracellular lipid metabolism. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) functions as an energy sensor to detect intracellular ATP/AMP ratio and plays a pivotal role in intracellular adaptation to energy stress. During different pathology (like myocardial ischemia and hypertension), the activation of cardiac AMPK appears to be essential for repairing cardiomyocyte’s function by accelerating ATP generation, attenuating ATP depletion, and protecting the myocardium against cardiac dysfunction and apoptosis. In this overview, we will talk about the normal heart’s metabolism, how metabolic shifts during aging and different pathologies, and how AMPK regulates metabolic changes during these conditions. PMID:25880509

  2. Shift products and factorizations of wavelet matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcajová, Radka; Kautsky, Jaroslav

    1994-03-01

    A class of so-called shift products of wavelet matrices is introduced. These products are based on circulations of columns of orthogonal banded block circulant matrices arising in applications of discrete orthogonal wavelet transforms (or paraunitary multirate filter banks) or, equivalently, on augmentations of wavelet matrices by zero columns (shifts). A special case is no shift; a product which is closely related to the Pollen product is then obtained. Known decompositions using factors formed by two blocks are described and additional conditions such that uniqueness of the factorization is guaranteed are given. Next it is shown that when nonzero shifts are used, an arbitrary wavelet matrix can be factorized into a sequence of shift products of square orthogonal matrices. Such a factorization, as well as those mentioned earlier, can be used for the parameterization and construction of wavelet matrices, including the costruction from the first row. Moreover, it is also suitable for efficient implementations of discrete orthogonal wavelet transforms and paraunitary filter banks.

  3. Central kynurenine pathway shift with age in women.

    PubMed

    de Bie, Josien; Guest, Jade; Guillemin, Gilles J; Grant, Ross

    2016-03-01

    Age is considered a dominant risk factor in the development of most neurodegenerative disorders. The kynurenine pathway, a major metabolic pathway of tryptophan is altered in the majority of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we have analysed CSF samples from 49 healthy women across a wide age range (0-90) for kynurenine pathway metabolites and the inflammatory marker neopterin. Our results show central tryptophan metabolism is increased with age in women, with an apparent shift towards the neurotoxin quinolinic acid. We also observed an increase in central levels of the inflammatory marker neopterin with age and a positive correlation between neopterin and kynurenine pathway activation. We conclude that, the changes that occur in the kynurenine pathway as a result of normal ageing are mechanistically linked to increased inflammatory signalling and have some explanatory potential with regard to age-associated degenerative diseases in the CNS. Management of health in ageing and (preventative) treatment would do well to look to the kynurenine pathway for potentially novel solutions. Both the inflammation marker neopterin and kynurenine pathway activity were increased with age in the CSF of female subjects. While levels of quinolinic acid (QUIN), picolinic acid (PIC), kynurenine and quinaldic acid (QA) were increased, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) was decreased and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3HAA) and kynurenic acid (KYNA) remained unchanged. Of particular interest is the increase in QUIN, a neuroexcitotoxin associated with neurodegeneration. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Shift to righthandedness in Rett syndrome around age 7.

    PubMed

    Olsson, B; Rett, A

    1986-01-01

    This paper confirms Nomura's finding (Nomura et al, 1984) that almost all of those children with Rett syndrome under 7 who grasp objects are lefthanded. It is suggested that the lefthandedness in Rett syndrome up to age 7 comes from a functional lateralization of the cerebral hemispheres similar to that which Birkmayer and Rett proposed for normal infants up to age 1 (Birkmayer and Rett, 1954). However, examination of children over 7 showed that almost all of those patients who grasp objects prefer the right hand and show symptoms of disturbance of the functions of the pyramidal tract that are more pronounced in the left than in the right upper limb. It is suggested that in connection with the severe developmental retardation of the CNS in Rett syndrome the right shift factor of handedness (Annett, 1981) has a belated manifestation. Within the framework of a regression of the CNS there occurs a regression which is more pronounced in the right cerebral hemisphere than in the left.

  5. Age Differences in Strategy Shift: Retrieval Avoidance or General Shift Reluctance?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, David J.; Touron, Dayna R.; Hertzog, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of metacognitive age differences in skill acquisition strategies have relied exclusively on tasks with a processing shift from an algorithm to retrieval strategy. Older adults’ demonstrated reluctance to shift strategies in such tasks could reflect either a specific aversion to a memory retrieval strategy or a general, inertial resistance to strategy change. Haider and Frensch’s (1999) alphabet verification task (AVT) affords a non-retrieval-based strategy shift. Participants verify the continuation of alphabet strings such as D E F G [4] L, with the bracketed digit indicating a number of letters to be skipped. When all deviations are restricted to the letter-digit-letter portion, participants can speed their responses by selectively attend only to that part of the stimulus. We adapted the AVT to include conditions which promoted shift to a retrieval strategy, a selective attention strategy, or both strategies. Item-level strategy reports were validated by eye movement data. Older adults shifted more slowly to the retrieval strategy but more quickly to the selective attention strategy than young adults, indicating a retrieval-strategy avoidance. Strategy confidence and perceived strategy difficulty correlated with shift to the two strategies in both age groups. Perceived speed of responses with each strategy specifically correlated with older adults’ strategy choices, suggesting that some older adults avoid retrieval because they do not appreciate its efficiency benefits. PMID:23088195

  6. Age differences in strategy shift: retrieval avoidance or general shift reluctance?

    PubMed

    Frank, David J; Touron, Dayna R; Hertzog, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of metacognitive age differences in skill acquisition strategies have relied exclusively on tasks with a processing shift from an algorithm to retrieval strategy. Older adults' demonstrated reluctance to shift strategies in such tasks could reflect either a specific aversion to a memory retrieval strategy or a general, inertial resistance to strategy change. Haider and Frensch's (1999) alphabet verification task (AVT) affords a non-retrieval-based strategy shift. Participants verify the continuation of alphabet strings such as D E F G [4] L, with the bracketed digit indicating a number of letters to be skipped. When all deviations are restricted to the letter-digit-letter portion, participants can speed their responses by selectively attending to only that part of the stimulus. We adapted the AVT to include conditions that promoted shift to a retrieval strategy, a selective attention strategy, or both strategies. Item-level strategy reports were validated by eye movement data. Older adults shifted more slowly to the retrieval strategy but more quickly to the selective attention strategy than young adults, indicating a retrieval-strategy avoidance. Strategy confidence and perceived strategy difficulty correlated with shift to the two strategies in both age groups. Perceived speed of responses with each strategy specifically correlated with older adults' strategy choices, suggesting that some older adults avoid retrieval because they do not appreciate its efficiency benefits.

  7. Thermal shifts and intermittent linear response of aging systems.

    PubMed

    Sibani, Paolo; Christiansen, Simon

    2008-04-01

    At time t after an initial quench, an aging system responds to a perturbation turned on at time twshifts. The average response as a function of t/tw,eff , where tw,eff is the effective age, is similar to the response of a system aged isothermally at the final temperature. Using an Ising model with plaquette interactions, the applicability of analytic formulas for the average isothermal magnetization is confirmed. The T -shifted aging behavior of the model is approximately described using effective ages. Large positive shifts nearly reset the effective age. Negative T shifts offer a more detailed probe of the dynamics. Assuming the marginal stability of the "current" attractor against thermal noise fluctuations, the scaling form tw,eff=tw x and the dependence of the exponent x on the aging temperatures before and after the shift are theoretically available. The predicted form of x has no adjustable parameters. Both the algebraic scaling of the effective age and the form of the exponent reasonably agree with the data. The present simulations thus confirm the crucial role of marginal stability in glassy relaxation.

  8. Does age affect the relationship between control at work and sleep disturbance for shift workers?

    PubMed

    Loudoun, Rebecca Jane; Muurlink, Olav; Peetz, David; Murray, Georgina

    2014-12-01

    Among miners, shift work, aging and lack of control at work may be factors leading to increased sleep problems. Such risk factors may also operate in interaction, resulting in an even increased harm for sleep disruption. The present study aims at evaluating these relationships drawing on a sample of Australian mine and energy workers and their partners. The workers were mainly men. All performed shift work that included either nights (95%) or multiple shifts (92%), usually both (87%), while 36% were aged 50 years or above. The results show that low latitude over work activities is associated with higher sleep disturbances across the sample, though the effects are clearer amongst younger workers. By contrast, for younger workers, control over shift scheduling is not associated with sleep disturbances but for workers aged 50 or more, low control results in more sleep disturbance. Misalignment between shift workers and partner work schedules, and partner dissatisfaction with shift worker's employment and shift worker's work-life balance, are also associated with more sleep disturbances amongst shift workers.

  9. Impairment in abstraction and set shifting in aged rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tara L; Killiany, Ronald J; Herndon, James G; Rosene, Douglas L; Moss, Mark B

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the nature of changes in cognition with aging has increased in importance as the number of individuals over the age of 65 years grows. To date, studies have demonstrated that age-related changes occur most extensively in the cognitive domains of memory and executive function. Whereas a large number of studies have been conducted about the effects of aging on memory, far less have explored the effects of aging on the so called "executive function" which include abilities essential for successful performance of higher level activities of daily living. As part of our ongoing effort to better characterize these changes, we assessed executive function in a non-human primate model of normal human aging using the Conceptual Set Shifting Task (CSST). This recently developed task assesses abstraction, concept formation and set shifting in the monkey in a way analogous to the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) in humans. Relative to young adult monkeys, aged monkeys evidenced significant difficulty in both acquisition and performance on this task, and moreover, demonstrated a high degree of perseverative responding. The pattern of performance displayed by the aged monkeys suggests an age-related decline in prefrontal cortex (PFC) functioning.

  10. AGE restriction in diabetes mellitus: a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E

    2011-05-24

    Persistently elevated oxidative stress and inflammation precede or occur during the development of type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus and precipitate devastating complications. Given the rapidly increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus and obesity in the space of a few decades, new genetic mutations are unlikely to be the cause, instead pointing to environmental initiators. A hallmark of contemporary culture is a preference for thermally processed foods, replete with pro-oxidant advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). These molecules are appetite-increasing and, thus, efficient enhancers of overnutrition (which promotes obesity) and oxidant overload (which promotes inflammation). Studies of genetic and nongenetic animal models of diabetes mellitus suggest that suppression of host defenses, under sustained pressure from food-derived AGEs, may potentially shift homeostasis towards a higher basal level of oxidative stress, inflammation and injury of both insulin-producing and insulin-responsive cells. This sequence promotes both types of diabetes mellitus. Reducing basal oxidative stress by AGE restriction in mice, without energy or nutrient change, reinstates host defenses, alleviates inflammation, prevents diabetes mellitus, vascular and renal complications and extends normal lifespan. Studies in healthy humans and in those with diabetes mellitus show that consumption of high amounts of food-related AGEs is a determinant of insulin resistance and inflammation and that AGE restriction improves both. This Review focuses on AGEs as novel initiators of oxidative stress that precedes, rather than results from, diabetes mellitus. Therapeutic gains from AGE restriction constitute a paradigm shift.

  11. AGE restriction in diabetes mellitus: a paradigm shift

    PubMed Central

    Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Persistently elevated oxidative stress and inflammation precede or occur during the development of type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus and precipitate devastating complications. Given the rapidly increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus and obesity in the space of a few decades, new genetic mutations are unlikely to be the cause, instead pointing to environmental initiators. A hallmark of contemporary culture is a preference for thermally processed foods, replete with pro-oxidant advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). These molecules are appetite-increasing and, thus, efficient enhancers of overnutrition (which promotes obesity) and oxidant overload (which promotes inflammation). Studies of genetic and nongenetic animal models of diabetes mellitus suggest that suppression of host defenses, under sustained pressure from food-derived AGEs, may potentially shift homeostasis towards a higher basal level of oxidative stress, inflammation and injury of both insulin-producing and insulin-responsive cells. This sequence promotes both types of diabetes mellitus. Reducing basal oxidative stress by AGE restriction in mice, without energy or nutrient change, reinstates host defenses, alleviates inflammation, prevents diabetes mellitus, vascular and renal complications and extends normal lifespan. Studies in healthy humans and in those with diabetes mellitus show that consumption of high amounts of food-related AGEs is a determinant of insulin resistance and inflammation and that AGE restriction improves both. This Review focuses on AGEs as novel initiators of oxidative stress that precedes, rather than results from, diabetes mellitus. Therapeutic gains from AGE restriction constitute a paradigm shift. PMID:21610689

  12. Where is ELSA? The early to late shift in aging.

    PubMed

    Dew, Ilana T Z; Buchler, Norbou; Dobbins, Ian G; Cabeza, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Studies of cognitive and neural aging have recently provided evidence of a shift from an early- to late-onset cognitive control strategy, linked with temporally extended activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). It has been uncertain, however, whether this age-related shift is unique to PFC and executive control tasks or whether the functional location might vary depending on the particular cognitive processes that are altered. The present study tested whether an early-to-late shift in aging (ELSA) might emerge in the medial temporal lobes (MTL) during a protracted context memory task comprising both anticipatory cue (retrieval preparation) and retrieval probe (retrieval completion) phases. First, we found reduced MTL activity in older adults during the early retrieval preparation phase coupled with increased MTL activity during the late retrieval completion phase. Second, we found that functional connectivity between MTL and PFC regions was higher during retrieval preparation in young adults but higher during retrieval completion in older adults, suggesting an important interactive relationship between the ELSA pattern in MTL and PFC. Taken together, these results critically suggest that aging results in temporally lagged activity even in regions not typically associated with cognitive control, such as the MTL.

  13. Baby Boomers and the shifting political construction of old age.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Robert B; Gonyea, Judith G

    2012-04-01

    Employing the political construct of "target" populations, we suggest that the Boomers in old age will constitute a conceptually distinct population from that represented by either their parents or grandparents. A fourfold typology organized along the dimensions posited by Schneider and Ingram (1993) yields categorizations of target populations as Dependent, Deviant, Advantaged, or Contender. Although these authors labeled the aged as Advantaged, categorizations of target populations can and do change over time. Using historical analysis, we explore, first, the transformation of the aged from Dependent to Advantaged and the more recent transformation to Contender status. This latest shift is reinforced by the perceived characteristics of the Boomer cohort itself now entering old age and by economic and political circumstances severely constraining policy agendas and options. We argue that the combination of weakened legitimacy in the face of pressing needs among many of the Boomer population may result in a fracturing of elders' longstanding singular political imagery. More affluent Boomers will continue to fight for their benefits as Contenders, whereas vulnerable Boomers may be relegated back to the Dependent categorization.

  14. Distal Shift of Arterial Pressure Wave Reflection Sites with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Jun; Hayashi, Koichiro; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2010-01-01

    An early return of reflected waves, the backward propagation of the arterial pressure wave from the periphery to the heart, is associated with the augmentation of central pulse pressure and cardiovascular risks. The location of arterial pressure wave reflection, along with arterial stiffening, have a major influence on the timing of the reflected wave. To determine the influence of aging on the location of a major reflection site, arterial length (via three-dimensional artery tracing of magnetic resonance imaging) and central (carotid-femoral) and peripheral (femoral-ankle) pulse wave velocity were measured in 208 adults varying in age. The major reflection site was detected by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the reflected wave transit time (via carotid arterial pressure wave analysis). The length from the aortic valve to the major reflection site (e.g., effective reflecting length) significantly increased with aging. The effective reflecting length normalized by the arterial length demonstrated that the major reflection sites located between the aortic bifurcation and femoral site in most of the subjects. The normalized effective reflecting length did not alter with aging until 65-year-old and increased remarkably thereafter in men and women. The effective reflecting length was significantly and positively associated with the difference between central and peripheral pulse wave velocity (r=0.76). This correlation remained significant even when the influence of aortic pulse wave velocity was partial out (r=0.35). These results suggest that the major reflection site shifts distally with aging partly due to the closer matching of impedance provided by central and peripheral arterial stiffness. PMID:20876449

  15. [Cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic shift workers in a population of railway workers].

    PubMed

    Graziani, A; De Luca, A; Mazzantini, A; Montalti, M; Mucci, N; Cupelli, V; Arcangeli, G

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors prevalence is studied with an increasing interest, involving also working-age people, Several studies had evidenced that shift-work is a key factor in the etiology of cardiovascular illnesses. Railway workers--especially those who are involved in the monitoring of rail traffic--are often shift-workers. Their shift-schedule is based on a rotation of--in this order--afternoon, morning and night. Regarding the important role played by this kind of workers for the public safety, the evaluation of their cardiovascular risk is of utmost importance. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in railway shift-workers to define prevention strategies.

  16. Epigenetic oxidative redox shift (EORS) theory of aging unifies the free radical and insulin signaling theories.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Gregory J

    2010-03-01

    Harman's free radical theory of aging posits that oxidized macromolecules accumulate with age to decrease function and shorten life-span. However, nutritional and genetic interventions to boost anti-oxidants have generally failed to increase life-span. Furthermore, the free radical theory fails to explain why exercise causes higher levels of oxyradical damage, but generally promotes healthy aging. The separate anti-aging paradigms of genetic or caloric reductions in the insulin signaling pathway is thought to slow the rate of living to reduce metabolism, but recent evidence from Westbrook and Bartke suggests metabolism actually increases in long-lived mice. To unify these disparate theories and data, here, we propose the epigenetic oxidative redox shift (EORS) theory of aging. According to EORS, sedentary behavior associated with age triggers an oxidized redox shift and impaired mitochondrial function. In order to maintain resting energy levels, aerobic glycolysis is upregulated by redox-sensitive transcription factors. As emphasized by DeGrey, the need to supply NAD(+) for glucose oxidation and maintain redox balance with impaired mitochondrial NADH oxidoreductase requires the upregulation of other oxidoreductases. In contrast to the 2% inefficiency of mitochondrial reduction of oxygen to the oxyradical, these other oxidoreductases enable glycolytic energy production with a deleterious 100% efficiency in generating oxyradicals. To avoid this catastrophic cycle, lactate dehydrogenase is upregulated at the expense of lactic acid acidosis. This metabolic shift is epigenetically enforced, as is insulin resistance to reduce mitochondrial turnover. The low mitochondrial capacity for efficient production of energy reinforces a downward spiral of more sedentary behavior leading to accelerated aging, increased organ failure with stress, impaired immune and vascular functions and brain aging. Several steps in the pathway are amenable to reversal for exit from the vicious

  17. [ASSESSMENT OF EXTREME FACTORS OF SHIFT WORK IN ARCTIC CONDITIONS BY WORKERS WITH DIFFERENT REGULATORY PROCESSES].

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Ya A; Simonova, N N

    2016-01-01

    A man working on a shift basis in the Arctic, every day is under the influence of various extreme factors which are inevitable for oil and gas indudtry. To adapt to shift work employees use various resources of the individual. The purpose of research is the determination of personal resources of shift workers to overcome the adverse factors of the environment in the Arctic. The study involved 191 builder of main gas pipelines, working in shifts in the Tyumen region (the length of the shift 52 days of arrival) at the age of 23 to 59 (mean age 34.9 ± 8.1) years. Methods: psychological testing, questioning, observation, descriptive statistics, discriminant step by step analysis. There was revealed the correlation between the subjective assessment of the majority of adverse climatic factors in the regulatory process "assessment of results"; production factors--regulatory processes such as flexibility, autonomy, simulation, and the general level of self-regulation; social factors are more associated with the severity of such regulatory processes, flexibility and evaluation of results.

  18. Doctoral Curriculum Studies in an Age of Shifting Boundaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansaldo, Jim; Goodman, Jesse

    2002-01-01

    Describes faculty and student experiences involving efforts to restructure the curriculum-studies doctoral program at Indiana University in light of shifting and ambiguous field boundaries. (Contains 26 references.) ((PKP)

  19. Wettability shifts caused by CO2 aging on mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, B.; Clarens, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Interfacial forces at the CO2/brine/mineral ternary interface have a well-established impact on multiphase flow properties through porous media. In the context of geologic carbon sequestration, this wettability will impact capillary pressure, residual trapping, and a variety of other key parameters of interest. While the wettability of CO2 on pure mineral and real rock sample have been studied a great deal over the past few year, very little is known about how the wettability of these rocks could change over long time horizons as CO2 interacts with species in the brine and on the mineral surface. In this work we sought to explore the role that dilute inorganic and organic species that are likely to exist in connate brines might have on a suite of mineral species. High-pressure contact angle experiments were carried out on a suite of polished mineral surfaces. Both static captive bubble and advancing/receding contact angle measurements were carried out. The effect of ionic strength, and in particular the valence of the dominant ions in the brine are found to have an important impact on the wettability which cannot be explained solely based on the shifts in the interfacial tension between the CO2 and brine. More significantly, three organic species, formate, acetate, and oxalate, all three of which are representative species commonly encountered in the saline aquifers that are considered target repositories for carbon sequestration. All three organic species show impacts on wettability, with the organics generally increasing the CO2 wetting of the mineral surface. Not all pure minerals respond the same to the presence of organics, with micas showing a more pronounced influence than quartz. Sandstone and limestone samples aged with different kinds of hydrocarbons, a surrogate for oil-bearing rocks, are generally more CO2-wet, with larger contact angles in the CO2/brine system. Over multiple days, the contact angle decreases, which could be attributed to partitioning

  20. Periodontal disease pathogenesis: genetic risk factors and paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Beth M; Roberts, Frank A

    2005-03-01

    Periodontitis is a widespread disease caused by oral bacteria and their interaction with lifestyle and genetic risk factors. The focus of periodontal research has expanded over the past few years to include significant progress in the understanding of genetic processes provided by the Human Genome Project. This presentation summarizes recent views on periodontal pathogenesis and the genetic risk factors involved in the disease. Additionally, it describes the paradigm shift in periodontal care, which is evolving from a repair-based to a wellness-based model.

  1. Caucasian facial L* shifts may communicate anti-ageing efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zedayko, T; Azriel, M; Kollias, N

    2011-10-01

    An ageing study was conducted to capture skin colour parameters in the CIELab system from Caucasians of both genders and all available adult ages. This study produced a linear correlation between L* and age for a Caucasian population between 20 and 59 years of age as follows: (L* value) = -0.13 × (Age in years) + 63.01. Previous studies have addressed age-related changes in skin colour. This work presents a novel consumer correlated quantitative linear model of skin brightness by which to communicate age-related changes. Two product assessment studies are also presented here, demonstrating the ability of anti-ageing products to deliver on objective and subjective improvements in skin brightness. It was determined to be possible to use the fundamental Caucasian L*-age correlation to describe product benefits in a novel quantitative and consumer-relevant fashion, through the depiction of a 'years back' calculation.

  2. Effects of irregular-shift work and physical activity on cardiovascular risk factors in truck drivers.

    PubMed

    Marqueze, Elaine Cristina; Ulhôa, Melissa Araújo; Moreno, Claudia Roberta de Castro

    2013-06-01

    To analyze the putative effect of type of shift and its interaction with leisure-time physical activity on cardiovascular risk factors in truck drivers. A cross-sectional study was undertaken on 57 male truck drivers working at a transportation company, of whom 31 worked irregular shifts and 26 worked on the day-shift. Participants recorded their physical activity using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire along with measurements of blood pressure, body mass index and waist-hip ratio. Participants also provided a fasting blood sample for analysis of lipid-related outcomes. Data were analyzed using a factorial model which was covariate-controlled for age, smoking, work demand, control at work and social support. Most of the irregular-shift and day-shift workers worked more than 8 hours per day (67.7% and 73.1%, respectively). The mean duration of experience working the irregular schedule was 15.7 years. Day-shift workers had never engaged in irregular-shift work and had been working as a truck driver for 10.8 years on average. The irregular-shift drivers had lower work demand but less control compared to day-shift drivers (p < 0.05). Moderately-active irregular-shift workers had higher systolic and diastolic arterial pressures (143.7 and 93.2 mmHg, respectively) than moderately-active day-shift workers (116 and 73.3 mmHg, respectively) (p < 0.05) as well as higher total cholesterol concentrations (232.1 and 145 mg/dl, respectively) (p = 0.01). Irrespective of their physical activity, irregular-shift drivers had higher total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations (211.8 and 135.7 mg/dl, respectively) than day-shift workers (161.9 and 96.7 mg/dl, respectively (ANCOVA, p < 0.05). Truck drivers are exposed to cardiovascular risk factors due to the characteristics of the job, such as high work demand, long working hours and time in this profession, regardless of shift type or leisure-time physical activity.

  3. Shift rotation, overtime, age, and anxiety as predictors of offshore sleep patterns.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Katharine R

    2015-01-01

    Shift work on offshore oil/gas installations necessitates 12 h shifts and rapid day/night shift changes. In the North Sea, both 'fixed-shift' (alternate day-shift and night-shift tours) and 'swing-shift' rotations (with a midtour shift change) are operated. The present study used survey data (n = 775) to examine sleep patterns over 3 'phases' of the offshore work cycle (day shifts, DS; night shifts, NS; and leave weeks, LS) in relation to shift roster, overtime, age, offshore shift work exposure, and anxiety. Specific predictions were tested in a mixed-model ANOVA in which DS, NS, and LS sleep were treated as repeated measures. Sleep duration and sleep quality were predicted by significant interactions of phase with roster, anxiety, age, and shift work exposure, but the patterns of findings differed across DS, NS and LS. Consistent with other published findings, personnel working 2-week nights-to-days swing shifts reported shorter DS and NS sleep duration than those working fixed shifts. Extended 3-week tours (7 nights/14 days) showed an advantage only for DS sleep. There was no evidence that LS sleep was impaired following night-shift work. Overtime was negatively related only to NS sleep duration. Anxiety predicted poor NS and DS sleep; the relationship between age and NS sleep quality was curvilinear with minimum values at 38-42 y. Shift work exposure negatively predicted NS (but not DS or LS) sleep. The results are discussed in relation to the initial predictions; more general implications of the findings, and methodological limitations of the work, are considered in a final section. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Effects of shift rotation and the flexibility of a shift system on daytime alertness and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Viitasalo, Katriina; Kuosma, Eeva; Laitinen, Jaana; Härmä, Mikko

    2008-06-01

    A controlled intervention study was conducted to evaluate the effects of two changes in shift characteristics on alertness and cardiovascular risk factors: a change in shift rotation (direction and speed) and a change in the flexibility of the shift system. Altogether 84 male workers currently working in a backward-rotating shift system volunteered for the study. A total of 40 men changed to a rapidly forward-rotating shift system, 22 changed to a more flexible shift system, and 22 remained with the old shift system. Health effects were studied with the use of clinical measurements, blood tests, and questionnaires before and after the shift changes. Analyses of variance were used with repeated measures to study associations of cardiovascular risk factors and daytime sleepiness according to the change in shift systems. The mean number of days on which the workers reported sleepiness decreased in the group with the forward-rotating shift system when compared with that of the group on the old shift system (from 2.9 to 2.1 days/week, P=0.02). Systolic blood pressure decreased (from 142 to 136 mm Hg, P=0.049), and heart rate showed a declining trend (from 66 to 60 beats/minute, P=0.06) in the flexible shift system when the three groups were compared. The study indicates that a faster speed, together with a change to the forward direction, in shift rotation alleviates daytime sleepiness. Combining individual flexibility with company-based flexibility in a shift system may have favorable effects on shift workers' blood pressure.

  5. Applying the age-shift approach to model responses to midrotation fertilization

    Treesearch

    Colleen A. Carlson; Thomas R. Fox; H. Lee Allen; Timothy J. Albaugh

    2010-01-01

    Growth and yield models used to evaluate midrotation fertilization economics require adjustments to account for the typically observed responses. This study investigated the use of age-shift models to predict midrotation fertilizer responses. Age-shift prediction models were constructed from a regional study consisting of 43 installations of a nitrogen (N) by...

  6. The effect of aging on vertical postural control during the forward and backward shift of the center of pressure.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Satoshi; Saito, Hiroshi; Anjiki, Tsubasa; Osanai, Hitomi

    2015-10-01

    Preventing fall-related injuries is becoming a priority as the world population ages. This study's purpose was to examine the effect of aging on vertical postural control in the community-dwelling elderly. Thirty-six elderly individuals and twenty-two healthy young adults were asked to shift their centers of pressure (COPs) as far as possible while standing. The COP position, angle of each lower leg joint, and postural muscle activities were measured using a force plate, three-dimensional motion analyzer, and electromyogram, respectively. The vertical position of the center of mass (COM) was also measured to assess the change in vertical postural control. The backward COP shift in the elderly group was significantly smaller than that in the young group, and both the forward and backward COM shifts were significantly smaller in elders relative to those in youths. The COM position in the elderly group during the backward COP shift was also significantly lower than that in the young group. Knee and ankle joint movements differed between the two groups during the backward COP shift. Factor analysis indicated that dorsal and ventral muscle groups were involved in the COP shift. Specifically, the relationship between the biceps femoris muscle and the voluntary COP shift was reinforced in the elderly group. These findings suggest that the vertical postural strategy changes in the elderly during the backward COP shift.

  7. Influencing Factors for Sleep Quality Among Shift-working Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study in China Using 3-factor Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Sun, Dong-Mei; Li, Chang-Bing; Tao, Min-Fang

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify influencing factors for sleep quality among shift-working nurses based on a three-factor scoring model that included sleep efficacy, sleep quality and daily dysfunction. A cross-sectional survey of 513 nurses in a hospital in Shanghai, China, was conducted using a self-reported questionnaire. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Data were analyzed based on the three-factor PSQI model: Factor 1, sleep efficacy; Factor 2, sleep quality; Factor 3, daily disturbances. After adjusting for age, marital status, and having children, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that participants who had previous shift work experience which was at least 6 months ago, or were currently performing shift work were significantly more likely to have poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) than those who had never done shift work (adjusted odds ratios of 3.943 and 3.975, respectively, both p < .001). Mean scores of the three individual factors increased significantly among nurses currently performing shift work compared with those who had never done shift work (Factor 1, β = 0.61, p < .001; Factor 2, β = 1.86, p < .001; Factor 3, β = 0.45, p = .002). Mean scores of Factor 2 and Factor 3 increased significantly among nurses with previous shift work experience compared with those who had never done shift work (Factor 2, β = 1.15, p = .003; Factor 3, β = 0.52, p = .005). Performing current shift work and performing shift work previously were significantly associated with poor sleep quality. An appropriate arrangement and intervention strategies are needed in Chinese hospitals in order to improve sleep quality among shift-working nurses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Shift-work disorder and sleep-related environmental factors in the manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yukari; Nakamura, Arisa; Yamauchi, Takenori; Takeuchi, Shouhei; Kuroda, Yoshiki

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between shift-work disorder (SWD) and environmental and somatic factors related to falling asleep among rapidly rotating shift workers in a manufacturing industry.A total of 556 male workers were recruited to complete a self-administered questionnaire regarding age, shift work experience, lifestyle, and family structure; the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS); the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI); and the Horne and Ostberg questionnaire, a questionnaire for environmental and somatic factors related to falling asleep. We classified workers according to having SWD or not, and compared workers with SWD with those without this disorder in terms of all items covered in the aforementioned questionnaires. A total of 208 workers (62.8%) working rapidly rotating shifts were diagnosed with SWD. The ESS and PSQI scores and scores for environmental and somatic factors were significantly higher in workers with SWD than in those without this disorder. The ESS scores and scores for environmental and somatic factors were also associated with SWD in the logistic regression analyses. We suggest that susceptibility to SWD in the manufacturing industry may be associated with environmental and somatic factors related to falling asleep.

  9. Rotating night shift work, sleep quality, selected lifestyle factors and prolactin concentration in nurses and midwives.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Agnieszka; Sobala, Wojciech; Peplonska, Beata

    2015-04-01

    The pattern of secretion of many hormones, including prolactin, is dependent on the circadian rhythm. Night shift work involves exposure to artificial light at night and sleep deficiency, which in turn can affect prolactin synthesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible association between night shift work characteristics, sleep quality, lifestyle factors and prolactin concentration, using data from a cross-sectional study of nurses and midwives. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 327 nurses and midwives currently working on rotating night shifts, and 330 nurses and midwives working during the day (aged 40-60 years) (388 premenopausal and 269 postmenopausal). Information about night shift work characteristics, lifestyle, reproductive factors, sleep pattern and other covariates was collected through a face-to-face interview, and from a one-week work and sleep diary completed by the subjects. Weight and height were measured. Prolactin concentration was measured in the morning blood sample using the electrochemiluminesence immunoassay method. Associations were analyzed using linear regression models adjusted for important confounders. Analyses were carried out separately in pre- and postmenopausal women. None of the night shift work or sleep characteristics was significantly associated with prolactin concentration. Prolactin concentration was significantly (p < 0.05) inversely associated with smoking and time of blood sample collection. These results were consistent among both pre- and postmenopausal women. Nulliparity was significantly positively associated with prolactin among premenopausal women, but inversely among postmenopausal. Age was related to prolactin among postmenopausal women only. Our study indicates that rotating night shift work is not associated with prolactin concentration. Smoking, parity, time of blood collection and age among postmenopausal women were significant determinants of prolactin.

  10. Storylines of aging with HIV: shifts toward sense making.

    PubMed

    Beuthin, Rosanne E; Bruce, Anne; Sheilds, Laurene

    2015-05-01

    Aging with HIV is a new phenomenon. It is expected that by 2015, approximately half of adults living with HIV in the United States will be age 50 and older. We used narrative inquiry to explore how older adults with HIV storied their experience and made sense of aging. Over a 3.5-year period, we interviewed 5 older adults living with HIV for 13 to 24 years. In analyzing the coconstructed stories, we identify six storylines that enhance understanding and guide listening: embodiment of the illness, sense making, death and loss, secrets and stigma, identity, and seeking connection. We theorize that the degree to which one reconciles each storyline influences how well one lives with illness. We share a storied exemplar to illustrate these storylines in one participant's experience of aging with HIV. These findings emphasize how vital is telling one's illness story, because sense making happens in the telling. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Baby Boomers and the Shifting Political Construction of Old Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Robert B.; Gonyea, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Employing the political construct of "target" populations, we suggest that the Boomers in old age will constitute a conceptually distinct population from that represented by either their parents or grandparents. A fourfold typology organized along the dimensions posited by Schneider and Ingram (1993) yields categorizations of target populations as…

  12. Lifestyles and Ageing: Targeting Key Mechanisms to Shift the Balance from Unhealthy to Healthy Ageing.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Claudio; Landi, Francesco; Delogu, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy has dramatically enhanced the prevalence of age-related chronic diseases resulting in growing costs for both society and individuals. Identification of strategies contributing to healthy ageing is thus one of the major challenges of the coming years. Lifestyle has a primary role among non-genetic factors affecting health and lifespan. In particular, nutrition, mental and physical activity impact the molecular and functional mechanisms whose alterations cause the major age-related diseases. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying the beneficial action of correct lifestyles is useful to develop interventions aimed at preventing and/or delaying the onset of chronic degenerative diseases, to identify high-risk populations who could be targeted in intervention trials as well as to identify novel biomarkers of healthy ageing. A multidisciplinary team of basic scientists and clinicians operating at the Catholic University Medical School in Rome is actively working on this topic to determine the ability of healthy lifestyles to promote active ageing and counteract the major age-related diseases affecting brain health, musculoskeletal function and gut microenvironment. This chapter summarizes our strategic approaches, the major results we obtained so far and the main experimental and translational perspectives.

  13. Revolutions and shifting paradigms in human factors & ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Boff, Kenneth R

    2006-07-01

    The "Revolution in Information Technology" has spawned a series of transformational revolutions in the nature and practice of human factors and ergonomics (HFE). "Generation 1" HFE evolved with a focus on adapting equipment, workplace and tasks to human capabilities and limitations. Generation 2, focused on cognitive systems integration, arose in response to the need to manage automation and dynamic function allocation. Generation 3 is focused on symbiotic technologies that can amplify human physical and cognitive capabilities. Generation 4 is emergent and is focused on biological enhancement of physical or cognitive capabilities. The shift from HFE Generations 1 and 2 to Generations 3 and 4 profoundly alters accepted boundary constraints on the adaptability of humans in complex systems design. Furthermore, it has opened an ethical divide between those that see cognitive and physical enhancement as a great benefit to society and those who perceive this as tampering with the fundamentals of human nature.

  14. Understanding less than nothing: children's neural response to negative numbers shifts across age and accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Gullick, Margaret M.; Wolford, George

    2013-01-01

    We examined the brain activity underlying the development of our understanding of negative numbers, which are amounts lacking direct physical counterparts. Children performed a paired comparison task with positive and negative numbers during an fMRI session. As previously shown in adults, both pre-instruction fifth-graders and post-instruction seventh-graders demonstrated typical behavioral and neural distance effects to negative numbers, where response times and parietal and frontal activity increased as comparison distance decreased. We then determined the factors impacting the distance effect in each age group. Behaviorally, the fifth-grader distance effect for negatives was significantly predicted only by positive comparison accuracy, indicating that children who were generally better at working with numbers were better at comparing negatives. In seventh-graders, negative number comparison accuracy significantly predicted their negative number distance effect, indicating that children who were better at working with negative numbers demonstrated a more typical distance effect. Across children, as age increased, the negative number distance effect increased in the bilateral IPS and decreased frontally, indicating a frontoparietal shift consistent with previous numerical development literature. In contrast, as negative comparison task accuracy increased, the parietal distance effect increased in the left IPS and decreased in the right, possibly indicating a change from an approximate understanding of negatives' values to a more exact, precise representation (particularly supported by the left IPS) with increasing expertise. These shifts separately indicate the effects of increasing maturity generally in numeric processing and specifically in negative number understanding. PMID:24058350

  15. Understanding less than nothing: children's neural response to negative numbers shifts across age and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Wolford, George

    2013-01-01

    We examined the brain activity underlying the development of our understanding of negative numbers, which are amounts lacking direct physical counterparts. Children performed a paired comparison task with positive and negative numbers during an fMRI session. As previously shown in adults, both pre-instruction fifth-graders and post-instruction seventh-graders demonstrated typical behavioral and neural distance effects to negative numbers, where response times and parietal and frontal activity increased as comparison distance decreased. We then determined the factors impacting the distance effect in each age group. Behaviorally, the fifth-grader distance effect for negatives was significantly predicted only by positive comparison accuracy, indicating that children who were generally better at working with numbers were better at comparing negatives. In seventh-graders, negative number comparison accuracy significantly predicted their negative number distance effect, indicating that children who were better at working with negative numbers demonstrated a more typical distance effect. Across children, as age increased, the negative number distance effect increased in the bilateral IPS and decreased frontally, indicating a frontoparietal shift consistent with previous numerical development literature. In contrast, as negative comparison task accuracy increased, the parietal distance effect increased in the left IPS and decreased in the right, possibly indicating a change from an approximate understanding of negatives' values to a more exact, precise representation (particularly supported by the left IPS) with increasing expertise. These shifts separately indicate the effects of increasing maturity generally in numeric processing and specifically in negative number understanding.

  16. Age-Related Shift in Neuro-Activation during a Word-Matching Task

    PubMed Central

    Methqal, Ikram; Provost, Jean-Sebastien; Wilson, Maximiliano A.; Monchi, Oury; Amiri, Mahnoush; Pinsard, Basile; Ansado, Jennyfer; Joanette, Yves

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence from the neuroscience of aging suggests that executive function plays a pivotal role in maintaining semantic processing performance. However, the presumed age-related activation changes that sustain executive semantic processing remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to explore the executive aspects of semantic processing during a word-matching task with regard to age-related neuro-functional reorganization, as well as to identify factors that influence executive control profiles. Twenty younger and 20 older participants underwent fMRI scanning. The experimental task was based on word-matching, wherein visual feedback was used to instruct participants to either maintain or switch a semantic-matching rule. Response time and correct responses were assessed for each group. A battery of cognitive tests was administrated to all participants and the older group was divided into two subgroups based on their cognitive control profiles. Even though the percentage of correct responses was equivalent in the task performance between both groups and within the older groups, neuro-functional activation differed in frontoparietal regions with regards to age and cognitive control profiles. A correlation between behavioral measures (correct responses and response times) and brain signal changes was found in the left inferior parietal region in older participants. Results indicate that the shift in age-related activation from frontal to parietal regions can be viewed as another form of neuro-functional reorganization. The greater reliance on inferior parietal regions in the older compared to the younger group suggests that the executive control system is still efficient and sustains semantic processing in the healthy aging brain. Additionally, cognitive control profiles underlie executive ability differences in healthy aging appear to be associated with specific neuro-functional reorganization throughout frontal and parietal regions. These findings

  17. Mindfulness and the aging brain: a proposed paradigm shift

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; De Leon, Angeline A.; Patterson, Beth; Schirda, Brittney L.; Janssen, Alisha L.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a proliferation of cognitive training studies investigating the efficacy of various cognitive training paradigms as well as strategies for improving cognitive control in the elderly. While some have found support for the transfer of training, the majority of training studies show modest to no transfer effects. When transfer effects have been observed, the mechanisms contributing to enhanced functioning have been difficult to dissociate. In this review, we provide a theoretical rationale for the study of mindfulness in older adults as a particular type of training program designed to improve cognitive control by capitalizing on older adults’ acquired behavioral orientation toward higher socioemotional goals. Given the synergistic relationship between emotional and cognitive control processes, the paradoxical divergence in older adults’ functional trajectory in these respective domains, and the harmonious interplay of cognitive and emotional control embedded in the practice of mindfulness, we propose mindfulness training as an opportunistic approach to cultivating cognitive benefits in older adults. The study of mindfulness within aging, we argue, capitalizes on a fundamental finding of the socioemotional aging literature, namely the preferential change in motivational goals of older adults from ones involving future-oriented wants and desires to present-focused emotion regulation and gratification. PMID:25009492

  18. Nurses aged over 50 years and their experiences of shift work.

    PubMed

    Clendon, Jill; Walker, Leonie

    2013-10-01

    The Late Career Nurse project examined views and characteristics of nurses working in New Zealand who were born before 1960. This paper focuses on the experiences of such nurses who undertake shift work. The mean age of registered nurses in New Zealand has been rising steadily, and 40% are now aged 50 years or over. While there is substantial literature on the phenomenon and consequences of the ageing nursing workforce, little is known of the particular experiences of nurses aged over 50 years who work shifts. An anonymous online survey was emailed to eligible nurse New Zealand Nurses Organisation members aged over 50 years in February 2012. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the 3273 responses received were undertaken. Over 45% of respondents worked shifts or flexible hours. While shift work suited many, others noted deleterious effects on family and social relationships, physical and mental health (notably sleep patterns and fatigue), and decreasing tolerance for shift work as they age. Poor scheduling practices were particularly detrimental. Worldwide, workforce ageing means strategies are required to retain older nurses in the workforce. Improved scheduling practices including increasing access to flexible and part time work hours, and development of resources on coping with shift work are recommended. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Factors affecting work ability in day and shift-working nurses.

    PubMed

    Camerino, Donatella; Conway, Paul Maurice; Sartori, Samantha; Campanini, Paolo; Estryn-Béhar, Madeleine; van der Heijden, Beatrice Isabella Johanna Maria; Costa, Giovanni

    2008-04-01

    Satisfactory work ability is sustained and promoted by good physical and mental health and by favorable working conditions. This study examined whether favorable and rewarding work-related factors increased the work ability among European nurses. The study sample was drawn from the Nurses' Early Exit Study and consisted of 7,516 nursing staff from seven European countries working in state-owned and private hospitals. In all, 10.8% were day, 4.2% were permanent night, 20.9% were shift without night shift, and 64.1% were shift workers with night shifts. Participants were administered a composite questionnaire at baseline (Time 0) and 1 yr later (Time 1). The Work Ability Index (WAI) at Time 1 was used as the outcome measure, while work schedule, sleep, rewards (esteem and career), satisfaction with pay, work involvement and motivation, and satisfaction with working hours at Time 0 were included as potential determinants of work ability. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted after adjusting for a number of confounders (i.e., country, age, sex, type of employment, family status, and other job opportunities in the same area). Work schedule was not related to Time 1 changes in WAI. Higher sleep quality and quantity and more favorable psychosocial factors significantly increased work ability levels. Higher sleep quality and quantity did not mediate the effect of work schedule on work ability. No relevant interaction effects on work ability were observed between work schedule and the other factors considered at Time 0. As a whole, sleep and satisfaction with working time were gradually reduced from day work to permanent night work. However, scores on work involvement, motivation, and satisfaction with pay and rewards were the highest in permanent night workers and the lowest in rotating shift workers that included night shifts.

  20. Dispositional factors and work mastery among shift workers.

    PubMed

    Foldal, Vegard; Langvik, Eva; Saksvik-Lehouillier, Ingvild

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how broad personality dimensions and dispositional resistance to change are associated with mastery of work among shift workers. A total of 285 shift workers employed in rotating shifts with morning, evening and night work and night shift schedules in a municipality in Norway completed electronic questionnaires. The findings suggest that the broad personality dimensions neuroticism and conscientiousness were significant predictors of perceived work mastery among shift workers in this sample, whereas the narrow trait dispositional resistance to change was not.

  1. Personality factors related to shift work tolerance in two- and three-shift workers.

    PubMed

    Natvik, Sylvia; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Moen, Bente Elisabeth; Magerøy, Nils; Sivertsen, Børge; Pallesen, Ståle

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether different personality variables were associated with shift work tolerance, and whether these potential associations were moderated by various types of shift work. The sample comprised 1505 nurses who worked either two or three rotating shifts. Personality traits were measured in terms of morningness, flexibility, languidity and hardiness. Morningness reflects the tendency to be alert relatively early in the morning and sleepy relatively early in the evening. Flexibility denotes the ability to both work and sleep at odd times of the day, while languidity concerns the tendency to become tired/sleepy when cutting down on sleep. Hardiness relates to resilience to stressful life events. The dependent variables in this study comprised of measures of insomnia, sleepiness, depression and anxiety. Hierarchical regression analyses, which controlled for demographic variables and work load, revealed that Morningness was significantly and negatively related to insomnia. The Morningness by Shift type interaction was overall significant for depressive symptoms. Morningness was near significantly associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in three-shift workers, but unrelated to depressive symptoms in two-shift workers. Flexibility was associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms. Flexibility by Shift type interaction was significant for insomnia, indicating that flexibility was negatively associated with insomnia for three-shift workers and unrelated with insomnia for two-shift workers. Languidity was associated with higher levels of sleepiness, depressive and anxiety symptoms. Hardiness was associated with lower levels of all four dependent variables. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  2. The factor harmful to the quality of human life--shift-work.

    PubMed

    Strzemecka, Joanna; Pencuła, Marcin; Owoc, Alfred; Szot, Wojciech; Strzemecka, Ewa; Jabłoński, Mirosław; Bojar, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    The system of human activity, which is established by genetics and regulated by outer and inner factors, is associated with many characteristics which maintain the body in the best condition and ensure appropriate life quality. To evaluate of life quality among male shift-workers. Research based on a self-devised questionnaire, conducted among 700 shift-workers, followed by statistical analysis of the results. Nearly a half of respondents (43.00%) reported that shift-work influences the quality of their family life. Remarkably, such an opinion was often stated by people with children (46.01%) p<0.05, the divorced (58.22%), married people (44.74%) and bachelors (25.33%), respectively. Fathers usually indicated lack of contact with their family as well as irregular consumption of meals (66.91%). Almost every third respondent noted that their shift type of work negatively influence their sexual life (31.14%). It was shown that shift-work negatively influences the respondents' life quality in the form of deterioration of the quality of family life; the respondents, regardless of marital status, age and having children, most often complained about the lack of contact with the family and irregular eating with them; negative influence on sexual life, which was the case in one-third of respondents. In order to encourage healthy behaviour and increase the quality of life of people performing shift-work, training and programmes should be introduced. These would help shift- workers to adjust their work time to their family and social life.

  3. Age differences and similarities in the shift from computation to retrieval during reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Katherine A; Touron, Dayna R

    2009-06-01

    Previous research has established that 1 mechanism underlying speed-ups in task performance with practice involves a shift from computational processing to retrieval of information encoded earlier in practice. To what extent do young and older adults differ in shifts from computation to retrieval with practice in reading comprehension? Young and older adults read short stories containing an unfamiliar noun-noun combination (e.g., bee caterpillar) followed by disambiguating information indicating the combination's meaning (either the normatively dominant meaning or an alternative subordinate meaning). Stories were presented either once or repeatedly across practice blocks. In Experiment 1, both age groups shifted from computation to retrieval with practice for the repeated items. However, older adults were slower to shift (e.g., older adults showed slower convergence of reading times for repeated subordinate and dominant items). Results of Experiment 2 suggested that the slower shift was due to age differences in bias against using retrieval rather than associative learning differences. The authors compare age differences in retrieval shifts in reading versus other tasks and discuss implications for age differences in the regulation of reading comprehension. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Age-related alterations in mesenchymal stem cells related to shift in differentiation from osteogenic to adipogenic potential: implication to age-associated bone diseases and defects.

    PubMed

    Kim, MiJung; Kim, ChanWha; Choi, Yu Suk; Kim, MinHwan; Park, ChanJeoung; Suh, Yousin

    2012-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have attracted considerable attention in the fields of cell and gene therapy due to their intrinsic ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. The various therapeutic applications involving MSC require initial expansion and/or differentiation in vitro prior to clinical use. However, serial passages of MSC in culture lead to decreased differentiation potential and stem cell characteristics, eventually inducing cellular aging which will limit the success of cell-based therapeutic interventions. Here we review the age-related changes that occur in MSC with a special focus on the shift of differentiation potential from osteogenic to adipogenic lineage during the MSC aging processes and how aging causes this preferential shift by oxidative stress and/or energy metabolism defect. Oxidative stress-related signals and some microRNAs affect the differentiation potential shift of MSC by directly targeting key regulatory factors such as Runx-2 or PPAR-γ, and energy metabolism pathway is involved as well. All information described here including transcription factors, microRNAs and FoxOs could be used towards development of treatment regimens for age-related bone diseases and related defects based on mutually exclusive lineage fate determination of MSC.

  5. The human factors of implementing shift work in logging operations.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D L; Gallagher, T V; Thomas, R E

    2008-10-01

    A fairly recent development in the forest industry is the use of shift work in logging in the southeastern U.S. Logging company owners are implementing shift work as an opportunity to increase production and potentially reduce the cost of producing each unit of wood, without consideration of the potential impacts on the logging crew. There are many documented physiological and psychological impacts on workers from shift work in a variety of industries, although few address forestry workers in the U.S. Semi-structured interviews were performed to gather information about how logging company owners were implementing shift work in seven southeastern states. Data collected during the interviews included employee turnover, shift hours, shift scheduling, safety considerations, and production impacts. Various work schedules were employed. The majority of the schedules encompassed less than 24 hours per day. Permanent and rotating shift schedules were found. None of the logging company owners used more than two crews in a 24-hour period. Additional safety precautions were implemented as a result of working after dark. No in-woods worker accidents or injuries were reported by any of those interviewed. Results indicate that a variety of work schedules can be successfully implemented in the southeastern logging industry.

  6. Exposure to Shift Work as a Risk Factor for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Timothy H.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Using telephone survey data from 1111 retired older adults (≥65 years; 634 male, 477 female), we tested the hypothesis that exposure to shift work might result in increased self-reported diabetes. Five shift work exposure bins were considered: 0 years, 1-7 years, 8-14 years, 15-20 years, and >20 years. Shift work exposed groups showed an increased proportion of self-reported diabetes (χ2 = 22.32, p < 0.001), with odds ratios (ORs) of about 2 when compared to the 0-year group. The effect remained significant after adjusting for gender and body mass index (BMI) (OR ≥ 1.4; χ2 = 10.78, p < 0.05). There was a significant shift work exposure effect on BMI (χ2 = 80.70, p < 0.001) but no significant gender effect (χ2 = 0.37, p > 0.50). PMID:24132061

  7. Does the light shift drive frequency aging in the rubidium atomic clock?

    PubMed

    Camparo, James

    2005-07-01

    Frequency aging in the rubidium (Rb) vapor-cell atomic clock plays a significant role in the device's timekeeping ability. Though many researchers have speculated on the physical mechanism(s) driving the linear, deterministic frequency change (i.e., deltaf(t)/fo = At), there is little unambiguous experimental data regarding the phenomenon. Here, long-term data were used from on-orbit global positioning system (GPS) Rb clocks to examine one postulated mechanism for frequency aging (i.e., the light-shift effect). Defining the light shift of the clock's fractional frequency as alphaI/Io, where alpha is the light-shift coefficient, we find that temporal variations of the relative light intensity, I/Io, cannot account for frequency aging. However, for the population of clocks considered here, we obtain the intriguing result that alpha/A = 1.7 +/- 1.5. Thus, it may be that frequency aging is driven by the light-shift effect through temporal variations of the light-shift coefficient.

  8. Age and Achievement: The Age Factor in Predicting Academic Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Sung-Mook

    1982-01-01

    In recent years a dramatic increase in enrollments of mature age students has occurred in courses of arts, social sciences, and humanities. The main objective of this study was to examine the predictive value of the age factor in the academic performance of behavioral science students at a regional college of advanced education in Australia. (SSH)

  9. Aging Successfully: A Four-Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Yen, Tung-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The study was designed to validate a model for a successful aging process and examine the gender differences in the aging process. Three hundred twelve participants who were 65 or older completed a Taiwan Social Change Survey that measures four factors that define successful aging process: including physical, psychological, social support, and…

  10. Aging Successfully: A Four-Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Yen, Tung-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The study was designed to validate a model for a successful aging process and examine the gender differences in the aging process. Three hundred twelve participants who were 65 or older completed a Taiwan Social Change Survey that measures four factors that define successful aging process: including physical, psychological, social support, and…

  11. Nitrogen stable isotopes reveal age-dependent dietary shift in the Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis.

    PubMed

    Aya, Frolan A; Kudo, Isao

    2017-03-01

    Ontogenetic niche shifts in diet are a consequence of changes in body size or resource partitioning between age classes. To better resolve the feeding patterns of the Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis, we examined the relative importance of age and size in the diet of this species using stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) from 2006 to 2009. Contribution of food sources was quantified using an isotope mixing model by comparing the muscle tissue isotope ratios to those of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) and their zooplankton prey (e.g. micro- and meso-zooplankton). Unlike the δ(13)C values, which remained constant with age and size, muscle δ(15)N values were more positively correlated with age accounting for 69 % of variations than size with only 46 %. Increasing (15)N values with age suggested that shifts in diet from SPOM to micro- and meso-zooplankton occurred during ontogeny in M. yessoensis. Results of the isotope mixing model indicated that SPOM contribution to scallop's diet decreased from 68 to 8 % while those of zooplankton increased from 15 to 50 % with increasing age. This study concludes that age-related dietary shift explains the enrichment of (15)N, as a result of predation on zooplankton by M. yessoensis.

  12. Sports participation during adolescence: a shift from environmental to genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Stubbe, Janine H; Boomsma, Dorret I; De Geus, Eco J C

    2005-04-01

    A twin design was used to assess the relative contribution of genetic and environmental influences on the variation in sports participation of Dutch male and female twins between the ages of 13 and 20 yr. Survey data from 2628 complete twin pairs were available (443 male and 652 female monozygotic twin pairs, 377 male and 434 female dizygotic twin pairs, and 722 opposite-sex twin pairs). Subjects were classified as participating in sports if they engaged in competitive or noncompetitive leisure-time sports activities with a minimal intensity of 4 METs for at least 60 min.wk. An overall main effect of age and sex was found on the sports participation dichotomy. Younger twins participated more in sports than older twins, and for each age group males participated more often than females. Genetic analyses of twin resemblance showed a shift in the factors contributing to sports participation from adolescence to adulthood. Between the ages of 13 and 16 yr, environmental factors shared by children from the same family largely account for individual differences in sports participation (78-84%), whereas genes are of no importance. At the age of 17-18 yr, genetic influences start to appear (36%), and the role of common environment decreases (47%). After the age of 18 yr, genes largely explain individual differences in sports participation (85%), and common environmental factors no longer contribute. Environmental factors shared by family members determine sports participation in young adolescence but cease to be of importance in adulthood when individual differences in sports participation are largely due to genetic variation.

  13. [Analysis of risk factors for hypertension among taxi drivers on different shifts].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenhua; Wang, Yuxiao; Yan, Fengfeng; Wei, Xiaomin; Yu, Sufang

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the incidence and risk factors for hypertension among taxi drivers working different shifts. Using the cluster sampling method, 415 day-shift and 304 night-shift taxi drivers in Jinan, China were selected and investigated. The influencing factors for hypertension were analyzed. The incidence of hypertension in all taxi drivers was 33.2%. The incidence of hypertension in night-shift drivers was significantly higher than that in day-shift drivers (37.8% vs 29.9%, P<0.05). According to multivariate analysis, the incidence of hypertension in day-shift drivers was closely related to body mass index (BMI), working years, working hours, sleep duration, rest days, diet quality, water intake, and smoking, while the incidence of hypertension in night-shift drivers was closely related to BMI, working years, working hours, part-time job, sleep duration, rest days, and drinking. BMI, working years, and working hours are the common risk factors for hypertension in day-shift and night-shift drivers. Sleep duration and rest days are the common protective factors. The risk factors for hypertension in taxi drivers vary with different shifts.

  14. Age-Related Change in Shifting Attention between Global and Local Levels of Hierarchical Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huizinga, Mariette; Burack, Jacob A.; Van der Molen, Maurits W.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this study was the developmental pattern of the ability to shift attention between global and local levels of hierarchical stimuli. Children aged 7 years and 11 years and 21-year-old adults were administered a task (two experiments) that allowed for the examination of 1) the direction of attention to global or local stimulus levels;…

  15. Determining productivity gains from herbaceous vegetation management with 'age-shift' calculations

    Treesearch

    David B. South; James H. Miller; Mark O. Kimberley; Curtis L. Vanderschaaf

    2006-01-01

    Gains in stand volume that result from competition control and fertilization are sometimes reported as 'percentage gains'. Because percentage gains arithmetically decline over time asstand volume increases, plantation managers have difficultyin using percentage gains to project growth and revenues. The 'age-shift' method quantifies the year...

  16. The prospects for detecting spectral shifts due to satellite sensor aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G.; Malila, W.; Weller, T.

    1988-01-01

    Along with responsivity changes due to sensor aging, there may be concurrent spectral changes. A field-measurement approach for detecting postlaunch spectral changes is described. For illustration, one hypothetical model of change (spectral band shift) is explored through simulation for five satellite sensors. Two different types of natural terrain - vegetation and bare soil - are used as test targets.

  17. Age-Related Change in Shifting Attention between Global and Local Levels of Hierarchical Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huizinga, Mariette; Burack, Jacob A.; Van der Molen, Maurits W.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this study was the developmental pattern of the ability to shift attention between global and local levels of hierarchical stimuli. Children aged 7 years and 11 years and 21-year-old adults were administered a task (two experiments) that allowed for the examination of 1) the direction of attention to global or local stimulus levels;…

  18. Hypomania soon after shifting from paroxetine to agomelatine in a middle-aged woman with depression.

    PubMed

    Tu, Kun-Yu; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Hypomania or mania has been reported to be induced by multiple classes of antidepressant agents. Agomelatine is a newly approved drug for treating major depression, and its antidepressant effect works through distinct pharmacodynamic mechanisms from most other commonly used antidepressants. Here, we report a middle-aged female patient who presented hypomanic symptoms shortly after shifting from paroxetine to agomelatine.

  19. Changing channels: an fMRI study of aging and cross-modal attention shifts.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Jeanne; Adamo, Maha; Haist, Frank

    2006-07-15

    Age-related deficits in visual selective attention suggest that the efficiency of inhibitory processes is particularly affected by aging. To investigate whether processing inefficiencies observed in visual attention are similar in auditory attention and when shifting attention across modalities, we conducted an fMRI study with healthy young and older adults using a task that required sustained auditory and visual selective attention and cross-modal attention shifts. Older adults in this study performed as well as the younger adults, but showed age-related differences in BOLD responses. The most striking of these differences were bilateral frontal and parietal regions of significantly increased activation in older adults during both focused and shifting attention. Our data suggest that this increased activation did not reflect new recruitment, but reliance on brain regions typically used by younger adults when task demands are greater. Older adults' activation patterns suggested that even during focused attention conditions they were "shifting" attention to stimuli in the unattended modality. Increased activation during processing of both task-relevant and task-irrelevant information implies age-related loss of processing selectivity. These patterns may reflect both task-specific compensatory neural recruitment and degradation of sensory inhibition.

  20. Shifting diet, shifting culture? A bioarchaeological approach to island dietary development on Iron-Age Öland, Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmson, Helene

    2017-06-01

    The diet and subsistence in Iron-Age Öland is debated as earlier studies and different archaeological sources seemingly provide conflicting interpretations. The objectives of this study are therefore to: (i) add new insights on diet and (ii) investigate the chronological variation in detail. It is common in studies of diet to investigate differences between datasets defined by archaeological periods (determined by artefact typology), but it is rare to explore whether these dietary changes are, in fact, well correlated with these temporal categories or not. Stable isotope analysis of 108 individuals and 25 animals was used to interpret diet in comparison with data from earlier studies. Different values of TLE (Trophic Level Effect) for δ(15) N were compared for interpretations of diet. Of the 108 individuals, 42 were subjected to (14) C analysis in this study. The isotopes from Iron-Age animals on Öland indicate that the local, contemporary ecology is specific. The human isotope values show chronological development both when pooled in chronological groups by typology and by more specific (14) C chronology. The new samples of animals as well as the use of 5‰ TLE for δ(15) N values results in the diet reinterpreted as mainly domesticate-based, with at least two shifts in diet occurring in the Iron Age. The use of (14) C dates in connection with the stable isotope results indicates a dietary transition occurring between 200 BC and AD 200, a date range that spans two typologically determined time periods. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Role of Age-Related Shifts in Rumen Bacteria and Methanogens in Methane Production in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chong; Meng, Qinghui; Chen, Yongxing; Xu, Mengsi; Shen, Min; Gao, Rui; Gan, Shangquan

    2017-01-01

    Rumen microbiota are essential for maintaining digestive and metabolic functions, producing methane as a byproduct. Dairy heifers produce large amounts of methane based on fermentation of digested organic matter, with adverse consequences for feed efficiency and the environment. It is therefore important to understand the influence of host age on the relationship between microbiota and methane production. This study explored the age effect on the relationship between microbial communities and enteric methane production in dairy cows and heifers using high-throughput sequencing. Methane production and volatile fatty acid concentrations were age-related. Heifers (9–10 months) had lower methane production but higher methane production per dry matter intake (DMI). The acetate:propionate ratio decreased significantly with increasing age. Age-related microbiota changes in the rumen were reflected by a significant shift in bacterial taxa, but relatively stable archaeal taxa. Prevotella, Ruminococcus, Flavonifractor, Succinivibrio, and Methanobrevibacter were affected by age. This study revealed different associations between predominant bacterial phylotypes and Methanobrevibacter with increasing age. Prevotella was strongly correlated with Methanobrevibacter in heifers; howerver, in older cows (96–120 months) this association was replaced by a correlation between Succinivibrio and Methanobrevibacter. This shift may account for the age-related difference in rumen fermentation and methane production per DMI. PMID:28855896

  2. Night shift work and inflammatory markers in male workers aged 20-39 in a display manufacturing company.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Woo; Jang, Eun-Chul; Kwon, Soon-Chan; Han, Wook; Kang, Min-Sung; Nam, Young-Hyeon; Lee, Yong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the association between shift work and inflammatory markers, which are independent risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, in male manual workers at a display manufacturing company. This study was conducted between June 1 and July 31, 2015 on 244 male manual workers aged 20-39 years old at a display manufacturing company and investigated age, marital status, education level, alcohol consumption habit, smoking habit, regular exercise habit, sleep duration, sleep debt, sleep insufficiency, past medical history, current and past shift work experience, duration of shift work, and weekly work hours through face-to-face interviews using structured questionnaires and performed blood tests. Study participants were divided into daytime, former shift, and current shift workers based on the work schedule. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance were performed to compare inflammatory markers and cardiovascular disease risk factors, and analyses of covariance were conducted after adjusting for variables potentially affecting inflammatory markers. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; mean ± standard deviation) levels in daytime, former shift, and current shift workers were 0.65 ± 0.43, 0.75 ± 0.43, and 0.86 ± 0.72 mg/L, respectively (p = 0.029). The leukocyte count (mean ± standard deviation) was 5,556 ± 1,123, 6,210 ± 1,366, and 6,530 ± 1,216 cells/μL, respectively (p < 0.001). Both hs-CRP level and leukocyte count were significantly higher in current shift workers than in daytime workers, and leukocyte count was higher in former shift workers than in daytime workers. After adjusting for variables potentially affecting inflammatory markers, hs-CRP levels (adjusted mean ± standard deviation) in daytime and current shift workers were 0.59 ± 0.06 and 0.92 ± 0.07 mg/L, respectively (p = 0.002). The leukocyte count (adjusted mean ± standard deviation) was 5

  3. Distinct shifts in microbiota composition during Drosophila aging impair intestinal function and drive mortality

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rebecca I.; Salazar, Anna; Yamada, Ryuichi; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Morselli, Marco; Alcaraz, Jeanette; Rana, Anil; Rera, Michael; Pellegrini, Matteo; Ja, William W.; Walker, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota have been correlated with aging and measures of frailty in the elderly. However, the relationships between microbial dynamics, age-related changes in intestinal physiology and organismal health remain poorly understood. Here, we show that dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota, characterized by an expansion of the Gammaproteobacteria, is tightly linked to age-onset intestinal barrier dysfunction in Drosophila. Indeed, alterations in the microbiota precede and predict the onset of intestinal barrier dysfunction in aged flies. Changes in microbial composition occurring prior to intestinal barrier dysfunction contribute to changes in excretory function and immune gene activation in the aging intestine. In addition, we show that a distinct shift in microbiota composition follows intestinal barrier dysfunction leading to systemic immune activation and organismal death. Our results indicate that alterations in microbiota dynamics could contribute to and also predict varying rates of health decline during aging in mammals. PMID:26321641

  4. Rotating shift-work as an independent risk factor for overweight Italian workers: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Barbadoro, Pamela; Santarelli, Lory; Croce, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Vincitorio, Daniela; Prospero, Emilia; Minelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    A job-related factor is attracting a growing interest as a possible determinant of body weight gain in shift-workers. The aim of the study was to reinvestigate the issue of overweight between rotating shift workers and daytime workers, taking into consideration possible confounding covariate factors. This is a cross-sectional study, conducted by reviewing data from subjects participating in an occupational surveillance program in 2008. Participants answered a self-administered questionnaire to retrieve information about socio-demographic factors and working conditions (job schedule type, job-related physical activity, time in job), subjective health status, health care visits during the previous year, and lifestyle factors (dietary habits, leisure time physical activity, alcohol consumption). Participants underwent a medical examination for measurement of BMI, and acquisition of medical history. Compared to daytime workers (N = 229), rotating shift workers (N = 110) displayed higher BMI (mean BMI was 27.6±3.9 and 26.7±3.6 for shift workers, and daytime workers, respectively; p<0.05). Logistic regression analysis allowed to highlight the role of rotating shift-work as an independent risk factor for increased body weight (OR 1.93, 95%CI 1.01-3.71), being aged between 35 and 54 years was a major determinant of increased BMI (OR 2.39, 95%CI 1.14-5.00). In addition, family history of obesity was the strongest determinant of overweight/obesity (OR 9.79, 95%CI 1.28-74.74). Interestingly, no significant association was found between overweight and other potentially relevant factors, such as diet quality and food choices, alcohol consumption, levels of occupational and leisure-time physical activity. Present findings seem to support the notion that rotating shift work is an independent risk factor for overweight, regardless of workers' dietary habits and physical activity levels.

  5. Rotating Shift-Work as an Independent Risk Factor for Overweight Italian Workers: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Barbadoro, Pamela; Santarelli, Lory; Croce, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Vincitorio, Daniela; Prospero, Emilia; Minelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background A job-related factor is attracting a growing interest as a possible determinant of body weight gain in shift-workers. Objective The aim of the study was to reinvestigate the issue of overweight between rotating shift workers and daytime workers, taking into consideration possible confounding covariate factors. Methods This is a cross-sectional study, conducted by reviewing data from subjects participating in an occupational surveillance program in 2008. Participants answered a self-administered questionnaire to retrieve information about socio-demographic factors and working conditions (job schedule type, job-related physical activity, time in job), subjective health status, health care visits during the previous year, and lifestyle factors (dietary habits, leisure time physical activity, alcohol consumption). Participants underwent a medical examination for measurement of BMI, and acquisition of medical history. Results Compared to daytime workers (N = 229), rotating shift workers (N = 110) displayed higher BMI (mean BMI was 27.6±3.9 and 26.7±3.6 for shift workers, and daytime workers, respectively; p<0.05). Logistic regression analysis allowed to highlight the role of rotating shift-work as an independent risk factor for increased body weight (OR 1.93, 95%CI 1.01–3.71), being aged between 35 and 54 years was a major determinant of increased BMI (OR 2.39, 95%CI 1.14–5.00). In addition, family history of obesity was the strongest determinant of overweight/obesity (OR 9.79, 95%CI 1.28–74.74). Interestingly, no significant association was found between overweight and other potentially relevant factors, such as diet quality and food choices, alcohol consumption, levels of occupational and leisure-time physical activity. Conclusions Present findings seem to support the notion that rotating shift work is an independent risk factor for overweight, regardless of workers' dietary habits and physical activity levels. PMID:23675472

  6. The Age Shift: Priorities for Action. Ageing Population Panel. Foresight: Making the Future Work for You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Trade and Industry, London (England).

    The Foresight Ageing Population Panel, which included representatives of business, government, the science base, and other experts from the United Kingdom, was charged with examining trends in the United Kingdom's population and the other drivers of change that will operate in the next 20-30 years. The panel discussed the likely impacts of the…

  7. [Intrinsic factors, genes, and skin aging].

    PubMed

    Makrantonaki, E; Pfeifer, G P; Zouboulis, C C

    2016-02-01

    Skin aging is determined by a combination of endogenous and environmental influences, including epigenetic, posttranslational, microbial, and lifestyle factors. In particular genetic changes, programmed or not, play a pivotal role and understanding of these complex mechanisms may contribute to the prevention of age-related diseases and extension of healthy lifespan. In this article, new knowledge about genes and biological processes that can significantly affect skin homeostasis in old age and can lead to the typical morphological and physiological characteristics of aging skin are summarized.

  8. A rightward shift in the visuospatial attention vector with healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Benwell, Christopher S. Y.; Thut, Gregor; Grant, Ashley; Harvey, Monika

    2014-01-01

    The study of lateralized visuospatial attention bias in non-clinical samples has revealed a systematic group-level leftward bias (pseudoneglect), possibly as a consequence of right hemisphere (RH) dominance for visuospatial attention. Pseudoneglect appears to be modulated by age, with a reduced or even reversed bias typically present in elderly participants. It has been suggested that this shift in bias may arise due to disproportionate aging of the RH and/or an increase in complementary functional recruitment of the left hemisphere (LH) for visuospatial processing. In this study, we report rightward shifts in subjective midpoint judgment relative to healthy young participants whilst elderly participants performed a computerized version of the landmark task (in which they had to judge whether a transection mark appeared closer to the right or left end of a line) on three different line lengths. This manipulation of stimulus properties led to a similar behavioral pattern in both the young and the elderly: a rightward shift in subjective midpoint with decreasing line length, which even resulted in a systematic rightward bias in elderly participants for the shortest line length (1.98° of visual angle, VA). Overall performance precision for the task was lower in the elderly participants regardless of line length, suggesting reduced landmark task discrimination sensitivity with healthy aging. This rightward shift in the attentional vector with healthy aging is likely to result from a reduction in RH resources/dominance for attentional processing in elderly participants. The significant rightward bias in the elderly for short lines may even suggest a reversal of hemisphere dominance in favor of the LH/right visual field under specific conditions. PMID:24959142

  9. Factors of skin ageing share common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Giacomoni, P U; Rein, G

    2001-01-01

    Ageing has been defined as the accumulation of molecular modifications which manifest as macroscopic clinical changes. Human skin, unique among mammalians insofar as it is deprived of fur, is particularly sensitive to environmental stress. Major environmental factors have been recognized to induce modifications of the morphological and biophysical properties of the skin. Metabolites from ingested or inhaled substances do affect skin, which is also sensitive to endogenous hormone levels. Factors as diverse as ultraviolet radiation, atmospheric pollution, wounds, infections, traumatisms, anoxya, cigarette smoke, and hormonal status have a role in increasing the rate of accumulation of molecular modifications and have thus been termed 'factors of ageing'. All these factors share as a common feature, the capability to directly or indirectly induce one of the steps of the micro-inflammatory cycle, which includes the expression of ICAM-1 in endothelial cells. This triggers a process leading to the accumulation of damages in the skin resulting in skin ageing since ICAM-1 expression provokes recruitment and diapedesis of circulating immune cells, which digest the extracellular matrix (ECM) by secreting collagenases, myeloperoxidases and reactive oxygen species. The activation of these lytic processes provokes random damage to resident cells, which in turn secrete prostaglandines and leukotrienes. These signaling molecules induce the degranulation of resident mast cells which release the autacoid histamine and the cytokine TNF-alpha thus activating endothelial cells lining adjacent capillaries which release P-selectin and synthesize ICAM-1. This closes a self-maintained micro-inflammatory cycle, which results in the accumulation of ECM damage, i.e. skin aging. In this paper we review the evidence that two factors able to induce macroscopical and molecular modifications in the skin, protein glycation and stretch, activate the micro-inflammatory cycle. We further present

  10. Role of circulating factors in cardiac aging

    PubMed Central

    Cannatà, Antonio; Marcon, Gabriella; Cimmino, Giovanni; Camparini, Luca; Ciucci, Giulio; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide increase in life expectancy is a major contributor to the epidemic of chronic degenerative diseases. Aging, indeed, simultaneously affects multiple organ systems, and it has been hypothesized that systemic alterations in regulators of tissue physiology may regulate this process. Cardiac aging itself is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and, because of the intimate relationship with the brain, may contribute to increase the risk of neurodegenerative disorders. Blood-borne factors may play a major role in this complex and still elusive process. A number of studies, mainly based on the revival of parabiosis, a surgical technique very popular during the 70s of the 20th century to study the effect of a shared circulation in two animals, have indeed shown the potential that humoral factors can control the aging process in different tissues. In this article we review the role of circulating factors in cardiovascular aging. A better understanding of these mechanisms may provide new insights in the aging process and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for chronic age-related disorders. PMID:28446965

  11. Growth factors, nutrient signaling, and cardiovascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Luigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Longo, Valter D.

    2012-01-01

    Growth factors regulated by specific macronutrients have been shown to promote aging and accelerate mortality in the great majority of the organisms studied. In particular, the enzymes activated by growth hormone (GH), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) in mammals and their orthologs in simple model organisms represent perhaps the best-understood proteins involved in the aging process. Dietary restriction (DR), which reduces the level of IGF-I and of other growth factors, has been associated with protection from diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases and deficiencies in GH signaling and IGF-I are strongly associated with protection from cancer and diabetes in both mice and humans, but their role in cardiac function and cardiovascular diseases is controversial. Here we review the link between growth factors, cardiac function and heart disease with focus on the cardioprotective and sensitizing effect of growth factors in both model organisms and humans. PMID:22499903

  12. Factors related to onset age of Huntington disease.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, R H; Madden, J J; Teague, J L; Falek, A

    1982-01-01

    One prominent feature of Huntington disease (HD) is the variable age at which the characteristic neurological or psychiatric symptoms appear. Ages of manifestation varying from 4 to 65 years are found in a sample of 95 HD pedigrees compiled since 1968 from the Southeastern United States. Significant parent-child correlations of age of onset indicate consistency of onset age within nuclear families. However, an average intrafamily range of 9 years and an average intrapedigree range of 12 years reveal substantial variability of onset age within these groups. Of the nine cases of juvenile-onset HD identified in this sample, seven were of paternal descent. The preponderance of juvenile patients inheriting the HD gene from a father confirms similar findings from other studies. In addition, a trend toward earlier onset in all offspring of paternal transmission suggests that the juvenile-onset phenomenon is only the tail of a shift in the curve of onset ages for this group. A trend toward earlier onset in successive generations was noted. This "anticipation" may reflect the finding that persons of early onset in prior generations are selectively nonreproductive as a result of manifestation of the disorder. By identifying familial factors influencing onset age of HD, it may be possible to more effectively evaluate environmental factors that influence the onset of the disorder. PMID:6211092

  13. Comprehensive Mitochondrial Metabolic Shift during the Critical Node of Seed Ageing in Rice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangkun; Whelan, James; Wu, Shuhua; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Baoyin; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jinmei; He, Juanjuan; Xin, Xia; Lu, Xinxiong

    2016-01-01

    The critical node (CN) in seed aging in rice (Oryza sativa) is the transformation from Phase I (P-I) to Phase II (P-II) of the reverse S-shaped curve (RS-SC). Although mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in seed ageing, the metabolic shift in the CN remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial regulatory mechanisms during the CN of rice seed ageing. We showed that during the CN of seed ageing, the mitochondrial ultrastructure was impaired, causing oxygen consumption to decrease, along with cytochrome c (cyt c) oxidase and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity. In addition, the transcript levels for the alternative pathway of the electron transport chain (ETC) were significantly induced, whereas the transcripts of the cytochrome oxidase (COX) pathway were inhibited. These changes were concomitant with the down-regulation of mitochondrial protein levels related to carbon and nitrogen metabolism, ATP synthase (ATPase) complex, tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle, mitochondrial oxidative enzymes, and a variety of other proteins. Therefore, while these responses inhibit the production of ATP and its intermediates, signals from mitochondria (such as the decrease of cyt c and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)) may also induce oxidative damage. These events provide considerable information about the mitochondrial metabolic shifts involved in the progression of seed ageing in the CN.

  14. Comprehensive Mitochondrial Metabolic Shift during the Critical Node of Seed Ageing in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guangkun; Whelan, James; Wu, Shuhua; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Baoyin; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jinmei; He, Juanjuan

    2016-01-01

    The critical node (CN) in seed aging in rice (Oryza sativa) is the transformation from Phase I (P-I) to Phase II (P-II) of the reverse S-shaped curve (RS-SC). Although mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in seed ageing, the metabolic shift in the CN remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial regulatory mechanisms during the CN of rice seed ageing. We showed that during the CN of seed ageing, the mitochondrial ultrastructure was impaired, causing oxygen consumption to decrease, along with cytochrome c (cyt c) oxidase and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity. In addition, the transcript levels for the alternative pathway of the electron transport chain (ETC) were significantly induced, whereas the transcripts of the cytochrome oxidase (COX) pathway were inhibited. These changes were concomitant with the down-regulation of mitochondrial protein levels related to carbon and nitrogen metabolism, ATP synthase (ATPase) complex, tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle, mitochondrial oxidative enzymes, and a variety of other proteins. Therefore, while these responses inhibit the production of ATP and its intermediates, signals from mitochondria (such as the decrease of cyt c and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)) may also induce oxidative damage. These events provide considerable information about the mitochondrial metabolic shifts involved in the progression of seed ageing in the CN. PMID:27124767

  15. Mitofusin 1 and optic atrophy 1 shift metabolism to mitochondrial respiration during aging.

    PubMed

    Son, Jyung Mean; Sarsour, Ehab H; Kakkerla Balaraju, Anurag; Fussell, Jenna; Kalen, Amanda L; Wagner, Brett A; Buettner, Garry R; Goswami, Prabhat C

    2017-10-01

    Replicative and chronological lifespan are two different modes of cellular aging. Chronological lifespan is defined as the duration during which quiescent normal cells retain their capacity to re-enter the proliferative cycle. This study investigated whether changes in metabolism occur during aging of quiescent normal human fibroblasts (NHFs) and the mechanisms that regulate these changes. Bioenergetics measurements were taken in quiescent NHFs from younger (newborn, 3-day, 5-month, and 1-year) and older (58-, 61-, 63-, 68-, and 70-year) healthy donors as well as NHFs from the same individual at different ages (29, 36, and 46 years). Results show significant changes in cellular metabolism during aging of quiescent NHFs: Old NHFs exhibit a significant decrease in glycolytic flux and lactate levels, and increase in oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and ATP levels compared to young NHFs. Results from the Seahorse XF Cell Mito Stress Test show that old NHFs with a lower Bioenergetic Health Index (BHI) are more prone to oxidative stress compared to young NHFs with a higher BHI. The increase in OCR in old NHFs is associated with a shift in mitochondrial dynamics more toward fusion. Genetic knockdown of mitofusin 1 (MFN1) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) in old NHFs decreased OCR and shifted metabolism more toward glycolysis. Downregulation of MFN1 and OPA1 also suppressed the radiation-induced increase in doubling time of NHFs. In summary, results show that a metabolic shift from glycolysis in young to mitochondrial respiration in old NHFs occurs during chronological lifespan, and MFN1 and OPA1 regulate this process. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Age-based factors in femicide.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ann Wolbert; Burgess, Allen G; Koehler, Steven A; Dominick, Joseph; Wecht, Cyril H

    2005-01-01

    Homicide is a topic of interest not only because of its severity but because it is a fairly reliable barometer of all violent crime, especially as it affects women. This exploratory study compared a group of murdered women over age 60 with a group of murdered women 30-59 and included age-based factors for both groups. Discussion focuses on forensics as insight to crime scene dynamics and homicidal behavior.

  17. AgeFactDB—the JenAge Ageing Factor Database—towards data integration in ageing research

    PubMed Central

    Hühne, Rolf; Thalheim, Torsten; Sühnel, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    AgeFactDB (http://agefactdb.jenage.de) is a database aimed at the collection and integration of ageing phenotype data including lifespan information. Ageing factors are considered to be genes, chemical compounds or other factors such as dietary restriction, whose action results in a changed lifespan or another ageing phenotype. Any information related to the effects of ageing factors is called an observation and is presented on observation pages. To provide concise access to the complete information for a particular ageing factor, corresponding observations are also summarized on ageing factor pages. In a first step, ageing-related data were primarily taken from existing databases such as the Ageing Gene Database—GenAge, the Lifespan Observations Database and the Dietary Restriction Gene Database—GenDR. In addition, we have started to include new ageing-related information. Based on homology data taken from the HomoloGene Database, AgeFactDB also provides observation and ageing factor pages of genes that are homologous to known ageing-related genes. These homologues are considered as candidate or putative ageing-related genes. AgeFactDB offers a variety of search and browse options, and also allows the download of ageing factor or observation lists in TSV, CSV and XML formats. PMID:24217911

  18. Shift of subtropical transport barriers explains observed hemispheric asymmetry of decadal trends of age of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, Gabriele P.; Fierli, Federico; Ploeger, Felix; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Funke, Bernd; Haenel, Florian J.; Reddmann, Thomas; Riese, Martin; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    In response to global warming, the Brewer-Dobson circulation in the stratosphere is expected to accelerate and the mean transport time of air along this circulation to decrease. This would imply a negative stratospheric age of air trend, i.e. an air parcel would need less time to travel from the tropopause to any point in the stratosphere. Age of air as inferred from tracer observations, however, shows zero to positive trends in the northern mid-latitude stratosphere and zonally asymmetric patterns. Using satellite observations and model calculations we show that the observed latitudinal and vertical patterns of the decadal changes of age of air in the lower to middle stratosphere during the period 2002-2012 are predominantly caused by a southward shift of the circulation pattern by about 5°. After correction for this shift, the observations reveal a hemispherically almost symmetric decrease of age of air in the lower to middle stratosphere up to 800 K of up to -0.25 years over the 2002-2012 period with strongest decrease in the northern tropics. This net change is consistent with long-term trends from model predictions.

  19. Factors associated with non-compliance during 16-hour long call shifts.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Jed; Herzig, Shoshana; Reynolds, Eileen; Yang, Julius

    2012-11-01

    Duty hour restrictions limit shift length to 16 hours during the 1(st) post-graduate year. Although many programs utilize a 16-hour "long call" admitting shift on inpatient services, compliance with the 16-hour shift length and factors responsible for extended shifts have not been well examined. To identify the incidence of and operational factors associated with extended long call shifts and residents' perceptions of the safety and educational value of the 16-hour long call shift in a large internal medicine residency program. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND MAIN MEASURES: Between August and December of 2010, residents were sent an electronic survey immediately following 16-hour long call shifts, assessing departure time and shift characteristics. We used logistic regression to identify independent predictors of extended shifts. In mid-December, all residents received a second survey to assess perceptions of the long call admitting model. Two-hundred and thirty surveys were completed (95 %). Overall, 92 of 230 (40 %) shifts included ≥ 1 team member exceeding the 16-hour limit. Factors independently associated with extended shifts per 3-member team were 3-4 patients (adjusted OR 5.2, 95 % CI 1.9-14.3) and>4 patients (OR 10.6, 95 % CI 3.3-34.6) admitted within 6 hours of scheduled departure and>6 total admissions (adjusted OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.05-8.3). Seventy-nine of 96 (82 %) residents completed the perceptions survey. Residents believed, on average, teams could admit 4.5 patients after 5 pm and 7 patients during long call shifts to ensure compliance. Regarding the long call shift, 73 % agreed it allows for safe patient care, 60 % disagreed/were neutral about working too many hours, and 53 % rated the educational value in the top 33 % of a 9-point scale. Compliance with the 16-hour long call shift is sensitive to total workload and workload timing factors. Knowledge of such factors should guide systems redesign aimed at achieving compliance while ensuring patient care

  20. Split-shift work in relation to stress, health and psychosocial work factors among bus drivers.

    PubMed

    Ihlström, Jonas; Kecklund, Göran; Anund, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Shift work has been associated with poor health, sleep and fatigue problems and low satisfaction with working hours. However, one type of shift working, namely split shifts, have received little attention. This study examined stress, health and psychosocial aspects of split-shift schedules among bus drivers in urban transport. A questionnaire was distributed to drivers working more than 70% of full time which 235 drivers in total answered. In general, drivers working split-shift schedules (n = 146) did not differ from drivers not working such shifts (n = 83) as regards any of the outcome variables that were studied. However, when individual perceptions towards split-shift schedules were taken into account, a different picture appeared. Bus drivers who reported problems working split shifts (36%) reported poorer health, higher perceived stress, working hours interfering with social life, lower sleep quality, more persistent fatigue and lower general work satisfaction than those who did not view split shifts as a problem. Moreover, drivers who reported problems with split shifts also perceived lower possibilities to influence working hours, indicating lower work time control. This study indicates that split shifts were not associated with increased stress, poorer health and adverse psychosocial work factors for the entire study sample. However, the results showed that individual differences were important and approximately one third of the drivers reported problems with split shifts, which in turn was associated with stress, poor health and negative psychosocial work conditions. More research is needed to understand the individual and organizational determinants of tolerance to split shifts.

  1. Motivational Shifts in Aging Monkeys and the Origins of Social Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Almeling, Laura; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Sennhenn-Reulen, Holger; Freund, Alexandra M; Fischer, Julia

    2016-07-11

    As humans age, they become more selective regarding their personal goals [1] and social partners [2]. Whereas the selectivity in goals has been attributed to losses in resources (e.g., physical strength) [3], the increasing focus on emotionally meaningful partners is, according to socioemotional selectivity theory, driven by the awareness of one's decreasing future lifetime [2]. Similar to humans, aging monkeys show physical losses [4] and reductions in social activity [2, 5-7]. To disentangle a general resource loss and the awareness of decreasing time, we combined field experiments with behavioral observations in a large age-heterogeneous population of Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) at La Forêt des Singes. Novel object tests revealed a loss of interest in the nonsocial environment in early adulthood, which was modulated by the availability of a food reward. Experiments using vocal and visual representations of social partners indicated that monkeys maintained an interest in social stimuli and a preferential interest in friends and socially important individuals into old age. Old females engaged in fewer social interactions, although other group members continued to invest in relationships with them. Consequently, reductions in sociality were not due to a decrease in social interest. In conclusion, some of the motivational shifts observed in aging humans, particularly the increasing focus on social over nonsocial stimuli, may occur in the absence of a limited time perspective and are most likely deeply rooted in primate evolution. Our findings highlight the value of nonhuman primates as valuable models for understanding human aging [8, 9].

  2. Factors affecting capsular volume changes and association with outcomes after Bankart repair and capsular shift.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Chung, Seok Won; Kumar, Gurudeo; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Choi, Jin Hyeok; Lee, Deukhee; Park, Sehyung

    2015-02-01

    Capsular laxity is a main contributing factor in recurrent shoulder instability and is suggested to be correlated with increased capsular volume. Arthroscopic capsular shift combined with Bankart repair can reduce the capsular volume and reinforce the redundant capsule; however, as the capsuloligamentous structure has viscoelastic properties, it is possible for the shifted and tensioned capsule of the glenohumeral joint to slowly stretch out again over time, resulting in an increase in capsular volume. To analyze changes in capsular volume of the glenohumeral joint over time after arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift, the factors associated with these changes, and their relevance to outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Included in this study were 105 patients (mean age, 25.8 ± 8.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for anterior shoulder instability and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) at 3 months and 1 year postoperatively and whose various functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>12 months). Among these patients, 27 also had preoperative CTA. These 27 patients were used to make comparisons between preoperative and 3-month postoperative CTA measurements, and all 105 patients were used for all other comparisons. Two raters measured the separate anterior and posterior capsular volume and cross-sectional area at the 5-o'clock position using 3-dimensional (3D) Slicer software. These measurements were subsequently adjusted for each glenoid size. The changes in capsular volume and cross-sectional area at the 5-o'clock position over time, the factors related to higher change in anterior capsular volume, and their correlation with outcomes were evaluated. Three months postoperatively, the total and anterior capsular volume and anterior cross-sectional area significantly decreased; however, these values increased again at 1 year postoperatively (all P < .01). The inter- and

  3. Risk Factors for Age-Related Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Paul P.; Keane, Pearse A.; O'Neill, Evelyn C.; Altaie, Rasha W.; Loane, Edward; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John M.; Beatty, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition. PMID:20339564

  4. Impact of hypnotics use on daytime function and factors associated with usage by female shift work nurses.

    PubMed

    Futenma, Kunihiro; Asaoka, Shoichi; Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Komada, Yoko; Ishikawa, Jun; Murakoshi, Akiko; Nishida, Shingo; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-05-01

    We investigated quality of life (QOL) and work performance of hypnotics users, and explored the factors associated with multiple hypnotics usage in shift work nurses. We conducted a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey on nurses in university hospitals. We analyzed responses from 1202 nurses; 997 were female shift work nurses (82.9%), including 696 and 281 two- and three-shift workers, respectively. The rate of hypnotics use was 10% (6.9% were single hypnotic users and 3.1% were multiple hypnotics users). The rate of insomnia did not differ between the single and multiple hypnotics users. However, multiple hypnotics users showed lower QOL, more severe depressive symptoms, and greater frequencies of work-related errors than those using a single hypnotic. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that age ≥27 years, presence of depression, eveningness chronotype, and presence of insomnia symptoms were significantly associated with hypnotics use. On the other hand, only the existence of shift work disorder (SWD) was significantly associated with usage of multiple hypnotics. The present study suggested that usage of multiple hypnotics is not beneficial for relieving insomnia or for keeping better QOL in shift work nurses. It would be desirable to explore the causal relationship between SWD and multiple hypnotics use in a future longitudinal study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Shift Work among Men and Women on the Threshold to Higher Working Age - Working Conditions and Health Status].

    PubMed

    Leser, C; Tisch, A; Tophoven, S

    2016-11-01

    Background: The number of older employees in shift and night work has increased significantly in recent years. Furthermore, the proportion of women in shift and night work has increased markedly. This is due to the aging workforce and the expansion of shift work in the tertiary sector. Previous research shows that shift work is often associated with health risks. Against this background, the aim of the present study is to examine the situation of working men and women on the threshold to higher working age with regard to the relationship between shift work and physical health. Methods: We employed data from the study "lidA - leben in der Arbeit" German Cohort Study on Work, Age and Health, a survey of the German baby boom cohorts born in 1959 and 1965 (n=5 637). Linear regression models are used to study the effect of shift work - with and without night work - and of further work exposures on the baby boomers' physical health status. The models control for sleep and health-related behaviour and are stratified by gender. Among women, also the scope of work was taken into account. Results: The results show that male shift workers are burdened by their on average lower occupational status and by physical exposure; female shift workers additionally suffer from high personal effort and low rewards and female part-time shift workers also from overcommitment. Conclusion: Working conditions of shift workers are strongly characterised by work stress. In order to preserve aging shift workers' work ability, some organisational measures seem necessary. In this context, occupational safety and health management as well as opportunities for recovery and encouraging leadership should be considered.

  6. Dietary shift after 3600 cal yr BP and its influencing factors in northwestern China: Evidence from stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Minmin; Dong, Guanghui; Jia, Xin; Wang, Hui; Cui, Yifu; Chen, Fahu

    2017-04-01

    :Human diets rely on natural resource availability and can reflect social and cultural values. When environments, societies, and cultures change, diets may also shift. This study traced the extent of dietary change and the factors influencing such change. Through stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of late Neolithic and early Bronze Age human and animal bone collagen, we found that significant shifts in human diets were closely associated with intercontinental cultural exchanges in Eurasia and climate change in northwestern China. The isotopic evidence indicated that human diets mainly consisted of C4 foodstuffs (presumably millet and/or animals fed with C4 foods) around 4000 calibrated years before the present (cal yr BP), corresponding to the flourishing of millet agriculture in the context of the optimal climate conditions of the mid-Holocene. Subsequently, more C3 foods (probably wheat, barley, and animals fed with C3 foods) were added to human diets post-3600 cal yr BP when the climate became cooler and drier. Such dietary variation is also consistent with the increasing intensity of long-distance exchange after 4000 cal yr BP. While many factors can lead to human dietary shifts (e.g. climate change, population growth, cultural factors, and human migration), climate may have been a key factor in Gansu and Qinghai.

  7. Dietary shift after 3600 cal yr BP and its influencing factors in northwestern China: Evidence from stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Minmin; Dong, Guanghui; Jia, Xin; Wang, Hui; Cui, Yifu; Chen, Fahu

    2016-08-01

    Human diets rely on natural resource availability and can reflect social and cultural values. When environments, societies, and cultures change, diets may also shift. This study traced the extent of dietary change and the factors influencing such change. Through stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of late Neolithic and early Bronze Age human and animal bone collagen, we found that significant shifts in human diets were closely associated with intercontinental cultural exchanges in Eurasia and climate change in northwestern China. The isotopic evidence indicated that human diets mainly consisted of C4 foodstuffs (presumably millet and/or animals fed with C4 foods) around 4000 calibrated years before the present (cal yr BP), corresponding to the flourishing of millet agriculture in the context of the optimal climate conditions of the mid-Holocene. Subsequently, more C3 foods (probably wheat, barley, and animals fed with C3 foods) were added to human diets post-3600 cal yr BP when the climate became cooler and drier. Such dietary variation is also consistent with the increasing intensity of long-distance exchange after 4000 cal yr BP. While many factors can lead to human dietary shifts (e.g. climate change, population growth, cultural factors, and human migration), climate may have been a key factor in Gansu and Qinghai.

  8. Generational shift in parental perceptions of overweight among school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Andrew R; Duncan, Dustin T; Tarasenko, Yelena N; Yan, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Parental perceptions of child's weight status may influence family readiness to foster healthy behaviors. This study investigated the generational shifting of parental perceptions about children's weight. Data were collected in the NHANES 1988-1994 (n = 2871) and 2005-2010 (n = 3202). Parents, mainly mothers, were asked whether they considered their child, ages 6 to 11 years, to be overweight, underweight, or just about the right weight. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2000 growth chart was used for reference. We ran Poisson regression to estimate the probability ratio between the 2 surveys for parents perceiving their child as overweight after controlling for actual weight. The 10th percentile of BMI z scores for children who were parentally perceived as overweight shifted with statistical significance from 84th percentile of reference population in the early survey to 91st percentile of reference population in the recent survey (P < .05). The mean z score of children parentally perceived as overweight also increased between surveys with the largest increase among children from poor families (from 1.60 [SE: 0.20] to 1.98 [0.08], P < .05), followed by African Americans (from 1.65 [0.09] to 2.02 [0.05], P < .05). The probability of overweight/obese children being correctly perceived as overweight by the parents declined by 24% between surveys (probability ratio = 0.76 [95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.87]). Overweight/obese children were less likely to be perceived as overweight in the recent survey compared with peers of similar weight but surveyed 10+ years earlier. The declining tendency among parents to perceive overweight children appropriately may indicate a generational shift in social norms related to body weight. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. [Sleep habits of medical students, physicians and nurses regarding age, sex, shift work and caffein consumption].

    PubMed

    Pecotić, Renata; Valić, Maja; Kardum, Goran; Sevo, Vana; Dogas, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sleep habits of nurses, medical students, and physicians and to explore whether they are influenced by age, sex, shift work, and caffeine consumption. The questionnaire was derived from the MEDSleep Survey. A total of 453 respondents were surveyed: second-year medical students (130); physicians at the postgraduate study program (68); specialists (162); nurses (93). Results of our study indicate that hours of sleep needed for feeling rested depends on age and gender. Younger respondents and women in the study need longer sleep to feel rested (7.5 hours and more) than older ones and males who need less than 7.5 hours of sleep. Among medical professionals a need for sleep differs related to work demands and work schedule. Nurses need more sleep than physicians (chi2 = 38.57, p < 0.001). Female nurses need more sleep for feeling rested than female physicians (chi2 = 18.18, p < 0.001), and sleep longer during the weeknights (chi2 = 33.78, p < 0.001) and weekends (chi2 = 28.06, p < 0.001). The respondents that consume caffeine have more trouble staying awake while listening to lectures or learning (chi2 = 9.37, p = 0.009), and while driving a car (chi2 = 14.56, p = 0.001). The results indicate that sleep habits are related to age, sex and caffeine consumption.

  10. Emotional bias of sleep-dependent processing shifts from negative to positive with aging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bethany J; Schultz, Kurt S; Adams, Sydney; Baran, Bengi; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2016-09-01

    Age-related memory decline has been proposed to result partially from impairments in memory consolidation over sleep. However, such decline may reflect a shift toward selective processing of positive information with age rather than impaired sleep-related mechanisms. In the present study, young and older adults viewed negative and neutral pictures or positive and neutral pictures and underwent a recognition test after sleep or wake. Subjective emotional reactivity and affect were also measured. Compared with waking, sleep preserved valence ratings and memory for positive but not negative pictures in older adults and negative but not positive pictures in young adults. In older adults, memory for positive pictures was associated with slow wave sleep. Furthermore, slow wave sleep predicted positive affect in older adults but was inversely related to positive affect in young adults. These relationships were strongest for older adults with high memory for positive pictures and young adults with high memory for negative pictures. Collectively, these results indicate preserved but selective sleep-dependent memory processing with healthy aging that may be biased to enhance emotional well-being.

  11. Emotional bias of sleep-dependent processing shifts from negative to positive with aging

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sydney; Baran, Bengi; Spencer, Rebecca M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related memory decline has been proposed to result partially from impairments in memory consolidation over sleep. However, such decline may reflect a shift toward selective processing of positive information with age rather than impaired sleep-related mechanisms. In the current study, young and older adults viewed negative and neutral pictures or positive and neutral pictures and underwent a recognition test after sleep or wake. Subjective emotional reactivity and affect were also measured. Compared to waking, sleep preserved valence ratings and memory for positive but not negative pictures in older adults and negative but not positive pictures in young adults. In older adults, memory for positive pictures was associated with slow wave sleep. Furthermore, slow wave sleep predicted positive affect in older adults but was inversely related to positive affect in young adults. These relationships were strongest for older adults with high memory for positive pictures and young adults with high memory for negative pictures. Collectively, these results indicate preserved but selective sleep-dependent memory processing with healthy aging that may be biased to enhance emotional well-being. PMID:27459938

  12. Modeling abrupt cultural regime shifts during the Palaeolithic and Stone Age.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kenichi

    2014-12-07

    The coupled dynamics of the size and the mean cultural/technological level of a population, with positive feedback between these two variables, is modeled in the Malthusian-Boserupian framework. Bifurcation diagrams, with innovativeness or the cultureless carrying capacity as the parameter, show that abrupt transitions in the mean cultural level are possible. For example, a gradual evolutionary change toward greater innate innovativeness would produce an associated gradual increase in mean cultural level, until a threshold is crossed that triggers an abrupt cultural regime shift. Hence, the model may help explain the apparently sudden and dramatic efflorescences of Palaeolithic/Stone Age culture during the Late Pleistocene, without having to invoke major contemporaneous genetic changes in cognition. The results of statistical studies on the association between population size and toolkit diversity among ethnographic societies are also discussed.

  13. Light-by-light scattering in the Lamb shift and the bound electron g factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Andrzej; Szafron, Robert

    2016-12-01

    We compute an O ( α2(Zα ) 6) contribution to the hydrogen-atom Lamb shift arising from light-by-light scattering. Analogous diagrams, with one atomic electric field insertion replaced by an external magnetic field, contribute to the gyromagnetic factor of the bound electron at O ( α2(Zα ) 4) . We also calculate the contribution to the gyromagnetic factor from the muon magnetic loop.

  14. The three loop slope of the Dirac form factor and the S Lamb shift in hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, K.

    1999-12-08

    The last unknown contribution to hydrogen energy levels at order malpha{sup 7}, due to the slope of the Dirac form factor at three loops, is evaluated in a closed analytical form. The resulting shift of the hydrogen nS energy level is found to be 3.016/n{sup 3} kHz. Using the QED calculations of the 1S Lamb shift, the authors extract a precise value of the proton charge radius r{sub p} = 0.883{+-}0.014 fm.

  15. 20 CFR 220.128 - Age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Age as a vocational factor. 220.128 Section... DETERMINING DISABILITY Vocational Considerations § 220.128 Age as a vocational factor. (a) General. (1) Age refers to how old the claimaint is (chronological age) and the extent to which his or her age affects...

  16. 20 CFR 220.128 - Age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Age as a vocational factor. 220.128 Section... DETERMINING DISABILITY Vocational Considerations § 220.128 Age as a vocational factor. (a) General. (1) Age refers to how old the claimaint is (chronological age) and the extent to which his or her age affects...

  17. 20 CFR 220.128 - Age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Age as a vocational factor. 220.128 Section... DETERMINING DISABILITY Vocational Considerations § 220.128 Age as a vocational factor. (a) General. (1) Age refers to how old the claimaint is (chronological age) and the extent to which his or her age affects...

  18. 20 CFR 220.128 - Age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Age as a vocational factor. 220.128 Section... DETERMINING DISABILITY Vocational Considerations § 220.128 Age as a vocational factor. (a) General. (1) Age refers to how old the claimaint is (chronological age) and the extent to which his or her age affects...

  19. Aging and factors related to running economy.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Timothy J; Manley, Michelle J; Aziz, Jason; Padham, Jamie L; MacKenzie, Allison M

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship that age has on factors affecting running economy (RE) in competitive distance runners. Fifty-one male and female subelite distance runners (Young [Y]: 18-39 years [n = 18]; Master [M]: 40-59 years [n = 22]; and Older [O]: 60-older [n = 11]) were measured for RE, step rate, lactate threshold (LT), VO2max, muscle strength and endurance, flexibility, power, and body composition. An RE test was conducted at 4 different velocities (161, 188, 215, and 241 m·min(-1)), with subjects running for 5 minutes at each velocity. The steady-state VO2max during the last minute of each stage was recorded and plotted vs. speed, and a regression equation was formulated. A 1 × 3 analysis of variance revealed no differences in the slopes of the RE regression lines among age groups (y = 0.1827x - 0.2974; R2 = 0.9511 [Y]; y = 0.1988x - 1.0416; R2 = 0.9697 [M]; y = 0.1727x + 3.0252; R2 = 0.9618 [O]). The VO2max was significantly lower in the O group compared to in the Y and M groups (Y = 64.1 ± 3.2; M = 56.8 ± 2.7; O = 44.4 ± 1.7 mlO2·kg(-1)·min(-1)). The maximal heart rate and velocity @ LT were significantly different among all age groups (Y = 197 ± 4; M = 183 ± 2; O = 170 ± 6 b·min(-1) and Y = 289.7 ± 27.0; M = 251.5 ± 32.9; O = 212.3 ± 24.6 m·min(-1), respectively). The VO2max @ LT was significantly lower in the O group compared to in the Y and M groups (Y = 50.3 ± 2.0; M = 48.8 ± 2.9; O = 34.9 ± 3.2 mlO2·kg(-1)·min(-1)). The O group was significantly lower than in the Y and M groups in flexibility, power, and upper body strength. Multiple regression analyses showed that strength and power were significantly related to running velocity. The results from this cross-sectional analysis suggest that age-related declines in running performance are associated with declines in maximal and submaximal cardiorespiratory variables and declines in strength and power, not because of declines in running economy.

  20. Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors Past Issues / Summer ... to learn more about the effects of sustained low-calorie diets in humans on factors affecting aging. This ...

  1. [Fluorine as a factor in premature aging].

    PubMed

    Machoy-Mokrzyńska, Anna

    2004-01-01

    osteoblasts, stimulate fibroblasts to produce collagenase, and trigger toxic reactions in osteocytes and chondrocytes of trabecular bone. Growing deformations of the skeleton reduce mobility and result in permanent crippling of the patient. Fluoride increases the mass of non-collagen proteins such as proteoglycans and glucosaminoglycans, accelerating skin aging even though protein biosynthesis is generally suppressed. The final outcome includes progressive vascular lesions and disorders of energy metabolism in muscles. In conclusions, the use of fluoride, particularly by dentists and pediatricians, must be controlled and adapted to individual needs. It is worth remembering that fluoride: is the cause of disability due to bone deformations and abnormalities in the musculoskeletal system; reduces the incidence of caries but do not protect against tooth loss; exerts an adverse effect of metabolic processes in the skin; accelerates calcification of vessels and thus reduces their elasticity; inhibits bioenergetic reactions, in particular oxidative phosphorylation, reducing physical activity of muscles. These findings suggest that fluorine may be yet another factor in accelerated aging and revive the dispute started more than two and half thousand years ago whether aging is a physiologic or pathologic process. The understanding of factors modifying the process of aging is the basis for preventive measures aimed at extending life and maintaining full psychosocial activity.

  2. Shift Work and the Relationship with Metabolic Syndrome in Chinese Aged Workers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanjun; Rong, Yi; Huang, Xiji; Lai, Hanpeng; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Yuewei; He, Meian; Wu, Tangchun; Chen, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Background Shift work is indicated to be associated with adverse metabolic disorders. However, potential effects of shift work on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components have not been well established. Methods In total, 26,382 workers from Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort were included in this study. Information on shift work history was gathered through questionnaires and metabolic traits were measured. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for long-term shift work related with MetS and each component, respectively. Further stratification analysis was performed to detect the differences on MetS between female and male shift workers. Results Long-term shift work was associated with MetS without adjusting for any confounders. Compared with the group of non-shift work, the multivariate-adjusted ORs (95%CI) of MetS associated with 1–10, 11−20, and ≥20y of shift work were 1.05 (0.95−1.16), 1.14 (1.03−1.26), 1.16 (1.01−1.31), respectively. In female workers, we found a dose-response relationship that every 10 years increase in shift work was associated with a 10% (95% CI: 1%−20%) elevated OR of MetS, while no significant dose-response trend was found among male workers. Furthermore, shift work duration was significantly associated with ORs of high blood pressure (1.07, 1.01−1.13), long waist circumference (1.10, 1.01−1.20) and high glucose levels (1.09, 1.04−1.15). No significant association was observed between shift work and low HDL cholesterol) and raised triglyceride levels. Conclusions Long-term shift work was associated with metabolic syndrome and the association might differ by gender in retired workers. Applicable intervention strategies are needed for prevention of metabolic disorders for shift workers. PMID:25761114

  3. Risk and contributing factors of ecosystem shifts over naturally vegetated land under climate change in China

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuanyuan; Tang, Qiuhong; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Xingcai

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the areas at risk of ecosystem transformation and the main contributing factors to the risk is essential to assist ecological adaptation to climate change. We assessed the risk of ecosystem shifts in China using the projections of four global gridded vegetation models (GGVMs) and an aggregate metric. The results show that half of naturally vegetated land surface could be under moderate or severe risk at the end of the 21st century under the middle and high emission scenarios. The areas with high risk are the Tibetan Plateau region and an area extended northeastward from the Tibetan Plateau to northeast China. With the three major factors considered, the change in carbon stocks is the main contributing factor to the high risk of ecosystem shifts. The change in carbon fluxes is another important contributing factor under the high emission scenario. The change in water fluxes is a less dominant factor except for the Tibetan Plateau region under the high emission scenario. Although there is considerable uncertainty in the risk assessment, the geographic patterns of the risk are generally consistent across different scenarios. The results could help develop regional strategies for ecosystem conservation to cope with climate change. PMID:26867481

  4. Risk and contributing factors of ecosystem shifts over naturally vegetated land under climate change in China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuanyuan; Tang, Qiuhong; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Xingcai

    2016-02-12

    Identifying the areas at risk of ecosystem transformation and the main contributing factors to the risk is essential to assist ecological adaptation to climate change. We assessed the risk of ecosystem shifts in China using the projections of four global gridded vegetation models (GGVMs) and an aggregate metric. The results show that half of naturally vegetated land surface could be under moderate or severe risk at the end of the 21(st) century under the middle and high emission scenarios. The areas with high risk are the Tibetan Plateau region and an area extended northeastward from the Tibetan Plateau to northeast China. With the three major factors considered, the change in carbon stocks is the main contributing factor to the high risk of ecosystem shifts. The change in carbon fluxes is another important contributing factor under the high emission scenario. The change in water fluxes is a less dominant factor except for the Tibetan Plateau region under the high emission scenario. Although there is considerable uncertainty in the risk assessment, the geographic patterns of the risk are generally consistent across different scenarios. The results could help develop regional strategies for ecosystem conservation to cope with climate change.

  5. Arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for recurrent anterior shoulder instability: functional outcomes and identification of risk factors for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Issaq; Ashton, Fiona; Robinson, Christopher Michael

    2012-07-18

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift is a well-established technique for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes following arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift and to identify risk factors that are predictive of recurrence of glenohumeral instability. We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database consisting of 302 patients who had undergone arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for the treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. The prevalence of patient and injury-related risk factors for recurrence was assessed. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the predicted probability of recurrence within two years. The chief outcome measures were the risk of recurrence and the two-year functional outcomes assessed with the Western Ontario shoulder instability index (WOSI) and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) scores. The rate of recurrent glenohumeral instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift was 13.2%. The median time to recurrence was twelve months, and this complication developed within one year in 55% of these patients. The risk of recurrence was independently predicted by the patient's age at surgery, the severity of glenoid bone loss, and the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion (all p < 0.001). These variables were incorporated into a model to provide an estimate of the risk of recurrence after surgery. Varying the cutoff level for the predicted probability of recurrence in the model from 50% to lower values increased the sensitivity of the model to detect recurrences but decreased the positive predictive value of the model to correctly predict failed repairs. There was a significant improvement in the mean WOSI and DASH scores at two years postoperatively (both p < 0.001), but the mean scores in the group with recurrence were significantly lower than those in the group

  6. Shift schedules, work factors, and mental health among onshore and offshore workers in the Norwegian petroleum industry

    PubMed Central

    BERTHELSEN, Mona; PALLESEN, Ståle; BJORVATN, Bjørn; KNARDAHL, Stein

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to answer the following research questions: (1) Do workers in different shift schedules differ in mental distress? (2) Do workers in different shift schedules differ in neuroticism? (3) Do shift schedules differ in psychosocial work exposures? (4) Do psychosocial work exposures contribute to mental distress among onshore- and offshore workers? (5) Does neuroticism confound the association between work exposures and mental distress? Workers on six shift-schedules answered a questionnaire (1,471 of 2,628 employees). Psychological and social work factors were measured by QPSNordic, mental distress was measured by HADS and neuroticism was measured by EPQ. The results showed 1) No differences in mental distress between workers in different shift schedules, 2) Revolving-shift workers reported higher neuroticism compared to day workers, 3) Swing-shift workers and revolving-shift workers reported lower job control compared to permanent-night and -day workers, 4) Job demands and role conflict were associated with more mental distress. Job control, role clarity, support, and leadership were associated with lower mental distress, 5) Neuroticism influenced the relationship between psychosocial work factors and mental distress. The present study did not find differences in mental distress between shift schedules. Job characteristics may be contributing factors when determining health effects of shift work. PMID:25740007

  7. Shift schedules, work factors, and mental health among onshore and offshore workers in the Norwegian petroleum industry.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, Mona; Pallesen, Ståle; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Knardahl, Stein

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to answer the following research questions: (1) Do workers in different shift schedules differ in mental distress? (2) Do workers in different shift schedules differ in neuroticism? (3) Do shift schedules differ in psychosocial work exposures? (4) Do psychosocial work exposures contribute to mental distress among onshore- and offshore workers? (5) Does neuroticism confound the association between work exposures and mental distress? Workers on six shift-schedules answered a questionnaire (1,471 of 2,628 employees). Psychological and social work factors were measured by QPSNordic, mental distress was measured by HADS and neuroticism was measured by EPQ. The results showed 1) No differences in mental distress between workers in different shift schedules, 2) Revolving-shift workers reported higher neuroticism compared to day workers, 3) Swing-shift workers and revolving-shift workers reported lower job control compared to permanent-night and -day workers, 4) Job demands and role conflict were associated with more mental distress. Job control, role clarity, support, and leadership were associated with lower mental distress, 5) Neuroticism influenced the relationship between psychosocial work factors and mental distress. The present study did not find differences in mental distress between shift schedules. Job characteristics may be contributing factors when determining health effects of shift work.

  8. Growth factors, aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Priya; Longo, Valter D

    2016-06-01

    Simple organisms including yeast and flies with mutations in the IGF-1 and Tor-S6K pathways are dwarfs, are highly protected from toxins, and survive up to 3 times longer. Similarly, dwarf mice with deficiencies in the growth hormone-IGF-I axis are also long lived and protected from diseases. We recently reported that humans with Growth Hormone Receptor Deficiency (GHRD) rarely develop cancer or diabetes. These findings are in agreement with the effect of defects in the Tor-S6K pathways in causing dwarfism and protection of DNA. Because protein restriction reduces both GHR-IGF-1 axis and Tor-S6K activity, we examined links between protein intake, disease, and mortality in over 6000 US subjects in the NHANES CDC database. Respondents aged 50-65 reporting a high protein intake displayed an increase in IGF-I levels, a 75% increased risk of overall mortality and a 3-4 fold increased risk of cancer mortality in agreement with findings in mouse experiments. These studies point to a conserved link between proteins and amino acids, GHR-IGF-1/insulin, Tor-S6k signaling, aging, and diseases.

  9. A Blue Spectral Shift of the Hemoglobin Soret Band Correlates with the Age (Time Since Deposition) of Dried Bloodstains

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Erin K.; Ballantyne, Jack

    2010-01-01

    The ability to determine the time since deposition of a bloodstain found at a crime scene could prove invaluable to law enforcement investigators, defining the time frame in which the individual depositing the evidence was present. Although various methods of accomplishing this have been proposed, none has gained widespread use due to poor time resolution and weak age correlation. We have developed a method for the estimation of the time since deposition (TSD) of dried bloodstains using UV-VIS spectrophotometric analysis of hemoglobin (Hb) that is based upon its characteristic oxidation chemistry. A detailed study of the Hb Soret band (λmax = 412 nm) in aged bloodstains revealed a blue shift (shift to shorter wavelength) as the age of the stain increases. The extent of this shift permits, for the first time, a distinction to be made between bloodstains that were deposited minutes, hours, days and weeks prior to recovery and analysis. The extent of the blue shift was found to be a function of ambient relative humidity and temperature. The method is extremely sensitive, requiring as little as a 1 µl dried bloodstain for analysis. We demonstrate that it might be possible to perform TSD measurements at the crime scene using a portable low-sample-volume spectrophotometer. PMID:20877468

  10. 20 CFR 203.6 - Age, citizenship, and other factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Age, citizenship, and other factors. 203.6 Section 203.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT EMPLOYEES UNDER THE ACT § 203.6 Age, citizenship, and other factors. The age, citizenship, or residence...

  11. 20 CFR 203.6 - Age, citizenship, and other factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Age, citizenship, and other factors. 203.6 Section 203.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT EMPLOYEES UNDER THE ACT § 203.6 Age, citizenship, and other factors. The age, citizenship, or residence...

  12. 20 CFR 203.6 - Age, citizenship, and other factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Age, citizenship, and other factors. 203.6 Section 203.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT EMPLOYEES UNDER THE ACT § 203.6 Age, citizenship, and other factors. The age, citizenship, or residence...

  13. 20 CFR 203.6 - Age, citizenship, and other factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Age, citizenship, and other factors. 203.6 Section 203.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT EMPLOYEES UNDER THE ACT § 203.6 Age, citizenship, and other factors. The age, citizenship, or residence...

  14. 20 CFR 203.6 - Age, citizenship, and other factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Age, citizenship, and other factors. 203.6 Section 203.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT EMPLOYEES UNDER THE ACT § 203.6 Age, citizenship, and other factors. The age, citizenship, or residence...

  15. Does the age-related "anterior shift" of the P3 reflect an inability to habituate the novelty response?

    PubMed

    Alperin, Brittany R; Mott, Katherine K; Holcomb, Phillip J; Daffner, Kirk R

    2014-08-08

    Old adults often generate larger anterior neural responses than young adults when carrying out task requirements. A common finding in the ERP literature is an "anterior shift" of the P3b to targets. Utilizing principal component analysis (PCA), we recently demonstrated that rather than the P3b moving anteriorly, old adults generate a large P3a that temporally overlaps with their P3b. A dominant hypothesis for the age-related increase in anterior P3 is the failure to habituate the brain's novelty response to rare targets. We tested this hypothesis in young and old adults by comparing the amplitude of the PCA factor representing P3a to targets presented in the first versus last of eight blocks of a visual oddball task. If, unlike young adults, old adults are unable to habituate a novelty response, one would expect (1) the P3a amplitude to decrease between the first and last blocks for young, but not old subjects and (2) the difference in P3a amplitude between young and old subjects to be greater in the last than the first block. Our results indicate the amplitude of the P3a was larger in old adults than young adults. However, this effect was not modulated by block. These findings argue against the hypothesis that an age-related increase in the P3a to targets reflects an inability of old subjects to habituate a novelty response. An alternative hypothesis is that the augmented P3a indexes the increased utilization of frontal executive functions to provide compensatory scaffolding to carry out a task.

  16. A Surrogate for Debye-Waller Factors from Dynamic Stokes Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qin; Johnson, Jerainne; Aamer, Khaled A.; Tyagi, Madhusudan

    2011-01-01

    We show that the short-time behavior of time-resolved fluorescence Stokes shifts (TRSS) are similar to that of the intermediate scattering function obtained from neutron scattering at q near the peak in the static structure factor for glycerol. This allows us to extract a Debye-Waller (DW) factor analog from TRSS data at times as short as 1 ps in a relatively simple way. Using the time-domain relaxation data obtained by this method we show that DW factors evaluated at times ≥ 40 ps can be directly influenced by α relaxation and thus should be used with caution when evaluating relationships between fast and slow dynamics in glassforming systems. PMID:21701673

  17. Factors Associated With High-Grade Lachman, Pivot Shift, and Anterior Drawer at the Time of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Robert A; Reinke, Emily K; Huston, Laura J; Hewett, Timothy E; Spindler, Kurt P

    2016-06-01

    To determine which patient and injury factors are associated with the detection of high-grade laxity on examination under anesthesia before anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. We identified 2,318 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction without associated ligament injuries. Demographic data and information regarding meniscal tears were collected. Patients with high-grade Lachman (difference from contralateral side >10 mm), pivot-shift (International Knee Documentation Committee grade 3+), or anterior drawer (difference from contralateral side >10 mm) tests were identified by physical examination under anesthesia before ACL reconstruction. Logistic regression modeling was used to evaluate whether chronicity of the ACL injury, patient age, sex, body mass index, generalized ligamentous laxity, and presence of meniscal tears were associated with increased odds of high-grade laxity, while we controlled for examining surgeon. Patients with chronic tears (>6 months from injury) had greater than twice the odds of having high-grade Lachman, pivot-shift, and anterior drawer tests (all P < .001) relative to patients with acute tears (<3 months from injury). Generalized ligamentous laxity (odds ratio [OR], 2.33; P < .001) and the presence of medial (OR, 1.63; P < .001) or lateral (OR, 1.41; P = .013) meniscus tears were associated with increased odds of a high-grade Lachman test. Age younger than 20 years (OR, 1.34; P = .023), female sex (OR, 1.49; P = .001), generalized ligamentous laxity (OR, 3.46; P < .001), and the presence of a medial (OR, 1.53; P < .001) or lateral (OR, 1.27; P = .041) meniscus tear were associated with increased odds of a high-grade pivot-shift test. Generalized ligamentous laxity (OR, 2.27; P < .001) and the presence of a medial (OR, 1.73; P = .001) or lateral (OR, 1.50; P = .010) meniscus tear were associated with increased odds of a high-grade anterior drawer test. Chronic ACL tears, generalized ligamentous laxity

  18. Postoperative trunk shift in Lenke 1 and 2 curves: how common is it? and analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Trobisch, Per D; Samdani, Amer F; Pahys, Joshua M; Cahill, Patrick J

    2011-07-01

    The goal of surgical treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is to achieve a solid fusion in a balanced spine. While many previous studies analyzed coronal balance, there is a paucity of studies that comment on postoperative trunk shift, which has shown to have impact on clinical outcome. The purpose of this retrospective, multicenter data analysis was to analyze the incidence of postoperative trunk shift in patients with surgical treatment for AIS. We conducted a retrospective, multicenter data analysis of 1,555 patients with AIS. Patients with a Lenke type 1 or 2 curve pattern and a minimum follow-up of 24 months after surgery were included. A >2 cm deviation of the trunk in relation to the pelvis was considered positive trunk shift. A subanalysis was performed to identify potential risk factors for trunk shift. 273 patients meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed. While the preoperative prevalence of trunk shift was surgically reduced from 29.3 to 13.6%, 24 patients (8.8%) with postoperative trunk shift had not had preoperative trunk shift, and the trunk shift was considered iatrogenic. Undercorrection of the lumbar curve was identified as potential risk factor, whereas thoracic correction, coronal balance, angulation and translation of the lowest instrumented vertebra did not seem to influence postoperative trunk shift. Iatrogenic postoperative trunk shift has an incidence of 8.8% in the surgical treatment of AIS.

  19. Cognitive Control Deficits in Shifting and Inhibition in Preschool Age Children are Associated with Increased Depression and Anxiety Over 7.5 Years of Development.

    PubMed

    Kertz, Sarah J; Belden, Andy C; Tillman, Rebecca; Luby, Joan

    2016-08-01

    Although depression and anxiety are common in youth (Costello et al. 2003), factors that put children at risk for such symptoms are not well understood. The current study examined associations between early childhood cognitive control deficits and depression and anxiety over the course of development through school age. Participants were 188 children (at baseline M = 5.42 years, SD = 0.79 years) and their primary caregiver. Caregivers completed ratings of children's executive functioning at preschool age and measures of depression and anxiety severity over seven assessment waves (a period of approximately 7.5 years). Longitudinal multilevel linear models were used to examine the effect of attention shifting and inhibition deficits on depression and anxiety. Inhibition deficits at preschool were associated with significantly greater depression severity scores at each subsequent assessment wave (up until 7.5 years later). Inhibition deficits were associated with greater anxiety severity from 3.5 to 7.5 years later. Greater shifting deficits at preschool age were associated with greater depression severity up to 5.5 years later. Shifting deficits were also associated with significantly greater anxiety severity up to 3.5 years later. Importantly, these effects were significant even after accounting for the influence of other key predictors including assessment wave/time, gender, parental education, IQ, and symptom severity at preschool age, suggesting that effects are robust. Overall, findings indicate that cognitive control deficits are an early vulnerability factor for developing affective symptoms. Timely assessment and intervention may be beneficial as an early prevention strategy.

  20. The age-related posterior-anterior shift as revealed by voxelwise analysis of functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Paul; Benuskova, Lubica; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    The posterior-anterior shift in aging (PASA) is a commonly observed phenomenon in functional neuroimaging studies of aging, characterized by age-related reductions in occipital activity alongside increases in frontal activity. In this work we have investigated the hypothesis as to whether the PASA is also manifested in functional brain network measures such as degree, clustering coefficient, path length and local efficiency. We have performed statistical analysis upon functional networks derived from a fMRI dataset containing data from healthy young, healthy aged, and aged individuals with very mild to mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Analysis of both task based and resting state functional network properties has indicated that the PASA can also be characterized in terms of modulation of functional network properties, and that the onset of AD appears to accentuate this modulation. We also explore the effect of spatial normalization upon the results of our analysis.

  1. A geometry-based approach to determining time-temperature superposition shifts in aging experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Maiti, Amitesh

    2015-12-21

    A powerful way to expand the time and frequency range of material properties is through a method called time-temperature superposition (TTS). Traditionally, TTS has been applied to the dynamical mechanical and flow properties of thermo-rheologically simple materials, where a well-defined master curve can be objectively and accurately obtained by appropriate shifts of curves at different temperatures. However, TTS analysis can also be useful in many other situations where there is scatter in the data and where the principle holds only approximately. In such cases, shifting curves can become a subjective exercise and can often lead to significant errors in themore » long-term prediction. This mandates the need for an objective method of determining TTS shifts. Here, we adopt a method based on minimizing the “arc length” of the master curve, which is designed to work in situations where there is overlapping data at successive temperatures. We examine the accuracy of the method as a function of increasing noise in the data, and explore the effectiveness of data smoothing prior to TTS shifting. In conclusion, we validate the method using existing experimental data on the creep strain of an aramid fiber and the powder coarsening of an energetic material.« less

  2. A geometry-based approach to determining time-temperature superposition shifts in aging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Amitesh

    2015-12-21

    A powerful way to expand the time and frequency range of material properties is through a method called time-temperature superposition (TTS). Traditionally, TTS has been applied to the dynamical mechanical and flow properties of thermo-rheologically simple materials, where a well-defined master curve can be objectively and accurately obtained by appropriate shifts of curves at different temperatures. However, TTS analysis can also be useful in many other situations where there is scatter in the data and where the principle holds only approximately. In such cases, shifting curves can become a subjective exercise and can often lead to significant errors in the long-term prediction. This mandates the need for an objective method of determining TTS shifts. Here, we adopt a method based on minimizing the “arc length” of the master curve, which is designed to work in situations where there is overlapping data at successive temperatures. We examine the accuracy of the method as a function of increasing noise in the data, and explore the effectiveness of data smoothing prior to TTS shifting. In conclusion, we validate the method using existing experimental data on the creep strain of an aramid fiber and the powder coarsening of an energetic material.

  3. Early Shifts of Brain Metabolism by Caloric Restriction Preserve White Matter Integrity and Long-Term Memory in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Janet; Bakshi, Vikas; Lin, Ai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of brain integrity with age is highly associated with lifespan determination. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase longevity and healthspan in various species; however, its effects on preserving living brain functions in aging remain largely unexplored. In the study, we used multimodal, non-invasive neuroimaging (PET/MRI/MRS) to determine in vivo brain glucose metabolism, energy metabolites, and white matter structural integrity in young and old mice fed with either control or 40% CR diet. In addition, we determined the animals' memory and learning ability with behavioral assessments. Blood glucose, blood ketone bodies, and body weight were also measured. We found distinct patterns between normal aging and CR aging on brain functions - normal aging showed reductions in brain glucose metabolism, white matter integrity, and long-term memory, resembling human brain aging. CR aging, in contrast, displayed an early shift from glucose to ketone bodies metabolism, which was associated with preservations of brain energy production, white matter integrity, and long-term memory in aging mice. Among all the mice, we found a positive correlation between blood glucose level and body weight, but an inverse association between blood glucose level and lifespan. Our findings suggest that CR could slow down brain aging, in part due to the early shift of energy metabolism caused by lower caloric intake, and we were able to identify the age-dependent effects of CR non-invasively using neuroimaging. These results provide a rationale for CR-induced sustenance of brain health with extended longevity.

  4. Early Shifts of Brain Metabolism by Caloric Restriction Preserve White Matter Integrity and Long-Term Memory in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Janet; Bakshi, Vikas; Lin, Ai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of brain integrity with age is highly associated with lifespan determination. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase longevity and healthspan in various species; however, its effects on preserving living brain functions in aging remain largely unexplored. In the study, we used multimodal, non-invasive neuroimaging (PET/MRI/MRS) to determine in vivo brain glucose metabolism, energy metabolites, and white matter structural integrity in young and old mice fed with either control or 40% CR diet. In addition, we determined the animals’ memory and learning ability with behavioral assessments. Blood glucose, blood ketone bodies, and body weight were also measured. We found distinct patterns between normal aging and CR aging on brain functions – normal aging showed reductions in brain glucose metabolism, white matter integrity, and long-term memory, resembling human brain aging. CR aging, in contrast, displayed an early shift from glucose to ketone bodies metabolism, which was associated with preservations of brain energy production, white matter integrity, and long-term memory in aging mice. Among all the mice, we found a positive correlation between blood glucose level and body weight, but an inverse association between blood glucose level and lifespan. Our findings suggest that CR could slow down brain aging, in part due to the early shift of energy metabolism caused by lower caloric intake, and we were able to identify the age-dependent effects of CR non-invasively using neuroimaging. These results provide a rationale for CR-induced sustenance of brain health with extended longevity. PMID:26617514

  5. Macro-economic factors influencing the architectural business model shift in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Raphaela Marie Louisa; Bruyère, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Richy, Florent-Frederic

    2016-10-01

    Technological innovations, new regulations, increasing costs of drug productions and new demands are only few key drivers of a projected alternation in the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this review is to understand the macro economic factors responsible for the business model revolution to possess a competitive advantage over market players. Areas covered: Existing literature on macro-economic factors changing the pharmaceutical landscape has been reviewed to present a clear image of the current market environment. Expert commentary: Literature shows that pharmaceutical companies are facing an architectural alteration, however the evidence on the rationale driving the transformation is outstanding. Merger & Acquisitions (M&A) deals and collaborations are headlining the papers. Q1 2016 did show a major slowdown in M&A deals by volume since 2013 (with deal cancellations of Pfizer and Allergan, or the downfall of Valeant), but pharmaceutical analysts remain confident that this shortfall was a consequence of the equity market volatility. It seems likely that the shift to an M&A model will become apparent during the remainder of 2016, with deal announcements of Abbott Laboratories, AbbVie and Sanofi worth USD 45billion showing the appetite of big pharma companies to shift from the fully vertical integrated business model to more horizontal business models.

  6. Hippocampal and Cognitive Aging across the Lifespan: A Bioenergetic Shift Precedes and Increased Cholesterol Trafficking Parallels Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kadish, I; Thibault, O; Blalock, EM; Chen, K-C; Gant, JC; Porter, NM; Landfield, PW

    2009-01-01

    Multiple hippocampal processes and cognitive functions change with aging or Alzheimer’s disease, but the potential triggers of these aging cascades are not well understood. Here, we quantified hippocampal expression profiles and behavior across the adult lifespan, to identify early aging changes and changes that coincide with subsequent onset of cognitive impairment. Well-powered microarray analyses (N=49 arrays), immunohistochemistry and Morris spatial maze learning were used to study male F344 rats at 5 age points. Genes that changed with aging (by ANOVA) were assigned to one-of-four onset-age ranges based upon template pattern matching; functional pathways represented by these genes were identified statistically (Genome Ontology). In the earliest onset-age range (3–6 months-old), upregulation began for genes in lipid/protein catabolic and lysosomal pathways, indicating a shift in metabolic substrates, whereas downregulation began for lipid synthesis, GTP/ATP-dependent signaling and neural development genes. By 6–9 months-of-age, upregulation of immune/inflammatory cytokines was pronounced. Cognitive impairment first appeared in the Midlife range (9–12 months), and coincided and correlated primarily with midlife upregulation of genes associated with cholesterol trafficking (apolipoprotein E), myelinogenic and proteolytic/MHC antigen-presenting pathways. Immunolabeling revealed that cholesterol trafficking proteins were substantially increased in astrocytes, and that myelination increased with aging. Together, our data suggest a novel sequential model in which an early-adult metabolic shift, favoring lipid/ketone body oxidation, triggers inflammatory degradation of myelin and resultant excess cholesterol that, by midlife, activates cholesterol transport from astrocytes to remyelinating oligodendrocytes. These processes may damage structure and compete with neuronal pathways for bioenergetic resources, thereby impairing cognitive function. PMID:19211887

  7. Evolutionary genetics of host shifts in herbivorous insects: insights from the age of genomics.

    PubMed

    Vertacnik, Kim L; Linnen, Catherine R

    2017-02-01

    Adaptation to different host taxa is a key driver of insect diversification. Herbivorous insects are classic models for ecological and evolutionary research, but it is recent advances in sequencing, statistics, and molecular technologies that have cleared the way for investigations into the proximate genetic mechanisms underlying host shifts. In this review, we discuss how genome-scale data are revealing-at resolutions previously unimaginable-the genetic architecture of host-use traits, the causal loci underlying host shifts, and the predictability of host-use evolution. Collectively, these studies are providing novel insights into longstanding questions about host-use evolution. On the basis of this synthesis, we suggest that different host-use traits are likely to differ in their genetic architecture (number of causal loci and the nature of their genetic correlations) and genetic predictability (extent of gene or mutation reuse), indicating that any conclusions about the causes and consequences of host-use evolution will depend heavily on which host-use traits are investigated. To draw robust conclusions and identify general patterns in host-use evolution, we argue that investigation of diverse host-use traits and identification of causal genes and mutations should be the top priorities for future studies on the evolutionary genetics of host shifts. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Genetic and pharmacological factors that influence reproductive aging in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stacie E; Evason, Kimberley; Xiong, Chengjie; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2007-02-16

    Age-related degenerative changes in the reproductive system are an important aspect of aging, because reproductive success is the major determinant of evolutionary fitness. Caenorhabditis elegans is a prominent organism for studies of somatic aging, since many factors that extend adult lifespan have been identified. However, mechanisms that control reproductive aging in nematodes or other animals are not well characterized. To use C. elegans to measure reproductive aging, we analyzed mated hermaphrodites that do not become sperm depleted and monitored the duration and level of progeny production. Mated hermaphrodites display a decline of progeny production that culminates in reproductive cessation before the end of the lifespan, demonstrating that hermaphrodites undergo reproductive aging. To identify factors that influence reproductive aging, we analyzed genetic, environmental, and pharmacological factors that extend lifespan. Dietary restriction and reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling delayed reproductive aging, indicating that nutritional status and a signaling pathway that responds to environmental stress influence reproductive aging. Cold temperature delayed reproductive aging. The anticonvulsant medicine ethosuximide, which affects neural activity, delayed reproductive aging, indicating that neural activity can influence reproductive aging. Some of these factors decrease early progeny production, but there is no consistent relationship between early progeny production and reproductive aging in strains with an extended lifespan. To directly examine the effects of early progeny production on reproductive aging, we used sperm availability to modulate the level of early reproduction. Early progeny production neither accelerated nor delayed reproductive aging, indicating that reproductive aging is not controlled by use-dependent mechanisms. The implications of these findings for evolutionary theories of aging are discussed.

  9. Sequence correction of random coil chemical shifts: correlation between neighbor correction factors and changes in the Ramachandran distribution.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming M

    2011-06-01

    Random coil chemical shifts are necessary for secondary chemical shift analysis, which is the main NMR method for identification of secondary structure in proteins. One of the largest challenges in the determination of random coil chemical shifts is accounting for the effect of neighboring residues. The contributions from the neighboring residues are typically removed by using neighbor correction factors determined based on each residue's effect on glycine chemical shifts. Due to its unusual conformational freedom, glycine may be particularly unrepresentative for the remaining residue types. In this study, we use random coil peptides containing glutamine instead of glycine to determine the random coil chemical shifts and the neighbor correction factors. The resulting correction factors correlate to changes in the populations of the major wells in the Ramachandran plot, which demonstrates that changes in the conformational ensemble are an important source of neighbor effects in disordered proteins. Glutamine derived random coil chemical shifts and correction factors modestly improve our ability to predict (13)C chemical shifts of intrinsically disordered proteins compared to existing datasets, and may thus improve the identification of small populations of transient structure in disordered proteins.

  10. Psychosocial factors for influencing healthy aging in adults in Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, KyungHun; Lee, YunJung; Gu, JaSung; Oh, Hee; Han, JongHee; Kim, KwuyBun

    2015-03-07

    Healthy aging includes physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being in later years. The purpose of this study is to identify the psychosocial factors influencing healthy aging and examining their socio-demographic characteristics. Perceived health status, depression, self-esteem, self-achievement, ego-integrity, participation in leisure activities, and loneliness were identified as influential factors in healthy aging. 171 Korean adults aged between 45 and 77 years-old participated in the study. Self-reporting questionnaires were used, followed by descriptive statistics and multiple regressions as inferential statistical analyses. There were significant differences between participants' general characteristics: age, education, religion, housing, hobby, and economic status. The factors related to healthy aging had positive correlation with perceived health status, self-esteem, self-achievements, and leisure activities, and negative correlation with depression and loneliness. The factors influencing healthy aging were depression, leisure activities, perceived health status, ego integrity, and self-achievements. These factors were able to explain 51.9%. According to the results, depression is the factor with the greatest influence on healthy aging. Perceived health status, ego integrity, self-achievement, self-esteem, participation of leisure activities were also influential on healthy aging as beneficial factors.

  11. Driving factors of a vegetation shift from Scots pine to pubescent oak in dry Alpine forests.

    PubMed

    Rigling, Andreas; Bigler, Christof; Eilmann, Britta; Feldmeyer-Christe, Elisabeth; Gimmi, Urs; Ginzler, Christian; Graf, Ulrich; Mayer, Philipp; Vacchiano, Giorgio; Weber, Pascale; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Zweifel, Roman; Dobbertin, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have reported on forest declines and vegetation shifts triggered by drought. In the Swiss Rhone valley (Valais), one of the driest inner-Alpine regions, the species composition in low elevation forests is changing: The sub-boreal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) dominating the dry forests is showing high mortality rates. Concurrently the sub-Mediterranean pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) has locally increased in abundance. However, it remains unclear whether this local change in species composition is part of a larger-scale vegetation shift. To study variability in mortality and regeneration in these dry forests we analysed data from the Swiss national forest inventory (NFI) on a regular grid between 1983 and 2003, and combined it with annual mortality data from a monitoring site. Pine mortality was found to be highest at low elevation (below 1000 m a.s.l.). Annual variation in pine mortality was correlated with a drought index computed for the summer months prior to observed tree death. A generalized linear mixed-effects model indicated for the NFI data increased pine mortality on dryer sites with high stand competition, particularly for small-diameter trees. Pine regeneration was low in comparison to its occurrence in the overstorey, whereas oak regeneration was comparably abundant. Although both species regenerated well at dry sites, pine regeneration was favoured at cooler sites at higher altitude and oak regeneration was more frequent at warmer sites, indicating a higher adaptation potential of oaks under future warming. Our results thus suggest that an extended shift in species composition is actually occurring in the pine forests in the Valais. The main driving factors are found to be climatic variability, particularly drought, and variability in stand structure and topography. Thus, pine forests at low elevations are developing into oak forests with unknown consequences for these ecosystems and their goods and

  12. Age as an Affective Factor in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bista, Krishna K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship of age factor to second language acquisition. Age as an affective factor brings about different performance stages in second as well as first language learning. Traditionally, research in Critical Period Hypothesis and other variables has derived two major aspects of language learning--the younger = the better…

  13. Control and the Aged: Environmental or Personality Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiffany, Phyllis G.; Dey, Kay

    Control over self, lifestyle, and environment is a major factor in how one ages. To investigate how age acts as an environmental force in affecting perceptions of control, 45 adults, aged 60-80, from western Kansas were administered the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), the Tiffany Experienced Control Scales (ECS), the Minnesota…

  14. Climate and vegetational regime shifts in the late Paleozoic ice age earth.

    PubMed

    DiMichele, W A; Montañez, I P; Poulsen, C J; Tabor, N J

    2009-03-01

    The late Paleozoic earth experienced alternation between glacial and non-glacial climates at multiple temporal scales, accompanied by atmospheric CO2 fluctuations and global warming intervals, often attended by significant vegetational changes in equatorial latitudes of Pangaea. We assess the nature of climate-vegetation interaction during two time intervals: middle-late Pennsylvanian transition and Pennsylvanian-Permian transition, each marked by tropical warming and drying. In case study 1, there is a catastrophic intra-biomic reorganization of dominance and diversity in wetland, evergreen vegetation growing under humid climates. This represents a threshold-type change, possibly a regime shift to an alternative stable state. Case study 2 is an inter-biome dominance change in western and central Pangaea from humid wetland and seasonally dry to semi-arid vegetation. Shifts between these vegetation types had been occurring in Euramerican portions of the equatorial region throughout the late middle and late Pennsylvanian, the drier vegetation reaching persistent dominance by Early Permian. The oscillatory transition between humid and seasonally dry vegetation appears to demonstrate a threshold-like behavior but probably not repeated transitions between alternative stable states. Rather, changes in dominance in lowland equatorial regions were driven by long-term, repetitive climatic oscillations, occurring with increasing intensity, within overall shift to seasonal dryness through time. In neither case study are there clear biotic or abiotic warning signs of looming changes in vegetational composition or geographic distribution, nor is it clear that there are specific, absolute values or rates of environmental change in temperature, rainfall distribution and amount, or atmospheric composition, approach to which might indicate proximity to a terrestrial biotic-change threshold.

  15. A paradigm shift in imaging biomarkers in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Waldstein, Sebastian M

    2016-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has undergone substantial break-throughs in diagnostic as well as therapeutic respect, with optical coherence tomography (OCT) allowing to identify disease morphology in great detail, and intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy providing unprecedented benefit. However, these two paths have yet not been combined in an optimal way, real-world outcomes are inferior to expectations, and disease management is largely inefficient in the real-world setting. This dilemma can be solved by identification of valid biomarkers relevant for visual function, disease activity and prognosis, which can provide solid guidance for therapeutic management on an individual level as well as on the population base. Qualitative and quantitative morphological features obtained by advanced OCT provide novel insight into exudative and degenerative stages of neovascular AMD. However, conclusions from structure/function correlations evolve differently from previous paradigms. While central retinal thickness was used as biomarker for guiding retreatment management in clinical trials and practice, fluid localization in different compartments offers superior prognostic value: Intraretinal cystoid fluid has a negative impact on visual acuity and is considered as degenerative when persisting through the initial therapeutic interval. Subretinal fluid is associated with superior visual benefit and a lower rate of progression towards geographic atrophy. Detachment of the retinal pigment epithelium was identified as most pathognomonic biomarker, often irresponsive to therapy and responsible for visual decline during a pro-re-nata regimen. Alterations of neurosensory tissue are usually associated with irreversible loss of functional elements and a negative prognosis. Novel OCT technologies offer crucial insight into corresponding changes at the level of the photoreceptor--retinal pigment epithelial--choriocapillary unit, identifying

  16. Transcription factors relevant to auxin signalling coordinate broad-spectrum metabolic shifts including sulphur metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Falkenberg, Bettina; Witt, Isabell; Zanor, Maria Inés; Steinhauser, Dirk; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Hesse, Holger; Hoefgen, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    A systems approach has previously been used to follow the response behaviour of Arabidopsis thaliana plants upon sulphur limitation. A response network was reconstructed from a time series of transcript and metabolite profiles, integrating complex metabolic and transcript data in order to investigate a potential causal relationship. The resulting scale-free network allowed potential transcriptional regulators of sulphur metabolism to be identified. Here, three sulphur-starvation responsive transcription factors, IAA13, IAA28, and ARF-2 (ARF1-Binding Protein), all of which are related to auxin signalling, were selected for further investigation. IAA28 overexpressing and knock-down lines showed no major morphological changes, whereas IAA13- and ARF1-BP-overexpressing plants grew more slowly than the wild type. Steady-state metabolite levels and expression of pathway-relevant genes were monitored under normal and sulphate-depleted conditions. For all lines, changes in transcript and metabolite levels were observed, yet none of these changes could exclusively be linked to sulphur stress. Instead, up- or down-regulation of the transcription factors caused metabolic changes which in turn affected sulphur metabolism. Auxin-relevant transcription factors are thus part of a complex response pattern to nutrient starvation that serve as coordinators of the metabolic shifts driving sulphur homeostasis rather then as direct effectors of the sulphate assimilation pathway. This study provides the first evidence ever presented that correlates auxin-related transcriptional regulators with primary plant metabolism. PMID:18596113

  17. Transcription factors relevant to auxin signalling coordinate broad-spectrum metabolic shifts including sulphur metabolism.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, Bettina; Witt, Isabell; Zanor, Maria Inés; Steinhauser, Dirk; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Hesse, Holger; Hoefgen, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    A systems approach has previously been used to follow the response behaviour of Arabidopsis thaliana plants upon sulphur limitation. A response network was reconstructed from a time series of transcript and metabolite profiles, integrating complex metabolic and transcript data in order to investigate a potential causal relationship. The resulting scale-free network allowed potential transcriptional regulators of sulphur metabolism to be identified. Here, three sulphur-starvation responsive transcription factors, IAA13, IAA28, and ARF-2 (ARF1-Binding Protein), all of which are related to auxin signalling, were selected for further investigation. IAA28 overexpressing and knock-down lines showed no major morphological changes, whereas IAA13- and ARF1-BP-overexpressing plants grew more slowly than the wild type. Steady-state metabolite levels and expression of pathway-relevant genes were monitored under normal and sulphate-depleted conditions. For all lines, changes in transcript and metabolite levels were observed, yet none of these changes could exclusively be linked to sulphur stress. Instead, up- or down-regulation of the transcription factors caused metabolic changes which in turn affected sulphur metabolism. Auxin-relevant transcription factors are thus part of a complex response pattern to nutrient starvation that serve as coordinators of the metabolic shifts driving sulphur homeostasis rather then as direct effectors of the sulphate assimilation pathway. This study provides the first evidence ever presented that correlates auxin-related transcriptional regulators with primary plant metabolism.

  18. Treating blood pressure to prevent strokes: The age factor.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2013-03-26

    The importance of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and pulse pressure (PP), on the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke are known. However, the importance of blood pressure (BP)-age shifts regarding the stroke incidence is not clearly known. The BP changes with the advancement of age from the predominance of DBP in the young to the predominance of SBP in the old. This change is due to the stiffening of the large arteries as a result of the aging process and the replacement of the elastic fibers with collagen fibers. This change results in the loss of compliance and the elastic recoil of these vessels leading to increase in pulse wave velocity, central SBP and widening of pulse pressure leading to an increased incidence of CHD and strokes. It has been demonstrated epidemiologically that the SBP rises linearly with age, whereas the DBP rises up to the age of 45-50 years, and then begins to decline after the age of 60 years leading to a progressive widening of PP. Several studies have shown an inverse relationship between DBP and CHD, whereas no such relationship has been demonstrated for stroke. However, a recent study showed an inverse relationship with DBP and stroke when it dropped below 71 mmHg in subjects 50 years of age or older. In contrast, there was a positive association between BP and stroke when both SBP and DBP were ≥ 71 mmHg. These findings suggest that in treating systolic hypertension in the elderly to reduce stroke risk, attention should be paid on the potential harm of low DBP and the widening of PP regarding CHD and stroke. The implications of BP shifts with age and the potential risks of low DBP regarding the risk of stroke will be discussed in this concise review.

  19. Treating blood pressure to prevent strokes: The age factor

    PubMed Central

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2013-01-01

    The importance of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and pulse pressure (PP), on the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke are known. However, the importance of blood pressure (BP)-age shifts regarding the stroke incidence is not clearly known. The BP changes with the advancement of age from the predominance of DBP in the young to the predominance of SBP in the old. This change is due to the stiffening of the large arteries as a result of the aging process and the replacement of the elastic fibers with collagen fibers. This change results in the loss of compliance and the elastic recoil of these vessels leading to increase in pulse wave velocity, central SBP and widening of pulse pressure leading to an increased incidence of CHD and strokes. It has been demonstrated epidemiologically that the SBP rises linearly with age, whereas the DBP rises up to the age of 45-50 years, and then begins to decline after the age of 60 years leading to a progressive widening of PP. Several studies have shown an inverse relationship between DBP and CHD, whereas no such relationship has been demonstrated for stroke. However, a recent study showed an inverse relationship with DBP and stroke when it dropped below 71 mmHg in subjects 50 years of age or older. In contrast, there was a positive association between BP and stroke when both SBP and DBP were ≥ 71 mmHg. These findings suggest that in treating systolic hypertension in the elderly to reduce stroke risk, attention should be paid on the potential harm of low DBP and the widening of PP regarding CHD and stroke. The implications of BP shifts with age and the potential risks of low DBP regarding the risk of stroke will be discussed in this concise review. PMID:23539515

  20. Age-dependent and coordinated shift in performance between implicit and explicit skill learning

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Dezso; Janacsek, Karolina; Fiser, József

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported recently that while general sequence learning across ages conforms to the typical inverted-U shape pattern, with best performance in early adulthood, surprisingly, the basic ability of picking up in an implicit manner triplets that occur with high vs. low probability in the sequence is best before 12 years of age and it significantly weakens afterwards. Based on these findings, it has been hypothesized that the cognitively controlled processes coming online at around 12 are useful for more targeted explicit learning at the cost of becoming relatively less sensitive to raw probabilities of events. To test this hypothesis, we collected data in a sequence learning task using probabilistic sequences in five age groups from 11 to 39 years of age (N = 288), replicating the original implicit learning paradigm in an explicit task setting where subjects were guided to find repeating sequences. We found that in contrast to the implicit results, performance with the high- vs. low-probability triplets was at the same level in all age groups when subjects sought patterns in the sequence explicitly. Importantly, measurements of explicit knowledge about the identity of the sequences revealed a significant increase in ability to explicitly access the true sequences exactly around the age where the earlier study found the significant drop in ability to learn implicitly raw probabilities. These findings support the conjecture that the gradually increasing involvement of more complex internal models optimizes our skill learning abilities by compensating for the performance loss due to down-weighting the raw probabilities of the sensory input, while expanding our ability to acquire more sophisticated skills. PMID:24155717

  1. Age-related Shifts in Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Peak-ratios and Amplitude Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is an important temporal cue for precise speech and complex sound recognition. However, functional decline of the auditory periphery as well as degradation of central auditory processing due to aging can reduce the salience and resolution of temporal cues. Age-related deficits in central temporal processing have previously been observed at more rapid AM frequencies and various AM depths. These centrally observed changes result from cochlear changes compounded with changes along the ascending auditory pathway. In fact, a decrease in ability to detect temporally modulated sounds accurately could originate from changes in cochlear filtering properties and in cochlear mechanics due to aging. Nonetheless, few studies have examined cochlear mechanisms in AM detection. To assess integrity of the mechanical properties of the auditory periphery, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are a tool commonly used in clinics and in research. In this study, we measured DPOAEs to reveal age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and degradation in AM detection by basilar membrane vibration. Two tones (f1 and f2, f2>f1) at various f2/f1 ratios and simultaneous presentation of one AM and one pure tone were used as stimuli to evoke DPOAEs. In addition of observing reduced DPOAE amplitudes and steeper slopes in the input-output DPOAE functions, higher peak f2/f1 ratios and broader f2/f1 tuning were also observed in aged animals. Aged animals generally had lower distortion product (DP) and first sideband (SB 1) responses evoked by an f1 pure tone and an f2 AM tone, regardless of whether the AM frequency was 45 Hz or 128 Hz. SB 1 thresholds, which corresponds to the smallest stimulus AM depth that can induce cochlear vibrations at the DP generator locus, were higher in aged animals as well. The results suggest that age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and AM detection by basilar membrane vibration are consistent with a reduction in endocochlear

  2. Impact of Night Shift and Training Development Factors on Performance of Professional Nurses in North West Bank Governmental Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayed, Ahmad; Thulth, Ahida Saleem; Sayej, Sumaya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organizational factors are considered to be the cornerstone in achieving psychological and professional security at work, which in turn are positively reflected in job performance both quantitatively and qualitatively. Aim of the Study: The study aimed to assess night shift and education/training developmental factors on performance of…

  3. Three-loop slope of the dirac form factor and the 1S lamb shift in hydrogen

    PubMed

    Melnikov; van Ritbergen T

    2000-02-21

    The last unknown contribution to hydrogen energy levels at order malpha(7), due to the slope of the Dirac form factor at three loops, is evaluated in a closed analytical form. The resulting shift of the hydrogen nS energy level is found to be 3.016/n(3) kHz. Using the QED calculations of the 1S Lamb shift, we extract a precise value of the proton charge radius r(p) = 0.883+/-0.014 fm.

  4. Efficacy and safety of ivabradine in chronic heart failure across the age spectrum: insights from the SHIFT study.

    PubMed

    Tavazzi, Luigi; Swedberg, Karl; Komajda, Michel; Böhm, Michael; Borer, Jeffrey S; Lainscak, Mitja; Ford, Ian

    2013-11-01

    To test whether the efficacy and safety of the selective heart rate-reducing agent ivabradine changes according to age in chronic heart failure (HF) patients. The ivabradine and placebo arms of SHIFT, which enrolled 6505 chronic HF patients, were combined and age distribution was divided by quartiles to give four groups (<53 years, n = 1522; 53 to <60 years, n = 1521; 60 to <69 years, n = 1750; and ≥69 years, n = 1712). The effects of ivabradine on cardiovascular outcomes, changes in heart rate, and adverse events, particularly bradycardia, were evaluated according to age group. A subgroup (602 patients) underwent 24 h ambulatory ECG Holter monitoring. The relative risk of the primary endpoint (cardiovascular death or hospitalization for worsening HF) was reduced by ivabradine in all age groups, ranging from 38% [hazard ratio (HR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.78, P < 0.001] in the youngest patients <53 years to 16% (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71-0.99, P = 0.035) in the oldest patients ≥69 years. Ivabradine up-titration reduced heart rate similarly in all age groups, by 11 b.p.m. As anticipated, bradycardia and phosphenes occurred more frequently with ivabradine, at a similar rate whatever the age. In the Holter substudy, there were no episodes of severe bradycardia and no clinically relevant pauses with ivabradine in any age group. Age does not limit the appropriate use of ivabradine in patients with chronic HF and systolic dysfunction. The safety and efficacy of ivabradine are comparable across all age groups.

  5. The Five to Seven Year Shift: The Age of Reason and Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sameroff, Arnold J., Ed.; Haith, Marshall M.

    This book reviews the contemporary state of knowledge on developmental transitions between 5 and 7 years. Contributions are: (1) "Interpreting Developmental Transitions" (Arnold Sameroff; Marshall Haith); (2) "The Child's Entry into the 'Age of Reason'" (Sheldon White); (3) "Is There a Neural Basis for Cognitive…

  6. The Five to Seven Year Shift: The Age of Reason and Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sameroff, Arnold J., Ed.; Haith, Marshall M.

    This book reviews the contemporary state of knowledge on developmental transitions between 5 and 7 years. Contributions are: (1) "Interpreting Developmental Transitions" (Arnold Sameroff; Marshall Haith); (2) "The Child's Entry into the 'Age of Reason'" (Sheldon White); (3) "Is There a Neural Basis for Cognitive…

  7. Spotlight on Scotland: Assets and Opportunities for Aging Research in a Shifting Sociopolitical Landscape.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Jane M; Bowes, Alison; Gibson, Grant; McCabe, Louise; Reynish, Emma L; Rutherford, Alasdair C; Wilińska, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Scotland is a small nation, yet it leads the field in key areas of aging research. With the creation of a devolved government with authority over health and social services, the country has witnessed practice and policy developments that offer distinctive opportunities for innovative research. With multidisciplinary groups of internationally recognized researchers, Scotland is able to take advantage of a unique set of opportunities for aging research: a well-profiled population brings opportunities in population data and linkage to understand people's interactions with health, social care, and other public services; while research on technology and telecare is a distinctive area where Scotland is recognized internationally for using technology to develop effective, high-quality and well-accepted services at relatively low financial cost. The paper also considers free personal care for older people and the national dementia strategy in Scotland. The potential to evaluate the impact of free personal care will provide valuable information for other global health and social care systems. Exploring the impact of the national dementia strategy is another unique area of research that can advance understanding in relation to quality of life and the development of services. The paper concludes that, while Scotland benefits from unique opportunities for progressive public policy and innovative aging research that will provide valuable lessons at the forefront of a globally aging population, the challenges associated with an aging population and increasing cultural diversity must be acknowledged and addressed to ensure that the vision of equality and social justice for all is realized. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Coeliac disease in the 21st century: paradigm shifts in the modern age.

    PubMed

    Newnham, Evan D

    2017-03-01

    The epidemiology of coeliac disease (CD) is changing. Presentation of CD with malabsorptive symptoms or malnutrition is now the exception rather than the rule and, it now affects those underweight and overweight equally. In concert with these epidemiological shifts, the incidence of CD is increasing. These changing patterns of disease presentation are challenging traditional management paradigms, and clinicians now need to adapt to these changes and respond to the demands of an increasingly well-informed consumer population. This article aims to provide historical context to the epidemiological changes in CD, which provides context to direct future research. Changing definitions and diagnostic paradigms are complicating the management of CD. The gold standard of diagnosis, treatment goals, guidelines for follow-up, and the role of population screening in CD remain controversial and unresolved. Although the patient population is interested in new treatments for CD and alternatives to a gluten-free diet, most therapies are not yet widely available or sufficiently researched, and our understanding of the natural history of CD is limited despite a number of retrospective and population-based studies. The management of asymptomatic CD has only recently been examined despite up to half of patients now presenting with no or minimal symptoms. There is surprisingly little evidence to resolve many of these issues, and only with robust prospective studies will our understanding of the true natural history of coeliac disease be clarified. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Shifting blame/selling health: corporate social responsibility in the age of obesity.

    PubMed

    Herrick, Clare

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how and why health has become a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) strategy for the global food and drink industry (FDI) in the context of current governmental and public calls to address mounting obesity rates. It argues that, despite the current prominence of health within CSR, there has not been a reciprocal interest by those adopting sociological approaches to the study of health and illness in the implications of this strategic uptake of health or in the viability and legitimacy of the state's own public health role. This omission is addressed through an empirical exploration of three contentions: first, that health and wellbeing may be used to secure brand value and consumer goodwill at a time when mounting obesity rates demand new levels of accountability from the FDI. Secondly, that the food industry, through CSR, may promote a narrow epidemiological understanding of obesity, shifting blame from 'foods' to 'diet' and from 'diet' to 'sedentarism'. Thirdly, that CSR reporting and its associated practices have enabled the food industry to assume some responsibility for obesity prevention, thereby problematising the state's role in addressing its own 'public health' crisis.

  10. Anti-aging and aging factors in life. The role of free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    2007-10-01

    The present review deals with some factors determining the anti-aging as well as the aging process. In order to get a deeper insight in the subject matter, firstly some less known spectroscopic and kinetic data of antioxidant vitamins (C, E, β-carotene) acting as anti-aging factors by electron transfer are briefly discussed. The generation of oxygen transients (OH, ROO rad , 1O 2, ozone radicals, etc.) by sunlight, ultrasonic and microwave radiation are causing "oxygen stress" and contribute to early ageing is also reviewed. Particular attention is paid to external environmental aging factors. Their action is based on the incorporation of various pollutants contained in water and air in the human organism. In this respect the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) play an essential role by initiating DNA-mutation, leading to an accelerate aging, carcinogenesis and diseases.

  11. Shift from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing glycine action in rat auditory neurones is due to age-dependent Cl− regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Ingrid; Löhrke, Stefan; Friauf, Eckhard

    1999-01-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine can elicit depolarizing responses in immature neurones. We investigated the changes in glycine responses and their ionic mechanism in developing neurones of the rat lateral superior olive (LSO), an auditory brainstem nucleus involved in sound localization. Whole-cell and gramicidin perforated-patch recordings were performed from visually identified LSO neurones in brain slices and glycine was pressure applied for 3–100 ms to the soma. Glycine-evoked currents were reversibly blocked by strychnine. They were mostly monophasic, but biphasic responses occurred in ∼30% of P8-11 neurones in perforated-patch recordings. In whole-cell recordings from P2-11 neurones, the reversal potential of glycine-evoked currents (EGly) was determined by the transmembranous Cl− gradient and corresponded closely to the Nernst potential for Cl−, regardless of age. This indicates that Cl− is the principle ion permeating glycine receptors, but is also consistent with a low relative (10–20%) permeability for HCO3−. The Cl− gradient also determined the polarity and amplitude of glycine-evoked membrane potential changes. Leaving the native intracellular [Cl−] undisturbed with gramicidin perforated-patch recordings, we found a highly significant, age-dependent change of EGly from −46.8 ± 1.8 mV (P1-4, n = 28) to −67.6 ± 3.3 mV (P5-8, n = 10) to −82.2 ± 4.1 mV (P9–11, n = 18). The majority of P1–4 neurones were depolarized by glycine (∼80%) and spikes were evoked in ∼30%. In contrast, P9–11 neurones were hyperpolarized. In perforated-patch recordings, EGly was influenced by the voltage protocol and the glycine application interval; it could be shifted in the positive and negative direction. For a given application interval, these shifts were always larger in P1–4 than in P8–11 neurones, pointing to less effective Cl− regulation mechanisms in younger neurones. Furosemide (frusemide), a blocker of cation

  12. Screening for Future Cardiovascular Disease Using Age Alone Compared with Multiple Risk Factors and Age

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Nicholas J.; Simmonds, Mark; Morris, Joan K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Risk factors such as blood pressure and serum cholesterol are used, with age, in screening for future cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The value of using these risk factors with age compared with using age alone is not known. We compared screening for future CVD events using age alone with screening using age and multiple risk factors based on regular Framingham risk assessments. Methods Ten-year CVD risk was estimated using Framingham risk equations in a hypothetical sample population of 500,000 people aged 0–89 years. Risk estimates were used to identify individuals who did and did not have a CVD event over a ten-year period. For screening using age alone (age screening) and screening using multiple risk factors and age (Framingham screening) we estimated the (i) detection rate (sensitivity); (ii) false–positive rate; (iii) proportion of CVD-free years of life lost in affected individuals with positive results (person-years detection rate); and (iv) cost per CVD-free life year gained from preventive treatment. Results Age screening using a cut-off of 55 years detected 86% of all first CVD events arising in the population every year and 72% of CVD-free years of life lost for a 24% false-positive rate; for five yearly Framingham screening the false-positive rate was 21% for the same 86% detection rate. The estimated cost per CVD-free year of life gained was £2,000 for age screening and £2,200 for Framingham screening if a Framingham screen costs £150 and the annual cost of preventive treatment is £200. Conclusion Age screening for future CVD events is simpler than Framingham screening with a similar screening performance and cost-effectiveness. It avoids blood tests and medical examinations. The advantages of age screening in the prevention of heart attack and stroke warrant considering its use in preference to multiple risk factor screening. PMID:21573224

  13. Factors associated with the occurrence of functional dyspepsia and insomnia in shift-working nurses.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hye-Sun; Lee, Bokim

    2016-04-06

    In South Korea, people are growing more and more interested in the early detection and prevention of health problems in shift workers. This study aims to investigate demographic, work-related and health-related factors relevant to functional dyspepsia and insomnia in shift-working nurses in South Korea. The sample was comprised of 1431 nurses who worked rotating shifts in three large hospitals in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. The questionnaire consisted of factors assessing demographic, work-related and health-related characteristics. Rome III criteria and the Insomnia Severity Index were applied to identify functional dyspepsia and insomnia, respectively. The survey was ongoing for approximately one month starting from 17 June 2013. The results of this study indicated that gender, body mass index, the number of night shifts worked, work-related stress, and regular dietary patterns were related to functional dyspepsia and insomnia in shift-working nurses. This study may help establish suitable working conditions and build workplace health promotion programs for shift-working nurses.

  14. Age-Related Shifts in Bacterial Diversity in a Reef Coral.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alex D; Brown, Barbara E; Putchim, Lalita; Sweet, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between microbial communities in differently sized colonies of the massive coral Coelastrea aspera at Phuket, Thailand where colony size could be used as a proxy for age. Results indicated significant differences between the bacterial diversity (ANOSIM, R = 0.76, p = 0.001) of differently sized colonies from the same intertidal reef habitat. Juvenile and small colonies (< 6 cm mean diam) harboured a lower bacterial richness than medium (~ 10 cm mean diam) and large colonies (> 28 cm mean diam). Bacterial diversity increased in a step-wise pattern from juveniles < small < medium colonies, which was then followed by a slight decrease in the two largest size classes. These changes appear to resemble a successional process which occurs over time, similar to that observed in the ageing human gut. Furthermore, the dominant bacterial ribotypes present in the tissues of medium and large sized colonies of C. aspera, (such as Halomicronema, an Oscillospira and an unidentified cyanobacterium) were also the dominant ribotypes found within the endolithic algal band of the coral skeleton; a result providing some support for the hypothesis that the endolithic algae of corals may directly influence the bacterial community present in coral tissues.

  15. Q-Type Factor Analysis of Healthy Aged Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleban, Morton H.

    Q-type factor analysis was used to re-analyze baseline data collected in 1957, on 47 men aged 65-91. Q-type analysis is the use of factor methods to study persons rather than tests. Although 550 variables were originally studied involving psychiatry, medicine, cerebral metabolism and chemistry, personality, audiometry, dichotic and diotic memory,…

  16. Q-Type Factor Analysis of Healthy Aged Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleban, Morton H.

    Q-type factor analysis was used to re-analyze baseline data collected in 1957, on 47 men aged 65-91. Q-type analysis is the use of factor methods to study persons rather than tests. Although 550 variables were originally studied involving psychiatry, medicine, cerebral metabolism and chemistry, personality, audiometry, dichotic and diotic memory,…

  17. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis Among Middle-Aged Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Lori W.; Wallace, Lorraine Silver; Perry, Blake Allen; Bleeker, Jeanne

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the risk factors for osteoporosis among a sample of middle-aged women. Methods: Adipose tissue and bone mineral density levels at the left femur, lumbar spine, and total body were assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Subjects (n=342) were surveyed regarding a variety of osteoporosis-related risk factors.…

  18. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis Among Middle-Aged Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Lori W.; Wallace, Lorraine Silver; Perry, Blake Allen; Bleeker, Jeanne

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the risk factors for osteoporosis among a sample of middle-aged women. Methods: Adipose tissue and bone mineral density levels at the left femur, lumbar spine, and total body were assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Subjects (n=342) were surveyed regarding a variety of osteoporosis-related risk factors.…

  19. Characterization of factors underlying the metabolic shifts in developing kernels of colored maize

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chaoyang; Li, Quanlin; Shen, Xuefang; Quan, Sheng; Lin, Hong; Duan, Lei; Wang, Yifa; Luo, Qian; Qu, Guorun; Han, Qing; Lu, Yuan; Zhang, Dabing; Yuan, Zheng; Shi, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of the metabolic pathways determining pigmentation and their underlying regulatory mechanisms in maize kernels is of high importance in attempts to improve the nutritional composition of our food. In this study, we compared dynamics in the transcriptome and metabolome between colored SW93 and white SW48 by integrating RNA-Seq and non-targeted metabolomics. Our data revealed that expression of enzyme coding genes and levels of primary metabolites decreased gradually from 11 to 21 DAP, corresponding well with the physiological change of developing maize kernels from differentiation through reserve accumulation to maturation, which was cultivar independent. A remarkable up-regulation of anthocyanin and phlobaphene pathway distinguished SW93 from SW48, in which anthocyanin regulating transcriptional factors (R1 and C1), enzyme encoding genes involved in both pathways and corresponding metabolic intermediates were up-regulated concurrently in SW93 but not in SW48. The shift from the shikimate pathway of primary metabolism to the flavonoid pathway of secondary metabolism, however, appears to be under posttranscriptional regulation. This study revealed the link between primary metabolism and kernel coloration, which facilitate further study to explore fundamental questions regarding the evolution of seed metabolic capabilities as well as their potential applications in maize improvement regarding both staple and functional foods. PMID:27739524

  20. Age-specific risk factors for lead absorption in children

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, S.D.; Yankel, A.J.; von Lindern, I.H.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship of blood lead levels to environmental and individual characteristics is analyzed in a large sample of children residing near a lead smelting complex, with particular emphasis on the identification of age-related risk factors. Exceptional variation in both blood leads and its determinants within the study region facilitated the simultaneous detection of several significant risk factors for each year of age from 1 to 9 y. The strongest predictor of blood lead at all ages was air lead, but the secondary risk factors were age dependent. Household dustiness was significantly related to blood lead in young children, especially those under 2 y of age; soil lead may be an important source of ingested lead for children between 2 and 7 y. Other significant effects included that of pica at about 2 y of age, a slight effect of the occupational category of the fathers of 5- to 8-y-old children, and a tendency for 8- and 9-y-old boys to have higher blood leads than girls of the same age. Lead concentration in household paint was not a significant risk factor. These results suggest that a multifactorial approach to the prevention of excessive lead absorption by children is required.

  1. Linking Land Surface Phenology and Growth Limiting Factor Shifts over the Past 30 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garonna, I.; Schenkel, D.; de Jong, R.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The study of global vegetation dynamics contributes to a better understanding of global change drivers and how these affect ecosystems and ecological diversity. Land-surface phenology (LSP) is a key response and feedback of vegetation to the climate system, and hence a parameter that needs to be accurately represented in terrestrial biosphere models [1]. However, the effects of climatic changes on LSP depend on the relative importance of climatic constraints in specific regions - which are not well understood at global scale. In this study, we analyzed a Phenology Reanalysis dataset [2] to evaluate shifts in three climatic drivers of phenology at global scale and over the last 30 years (1982-2012): incoming radiation, evaporative demand and minimum temperature. As a first step, we compared LAI as modeled from these three factors (LAIre) to remotely sensed observations of LSP (LAI3g, [3]) over the same time period. As a second step, we examined temporal trends in the climatic constraints at Start- and End- of the Growing Season. There was good agreement between phenology metrics as derived form LAI3g and LAIre over the last 30 years - thus providing confidence in the climatic constraints underlying the modeled data. Our analysis reveals inter-annual variation in the relative importance of the three climatic factors in limiting vegetation growth at Start- and End- of the Growing Season over the last 30 years. High northern latitudes, as well as northern Europe and central Asia, appear to have undergone significant changes in dominance between the three controls. We also find that evaporative demand has become increasingly limiting for growth in many parts of the world, in particular in South America and eastern Asia. [1] Richardson, A.D. et al. Global Change Biology 18, 566-584 (2012). [2] Stöckli, R. et al. J. Geophys. Res 116, G03020 (2011). [3] Zhu, Z. et al. Remote Sensing 5, 927-948 (2013).

  2. Oral Microbial Shift: Factors affecting the Microbiome and Prevention of Oral Disease.

    PubMed

    Dagli, Namrata; Dagli, Rushabh; Darwish, Shrouq; Baroudi, Kusai

    2016-01-01

    Recently, oral microbiome has gained popularity among scientists. Microorganisms are no longer considered as disease-producing pathogens, rather they are now considered as partners of human in maintaining health. Since ancient times, changes in our lifestyle have affected our microbiome and the balance with their human host has been perturbed. The present review includes the description about factors affecting oral microbiome and establishing symbiosis with the human host so that they contribute in maintaining health rather than eliciting diseases. A comprehensive literature search was performed on databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed and Medline until April 2015. First, articles were selected on the basis of their titles and then abstracts were screened and unwanted articles were excluded. Articles obtained from all the databases were checked and duplicate articles were removed. Articles obtained from various databases: PubMed = 35, Google Scholar=8. Out of these 43 articles, total 29 articles were finally selected for this review. The published literature suggests that the modern oral microbiome is less biodiverse, and possess more pathogenic bacterial species and lesser beneficial bacteria. The possible factors mainly responsible for this shift in microbiome were found to be change in diet, industrial revolution and indiscriminate use of antibiotics. Various changes in lifestyles have affected oral microbiome adversely and perturb the symbiosis between the microbiome and their hosts. The present oral microbiome is found to be less diverse and more pathogenic. The present review may be helpful in understanding the relationship between the microbiome and their human hosts so that microbiome contributes in maintaining healthy state of the body.

  3. Multi-directional Abundance Shifts Among North American Birds and the Relative Influence of Multi-Faceted Climate Factors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiongyu; Sauer, John R; Dubayah, Ralph O

    2017-03-12

    Shifts in species distributions are major fingerprint of climate change. Examining changes in species abundance structures at a continental scale enables robust evaluation of climate change influences, but few studies have conducted these evaluations due to limited data and methodological constraints. In this study, we estimate temporal changes in abundance from North American Breeding Bird Survey data at the scale of physiographic strata to examine the relative influence of different components of climatic factors and evaluate the hypothesis that shifting species distributions are multi-directional in resident bird species in North America. We quantify the direction and velocity of the abundance shifts of 57 permanent resident birds over 44 years using a centroid analysis. For species with significant abundance shifts in the centroid analysis, we conduct a more intensive correlative analysis to identify climate components most strongly associated with composite change of abundance within strata. Our hypotheses focus on two contrasts: the relative importance of climate extremes versus averages, and of temperature versus precipitation in strength of association with abundance change. Our study shows that 36 species had significant abundance shifts over the study period. The average velocity of the centroid is 5.89 km·yr(-1) .The shifted distance on average covers 259 km, 9% of range extent. Our results strongly suggest that the climate change fingerprint in studied avian distributions is multidirectional. Among 6 directions with significant abundance shifts, the northwestward shift was observed in the largest number of species (n=13). The temperature/average climate model consistently has greater predictive ability than the precipitation/extreme climate model in explaining strata-level abundance change. Our study shows heterogeneous avian responses to recent environmental changes. It highlights needs for more species-specific approaches to examine contributing

  4. Memory-enhancing effects of DHEAS in aged mice on a win-shift water escape task.

    PubMed

    Markowski, M; Ungeheuer, M; Bitran, D; Locurto, C

    2001-03-01

    The steroid hormone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) have been implicated in age-associated deficits in memory. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of these neurosteroids to enhance retention and ameliorate the effects of various memory-blocking agents, but few studies have directly assayed their effects on memory in aged animals. The present study investigated the memory-enhancing effects of DHEAS in a win-shift (nonmatching-to-sample) task in aged mice using water escape motivation. Sixteen CD-1 mice, 18-20 months old, were trained to a moderate criterion of 7/10 correct trials and were then divided into two equal groups based on acquisition performance. One group received oral administration of DHEAS (1.5 mg/mouse/day) in a vehicle solution (0.0015% methyl salicylate) while the other group received the vehicle alone. DHEAS effects were assessed using a procedure in which delay intervals (0, 120, and 240 s) were interposed between sample and comparison trials over the course of three test sessions. The group receiving DHEAS recorded significantly higher retention scores across 3 days of testing, particularly at the 120-s delay interval, indicating that DHEAS enhanced working memory in these aged animals.

  5. Telomeres and lifestyle factors: roles in cellular aging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jue; Epel, Elissa; Blackburn, Elizabeth

    2012-02-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that telomere maintenance might be a key integrating point for the cumulative effects of genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors on aging and aging-related diseases. It is timely to 'take stock' of where this work has led the field. This review summarizes studies that have examined associations between lifestyle factors and telomere length and telomerase activity. In most of the studies described in this chapter, telomere length was measured in leukocytes (LTL) or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), taken from blood draws from the study subjects. Much of this chapter focuses on psychological stress, a widespread factor often intimately tied in with lifestyle or behavioral factors that in turn are related to risks of clinical diseases. Together, these findings suggest that cellular aging is linked to a range of influences, with an individual's life events and lifestyle parameters playing significant roles. Lastly, we propose possible biochemical mechanisms that mediate these associations and discuss future directions.

  6. 38 CFR 18.514 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination; reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... against age discrimination; reasonable factors other than age. 18.514 Section 18.514 Pensions, Bonuses... 1964 Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 18.514 Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination; reasonable factors other than age. A recipient...

  7. Regeneration of the aged thymus by a single transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Bredenkamp, Nicholas; Nowell, Craig S; Blackburn, C Clare

    2014-04-01

    Thymic involution is central to the decline in immune system function that occurs with age. By regenerating the thymus, it may therefore be possible to improve the ability of the aged immune system to respond to novel antigens. Recently, diminished expression of the thymic epithelial cell (TEC)-specific transcription factor Forkhead box N1 (FOXN1) has been implicated as a component of the mechanism regulating age-related involution. The effects of upregulating FOXN1 function in the aged thymus are, however, unknown. Here, we show that forced, TEC-specific upregulation of FOXN1 in the fully involuted thymus of aged mice results in robust thymus regeneration characterized by increased thymopoiesis and increased naive T cell output. We demonstrate that the regenerated organ closely resembles the juvenile thymus in terms of architecture and gene expression profile, and further show that this FOXN1-mediated regeneration stems from an enlarged TEC compartment, rebuilt from progenitor TECs. Collectively, our data establish that upregulation of a single transcription factor can substantially reverse age-related thymic involution, identifying FOXN1 as a specific target for improving thymus function and, thus, immune competence in patients. More widely, they demonstrate that organ regeneration in an aged mammal can be directed by manipulation of a single transcription factor, providing a provocative paradigm that may be of broad impact for regenerative biology.

  8. U.S. sulfur dioxide emission reductions: Shifting factors and a carbon dioxide penalty

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Marilyn Ann; Li, Yufei; Massetti, Emanuele; ...

    2017-01-18

    For more than 20 years, the large-scale application of flue gas desulfurization technology has been a dominant cause of SO2 emission reductions. From 1994–2004, electricity generation from coal increased, but the shift to low-sulfur coal eclipsed this. From 2004–2014, electricity generation from coal decreased, but a shift to higher-sulfur subbituminous and lignite coal overshadowed this. Here, the shift in coal quality has also created a CO2 emissions penalty, representing 2% of the sector’s total emissions in 2014.

  9. Risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Nano, María Eugenia; Lansingh, Van Charles; Pighin, María Soledad; Zarate, Natalia; Nano, Hugo; Carter, Marissa Janine; Furtado, João Marcello; Nano, Clelia Crespo; Vernengo, Luciana Fiocca; Luna, José Domingo; Eckert, Kristen Allison

    2013-01-01

    To assess the risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina using a case-control study. Surveys were used for subjects' antioxidant intake, age/gender, race, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (and type of treatment), smoking, sunlight exposure, red meat consumption, fish consumption, presence of age-related macular degeneration and family history of age-related macular degeneration. Main effects models for logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze the results. There were 175 cases and 175 controls with a mean age of 75.4 years and 75.5 years, respectively, of whom 236 (67.4%) were female. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration, 159 (45.4%) had age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 154 (44.0%) in their right eyes, and 138 (39.4%) in both eyes. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 47.8% had the dry type, 40.3% had the wet type, and the type was unknown for 11.9%. The comparable figures for right eyes were: 51.9%, 34.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. The main effects model was dominated by higher sunlight exposure (OR [odds ratio]: 3.3) and a family history of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 4.3). Other factors included hypertension (OR: 2.1), smoking (OR: 2.2), and being of the Mestizo race, which lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 0.40). Red meat/fish consumption, body mass index, and iris color did not have an effect. Higher age was associated with progression to more severe age-related macular degeneration. Sunlight exposure, family history of age-related macular degeneration, and an older age were the significant risk factors. There may be other variables, as the risk was not explained very well by the existing factors. A larger sample may produce different and better results.

  10. Language Shift or Maintenance? An Examination of Language Usage across Four Generations as Self-Reported by University Age Students in Belarus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, N. Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the degree to which language shift or maintenance is obtained across four generations in Belarus. Linguistic homogeneity and heterogeneity receive particular attention as potential contributing factors to language shift or maintenance in the home, arguably the last bastion in terms of language maintenance. In an effort to…

  11. Rapid northward shift of the Indian Monsoon on the Tibetan Plateau at the end of the Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Xu, Baiqing; Günther, Franziska; Witt, Roman; Wang, Mo; Xie, Ying; Zhao, Huabiao; Li, Jiule; Gleixner, Gerd

    2017-09-01

    Variations in the Indian Monsoon (IM) and Westerlies (WS) significantly affect the climate on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and have widespread ecological and socioeconomic impacts on the whole of Asian society. So far, however, the rate and magnitude of changes in the IM have still remained unclear. Here we report for the first time that the IM rapidly shifted northward at the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA). We used sediment proxies for humidity and moisture sources from the Taro Co Lake, which is located in the transition zone between the WS and IM. Our comprehensive survey of climate records for the TP and its peripheral mountain ranges revealed that the northern boundary of the IM (i.e., the southern boundary of the WS) lay along the southern slope of the Gandise Range ( 29.5°N) in the late LIA. In contrast, it passed quickly over the Gandise Range by at least 1.5° in latitude at the end of the LIA. Our results suggest that this rapid climatic shift was potentially triggered by the counteracting effects of blocking by the TP and its marginal orography, which hindered the northward movement of the IM, and the pulling thermal gradient of the TP.

  12. Shift in fungal communities and associated enzyme activities along an age gradient of managed Pinus sylvestris stands.

    PubMed

    Kyaschenko, Julia; Clemmensen, Karina E; Hagenbo, Andreas; Karltun, Erik; Lindahl, Björn D

    2017-04-01

    Forestry reshapes ecosystems with respect to tree age structure, soil properties and vegetation composition. These changes are likely to be paralleled by shifts in microbial community composition with potential feedbacks on ecosystem functioning. Here, we assessed fungal communities across a chronosequence of managed Pinus sylvestris stands and investigated correlations between taxonomic composition and extracellular enzyme activities. Not surprisingly, clear-cutting had a negative effect on ectomycorrhizal fungal abundance and diversity. In contrast, clear-cutting favoured proliferation of saprotrophic fungi correlated with enzymes involved in holocellulose decomposition. During stand development, the re-establishing ectomycorrhizal fungal community shifted in composition from dominance by Atheliaceae in younger stands to Cortinarius and Russula species in older stands. Late successional ectomycorrhizal taxa correlated with enzymes involved in mobilisation of nutrients from organic matter, indicating intensified nutrient limitation. Our results suggest that maintenance of functional diversity in the ectomycorrhizal fungal community may sustain long-term forest production by retaining a capacity for symbiosis-driven recycling of organic nutrient pools.

  13. Transforming growth factor-beta during carcinogenesis: the shift from epithelial to mesenchymal signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Koichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2006-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) activates not only TGF-beta type I receptor (TbetaRI) but also c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), changing unphosphorylated Smad3 to its phosphoisoforms: C-terminally phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C) and linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L). While the TbetaRI/pSmad3C pathway inhibits growth of normal epithelial cells, JNK/pSmad3L-mediated signaling is involved in invasion by activated mesenchymal cells. During sporadic human colorectal carcinogenesis, TGF-beta signaling confers a selective advantage on tumor cells by shifting from the TbetaRI/pSmad3C pathway characteristic of mature epithelial cells to the JNK/pSmad3L pathway, which is more characteristic of the state of flux shown by the activated mesenchymal cells. JNK acts as a regulator of TGF-beta signaling by increasing the basal level of pSmad3L available for action in the nuclei of the invasive adenocarcinoma, in the meantime shutting down TGF-beta-dependent nuclear activity of pSmad3C. Loss of epithelial homeostasis and acquisition of a migratory, mesenchymal phenotype are essential for tumor invasion. From the viewpoint of TGF-beta signaling, a key therapeutic aim in cancer would be restoration of the lost tumor suppressor function observed in normal colorectal epithelial cells at the expense of effects promoting aggressive behavior of the adenocarcinoma. Specific inhibitors of the JNK/pSmad3L pathway might prove useful in this respect. In the case of molecularly targeted therapy for human cancer, pSmad3L and pSmad3C could be assessed as biomarkers to evaluate the likely benefit from specific inhibition of the JNK/pSmad3L pathway.

  14. Exceptional Shift to a Weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation at the end of the Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornalley, D. J.; Oppo, D.; Moffa Sanchez, P.; Hall, I. R.; Keigwin, L. D.; Rose, N.; Green, K.; Pallottino, F.; Ortega, P.; Robson, J.

    2016-12-01

    Several proxy and modelling studies suggest that there may have been considerable change in the operation of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the last two millennia. Yet despite its importance for regional and global climate, the recent history of the AMOC is poorly constrained and comprehensive observational records only extend back a few decades at most. Observational data suggest that the export of large volumes of sea-ice and freshwater from the Arctic during the Great Salinity Anomaly of the late 1960s to early 1970s impacted North Atlantic circulation, and perhaps the strength of the AMOC, thus raising the possibility that more extreme events may have affected the AMOC during the pre-instrumental era. We present a suite of AMOC related proxies from high resolution marine sediment cores from the North Atlantic, spanning the last 2000 years, including proxies for both deep ocean circulation and surface ocean climate. Our results suggest that there was an exceptional shift to a weaker mode of Labrador Sea Water (LSW) formation during the late 19th century, which persisted up to the present day, notwithstanding strong decadal-scale LSW production events such as during the 1990s. Using a compilation of sites that allow the sea-surface temperature fingerprint of AMOC change to be identified, we show that the shift to weaker LSW formation was accompanied by a weakening of the combined AMOC. Preliminary data suggests that this exceptional event impacted marine ecosystems in certain locations. Based on their timing, we infer that the weakening of LSW and AMOC may have been caused by the export of sea-ice and freshwater from the Arctic during the termination of the Little Ice Age (somewhat mimicking, albeit on a smaller scale, the AMOC weakening events that accompanied the last Ice Age termination). These results have significant implications for the sensitivity of the AMOC to climate forcing, and the cause of late Holocene climate events.

  15. Factors contributing to the facial aging of identical twins.

    PubMed

    Guyuron, Bahman; Rowe, David J; Weinfeld, Adam Bryce; Eshraghi, Yashar; Fathi, Amir; Iamphongsai, Seree

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the environmental factors that contribute to facial aging in identical twins. During the Twins Day Festival in Twinsburg, Ohio, 186 pairs of identical twins completed a comprehensive questionnaire, and digital images were obtained. A panel reviewed the images independently and recorded the differences in the perceived twins' ages and their facial features. The perceived age differences were then correlated with multiple factors. Four-point higher body mass index was associated with an older appearance in twins younger than age 40 but resulted in a younger appearance after age 40 (p = 0.0001). Eight-point higher body mass index was associated with an older appearance in twins younger than age 55 but was associated with a younger appearance after age 55 (p = 0.0001). The longer the twins smoked, the older they appeared (p < 0.0001). Increased sun exposure was associated with an older appearance and accelerated with age (p = 0.015), as was a history of outdoor activities and lack of sunscreen use. Twins who used hormone replacement had a younger appearance (p = 0.002). Facial rhytids were more evident in twins with a history of skin cancer (p = 0.05) and in those who smoked (p = 0.005). Dark and patchy skin discoloration was less prevalent in twins with a higher body mass index (p = 0.01) and more common in twins with a history of smoking (p = 0.005) and those with sun exposure (p = 0.005). Hair quantity was better with a higher body mass index (p = 0.01) although worse with a history of skin cancer (p = 0.005) and better with the use of hormones (p = 0.05). This study offers strong statistical evidence to support the role of some of the known factors that govern facial aging.

  16. [Association of coronary risk factors in old age. AFRICA study].

    PubMed

    Paterno, Carlos A; Cornelio, Cecilia I; Giménez, Juan C

    2006-06-01

    We carried out a multicenter cross-sectional study in Argentina to investigate the prevalence of behavioral and other risk factors for coronary heart disease in patients aged 90 years or more and to study the association between risk factors and longevity. Data were collected on 322 individuals aged 90 years or more, 47% of whom had a family history of longevity. The majority ate meals comprising mainly fruit, milk and vegetables every day and half of the participants drank a moderate amount of red wine. On average, their body mass index was normal and they regularly took some form of physical activity. Generally, diabetes mellitus was associated with obesity. The onset of arterial hypertension occurred at the high average age of 72 years. Few were found to be current smokers. Few individuals had two concurrent risk factors, and even fewer had three concurrent major coronary risk factors. In conclusion, patients aged 90 or more in our series showed characteristics indicating both a genetic trait and environmental factors favouring longevity.

  17. Structural and Cultural Factors in Successful Aging Among Older Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Successful or healthful aging are terms that draw attention to life course issues related to individual, physical, and psychologic development and maturation, but they also draw attention to the material basis of successful aging and the social structures that determine one’s place in the social hierarchy. This article focuses on barriers to optimal aging for Hispanics, especially those of Mexican origin, and argues that cultural factors and social class are closely associated. The reduction of health disparities and equity in medical and long-term care requires an understanding of both cultural and material sources of differential health levels. PMID:19065093

  18. Three-Loop Slope of the Dirac Form Factor and the 1S Lamb Shift in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, Kirill; Ritbergen, Timo van

    2000-02-21

    The last unknown contribution to hydrogen energy levels at order m{alpha}{sup 7} , due to the slope of the Dirac form factor at three loops, is evaluated in a closed analytical form. The resulting shift of the hydrogen nS energy level is found to be 3.016/n{sup 3} kHz . Using the QED calculations of the 1S Lamb shift, we extract a precise value of the proton charge radius r{sub p}=0.883{+-}0.014 fm . (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Three-Loop Slope of the Dirac Form Factor and the 1S Lamb Shift in Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Melnikov, K; van Ritbergen, T

    2000-02-21

    The last unknown contribution to hydrogen energy levels at order mα^{7}, due to the slope of the Dirac form factor at three loops, is evaluated in a closed analytical form. The resulting shift of the hydrogen nS energy level is found to be 3.016/n^{3} kHz. Using the QED calculations of the 1S Lamb shift, we extract a precise value of the proton charge radius r_{p}=0.883±0.014 fm.

  20. [Night shift work and prolactin as a breast cancer risk factor].

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Agnieszka; Pepłońska, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin - a hormone secreted in a circadian rhythm acts as a regulator of growth and development of the mammary glands. It has been observed that working at night increases breast cancer risk in women. Night shift work, probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A IARC), can disrupt a circadian rhythm, and thus potentially alter the rhythm of prolactin secretion. The aim of our work was to review epidemiological evidence on the association between prolactin and the risk of breast cancer and the influence of work at night on prolactin secretion. Search was done in the Medline database by keywords (shift work, work at night, risk of breast cancer and prolactin). 'The increased proliferation of breast cells activated by prolactin can promote the development of cancer. The results of the largest epidemiological prospective studies suggest the association between prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer in women. So far, only seven studies have investigated the association between work at night and prolactin secretion. In three studies lower concentrations of prolactin have been observed in night shift workers. No relationship between the night shift work duration and prolactin level in women have been reported. Night shift work can modify the profile of prolactin secretion in night workers, probably decreasing the secretion of this hormone at night. It is therefore unlikely that prolactin plays an important role in the development of breast cancer in women working at night. This conclusion is based on the results of a few epidemiological studies.

  1. 44 CFR 7.922 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age. 7.922 Section 7.922 Emergency Management... Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance From FEMA Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 7.922 Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age. A...

  2. Growth Differentiation Factor 11 is a Circulating Factor that Reverses Age-Related Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Loffredo, Francesco S.; Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Jay, Steven M.; Gannon, Joseph; Pancoast, James R.; Yalamanchi, Pratyusha; Sinha, Manisha; Dall’Osso, Claudia; Khong, Danika; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Miller, Christine M.; Singer, Britta S.; Stewart, Alex; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Gerszten, Robert E.; Hartigan, Adam J.; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Serwold, Thomas; Wagers, Amy J.; Lee, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The most common form of heart failure occurs with normal systolic function and often involves cardiac hypertrophy in the elderly. To clarify the biological mechanisms that drive cardiac hypertrophy in aging, we tested the influence of circulating factors using heterochronic parabiosis, a surgical technique in which joining of animals of different ages leads to a shared circulation. After 4 weeks of exposure to the circulation of young mice, cardiac hypertrophy in old mice dramatically regressed, accompanied by reduced cardiomyocyte size and molecular remodeling. Reversal of age-related hypertrophy was not attributable to hemodynamic or behavioral effects of parabiosis, implicating a blood-borne factor. Using modified aptamer-based proteomics, we identified the TGFβ superfamily member GDF11 as a circulating factor in young mice that declines with age. Treatment of old mice to restore GDF11 to youthful levels recapitulated the effects of parabiosis and reversed age-related hypertrophy, revealing a new therapeutic opportunity for cardiac aging. PMID:23663781

  3. State spending on dual eligibles under age 65 shows variations, evidence of cost shifting from Medicaid to Medicare.

    PubMed

    Bubolz, Thomas; Emerson, Constance; Skinner, Jonathan

    2012-05-01

    Roughly half of Medicare beneficiaries under age sixty-five are also eligible for Medicaid. These "dual eligibles" have been the subject of much research because of their low income and poor health status. Previous studies suggest that some states seek to shift costly health care services for this group out of state-run Medicaid programs and into the federally funded Medicare program--for example, replacing nursing home care with hospital care. Using state-level data on dual eligibles under age sixty-five, we found support for this hypothesis. In states with below-average per capita Medicaid spending, corresponding Medicare spending was above average. These state-level estimates also revealed a nearly threefold difference in total--Medicare plus Medicaid-price--adjusted spending per person, ranging from $16,309 in Georgia to $43,587 in New York. Such large variations among people with serious diseases suggest inefficiency. Some states may be spending too little for Medicaid, meaning that some patients' needs are not being met, or some states may be spending too much, meaning that more services are being provided than needed. Such inefficiency exposes patients to unnecessary risk, drives costs up unnecessarily, and highlights the large potential gains arising from improved care coordination for dual eligibles.

  4. Factors for Successful E-Learning: Does Age Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Julie; Becker, Karen; Newton, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors affecting employees' overall acceptance, satisfaction and future use of e-learning, specifically exploring the impact that age has on the intended future use of e-learning relative to the other potential predictors. Design/Methodology/Approach: The project developed an online survey and…

  5. Economic and Sociological Factors Influencing Life Satisfaction of the Aged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatfield, Walter F.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the relative importance of income, health status, and such sociological factors as worker roles and family setting in explaining the life satisfaction of the aged. Results indicated that the lower life satisfaction resulted primarily from the loss of income and not from the loss of a worker-producer role. (Author)

  6. Factors Influencing Residents' Satisfaction in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the important factors influencing residents' satisfaction in residential aged care and to provide a better understanding of their interrelationships. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect the required information, including resident satisfaction, resident dependency…

  7. Factors Influencing Residents' Satisfaction in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the important factors influencing residents' satisfaction in residential aged care and to provide a better understanding of their interrelationships. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect the required information, including resident satisfaction, resident dependency…

  8. Factors for Successful E-Learning: Does Age Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Julie; Becker, Karen; Newton, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors affecting employees' overall acceptance, satisfaction and future use of e-learning, specifically exploring the impact that age has on the intended future use of e-learning relative to the other potential predictors. Design/Methodology/Approach: The project developed an online survey and…

  9. Relations of age and personality dimensions to cognitive ability factors.

    PubMed

    Costa, P T; Fozard, J L; McCrae, R R; Bosśe, R

    1976-11-01

    The relation between three cognitive ability factors - Information Processing Ability (IPA), Manual Dexterity (MD), and Pattern Analysis Capability (PAC) - and three personality dimensions - Anxiety, Extraversion, and Openness to Experience - were examined in three age groups. Subjects were 969 male volunteers ranging in age from 25 to 82. Subjects high in anixety scored lower on all three cognitive factors; subjects open to experience scored higher on IPA and PAC; and introverted subjects scored higher on PAC. Most of these effects remained when the education and socio-economic status were held constant in covariance analyses. Older subjects performed less well than younger ones on MD and PAC, but not on IPA. While personality has some influence on cognitive performance, the declines with age in performance on some cognitive tasks are not mediated by personality.

  10. Factors influencing STI transmission in middle-aged heterosexual individuals.

    PubMed

    Monsell, Ellen; McLuskey, John

    2016-06-23

    Research has shown that individuals aged 45-64, or the 'middle-aged' population, are at an increasing risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI). An exploration of the factors that may influence STIs in this age group was carried out to ascertain how to reduce the risk. A critical review identified 14 research papers that considered STIs in middle-aged people. The available evidence base highlighted an under-representation of women, the absence of a consistent definition of 'middle age', and a paucity of specific information on the sexual health needs of this group. Low condom use was found to be a possible contributor to increasing STI rates; men were shown to report particularly low use. Behaviours such as contact with sex workers and sexual encounters abroad were found to be additional risk factors in men, requiring further consideration. The breakdown and formation of relationships during middle age was also identified as a possible area to investigate, as were the behavioural traits of women and associated STI risk. Further research into these areas could facilitate the development of attitudes, knowledge, policy and practice that could help provide better support for individuals affected.

  11. Social Factors and Healthy Aging: Findings from the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS)

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Katie E.; Brown, Jennifer Silva; Kim, Sangkyu; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2016-01-01

    Social behaviors are associated with health outcomes in later life. The authors examined relationships among social and physical activities and health in a lifespan sample of adults (N = 771) drawn from the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). Four age groups were compared: younger (21-44 years), middle-aged (45-64 years), older (65-84 years), and oldest-old adults (85 to 101 years). Linear regression analyses indicated that physical activity, hours spent outside of the house, and social support were significantly associated with self-reported health, after controlling for sociodemographic factors. Number of clubs was significantly associated with objective health status, after controlling for sociodemographic factors. These data indicate that social and physical activities remain an important determinant of self-perceived health into very late adulthood. Implications of these data for current views on successful aging are discussed. PMID:27034910

  12. Opposing aging-related shift of excitatory dopamine D1 and inhibitory D3 receptor protein expression in striatum and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Benjamin E; Lallemand, Perrine; Patel, Mukund M; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E; Clemens, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Normal aging is associated with a decrease in motor function, a concomitant increase in muscle stiffness and tone, and a decrease in dopamine (DA) levels in the spinal cord. The striatum plays a critical role in the control of motor function, and it receives strong DA innervation from the substantia nigra. However, locomotor activity also requires the activation of motoneurons in the lumbar spinal cord, which in the mouse express all five DA receptor subtypes (D1-D5). Of these, the D3 receptor (D3R) expresses the highest affinity to DA and mediates inhibitory actions, while activation of the lower-affinity D1 receptor (D1R) system promotes excitatory effects. To test whether the aging-related decrease in DA levels is associated with corresponding changes in DA receptor protein expression levels, we probed with Western blot and immunohistochemical techniques for D1R and D3R protein expression levels over the normal life span of the mouse. We found that with age D1R expression levels increased in both striatum and spinal cord, while D3R expression levels remained stable in the striatum or slightly decreased in the spinal cord. The resulting D1-to-D3 ratio indicates a strong upregulation of D1R-mediated pathways in old animals, which is particularly pronounced in the lumbar spinal cord. These data suggest that aging may be associated with a shift in DA-mediated pathways in striatum and spinal cord, which in turn could be an underlying factor in the emergence of aging- and DA-related motor dysfunctions such as Parkinson's disease or Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS).

  13. Factors affecting the use of 13Cα chemical shifts to determine, refine, and validate protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    Interest centers here on the analysis of two different, but related, phenomena that affect side-chain conformations and consequently 13Cα chemical shifts and their applications to determine, refine, and validate protein structures. The first is whether 13Cα chemical shifts, computed at the DFT level of approximation with charged residues is a better approximation of observed 13Cα chemical shifts than those computed with neutral residues for proteins in solution. Accurate computation of 13Cα chemical shifts requires a proper representation of the charges, which might not take on integral values. For this analysis, the charges for 139 conformations of the protein ubiquitin were determined by explicit consideration of protein binding equilibria, at a given pH, that is, by exploring the 2ξ possible ionization states of the whole molecule, with ξ being the number of ionizable groups. The results of this analysis, as revealed by the shielding/deshield-ing of the 13Cα nucleus, indicated that: (i) there is a significant difference in the computed 13Cα chemical shifts, between basic and acidic groups, as a function of the degree of charge of the side chain; (ii) this difference is attributed to the distance between the ionizable groups and the 13Cα nucleus, which is shorter for the acidic Asp and Glu groups as compared with that for the basic Lys and Arg groups; and (iii) the use of neutral, rather than charged, basic and acidic groups is a better approximation of the observed 13Cα chemical shifts of a protein in solution. The second is how side-chain flexibility influences computed 13Cα chemical shifts in an additional set of ubiquitin conformations, in which the side chains are generated from an NMR-derived structure with the backbone conformation assumed to be fixed. The 13Cα chemical shift of a given amino acid residue in a protein is determined, mainly, by its own backbone and side-chain torsional angles, independent of the neighboring residues; the

  14. Biopsychosocial factors related to depression in aged care residents.

    PubMed

    Davison, Tanya E; McCabe, Marita P; Knight, Tess; Mellor, David

    2012-12-15

    While depression is common in residential aged care settings, there is an absence of research into factors that may be associated with this condition. This pilot study examined the relationship between depression and multiple biopsychosocial factors among residents of aged care facilities. Participants were 50 aged care residents with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder, based on a clinical assessment using the SCID-I, and a matched sample of 50 residents without depression. The sample consisted of 80 women and 20 men without significant cognitive impairment, with a mean age of 83.0 years (SD=7.2 years). Participants completed a diagnostic interview with a clinical psychologist to determine the presence or absence of a mood disorder, and a set of scales related to demographics, depressive symptoms, physical health, functional disability, religiosity, and psychological wellbeing. The unique predictors of scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale-15 were environmental mastery, purpose in life, and autonomy. These three variables discriminated between participants with and without a diagnosis of MDD with 80% accuracy. Findings were limited by the cross-sectional methodology and small sample size of cognitively intact English-speaking aged care residents. Replication is required with a prospective longitudinal design with a broader sample of residents. Psychological variables were more important in understanding depression among aged care residents than traditional risk factors such as medical illness and disability. While preliminary, these findings highlight possible targets to prevent and treat depression in aged care settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Age-dependent shifts in renal response to injury relate to altered BMP6/CTGF expression and signaling.

    PubMed

    Falke, Lucas L; Kinashi, Hiroshi; Dendooven, Amelie; Broekhuizen, Roel; Stoop, Reinout; Joles, Jaap A; Nguyen, Tri Q; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2016-11-01

    Age is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which, through progressive tissue damage and fibrosis, ultimately leads to loss of kidney function. Although much effort is put into studying CKD development experimentally, age has rarely been taken into account. Therefore, we investigated the effect of age on the development of renal tissue damage and fibrosis in a mouse model of obstructive nephropathy (i.e., unilateral ureter obstruction; UUO). We observed that after 14 days, obstructed kidneys of old mice had more tubulointerstitial atrophic damage but less fibrosis than those of young mice. This was associated with reduced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and higher bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) expression and pSMAD1/5/8 signaling, while transforming growth factor-β expression and transcriptional activity were no different in obstructed kidneys of old and young mice. In vitro, CTGF bound to and inhibited BMP6 activity. In summary, our data suggest that in obstructive nephropathy atrophy increases and fibrosis decreases with age and that this relates to increased BMP signaling, most likely due to higher BMP6 and lower CTGF expression.

  16. Age-dependent shift in response to food element composition in Collembola: contrasting effects of dietary nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas C; Leinaas, Hans Petter; Hessen, Dag O

    2006-10-01

    We examined the effect of different food qualities, in terms of the C:N:P content, on the collembolan Hypogastrura viatica. We hypothesised that (faster growing) juveniles would have higher demands for P and N than adults; this, however, was rejected by our experiments. There was no difference between the elemental compositions of juveniles and adults. In food preference experiments, juveniles and adults were offered green algae Raphidocelis subcapitata with three different C:N:P ratios. There was a strong shift in dietary response with age; juveniles preferred algae with low or medium N contents over the most N-rich algae, whereas adults showed the opposite. No response was seen when the specific P content in the food was varied. Juveniles fed on algae with high N content showed lower growth rates and survival than those fed on algae with other food qualities. In contrast, adults had lowest growth rates when fed on algae with a low N content. The negative effect on juveniles of the most N-rich diet appeared to be a toxic response that was directly or indirectly related to the algal N content. Adults had higher tolerance for N-rich diets, but were also more likely to face dietary N-limitation. These animals face a stoichiometric trade-off scenario in the sense that adaptation to maximise retention of a limiting element may result in reduced physiological ability to cope with excessive elements when feeding on "richer" diets, and vice versa. This problem is partly solved in H. viatica by contrasting selective feeding and ontogenetic dietary shifts between juveniles and adults.

  17. Glutathione administration reduces mitochondrial damage and shifts cell death from necrosis to apoptosis in ageing diabetic mice hearts during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, S; Botta, A; Gottfred, S; Nusrat, A; Laher, I; Ghosh, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The effect of antioxidants on ageing type 2 diabetic (T2D) hearts during exercise is unclear. We hypothesized that GSH therapy during exercise reduces mitochondrial oxidative stress (mOXS) and cell death in ageing db/db mice hearts. Experimental Approach The effect of GSH on cardiac mOXS and cell death was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. Key Results During exercise, GSH treatment protected db/db hearts from exaggerated mOXS without reducing total cell death. Despite similar cell death, investigations on apoptosis-specific single-stranded DNA breaks and necrosis-specific damage provided the first in vivo evidence of a shift from necrosis to apoptosis, with reduced fibrosis following GSH administration in exercised db/db hearts. Further support for a GSH-regulated ‘switch’ in death phenotypes came from NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and H9c2 cardiomyocytes treated with H2O2, a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Similar to in vivo findings, augmenting GSH by overexpressing glutamyl cysteine ligase (GCLc) protected fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes from necrosis induced by H2O2, but elevated caspase-3 and apoptosis instead. Similar to in vivo findings, where GSH therapy in normoglycaemic mice suppressed endogenous antioxidants and augmented caspase-3 activity, GCLc overexpression during staurosporine-induced death, which was not characterized by ROS, increased GSH efflux and aggravated death in fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes, confirming that oxidative stress is required for GSH-mediated cytoprotection. Conclusions and Implications While GSH treatment is useful for reducing mOXS and attenuating necrosis and fibrosis in ageing T2D hearts during exercise, such antioxidant treatment could be counterproductive in the healthy heart during exercise. PMID:25039894

  18. Shifts in depth distributions of alewives, rainbow smelt, and age-2 lake trout in southern Lake Ontario following establishment of Dreissenids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Gorman, Robert; Elrod, Joseph H.; Owens, Randall W.; Schneider, Clifford P.; Eckert, Thomas H.; Lantry, Brian F.

    2000-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, biologists conducting assessments of fish stocks in Lake Ontario reported finding alewives Alosa pseudoharengus, rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, and juvenile lake trout Salvelinus namaycush at greater depths than in the mid-1980s. To determine if depth distributions shifted coincident with the early 1990s colonization of Lake Ontario by exotic Dreissena mussels, we calculated mean depth of capture for each of the three species during trawl surveys conducted annually during 1978–1997 and examined the means for significant deviations from established patterns. We found that mean capture depth of alewives, rainbow smelt, and age-2 lake trout shifted deeper during the build up of the dreissenid population in Lake Ontario but that timing of the shift varied among seasons and species. Depth shifts occurred first for rainbow smelt and age-2 lake trout in June 1991. In 1992, alewives shifted deeper in June followed by age-2 lake trout in July–August. Finally, in 1993 and 1994, the distribution of lake trout and alewives shifted in April–May. Reasons why the three fishes moved to deeper water are not clear, but changes in distribution were not linked to temperature. Mean temperature of capture after the depth shift was significantly lower than before the depth shift except for alewives in April–May. Movement of alewives, rainbow smelt, and age-2 lake trout to colder, deeper water has the potential to alter growth and reproduction schedules by exposing the fish to different temperature regimes and to alter the food chain, increasing predation on Mysis relicta in deep water and decreasing alewife predation on lake trout fry over nearshore spawning grounds in spring.

  19. Genetic risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Maryam; Armstrong, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in individuals older than 65 years of age. It is a multifactorial disorder and identification of risk factors enables individuals to make lifestyle choices that may reduce the risk of disease. Collaboration between geneticists, ophthalmologists, and optometrists suggests that genetic risk factors play a more significant role in AMD than previously thought. The most important genes are associated with immune system modulation and the complement system, e.g., complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB), factor C3, and serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPING1). Genes associated with membrane transport, e.g., ATP-binding cassette protein (ABCR) and voltage-dependent calcium channel gamma 3 (CACNG3), the vascular system, e.g., fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), fibulin-5, lysyl oxidase-like gene (LOXL1) and selectin-P (SELP), and with lipid metabolism, e.g., apolipoprotein E (APOE) and hepatic lipase (LIPC) have also been implicated. In addition, several other genes exhibit some statistical association with AMD, e.g., age-related maculopathy susceptibility protein 2 (ARMS2) and DNA excision repair protein gene (ERCC6) but more research is needed to establish their significance. Modifiable risk factors for AMD should be discussed with patients whose lifestyle and/or family history place them in an increased risk category. Furthermore, calculation of AMD risk using current models should be recommended as a tool for patient education. It is likely that AMD management in future will be increasingly influenced by assessment of genetic risk as such screening methods become more widely available.

  20. Anorexia of Aging: Risk Factors, Consequences, and Potential Treatments.

    PubMed

    Landi, Francesco; Calvani, Riccardo; Tosato, Matteo; Martone, Anna Maria; Ortolani, Elena; Savera, Giulia; Sisto, Alex; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2016-01-27

    Older people frequently fail to ingest adequate amount of food to meet their essential energy and nutrient requirements. Anorexia of aging, defined by decrease in appetite and/or food intake in old age, is a major contributing factor to under-nutrition and adverse health outcomes in the geriatric population. This disorder is indeed highly prevalent and is recognized as an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in different clinical settings. Even though anorexia is not an unavoidable consequence of aging, advancing age often promotes its development through various mechanisms. Age-related changes in life-style, disease conditions, as well as social and environmental factors have the potential to directly affect dietary behaviors and nutritional status. In spite of their importance, problems related to food intake and, more generally, nutritional status are seldom attended to in clinical practice. While this may be the result of an "ageist" approach, it should be acknowledged that simple interventions, such as oral nutritional supplementation or modified diets, could meaningfully improve the health status and quality of life of older persons.

  1. Anorexia of Aging: Risk Factors, Consequences, and Potential Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Francesco; Calvani, Riccardo; Tosato, Matteo; Martone, Anna Maria; Ortolani, Elena; Savera, Giulia; Sisto, Alex; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Older people frequently fail to ingest adequate amount of food to meet their essential energy and nutrient requirements. Anorexia of aging, defined by decrease in appetite and/or food intake in old age, is a major contributing factor to under-nutrition and adverse health outcomes in the geriatric population. This disorder is indeed highly prevalent and is recognized as an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in different clinical settings. Even though anorexia is not an unavoidable consequence of aging, advancing age often promotes its development through various mechanisms. Age-related changes in life-style, disease conditions, as well as social and environmental factors have the potential to directly affect dietary behaviors and nutritional status. In spite of their importance, problems related to food intake and, more generally, nutritional status are seldom attended to in clinical practice. While this may be the result of an “ageist” approach, it should be acknowledged that simple interventions, such as oral nutritional supplementation or modified diets, could meaningfully improve the health status and quality of life of older persons. PMID:26828516

  2. Modifiable diarrhoea risk factors in Egyptian children aged <5 years.

    PubMed

    Mansour, A M; Mohammady, H El; Shabrawi, M El; Shabaan, S Y; Zekri, M Abou; Nassar, M; Salem, M E; Mostafa, M; Riddle, M S; Klena, J D; Messih, I A Abdel; Levin, S; Young, S Y N

    2013-12-01

    By conducting a case-control study in two university hospitals, we explored the association between modifiable risk behaviours and diarrhoea. Children aged <5 years attending outpatient clinics for diarrhoea were matched by age and sex with controls. Data were collected on family demographics, socioeconomic indicators, and risk behaviour practices. Two rectal swabs and a stool specimen were collected from cases and controls. Samples were cultured for bacterial pathogens using standard techniques and tested by ELISA to detect rotavirus and Cryptosporidium spp. Four hundred cases and controls were enrolled between 2007 and 2009. The strongest independent risk factors for diarrhoea were: presence of another household member with diarrhoea [matched odds ratio (mOR) 4.9, 95% CI 2.8-8.4] in the week preceding the survey, introduction to a new kind of food (mOR 3, 95% CI 1.7-5.4), and the child being cared for outside home (mOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.2). While these risk factors are not identifiable, in some age groups more easily modifiable risk factors were identified including: having no soap for handwashing (mOR 6.3, 95% CI 1.2-33.9) for children aged 7-12 months, and pacifier use (mOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5) in children aged 0-6 months. In total, the findings of this study suggest that community-based interventions to improve practices related to sanitation and hygiene, handwashing and food could be utilized to reduce the burden of diarrhoea in Egyptian children aged <5 years.

  3. Extracting signals robust to electrode number and shift for online simultaneous and proportional myoelectric control by factorization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Muceli, Silvia; Jiang, Ning; Farina, Dario

    2014-05-01

    Previous research proposed the extraction of myoelectric control signals by linear factorization of multi-channel electromyogram (EMG) recordings from forearm muscles. This paper further analyses the theoretical basis for dimensionality reduction in high-density EMG signals from forearm muscles. Moreover, it shows that the factorization of muscular activation patterns in weights and activation signals by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is robust with respect to the channel configuration from where the EMG signals are obtained. High-density surface EMG signals were recorded from the forearm muscles of six individuals. Weights and activation signals extracted offline from 10 channel configurations with varying channel numbers (6, 8, 16, 192 channels) were highly similar. Additionally, the method proved to be robust against electrode shifts in both transversal and longitudinal direction with respect to the muscle fibers. In a second experiment, six subjects directly used the activation signals extracted from high-density EMG for online goal-directed control tasks involving simultaneous and proportional control of two degrees-of-freedom of the wrist. The synergy weights for this control task were extracted from a reference configuration and activation signals were calculated online from the reference configuration as well as from the two shifted configurations, simulating electrode shift. Despite the electrode shift, the task completion rate, task completion time, and execution efficiency were generally not statistically different among electrode configurations. Online performances were also mostly similar when using either 6, 8, or 16 EMG channels. The robustness of the method to the number and location of channels, proved both offline and online, indicates that EMG signals recorded from forearm muscles can be approximated as linear instantaneous mixtures of activation signals and justifies the use of linear factorization algorithms for extracting, in a

  4. CdS nanoparticles incorporated onion-like mesoporous silica films: Ageing-induced large stokes shifted intense PL emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Manish Kr; Mandal, Abhijit; Saha, Jony; De, Goutam

    2013-10-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) were generated in onion-like ordered mesoporous SiO2 films through a modified sol-gel process using P123 as a structure directing agent. Initially Cd2+ doped (12 equivalent mol% with respect to the SiO2) mesoporous SiO2 films were prepared on glass substrate. These films after heat-treatment at 350 °C in air yielded transparent mesoporous SiO2 films having hexagonally ordered onion-like pore channels embedded with uniformly dispersed CdO NPs. The generated CdO NPs were transformed into CdS NPs after exposing the films in H2S gas at 200 °C for 2 h. The as-prepared CdS NPs incorporated mesoporous SiO2 films (transparent and bright yellow in color) showed a band-edge emission at 485 nm and a weak surface defect related emission at 530 nm. During ageing of the films in ambient condition the band-edge emission gradually weakened with time and almost disappeared after about 15 days with concomitant increase of defect related strong surface state emission band near 615 nm. This transformation was related to the decay of initially formed well crystalline CdS to relatively smaller and weakly crystalline CdS NPs with surface defects due to gradual oxidation of surface sulfide. At this condition the embedded CdS NPs show large Stokes shifted (˜180 nm) intense broad emission which could be useful for luminescent solar concentrators. The detailed process was monitored by UV-Visible, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, XPS, XRD and TEM studies. The evolution of photoluminescence (PL) and life times of CdS/SiO2 films were monitored with respect to the ageing time.

  5. 40 CFR 7.155 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination-reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... discrimination-reasonable factors other than age. 7.155 Section 7.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 7.155 Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination—reasonable factors other than age. A recipient is permitted to take an action...

  6. 45 CFR 90.15 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age. 90.15 Section 90.15 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age. A recipient...

  7. Risk factors for small for gestational age infants.

    PubMed

    McCowan, Lesley; Horgan, Richard P

    2009-12-01

    There are many established risk factors for babies who are small for gestational age (SGA) by population birth weight centiles (usually defined as <10th centile). The confirmed maternal risk factors include short stature, low weight, Indian or Asian ethnicity, nulliparity, mother born SGA, cigarette smoking and cocaine use. Maternal medical history of: chronic hypertension, renal disease, anti-phospholipid syndrome and malaria are associated with increased SGA. Risk factors developing in pregnancy include heavy bleeding in early pregnancy, placental abruption, pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension. A short or very long inter-pregnancy interval, previous SGA infant or previous stillbirth are also risk factors. Paternal factors including changed paternity, short stature and father born SGA also contribute. Factors associated with reduced risk of SGA or increased birth weight include high maternal milk consumption and high intakes of green leafy vegetables and fruit. Future studies need to investigate risk factors for babies SGA by customised centiles as these babies have greater morbidity and mortality than babies defined as SGA by population centiles.

  8. Protective Factors for Adults from Low Childhood Socioeconomic Circumstances: The Benefits of Shift-and-Persist for Allostatic Load

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Edith; Miller, Gregory E.; Lachman, Margie E.; Gruenewald, Tara L.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low socioeconomic status (SES) early in life is one of the most well-established social predictors of poor health. However, little is understood about why some adults who grew up in low SES environments do not have poor health outcomes. This study examined whether the psychological characteristic of “shift-and-persist” protects adults from the physiological risks of growing up in low SES households. Shift-and-persist consists of reframing appraisals of current stressors more positively (shifting), while simultaneously persisting with a focus on the future. We hypothesized that this characteristic would be associated with reduced physiological risk in low childhood SES individuals. Methods A national sample of 1,207 adults (ages 25-74) from the Survey of Midlife Development in the U.S. (MIDUS) completed psychological questionnaires, and were queried about parent education. Biological assessments consisted of 24 different measures across seven physiological systems, from which a composite measure representing cumulative physiological risk (allostatic load) was derived. Results Among adults who grew up in low SES households, those who engaged in high shift and high persist strategies had the lowest allostatic load (b=-.15, p=.04). No benefit of shift-and-persist was found for those from higher childhood SES backgrounds (p=.36). Conclusions Identifying the health-related protective qualities that naturally occur in some low SES individuals represents one important approach for developing future health improvement interventions for those who start out life low in SES. Moreover, the psychological qualities that are protective from future disease risk for those from low SES backgrounds are different from those beneficial to high SES individuals. PMID:22286848

  9. Moving Towards the Age-friendly Hospital: A Paradigm Shift for the Hospital-based Care of the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Allen R.; Larente, Nadine; Morais, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Care of the older adult in the acute care hospital is becoming more challenging. Patients 65 years and older account for 35% of hospital discharges and 45% of hospital days. Up to one-third of the hospitalized frail elderly loses independent functioning in one or more activities of daily living as a result of the ‘hostile environment’ that is present in the acute hospitals. A critical deficit of health care workers with expertise and experience in the care of the elderly also jeopardizes successful care delivery in the acute hospital setting. Methods We propose a paradigm shift in the culture and practice of event-driven acute hospital-based care of the elderly which we call the Age-friendly Hospital concept. Guiding principles include: a favourable physical environment; zero tolerance for ageism throughout the organization; an integrated process to develop comprehensive services using the geriatric approach; assistance with appropriateness decision-making and fostering links between the hospital and the community. Our current proposed strategy is to focus on delirium management as a hospital-wide condition that both requires and highlights the Geriatric Medicine specialist as an expert of content, for program development and of evaluation. Conclusion The Age-friendly Hospital concept we propose may lead the way to enable hospitals in the fast-moving health care system to deliver high-quality care without jeopardizing risk-benefit, function, and quality of life balances for the frail elderly. Recruitment and retention of skilled health care professionals would benefit from this positive ‘branding’ of an institution. Convincing hospital management and managing change are significant challenges, especially with competing priorities in a fiscal environment with limited funding. The implementation of a hospital-wide delirium management program is an example of an intervention that embodies many of the principles in the Age-friendly Hospital concept

  10. Age as a prognostic factor in carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Lybeert, M L; Meerwaldt, J H; van Putten, W L

    1987-06-01

    To investigate whether age is a prognostic factor in patients with carcinoma of the cervix, a retrospective study was undertaken of 261 patients, aged 45 years or less, who were referred to the Rotterdamsch Radio-Therapeutisch Instituut (RRTI) between 1973 and 1982. Patients were referred for either primary treatment--surgery or radiotherapy--or for adjuvant radiotherapy. Overall 5-year survival figures were rather low, which may be explained by negative patient selection as the RRTI is a referral hospital: stage IB, 72%; stage IIA; 61%; stage IIB; 52%; stage III; 29%. A particular poor survival was noted for patients (n = 22) aged 28 or less. Overall 5-year survival of these patients was only 39% in contrast to 67% 5-year survival of older patients. This difference was highly significant (p less than 0.002). Even if corrected for stage, very young patients had a poorer prognosis (stage IB: 45% versus 75% 5-year survival of older patients). Within the older age group, no trend towards a better prognosis with increasing age could be identified. As a treatment was similar for all patients, no explanation is available for this observation.

  11. Task factor usability ratings for different age groups writing Chinese.

    PubMed

    Chan, A H S; So, J C Y

    2009-11-01

    This study evaluated how different task factors affect performance and user subjective preferences for three different age groups of Chinese subjects (6-11, 20-23, 65-70 years) when hand writing Chinese characters. The subjects copied Chinese character sentences with different settings for the task factors of writing plane angle (horizontal 0 degrees , slanted 15 degrees ), writing direction (horizontal, vertical), and line spacing (5 mm, 7 mm and no lines). Writing speed was measured and subjective preferences (effectiveness and satisfaction) were assessed for each of the task factor settings. The result showed that there was a conflict between writing speed and personal preference for the line spacing factor; 5 mm line spacing increased writing speed but it was the least preferred. It was also found that: vertical and horizontal writing directions and a slanted work surface suited school-aged children; a horizontal work surface and horizontal writing direction suited university students; and a horizontal writing direction with either a horizontal or slanted work surface suited the older adults.

  12. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Nathan G.; Singh, Malkit K.; ElShelmani, Hanan; Mansergh, Fiona C.; Wride, Michael A.; Padilla, Maximilian; Keegan, David; Hogg, Ruth E.; Ambati, Balamurali K.

    2016-01-01

    A biomarker can be a substance or structure measured in body parts, fluids or products that can affect or predict disease incidence. As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, much research and effort has been invested in the identification of different biomarkers to predict disease incidence, identify at risk individuals, elucidate causative pathophysiological etiologies, guide screening, monitoring and treatment parameters, and predict disease outcomes. To date, a host of genetic, environmental, proteomic, and cellular targets have been identified as both risk factors and potential biomarkers for AMD. Despite this, their use has been confined to research settings and has not yet crossed into the clinical arena. A greater understanding of these factors and their use as potential biomarkers for AMD can guide future research and clinical practice. This article will discuss known risk factors and novel, potential biomarkers of AMD in addition to their application in both academic and clinical settings. PMID:27156982

  13. Spirituality, gender and age factors in cybergossip among Nigerian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Oluwole, David Adebayo

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated the patterns of spirituality, gender, and age in cybergossip practices among Nigerian adolescents. The study utilized a descriptive survey method. Five hundred thirty adolescent students, randomly selected from four major cities in Nigeria, participated in the study. Their age range was 16 to 21. General Spirituality and Gossip Purpose scales were used to collect data from the participants. Data collected were subjected to t test statistics. Findings showed that there is no significant difference in the cybergossiping practices of adolescents based on their levels of spirituality. This reveals that spirituality is not an inhibiting factor in cybergossiping practices among the adolescents. However, there is significant difference between male and female youths in their cybergossiping practices. The results showed that females are more likely than males to be involved in cybergossiping activities. There is also significant difference between early and late adolescents' cybergossiping activities. The implication is that gossip and cybergossip is a natural tendency that involves communicative expression with a pleasure-seeking purpose. It is a habit that excludes no one despite spiritual, gender, or age factors. Therefore, this behavior should be positively directed away from abusive computing and communication. This work is unique because of the need for parents, guardians, and psychologists to design measures to identify and manage various moderating variables in children's computing practices for optimal positive outcomes.

  14. Should It Stay or Should It Go: How Successful Superintendents Build, Shift, and Transform District Culture in an Age of Increasing Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Joshua F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain information regarding the manner in which superintendents build, shift, and transform district culture in an age of increasing accountability so that the new values and past practices of the organization work in concert with each other to match the culture of educational accountability sweeping the nation.…

  15. Serum Response Factor in Muscle Tissues: From Development to Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Coletti, Dario; Daou, Nissrine; Hassani, Medhi; Li, Zhenlin; Parlakian, Ara

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle cells share various common characteristic features. During development the embryonic mesodermal layer contribute at different proportions to the formation of these tissues. At the functional level, contractility as well as its decline during ageing, are also common features. Cytoskeletal components of these tissues are characterized by various actin isoforms that govern through their status (polymerised versus monomeric) and their interaction with the myosins the contractile properties of these muscles. Finally, at the molecular level, a set of different transcription factors with the notable exception of Serum Response Factor SRF- which is commonly enriched in the 3 types of muscle- drive and maintain the differentiation of these cells (Myf5, MyoD, Myogenin for skeletal muscle; Nkx2.5, GATA4 for cardiomyocytes). In this review, we will focus on the transcription factor SRF and its role in the homeostasis of cardiac, smooth and skeletal muscle tissues as well as its behaviour during the age related remodelling process of these tissues with a specific emphasis on animal models and human data when available. PMID:27478561

  16. Management of the aging risk factor for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillipson, Oliver T

    2014-04-01

    The aging risk factor for Parkinson's disease is described in terms of specific disease markers including mitochondrial and gene dysfunctions relevant to energy metabolism. This review details evidence for the ability of nutritional agents to manage these aging risk factors. The combination of alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, and melatonin supports energy metabolism via carbohydrate and fatty acid utilization, assists electron transport and adenosine triphosphate synthesis, counters oxidative and nitrosative stress, and raises defenses against protein misfolding, inflammatory stimuli, iron, and other endogenous or xenobiotic toxins. These effects are supported by gene expression via the antioxidant response element (ARE; Keap/Nrf2 pathway), and by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1 alpha (PGC-1 alpha), a transcription coactivator, which regulates gene expression for energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, and maintains the structural integrity of mitochondria. The effectiveness and synergies of the combination against disease risks are discussed in relation to gene action, dopamine cell loss, and the accumulation and spread of pathology via misfolded alpha-synuclein. In addition there are potential synergies to support a neurorestorative role via glial derived neurotrophic factor expression. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lifestyle and dietary factors determine age at natural menopause.

    PubMed

    Sapre, Shilpa; Thakur, Ratna

    2014-01-01

    A literature search was done using PubMed. The age at natural menopause (ANM) depends on various factors like genetic, environmental, socioeconomic, reproductive, dietary, and lifestyle of which some like nulliparity, vegetarian diet, smoking, high fat intake, cholesterol, and caffeine accelerates; while others like parity, prior use of oral contraceptive pills, and Japanese ethnicity delays the ANM. ANM is an important risk factor for long-term morbidity and mortality; and hence, the need to identify the modifiable risk factors like diet and lifestyle changes. Delayed menopause is associated with increased risk of endometrial and breast cancer, while early ANM enhances the risk for cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis. The correlation between diet and ANM has not been extensively studied; however, whatever studies have been done till now point towards role of high intake of total calories, fruits, and proteins in delaying the ANM, while high polyunsaturated fat intake accelerates it. The role of dietary soy, total fat, saturated fat, red meat, and dietary fiber in determining the ANM has been controversial and needs further studies to substantiate it. The lifestyle factors like current smoking and vigorous exercise have been significantly associated with early menopause, while moderate alcohol consumption delays the ANM. Large prospective studies are needed to study the association of ANM and other modifiable factors like passive smoking fish consumption, soy, and various types of tea. The knowledge of modifiable determinants of ANM can help in setting up menopausal clinics and initiating health programs specially in developing countries.

  18. Factors contributing to the variability in muscle ageing.

    PubMed

    Degens, Hans; Korhonen, Marko T

    2012-11-01

    Ageing is accompanied with a progressive loss of muscle mass and force generating capacity. Ultimately, the muscle wasting and weakness may dramatically impact on mobility and the quality of life, where the elderly has increasing problems with performing activities of daily life, such as rising from a chair or climbing stairs. The rate of structural and functional deterioration of muscle appears to vary considerably between people. Part of the variation in the 'rate of muscle ageing' is attributable to genetic factors, the timing of changes in circulating hormones and the presence or absence of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation. Where an individual cannot change much in his or her genetic constitution, circulating hormones and systemic inflammation, (s)he can still significantly slow the rate of muscle ageing by an adequate dietary intake and regular physical activity. Finally, it is suggested that age-related alterations in the capillary bed may negatively affect muscle mass. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. rNMF 1.0: Robust Nonnegative matrix factorization with kmeans clustering and signal shift

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Iliev, Filip L.; Stanev, Valentin; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-09-14

    From a general perspective, the code represents an unsupervised adaptive machine learning algorithm that allows efficient and high performance de-mixing and feature extraction of a multitude of nonnegative signals mixed and recorded by a network of uncorrelated sensors. The code identifies the number of the mixed original signals. Further, the code also allows deciphering of signals that have been delayed in regards to the mixing process in each sensor. This code is high customizable and it can be efficiently used for a fast macro-analyses of data. The code is applicable to a plethora of distinct problems: chemical decomposition, pressure transient decomposition, unknown sources allocation, EM signal decomposition, and cancer genomics. Importantly, the code can be applied for mutational signatures analysis in cancer. The ability for detecting shifted signatures occurring in temporally distinct cancer sub-clonal populations.

  20. The expanding universe of neurotrophic factors: therapeutic potential in aging and age-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Lanni, C; Stanga, S; Racchi, M; Govoni, S

    2010-01-01

    Multiple molecular, cellular, structural and functional changes occur in the brain during aging. Neural cells may respond to these changes adaptively by employing multiple mechanisms in order to maintain the integrity of nerve cell circuits and to facilitate responses to environmental demands. Otherwise, they may succumb to neurodegenerative cascades that result in disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. An important role in this balancement is played by neurotrophic factors, which are central to many aspects of nervous system function since they regulate the development, maintenance and survival of neurons and neuron-supporting cells such as glia and oligodendrocytes. A vast amount of evidence indicates that alterations in levels of neurotrophic factors or their receptors can lead to neuronal death and contribute to aging as well as to the pathogenesis of diseases of abnormal trophic support (such as neurodegenerative diseases and depression) and diseases of abnormal excitability (such as epilepsy and central pain sensitization). Cellular and molecular mechanisms by which neurotrophic factors may influence cell survival and excitability are also critically examined to provide novel concepts and targets for the treatment of physiological changes bearing detrimental functional alterations and of different diseases affecting the central nervous system during aging.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin receptors modulate glutamate-induced phase shifts of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Michel, S.; Clark, J. P.; Ding, J. M.; Colwell, C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Light information reaches the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) through a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells. Previous work raised the possibility that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high-affinity tropomyosin-related receptor kinase may be important as modulators of this excitatory input into the SCN. In order to test this possibility, we used whole-cell patch-clamp methods to measure spontaneous excitatory currents in mouse SCN neurons. We found that the amplitude and frequency of these currents were increased by BDNF and decreased by the neurotrophin receptor inhibitor K252a. The neurotrophin also increased the magnitude of currents evoked by application of N-methyl-D-aspartate and amino-methyl proprionic acid. Next, we measured the rhythms in action potential discharge from the SCN brain slice preparation. We found that application of K252a dramatically reduced the magnitude of phase shifts of the electrical activity rhythm generated by the application of glutamate. By itself, BDNF caused phase shifts that resembled those produced by glutamate and were blocked by K252a. The results demonstrate that BDNF and neurotrophin receptors can enhance glutamatergic synaptic transmission within a subset of SCN neurons and potentiate glutamate-induced phase shifts of the circadian rhythm of neural activity in the SCN. PMID:16930436

  2. Factors associated with active aging in Finland, Poland, and Spain.

    PubMed

    Perales, Jaime; Martin, Steven; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Chatterji, Somnath; Garin, Noe; Koskinen, Seppo; Leonardi, Matilde; Miret, Marta; Moneta, Victoria; Olaya, Beatriz; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Haro, Josep Maria

    2014-08-01

    Continuous population aging has raised international policy interest in promoting active aging (AA). AA theoretical models have been defined from a biomedical or a psychosocial perspective. These models may be expanded including components suggested by lay individuals. This paper aims to study the correlates of AA in three European countries, namely, Spain, Poland, and Finland using four different definitions of AA. The EU COURAGE in Europe project was a cross-sectional general adult population survey conducted in a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized population of Finland, Poland, and Spain. Participants (10,800) lived in the community. This analysis focuses on individuals aged 50 years old and over (7,987). Four definitions (two biomedical, one psychosocial, and a complete definition including biomedical, psychosocial, and external variables) of AA were analyzed. Differences in AA were found for country, age, education, and occupation. Finland scored consistently the highest in AA followed by Spain and Poland. Younger age was associated with higher AA. Higher education and occupation was associated with AA. Being married or cohabiting was associated with better AA compared to being widowed or separated in most definitions. Gender and urbanicity were not associated with AA, with few exceptions. Men scored higher in AA only in Spain, whereas there was no gender association in the other two countries. Being widowed was only associated with lower AA in Poland and not being married was associated with lower AA in Poland and Finland but not Spain. Associations with education, marital status, and occupation suggest that these factors are the most important components of AA. These association patterns, however, seem to vary across the three countries. Actions to promote AA in these countries may be addressed at reducing inequalities in occupation and education or directly tackling the components of AA lacking in each country.

  3. Age-related differences in emotion regulation strategies: Examining the role of contextual factors.

    PubMed

    Schirda, Brittney; Valentine, Thomas R; Aldao, Amelia; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya

    2016-09-01

    Increasing age is characterized by greater positive affective states. However, there is mixed evidence on the implementation of emotion regulation strategies across the life span. To clarify the discrepancies in the literature, we examined the modulating influence of contextual factors in understanding emotion regulation strategy use in older and young adults. Forty-eight older adults and forty-nine young adults completed a retrospective survey inquiring about the use of emotion regulation strategies in emotion-eliciting situations experienced over the preceding 2 weeks. We used factor analysis to establish clusters of emotion regulation strategies, resulting in cognitive strategies, acceptance, and maladaptive strategies. Overall, we found context-dependent age-related differences in emotion regulation strategy use. Specifically, older adults reported greater use of acceptance than young adults in situations of moderate intensity and in situations that evoke anxiety and sadness. In addition, older adults reported using maladaptive strategies to a lesser extent in high- and moderate-intensity situations and in situations that elicit anxiety and sadness when compared with young adults. There were no age-related differences in the use of cognitive strategies across contexts. Older adults, compared to young adults, reported less use of maladaptive strategies and greater use of acceptance than young adults, which suggests that the enhanced emotional functioning observed later in life may be due to a shift in strategy implementation. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Shifts in bryophyte carbon isotope ratio across an elevation × soil age matrix on Mauna Loa, Hawaii: do bryophytes behave like vascular plants?

    PubMed

    Waite, Mashuri; Sack, Lawren

    2011-05-01

    The carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C) of vascular plant leaf tissue is determined by isotope discrimination, primarily mediated by stomatal and mesophyll diffusion resistances and by photosynthetic rate. These effects lead to predictable trends in leaf δ(13)C across natural gradients of elevation, irradiance and nutrient supply. Less is known about shifts in δ(13)C for bryophytes at landscape scale, as bryophytes lack stomata in the dominant gametophyte phase, and thus lack active control over CO(2) diffusion. Twelve bryophyte species were sampled across a matrix of elevation and soil ages on Mauna Loa, Hawaii Island. We tested hypotheses based on previous findings for vascular plants, which tend to have less negative δ(13)C at higher elevations or irradiances, and for leaves with higher leaf mass per area (LMA). Across the matrix, bryophytes spanned the range of δ(13)C values typical of C(3) vascular plants. Bryophytes were remarkably similar to vascular plants in exhibiting less negative δ(13)C with increasing elevation, and with lower overstory cover; additionally δ(13)C was related to bryophyte canopy projected mass per area, a trait analogous to LMA in vascular plants, also correlated negatively with overstory cover. The similarity of responses of δ(13)C in bryophytes and vascular plants to environmental factors, despite differing morphologies and diffusion pathways, points to a strong direct role of photosynthetic rate in determining δ(13)C variation at the landscape scale.

  5. 77 FR 19080 - Disparate Impact and Reasonable Factors Other Than Age Under the Age Discrimination in Employment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... that reasonable factors should be related to job requirements or job performance. One commenter who... COMMISSION 29 CFR Part 1625 RIN 3046-AA76 Disparate Impact and Reasonable Factors Other Than Age Under the... concerning disparate-impact claims and the reasonable factors other than age defense (``RFOA''). The...

  6. Infectious disease, shifting climates, and opportunistic predators: cumulative factors potentially impacting wild salmon declines

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kristina M; Teffer, Amy; Tucker, Strahan; Li, Shaorong; Schulze, Angela D; Trudel, Marc; Juanes, Francis; Tabata, Amy; Kaukinen, Karia H; Ginther, Norma G; Ming, Tobi J; Cooke, Steven J; Hipfner, J Mark; Patterson, David A; Hinch, Scott G

    2014-01-01

    Emerging diseases are impacting animals under high-density culture, yet few studies assess their importance to wild populations. Microparasites selected for enhanced virulence in culture settings should be less successful maintaining infectivity in wild populations, as once the host dies, there are limited opportunities to infect new individuals. Instead, moderately virulent microparasites persisting for long periods across multiple environments are of greatest concern. Evolved resistance to endemic microparasites may reduce susceptibilities, but as barriers to microparasite distributions are weakened, and environments become more stressful, unexposed populations may be impacted and pathogenicity enhanced. We provide an overview of the evolutionary and ecological impacts of infectious diseases in wild salmon and suggest ways in which modern technologies can elucidate the microparasites of greatest potential import. We present four case studies that resolve microparasite impacts on adult salmon migration success, impact of river warming on microparasite replication, and infection status on susceptibility to predation. Future health of wild salmon must be considered in a holistic context that includes the cumulative or synergistic impacts of multiple stressors. These approaches will identify populations at greatest risk, critically needed to manage and potentially ameliorate the shifts in current or future trajectories of wild populations. PMID:25469162

  7. Personal and social factors influencing age at first sexual intercourse.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, D A; Smith, A M; de Visser, R

    1999-08-01

    Early initiation of sexual activity is a concern, in part because of increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV, and unwanted pregnancies among young people. In this study, 241 high schoolers were administered a questionnaire to establish the relationships between age at first sexual intercourse and personal qualities (sexual style, attractiveness, physical maturity, restraint, autonomy expectations, and attitudes to gender roles), smoking and drug use, and aspects of the social context (social activities, media impact, peer norms). There were few effects of sex of respondent and none in which respondents' sex impacted on age of initiation. Overall (and among the male sample), perceptions of greater physical maturity, greater use of uncommon (mostly illicit) drugs, and expectations of earlier autonomy significantly differentiated between early and later initiators. This group of factors tends to confirm the view that early experience of sexual intercourse is correlated with problem behaviors and a press toward "adult" behaviors. For girls, this pattern was even clearer, with use of uncommon drugs being replaced as a significant contributor to early sexual experience by relative lack of restraint. We conclude that the desire to achieve the transition to adulthood at an earlier age than their peers constitutes a powerful incentive for young people to become sexually active.

  8. Ageing as an Important Risk Factor for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Karel; Lacina, Lukáš; Szabo, Pavol; Dvořánková, Barbora; Brož, Prokop; Šedo, Aleksi

    2016-10-01

    An ageing population is a typical feature of many developed countries across the world. Analyzed from a biomedical and philosophical point of view, this phenomenon is also a potential risk factor for social sustainability of communities. The association between ageing and cancer seems to be more than apparent. Therefore, the further increase of epidemic-like incidence of malignant tumors in a population can be expected in the near future. Elderly people usually suffer from age-dependent diseases, and such polymorbidity can seriously affect the treatment of malignant tumors. Such an impending situation may be associated with multiple medical, social and economic issues. This article summarizes data about the possible molecular mechanism influencing rapid spreading of tumors in the elderly population. Reduction of the activity of DNA repair machinery is a likely genetic cause. Besides this, even epigenetic mechanisms can influence this process. In this context, the role of cancer stroma in controlling multiple biological properties of tumors is a prospective target for translational research with potential therapeutic outcomes. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. 10 CFR 1040.87 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination... Discrimination Act of 1975, as Amended Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 1040.87 Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age. A recipient is permitted to take...

  10. 45 CFR 90.15 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE What is Age Discrimination? Standards for Determining Discriminatory Practices § 90.15 Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age. A recipient...

  11. 29 CFR 35.13 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 35.13 Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: reasonable factors other than age. A recipient is permitted to take an action...

  12. 45 CFR 91.14 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.14 Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age. A recipient is permitted to take an...

  13. 44 CFR 7.922 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age. 7.922 Section 7.922 Emergency Management... NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY-ASSISTED PROGRAMS (FEMA REG. 5) Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance From FEMA Standards for Determining Age Discrimination §...

  14. Early Decline in Glucose Transport and Metabolism Precedes Shift to Ketogenic System in Female Aging and Alzheimer's Mouse Brain: Implication for Bioenergetic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Fan; Yao, Jia; Rettberg, Jamaica R.; Chen, Shuhua; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mitochondrial bioenergetic deficits in the female brain accompanied reproductive senescence and was accompanied by a shift from an aerobic glycolytic to a ketogenic phenotype. Herein, we investigated the relationship between systems of fuel supply, transport and mitochondrial metabolic enzyme expression/activity during aging (3–15 months) in the hippocampus of nontransgenic (nonTg) background and 3xTgAD female mice. Results indicate that during female brain aging, both nonTg and 3xTgAD brains undergo significant decline in glucose transport, as detected by FDG-microPET, between 6–9 months of age just prior to the transition into reproductive senescence. The deficit in brain metabolism was sustained thereafter. Decline in glucose transport coincided with significant decline in neuronal glucose transporter expression and hexokinase activity with a concomitant rise in phosphorylated/inactivated pyruvate dehydrogenase. Lactate utilization declined in parallel to the decline in glucose transport suggesting lactate did not serve as an alternative fuel. An adaptive response in the nonTg hippocampus was a shift to transport and utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel. In the 3xTgAD brain, utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel was evident at the earliest age investigated and declined thereafter. The 3xTgAD adaptive response was to substantially increase monocarboxylate transporters in neurons while decreasing their expression at the BBB and in astrocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that the earliest change in the metabolic system of the aging female brain is the decline in neuronal glucose transport and metabolism followed by decline in mitochondrial function. The adaptive shift to the ketogenic system as an alternative fuel coincided with decline in mitochondrial function. Translationally, these data provide insights into the earliest events in bioenergetic aging of the female brain and provide potential

  15. Early decline in glucose transport and metabolism precedes shift to ketogenic system in female aging and Alzheimer's mouse brain: implication for bioenergetic intervention.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fan; Yao, Jia; Rettberg, Jamaica R; Chen, Shuhua; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mitochondrial bioenergetic deficits in the female brain accompanied reproductive senescence and was accompanied by a shift from an aerobic glycolytic to a ketogenic phenotype. Herein, we investigated the relationship between systems of fuel supply, transport and mitochondrial metabolic enzyme expression/activity during aging (3-15 months) in the hippocampus of nontransgenic (nonTg) background and 3xTgAD female mice. Results indicate that during female brain aging, both nonTg and 3xTgAD brains undergo significant decline in glucose transport, as detected by FDG-microPET, between 6-9 months of age just prior to the transition into reproductive senescence. The deficit in brain metabolism was sustained thereafter. Decline in glucose transport coincided with significant decline in neuronal glucose transporter expression and hexokinase activity with a concomitant rise in phosphorylated/inactivated pyruvate dehydrogenase. Lactate utilization declined in parallel to the decline in glucose transport suggesting lactate did not serve as an alternative fuel. An adaptive response in the nonTg hippocampus was a shift to transport and utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel. In the 3xTgAD brain, utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel was evident at the earliest age investigated and declined thereafter. The 3xTgAD adaptive response was to substantially increase monocarboxylate transporters in neurons while decreasing their expression at the BBB and in astrocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that the earliest change in the metabolic system of the aging female brain is the decline in neuronal glucose transport and metabolism followed by decline in mitochondrial function. The adaptive shift to the ketogenic system as an alternative fuel coincided with decline in mitochondrial function. Translationally, these data provide insights into the earliest events in bioenergetic aging of the female brain and provide potential

  16. Post-MBA Industry Shifts: An Investigation of Career, Educational and Demographic Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Alvin; Bento, Regina; Arbaugh, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine factors that predict industry-level career change among MBA graduates. Design/methodology/approach: The study analyzed longitudinal data from the Management Education Research Institute (MERI)'s Global MBA Graduate Survey Dataset and MBA Alumni Perspectives Survey Datasets, using principal component…

  17. Seasonal shift in factors controlling net ecosystem production in a high Arctic terrestrial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masaki; Kishimoto, Ayaka; Muraoka, Hiroyuki; Nakatsubo, Takayuki; Kanda, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We examined factors controlling temporal changes in net ecosystem production (NEP) in a high Arctic polar semi-desert ecosystem in the snow-free season. We examined the relationships between NEP and biotic and abiotic factors in a dominant plant community (Salix polaris-moss) in the Norwegian high Arctic. Just after snowmelt in early July, the ecosystem released CO(2) into the atmosphere. A few days after snowmelt, however, the ecosystem became a CO(2) sink as the leaves of S. polaris developed. Diurnal changes in NEP mirrored changes in light incidence (photosynthetic photon flux density, PPFD) in summer. NEP was significantly correlated with PPFD when S. polaris had fully developed leaves, i.e., high photosynthetic activity. In autumn, NEP values decreased as S. polaris underwent senescence. During this time, CO(2) was sometimes released into the atmosphere. In wet conditions, moss made a larger contribution to NEP. In fact, the water content of the moss regulated NEP during autumn. Our results indicate that the main factors controlling NEP in summer are coverage and growth of S. polaris, PPFD, and precipitation. In autumn, the main factor controlling NEP is moss water content.

  18. Post-MBA Industry Shifts: An Investigation of Career, Educational and Demographic Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Alvin; Bento, Regina; Arbaugh, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine factors that predict industry-level career change among MBA graduates. Design/methodology/approach: The study analyzed longitudinal data from the Management Education Research Institute (MERI)'s Global MBA Graduate Survey Dataset and MBA Alumni Perspectives Survey Datasets, using principal component…

  19. Coexistence of hypofibrinogenemia and factor V Leiden mutation: is the balance shifted to thrombosis?

    PubMed

    Miljić, Predrag; Nedeljkov-Jančić, Ružica; Zuvela, Marinko; Subota, Vesna; Dorđević, Valentina

    2014-09-01

    Congenital hypofibrinogenemia and afibrinogenemia are usually associated with an increased risk of bleeding, but occurrence of arterial or venous thrombosis has also been reported in individuals with fibrinogen deficiency. This study reports on a 25-year-old patient with hypofibrinogenemia (fibrinogen 0.6 g/l) and congenital thrombophilia due to heterozygous factor V Leiden mutation who developed spontaneous deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in the right lower extremity. Regardless of hypofibrinogenemia, he was receiving anticoagulant therapy over 6 months, with no occurrence of bleeding. His father is also a heterozygous carrier of factor V Leiden, but with normal fibrinogen level and he remained asymptomatic despite having experienced surgery in the past. This case, as well as data from literature, suggests that risk of thrombosis in carriers of factor V Leiden mutation is not counterbalanced by moderate congenital hypofibrinogenemia, and that antithrombotic prophylaxis should not be omitted in high-risk situations for occurrence of thrombosis in patients with coinheritance of hypofibrinogenemia and factor V Leiden mutation.

  20. Factors associated with resilience of school age children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong H; Yoo, Il Y

    2010-07-01

    To identify factors associated with resilience of school age children with cancer. The participants were 74 children, 10-15 years old who were diagnosed with cancer at least 6 months prior to data collection. The instruments used were; a self-reported questionnaire on resilience, Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale III, measurements of relationship with friends and teachers. Descriptive, Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were used to analyse the data. The average score for resilience was 98.49 (range: 32-128). There was no statistically significant relationship with resilience for age, gender, religion, existence of siblings, mother's age, academic performance, duration of illness or type of cancer. In bivariate analysis, family adaptability and cohesion (r= 0.535, P < 0.001), relationship with friends (r= 0.520, P < 0.001) and teachers (r= 0.318, P < 0.01) were significantly related to resilience. However, the results of multiple regression analysis showed that only family function (beta= 0.257, P < 0.05) and relationship with friends (beta= 0.581, P < 0.01) were significantly associated with resilience. School age children with cancer who reported higher family function and positive relationships with friends showed higher resiliency than their counterparts. Thus, it is important to help the families of children with cancer to enhance family function and help children to adjust to school re-entry by maintaining ties with school friends and teachers during treatment. Development of counselling programmes for parents to promote family adaptation and cohesion and educational programmes for classmates and teachers are recommended.

  1. Shift of anammox bacterial community structure along the Pearl Estuary and the impact of environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bingbing; Liu, Jiwen; Yang, Hongmei; Hsu, Ting Chang; He, Biyan; Dai, Minhan; Kao, Shuh Ji; Zhao, Meixun; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) plays an important role in the marine nitrogen cycle. The Pearl Estuary, a typical subtropical estuary characterized by hypoxia upstream and high loads of organic matter and inorganic nutrients caused by anthropogenic activities, has received extensive attention. In this study, anammox bacterial community structures in surface sediments along the Pearl Estuary were investigated using 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase (HZO) genes. In addition, abundance of anammox bacteria in both water and surface sediments was investigated by quantitative PCR. Obvious anammox bacterial community structure shift was observed in surface sediments, in which the dominant genus changed from "Candidatus Brocadia" or "Candidatus Anammoxoglobus" to "Candidatus Scalindua" along the salinity gradient from freshwater to the open ocean based on 16S rRNA gene and HZO amino acid phylotypes. This distribution pattern was associated with salinity, temperature, pH of overlying water, and particularly C/N ratio. Phylogenetic analysis unraveled a rich diversity of anammox bacteria including four novel clusters provisionally named "Candidatus Jugangensis," "Candidatus Oceanicum," "Candidatus Anammoxidans," and "Candidatus Aestuarianus." The abundance of anammox bacteria in surface sediments, bottom and surface waters ranged from 4.22 × 105 to 2.55 × 106 copies g-1, 1.24 × 104 to 1.01×105 copies L-1, and 8.07×103 to 8.86×105 copies L-1, respectively. The abundance of anammox bacteria in the water column was positively correlated with NO2- and NO3-, and negatively correlated with dissolved oxygen, although an autochthonous source might contribute to the observed abundance of anammox bacteria.

  2. Functional outcomes of fungal community shifts driven by tree genotype and spatial-temporal factors in Mediterranean pine forests.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Izquierdo, Leticia; Zabal-Aguirre, Mario; Flores-Rentería, Dulce; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Buée, Marc; Rincón, Ana

    2017-02-09

    Fungi provide relevant ecosystem services contributing to primary productivity and the cycling of nutrients in forests. These fungal inputs can be decisive for the resilience of Mediterranean forests under global change scenarios, making necessary an in-deep knowledge about how fungal communities operate in these ecosystems. By using high-throughput sequencing and enzymatic approaches, we studied the fungal communities associated with three genotypic variants of Pinus pinaster trees, in 45-year-old common garden plantations. We aimed to determine the impact of biotic (i.e., tree genotype) and abiotic (i.e., season, site) factors on the fungal community structure, and to explore whether structural shifts triggered functional responses affecting relevant ecosystem processes. Tree genotype and spatial-temporal factors were pivotal structuring fungal communities, mainly by influencing their assemblage and selecting certain fungi. Diversity variations of total fungal community and of that of specific fungal guilds, together with edaphic properties and tree's productivity, explained relevant ecosystem services such as processes involved in carbon turnover and phosphorous mobilization. A mechanistic model integrating relations of these variables and ecosystem functional outcomes is provided. Our results highlight the importance of structural shifts in fungal communities because they may have functional consequences for key ecosystem processes in Mediterranean forests.

  3. Shifting attention from objective risk factors to patients' self-assessed health resources: a clinical model for general practice.

    PubMed

    Hollnagel, H; Malterud, K

    1995-12-01

    The study was designed to present and apply theoretical and empirical knowledge for the construction of a clinical model intended to shift the attention of the general practitioner from objective risk factors to self-assessed health resources in male and female patients. Review, discussion and analysis of selected theoretical models about personal health resources involving assessing existing theories according to their emphasis concerning self-assessed vs. doctor-assessed health resources, specific health resources vs. life and coping in general, abstract vs. clinically applicable theory, gender perspective explicitly included or not. Relevant theoretical models on health and coping (salutogenesis, coping and social support, control/demand, locus of control, health belief model, quality of life), and the perspective of the underprivileged Other (critical theory, feminist standpoint theory, the patient-centred clinical method) were presented and assessed. Components from Antonovsky's salutogenetic perspective and McWhinney's patient-centred clinical method, supported by gender perspectives, were integrated to a clinical model which is presented. General practitioners are recommended to shift their attention from objective risk factors to self-assessed health resources by means of the clinical model. The relevance and feasibility of the model should be explored in empirical research.

  4. Evaluating Temporal Factors in Combined Interventions of Workforce Shift and School Closure for Mitigating the Spread of Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyou; Fu, Xiuju; Ma, Stefan; Xiao, Gaoxi; Wong, Limsoon; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Lees, Michael; Lee, Gary Kee Khoon; Hung, Terence

    2012-01-01

    Background It is believed that combined interventions may be more effective than individual interventions in mitigating epidemic. However there is a lack of quantitative studies on performance of the combination of individual interventions under different temporal settings. Methodology/Principal Findings To better understand the problem, we develop an individual-based simulation model running on top of contact networks based on real-life contact data in Singapore. We model and evaluate the spread of influenza epidemic with intervention strategies of workforce shift and its combination with school closure, and examine the impacts of temporal factors, namely the trigger threshold and the duration of an intervention. By comparing simulation results for intervention scenarios with different temporal factors, we find that combined interventions do not always outperform individual interventions and are more effective only when the duration is longer than 6 weeks or school closure is triggered at the 5% threshold; combined interventions may be more effective if school closure starts first when the duration is less than 4 weeks or workforce shift starts first when the duration is longer than 4 weeks. Conclusions/Significance We therefore conclude that identifying the appropriate timing configuration is crucial for achieving optimal or near optimal performance in mitigating the spread of influenza epidemic. The results of this study are useful to policy makers in deliberating and planning individual and combined interventions. PMID:22403634

  5. Sex-linked transcription factor involved in a shift of sex-pheromone preference in the silkmoth Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Tsuguru; Fujii, Takeshi; Namiki, Shigehiro; Abe, Hiroaki; Sakurai, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Akio; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Katsuma, Susumu; Ishikawa, Yukio; Shimada, Toru

    2011-01-01

    In the sex-pheromone communication systems of moths, odorant receptor (Or) specificity as well as higher olfactory information processing in males should be finely tuned to the pheromone of conspecific females. Accordingly, male sex-pheromone preference should have diversified along with the diversification of female sex pheromones; however, the genetic mechanisms that facilitated the diversification of male preference are not well understood. Here, we explored the mechanisms involved in a drastic shift in sex-pheromone preference in the silkmoth Bombyx mori using spli mutants in which the genomic structure of the gene Bmacj6, which encodes a class IV POU domain transcription factor, is disrupted or its expression is repressed. B. mori females secrete an ∼11:1 mixture of bombykol and bombykal. Bombykol alone elicits full male courtship behavior, whereas bombykal alone shows no apparent activity. In the spli mutants, the behavioral responsiveness of males to bombykol was markedly reduced, whereas bombykal alone evoked full courtship behavior. The reduced response of spli males to bombykol was explained by the paucity of bombykol receptors on the male antennae. It was also found that, in the spli males, neurons projecting into the toroid, a compartment in the brain where bombykol receptor neurons normally project, responded strongly to bombykal. The present study highlights a POU domain transcription factor, Bmacj6, which may have caused a shift of sex-pheromone preference in B. mori through Or gene choice and/or axon targeting. PMID:22006327

  6. 20 CFR 416.963 - Your age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the older age category after evaluating the overall impact of all the factors of your case. (c... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Your age as a vocational factor. 416.963... age as a vocational factor. (a) General. “Age” means your chronological age. When we decide...

  7. Thresholds for Coral Bleaching: Are Synergistic Factors and Shifting Thresholds Changing the Landscape for Management? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, C.; Donner, S. D.; Logan, C. A.; Gledhill, D. K.; Liu, G.; Heron, S. F.; Christensen, T.; Rauenzahn, J.; Morgan, J.; Parker, B. A.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Skirving, W. J.; Strong, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    As carbon dioxide rises in the atmosphere, climate change and ocean acidification are modifying important physical and chemical parameters in the oceans with resulting impacts on coral reef ecosystems. Rising CO2 is warming the world’s oceans and causing corals to bleach, with both alarming frequency and severity. The frequent return of stressful temperatures has already resulted in major damage to many of the world’s coral reefs and is expected to continue in the foreseeable future. Warmer oceans also have contributed to a rise in coral infectious diseases. Both bleaching and infectious disease can result in coral mortality and threaten one of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth and the important ecosystem services they provide. Additionally, ocean acidification from rising CO2 is reducing the availability of carbonate ions needed by corals to build their skeletons and perhaps depressing the threshold for bleaching. While thresholds vary among species and locations, it is clear that corals around the world are already experiencing anomalous temperatures that are too high, too often, and that warming is exceeding the rate at which corals can adapt. This is despite a complex adaptive capacity that involves both the coral host and the zooxanthellae, including changes in the relative abundance of the latter in their coral hosts. The safe upper limit for atmospheric CO2 is probably somewhere below 350ppm, a level we passed decades ago, and for temperature is a sustained global temperature increase of less than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. How much can corals acclimate and/or adapt to the unprecedented fast changing environmental conditions? Any change in the threshold for coral bleaching as the result of acclimation and/or adaption may help corals to survive in the future but adaptation to one stress may be maladaptive to another. There also is evidence that ocean acidification and nutrient enrichment modify this threshold. What do shifting thresholds mean

  8. Risk factors for premature death in middle aged men

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Bo; Trell, Erik; Henningsen, Nels-Christian; Hood, Bertil

    1984-01-01

    The causes of premature death and the associated risk factors were analysed in a cohort of 7935 middle aged men participating in a preventive population programme in Malmö. They were screened when aged 46-48 and then followed up for 3½-8 years. Two hundred and eighteen died, of whom 181 (83%) underwent necropsy. Three major causes of death were established: cancer in 61 (28%), deaths related to consumption of alcohol in 55 (25%), and coronary heart disease in 50 (23%). Distinctly different patterns of risk factors were found to be associated with each of the three main causes of premature death. In death due to coronary heart disease smoking (p=0·0062), serum cholesterol concentration (p=0·00014), serum triglyceride concentration (p=0·00013), systolic blood pressure (p=0·000012), and diastolic blood pressure (p=0·0021) were the strongest single determinants but diastolic blood pressure ceased to be a predictive factor in a multivariate analysis whereas all the other variables could be combined in a highly predictive logistic model. In death related to consumption of alcohol equal or even stronger associations were found for serum γ glutamyltransferase activity (p<0·0001), points scored in a questionnaire screening for alcoholism (p<0·0001), and, inversely, serum cholesterol (p=0·0046) and serum creatinine (p<0·0001) concentrations both when applied independently and when combined in a logistic model. In death due to cancer significant associations were found for serum urate concentration (p=0·023) and, inversely, serum cholesterol concentration (p=0·056-0·031). Malignant diseases and diseases related to consumption of alcohol were at least as prominent as cardiovascular disorders in causing premature death in the cohort of men studied. All three types of conditions are potentially avoidable and seem to be associated with significant and distinctive patterns of risk factors. These patterns should be used, as blood pressure and serum lipid

  9. Factors associated with shift work disorder in nurses working with rapid-rotation schedules in Japan: the nurses' sleep health project.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Shoichi; Aritake, Sayaka; Komada, Yoko; Ozaki, Akiko; Odagiri, Yuko; Inoue, Shigeru; Shimomitsu, Teruichi; Inoue, Yuichi

    2013-05-01

    Workers who meet the criteria for shift work disorder (SWD) have elevated levels of risk for various health and behavioral problems. However, the impact of having SWD on shiftworkers engaged in rapid-rotation schedules is unknown. Moreover, the risk factors for the occurrence of SWD remain unclear. To clarify these issues, we conducted a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey on a sample of shiftworking nurses. Responses were obtained from 1202 nurses working at university hospitals in Tokyo, Japan, including 727 two-shift workers and 315 three-shift workers. The questionnaire included items relevant to age, gender, family structure, work environment, health-related quality of life (QOL), diurnal type, depressive symptoms, and SWD. Participants who reported insomnia and/or excessive sleepiness for at least 1 mo that was subjectively relevant to their shiftwork schedules were categorized as having SWD. The prevalence of SWD in the sampled shiftworking nurses was 24.4%; shiftworking nurses with SWD showed lower health-related QOL and more severe depressive symptoms, with greater rates of both actual accidents/errors and near misses, than those without SWD. The results of logistic regression analyses showed that more time spent working at night, frequent missing of nap opportunities during night work, and having an eveningness-oriented chronotype were significantly associated with SWD. The present study indicated that SWD might be associated with reduced health-related QOL and decreased work performance in shiftworking nurses on rapid-rotation schedules. The results also suggested that missing napping opportunities during night work, long nighttime working hours, and the delay of circadian rhythms are associated with the occurrence of SWD among shiftworking nurses on rapid-rotation schedules.

  10. Evidence for a non-linear regime shift in the North Atlantic ocean circulation at the onset of the Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich; Divine, Dmitry; Donges, Jonathan F.; Miettinen, Arto; Donner, Reik V.; Feulner, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The mechanisms behind the transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly to the Little Ice Age are still unclear although it is one of the most prominent climate signals of the pre-industrial last millennium. We applied a novel time series irreversibility test to high-resolution ocean sediment August sea-surface temperature records and report evidence for a non-linear regime shift in North Atlantic ocean circulation during this period. We performed ensemble simulations with the model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-3α and find a persistent regime shift and an AMOC weakening as a result of a volcanically triggered sea-ice ocean feedback cascade. The sediment record from the central subpolar basin shows an anomalous warming during the Little Ice Age period that is reproduced by the model. Our results suggest that such a regional multi-stability in the North Atlantic can affect regional climate on centennial time-scales.

  11. Risk factors for vitamin A deficiency among preschool aged children in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Carrie M; Sullivan, Kevin M; van der Haar, Frits; Auerbach, Steven B; Iohp, Kidsen K

    2004-02-01

    In 1993, the Department of Health of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) conducted a population-based stratified random survey among 355 children aged 24-48 months in Pohnpei, one of the four FSM States. The objective was to determine the prevalence, and explore risk factors for vitamin A deficiency (VAD). Trained field workers collected data from a range of demographic, dietary and socioeconomic variables related to the children. The serum retinol concentration was 19.4 +/- 7.5 microg/dl (mean +/- SD), and the VAD prevalence (serum retinol <20 microg/dl) 53.1 per cent. The significant independent risk factors, determined by logistic regression, were: mother's work at home, sibling <2 years older, rural household located on the main island, early weaning, and child anemia, controlling for pipe water and electricity in the household. If compared with a reference of apparently healthy children of similar age in the USA, the distribution of serum retinol among young Pohnpei children was shifted entirely to low levels. We conclude that eliminating the pervasive VAD problem in Pohnpei would require a multi-pronged tactical approach that combines dietary improvement strategies with the ongoing supplementation effort.

  12. Estimation of the stand ages of tropical secondary forests after shifting cultivation based on the combination of WorldView-2 and time-series Landsat images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Shogoro; Okada, Kei-ichi; Nishio, Shogo; Kitayama, Kanehiro

    2016-09-01

    We developed a new method to estimate stand ages of secondary vegetation in the Bornean montane zone, where local people conduct traditional shifting cultivation and protected areas are surrounded by patches of recovering secondary vegetation of various ages. Identifying stand ages at the landscape level is critical to improve conservation policies. We combined a high-resolution satellite image (WorldView-2) with time-series Landsat images. We extracted stand ages (the time elapsed since the most recent slash and burn) from a change-detection analysis with Landsat time-series images and superimposed the derived stand ages on the segments classified by object-based image analysis using WorldView-2. We regarded stand ages as a response variable, and object-based metrics as independent variables, to develop regression models that explain stand ages. Subsequently, we classified the vegetation of the target area into six age units and one rubber plantation unit (1-3 yr, 3-5 yr, 5-7 yr, 7-30 yr, 30-50 yr, >50 yr and 'rubber plantation') using regression models and linear discriminant analyses. Validation demonstrated an accuracy of 84.3%. Our approach is particularly effective in classifying highly dynamic pioneer vegetation younger than 7 years into 2-yr intervals, suggesting that rapid changes in vegetation canopies can be detected with high accuracy. The combination of a spectral time-series analysis and object-based metrics based on high-resolution imagery enabled the classification of dynamic vegetation under intensive shifting cultivation and yielded an informative land cover map based on stand ages.

  13. Form factors of the isovector scalar current and the [Formula: see text] scattering phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Albaladejo, M; Moussallam, B

    A model for S-wave [Formula: see text] scattering is proposed which could be realistic in an energy range from threshold up to above 1 GeV, where inelasticity is dominated by the [Formula: see text] channel. The T-matrix, satisfying two-channel unitarity, is given in a form which matches the chiral expansion results at order [Formula: see text] exactly for the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] amplitudes and approximately for [Formula: see text]. It contains six phenomenological parameters. Asymptotic conditions are imposed which ensure a minimal solution of the Muskhelishvili-Omnès problem, thus allowing one to compute the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] form factor matrix elements of the [Formula: see text] scalar current from the T-matrix. The phenomenological parameters are determined such as to reproduce the experimental properties of the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] resonances, as well as the chiral results of the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] scalar radii, which are predicted to be remarkably small at [Formula: see text]. This T-matrix model could be used for a unified treatment of the [Formula: see text] final-state interaction problem in processes such as [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], or the [Formula: see text] initial-state interaction in [Formula: see text].

  14. 45 CFR 91.14 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age. 91.14 Section 91.14 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM HHS Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 91.14 Exceptions to the...

  15. 34 CFR 110.13 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age. 110.13 Section 110.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining...

  16. 45 CFR 90.15 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age. 90.15 Section 90.15 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING...

  17. 40 CFR 7.155 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination-reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination-reasonable factors other than age. 7.155 Section 7.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 7.155 Exceptions to the...

  18. 10 CFR 4.314 - Exceptions to the rule against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exceptions to the rule against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age. 4.314 Section 4.314 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION... COMMISSION Regulations Implementing the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as Amended Standards for...

  19. 45 CFR 91.14 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age. 91.14 Section 91.14 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING...

  20. 34 CFR 110.13 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination: Reasonable factors other than age. 110.13 Section 110.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining...

  1. 10 CFR 4.314 - Exceptions to the rule against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exceptions to the rule against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age. 4.314 Section 4.314 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION... COMMISSION Regulations Implementing the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as Amended Standards for...

  2. Age, gender, and education may have little influence on error patterns in the assessment of set-shifting and rule induction among normal elderly.

    PubMed

    Lowe, P A; Reynolds, C R

    1999-04-01

    Error patterns have been found to be sensitive to cognitive status, but the relationship between aging and error patterns remains unclear, and may differ as a function of gender, education, and whether a task is verbal or nonverbal. The present study examined the error patterns of normal elderly individuals on a verbal measure of set-shifting and rule induction to determine whether demographic variables, that is, age, gender, and education, influenced test performance. The sample of 109 individuals, 38 males and 71 females, ranging in age from 54 to 89 years with 6 to 19 years of education, was assessed on the Classification subtest of the Test of Verbal Conceptualization and Fluency, a verbal measure of set-shifting and rule induction. Subjects' protocols were scored for perseverative, nonperseverative, and random errors, tabulated, and analyzed. Multivariate analysis of covariance with education as the covariate as well as other statistical tests revealed nonsignificant relationships between error scores and age, gender, and education. Years of education, however, showed a significant correlation with a reduction in random responses. Results are interpreted based on Horn's (1978) fluid-crystallized explanations of changes in intelligence with advancing age.

  3. Analysis of In Vitro DNA Interactions of Brassinosteroid-Controlled Transcription Factors Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay.

    PubMed

    Unterholzner, Simon J; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Most signaling cascades ultimately lead to changes in gene expression by modulating the activity of transcription factors (TFs). The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) is a simple but powerful in vitro method for investigation of specific protein-DNA interactions. It makes use of the fact that protein-DNA complexes have a lower electrophoretic mobility in gels than free DNA has. The application of labeled probes in combination with unlabeled competitors allows investigation of DNA-binding specificity and identification of binding motifs with single base-pair resolution. Here we describe the application of EMSAs for the study of interactions of the brassinosteroid-regulated TFs, BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1, (BZR1), BRI1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 (BES1)/BZR2, and CESTA with putative binding sites. The classical approach using radiolabeled probes, as well as the more recent application of fluorescent probes, is described and the advantages and disadvantages of both methods are discussed.

  4. Metabolic shift in liver: Correlation between perfusion temperature and hypoxia inducible factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Ferrigno, Andrea; Di Pasqua, Laura Giuseppina; Bianchi, Alberto; Richelmi, Plinio; Vairetti, Mariapia

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study at what temperature the oxygen carried by the perfusate meets liver requirements in a model of organ perfusion. METHODS: In this study, we correlated hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression to the perfusion temperature and the hepatic oxygen uptake in a model of isolated perfused rat liver. Livers from Wistar rats were perfused for 6 h with an oxygenated medium at 10, 20, 30 and 37 °C. Oxygen uptake was measured by an oxygen probe; lactate dehydrogenase activity, lactate release and glycogen were measured spectrophotometrically; bile flow was gravitationally determined; pH of the perfusate was also evaluated; HIF-1α mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by real time-polymerase chain reaction and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: Livers perfused at 10 and 20 °C showed no difference in lactate dehydrogenase release after 6 h of perfusion (0.96 ± 0.23 vs 0.93 ± 0.09 mU/min per g) and had lower hepatic damage as compared to 30 and 37 °C (5.63 ± 0.76 vs 527.69 ± 45.27 mU/min per g, respectively, Ps < 0.01). After 6 h, tissue ATP was significantly higher in livers perfused at 10 and 20 °C than in livers perfused at 30 and 37 °C (0.89 ± 0.06 and 1.16 ± 0.05 vs 0.57 ± 0.09 and 0.33 ± 0.08 nmol/mg, respectively, Ps < 0.01). No sign of hypoxia was observed at 10 and 20 °C, as highlighted by low lactate release respect to livers perfused at 30 and 37 °C (121.4 ± 12.6 and 146.3 ± 7.3 vs 281.8 ± 45.3 and 1094.5 ± 71.7 nmol/mL, respectively, Ps < 0.02), and low relative HIF-1α mRNA (0.40 ± 0.08 and 0.20 ± 0.03 vs 0.60 ± 0.20 and 1.47 ± 0.30, respectively, Ps < 0.05) and protein (3.72 ± 0.16 and 3.65 ± 0.06 vs 4.43 ± 0.41 and 6.44 ± 0.82, respectively, Ps < 0.05) expression. CONCLUSION: Livers perfused at 10 and 20 °C show no sign of liver injury or anaerobiosis, in contrast to livers perfused at 30 and 37 °C. PMID:25632183

  5. Ageing is a risk factor in imatinib mesylate cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Maharsy, Wael; Aries, Anne; Mansour, Omar; Komati, Hiba; Nemer, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Aims Chemotherapy-induced heart failure is increasingly recognized as a major clinical challenge. Cardiotoxicity of imatinib mesylate, a highly selective and effective anticancer drug belonging to the new class of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, is being reported in patients, some progressing to congestive heart failure. This represents an unanticipated challenge that could limit effective drug use. Understanding the mechanisms and risk factors of imatinib mesylate cardiotoxicity is crucial for prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients. Methods and results We used genetically engineered mice and primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes to analyse the action of imatinib on the heart. We found that treatment with imatinib (200 mg/kg/day for 5 weeks) leads to mitochondrial-dependent myocyte loss and cardiac dysfunction, as confirmed by electron microscopy, RNA analysis, and echocardiography. Imatinib cardiotoxicity was more severe in older mice, in part due to an age-dependent increase in oxidative stress. Mechanistically, depletion of the transcription factor GATA4 resulting in decreased levels of its prosurvival targets Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL was an underlying cause of imatinib toxicity. Consistent with this, GATA4 haploinsufficient mice were more susceptible to imatinib, and myocyte-specific up-regulation of GATA4 or Bcl-2 protected against drug-induced cardiotoxicity. Conclusion The results indicate that imatinib action on the heart targets cardiomyocytes and involves mitochondrial impairment and cell death that can be further aggravated by oxidative stress. This in turn offers a possible explanation for the current conflicting data regarding imatinib cardiotoxicity in cancer patients and suggests that cardiac monitoring of older patients receiving imatinib therapy may be especially warranted. PMID:24504921

  6. 20 CFR 228.16 - Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF... RETIREMENT ACT COMPUTATION OF SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.16 Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF). Upon the attainment of retirement age, the previously-computed age reduction...

  7. 20 CFR 416.963 - Your age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Your age as a vocational factor. 416.963... age as a vocational factor. (a) General. “Age” means your chronological age. When we decide whether you are disabled under § 416.920(g)(1), we will consider your chronological age in combination...

  8. 20 CFR 228.16 - Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF... RETIREMENT ACT COMPUTATION OF SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.16 Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF). Upon the attainment of retirement age, the previously-computed age reduction...

  9. 20 CFR 228.16 - Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF... RETIREMENT ACT COMPUTATION OF SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.16 Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF). Upon the attainment of retirement age, the previously-computed age reduction...

  10. 20 CFR 416.963 - Your age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Your age as a vocational factor. 416.963... age as a vocational factor. (a) General. “Age” means your chronological age. When we decide whether you are disabled under § 416.920(g)(1), we will consider your chronological age in combination...

  11. 20 CFR 228.16 - Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF... RETIREMENT ACT COMPUTATION OF SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.16 Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF). Upon the attainment of retirement age, the previously-computed age reduction...

  12. 20 CFR 416.963 - Your age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Your age as a vocational factor. 416.963... age as a vocational factor. (a) General. “Age” means your chronological age. When we decide whether you are disabled under § 416.920(g)(1), we will consider your chronological age in combination...

  13. Anorexia of aging: a modifiable risk factor for frailty.

    PubMed

    Martone, Anna Maria; Onder, Graziano; Vetrano, Davide Liborio; Ortolani, Elena; Tosato, Matteo; Marzetti, Emanuele; Landi, Francesco

    2013-10-14

    Anorexia of aging, defined as a loss of appetite and/or reduced food intake, affects a significant number of elderly people and is far more prevalent among frail individuals. Anorexia recognizes a multifactorial origin characterized by various combinations of medical, environmental and social factors. Given the interconnection between weight loss, sarcopenia and frailty, anorexia is a powerful, independent predictor of poor quality of life, morbidity and mortality in older persons. One of the most important goals in the management of older, frail people is to optimize their nutritional status. To achieve this objective it is important to identify subjects at risk of anorexia and to provide multi-stimulus interventions that ensure an adequate amount of food to limit and/or reverse weight loss and functional decline. Here, we provide a brief overview on the relevance of anorexia in the context of sarcopenia and frailty. Major pathways supposedly involved in the pathogenesis of anorexia are also illustrated. Finally, the importance of treating anorexia to achieve health benefits in frail elders is highlighted.

  14. Anorexia of Aging: A Modifiable Risk Factor for Frailty

    PubMed Central

    Martone, Anna Maria; Onder, Graziano; Vetrano, Davide Liborio; Ortolani, Elena; Tosato, Matteo; Marzetti, Emanuele; Landi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia of aging, defined as a loss of appetite and/or reduced food intake, affects a significant number of elderly people and is far more prevalent among frail individuals. Anorexia recognizes a multifactorial origin characterized by various combinations of medical, environmental and social factors. Given the interconnection between weight loss, sarcopenia and frailty, anorexia is a powerful, independent predictor of poor quality of life, morbidity and mortality in older persons. One of the most important goals in the management of older, frail people is to optimize their nutritional status. To achieve this objective it is important to identify subjects at risk of anorexia and to provide multi-stimulus interventions that ensure an adequate amount of food to limit and/or reverse weight loss and functional decline. Here, we provide a brief overview on the relevance of anorexia in the context of sarcopenia and frailty. Major pathways supposedly involved in the pathogenesis of anorexia are also illustrated. Finally, the importance of treating anorexia to achieve health benefits in frail elders is highlighted. PMID:24128975

  15. Age of diagnosis for autism: individual and community factors across 10 birth cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Christine; King, Marissa D; Bearman, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    Background The incidence of autism rose dramatically between 1992 and 2001, while the age at which children were first diagnosed declined. During this period the size and composition of the autism caseload has changed, but little is known about whether the factors associated with the timing of diagnosis may also have shifted. Using a multilevel analysis strategy, the individual and community-level factors associated with age of diagnosis were modelled across 10 birth cohorts of California children. Methods Linked birth and administrative records on 17 185 children with diagnoses of autistic disorder born in California between 1992 and 2001 and enrolled with the California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) were analysed. Information on cases, their parents and their residential location were extracted from birth and DDS records. Zip codes of residence were matched to census data to create community-level measures. Multilevel linear models were estimated for each birth cohort, with individual-level effects for sex, race, parental characteristics, poverty status, birth order and symptom expression. At the community level measures of educational and economic composition, local autism prevalence and the presence of a child psychiatrist were included. Results Children with highly educated parents are diagnosed earlier, and this effect has strengthened over time. There is a persistent gap in the age of diagnosis between high and low socioeconomic status (SES) children that has shrunk but not disappeared over time. Conclusion Routine screening for autism in early childhood for all children, particularly those of low SES, is necessary to eliminate disparities in early intervention. PMID:20974836

  16. The Effect of Demographic Factors on Age-Earnings Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Richard B.

    1979-01-01

    The age-earnings profile of male workers is significantly influenced by the age composition of the workforce. The dependence of the age-earnings profile on demographically induced movements along a relative demand schedule suggests that standard human capital models of the profile are incomplete. (MF)

  17. Gestational age-dependent risk factors for preterm birth: associations with maternal education and age early in gestation.

    PubMed

    Auger, Nathalie; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Wynant, Willy; Lo, Ernest

    2014-05-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) before 37 weeks can occur over a wide range of gestational ages, but few studies have assessed if associations between risk factors and PTB vary over the duration of gestation. We sought to evaluate if associations between two major risk factors (maternal education and age) and PTB depend on gestational age at delivery. We estimated hazard ratios of PTB for education and age in a time-to-event analysis using a retrospective cohort of 223,756 live singleton births from the province of Québec, Canada for the years 2001-2005. Differences in hazards of maternal education and age with PTB were assessed over gestational age in a Cox proportional hazards model using linear and nonlinear time interaction terms, adjusting for maternal characteristics. Associations of PTB with lower (vs. higher) education and older (vs. younger) age strengthened progressively at earlier gestational ages, such that the risk of PTB for maternal education and age was not constant over the course of gestation. Associations of PTB with risk factors such as maternal low education and older age may be stronger early in gestation. Models that capture the time-dependent nature of PTB may be useful when the goal is to assess associations at low gestational ages, and to avoid masked or biased associations early in gestation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reproductive Factors and Risk of Premenopausal Breast Cancer by Age at Diagnosis: Are There Differences Before and After Age 40?

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Erica T.; Colditz, Graham A.; Palmer, Julie R.; Partridge, Ann H.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Tamimi, Rulla M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE We examined the relationship between reproductive factors and risk of premenopausal breast cancer among women less than age 40 compared with older premenopausal women. METHODS We documented 374 incident cases of breast cancer diagnosed before age 40 and 2,533 cases diagnosed at age 40 and older among premenopausal women in the Nurses’ Health Study cohorts. Biennial questionnaires were used to determine age at menarche, age at first birth, parity, breastfeeding and other reproductive factors. Multivariate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models within age at diagnosis groups. RESULTS Tumors in younger women were significantly more likely to be higher grade, larger size, and hormone receptor negative than were tumors in older premenopausal women (p< 0.0001). There was no significant heterogeneity according to age in associations between reproductive factors and risk of premenopausal breast cancer. First birth at age 30 or older increased breast cancer risk in both age groups (age <40: RR: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.80, 1.50; age ≥40: RR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.32; p-heterogeneity= 0.44). Risk of premenopausal breast cancer decreased with each additional year of age at menarche in both age groups (age <40 RR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.87, 0.99; p-trend=0.02; age ≥ 40 RR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.91, 0.97; p-trend=<0.0001). Among premenopausal parous women, breastfeeding was protective regardless of age at diagnosis (age <40 RR: 0.84, 95% CI 0.57, 1.22; age ≥40: RR: 0.85, 95% CI 0.72, 0.99; p-heterogeneity=0.79). CONCLUSIONS In the largest prospective examination of reproductive risk factors and risk of breast cancer before and after age 40, we found that younger women were more likely to develop tumors with less favorable prognostic characteristics. However, associations between reproductive factors and risk of breast cancer were similar regardless of age at diagnosis of premenopausal breast cancer. PMID:24136668

  19. Aging Negatively Affects Estrogens-Mediated Effects on Nitric Oxide Bioavailability by Shifting ERα/ERβ Balance in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Novensà, Laura; Novella, Susana; Medina, Pascual; Segarra, Gloria; Castillo, Nadia; Heras, Magda; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Dantas, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Aims Aging is among the major causes for the lack of cardiovascular protection by estrogen (E2) during postmenopause. Our study aims to determine the mechanisms whereby aging changes E2 effects on nitric oxide (NO) production in a mouse model of accelerated senescence (SAM). Methods and Results Although we found no differences on NO production in females SAM prone (SAMP, aged) compared to SAM resistant (SAMR, young), by either DAF-2 fluorescence or plasmatic nitrite/nitrate (NO2/NO3), in both cases, E2 treatment increased NO production in SAMR but had no effect in SAMP. Those results are in agreement with changes of eNOS protein and gene expression. E2 up-regulated eNOS expression in SAMR but not in SAMP. E2 is also known to increase NO by decreasing its catabolism by superoxide anion (O2-). Interestingly, E2 treatment decreased O2− production in young females, while increased O2− in aged ones. Furthermore, we observed that aging changed expression ratio of estrogen receptors (ERβ/ERα) and levels of DNA methylation. Increased ratio ERβ/ERα in aged females is associated to a lack of estrogen modulation of NO production and with a reversal in its antioxidant effect to a pro-oxidant profile. Conclusions Together, our data suggest that aging has detrimental effects on E2-mediated benefits on NO bioavailability, partially by affecting the ability of E2 to induce up regulation of eNOS and decrease of O2−. These modifications may be associated to aging-mediated modifications on global DNA methylation status, but not to a specific methylation at 5′flanking region of ERα gene. PMID:21966501

  20. Aging alters bone-fat reciprocity by shifting in vivo mesenchymal precursor cell fate towards an adipogenic lineage.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lakshman; Brennan, Tracy A; Russell, Elizabeth; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Chen, Qijun; Brad Johnson, F; Pignolo, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) play an important role in bone homeostasis. Age-related changes occur in bone resulting in a decrease in bone density and a relative increase in adipocity. Although in vitro studies suggest the existence of an age-related lineage switch between osteogenic and adipogenic fates, stem cell and microenvironmental contributions to this process have not been elucidated in vivo. In order to study the effects of MPC and microenvironmental aging on functional engraftment and lineage switching, transplantation studies were performed under non-myeloablative conditions in old recipients, with donor MPCs derived from young and old green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice. Robust engraftment by young MPCs or their progeny was observed in the marrow, bone-lining region and in the matrix of young recipients; however, significantly lower engraftment was seen at the same sites in old recipients transplanted with old MPCs. Differentiation of transplanted MPCs strongly favored adipogenesis over osteogenesis in old recipients irrespective of MPC donor age, suggesting that microenvironmental alterations that occur with in vivo aging are predominately responsible for MPC lineage switching. These data indicate that aging alters bone-fat reciprocity and differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors towards an adipogenic fate.

  1. Complement Factor D in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Chloe M.; Yates, John R.W.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Seddon, Johanna M.; Swaroop, Anand; Stambolian, Dwight; Fauser, Sascha; Hoyng, Carel; Yu, Yi; Atsuhiro, Kanda; Branham, Kari; Othman, Mohammad; Chen, Wei; Kortvely, Elod; Chalmers, Kevin; Hayward, Caroline; Moore, Anthony T.; Dhillon, Baljean; Ueffing, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the role of complement factor D (CFD) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by analysis of genetic association, copy number variation, and plasma CFD concentrations. Methods. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CFD gene were genotyped and the results analyzed by binary logistic regression. CFD gene copy number was analyzed by gene copy number assay. Plasma CFD was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. Genetic association was found between CFD gene SNP rs3826945 and AMD (odds ratio 1.44; P = 0.028) in a small discovery case-control series (462 cases and 325 controls) and replicated in a combined cohorts meta-analysis of 4765 cases and 2693 controls, with an odds ratio of 1.11 (P = 0.032), with the association almost confined to females. Copy number variation in the CFD gene was identified in 13 out of 640 samples examined but there was no difference in frequency between AMD cases (1.3%) and controls (2.7%). Plasma CFD concentration was measured in 751 AMD cases and 474 controls and found to be elevated in AMD cases (P = 0.00025). The odds ratio for those in the highest versus lowest quartile for plasma CFD was 1.81. The difference in plasma CFD was again almost confined to females. Conclusions. CFD regulates activation of the alternative complement pathway, which is implicated in AMD pathogenesis. The authors found evidence for genetic association between a CFD gene SNP and AMD and a significant increase in plasma CFD concentration in AMD cases compared with controls, consistent with a role for CFD in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:22003108

  2. RECENT INCIDENCE OF TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS IN MONTENEGRO: A SHIFT TOWARD YOUNGER AGE AT DISEASE ONSET.

    PubMed

    Samardžić, Mira; Martinović, Milica; Nedović-Vuković, Mirjana; Popović-Samardžić, Milena

    2016-03-01

    In the last several decades, a great number of studies have pointed to a dramatic increase of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) incidence in the whole world, especially in younger age groups. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess changes in the age distribution at onset of T1DM in Montenegro children aged < 15 years during a 15-year period (1997-2011) and analyze the seasonal pattern. Primary case ascertainment was from diabetes register, secondary and tertiary independent data sources were hospital case records and register of children receiving free test stripes in pharmacy. Standardized incidence rates were calculated using the Poisson regression. Case ascertainment was 100% complete using the capture-recapture method. The mean age-standardized incidence was 18.6/100,000 (95% CI: 13.0-24.1) from 2007 to 2011 compared with 13.4/100,000 95% CI, 11.5-15.5) from 1997 to 2006. The incidence of T1DM increased predominantly in younger age groups. Relative increase of incidence per 5-year period was largest in boys aged 0-4 and 5-9 years: 64.7% (95% CI: 20.6-10.7; p = 0.004) and 52.8% (95% CI: 16.9-88.8; p = 0.004), respectively. Seasonality in monthly case counts of T1DM was apparent. The greatest number of cases were diagnosed during autumn and winter months. In conclusion, the onset of T1DM was found to occur at an ever younger age in Montenegro children. Our results indicated a seasonal pattern of the disease onset.

  3. A secular trend toward earlier male sexual maturity: evidence from shifting ages of male young adult mortality.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Joshua R

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows new evidence of a steady long-term decline in age of male sexual maturity since at least the mid-eighteenth century. A method for measuring the timing of male maturity is developed based on the age at which male young adult mortality accelerates. The method is applied to mortality data from Sweden, Denmark, Norway, the United Kingdom, and Italy. The secular trend toward earlier male sexual maturity parallels the trend toward earlier menarche for females, suggesting that common environmental cues influence the speed of both males' and females' sexual maturation.

  4. A Secular Trend toward Earlier Male Sexual Maturity: Evidence from Shifting Ages of Male Young Adult Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Joshua R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows new evidence of a steady long-term decline in age of male sexual maturity since at least the mid-eighteenth century. A method for measuring the timing of male maturity is developed based on the age at which male young adult mortality accelerates. The method is applied to mortality data from Sweden, Denmark, Norway, the United Kingdom, and Italy. The secular trend toward earlier male sexual maturity parallels the trend toward earlier menarche for females, suggesting that common environmental cues influence the speed of both males' and females' sexual maturation. PMID:21857893

  5. Effect of Age and Other Factors on Maximal Heart Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.

    1982-01-01

    To reduce confusion regarding reported effects of age on maximal exercise heart rate, a comprehensive review of the relevant English literature was conducted. Data on maximal heart rate after exercising with a bicycle, a treadmill, and after swimming were analyzed with regard to physical fitness and to age, sex, and racial differences. (Authors/PP)

  6. Language Acquisition: The Age Factor. Multilingual Matters 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, David

    This book provides an overview of research and thinking on age-related dimensions of language acquisition, intended for students, researchers, and educators with some experience in linguistics and applied linguistics. The first chapter introduces the variety of issues associated with age and language acquisition. Chapter 2 examines the evidence…

  7. Language Acquisition: The Age Factor. Multilingual Matters 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, David

    This book provides an overview of research and thinking on age-related dimensions of language acquisition, intended for students, researchers, and educators with some experience in linguistics and applied linguistics. The first chapter introduces the variety of issues associated with age and language acquisition. Chapter 2 examines the evidence…

  8. COGNITIVE AND MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS IN AGING AND DISENGAGEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BACK, KURT W.; GERGEN, KENNETH J.

    PREVIOUS THEORIES OF THE AGING PROCESS HAVE DERIVED BEHAVIOR AS NECESSARY FUNCTIONS OF SOCIAL OR INDIVIDUAL VARIABLES. AN INTERMEDIATE THEORY, PERSONAL ORIENTATION, ALLOWS THE INDIVIDUAL THE POSSIBILITY OF CHOICE WITHIN HIS CAPACITIES AND SOCIAL SITUATION. THIS THEORY IS BASED ON A DISENGAGEMENT THEORY OF AGING THAT SUGGESTS THAT A PERSON…

  9. The impact of sociodemographic factors vs. gender roles on female hospital workers' health: do we need to shift emphasis?

    PubMed

    Musshauser, Doris; Bader, Angelika; Wildt, Beatrice; Hochleitner, Margarethe

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the physical and mental health status of female workers from five different occupational groups and to identify possible sociodemographic and gender-coded family-related factors as well as work characteristics influencing women's health. The identified predictors of health status were subjected to a gender-sensitive analysis and their relations to one another are discussed. A total of 1083 female hospital workers including medical doctors, technical and administrative personnel, nurses and a group mainly consisting of scientific personnel and psychologists completed a questionnaire measuring work- and family-related variables, sociodemographic data and the Short-form 36 Health Questionnaire (SF-36). Data were analysed by multivariate regression analyses. Female medical doctors reported highest scores for all physical health dimensions except General Health. Our study population showed general low mental health status among administrative personnel and the heterogeneous group, others, scored highest on all mental health component scores. A series of eight regression analyses were performed. Three variables contributed highly significantly to all SF-36 subscale scores: age, satisfaction with work schedule, and the unpaid work variable. Age had the strongest influence on all physical dimensions except General Health (beta=-0.17) and had no detectable influence on mental health scores. The unpaid work variable (beta=-0.23; p<0.001) exerted a stronger influence on General Health than did age. Nevertheless, these variables were limited predictors of physical and mental health status. In all occupational groups the amount of time spent daily on child care and household tasks, as a traditional gender-coded factor, and satisfaction with work schedule were the only contributors to mental health among working women in this study. Traditional sociodemographic data had no effect on mental health status. In addition to age, these

  10. Age-Related Shifts in the Density and Distribution of Genetic Marker Water Quality Indicators in Cow and Calf Feces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown that different adult bovine animal feeding practices dramatically influence fecal indicator bacteria shedding, however very little is known about juvenile milk-fed calves. Calves (≤ 6 months of age) make up about 16% of the current bovine population in ...

  11. Age-related shifts in the density and distribution of genetic marker water quality indicators in cow and calf feces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent studies have shown that different adult bovine animal feeding practices dramatically influence fecal indicator bacteria shedding, however very little is known about milk-fed calves. Calves (= 6 months of age) make up about 16% of the current bovine population in the United States and can exc...

  12. Normative shifts of cortical mechanisms of encoding contribute to adult age differences in visual-spatial working memory.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Viola S; Li, Shu-Chen; Heekeren, Hauke R; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-06-01

    The capacity of visual-spatial working memory (WM) declines from early to late adulthood. Recent attempts at identifying neural correlates of WM capacity decline have focused on the maintenance phase of WM. Here, we investigate neural mechanisms during the encoding phase as another potential mechanism contributing to adult age differences in WM capacity. We used electroencephalography to track neural activity during encoding and maintenance on a millisecond timescale in 35 younger and 35 older adults performing a visual-spatial WM task. As predicted, we observed pronounced age differences in ERP indicators of WM encoding: Younger adults showed attentional selection during item encoding (N2pc component), but this selection mechanism was greatly attenuated in older adults. Conversely, older adults showed more pronounced signs of early perceptual stimulus processing (N1 component) than younger adults. The amplitude modulation of the N1 component predicted WM capacity in older adults, whereas the attentional amplitude modulation of the N2pc component predicted WM capacity in younger adults. Our findings suggest that adult age differences in mechanisms of WM encoding contribute to adult age differences in limits of visual-spatial WM capacity.

  13. Age-Related Shifts in the Density and Distribution of Genetic Marker Water Quality Indicators in Cow and Calf Feces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown that different adult bovine animal feeding practices dramatically influence fecal indicator bacteria shedding, however very little is known about juvenile milk-fed calves. Calves (≤ 6 months of age) make up about 16% of the current bovine population in ...

  14. Factors Affecting Age at ASD Diagnosis in UK: No Evidence That Diagnosis Age Has Decreased between 2004 and 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Denise; Warnell, Frances; McConachie, Helen; Parr, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical initiatives have aimed to reduce the age at ASD diagnosis in the UK. This study investigated whether the median age at diagnosis in childhood has reduced in recent years, and identified the factors associated with earlier diagnosis in the UK. Data on 2,134 children with ASD came from two large family databases. Results showed that the age…

  15. 10 CFR 1040.87 - Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exceptions to the rules against age discrimination. Reasonable factors other than age. 1040.87 Section 1040.87 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES Nondiscrimination on the Basis of...

  16. Influence of Psychosocial Factors on Aging among the Aged in Ihitte-Uboma Local Government Area of Imo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojukwu, M. O.

    2016-01-01

    The major aim of this study was to examine influence of psychosocial factors on aging among the aged in Ihitte Uboma Local Government Area of Imo State, Nigeria. Ex-post facto or casual comparative research design was adopted for the study. Two hundred and twenty-five (225) old people were selected through random sampling for the study.…

  17. Factors Affecting Age at ASD Diagnosis in UK: No Evidence That Diagnosis Age Has Decreased between 2004 and 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Denise; Warnell, Frances; McConachie, Helen; Parr, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical initiatives have aimed to reduce the age at ASD diagnosis in the UK. This study investigated whether the median age at diagnosis in childhood has reduced in recent years, and identified the factors associated with earlier diagnosis in the UK. Data on 2,134 children with ASD came from two large family databases. Results showed that the age…

  18. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  19. [Delivery during time of shift change is not a risk factor for obstetric complication: a historical cohort study].

    PubMed

    Reichman, Orna; Samueloff, Arnon; Gdansky, Efraim; Yekel, Yael; Calderon-Margalit, Ronit

    2015-03-01

    The time of shift change is a unique time because the continuity of routine care is interrupted. The association between delivery during time of shift change and obstetric complications has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that delivery during time of shift change is at risk for obstetric complications. A historical cohort study was performed of all women with a singleton pregnancy undergoing a trial of labor at term during 2006-2010. Data was extracted from a computerized database that is continuously updated during Labor. The hour of delivery was divided into two categories: "morning shift" (09:30-15:00) and "time of shift change" which was defined 30 minutes prior to and 90 minutes past the official time of shift change, which occurs twice daily at 07:30 and 15:30. Multivariate logistic regression models were implemented to estimate the association between deliveries during "time of shift change" compared to "morning weekdays", with instrumental delivery (primary outcome) and prolonged second stage, unplanned cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, 5 minutes Apgar score < 7, admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and prolonged maternal hospitalization (secondary outcome). A total of 16,341 deliveries were included in the cohort. No statistical difference in instrumental vaginal delivery was documented for women delivering during "time of shift change compared to morning shift weekdays (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.83- 1.11, p = 0.605). None of the secondary outcomes were found at risk for women delivering during "time of shift change". Delivery during "time of shift change" does not pose additional risk for obstetric complications.

  20. 29 CFR 1625.7 - Differentiations based on reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Differentiations based on reasonable factors other than age. 1625.7 Section 1625.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AGE DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT ACT Interpretations § 1625.7 Differentiations based on reasonable factors other than age. (a) Section 4(...

  1. Nerve growth factor-induced circadian phase shifts and MAP kinase activation in the hamster suprachiasmatic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Pizzio, Gastón A; Hainich, Ernesto C; Plano, Santiago A; Ralph, Martin R; Golombek, Diego A

    2005-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are entrained by light and by several neurochemical stimuli. In hamsters housed in constant darkness, i.c.v. administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) at various times in their circadian cycle produced phase shifts of locomotor activity rhythms that were similar in direction and circadian timing to those produced by brief pulses of light. Moreover, the effect of NGF and light were not additive, indicating signalling points in common. These points include the immediate-early gene c-fos and ERK1/2, a component of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) family. NGF activates c-FOS and ERK1/2-MAPK in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a circadian clock in mammals, when administered during the subjective night but not during the day. The effect of NGF on ERK1/2 activation was not inhibited by the administration of MK-801, a glutamate/NMDA receptor antagonist. These results suggest that NGF, acting through MAPK activation, plays a role in photic entrainment of the mammalian circadian clock.

  2. Lifestyle factors associated with age-related differences in body composition: the Florey Adelaide Male Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Atlantis, Evan; Martin, Sean A; Haren, Matthew T; Taylor, Anne W; Wittert, Gary A

    2008-07-01

    Age-related change in body composition is associated with adverse health outcomes, including functional decline, disability, morbidity, and early mortality. Prevention of age-related changes requires a greater understanding of the associations among age, lifestyle factors, and body composition. We aimed to comprehensively determine lifestyle factors associated with age-related differences in body composition assessed by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We analyzed baseline (cross-sectional) data collected from 2002 to 2005 for approximately 1200 men in the Florey Adelaide Male Aging Study, a regionally representative cohort of Australian men aged 35-81 y. Mean values for whole-body lean mass (LM) and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) decreased, whereas mean values for abdominal fat mass (FM) and whole-body and abdominal percentage FM (%FM) increased with age. No significant age-related differences were found for whole-body FM. Multiple adjusted odds of being in the highest tertiles for whole-body and abdominal %FM decreased for smokers (63-71%) but increased with age group and for lowest energy (43-50%), carbohydrate (92-107%), and fiber (107%) intake tertiles. Multiple adjusted odds of being in the highest aBMD tertile decreased for lowest body mass (92%) and carbohydrate intake (63%) tertiles and for men aged > or = 75 y (78%) but increased for Australian birth (58%) and for participation in vigorous physical activities (82%). Age-related differences in body composition indicate that whole-body FM remains stable but increases viscerally and that whole-body %FM is confounded by LM, whereas aBMD decreases with age. Age-related differences in %FM and aBMD are associated with demographic and lifestyle factors.

  3. Child maltreatment in Taiwan for 2004-2013: A shift in age group and forms of maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Tsai; Yang, Nan-Ping; Chou, Pesus

    2016-02-01

    Cases of child maltreatment are being increasingly reported in Taiwan. However, the trend or changes of child maltreatment in Taiwan are fragmentary and lack empirical evidence. This study analyzed the epidemiological characteristics of substantiated child maltreatment cases from the previous decade, using mortality as an indicator to investigate the care of children who experienced substantiated maltreatment in the past to determine any new developments. Data for analysis and estimates were retrieved from the Department of Statistics in the Ministry of the Interior from 2004 to 2013. Trend analyses were conducted using the Joinpoint Regression Program. The child maltreatment rate in Taiwan was found to have nearly tripled from 2004 to 2013. A greater increase in the maltreatment of girls than boys and the maltreatment of aboriginal children than non-aboriginal children was noted from 2004 to 2013. When stratified by age group, the increase in maltreatment was most pronounced in children aged 12-17 years, and girls aged 12-17 years experienced the greatest increase in maltreatment. In terms of the proportional changes of different maltreatment forms among substantiated child maltreatment cases, child neglect was decreasing. The increase in sexual abuse was higher than for any other form of maltreatment and surpassed neglect by the end of 2013. Furthermore, the mortality rate of children with substantiated maltreatment record is increasing in Taiwan, whereas the mortality rate among children without any substantiated maltreatment record is decreasing. The results of this study highlight the need for policy reform in Taiwan regarding child maltreatment.

  4. Preschool-age children and adults flexibly shift their preferences for auditory versus visual modalities but do not exhibit auditory dominance.

    PubMed

    Noles, Nicholaus S; Gelman, Susan A

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the claim that young children display preferences for auditory stimuli over visual stimuli. This study was motivated by concerns that the visual stimuli employed in prior studies were considerably more complex and less distinctive than the competing auditory stimuli, resulting in an illusory preference for auditory cues. Across three experiments, preschool-age children and adults were trained to use paired audio-visual cues to predict the location of a target. At test, the cues were switched so that auditory cues indicated one location and visual cues indicated the opposite location. In contrast to prior studies, preschool-age children did not exhibit auditory dominance. Instead, children and adults flexibly shifted their preferences as a function of the degree of contrast within each modality, with high contrast leading to greater use.

  5. [Frequency of successful aging and frailty. Associated risk factors].

    PubMed

    Carrazco-Peña, Karla Berenice; Farías-Moreno, Katia; Trujillo-Hernández, Benjamín

    2017-07-20

    To determine the frequency of successful aging (SA) and its relationship with frailty in an elderly population. An analytical cross-sectional study of subjects ≥60 years of age seen as outpatients in a general hospital. Successful aging was defined as scores of ≥ 90 in the Barthel index and ≤ 2 in the Pfeiffer test. Frailty was determined using the Fried criteria. The study included 400 subjects (272 women and 128 men), with a mean age of 71.6±8.2 years. The SA frequency was 40.4%. frail status was statistically higher in non-successful aging subjects than in SA subjects (161.7 versus 7.9%; P<.001). Women were more frequently frail, while being a pensioner/retired and married were associated less frequently with frailty. Successful aging is associated with a lower level of frailty. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Teacher Professionalization: Motivational Factors and the Influence of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrandt, Susan A.; Eom, Minhee

    2011-01-01

    This study examines motivational factors of teachers who have achieved a national standard of professionalization. Data were collected from National Board certified teachers in the United States (N = 453) using a two-part, web-based survey. Exploratory factor analysis found five motivators: improved teaching, financial gain, collaborative…

  7. Global risk factor rankings: the importance of age-based health loss inequities caused by alcohol and other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Shield, Kevin D; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-06-09

    Achieving health equity is a priority of the World Health Organization; however, there is a scant amount of literature on this topic. As the underlying influences that determine health loss caused by risk factors are age-dependent, the aim of this paper is to examine how the risk factor rankings for health loss differ by age. Rankings were based on data obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Health loss (as measured by Disability Adjusted Life Years lost) by risk factor was estimated using Population-Attributable Fractions, years of life lost due to premature mortality, and years lived with disability, which were calculated for 187 countries, 20 age groups and both sexes. Uncertainties of the risk factor rankings were estimated using 1,000 simulations taken from posterior distributions The top risk factors by age were: household air pollution for neonates 0-6 days of age [95% uncertainty interval (UI): 1 to 1]; suboptimal breast feeding for children 7-27 days of age (95% UI: 1-1); childhood underweight for children 28 days to less than 1 year of age and 1-4 years of age (95% UI: 1-2 and 1-1, respectively); iron deficiency for children and youth 5-14 years of age (95% UI: 1-1); alcohol use for people 15-49 years of age (95% UI: 1-2); and dietary risks for people 50 years of age and older (95% UI: 1-1). Rankings of risk factors varied by sex among the older age groups. Alcohol and smoking were the most important risk factors among men 15 years of age and older, and high body mass and intimate partner violence were some of the most important risk factors among women 15 years of age and older. Our analyses confirm that the relative importance of risk factors is age-dependent. Therefore, preventing harms caused by various modifiable risk factors using interventions that target people of different ages should be a priority, especially since easily implemented and cost-effective public health interventions exist.

  8. Applicant Age as a Subjective Employability Factor: A Study of Workers over and under Age Fifty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forte, Catherine Sabin; Hansvick, Christine L.

    1999-01-01

    Three hundred employers in a suburban area of the Pacific Northwest were surveyed for their perceptions of older (ages 50 and over) and younger (aged 49 and under) workers on 12 attributes. In contrast to previous research, this study found more favorable ratings for older workers overall, including categories such as attendance and salary…

  9. Factor Structure of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale for Norwegian School-Age Children Explored with Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drugli, May Britt; Hjemdal, Odin

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS) was examined in a national sample of 863 Norwegian schoolchildren in grades 1-7 (aged 6-13). The original factor structure of the STRS was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The CFA results did not support the original three-factor structure of the STRS. Subsequent CFA of the…

  10. Factor Structure of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale for Norwegian School-Age Children Explored with Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drugli, May Britt; Hjemdal, Odin

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS) was examined in a national sample of 863 Norwegian schoolchildren in grades 1-7 (aged 6-13). The original factor structure of the STRS was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The CFA results did not support the original three-factor structure of the STRS. Subsequent CFA of the…

  11. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping of DNA binding by a zinc-finger domain from the yeast transcription factor ADR1.

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedeskamp, M.; Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    Mutagenesis studies have revealed that the minimal DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor ADR1 consists of two Cys2-His2 zinc fingers plus an additional 20 residues proximal and N-terminal to the fingers. We have assigned NMR 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts for the entire minimal DNA-binding domain of ADR1 both free and bound to specific DNA. 1H chemical shift values suggest little structural difference between the zinc fingers in this construct and in single-finger constructs, and 13C alpha chemical shift index analysis indicates little change in finger structure upon DNA binding. 1H chemical shift perturbations upon DNA binding are observed, however, and these are mapped to define the protein-DNA interface. The two zinc fingers appear to bind DNA with different orientations, as the entire helix of finger 1 is perturbed, while only the extreme N-terminus of the finger 2 helix is affected. Furthermore, residues N-terminal to the first finger undergo large chemical shift changes upon DNA binding suggesting a role at the protein-DNA interface. A striking correspondence is observed between the protein-DNA interface mapped by chemical shift changes and that previously mapped by mutagenesis. PMID:9300483

  12. Aging Memory Is "Not" a Limiting Factor for Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalovic, Dejan; Gvozdenovic, Vasilije

    2015-01-01

    Efficient memory is one of the necessary cognitive potentials required for virtually every form of lifelong learning. In this contribution we first briefly review and summarize state of the art of knowledge on memory and related cognitive functions in normal aging. Then we critically discuss a relatively short inventory of clinical, psychometric,…

  13. Age Differences in Sequential Speech Production: Articulatory and Physiological Factors.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau-Mercure, Mylène; Tremblay, Pascale

    2016-11-01

    To explore age differences in speech production in relation to orofacial physiology. Cross-sectional quasi-experimental group study. General community. Physically and cognitively healthy volunteers recruited from the community (N = 30), including 15 young (18-39) and 15 older (66-85) adults. Accuracy and speech rate were calculated during the production of sequences of syllables containing oral vowels, nasal vowels, or both. Lip and tongue muscular strength, muscular endurance, and tactile sensitivity were also measured. Older adults had a slower speech rate than younger adults and greater difficulty articulating nasal vowels. Analyses revealed that age-related decline in lip endurance is associated with decline in accuracy during speech production. Older adults are not just slower than younger adults, they also exhibit specific articulatory difficulties. Although many physiological changes in orofacial functions occur in aging, only muscular endurance of the lips is related to age-related differences in speech production. This information is important for the development of speech interventions targeting older adults with speech motor disorders. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Age and Sex Factors in the Control of Automobiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, John A., Jr.; Soliday, Stanley M.

    The study investigated age and sex in the control of an automobile under normal driving conditions. Its major purpose was to gather baseline data for a driver license, road testing program. Forty volunteer subjects (10 men and 10 women over 30, 10 men and 10 women under 30) drove a specially instrumented car over an interstate highway course and a…

  15. 20 CFR 220.128 - Age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... claimant's residual functional capacity, education, and work experience. If the claimant is unemployed... economy, the Board will find that he or she is not disabled. Appendix 2 of this part explains in detail... adjust to a significant number of jobs in the national economy. (d) Person of advanced age. The Board...

  16. Estuarine phytoplankton dynamics and shift of limiting factors: A study in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary and adjacent area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhuo-Yi; Ng, Wai-Man; Liu, Su-Mei; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Jay-Chung; Wu, Ying

    2009-09-01

    Environmental factors in estuaries are highly variable in terms of both spatial and temporal dimensions and hence phytoplankton biomass, as well as community structure, is dynamic. Two cruises were carried out in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary and adjacent area in spring and summer. The result of CHEMTAX calculation suggests that in spring diatoms and chlorophytes contribute equally to phytoplankton biomass, while phytoplankton community structure is mainly composed of diatoms in summer. We encountered blooms in summer with chlorophyll a (CHL a) over 10 μg l -1 off the Changjiang Estuary and they were mainly caused by diatoms (>90%). Based on the HPLC analysis of samples collected, phytoplankton pigments mainly concentrated beyond the front between 122.5°E and 123°E where nutrients and turbidity were best balanced. Euphotic depth ( Zeu, calculated from Secchi disk depth) to surface mixed layer depth ( Zmix) ratio (i.e. Zeu/ Zmix) were comparable in spring (average value 1.2) and the ratio increased to 5.2 in summer. Variation of the ratio indicates an apparent shift of light and physical conditions from spring to summer. Correspondingly, CHL a was positively related to Zeu/ Zmix ratio ( r2 = 0.83) in spring, indicating the light limitation over the whole investigation area. On the other hand, the relationship of CHL a and Zeu/ Zmix ratio became unclear when Zeu/ Zmix ratio >3 in summer. This is probably due to the combination of both light limitation before the front and nutrient limitation beyond the front. In addition, evidence was found that light condition can impact the diagnostic pigments in the Changjiang Estuary.

  17. Prenatal Arsenic Exposure and Shifts in the Newborn Proteome: Interindividual Differences in Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-Responsive Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kathryn A.; Laine, Jessica; Rager, Julia E.; Sebastian, Elizabeth; Olshan, Andrew; Smeester, Lisa; Drobná, Zuzana; Stýblo, Miroslav; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; García-Vargas, Gonzalo; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) early in life is associated with adverse health effects in infants, children, and adults, and yet the biological mechanisms that underlie these effects are understudied. The objective of this research was to examine the proteomic shifts associated with prenatal iAs exposure using cord blood samples isolated from 50 newborns from Gómez Palacio, Mexico. Levels of iAs in maternal drinking water (DW-iAs) and the sum of iAs and iAs metabolites in maternal urine (U-tAs) were determined. Cord blood samples representing varying iAs exposure levels during the prenatal period (DW-iAs ranging from <1 to 236 μg As/l) were analyzed for altered expression of proteins associated with U-tAs using a high throughput, antibody-based method. A total of 111 proteins were identified that had a significant association between protein level in newborn cord blood and maternal U-tAs. Many of these proteins are regulated by tumor necrosis factor and are enriched in functionality related to immune/inflammatory response and cellular development/proliferation. Interindividual differences in proteomic response were observed in which 30 newborns were “activators,” displaying a positive relationship between protein expression and maternal U-tAs. For 20 “repressor” newborns, a negative relationship between protein expression level and maternal U-tAs was observed. The activator/repressor status was significantly associated with maternal U-tAs and head circumference in newborn males. These results may provide a critical groundwork for understanding the diverse health effects associated with prenatal arsenic exposure and highlight interindividual responses to arsenic that likely influence differential susceptibility to adverse health outcomes. PMID:24675094

  18. Prognostic factors in young Japanese women with breast cancer: prognostic value of age at diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Miwa; Shimizu, Chikako; Fukutomi, Takashi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Akashi-Tanaka, Sadako; Ando, Masashi; Hojo, Takashi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro

    2011-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to verify whether breast cancer patients aged <35 at diagnosis have poorer prognoses than those aged 35-39, in other words, to identify the prognostic value of age in younger premenopausal patients under 40 years old. The secondary objective was to assess prognostic factors specific for younger premenopausal patients. We identified 242 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer before the age of 40 and underwent surgery between 1990 and 2004. We compared disease-free survival and overall survival in patients aged <35 years and those aged 35-39 years, and evaluated clinicopathological factors associated with disease-free survival or overall survival in each age group and in all patients under the age of 40. Ninety-nine (41%) patients were younger than 35 years and 143 (59%) were between 35 and 39 years. No significant difference in disease-free survival or overall survival was found between the two groups. In our cohort of patients under the age of 40, the independent factors associated with poor disease-free survival and overall survival included positive axillary lymph nodes and triple-negative status, but not age at diagnosis. Adverse prognostic factors also did not differ considerably between the two age groups. Age at diagnosis was not an independent prognostic factor in our study. Our findings suggest that other clinicopathological features rather than age should be used to determine individualized treatment courses for breast cancer patients younger than 40 years.

  19. Lifestyle risk factors predict healthcare costs in an aging cohort.

    PubMed

    Leigh, J Paul; Hubert, Helen B; Romano, Patrick S

    2005-12-01

    While the U.S. elderly population uses a disproportionate amount of healthcare resources, there is limited knowledge from prospective studies regarding the impact of lifestyle-related factors on costs in this group. The association was examined between smoking, drinking, exercise, body mass index (BMI), and changes in these risk factors, and healthcare costs after 4 years among 68- to 95-year-olds. A total of 1323 participants completed annual surveys providing information on lifestyle factors (1986-1994) and health utilization (1994-1998). Healthcare costs in nine categories were ascertained from validated utilization. The relationships between risk factors and costs were examined in 2004 using linear regression models. Fewer cigarette pack-years and lower BMI were the most significant predictors of lower total costs in 1998 (p<0.001), controlling for baseline sociodemographic factors, costs, and conditions. Associations with smoking were strongest for hospitalizations, diagnostic tests, and physician and nursing-home visits. Those who reduced smoking by one pack per day experienced cost savings of 1160 dollars (p<0.05). The costs for normal weight compared to minimally obese seniors were approximately 1548 dollars lower, with diagnostic testing, physician visits, and medications accounting for much of this difference. Daily walking, measured at baseline, also predicted lower costs for hospitalizations and diagnostic testing. Seniors who were leaner, smoked fewer cigarettes over a lifetime, reduced their smoking, or walked farther had significant subsequent cost savings compared to those with less-healthy lifestyle-related habits.

  20. Cardiac High-Energy Phosphate Metabolism Alters with Age as Studied in 196 Healthy Males with the Help of 31-Phosphorus 2-Dimensional Chemical Shift Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Esterhammer, Regina; Klug, Gert; Wolf, Christian; Mayr, Agnes; Reinstadler, Sebastian; Feistritzer, Hans-Josef; Metzler, Bernhard; Schocke, Michael F. H.

    2014-01-01

    Recently published studies have elucidated alterations of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism during ageing. The intention of the present study was to evaluate the impact of ageing on cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism and cardiac function in healthy humans. 31-phosphorus 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (31P 2D CSI) and echocardiography were performed in 196 healthy male volunteers divided into groups of 20 to 40 years (I, n = 43), 40 to 60 years (II, n = 123) and >60 years (III, n = 27) of age. Left ventricular PCr/β-ATP ratio, myocardial mass (MM), ejection fraction and E/A ratio were assessed. Mean PCr/β-ATP ratios were significantly different among the three groups of volunteers (I, 2.10±0.37; II, 1.77±0.37; III, 1.45±0.28; all p<0.001). PCr/β-ATP ratios were inversely related to age (r2 = −0.25; p<0.001) with a decrease from 2.65 by 0.02 per year of ageing. PCr/β-ATP ratios further correlated with MM (r = −0.371; p<0.001) and E/A ratios (r = 0.213; p<0.02). Moreover, E/A ratios (r = −0.502, p<0.001), MM (r = 0.304, p<0.001), glucose-levels (r = 0.157, p<0.05) and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.224, p<0.005) showed significant correlations with age. The ejection fraction did not significantly differ between the groups. This study shows that cardiac PCr/β-ATP ratios decrease moderately with age indicating an impairment of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism due to age. Furthermore, MM increases, and E/A ratio decreases with age. Both correlate with left-ventricular PCr/β-ATP ratios. The findings of the present study confirm numerous experimental studies showing an impairment of cardiac mitochondrial function with age. PMID:24940736

  1. Age-related shifts in the density and distribution of genetic marker water quality indicators in cow and calf feces.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Orin C; Kelty, Catherine A; Peed, Lindsay; Sivaganesan, Mano; Mooney, Thomas; Jenkins, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Calves make up about 16% of the current bovine population in the United States and can excrete high levels of human pathogens in their feces. We describe the density and distribution of genetic markers from 9 PCR- and real-time quantitative PCR-based assays, including CF128, CF193, CowM2, CowM3, GenBac3, Entero1, EC23S857, CampF2, and ttr-6, commonly used to help assess ambient surface water quality. Each assay was tested against a collection of 381 individual bovine fecal samples representing 31 mother and calf pairings collected over a 10-month time period from time of birth through weaning. Genetic markers reported to be associated with ruminant and/or bovine fecal pollution were virtually undetected in calves for up to 115 days from birth, suggesting that physiological changes in calf ruminant function impact host-associated genetic marker shedding. In addition, general fecal indicator markers for Bacteroidales, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus spp. exhibited three separate trends across time, indicating that these bacteria respond differently to age-related physiological and dietary changes during calf development. The results of this study suggest that currently available PCR-based water quality indicator technologies can under- or overestimate fecal pollution originating from calves and identify a need for novel calf-associated source identification methods.

  2. The shift in infant preferences for vowel duration and pitch contour between 6 and 10 months of age.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Christine; Notley, Anna

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates the influence of the acoustic properties of vowels on 6- and 10-month-old infants' speech preferences. The shape of the contour (bell or monotonic) and the duration (normal or stretched) of vowels were manipulated in words containing the vowels /i/ and /u/, and presented to infants using a two-choice preference procedure. Experiment 1 examined contour shape: infants heard either normal-duration bell-shaped and monotonic contours, or the same two contours with stretched duration. The results show that 6-month-olds preferred bell to monotonic contours, whereas 10-month-olds preferred monotonic to bell contours. In Experiment 2, infants heard either normal-duration and stretched bell contours, or normal-duration and stretched monotonic contours. As in Experiment 1, infants showed age-specific preferences, with 6-month-olds preferring stretched vowels, and 10-month-olds preferring normal-duration vowels. Infants' attention to the acoustic qualities of vowels, and to speech in general, undergoes a dramatic transformation in the final months of the first year, a transformation that aligns with the emergence of other developmental milestones in speech perception.

  3. Asynchronous Little Ice Age glacier fluctuations in Iceland and European Alps linked to shifts in subpolar North Atlantic circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Darren J.; Miller, Gifford H.; Geirsdóttir, Áslaug

    2013-10-01

    Records of past glacier fluctuations are an important source of paleoclimate data and provide context for future changes in global ice volume. In the North Atlantic region, glacier chronologies can be used to track the response of terrestrial environments to variations in marine conditions including circulation patterns and sea ice cover. However, the majority of glacier records are discontinuous and temporally restricted, owing in part to the extensive advance of Northern Hemisphere glaciers during the Little Ice Age (LIA), the most recent and severe climate anomaly of the Neoglacial period. Here, we combine an absolutely dated and continuous record of Langjökull ice marginal fluctuations with new reconstructions of sediment flux through the past 1.2 ka using varved sediments from Hvítárvatn, a proglacial lake in Iceland's central highlands. Large spatial and temporal variations in sediment flux related to changing ice cap dimensions are reconstructed from six sediment cores and seismic reflection profiles. Sediment data reveal two discrete phases of ice expansion occurring ca. 1400 to 1550 AD and ca. 1680 to 1890 AD. These advances are separated by a persistent interval of ice retreat, suggesting that a substantial period of warming interrupted LIA cold. The pattern of Icelandic glacier activity contrasts with that of European glaciers but shows strong similarities to reconstructed changes in North Atlantic oceanographic conditions, indicating differing regional responses to coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice variations. Our data suggest that subpolar North Atlantic circulation dynamics may have led to coherent asynchronous glacier fluctuations during the mid LIA and highlight the importance of circulation variability in triggering and transmitting multidecadal scale climate changes to nearby terrestrial environments.

  4. Asynchronous Little Ice Age glacier fluctuations in Iceland and European Alps linked to shifts in subpolar North Atlantic circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. J.; Miller, G. H.; Geirsdottir, A.

    2013-12-01

    Records of past glacier fluctuations are an important source of paleoclimate data and provide context for future changes in global ice volume. In the North Atlantic region, glacier chronologies can be used to track the response of terrestrial environments to variations in marine conditions including circulation patterns and sea ice cover. However, the majority of glacier records are discontinuous and temporally restricted, owing in part to the extensive advance of Northern Hemisphere glaciers during the Little Ice Age (LIA), the most recent and severe climate anomaly of the Neoglacial period. Here, we combine an absolutely dated and continuous record of Langjökull ice marginal fluctuations with new reconstructions of sediment flux through the past 1.2 ka using varved sediments from Hvítárvatn, a proglacial lake in Iceland's central highlands. Large spatial and temporal variations in sediment flux related to changing ice cap dimensions are reconstructed from six sediment cores and seismic reflection profiles. Sediment data reveal two discrete phases of ice expansion occurring ca. 1400 to 1550 AD and ca. 1680 to 1890 AD. These advances are separated by a persistent interval of ice retreat, suggesting that a substantial period of warming interrupted LIA cold. The pattern of Icelandic glacier activity contrasts with that of European glaciers but shows strong similarities to reconstructed changes in North Atlantic oceanographic conditions, indicating differing regional responses to coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice variations. Our data suggest that subpolar North Atlantic circulation dynamics may have led to coherent asynchronous glacier fluctuations during the mid LIA and highlight the importance of circulation variability in triggering and transmitting multidecadal scale climate changes to nearby terrestrial environments.

  5. Factors influencing eating a varied diet in old age.

    PubMed

    Dean, Moira; Raats, Monique M; Grunert, Klaus G; Lumbers, Margaret

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the influences of resources and food-related goals on the variety of food choice among older people. A questionnaire-based survey in eight European countries: Poland, Portugal, United Kingdom, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, Italy and Spain. Participants (n 3200) were above 65 years of age and living in their own homes. The samples were quota samples, eight groups of fifty in each country, based on gender, age and living circumstances, reflecting the diversity of each of the national populations based on education, income and urbanization of living environment. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that income, health status, access to a car and living arrangement affected the level of dietary variety. The perceived level of different food-related resources impacted the consumption of a varied diet over and above actual resource levels. Food-related goals contributed to variety of food intake that was not accounted for by the amount of material resources possessed or the social and other resources perceived to be possessed. Older people's variety of food intake depended on material resources (e.g. monthly income, access to a car, living arrangement, physical and mental health). However, in addition to these variables, the way older people perceived other resources, such as their level of appetite, their food knowledge, their perception of the distance to the shops, access to high-quality products, having better kitchen facilities, access to good service providers and support from friends and neighbours, all contributed to how varied a diet they ate.

  6. Age, sex and other factors in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.; Carnes, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    It has been held for a long time that the young are more susceptible than adults to the induction of cancer by radiation. The data in support of that contention are accumulating especially from human studies. In an exposed population a significant fraction of the total population risk may be attributed to the risk associated with those who were young at the time of exposure. Since cancer may not appear for decades after exposure estimates of risk may require models for projecting the lifetime risk. Two such models, additive or absolute risk and multiplicative or relative risk have been used. The appropriateness of the latter model is supported by the finding in mice of a positive relationship between natural incidence and the susceptibility for induction by radiation of solid cancer. The choice of model for leukemias is not clear cut. The incidence of cancer increases with age, but the susceptibility for induction decreases. The incidence of cancers increases to a peak and then begins to decline at different ages, dependent on the type of cancer. Sex-dependent differences in both the natural incidence and the susceptibility for induction of cancer are not restricted to sex organs. For example, the susceptibility for the induction by radiation for myeloid leukemia is greater in males than females, whereas in the case of thymic lymphoma it is vice versa. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. New Variants and Age Shift to High Fatality Groups Contribute to Severe Successive Waves in the 2009 Influenza Pandemic in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Huang, Yuan-Pin; Chang, Feng-Yee; Hsu, Li-Ching; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Su, Chun-Hui; Chen, Pei-Jer; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2011-01-01

    Past influenza pandemics have been characterized by the signature feature of multiple waves. However, the reasons for multiple waves in a pandemic are not understood. Successive waves in the 2009 influenza pandemic, with a sharp increase in hospitalized and fatal cases, occurred in Taiwan during the winter of 2010. In this study, we sought to discover possible contributors to the multiple waves in this influenza pandemic. We conducted a large-scale analysis of 4703 isolates in an unbiased manner to monitor the emergence, dominance and replacement of various variants. Based on the data from influenza surveillance and epidemic curves of each variant clade, we defined virologically and temporally distinct waves of the 2009 pandemic in Taiwan from May 2009 to April 2011 as waves 1 and 2, an interwave period and wave 3. Except for wave 3, each wave was dominated by one distinct variant. In wave 3, three variants emerged and co-circulated, and formed distinct phylogenetic clades, based on the hemagglutinin (HA) genes and other segments. The severity of influenza was represented as the case fatality ratio (CFR) in the hospitalized cases. The CFRs in waves 1 and 2, the interwave period and wave 3 were 6.4%, 5.1%, 15.2% and 9.8%, respectively. The results highlight the association of virus evolution and variable influenza severity. Further analysis revealed that the major affected groups were shifted in the waves to older individuals, who had higher age-specific CFRs. The successive pandemic waves create challenges for the strategic preparedness of health authorities and make the pandemic uncertain and variable. Our findings indicate that the emergence of new variants and age shift to high fatality groups might contribute potentially to the occurrence of successive severe pandemic waves and offer insights into the adjustment of national responses to mitigate influenza pandemics. PMID:22140569

  8. Factors That Affect Age of Identification of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Chana R.; Kubiszyn, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This study explored factors associated with age of identification of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results of a one-way ANOVA indicated differences in age of diagnosis among the four regions in the United States, F(3, 650) = 7.618, p = 0.01. Tukey's post hoc comparisons of the groups indicated that the mean age of diagnosis in the Midwest (M =…

  9. 41 CFR 101-8.706-2 - Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... than age. 101-8.706-2 Section 101-8.706-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.706-2 Reasonable factors other than age. (a) A recipient is permitted to take an action, otherwise prohibited...

  10. 41 CFR 101-8.706-2 - Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... than age. 101-8.706-2 Section 101-8.706-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.706-2 Reasonable factors other than age. (a) A recipient is permitted to take an action, otherwise prohibited...

  11. 41 CFR 101-8.706-2 - Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... than age. 101-8.706-2 Section 101-8.706-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.706-2 Reasonable factors other than age. (a) A recipient is permitted to take an action, otherwise prohibited...

  12. 41 CFR 101-8.706-2 - Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... than age. 101-8.706-2 Section 101-8.706-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.706-2 Reasonable factors other than age. (a) A recipient is permitted to take an action, otherwise prohibited...

  13. 41 CFR 101-8.706-2 - Reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... than age. 101-8.706-2 Section 101-8.706-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.706-2 Reasonable factors other than age. (a) A recipient is permitted to take an action, otherwise prohibited...

  14. Factors That Affect Age of Identification of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Chana R.; Kubiszyn, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This study explored factors associated with age of identification of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results of a one-way ANOVA indicated differences in age of diagnosis among the four regions in the United States, F(3, 650) = 7.618, p = 0.01. Tukey's post hoc comparisons of the groups indicated that the mean age of diagnosis in the Midwest (M =…

  15. Psychophysiological Effects of Aging - Developing a Functional Age Index for Pilots. II Taxonomy of Psychological Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    p.tnodoo Poory cdftt IIsec toodt Wtt" - ’t- r ~ ~ ~ rfe log. to I Iro feldferd- 0L 1 lzr.- ýdiskop lroprsot poocrvrtio.tSforr a nvfltspoto- r mijtwt...be affecto•d. The. skeietal-muscle mass decreases with increasing age. Reduced • horn~ei. production, a decrement of thyroid hormone output, and

  16. The Frontal Hypothesis of Cognitive Aging: Factor Structure and Age Effects on Four "Frontal Tests" among Healthy Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Aranda, Claudia; Sundet, Kjetil

    2006-01-01

    With 101 healthy aging adult participants, the authors investigated whether executive functions are a unitary concept. The authors established the factor structure of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST; E. A. Berg, 1948), the Stroop color and word test (C. J. Golden, 1978), verbal fluency using the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT;…

  17. The Problem of the Aging Surgeon: When Surgeon Age Becomes a Surgical Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The question of when a surgeon should retire has been the subject of debate for decades. Both anecdotal evidence and objective testing of surgeons suggest age causes deterioration in physical and cognitive performance. Medical education, residency and fellowship training, and technology evolve at a rapid pace, and the older a surgeon is, the more likely it is he or she is remote from his or her initial education in his or her specialty. Research also shows surgeons are reluctant to plan for retirement. Although there is no federally mandated retirement age for surgeons in the United States, surgeons must realize their skills will decline, a properly planned retirement can be satisfying, and the retired surgeon has much to offer the medical and teaching community. PMID:18975041

  18. Imageability, age of acquisition, and frequency factors in acronym comprehension.

    PubMed

    Playfoot, David; Izura, Cristina

    2013-06-01

    In spite of their unusual orthographic and phonological form, acronyms (e.g., BBC, HIV, NATO) can become familiar to the reader, and their meaning can be accessed well enough that they are understood. The factors in semantic access for acronym stimuli were assessed using a word association task. Two analyses examined the time taken to generate a word association response to acronym cues. Responses were recorded more quickly to cues that elicited a large proportion of semantic responses, and those that were high in associative strength. Participants were shown to be faster to respond to cues which were imageable or early acquired. Frequency was not a significant predictor of word association responses. Implications for theories of lexical organisation are discussed.

  19. Male age is not an independent factor to affect the outcome of assisted reproductive techniques.

    PubMed

    Kumtepe, Yakup; Yakin, Kayhan; Kahraman, Semra; Sertyel, Semra; Vanlioğlu, Faruk; Cengiz, Sami; Dönmez, Ersan

    2003-06-01

    Controversy exists whether advanced male age is associated with poor sperm quality and subsequent failure in the assisted reproductive techniques (ART). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of male age on sperm quality and the outcome of ART as well as the association of male age with other relevant factors, particularly with the female age. A retrospective study was performed in order to evaluate the effect of male age on the sperm parameters in 880 routine seminal analyses. Additionally, sperm parameters were also compared among different age groups in 919 cases with male factor infertility who had been included in an ART programme. The laboratory and clinical results of ART (fertilization rate, number and quality of embryos transferred, as well as pregnancy rates) were compared according to different age groups. The results were also evaluated by one-way correlation and also step-wise logistic regression analysis to identify the interactions and correlations between different parameters. There were no statistically significant differences between male age groups in terms of sperm concentration, motility and morphology either in routine seminal analyses or in ART groups. In the ART group, a statistically significant linear correlation was present between male and female ages. Male age was increasing in parallel to female age. Female age was also correlated significantly with ART results. In one-way correlation analysis, male age was found to be correlated with the pregnancy rate, but not with fertilization rate and the quality of the transferred embryos. However, regression analysis revealed that correlation between male age and pregnancy results was simply dependent on the effect of the female age. Seminal parameters did not reveal a significant change with the increasing male age. The effect of male age on ART results in cases with male factor infertility is not a direct effect but a reflection of the negative impact of the parallel increase in

  20. 18 CFR 1309.7 - Is the use of reasonable factors other than age an exception to the rules against age...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reasonable factors other than age an exception to the rules against age discrimination? 1309.7 Section 1309.7... § 1309.7 Is the use of reasonable factors other than age an exception to the rules against age discrimination? A recipient is permitted to take an action otherwise prohibited by § 1309.5 which is based on...

  1. Increase in reptile-associated human salmonellosis and shift toward adulthood in the age groups at risk, the Netherlands, 1985 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Heck, Max; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2016-01-01

    While the contribution of the main food-related sources to human salmonellosis is well documented, knowledge on the contribution of reptiles is limited. We quantified and examined trends in reptile-associated salmonellosis in the Netherlands during a 30-year period, from 1985 to 2014. Using source attribution analysis, we estimated that 2% (95% confidence interval: 1.3–2.8) of all sporadic/domestic human salmonellosis cases reported in the Netherlands during the study period (n = 63,718) originated from reptiles. The estimated annual fraction of reptile-associated salmonellosis cases ranged from a minimum of 0.3% (corresponding to 11 cases) in 1988 to a maximum of 9.3% (93 cases) in 2013. There was a significant increasing trend in reptile-associated salmonellosis cases (+ 19% annually) and a shift towards adulthood in the age groups at highest risk, while the proportion of reptile-associated salmonellosis cases among those up to four years-old decreased by 4% annually and the proportion of cases aged 45 to 74 years increased by 20% annually. We hypothesise that these findings may be the effect of the increased number and variety of reptiles that are kept as pets, calling for further attention to the issue of safe reptile–human interaction and for reinforced hygiene recommendations for reptile owners. PMID:27589037

  2. Increase in reptile-associated human salmonellosis and shift toward adulthood in the age groups at risk, the Netherlands, 1985 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Heck, Max; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2016-08-25

    While the contribution of the main food-related sources to human salmonellosis is well documented, knowledge on the contribution of reptiles is limited. We quantified and examined trends in reptile-associated salmonellosis in the Netherlands during a 30-year period, from 1985 to 2014. Using source attribution analysis, we estimated that 2% (95% confidence interval: 1.3-2.8) of all sporadic/domestic human salmonellosis cases reported in the Netherlands during the study period (n = 63,718) originated from reptiles. The estimated annual fraction of reptile-associated salmonellosis cases ranged from a minimum of 0.3% (corresponding to 11 cases) in 1988 to a maximum of 9.3% (93 cases) in 2013. There was a significant increasing trend in reptile-associated salmonellosis cases (+ 19% annually) and a shift towards adulthood in the age groups at highest risk, while the proportion of reptile-associated salmonellosis cases among those up to four years-old decreased by 4% annually and the proportion of cases aged 45 to 74 years increased by 20% annually. We hypothesise that these findings may be the effect of the increased number and variety of reptiles that are kept as pets, calling for further attention to the issue of safe reptile-human interaction and for reinforced hygiene recommendations for reptile owners.

  3. Childhood Risk Factors for Lifetime Anorexia Nervosa by Age 30 Years in a National Birth Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Dasha E.; Viner, Russell M.

    2009-01-01

    Whether previously identified childhood risk factors for anorexia nervosa (AN) predict self-reported lifetime AN by age 30 is examined. The cohort confirmed four risk and two protective factors out of the 22 suggested risk factors. The study used data from the 1970 British Cohort Study.

  4. Childhood Risk Factors for Lifetime Anorexia Nervosa by Age 30 Years in a National Birth Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Dasha E.; Viner, Russell M.

    2009-01-01

    Whether previously identified childhood risk factors for anorexia nervosa (AN) predict self-reported lifetime AN by age 30 is examined. The cohort confirmed four risk and two protective factors out of the 22 suggested risk factors. The study used data from the 1970 British Cohort Study.

  5. Demographic, physical and lifestyle factors associated with androgen status: the Florey Adelaide Male Ageing Study (FAMAS).

    PubMed

    Atlantis, Evan; Martin, Sean A; Haren, Matthew T; O'Loughlin, Peter D; Taylor, Anne W; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Ivell, Richard; Wittert, Gary A

    2009-08-01

    Plasma androgen levels are inversely associated with health in men, the age-related decline of which may result from factors other than ageing per se. This study aimed to determine the effects of demographic, physical and lifestyle factors on age-related androgen status in men. An observational survey of a regionally representative male population residing in the North West regions of Adelaide, Australia. Study sample includes 1195 men aged 35-81 years with a response rate of 45.1%. Plasma levels of total testosterone (TT), bioavailable testosterone (BT), SHBG, insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), and gonadotrophins were measured along with an extensive list of demographic, physical and lifestyle factors including body composition, muscle strength and biomarkers of chronic diseases, physical activity, nutrition and smoking behaviour. Low TT was mostly associated with high abdominal fat and triglycerides and low muscle strength rather than ageing per se. Low BT was associated with increased age followed by high whole body fat percentage. BT and TT levels were higher in unmarried men and smokers. SHBG levels increased with age, but were also inversely associated with insulin and triglycerides. The Leydig cell specific factor INSL3 was the strongest biomarker associated with both TT and BT. Factors associated with low androgen status variably include high body fat percentage, low muscle strength and biomarkers of the metabolic syndrome. Reducing exposure to factors that adversely affect androgen status may improve the general health of ageing men by mechanisms yet to be defined.

  6. Environmental factors and the age at onset in first episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Brian; Lyne, John; Madigan, Kevin; Lane, Abbie; Turner, Niall; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; Clarke, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Factors that influence the age at onset in psychotic disorders could provide valuable insights into precipitating or causative factors of the disorder. Despite being established risk factors, it is not yet known whether migration status, place of birth, social class at birth and season of birth influence the age at onset of psychotic disorders. This study aimed to determine whether these environmental factors, in addition to cannabis abuse and obstetric complications, influence the age at onset. Additionally, we investigated whether environmental factors could have a cumulative effect on the age at onset. Data was obtained from two first episode of psychosis (FEP) cohort studies. Diagnosis was established using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV diagnoses. The age at onset was determined for 555 individuals with a FEP and the median age at onset was 27.3years. Individuals with a history of cannabis abuse had an earlier age at onset by nearly six years. There was a trend for a history of obstetric complications to be associated with a younger age at onset by 2.7years and this was significant in the subgroup with a family history of psychosis. Social class at birth, migration status, place of birth and season of birth were not associated with the age at onset. Exposure to a higher number of environmental factors was associated with an earlier age at onset. Cannabis and obstetric complications are associated with an earlier age at onset and there appears to be a cumulative effect of exposure to multiple environmental factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Psychosocial Factors Associated With Risk Perceptions for Chronic Diseases in Younger and Middle-Aged Women.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jada G; Lobel, Marci

    2015-01-01

    Perceptions of disease risk play an important role in motivating people to adopt healthy behaviors. However, little is known about psychosocial factors that influence women's perceived risk for developing disease. The present study investigated the extent to which individual traits, social influences, objective risk factors, and demographic characteristics were associated with women's risk perceptions for cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, and lung cancer. Using structural equation modeling, we examined hypothesized associations among 452 younger (ages 18-25 years) and 167 middle-aged (ages 40-64 years) women. A greater number and variety of factors were associated with middle-aged women's risk perceptions compared to younger women. For both groups, some objective risk factors were associated with risk perceptions; yet, associations also existed between multiple psychosocial variables (optimism, health locus of control, social exposure to disease, perceived stigma) and risk perceptions. Results suggested that women may base their risk estimates on factors beyond those considered important by healthcare providers.

  8. Shifting Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  9. Shifting Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  10. Reducing eating disorder risk factors: A controlled investigation of a blended task-shifting/train-the-trainer approach to dissemination and implementation

    PubMed Central

    Kilpela, Lisa Smith; Hill, Kaitlin; Kelly, Mackenzie C.; Elmquist, Joanna; Ottoson, Paige; Keith, Demetra; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Becker, Carolyn Black

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in psychological intervention research have led to an increase in evidence-based interventions (EBIs), yet there remains a lag in dissemination and implementation of EBIs. Task-shifting and the train-the-trainer (TTT) model offer two potential strategies for enhancing reach of EBIs. The Body Project, an EBI found to prevent onset of eating disorders, served as the vehicle for this dissemination/implementation study. The primary aim of this study was to determine if training of peer-leaders for the Body Project could be task-shifted to undergraduate students using a hybrid task-shifting/TTT model. Our secondary aim was to determine if subgroups of participants evidenced different trajectories of change through 14-month follow-up. Regarding the first aim, we found almost no evidence to suggest that a presence of a doctoral-level trainer yielded superior participant outcomes compared to training by undergraduates alone. Regarding Aim 2, almost all classes for all variables evidenced improvement or a benign response. Additionally, for three key risk factors (thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, and ED symptoms) virtually all trajectories showed improvement. This study provides initial support for the use of a blended task-shifting/TTT approach to dissemination and implementation within prevention generally, and further support for broad dissemination of the Body Project specifically. PMID:25305538

  11. Reducing eating disorder risk factors: a controlled investigation of a blended task-shifting/train-the-trainer approach to dissemination and implementation.

    PubMed

    Kilpela, Lisa Smith; Hill, Kaitlin; Kelly, Mackenzie C; Elmquist, Joanna; Ottoson, Paige; Keith, Demetra; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Becker, Carolyn Black

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in psychological intervention research have led to an increase in evidence-based interventions (EBIs), yet there remains a lag in dissemination and implementation of EBIs. Task-shifting and the train-the-trainer (TTT) model offer two potential strategies for enhancing reach of EBIs. The Body Project, an EBI found to prevent onset of eating disorders, served as the vehicle for this dissemination/implementation study. The primary aim of this study was to determine if training of peer-leaders for the Body Project could be task-shifted to undergraduate students using a hybrid task-shifting/TTT model. Our secondary aim was to determine if subgroups of participants evidenced different trajectories of change through 14-month follow-up. Regarding the first aim, we found almost no evidence to suggest that a presence of a doctoral-level trainer yielded superior participant outcomes compared to training by undergraduates alone. Regarding Aim 2, almost all classes for all variables evidenced improvement or a benign response. Additionally, for three key risk factors (thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, and ED symptoms) virtually all trajectories showed improvement. This study provides initial support for the use of a blended task-shifting/TTT approach to dissemination and implementation within prevention generally, and further support for broad dissemination of the Body Project specifically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer disease and subjective memory impairment across age groups.

    PubMed

    Chen, Stephen T; Siddarth, Prabha; Ercoli, Linda M; Merrill, David A; Torres-Gil, Fernando; Small, Gary W

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has identified modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in older adults. Research is limited on the potential link between these risk factors and subjective memory impairment (SMI), which may precede AD and other dementias. Examination of these potential relationships may help identify those at risk for AD at a stage when interventions may delay or prevent further memory problems. The objective of this study was to determine whether risk factors for AD are associated with SMI among different age groups. Trained interviewers conducted daily telephone surveys (Gallup-Healthways) of a representative community sample of 18,614 U.S. respondents, including 4,425 younger (age 18 to 39 years), 6,365 middle-aged (40 to 59 years), and 7,824 older (60 to 99 years) adults. The surveyors collected data on demographics, lifestyles, and medical information. Less education, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, less exercise, obesity and depression, and interactions among them, were examined for associations with SMI. Weighted logistic regressions and chi-square tests were used to calculate odds ratios and confidence intervals for SMI with each risk factor and pairwise interactions across age groups. Depression, less education, less exercise, and hypertension were significantly associated with SMI in all three age groups. Several interactions between risk factors were significant in younger and middle-aged adults and influenced their associations with SMI. Frequency of SMI increased with age and number of risk factors. Odds of having SMI increased significantly with just having one risk factor. These results indicate that modifiable risk factors for AD are also associated with SMI, suggesting that these relationships occur in a broad range of ages and may be targeted to mitigate further memory problems. Whether modifying these risk factors reduces SMI and the eventual incidence of AD and other dementias later in life remains to be determined.

  13. Environmental and lifestyle factors associated with perceived facial age in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Andrew E; Murray, Peter G; Gunn, David A; Tomlin, Cyrena C; Catt, Sharon D; Wen, Yi B; Zhou, Li P; Wang, Hong Q; Catt, Michael; Granger, Stewart P

    2010-12-13

    Perceived facial age has been proposed as a biomarker of ageing with 'looking young for one's age' linked to physical and cognitive functioning and to increased survival for Caucasians. We have investigated the environmental and lifestyle factors associated with perceived facial ageing in Chinese women. Facial photographs were collected from 250 Chinese women, aged 25-70 years in Shanghai, China. Perceived facial age was determined and related to chronological age for each participant. Lifestyle and health information was collected by questionnaire. Bivariate analyses (controlling for chronological age) identified and quantified lifestyle variables associated with perceived facial age. Independent predictors of perceived age were identified by multivariate modelling. Factors which significantly associated with looking younger for one's chronological age included greater years of education (p<0.001), fewer household members (p=0.027), menopausal status (p=0.020), frequency of visiting one's doctor (p=0.013), working indoors (p<0.001), spending less time in the sun (p=0.015), moderate levels of physical activity (p=0.004), higher frequency of teeth cleaning (p<0.001) and more frequent use of facial care products: cleanser (p<0.001); moisturiser (p=0.016) or night cream (p=0.016). Overall, 36.5% of the variation in the difference between perceived and chronological age could be explained by a combination of chronological age and 6 independent lifestyle variables. We have thus identified and quantified a number of factors associated with younger appearance in Chinese women. Presentation of these factors in the context of facial appearance could provide significant motivation for the adoption of a range of healthy behaviours at the level of both individuals and populations.

  14. Environmental and Lifestyle Factors Associated with Perceived Facial Age in Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Andrew E.; Murray, Peter G.; Gunn, David A.; Tomlin, Cyrena C.; Catt, Sharon D.; Wen, Yi B.; Zhou, Li P.; Wang, Hong Q.; Catt, Michael; Granger, Stewart P.

    2010-01-01

    Perceived facial age has been proposed as a biomarker of ageing with ‘looking young for one’s age' linked to physical and cognitive functioning and to increased survival for Caucasians. We have investigated the environmental and lifestyle factors associated with perceived facial ageing in Chinese women. Facial photographs were collected from 250 Chinese women, aged 25–70 years in Shanghai, China. Perceived facial age was determined and related to chronological age for each participant. Lifestyle and health information was collected by questionnaire. Bivariate analyses (controlling for chronological age) identified and quantified lifestyle variables associated with perceived facial age. Independent predictors of perceived age were identified by multivariate modelling. Factors which significantly associated with looking younger for one's chronological age included greater years of education (p<0.001), fewer household members (p = 0.027), menopausal status (p = 0.020), frequency of visiting one's doctor (p = 0.013), working indoors (p<0.001), spending less time in the sun (p = 0.015), moderate levels of physical activity (p = 0.004), higher frequency of teeth cleaning (p<0.001) and more frequent use of facial care products: cleanser (p<0.001); moisturiser (p = 0.016) or night cream (p = 0.016). Overall, 36.5% of the variation in the difference between perceived and chronological age could be explained by a combination of chronological age and 6 independent lifestyle variables. We have thus identified and quantified a number of factors associated with younger appearance in Chinese women. Presentation of these factors in the context of facial appearance could provide significant motivation for the adoption of a range of healthy behaviours at the level of both individuals and populations. PMID:21179450

  15. Age and social composition factors as explanations for cleavages in socio-political values.

    PubMed

    Tedin, K L

    While age group differences on social and political values have been frequently documented in survey data, it is often claimed that these differences are due to social composition factors rather than to age itself. In this analysis we test for the effects of age vs. social composition in explaining variation in four attitudinal dependent variables. Using a sample especially drawn to study generational differences, and employing a multivariate statistical model, it was found that age differences were only modestly reduced by social composition variables. It is concluded that nonartifactual age group differences do exist on the dependent variables.

  16. 29 CFR 1625.7 - Differentiations based on reasonable factors other than age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... exist must be decided on the basis of all the particular facts and circumstances surrounding each... the grounds that it is a “factor other than” age, and such a practice has an adverse impact...

  17. Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children 1 and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor Routine Recommendations for Pneumococcal Conjugate ... X X X X X 1 For PCV13 vaccination of healthy children, see “Recommen- dations for Pneumococcal ...

  18. Identifying factors affecting age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use in Sahiwal bulls

    PubMed Central

    Naha, B. C.; Chakravarty, A. K.; Mir, M. A.; Jamuna, V.; Singh, A. P.; Maher, D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of non-genetic factors on reproduction traits viz. age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use of breeding bulls in Sahiwal bulls by fitting least-squares analysis. Materials and Methods: The information on reproduction traits of 43 Sahiwal breeding bulls belonging to 8 sets of Sahiwal breeding program at Indian Council of Agricultural Research-National Dairy Research Institute (ICAR-NDRI), Karnal (Haryana), India during 27 years (1987-2013) were analyzed using fixed linear model. The information was collected from AI records, reproduction sheets, and bull AI register maintained at different sections of Institute viz. record room of Dairy Cattle Breeding Division (DCB), Cattle Yard, Artificial Breeding Research Centre, ICAR-NDRI, Karnal. Results: The average age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use of Sahiwal breeding bulls was estimated as 3.17±0.01 years and 5.35±0.01 years, with the coefficient of variation 18.93% and 20%, respectively. The overall least-squares mean for age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use was estimated as 3.14±0.09 years and 5.25±0.02 years, respectively, in Sahiwal breeding bulls. Period of freezing/use had significant effects on reproductive traits (p<0.01). Season had no significant effect on any of the traits considered in this study. Conclusion: It can be concluded that management inputs such as nutrition, breeding, and optimum environment should be taken care of to optimize age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use for better utilization of superior germplasm. PMID:27047178

  19. Age-related differences in factors associated with cervical spine injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Julie C; Jaffe, David M; Olsen, Cody S; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-04-01

    The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) investigators previously identified risk factors associated with cervical spine injuries (CSIs) in children. Anatomic maturation and age-related variation in mechanisms of injury suggested the need to explore factors separately for younger versus older children. The purpose of this substudy was to investigate CSI risk factors in age subgroups within the PECARN study cohort. This was an age-stratified case-control analysis of children younger than 16 years presenting to 17 PECARN hospitals following blunt trauma between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2004. Data were abstracted for children with CSIs and randomly selected CSI-free children. Age-stratified multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with CSI within three age groups: younger than 2, 2 to 7, and 8 to 15 years. Sensitivity and specificity for CSI were estimated for both the age-specific and original (altered mental status, focal neurologic findings, neck pain, torticollis, substantial torso injury, predisposing conditions, diving, and high-risk motor vehicle crash [MVC]) models. Among 540 children with CSIs, 27 were younger than 2 years, 140 were 2 to 7 years, and 373 were 8 to 15 years. Focal neurologic deficits and high-risk MVC were associated with CSIs in all age-specific models. Other age-specific factors included the following: younger than 2 years, none; 2 to 7 years, altered mental status, neck pain, torticollis; and 8 to 15 years, altered mental status, neck pain, diving. Age-specific models had comparable sensitivity to the original model among the older groups, but had lower sensitivity and higher specificity among the youngest children. While this analysis supports the original PECARN model for CSI, there were subtle age variations in factors associated with CSIs in children that warrant future investigation. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Age, sex, and setting factors and labor force in athletic training.

    PubMed

    Kahanov, Leamor; Eberman, Lindsey E

    2011-01-01

    Occupation or occupational setting shifts might be occurring in the athletic training profession, and differences between sexes might exist; however, little evidence exists to confirm this supposition. To evaluate trends in male and female athletic training employment patterns in terms of age and occupational setting. Cross-sectional study. We requested demographic data from the National Athletic Trainers' Association (October 27, 2009) and obtained frequency totals of members by sex across the occupational life span by occupational setting. Our sample included 18 571 athletic trainers employed in the 3 largest classifications of occupational settings within the profession: college or university, clinical, and secondary school. We calculated frequencies and percentages to determine demographic and descriptive data. We analyzed the data using an analysis of variance to identify the differences between sexes across age and setting. We observed trends in occupational setting and sex across ages 22 to 67 years. We identified differences between sexes across the ages 22 to 67 years (F(1,18569) = 110818.080, P < .001, η(2) = .068) and across occupational settings (F(1,18569) = 61.908, P < .001, η(2) = .003), noting a marked decline in female athletic trainers in the workforce beginning around age 28 years and an increase in male athletic trainers in the secondary school setting beginning around their middle to late 40s. We observed differences at the intercept between setting and sex (F(1,18569) = 63529.344, P < .001, η(2) = .845), which were greater when observed across the ages (F(1,18569) = 23566787.642, P < .001, η(2) = .939). We identified differences between sexes across settings and ages in addition to an overall decrease in the workforce among all professionals. A marked decline in female athletic trainers occurred at age 28 years, yet the male population increased at the secondary school level, suggesting a setting shift. Burnout, fatigue, pay scale, and a

  1. Age- and menopause-related differences in physiological factors of health quality in women aged 35-60.

    PubMed

    Wiacek, Magdalena; Jegal, Bo Seul; Hagner, Wojciech; Hagner-Derengowska, Magdalena; Zubrzycki, Igor Z

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate using time series analysis age and menopause induced differences in selected health quality related physiological factors. The study was conducted, using the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), and the NHANES 1999-2002 data, on women aged 35-60. Subjects who had not had surgical menopause, did not use contraceptives, did not smoke, and did not breastfeed during the examination, and did not use contraception and for whom follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone (LH) activity was assessed, were included in the study. Menopausal status was defined by months since the last period (<2, 2-12, and >12 months for pre-, peri-, and postmenopause, respectively). The results indicate that postmenopausal women, aged less than 45, are characterized by a decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP), an increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, and a decrease in triglyceride (TG) levels. It was also determined that aging is the main factor leading to physiological variability in systolic blood pressure and high density lipoprotein levels, in pre- and perimenopausal women, and in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) activity in peri- and postmenopausal women.

  2. Maternal age at the birth of the first child as an epistatic factor in polygenic disorders.

    PubMed

    Comings, David E; MacMurray, James P

    2006-01-05

    The identification of the genes for complex, polygenic disorders has proven difficult. This is due to the small effect size of each gene and genetic heterogeneity. An additional important factor could be the presence of unidentified epistatic factors. In the broad definition of epistasis, the effect of one unit is not predicable unless the value of another unit is known and one of the units may not be a gene. We have previously identified maternal age as an epistatic factor for the effect of the LEP gene on the age of onset of menarche. We report here the effect of maternal age and the age of the mother at the birth of her first child (maternal age 1st) as epistatic factors for the interaction of the dopamine D1 gene (DRD1) with obsessive-compulsive behaviors and with stuttering. The epistatic effects of maternal age 1st were stronger than maternal age. This type of epistatic factor may be generalizable to many other gene-trait interactions. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Is age a predisposing factor of postoperative complications after lung resection for primary pulmonary neoplasms?

    PubMed

    Cañizares Carretero, Miguel-Ángel; García Fontán, Eva-María; Blanco Ramos, Montserrat; Soro García, José; Carrasco Rodríguez, Rommel; Peña González, Emilio; Cueto Ladrón de Guevara, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Age has been classically considered as a determining factor for the development of postoperative complications related to lung resection for bronchogenic carcinoma. The Postoperative Complications Study Group of the Spanish Society of Thoracic Surgery has promoted a registry to analyze this factor. A total of 3,307 patients who underwent any type of surgical resection for bronchogenic carcinoma have been systematically and prospectively recorded in any of the 24 units that are part of the group. Several variables related to comorbidity and age, as well as postoperative complications, were analyzed. The mean age of patients was 65,44. Men were significantly more common than female. The most frequent complication was prolonged air leak, which was observed in more than one third of patients. In a univariant analysis, air leak presence and postsurgical atelectasis showed statistical association with patient age, when stratified in age groups. In a multivariate analysis, age was recognized as an independent prognostic factor in relation to air leak onset. However, this could not be confirmed for postoperative atelectasis. Age is a predisposing factor for the development of postoperative complications after lung resection. Other associated factors also influence the occurrence of these complications. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence and risk factors for adult paternity among adolescent females ages 14 through 16 years.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, Brian C; Clark, Jamie; Lewis, Kayan; Samsel, Rachel; Mirchandani, Gita

    2010-11-01

    To investigate sociodemographic factors associated with adolescent females ages 14-16 years having children fathered by males age 20 years or older and identify differences in correlates across rural, urban, and border areas. The method section was a cross-sectional study using Texas birth record data. From 2000 through 2004, there were 29,186 births to adolescent females aged 14-16 years with valid paternal age. Prevalence of and adjusted odds of paternal age of 20 years or older were identified by paternal and maternal factors. The Results section Having both parents born outside of the U.S. was associated with a 5.29 (95% CI: 4.82, 5.80) times increase in the odds of paternal age of 20 years or older as compared to having both parents born in the U.S. Parental place of birth was associated with greater odds of paternal age of 20 years or older in urban areas compared to rural or border areas. Compared to those with average or high educational attainment relative to age, low educational attainment relative to age was associated with an increase in the odds of paternal age of 20 years or older. This association was present whether maternal or paternal educational attainment was low relative to age. Messages are needed to help adolescent females avoid pregnancy with adult males. In addressing this specific prevention challenge, it is important to consider maternal/paternal place of birth and its association with adolescent births with adult males.

  5. Growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) - a promising anti-ageing factor - is highly concentrated in platelets.

    PubMed

    Bueno, J L; Ynigo, M; de Miguel, C; Gonzalo-Daganzo, R M; Richart, A; Vilches, C; Regidor, C; García-Marco, J A; Flores-Ballester, E; Cabrera, J R

    2016-11-01

    Recent research suggests that growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) could reverse age-related diseases and that its blood concentration decreases with age. This poses plasma from young donors as a therapeutic GDF11 source to treat age-related diseases. In addition, the tissue source of circulating GDF11 remains unknown. We analysed GDF11 levels in paired samples of serum, plasma and platelet lysate (PL) from 23 volunteers. Plasma and PL were collected by plateletpheresis. Here, we show that GDF11 is highly concentrated in platelets and that the circulating levels reported in previous studies could be biased as a result of serum sample manipulation.

  6. 20 CFR 404.1563 - Your age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Your age as a vocational factor. 404.1563 Section 404.1563 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations § 404.1563 Your...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1563 - Your age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Your age as a vocational factor. 404.1563 Section 404.1563 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations § 404.1563 Your...

  8. 20 CFR 404.1563 - Your age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Your age as a vocational factor. 404.1563 Section 404.1563 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations § 404.1563 Your...

  9. 20 CFR 404.1563 - Your age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Your age as a vocational factor. 404.1563 Section 404.1563 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations § 404.1563 Your...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1563 - Your age as a vocational factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Your age as a vocational factor. 404.1563 Section 404.1563 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations § 404.1563 Your...

  11. Factor Structure of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms for Children Age 3 to 5 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGoey, Kara E.; Schreiber, James; Venesky, Lindsey; Westwood, Wendy; McGuirk, Lindsay; Schaffner, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) distinguishes two dimensions of symptoms, inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity for ages 3 to adulthood. Currently, no separate classification for preschool-age children exists, whereas preliminary research suggests that the two-factor structure of ADHD may not match the…

  12. Hope and Adaptation to Old Age: Their Relationship with Individual-Demographic Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraitou, Despina; Kolovou, Chrysa; Papasozomenou, Chrysa; Paschoula, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between hope as disposition, adaptation to old age, and individual-demographic factors. One hundred and fifty older adults, aged 60-93 years old, completed the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale developed by Snyder et AL. [1991, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60, pp. 570-585], and the Adaptation to…

  13. [Socioeconomic inequalities and age and gender differences in cardiovascular risk factors].

    PubMed

    López-González, Ángel A; Bennasar-Veny, Miquel; Tauler, Pedro; Aguilo, Antoni; Tomàs-Salvà, Matias; Yáñez, Aina

    2015-01-01

    To describe the cardiovascular risk factors in a working population in the Balearic Islands and to examine whether differences by social class vary according to age and gender. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of active workers aged 20-65 years in the Balearic Islands. The participants were included in the study during their annual work health assessment in 2011. The following variables were collected: occupation, social class, age, gender, height, weight, smoking, blood pressure, lipid profile, and glucose levels. Cardiovascular risk was calculated using two different equations (Framingham and REGICOR). Differences by social class were observed for most cardiovascular risk factors. The pattern of these differences differed depending on age group and gender. Differences in obesity by social class increased with age in women but decreased in men. More differences in hypertension by social class were found among women than among men, with differences increasing with age in both genders. Significant differences by social class were found among women in lipid profile, and these differences increased with age, mainly for low levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Inequalities in cardiovascular risk factors by social class were higher among women than among men. Some cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking and obesity showed significant inequalities from a very early age. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Mature Age Professionals: Factors Influencing Their Decision to Make a Career Change into Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Carmel; Thomas, Sue; Sim, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the early findings from a study that addresses the topic of mature age professionals making a career change into the secondary teaching profession by undertaking a postgraduate coursework initial teacher education program. The paper specifically addresses the factors that affect the decision for mature age professionals to make…

  15. Factor Structure of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms for Children Age 3 to 5 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGoey, Kara E.; Schreiber, James; Venesky, Lindsey; Westwood, Wendy; McGuirk, Lindsay; Schaffner, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) distinguishes two dimensions of symptoms, inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity for ages 3 to adulthood. Currently, no separate classification for preschool-age children exists, whereas preliminary research suggests that the two-factor structure of ADHD may not match the…

  16. Hope and Adaptation to Old Age: Their Relationship with Individual-Demographic Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraitou, Despina; Kolovou, Chrysa; Papasozomenou, Chrysa; Paschoula, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between hope as disposition, adaptation to old age, and individual-demographic factors. One hundred and fifty older adults, aged 60-93 years old, completed the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale developed by Snyder et AL. [1991, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60, pp. 570-585], and the Adaptation to…

  17. Factors that Limit and Enable Preschool-Aged Children's Physical Activity on Child Care Centre Playgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Bianca; Dyment, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of childhood obesity amongst preschool-aged children has increased dramatically in recent years and can be attributed, in part, to a lack of physical activity amongst children in this age group. This study explores the social factors that stand to limit and/or enable children's physical activity opportunities in outdoor settings in…

  18. Age as Risk Factor for Death from Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Dabanch, Jeannette; Nájera, Manuel; González, Claudia; Guerrero, Andrea; Olea, Andrea; Fasce, Rodrigo; Morales, Cecilia; Vega, Jeanette

    2011-01-01

    Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 affected Chile during the winter of 2009. The hospitalization rate was 0.56% overall and 3.47% for persons >60 years of age at risk for severe disease and death independent of concurrent conditions. Age >60 years was the major risk factor for death from pandemic (H1N1) 2009. PMID:21762580

  19. Factors related to age at natural menopause: longitudinal analyses from SWAN.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ellen B; Crawford, Sybil L; Avis, Nancy E; Crandall, Carolyn J; Matthews, Karen A; Waetjen, L Elaine; Lee, Jennifer S; Thurston, Rebecca; Vuga, Marike; Harlow, Siobán D

    2013-07-01

    Early age at the natural final menstrual period (FMP) or menopause has been associated with numerous health outcomes and might be a marker of future ill health. However, potentially modifiable factors affecting age at menopause have not been examined longitudinally in large, diverse populations. The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) followed 3,302 initially premenopausal and early perimenopausal women from 7 US sites and 5 racial/ethnic groups, using annual data (1996-2007) and Cox proportional hazards models to assess the relation of time-invariant and time-varying sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health factors to age at natural FMP. Median age at the FMP was 52.54 years (n = 1,483 observed natural FMPs). Controlling for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health factors, we found that racial/ethnic groups did not differ in age at the FMP. Higher educational level, prior oral contraceptive use, and higher weight at baseline, as well as being employed, not smoking, consuming alcohol, having less physical activity, and having better self-rated health over follow-up, were significantly associated with later age at the FMP. These results suggest that age at the natural FMP reflects a complex interrelation of health and socioeconomic factors, which could partially explain the relation of late age at FMP to reduced morbidity and mortality.

  20. Factors Related to Age at Natural Menopause: Longitudinal Analyses From SWAN

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ellen B.; Crawford, Sybil L.; Avis, Nancy E.; Crandall, Carolyn J.; Matthews, Karen A.; Waetjen, L. Elaine; Lee, Jennifer S.; Thurston, Rebecca; Vuga, Marike; Harlow, Siobán D.

    2013-01-01

    Early age at the natural final menstrual period (FMP) or menopause has been associated with numerous health outcomes and might be a marker of future ill health. However, potentially modifiable factors affecting age at menopause have not been examined longitudinally in large, diverse populations. The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) followed 3,302 initially premenopausal and early perimenopausal women from 7 US sites and 5 racial/ethnic groups, using annual data (1996–2007) and Cox proportional hazards models to assess the relation of time-invariant and time-varying sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health factors to age at natural FMP. Median age at the FMP was 52.54 years (n = 1,483 observed natural FMPs). Controlling for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health factors, we found that racial/ethnic groups did not differ in age at the FMP. Higher educational level, prior oral contraceptive use, and higher weight at baseline, as well as being employed, not smoking, consuming alcohol, having less physical activity, and having better self-rated health over follow-up, were significantly associated with later age at the FMP. These results suggest that age at the natural FMP reflects a complex interrelation of health and socioeconomic factors, which could partially explain the relation of late age at FMP to reduced morbidity and mortality. PMID:23788671

  1. Factors that Limit and Enable Preschool-Aged Children's Physical Activity on Child Care Centre Playgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Bianca; Dyment, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of childhood obesity amongst preschool-aged children has increased dramatically in recent years and can be attributed, in part, to a lack of physical activity amongst children in this age group. This study explores the social factors that stand to limit and/or enable children's physical activity opportunities in outdoor settings in…

  2. Identifying Target Risk Factors Using Population Attributable Risks of Ischemic Stroke by Age and Sex.

    PubMed

    Park, Tai Hwan; Ko, Youngchai; Lee, Soo Joo; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Jun; Han, Moon-Ku; Park, Jong-Moo; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Oh, Mi-Sun; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2015-09-01

    Estimating age- and sex-specific population attributable risks (PARs) of major risk factors for stroke may be a useful strategy to identify risk factors for targeting preventive strategies. For this case-control matched study, consecutive patients aged 18-90 years and admitted to nine nationwide hospitals with acute ischemic stroke between December 2008 and June 2010, were enrolled as cases. Controls, individually matched by age and sex, were chosen from the 4th Korean National Health & Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2010). Based on odds ratios and prevalence, standardized according to the age and sex structure of the Korean population, PARs of major risk factors were estimated according to age (young, ≤ 45; middle-aged, 46-65; and elderly, ≥ 66 years) and sex subgroups. In 4,743 matched case-control sets, smoking (PAR, 45.1%) was the greatest contributing risk factor in young men, followed by hypertension (28.5%). In middle-aged men, the greatest contributing factors were smoking (37.4%), hypertension (22.7%), and diabetes (14.6%), whereas in women the greatest factors were hypertension (22.7%) and stroke history (10.6%). In the elderly, hypertension was the leading factor in men (23.7%) and women (23.4%). Other noticeable factors were stroke history (men, 19.7%; women, 17.3%) and diabetes (men, 12.5%; women, 15.1%). In young women, risk factors with a PAR greater than 10% were not found. Smoking cessation in young people and hypertension and diabetes control in older people may be effective in reducing the burden of stroke on the population. In the elderly, secondary prevention could also be emphasized.

  3. Cardiovascular risk factors in parents of short children born small for gestational age.

    PubMed

    De Kort, Sandra W K; Van Dijk, Marije; Willemsen, Ruben H; Ester, Wietske A; Viet, Lucie; De Rijke, Yolanda B; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2008-07-01

    Small for gestational age (SGA) children have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors at a young age. It is not known whether this increased risk is caused by their size at birth, a familial predisposition for cardiovascular disease or smallness at birth or a combination of these factors. The cardiovascular risk profile of parents of SGA children is unknown. We compared anthropometry, blood pressure, fasting serum lipid, glucose, and insulin levels of 482 parents (mean age 41 y) and 286 short SGA children with age- and sex-matched references. We also investigated whether these parameters correlated between parents and their offspring. Mothers had higher systolic blood pressure, fathers had a higher body mass index and parents had more frequently high fasting glucose levels than age- and sex-matched references. Children had significantly higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure than sex- and height-matched references. Twenty-four percent (mothers) and 10% (fathers) were born SGA but they did not have more cardiovascular risk factors than those born appropriate for gestational age. Cardiovascular risk factors did not correlate between parents and children. In conclusion, parents of short SGA children have a modest increase in some cardiovascular risk factors but risk factors did not correlate between parents and children.

  4. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) shift the age composition of circulating red blood cells towards a younger cohort when exposed to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Johanne M; Klein, Georgia; Walsh, Patrick J; Currie, Suzanne

    2012-07-01

    Freshwater fish, such as the rainbow trout, are commonly exposed to temperature fluctuations in their aquatic environment. Exposure to increased temperatures places fish under respiratory stress and increases the likelihood of protein misfolding and degradation that could eventually lead to cell death. Previously, we showed that genes associated with the cellular stress response, apoptosis and hematopoiesis are upregulated in the red blood cells (RBCs) of rainbow trout post-thermal stress, leading to the hypothesis that a tightly regulated interaction between cell repair and cell death is occurring after heat stress. To test this hypothesis, we tracked changes in age class composition and markers of apoptosis in circulating RBCs within individual trout during exposure to and recovery from acute thermal stress. RBCs did not show any indication of apoptosis or necrosis following acute heat stress; however, we observed significant increases in numbers of early, juvenile and dividing RBCs. We also observed a shift in the composition of the circulating RBCs towards a younger cohort following heat shock through release of stored cells from the spleen and an increase in the maturation rate of early RBCs. These results suggest that the genes activated by increased temperature provided sufficient protection against thermal stress in the RBC, subsequently preventing the triggering of the cell death cascade.

  5. Factors associated with the differential in actual gestational age and gestational age predicted from transrectal ultrasonography in pregnant dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, A M; Ryan, D P; Berry, D P

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine (1) how gestational age predicted using transrectal ultrasonography related to actual gestational age derived as the number of days from the most recent artificial insemination date, (2) what factors, if any, were associated with the differential between the two measures, and (3) the association between this differential in gestational age and the likelihood of subsequent pregnancy loss, stillbirth, or calving dystocia. The data set contained 7340 ultrasound records from 6805 Holstein Friesian dairy cows in 175 herds. Ultrasonography assessment underestimated gestational age relative to days since last service by 0.51 days (standard error [SE]: 0.040), although the differential was less during embryonic development phase (i.e., ≤42 days of gestation; mean overestimation of 0.31 days) versus fetal development phase (i.e., >42 days of gestation; mean underestimation of 0.81 days). Predicted calving date calculated from ultrasonography was 1.41 days (SE: 0.040) later than the actual subsequent calving date and was, on average, 0.52 days later than predicted calving date, assuming a gestation length of 282 days. Parity of the dam (P < 0.05), stage of pregnancy (P < 0.001), and sex of the calf born (P < 0.001) were all associated with the differential in gestational age based on ultrasonography versus days since last service. No obvious trend among parities was evident in the difference between the methods in predicting gestational age. Ultrasonography underestimated gestational age by 0.83 (SE: 0.15) days in parity 5+ cows and underestimated gestational age by 0.41 (SE: 0.14) days in the first-parity cows. Relative to gestational age predicted from the most recent service, ultrasonography underestimated gestational age by 0.75 (SE: 0.13) days for heifer fetuses and underestimated gestational age by 0.36 (SE: 0.13) days for bull fetuses. The heritability of the differential in gestational age between the methods of

  6. Associations of obesity with socioeconomic and lifestyle factors in middle-aged and elderly men: European Male Aging Study (EMAS).

    PubMed

    Han, T S; Lee, D M; Lean, M E J; Finn, J D; O'Neill, T W; Bartfai, G; Forti, G; Giwercman, A; Kula, K; Pendleton, N; Punab, M; Rutter, M K; Vanderschueren, D; Huhtaniemi, I T; Wu, F C W; Casanueva, F F

    2015-01-01

    Social and lifestyle influences on age-related changes in body morphology are complex because lifestyle and physiological response to social stress can affect body fat differently. In this study, we examined the associations of socioeconomic status (SES) and lifestyle factors with BMI and waist circumference (WC) in middle-aged and elderly European men. A cross-sectional study of 3319 men aged 40-79 years recruited from eight European centres. We estimated relative risk ratios (RRRs) of overweight/obesity associated with unfavourable SES and lifestyles. The prevalence of BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) or WC ≥ 102 cm rose linearly with age, except in the eighth decade when high BMI, but not high WC, declined. Among men aged 40-59 years, compared with non-smokers or most active men, centre and BMI-adjusted RRRs for having a WC between 94 and 101.9 cm increased by 1.6-fold in current smokers, 2.7-fold in least active men and maximal at 2.8-fold in least active men who smoked. Similar patterns but greater RRRs were observed for men with WC ≥ 102 cm, notably 8.4-fold greater in least active men who smoked. Compared with men in employment, those who were not in employment had increased risk of having a high WC by 1.4-fold in the 40-65 years group and by 1.3-fold in the 40-75 years group. These relationships were weaker among elderly men. Unfavourable SES and lifestyles associate with increased risk of obesity, especially in middle-aged men. The combination of inactivity and smoking was the strongest predictor of high WC, providing a focus for health promotion and prevention at an early age. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  7. Rates and risk factors for progression to incident dementia vary by age in a population cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ching-Wen; Snitz, Beth E.; Hughes, Tiffany F.; McDade, Eric; Chang, Chung-Chou H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate rate of progression from normal cognition or mild impairment to dementia, and to identify potential risk and protective factors for incident dementia, based on age at dementia onset in a prospective study of a population-based cohort (n = 1,982) aged 65 years and older. Methods: Following the cohort annually for up to 5 years, we estimated incidence of dementia (Clinical Dementia Rating ≥1) among individuals previously normal or mildly impaired (Clinical Dementia Rating 0 or 0.5). In the whole cohort, and also stratified by median onset age, we examined several vascular, metabolic, and inflammatory variables as potential risk factors for developing dementia, using interval-censored survival models. Results: Based on 67 incident cases of dementia, incidence rate (per 1,000 person-years) was 10.0 overall, 5.8 in those with median onset age of 87 years or younger, and 31.5 in those with onset age after 87 years. Adjusting for demographics, the risk of incident dementia with onset age of 87 years or younger (n = 33) was significantly increased by baseline smoking, stroke, low systolic blood pressure, and APOE*4 genotype, and reduced by current alcohol use. Among those with dementia with onset after 87 years (n = 34), no risk or protective factor was significant. Conclusion: Risk and protective factors were only found for incident dementia with onset before the median onset age of 87 years, and not for those with later onset. Either unexplored risk factors explain the continued increase in incidence with age, or unknown protective factors are allowing some individuals to delay onset into very old age. PMID:25471390

  8. Human Factors Evaluation of the Work Environment of Operators Engaged in the Inspection and Repair of Aging Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    employed anyone with a background in pressed in foot candles.) These average levels do not quite human factors/ ergonomics /industrial psychology...variety of fixed and moveable scaffolds and plat- than that provided by D-cell flashlights, and the area il- forms, ladders, stools , and "cherry pickers...and 2nd shifts. 3rd shift permanent 7. a. Is there a human factors or ergonomics staff person assigned to the organization? Yes.5 No14 b. Has a human

  9. Risk factors for crop health under global change and agricultural shifts: a framework of analyses using rice in tropical and subtropical Asia as a model.

    PubMed

    Savary, S; Mila, A; Willocquet, L; Esker, P D; Carisse, O; McRoberts, N

    2011-06-01

    Plant disease epidemiology requires expansion of its current methodological and theoretical underpinnings in order to produce full contributions to global food security and global changes. Here, we outline a framework which we applied to farmers' field survey data set on rice diseases in the tropical and subtropical lowlands of Asia. Crop health risks arise from individual diseases, as well as their combinations in syndromes. Four key drivers of agricultural change were examined: labor, water, fertilizer, and land availability that translate into crop establishment method, water shortage, fertilizer input, and fallow period duration, respectively, as well as their combinations in production situations. Various statistical approaches, within a hierarchical structure, proceeding from higher levels of hierarchy (production situations and disease syndromes) to lower ones (individual components of production situations and individual diseases) were used. These analyses showed that (i) production situations, as wholes, represent very large risk factors (positive or negative) for occurrence of disease syndromes; (ii) production situations are strong risk factors for individual diseases; (iii) drivers of agricultural change represent strong risk factors of disease syndromes; and (iv) drivers of change, taken individually, represent small but significant risk factors for individual diseases. The latter analysis indicates that different diseases are positively or negatively associated with shifts in these drivers. We also report scenario analyses, in which drivers of agricultural change are varied in response to possible climate and global changes, generating predictions of shifts in rice health risks. The overall set of analyses emphasizes the need for large-scale ground data to define research priorities for plant protection in rapidly evolving contexts. They illustrate how a structured theoretical framework can be used to analyze emergent features of agronomic and

  10. The Hierarchical Factor Model of ADHD: Invariant across Age and National Groupings?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toplak, Maggie E.; Sorge, Geoff B.; Flora, David B.; Chen, Wai; Banaschewski, Tobias; Buitelaar, Jan; Ebstein, Richard; Eisenberg, Jacques; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Miranda, Ana; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Thompson, Margaret; Tannock, Rosemary; Asherson, Philip; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the factor structure of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a clinical sample of 1,373 children and adolescents with ADHD and their 1,772 unselected siblings recruited from different countries across a large age range. Hierarchical and correlated factor analytic models were compared separately in the ADHD and…

  11. Longitudinal Analysis of Factors Associated with Successful Outcomes for Transition-Age Youths with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Elyse; Curtis, Amy; Emerson, Robert Wall; Dormitorio, Benedict

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Transition-age youths with visual impairments have higher rates of unemployment than their peers without impairment, and factors associated with success after graduation have been examined; however, it is unknown whether these factors remain influential across the first decade after exiting high school. Methods: Five waves of the…

  12. Intrinsic Motivation and Environmental Factors Affecting Research of Social Work Faculty on Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Janice G.; Short, Glenda F. Lester

    2010-01-01

    Within the context of Self-determination Theory, this research identifies intrinsic motivation and environmental factors that support social-work-faculty research in aging. Intrinsic factors include faculty's interest in gerontology as a field of practice, the desire to advance knowledge in the field of gerontology, including producing…

  13. Intrinsic Motivation and Environmental Factors Affecting Research of Social Work Faculty on Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Janice G.; Short, Glenda F. Lester

    2010-01-01

    Within the context of Self-determination Theory, this research identifies intrinsic motivation and environmental factors that support social-work-faculty research in aging. Intrinsic factors include faculty's interest in gerontology as a field of practice, the desire to advance knowledge in the field of gerontology, including producing…

  14. [Prevalence and risk factors of age-related memory disorder in a health district].

    PubMed

    Vera-Cuesta, H; Vera-Acosta, H; León-Benito, O; Fernández-Maderos, I

    Normal aging is characterised by alterations affecting the cognitive functions. In 1958 Kral coined the term 'benign senescent forgetfulness' to designate a memory disorder that is different from those that occur during normal aging. In 1986, a group of researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health and other centres proposed a novel neuropsychological entity called age-related memory disorder. The determination of the prevalence, progression and risk factors of this condition currently represents an important challenge for the scientific community. To establish the rate of prevalence and to identify some of the risk factors involved in age-related memory disorders. The universe consisted of all the patients over 50 years of age from a health district (234 individuals); the diagnostic criteria were applied to the whole sample. In addition to the patients, a control group was also chosen in order to be able to establish a correlation with selected risk factors. The prevalence rate was found to be 39.7%, of which 38.7% were males and 40.4% were females. It was also observed that the impairment was greater as the patient's age and the length of the disease history increased. As far as risk factors are concerned, it was observed that smoking and psychosocial characteristics constitute predisposing factors, while this was not the case for arterial hypertension, a history of dementia and the satisfaction of basic needs.

  15. Objective assessment of facial skin aging and the associated environmental factors in Japanese monozygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    Ichibori, Ryoko; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanigawa, Tomoko; Kanazawa, Shigeyuki; Shingaki, Kenta; Torii, Kosuke; Tomita, Koichi; Yano, Kenji; Sakai, Yasuo; Hosokawa, Ko

    2014-01-01

    Twin studies, especially those involving monozygotic (MZ) twins, facilitate the analysis of factors affecting skin aging while controlling for age, gender, and genetic susceptibility. The purpose of this study was to objectively assess various features of facial skin and analyze the effects of environmental factors on these features in MZ twins. At the Osaka Twin Research Center, 67 pairs of MZ twins underwent medical interviews and photographic assessments, using the VISIA® Complexion Analysis System. First, the average scores of the right and left cheek skin spots, wrinkles, pores, texture, and erythema were calculated; the differences between the scores were then compared in each pair of twins. Next, using the results of medical interviews and VISIA data, we investigated the effects of environmental factors on skin aging. The data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The intrapair differences in facial texture scores significantly increased as the age of the twins increased (P = 0.03). Among the twin pairs who provided answers to the questions regarding history differences in medical interviews, the twins who smoked or did not use skin protection showed significantly higher facial texture or wrinkle scores compared with the twins not exposed to cigarettes or protectants (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively). The study demonstrated that skin aging among Japanese MZ twins, especially in terms of facial texture, was significantly influenced by environmental factors. In addition, smoking and skin protectant use were important environmental factors influencing skin aging. PMID:24910280

  16. Prevalence, risk factors and clinical signs predictive for equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction in aged horses.

    PubMed

    McGowan, T W; Pinchbeck, G P; McGowan, C M

    2013-01-01

    Equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) is an ageing-related neurodegenerative disorder. The prevalence and risk factors for PPID using seasonally adjusted basal adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentrations in aged horses have not been previously reported. To determine the prevalence, risk factors and clinical signs predictive for PPID in a population of horses aged ≥ 15 years in Queensland, Australia. Owner-reported data was obtained using a postal questionnaire distributed to an equestrian group. A subgroup of surveyed owners were visited and a veterinary physical examination performed on all horses aged ≥ 15 years. Blood samples were analysed for basal plasma alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and ACTH concentrations, routine haematology and selected biochemistry. Aged horses with elevations above seasonally adjusted cut-off values for basal plasma ACTH were considered positive for PPID. Positive horses were compared with their aged counterparts to determine risk factors and clinical signs associated with PPID. Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction was prevalent in aged horses (21.2%) despite owners infrequently reporting it as a known or diagnosed disease or disorder. Numerous clinical or historical signs were associated with an increased risk of PPID in the univariable model, but only age (odds ratio (OR) 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-1.25, P<0.001) and owner-reported history of hirsutism (OR 7.80; 95% CI 3.67-16.57, P<0.001) remained in the final multivariable model. There were no routine haematological or biochemical variables supportive of a diagnosis of PPID. Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction occurs commonly in aged horses despite under-recognition by owners. The increased risk of PPID with age supports that this is an ageing associated condition. Aged horses with clinical or historical signs consistent with PPID, especially owner-reported hirsutism (delayed shedding and/or long hair coat), should be tested and

  17. [Sleep disorders among physicians on shift work].

    PubMed

    Schlafer, O; Wenzel, V; Högl, B

    2014-11-01

    Sleep disorders in physicians who perform shift work can result in increased risks of health problems that negatively impact performance and patient safety. Even those who cope well with shift work are likely to suffer from sleep disorders. The aim of this manuscript is to discuss possible causes, contributing factors and consequences of sleep disorders in physicians and to identify measures that can improve adaptation to shift work and treatment strategies for shift work-associated sleep disorders. The risk factors that influence the development of sleep disorders in physicians are numerous and include genetic factors (15 % of the population), age (> 50 years), undiagnosed sleep apnea,, alcohol abuse as well as multiple stress factors inherent in clinical duties (including shift work), research, teaching and family obligations. Several studies have reported an increased risk for medical errors in sleep-deprived physicians. Shift workers have an increased risk for psychiatric and cardiovascular diseases and shift work may also be a contributing factor to cancer. A relationship has been reported not only with sleep deprivation and changes in food intake but also with diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension and coronary heart disease. Nicotine and alcohol consumption are more frequent among shift workers. Increased sickness and accident rates among physicians when commuting (especially after night shifts) have a socioeconomic impact. In order to reduce fatigue and to improve performance, short naps during shiftwork or naps plus caffeine, have been proposed as coping strategies; however, napping during adverse circadian phases is less effective, if not impossible when unable to fall asleep. Bright and blue light supports alertness during a night shift. After shiftwork, direct sunlight exposure to the retina can be avoided by using dark sunglasses or glasses with orange lenses for commuting home. The home environment for daytime sleeping after a night shift should be

  18. Conceptualizing age-friendly community characteristics in a sample of urban elders: an exploratory factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard J; Lehning, Amanda J; Dunkle, Ruth E

    2013-01-01

    Accurate conceptualization and measurement of age-friendly community characteristics would help to reduce barriers to documenting the effects on elders of interventions to create such communities. This article contributes to the measurement of age-friendly communities through an exploratory factor analysis of items reflecting an existing US Environmental Protection Agency policy framework. From a sample of urban elders (n = 1,376), we identified 6 factors associated with demographic and health characteristics: access to business and leisure, social interaction, access to health care, neighborhood problems, social support, and community engagement. Future research should explore the effects of these factors across contexts and populations.

  19. Socioeconomic factors, immigration status, and cancer screening among Mexican American women aged 75 and older.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2010-12-01

    To explore the association between socioeconomic factors and acculturation with cancer screening methods, we analyzed data from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly, on 1,272 women aged 75 and older residing in the United States in 2004-2005. We found that lower Pap smear or mammography uses were associated with older age, lower education, and having public health insurance compared with private. Other factors associated with mammography use were depressive symptoms, cognition, and functional limitations. In sum, socioeconomic factors and health insurance coverage, but not acculturation, determine cancer screening utilization in very old Mexican American women.

  20. Socioeconomic factors, immigration status, and cancer screening among Mexican American women aged 75 and older

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A.; Markides, Kyriakos S.

    2011-01-01

    To explore the association between socioeconomic factors and acculturation with cancer screening methods, we analyzed data from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly, on 1,272 women aged 75 and older residing in the United States in 2004-2005. We found that lower Pap smear or mammography uses were associated with older age, lower education, and having public health insurance compared to private. Other factors associated with mammography use were depressive symptoms, cognition and functional limitations. In sum, socioeconomic factors and health insurance coverage determine cancer screening utilization in very old Mexican American women but not acculturation. PMID:21058091

  1. Stress-Activated Cap’n’collar Transcription Factors in Aging and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Bohmann, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Cap’n’collar (Cnc) transcription factors are conserved in metazoans and have important developmental and homeostatic functions. The vertebrate Nrf1, Nrf2, and Nrf3, the Caenorhabditis elegans SKN-1, and the Drosophila CncC comprise a subgroup of Cnc factors that mediate adaptive responses to cellular stress. The most studied stress-activated Cnc factor is Nrf2, which orchestrates the transcriptional response of cells to oxidative stressors and electrophilic xenobiotics. In rodent models, signaling by Nrf2 defends against oxidative stress and aging-associated disorders, such as neurodegeneration, respiratory diseases, and cancer. In humans, polymorphisms that decrease Nrf2 abundance have been associated with various pathologies of the skin, respiratory system, and digestive tract. In addition to preventing disease in rodents and humans, Cnc factors have lifespan-extending and anti-aging functions in invertebrates. However, despite the pro-longevity and antioxidant roles of stress-activated Cnc factors, their activity paradoxically declines in aging model organisms and in humans suffering from progressing respiratory disease or neurodegeneration. We review the roles and regulation of stress-activated Cnc factors across species, present all reported instances in which their activity is paradoxically decreased in aging and disease, and discuss the possibility that the pharmacological restoration of Nrf2 signaling may be useful in the prevention and treatment of age-related diseases. PMID:20215646

  2. Risk factors for low BMD in healthy men age 50 years or older: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, A; Kennedy, C C; Cranney, A; Hawker, G; Brown, J P; Kaiser, S M; Leslie, W D; O'Brien, C J M; Sawka, A M; Khan, A; Siminoski, K; Tarulli, G; Webster, D; McGowan, J; Adachi, J D

    2009-04-01

    In this systematic review, we summarize risk factors for low bone mineral density and bone loss in healthy men age 50 years or older. Consistent risk factors were: age, smoking, low weight, physical/functional limitations, and previous fracture. Data specific to men has clinical and policy implications. Osteoporosis is a significant health care problem in men as well as women, yet the majority of evidence on diagnosis and management of osteoporosis is focused on postmenopausal women. The objective of this systematic review is to examine risk factors for low bone mineral density (BMD) and bone loss in healthy men age 50 years or older. A systematic search for observational studies was conducted in MEDLINE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, CENTRAL, CINAHL and Embase, Health STAR. The three main search concepts were bone density, densitometry, and risk factors. Trained reviewers assessed articles using a priori criteria. Of 642 screened abstracts, 299 articles required a full review, and 25 remained in the final assessment. Consistent risk factors for low BMD/bone loss were: advancing age, smoking, and low weight/weight loss. Although less evidence was available, physical/functional limitations and prevalent fracture (after age 50) were also associated with low BMD/bone loss. The evidence was inconsistent or weak for physical activity, alcohol consumption, calcium intake, muscle strength, family history of fracture/osteoporosis, and height/height loss. In this systematic review, we identified several risk factors for low BMD/bone loss in men that are measurable in primary practice.

  3. Profiling immunologic risk for acute rejection in liver transplantation: Recipient age is an important risk factor.

    PubMed

    Kueht, Michael L; Cotton, Ronald T; Galvan, N Thao N; O'Mahony, Christine A; Goss, John A; Rana, Abbas

    2016-09-01

    Careful management of induction and maintenance of immunosuppression is paramount to prevent acute rejection in liver transplantation. A methodical analysis of risk factors for acute cellular rejection may provide a more comprehensive method to profile the immunologic risk of candidates. Using registry data from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), we identified 42,508 adult recipients who underwent orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) between 2002 and 2013. We excluded recipients with a blank entry for treated rejection. We analyzed this all inclusive cohort in addition to a subset of 27,493 patients with just tacrolimus immunosuppression. Multivariate logistic regression was used on both cohorts and identified independent risk factors for treated acute rejection at one year. Recipient age (reference group was 40 to 60years) was a dominant risk factor for rejection in both cohorts and had a dose response relationship. The strongest risk factors in the inclusive cohort were: age 18-25 (OR 2.20), age 26-29 (OR 2.03), and primary biliary cholangitis (OR 1.55). The most protective factors were age 70 and older (OR 0.68), and age 65-69 (OR 0.70). The rates of rejection had a similar pattern. Although prior studies have suggested age as a risk factor for rejection in liver transplantation, this is the first study of national-level data to demonstrate a robust dose dependent relationship between age and risk for rejection at one year. Clinicians should place significant weight on recipient age when they assess their recipients for the immunologic risk of rejection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Reliability of health belief indexes: confirmatory factor analysis in sex, race, and age subgroups.

    PubMed Central

    Weissfeld, J L; Brock, B M; Kirscht, J P; Hawthorne, V M

    1987-01-01

    Despite frequent reference to the Health Belief Model (HBM), few studies address the internal consistency (within questionnaires) or the stability across populations of scales used to measure HBM variables. As part of a 1983 Michigan statewide blood pressure survey, trained interviewers administered 32 health belief questionnaire items to 2,802 randomly selected adult Michigan residents. Exploratory common factor analysis was used to examine the structure of these questionnaire items. Six correlated factors, which corresponded closely with theoretical constructs, appeared. Guided by these results, we developed a confirmatory common factor model. The model's fit was examined in random population halves and in univariate sex, race, and age subgroups. Except perhaps in the oldest age group, the model's fit appeared constant. Reliabilities estimated for HBM factor scales formed with these questionnaire items appeared independent of age, race, or sex. PMID:3570810

  5. Factorial invariance of child self-report across age subgroups: a confirmatory factor analysis of ages 5 to 16 years utilizing the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales.

    PubMed

    Limbers, Christine A; Newman, Daniel A; Varni, James W

    2008-01-01

    The utilization of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measurement in an effort to improve pediatric health and well-being and determine the value of health care services has grown dramatically over the past decade. The paradigm shift toward patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials has provided the opportunity to emphasize the value and essential need for pediatric patient self-report. In order for HRQOL/PRO comparisons to be meaningful for subgroup analyses, it is essential to demonstrate factorial invariance. This study examined age subgroup factorial invariance of child self-report for ages 5 to 16 years on more than 8,500 children utilizing the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales. Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis (MGCFA) was performed specifying a five-factor model. Two multigroup structural equation models, one with constrained parameters and the other with unconstrained parameters, were proposed to compare the factor loadings across the age subgroups. Metric invariance (i.e., equal factor loadings) across the age subgroups was demonstrated based on stability of the Comparative Fit Index between the two models, and several additional indices of practical fit including the Root Mean Squared Error of Approximation, the Non-Normed Fit Index, and the Parsimony Normed Fit Index. The findings support an equivalent five-factor structure across the age subgroups. Based on these data, it can be concluded that children across the age subgroups in this study interpreted items on the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales in a similar manner regardless of their age.

  6. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; hide

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  7. Age, kidney function, and risk factors associate differently with cortical and medullary volumes of the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangling; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Avula, Ramesh T.; Walters, Leah R.; Chakkera, Harini A.; Kremers, Walter K.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Rule, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    The kidney atrophies in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) but factors influencing kidney size in normal adults are less clear. To help define this we measured kidney volumes on contrast-enhanced CT images from 1344 potential kidney donors (ages 18 to 75 years). Cortical volume per body surface area progressively declined in both genders with increased age. Statistically, this was primarily dependent on the age-related decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Independent predictors of increased cortical volume per body surface area were male gender, increased GFR, increased 24-hour urine albumin, current smoker, and decreased high-density lipid cholesterol. Medullary volume per body surface area increased with age in men while it increased with age in women until age 50 followed by a subsequent decline. Independent predictors of increased medullary volume per body surface area were older age, male gender, increased GFR, increased 24-hour urine albumin, increased serum glucose, and decreased serum uric acid. Thus, while cortical volume declines with age along the same biological pathway as the age-related decline in GFR and albuminuria some CKD risk factors are actually associated with increased cortical or medullary volume among relatively healthy adults. Underlying hypertrophy or atrophy of different nephron regions may explain these findings. PMID:24067437

  8. Conceptualisation of ageing in relation to factors of importance for extending working life - a review.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Kerstin

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and understand the complexity of ageing in relation to factors of importance for extending working life. Discourse analysis of documents was used in an integrative review including 128 articles. Four different conceptualisation of ageing are shown to affect older workers' ability to extend their working life: (a) biological ageing people's health in relation to their physical and mental work environment, their pace of work and recuperation needs; (b) chronological ageing statutory retirement age and policies and economic incentives devised for older workers by society, unions and organisations/enterprises; (c) social ageing inclusion in different social groups, the attitude of managers, organisations and family members, the leisure activities and surrounding environment; and (d) mental/cognitive ageing self-crediting, motivating and meaningful activities, competence and skills in working life. CONCLUSIONS SOCIETIES TODAY FOCUS MOSTLY ON CHRONOLOGICAL AGEING AND ARE LOOKING TO INCREASE THE RETIREMENT AGE WITH REGARD TO STATUTORY PENSION SYSTEMS, EG BEYOND 65 YEARS OF AGE THE INTER-RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHRONOLOGICAL, MENTAL, BIOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL AGEING AND THE NINE AREAS IDENTIFIED AS BEING IMPORTANT TO OLDER WORKERS IN THESE RESPECTS NEED TO BE CONSIDERED WHEN AIMING TO PROVIDE A SUSTAINABLE WORKING LIFE FOR THE INCREASING NUMBERS OF OLDER WORKERS IN MODERN SOCIETY THE THEORETICAL MODEL DEVELOPED IS A CONTRIBUTION TO THE CRITICAL DEBATE THAT CAN BE APPLIED BY SOCIETIES, EMPLOYERS AND MANAGERS IN ORDER TO PROVIDE OLDER WORKERS WITH AN INCLUSIVE AND SUSTAINABLE EXTENDED WORKING LIFE. © 2016 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  9. Major shifts in age control at ODP S. 982 near the Pliocene onset of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation - Composite depths and d18O stratigraphy revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelifi, Nabil; Sarnthein, Michael

    2010-05-01

    ODP Site 982 at Rockall Plateau provided a key sediment section for reconstructing northeast Atlantic paleoceanography over the Late Pliocene to Quaternary onset of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation. By now, S. 982 served to monitor benthic d18O stratigraphy and the global d18O ice effect (Venz and Hodell, 2002; Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005), past changes in SST and SST phase relationships (Lawrence, 2009), trends in atmospheric pCO2 (Pagani et al., 2010) and Atlantic Intermediate Water composition, and the advection of Mediterranean Outflow Water (Khelifi, 2010, in prep.). A detailed revision of composite depths and magnetostratigraphy, and renewed fine-tuning of the benthic d18O record now led to a significant age shift (rejuvenation) of all proxy records by 20 to 150 ky during the onset of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation 3.2-2.7 Ma, an interval of major climate change. The revised new SST records well compares with coeval SST trends previously published from ODP sites elsewhere in the northern North Atlantic (e.g., Bartoli et al., 2005). Our study demonstrates the crucial significance of assembling with care composite-depth scales and a reliable d18O stratigraphy in ODP sediment records as backbone for correlations in paleoceanography. Refs: G. Bartoli et al., 2005, EPSL, 237, 33-44. N. Khelifi, 2010, PhD Thesis Kiel University, in prep. K. Lawrence, 2009, Paleoceanogr., 24/2 Lisiecki and M. Raymo, 2005, Paleoceanogr., 20 PA1003, Pagani et al., 2010, Nature Geoscience, 3/1, Venz and D. Hodell, 2002, Palaeo. Palaeo. Palaeo., 182, 197-220.

  10. Comparison of accelerated 3-D spiral chemical shift imaging and single-voxel spectroscopy at 3T in the pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Yazbek, Sandrine; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Connaughton, Pauline; Grant, Patricia E; Gagoski, Borjan

    2015-08-01

    Single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) is usually used in the pediatric population when a short acquisition time is crucial. To overcome the long acquisition time of 3-D phase-encoded chemical shift imaging (CSI) and lack of spatial coverage of single-voxel spectroscopy, efficient encoding schemes using spiral k-space trajectories have been successfully deployed, enabling acquisition of volumetric CSI in <5 min. We assessed feasibility of using 3-D spiral CSI sequence routinely in pediatric clinical settings by comparing its reconstructed spectra against SVS spectra. Volumetric spiral CSI obtained spectra from 2-cc isotropic voxels over a 16×16×10-cm region. SVS acquisition encoded a 3.4-cc (1.5-mm) isotropic voxel. Acquisition time was 3 min for every technique. Data were gathered prospectively from 11 random pediatric patients. Spectra from left basal ganglia were obtained using both techniques and were processed with post-processing software. The following metabolite ratios were calculated: N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr), choline/creatine (Cho/Cr), lactate/creatine (Lac/Cr) and N-acetylapartate/choline (NAA/Cho). We collected data on 11 children ages 4 days to 10 years. In 10/11 cases, spectral quality of both methods was acceptable. Considering 10/11 cases, we found a statistically significant difference between SVS and 3-D spiral CSI for all three ratios. However, this difference was fixed and was probably caused by a fixed bias. This means that 3-D spiral CSI can be used instead of SVS by removing the mean difference between the methods for each ratio. Accelerated 3-D CSI is feasible in pediatric patients and can potentially substitute for SVS.

  11. Molecular mechanism of extrinsic factors affecting anti-aging of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tzyy Yue; Solis, Mairim Alexandra; Chen, Ying-Hui; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei

    2015-03-26

    Scientific evidence suggests that stem cells possess the anti-aging ability to self-renew and maintain differentiation potentials, and quiescent state. The objective of this review is to discuss the micro-environment where stem cells reside in vivo, the secreted factors to which stem cells are exposed, the hypoxic environment, and intracellular factors including genome stability, mitochondria integrity, epigenetic regulators, calorie restrictions, nutrients, and vitamin D. Secreted tumor growth factor-β and fibroblast growth factor-2 are reported to play a role in stem cell quiescence. Extracellular matrices may interact with caveolin-1, the lipid raft on cell membrane to regulate quiescence. N-cadherin, the adhesive protein on niche cells provides support for stem cells. The hypoxic micro-environment turns on hypoxia-inducible factor-1 to prevent mesenchymal stem cells aging through p16 and p21 down-regulation. Mitochondria express glucosephosphate isomerase to undergo glycolysis and prevent cellular aging. Epigenetic regulators such as p300, protein inhibitors of activated Stats and H19 help maintain stem cell quiescence. In addition, calorie restriction may lead to secretion of paracrines cyclic ADP-ribose by intestinal niche cells, which help maintain intestinal stem cells. In conclusion, it is crucial to understand the anti-aging phenomena of stem cells at the molecular level so that the key to solving the aging mystery may be unlocked.

  12. Molecular mechanism of extrinsic factors affecting anti-aging of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tzyy Yue; Solis, Mairim Alexandra; Chen, Ying-Hui; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that stem cells possess the anti-aging ability to self-renew and maintain differentiation potentials, and quiescent state. The objective of this review is to discuss the micro-environment where stem cells reside in vivo, the secreted factors to which stem cells are exposed, the hypoxic environment, and intracellular factors including genome stability, mitochondria integrity, epigenetic regulators, calorie restrictions, nutrients, and vitamin D. Secreted tumor growth factor-β and fibroblast growth factor-2 are reported to play a role in stem cell quiescence. Extracellular matrices may interact with caveolin-1, the lipid raft on cell membrane to regulate quiescence. N-cadherin, the adhesive protein on niche cells provides support for stem cells. The hypoxic micro-environment turns on hypoxia-inducible factor-1 to prevent mesenchymal stem cells aging through p16 and p21 down-regulation. Mitochondria express glucosephosphate isomerase to undergo glycolysis and prevent cellular aging. Epigenetic regulators such as p300, protein inhibitors of activated Stats and H19 help maintain stem cell quiescence. In addition, calorie restriction may lead to secretion of paracrines cyclic ADP-ribose by intestinal niche cells, which help maintain intestinal stem cells. In conclusion, it is crucial to understand the anti-aging phenomena of stem cells at the molecular level so that the key to solving the aging mystery may be unlocked. PMID:25815136

  13. Factors Associated with Healthy Aging among Older Persons in Northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Manasatchakun, Pornpun; Chotiga, Pleumjit; Hochwälder, Jacek; Roxberg, Åsa; Sandborgh, Maria; Asp, Margareta

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe factors associated with perceived health and healthy aging among older people in northeastern Thailand. Thailand's aging population is growing and facing an increasing old-age dependency ratio. Northeastern Thailand, known as Isan, is a region in which the number of older residents is projected to grow rapidly. Older people in this region are likely to confront great threats to their health and well-being. These issues require appropriate attention and actions to promote healthy aging. However, healthy aging in this region has not been studied. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 453 older people, aged 60 years or older. Participants completed the Healthy Aging Instrument (HAI) and provided relevant demographic characteristics. Mann-Whitney U tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests and multiple regression models were used to analyze the data. Through comparative analyses, significant differences in HAI scores were observed for the following factors: marital status, residential area, disability, income level, and perceived meaningfulness in life. In the multiple regression models, residential area, disability, and marital status explained 24.30 % of the variance in HAI scores. Health promotion strategies and future targeted intervention programs should consider the importance of these factors.

  14. A new sentinel surveillance system for severe influenza in England shows a shift in age distribution of hospitalised cases in the post-pandemic period.

    PubMed

    Bolotin, Shelly; Pebody, Richard; White, Peter J; McMenamin, James; Perera, Luke; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; Barlow, Thomas; Watson, John M

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control have highlighted the importance of establishing systems to monitor severe influenza. Following the H1N1 (2009) influenza pandemic, a sentinel network of 23 Trusts, the UK Severe Influenza Surveillance System (USISS), was established to monitor hospitalisations due to confirmed seasonal influenza in England. This article presents the results of the first season of operation of USISS in 2010/11. A case was defined as a person hospitalised with confirmed influenza of any type. Weekly aggregate numbers of hospitalised influenza cases, broken down by flu type and level of care, were submitted by participating Trusts. Cases in 2010/11 were compared to cases during the 2009 pandemic in hospitals with available surveillance data for both time periods (n = 19). An unexpected resurgence in seasonal A/H1N1 (2009) influenza activity in England was observed in December 2010 with reports of severe disease. Reported cases over the period of 4 October 2010 to 13 February 2011 were mostly due to influenza A/H1N1 (2009). One thousand and seventy-one cases of influenza A/H1N1 (2009) occurred over this period compared to 409 at the same Trusts over the 2009/10 pandemic period (1 April 2009 to 6 January 2010). Median age of influenza A/H1N1 (2009) cases in 2010/11 was 35 years, compared with 20 years during the pandemic (p = <0.0001). The Health Protection Agency successfully established a sentinel surveillance system for severe influenza in 2010/11, detecting a rise in influenza cases mirroring other surveillance indicators. The data indicate an upward shift in the age-distribution of influenza A/H1N1 (2009) during the 2010/11 influenza season as compared to the 2009/10 pandemic. Systems to enable the ongoing surveillance of severe influenza will be a key component in understanding and responding to the evolving epidemiology of influenza in the post-pandemic era.

  15. Risk factors for fracture in middle- and older-age men of African descent

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yahtyng; Cauley, Jane A.; Patrick, Alan L.; Wheeler, Victor W.; Bunker, Clareann H.; Zmuda, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Although fracture rates are lower in individuals of African descent compared to individuals of European ancestry, morbidity and mortality following a fracture may be greater in African ancestry individuals. However, fracture risk and associated clinical risk factors have not been well-defined among African ancestry populations, especially among African ancestry men. We used data collected from the Tobago Bone Health Study to examine potential clinical risk factors for incident fractures including demographic information, anthropometric measurements, medical history, lifestyle factors, bone mineral density (BMD) and hip structural geometry. Among 1,933 Afro-Caribbean men aged ≥40 years at study entry (mean age: 57.2 ± 11.0 years), 65 reported at least one new fracture during 10 years of subsequent follow-up. Younger age, mixed Afro-Caribbean ancestry, prior fracture history, BMD and hip structural geometry were statistically significant risk factors for incident fractures. One Standard deviation change in several skeletal parameters (hip BMD, cross-sectional area, outer diameter, cortical thickness and buckling ratio) were each associated with a 35% to 56% increase in incident fracture risk after adjusting for age. Men with a prior fracture history were 3 times more likely to experience a new fracture during follow-up, and the association remained strong after adjusting for age, mixed Afro-Caribbean ancestry and skeletal parameters (hazard ratios ranged 2.72–2.82). Our findings suggest that except for age, risk factors for fracture in men of African ancestry are similar to established risk factors in Caucasian populations. Prior fracture history is a powerful and independent risk factor for incident fractures among African ancestry men and could easily be incorporated into clinical risk evaluation. PMID:23775783

  16. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  17. Testicular gene expression of steroidogenesis-related factors in prepubertal, postpubertal, and aging dogs.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, E; Kawate, N; Inaba, T; Tamada, H

    2017-03-01

    Developmental and aging changes in testicular factors related to steroidogenesis are unknown in dogs. Using reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR, this study examined testicular mRNA levels of CYP11A1 (P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, P450scc), CYP17A1 (P450 17α-hydroxylase/C17-20 lyase, P450c17), HSD3B2 (3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 3β-HSD), CYP19A (P450 aromatase, P450arom), STAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, StAR), cyclooxygenase (COX) -1 and COX-2 in prepubertal (4-6 months of age), postpubertal (1 year of age), and aging (2-18 years of age) dogs. Testicular mRNA levels for P450scc, 3β-HSD, StAR, COX-1, and COX-2 did not change from prepubertal to postpubertal stages, whereas that for P450arom markedly and abruptly increased and that for P450c17 gradually decreased. In postpubertal and aging dogs, a negative correlation was found between aging and testicular P450arom mRNA levels. Based on the rapid testicular growth observed during puberty, these results suggested that total testis gene expression for steroidogenesis-related factors, in particular for P450arom, increases during puberty in dogs. In addition, the decline in P450arom gene expression during aging may affect the ability to synthesize steroids in canine testes.

  18. [Association of socio-demographic factors with the age at death due to cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Haase, Juan; Lavanderos, Sebastián; Riquelme, Camilo; Morales, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    The association of cardiovascular diseases with socio-demographic factors has not been fully explored. To analyze the association of socio-demographic features with the survival time of individuals who died due to cardiovascular diseases. The death registries published by the Ministry of Health were analyzed. All deaths due to cardiovascular diseases occurred between 2001 and 2013 in people aged over one year were considered. Using a principal component analysis, the age at death was associated with socio-demographic features such as sex, marital status, residence zone, schooling, work status and medical care prior to death. A total of 293,370 cardiovascular deaths were analyzed. The median age at death was 77 years. Not receiving medical care prior to death, was significantly associated with a lower age at the moment of the decease, mainly between 20 and 80 years of age. Among men, being occupationally active (hazard ratio (HR = 1.5 p < 0.01) and being unemployed (HR = 1.1 p < 0.01) were risks factors for early cardiovascular death. Being married, having higher schooling, residing in urban areas and having prior medical care were associated with a higher age at the moment of decease. Socio-demographic profiles are associated with the age at death due to cardiovascular diseases. The effect of not receiving medical care on the age at death is noteworthy and reflects social inequities in the access to health care.

  19. The combination of stem cell factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for chronic stroke treatment in aged animals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke occurs more frequently in the elderly population and presents the number one leading cause of persistent disability worldwide. Lack of effective treatment to enhance brain repair and improve functional restoration in chronic stroke, the recovery phase of stroke, is a challenging medical problem to be solved in stroke research. Our early study has revealed the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) on chronic stroke in young animals. However, whether this treatment is effective and safe to the aged population remains to be determined. Methods Cortical brain ischemia was produced in aged C57BL mice or aged spontaneously hypertensive rats. SCF+G-CSF or equal volume of vehicle solution was subcutaneously injected for 7 days beginning at 3–4 months after induction of cortical brain ischemia. Using the approaches of biochemistry assays, flow cytometry, pathology, and evaluation of functional outcome, several doses of SCF+G-CSF have been examined for their safety and efficiency on chronic stroke in aged animals. Results All tested doses did not show acute or chronic toxicity in the aged animals. Additionally, SCF+G-CSF treatment in chronic stroke of aged animals mobilized bone marrow stem cells and improved functional outcome in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions SCF+G-CSF treatment is a safe and effective approach to chronic stroke in the aged condition. This study provides important information needed for developing a new therapeutic strategy to improve the health of older adults with chronic stroke. PMID:23254113

  20. Structural validity of the Movement ABC-2 test: factor structure comparisons across three age groups.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Joerg; Henderson, Sheila E; Sugden, David A; Barnett, Anna L

    2011-01-01

    The Movement ABC test is one of the most widely used assessments in the field of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). Improvements to the 2nd edition of the test (M-ABC-2) include an extension of the age range and reduction in the number of age bands as well as revision of tasks. The total test score provides a measure of motor performance, which can be used to help make a diagnosis of DCD. M-ABC-2 also provides 3 sub-scales for Manual Dexterity, Aiming and Catching and Balance but the validity of these conceptually derived sub-scales has not previously been reported. To examine the factor structure of the M-ABC-2 test across the three age bands (AB): AB1 (3-6-year olds), AB2 (7-10-year olds) and AB3 (11-16-year olds). Data from the 2007 standardisation sample (N=1172) were used in this study. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) and structural equation modelling (LISREL 8.8) were employed to explore the relationship between the tasks within each of the 3 age bands. A model trimming approach was used to arrive at a well fitting model. In AB1 a complex factor structure emerged providing evidence for an independent general factor, as well as specific factors representing the 3 test components. In AB2 a final model emerged with four correlated factors, an additional distinction being drawn between static and dynamic balance. In addition, a 2nd order general factor explained a considerable amount of variance in each primary factor. In AB3 CFA supported the 3-factor structure of the M-ABC-2, with only modest correlations between each factor. The confirmatory factor analyses undertaken in this study further validate the structural validity of the M-ABC-2 as it has developed over time. Although its tasks are largely associated with the three sub-components within each age band, there was also clear evidence for a change in the factor structure towards differentiation in motor abilities with age. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dehydration: biological considerations, age-related changes, and risk factors in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, C M; Perry, P A; Cromwell, S L

    1999-07-01

    Maintenance of water balance is essential to normal physiologic function and vigorous aging. Older adults, however, frequently experience alterations in fluid homeostasis, which result in dehydration. This article describes the physiology of water balance, age-related changes that influence fluid regulation, and associated risk factors for dehydration in older adults. Fluid hygiene is an important health promotion activity for this age group, but when efforts to prevent imbalance are unsuccessful, early identification and intervention to correct problems should be done to minimize adverse consequences. Although much is known about fluid homeostasis, dehydration, and contributory factors in the aging process, water disorders remain prevalent in this group. A great deal of work is still needed to determine "best practices" and creative clinical interventions to support adequate fluid intake behaviors. Both quality management programs and research studies provide avenues for systematic evaluation.

  2. Age at onset of Alzheimer's disease: clue to the relative importance of etiologic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    Clues to the relative importance of possible etiologic factors for dementia of the Alzheimer type may be gained by examining the fit of case series to Sartwell's model of the distribution of incubation periods. If age at disease onset is used as the incubation period of this disease, a genetic or environmental factor acting during the prenatal period is suggested if the distribution of these ages fits the lognormal curve; otherwise, environmental factors acting after birth are implicated. Case series were identified from the literature. Four case series were found which contained sufficiently detailed data to permit this secondary analysis; only one case series was population-based. The distribution of age at disease onset for each series was graphically and statistically assessed for fit to the logarithmic normal distribution. Each case series fit the lognormal curve well. This suggests that research into the etiology of dementia of the Alzheimer type should focus on the prenatal experiences of patients with this disease.

  3. Is advanced maternal age a risk factor for congenital heart disease?

    PubMed

    Best, Kate E; Rankin, Judith

    2016-06-01

    Studies have reported that advanced maternal age is a risk factor for congenital heart disease (CHD), but none of these have been performed in the United Kingdom. Currently, women in the United Kingdom are not referred for specialist fetal echocardiography based on maternal age alone. The aim of this study is to examine the association between maternal age at delivery and CHD prevalence in the North of England. Singleton cases of CHD notified to the Northern Congenital Abnormality Survey and born between January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2013, were included. Cases with chromosomal anomalies were excluded. The relative risk (RR) of CHD according to maternal age at delivery was estimated using Poisson regression. There were 4024 singleton cases of nonchromosomal CHD, giving a prevalence of 8.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.8-8.3) per 1000 live and stillbirths. There was no association between maternal age at delivery and CHD prevalence (p = 0.97), with no evidence of an increased risk of CHD in mothers aged ≥35 compared to aged 25 to 29 (RR = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.89-1.09). There were no significant associations between maternal age at delivery and severity III CHD (p = 0.84), severity II CHD (p = 0.74), or severity I CHD (p = 0.66), although there was a slight increased risk of severity I CHD in mothers aged ≥35 (RR = 1.27; 95% CI, 0.83-1.95). We found little evidence that advanced maternal age is a risk factor for CHD. There is no evidence that women in the United Kingdom should be referred for specialist prenatal cardiac screening based on their age. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:461-467, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Maternal and Neonatal Birth Factors Affecting the Age of ASD Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Darcy-Mahoney, Ashley; Minter, Bonnie; Higgins, Melinda; Guo, Ying; Zauche, Lauren Head; Hirst, Jessica

    2016-12-01

    Early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) enables early intervention that improves long term functioning of children with ASD but is often delayed until age of school entry. Few studies have identified factors that affect timely diagnosis. This study addressed how maternal education, race, age, marital status as well as neonatal birth factors affect the age at which a child is diagnosed with ASD. This study involved a retrospective analysis of 664 records of children treated at one of the largest autism treatment centers in the United States from March 1, 2009 to December 30, 2010. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to identify maternal and neonatal factors associated with age of diagnosis. Infant gender, maternal race, marital status, and maternal age were identified as significant factors for predicting the age of ASD diagnosis. In the Cox proportional hazards regression model, only maternal race and marital status were included. Median survival age till diagnosis of children born to married mothers was 53.4 months compared to 57.8 months and 63.7 months of children born to single and divorced or widowed mothers respectively. Median survival age till diagnosis for children of African American mothers was 53.8 months compared to 57.2 months for children of Caucasian mothers. No statistically significant difference of timing of ASD diagnosis was found for children of varying gestational age. Children born to older or married mothers and mothers of minority races were more likely to have an earlier ASD diagnosis. No statistically significant differences in timing of ASD diagnosis were found for children born at varying gestational ages. Identification of these factors has the potential to inform public health outreach aimed at promoting timely ASD diagnosis. This work could enhance clinical practice for timelier diagnoses of ASD by supporting parents and clinicians around the world in identifying risk factors beyond gender

  5. Risk factors for age at initial Pseudomonas acquisition in the cystic fibrosis epic observational cohort.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Emerson, Julia; McNamara, Sharon; Thompson, Valeria; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Morgan, Wayne; Gibson, Ronald L

    2012-09-01

    Risk factors for initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) acquisition, particularly environmental exposures, are poorly understood. We aimed to identify such risk factors in order to inform prevention strategies and identify high-risk populations. The study cohort included all participants in the U.S. EPIC Observational Study who had no prior Pa-positive respiratory cultures (N=889). Cox proportional hazard models were used to test the effects of factors on age at first Pa-positive respiratory culture. Cystic fibrosis (CF) genotype functional class had an important effect on age at initial Pa acquisition (hazard ratio (HR) comparing minimal to residual CFTR function 2.87 (95% CI 1.88, 4.39)). None of the modifiable risk factors evaluated, including cigarette smoke, hot tub use, breastfeeding, or daycare, was associated with age at Pa acquisition. Similarly, newborn screening was not associated with age at Pa acquisition (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.66, 1.09). Key associations were validated in a CF Foundation National Patient Registry replication cohort. Given the ubiquitous presence of Pa in the environment, it may be that many imposed lifestyle changes will have less impact on age at initial Pa acquisition than genetic determinants. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors associated with medication adherence in school-aged children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Amy H Y; Stewart, Alistair W; Foster, Juliet M; Mitchell, Edwin A; Camargo, Carlos A; Harrison, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to preventive asthma treatment is poor, particularly in children, yet the factors associated with adherence in this age group are not well understood. Adherence was monitored electronically over 6 months in school-aged children who attended a regional emergency department in New Zealand for an asthma exacerbation and were prescribed twice-daily inhaled corticosteroids. Participants completed questionnaires including assessment of family demographics, asthma responsibility and learning style. Multivariable analysis of factors associated with adherence was conducted. 101 children (mean (range) age 8.9 (6-15) years, 51% male) participated. Median (interquartile range) preventer adherence was 30% (17-48%) of prescribed. Four explanatory factors were identified: female sex (+12% adherence), Asian ethnicity (+19% adherence), living in a smaller household (-3.0% adherence per person in the household), and younger age at diagnosis (+2.7% for every younger year of diagnosis) (all p<0.02). In school-aged children attending the emergency department for asthma, males and non-Asian ethnic groups were at high risk for poor inhaled corticosteroid adherence and may benefit most from intervention. Four factors explained a small proportion of adherence behaviour indicating the difficulty in identifying adherence barriers. Further research is recommended in other similar populations.

  7. Factors associated with medication adherence in school-aged children with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alistair W.; Foster, Juliet M.; Mitchell, Edwin A.; Camargo, Carlos A.; Harrison, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to preventive asthma treatment is poor, particularly in children, yet the factors associated with adherence in this age group are not well understood. Adherence was monitored electronically over 6 months in school-aged children who attended a regional emergency department in New Zealand for an asthma exacerbation and were prescribed twice-daily inhaled corticosteroids. Participants completed questionnaires including assessment of family demographics, asthma responsibility and learning style. Multivariable analysis of factors associated with adherence was conducted. 101 children (mean (range) age 8.9 (6–15) years, 51% male) participated. Median (interquartile range) preventer adherence was 30% (17–48%) of prescribed. Four explanatory factors were identified: female sex (+12% adherence), Asian ethnicity (+19% adherence), living in a smaller household (−3.0% adherence per person in the household), and younger age at diagnosis (+2.7% for every younger year of diagnosis) (all p<0.02). In school-aged children attending the emergency department for asthma, males and non-Asian ethnic groups were at high risk for poor inhaled corticosteroid adherence and may benefit most from intervention. Four factors explained a small proportion of adherence behaviour indicating the difficulty in identifying adherence barriers. Further research is recommended in other similar populations. PMID:27730181

  8. The effects of age and sex on the factor structure of the Wechsler Memory Scale.

    PubMed

    Arbit, J; Zagar, R

    1979-07-01

    Memory is one of the central intellectual functions characteristic of human behavior. Increasing age affects memory processes by requiring more time and increased learning trials in such tasks as memory for digits, symbols, and figures, and in the acquisition of new information. Factor analytic studies of the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) have been contradictory because of the confounding effects of subject age and sex. Principal component analyses with oblique rotations were performed 16 times on independent and random samples of males and females, and of males and females at each of three developmental age levels: 13-39, 40-59, and 60-88 years. For total male and female samples, a two-factor structure of general retentiveness and memory was found. For both males and females at 13-39 and 40-59 years, the same factor structure was obtained. The two-factor structure did not occur at age 60-88 for males or females. These findings confirm Wechsler's hypothesis as to the structure of the WMS, and Guilford's hypothesis as to the effect of age upon memory.

  9. Effect of shared environmental factors on exercise behavior from age 7 to 12 years.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, Charlotte; Bartels, Meike; Van Beijsterveldt, Catherina E M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hudziak, James J; De Geus, Eco J C

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on children's leisure time exercise behavior through the classic twin design. Data were taken from The Netherlands Twin Register. The twins were 7 (n = 3966 subjects), 10 (n = 3562), and 12-yr-olds (n = 8687), with longitudinal data for 27% of the sample. Parents were asked to indicate the children's regular participation in leisure time exercise activities, including frequency and duration. Resemblance between monozygotic and dizygotic twins for weekly MET-hours spent on exercise activities was analyzed as a function of their genetic relatedness. Average weekly MET-hours increased with age for both boys (age 7 yr: 14.0 (SD = 11.8); age 10 yr: 22.6 (SD = 18.7); age 12 yr: 28.4 (SD = 24.9)) and girls (age 7 yr: 9.7 (SD = 9.5); age 10 yr: 15.3 (SD = 15.1); age 12 yr: 19.3 (SD = 19.8)). Around 13% of boys and girls across all age groups did not participate in any regular leisure time exercise activities. Tracking of exercise behavior from age 7 to 12 yr was modest (0.168 < r < 0.534). For boys, genetic effects accounted for 24% (confidence interval, 18%-30%) of the variance at age 7 yr, 66% (53%-81%) at age 10 yr, and 38% (32%-46%) at age 12 yr. For girls, this was 22% (15%-30%), 16% (9%-24%), and 36% (30%-43%), respectively. Environmental influences shared by children from the same family explained 71%, 25%, and 50% of the variance in boys (age 7, 10, and 12 yr) and 67%, 72%, and 53% in girls. The shared environment influencing exercise behavior was partially different between boys and girls. Our results stress the important role of shared environment for exercise behavior in young children.

  10. Toxocara canis infection in preschool age children: risk factors and the cognitive development of preschool children.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S; Greene, T; Ernhart, C B

    1996-01-01

    Risk factors for Toxocara canis (T. canis) infection were evaluated in a prospective study of disadvantaged preschool children. In addition, the hypothesis that T. canis exposure is associated with lower intelligence was tested. Seropositivity was tested at 2 years, 3 years, and at 4 years 10 months (4-10). Intelligence was measured at age 4-10 by the Full Scale IQ of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scales of Intelligence (WPPSI). Pica and ownership of a dog were unrelated to seropositivity. Seropositive children had lower scores on the Mental Development Index (MDI) of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development at age 1 year (prior to likely exposure). They also had less favorable scores on a measure of the quality of childrearing. These findings suggest that, for disadvantaged children, lower initial intelligence and less advantageous child rearing are risk factors for T. canis exposure. Seropositive children also had higher blood lead levels, probably as a result of the common pathway of hand to mouth transmittal. Seropositivity at 3 years, at age 4-10, or, cumulatively, at any of the age 2, 3, or 4-10 assessments was associated with the WPPSI IQ after adjustment for sociodemographic factors. Exposure at age 4-10-years was significantly associated with reduced IQ scores (p = 0.030). However, when the age 1 year MDI score was controlled, the estimate became nonsignificant. We, thus, can neither confirm nor deny a relationship of T. canis and intelligence, but the importance of considering prior developmental status is emphasized.

  11. Prevalence of and risk factors for androgen deficiency in middle-aged men in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wong, Samuel Yeung Shan; Chan, Dicken C C; Hong, Athena; Woo, Jean

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the prevalence of and risk factors for androgen deficiency in middle-aged men in Hong Kong. A community-based, cross-sectional household survey was performed in Hong Kong on men aged 45 to 64 years. Demographics, lifestyle information (cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity), and symptoms previously defined for identifying those with androgen deficiency were measured by using standardized questionnaires. Blood samples were collected in the morning, and total, free, and bioavailable testosterone levels were assessed. Data on androgen deficiency were available for 252 men aged 45 to 64 years. Crude prevalence of androgen deficiency was 9.52%. Prevalence increased significantly with age. For risk factors, having a lower personal income and having a history of hypertension were independently associated with increased risk of having androgen deficiency (odds ratio, 3.72; confidence interval, 1.01-13.61; and odds ratio, 2.89; confidence interval, 1.06-7.91, respectively). The prevalence of androgen deficiency in Hong Kong Chinese is similar to that found in Caucasians by using a similar definition. From this age-specific prevalence cross-sectional data, it is estimated that there are approximately 68,775 Hong Kong Chinese men aged 45-64 years with androgen deficiency. Future studies with large sample size are needed to evaluate the risk factors for androgen deficiency in men.

  12. Factors that characterize bone health with aging in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Shota; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Nakamura, Yukio; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Kamimura, Mikio; Nonaka, Kiichi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    The exponential increase in the incidence of fragility fractures in older people is attributed to attenuation of both bone strength and neuromuscular function. Decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) does not entirely explain this increase. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of age on various parameters related to bone health with aging, and to identify combinations of factors that collectively express the bone metabolic state in healthy postmenopausal women. Height, weight, and grip strength were measured in 135 healthy postmenopausal volunteer women. Hip BMD, biomechanical indices derived from quantitative computed tomography (QCT), cross-sectional areas of muscle and fat of the proximal thigh, and various biochemical markers of bone metabolism were measured. A smaller group of factors explanatory for bone health was identified using factor analysis and each was newly named. As a result, the factors bone mass, bone turnover, bone structure, and muscle strength had the greatest explanatory power for assessing the bone health of healthy postmenopausal women. Whereas dual X-ray absorptiometry parameters only loaded on the factor bone mass, QCT parameters loaded on both the factors bone mass and bone structure. Most bone turnover markers loaded on the factor bone turnover, but deoxypyridinoline loaded on both bone turnover and muscle strength. Age was negatively correlated with bone mass (r = -0.49, p < 0.001) and muscle strength (r = -0.67, p < 0.001). We conclude that aging is associated as much with muscle weakening as with low BMD. More attention should be paid to the effects of muscle weakening during aging in assessments of bone health.

  13. Case-control study of the risk factors for age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chaine, G.; Hullo, A.; Sahel, J.; Soubrane, G.; Espinasse-Berrod, M.; Schutz, D.; Bourguignon, C.; Harpey, C.; Brault, Y.; Coste, M.; Moccatti, D.; Bourgeois, H.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—A case-control study was initiated to determine the risk factors for the development of age related macular degeneration (AMD).
METHODS—Study participants, who were all white, aged 50-85 years, and were recruited from private ophthalmology practices. Each practitioner enrolled patients with bilateral AMD, who were then matched with controls for sex and age. Environmental factors and systemic and ocular histories were screened. All patients had bilateral red-free fundus photographs and fluorescein angiography. Photographs were classified into pigment epithelium alterations, drusen, geographic atrophy, and exudative AMD. Statistical analysis included the identification of risk factors for AMD. A multivariate analysis was performed at the end of the study. Analysis included the entire study population and was carried out for each stage of AMD.
RESULTS—1844 controls were compared with 1844 patients with AMD. Mean age was 71 years for controls and 72 for cases. Logistic regression identified six major risk factors for AMD (whole population): arterial hypertension (odds ratio (OR) =1.28), coronary disease (OR=1.31), hyperopia (OR=1.33), light coloured irises (OR=1.22), and lens opacities or previous cataract surgery (OR=1.55). The significance of vascular risk factors was increased for late stages of AMD, especially the atrophic forms (coronary disease, OR=3.19).
CONCLUSIONS—This large case-control study confirms some of the risk factors previously identified and may contribute to the determination of methods for prevention of AMD.

 Keywords: age related macular degeneration; risk factors; case-control study PMID:9893587

  14. Psychosocial Factors Associated with Risk Perceptions for Chronic Diseases in Younger and Middle-Aged Women

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jada G.; Lobel, Marci

    2016-01-01

    Perceptions of disease risk play an important role in motivating people to adopt healthy behaviors. However, little is known about psychosocial factors that influence women’s perceived risk for developing disease. The present study investigated the extent to which individual traits, social influences, objective risk factors, and demographic characteristics were associated with women’s risk perceptions for cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, and lung cancer. Using structural equation modeling, we examined hypothesized associations among 452 younger (ages 18-25 years) and 167 middle-aged (ages 40-64 years) women. A greater number and variety of factors were associated with middle-aged women’s risk perceptions compared to younger women. For both groups, some objective risk factors were associated with risk perceptions; yet, associations also existed between multiple psychosocial variables (optimism, health locus of control, social exposure to disease, perceived stigma) and risk perceptions. Results suggested that women may base their risk estimates on factors beyond those considered important by healthcare providers. PMID:26110993

  15. Influence of socioeconomic factors on age at menarche of Polish girls.

    PubMed

    Szwed, Anita; John, Aleksandra; Czapla, Zbigniew; Kosińska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of socioeconomic factors on age at menarche in Polish girls. Questionnaire data of 2016 girls were collected during the cross-sectional research. Within the socioeconomic variables parents' education, urbanization, number of children in the family and date of menarche were considered. To examine the effects of the analyzed socioeconomic factors on age at menarche, the analysis of variance and the Kaplan-Meier method were used. To estimate the mutual relations between the analyzed variables, the method of classification and regression trees (CART) was applied. The socioeconomic factors significantly affect age at menarche. The latest crossed threshold of puberty is observed in girls whose parents inhabit rural areas. Family size also affects age at menarche: girls from large families are the latest who have crossed the pubertal threshold. The method of classification and regression trees indicates that the most important predictive factor is the number of children in the family. The obtained results confirmed the complex effect of the analyzed variables. A factor that conditions occurrence of menarche most of all is the number of children in the family and then the urbanization degree of mother's place of residence. Further research is clearly required--especially research including analyses of mutual relations between variables and their complex effect.

  16. Acceleration factors for oxidative aging of polymeric materials by oxygen detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Skutnik, Julie Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Three methods that were used to measure the chemical changes associated with oxidative degradation of polymeric materials are presented. The first method is based on the nuclear activation of {sup 18}O in an elastomer that was thermally aged in an {sup 18}O{sub 2} atmosphere. Second, the alcohol groups in a thermally aged elastomer were derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride and their concentration measured via {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy. Finally, a respirometer was used to directly measure the oxidative rates of a polyurethane foam as a function of aging temperature. The measurement of the oxidation rates enabled acceleration factors for oxidative degradation of these materials to be calculated.

  17. Sociodemographic Factors Associated With Changes in Successful Aging in Spain: A Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Domènech-Abella, Joan; Perales, Jaime; Lara, Elvira; Moneta, Maria Victoria; Izquierdo, Ana; Rico-Uribe, Laura Alejandra; Mundó, Jordi; Haro, Josep Maria

    2017-06-01

    Successful aging (SA) refers to maintaining well-being in old age. Several definitions or models of SA exist (biomedical, psychosocial, and mixed). We examined the longitudinal association between various SA models and sociodemographic factors, and analyzed the patterns of change within these models. This was a nationally representative follow-up in Spain including 3,625 individuals aged ≥50 years. Some 1,970 individuals were interviewed after 3 years. Linear regression models were used to analyze the survey data. Age, sex, and occupation predicted SA in the biomedical model, while marital status, educational level, and urbanicity predicted SA in the psychosocial model. The remaining models included different sets of these predictors as significant. In the psychosocial model, individuals tended to improve over time but this was not the case in the biomedical model. The biomedical and psychosocial components of SA need to be addressed specifically to achieve the best aging trajectories.

  18. DNA Double-Strand Breaks: A Potential Causative Factor for Mammalian Aging?

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li; Mitchell, James R.; Hasty, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Aging is a pleiotropic and stochastic process influenced by both genetics and environment. As a result the fundamental underlying causes of aging are controversial and likely diverse. Genome maintenance and in particular the repair of DNA damage is critical to ensure longevity needed for reproduction and as a consequence imperfections or defects in maintaining the genome may contribute to aging. There are many forms of DNA damage with double-strand breaks (DSBs) being the most toxic. Here we discuss DNA DSBs as a potential causative factor for aging including factors that generate DNA DSBs, pathways that repair DNA DSBs, consequences of faulty or failed DSB repair and how these consequences may lead to age-dependent decline in fitness. At the end we compare mouse models of premature aging that are defective for repairing either DSBs or UV light-induced lesions. Based on these comparisons we believe the basic mechanisms responsible for their aging phenotypes are fundamentally different demonstrating the complex and pleiotropic nature of this process. PMID:18346777

  19. Effect of age on the gene expression of neural-restrictive silencing factor NRSF/REST.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nozomu; Mizuno, Takafumi; Murai, Kiyohito; Nakano, Itsuko; Yamashita, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    Aging affects a wide range of gene expression changes in the nervous system. Such effects could be attributed to random changes in the environment with age around each gene, but also could be caused by selective changes in a limited set of key regulatory transcription factors and/or chromatin remodeling components. To approach the question of whether neural-restrictive silencer factor NRSF, a key determinant of the neuron-specific gene expression, is involved in these changes, we examined the levels of NRSF in the rat brain and dosal root ganglia during aging by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (RT-PCR). Complementary expression profiles of transcripts of NRSF and SCG10 in the mature brain were shown by in situ hybridization. Neither the mRNA levels of NRSF nor a splicing variant NRnV were changed, at least in rats up to 26 months old. The gene expression level of SCG10, one of the NRSF targets, was also unaffected by age. The stable expression of SCG10 transcripts in aging was confirmed by in situ hybridization. The NRS-binding ability of NRSF was also unchanged significantly in the nuclear extracts of aged rat brain. These results suggest that the genetic machinery associated with the NRS-NRSF system is well maintained during aging.

  20. Factors influencing acceptance of technology for aging in place: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Peek, Sebastiaan T M; Wouters, Eveline J M; van Hoof, Joost; Luijkx, Katrien G; Boeije, Hennie R; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2014-04-01

    To provide an overview of factors influencing the acceptance of electronic technologies that support aging in place by community-dwelling older adults. Since technology acceptance factors fluctuate over time, a distinction was made between factors in the pre-implementation stage and factors in the post-implementation stage. A systematic review of mixed studies. Seven major scientific databases (including MEDLINE, Scopus and CINAHL) were searched. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) original and peer-reviewed research, (2) qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods research, (3) research in which participants are community-dwelling older adults aged 60 years or older, and (4) research aimed at investigating factors that influence the intention to use or the actual use of electronic technology for aging in place. Three researchers each read the articles and extracted factors. Sixteen out of 2841 articles were included. Most articles investigated acceptance of technology that enhances safety or provides social interaction. The majority of data was based on qualitative research investigating factors in the pre-implementation stage. Acceptance in this stage is influenced by 27 factors, divided into six themes: concerns regarding technology (e.g., high cost, privacy implications and usability factors); expected benefits of technology (e.g., increased safety and perceived usefulness); need for technology (e.g., perceived need and subjective health status); alternatives to technology (e.g., help by family or spouse), social influence (e.g., influence of family, friends and professional caregivers); and characteristics of older adults (e.g., desire to age in place). When comparing these results to qualitative results on post-implementation acceptance, our analysis showed that some factors are persistent while new factors also emerge. Quantitative results showed that a small number of variables have a significant influence in the pre-implementation stage. Fourteen out of

  1. Influences of gender and age on relationships between alcohol drinking and atherosclerotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2010-02-01

    Alcohol drinking affects atherosclerotic progression mainly through blood pressure and lipid metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to clarify whether effects of alcohol drinking on atherosclerotic risk factors differ by gender and age. The database of periodic health check-ups for local district workers was used. The subjects were divided into 3 groups according to mean ethanol consumption per day (nondrinkers; light drinkers, less than 30 g per day; moderate-to-heavy drinkers, 30 g or more per day). The mean levels of each atherosclerosis-related variable in the 3 groups were compared. The mean level of body mass index (BMI) was slightly but significantly lower in drinkers than in nondrinkers in the thirties, forties, and fifties age groups in men and in the twenties, thirties, forties, and fifties age groups in women, while this tendency was not found in the sixties age groups of men and women. In men, mean blood pressure was higher in moderate-to-heavy drinkers than in nondrinkers in all age groups and was higher in light drinkers than in nondrinkers only in the age groups after 40 years. Mean blood pressure of women was higher in the moderate-to-heavy drinker group than in the nondrinker group and this difference became higher with advance of age. In women, mean blood pressure was not affected by light drinking in any of the age groups except for the fifties age group. In men, serum total cholesterol was higher in drinkers than in nondrinkers in the twenties age group but was lower in drinkers than in nondrinkers at thirties or older. Serum total cholesterol in women was lower in drinkers than in nondrinkers in the age groups from twenties to forties but tended to be higher in drinkers than in nondrinkers in the sixties age group. Serum HDL cholesterol increased with advance of age from thirties to sixties in men, while it decreased with advance of age from twenties to sixties in women. Serum HDL cholesterol was higher in drinkers than in nondrinkers

  2. Factors associated with dental caries in a group of American Indian children at age 36 months.

    PubMed

    Warren, John J; Blanchette, Derek; Dawson, Deborah V; Marshall, Teresa A; Phipps, Kathy R; Starr, Delores; Drake, David R

    2016-04-01

    Early childhood caries (ECC) is rampant among American Indian children, but there has been relatively little study of this problem. This article reports on risk factors for caries for a group of American Indian children at age 36 months as part of a longitudinal study. Pregnant women from a Northern Plains Tribal community were recruited to participate in a longitudinal study of caries and caries risk factors. Standardized dental examinations were completed on children, and questionnaires were completed by mothers at baseline and when children were 4, 8, 12, 16, 22, 28, and 36 months of age. Examinations were surface-specific for dental caries, and the questionnaires collected data on demographic, dietary, and behavioral factors. Nonparametric bivariate tests and logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for caries at 36 months, and negative binomial regression was used to identify factors related to caries severity (dmf counts). Among the 232 children, and caries prevalence for cavitated lesions was 80%, with an additional 15% having only noncavitated lesions. The mean dmfs was 9.6, and of the total dmfs, nearly 62% of affected surfaces were decayed, 31% were missing, and 7% were filled. Logistic regression identified higher added-sugar beverage consumption, younger maternal age at baseline, higher maternal DMFS at baseline, and greater number of people in the household as significant (P < 0.05) risk factors. Negative binomial regression found that only maternal DMFS was associated with child dmf counts. By the age of 36 months, dental caries is nearly universal in this population of American Indian children. Caries risk factors included sugared beverage consumption, greater household size, and maternal factors, but further analyses are needed to better understand caries in this population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Factors Associated with Dental Caries in a Group of American Indian Children at age 36 Months

    PubMed Central

    Warren, John J.; Blanchette, Derek; Dawson, Deborah V.; Marshall, Teresa A.; Phipps, Kathy R.; Starr, Delores; Drake, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Early childhood caries (ECC) is rampant among American Indian children, but there has been relatively little study of this problem. This paper reports on risk factors for caries for a group of American Indian children at age 36 months as part of a longitudinal study. Methods Pregnant women from a Northern Plains Tribal community were recruited to participate in a longitudinal study of caries and caries risk factors. Standardized dental examinations were completed on children and questionnaires were completed by mothers at baseline and when children were 4, 8, 12, 16, 22, 28 and 36 months of age. Examinations were surface-specific for dental caries, and the questionnaires collected data on demographic, dietary and behavioral factors. Non-parametric bivariate tests and logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for caries at 36 months, and negative binomial regression was used to identify factors related to caries severity (dmf counts). Results Among the 232 children, and caries prevalence for cavitated lesions was 80%, with an additional 15% having only non-cavitated lesions. The mean dmfs was 9.6, and of the total dmfs, nearly 62% of affected surfaces were decayed, 31% were missing, and 7% were filled. Logistic regression identified higher added sugar beverage consumption, younger maternal age at baseline, higher maternal DMFS at baseline, and greater number of people in the household as significant (p<0.05) risk factors. Negative binomial regression found that only maternal DMFS was associated with child dmf counts. Conclusions By the age of 36 months, dental caries is nearly universal in this population of American Indian children. Caries risk factors included sugared beverage consumption, greater household size and maternal factors, but further analyses are needed to better understand caries in this population. PMID:26544674

  4. Young age as a modifying factor in sports concussion management: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Foley, Cassidy; Gregory, Andrew; Solomon, Gary

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Concussion in Sport Group (CISG) published its third consensus statement and introduced 10 'modifying' factors that were presumed clinically to influence the investigation and management of concussions in sports. Young age was listed as one of the modifying factors. In some cases, these modifiers were thought to be predictive of prolonged or persistent symptoms. These same modifying factors were retained in the fourth iteration of the CISG consensus statement (2013), although mention was made of possible limitations of their efficacy. The CISG statements provided several empirical references regarding young age as a modifying factor. We reviewed the published sports concussion literature with the purpose of determining empirical studies that support or refute the inclusion of young age as a modifier of concussive injury in sports. We performed a systematic review of the PubMed database utilizing the keywords concussion, sports, mild traumatic brain injury, youth, adolescents, and children. English language studies were extracted by the authors and summarized for review. Multiple empirical studies were found indicating that younger athletes may take longer to recover from a sports-related concussion (SRC) than their older peers. However, studies did not indicate that younger athletes were at more risk for prolonged recovery (>4 wk). Empirical evidence supports the inclusion of young age as a modifying factor in sports concussion. However, the difference in recovery time seems relatively small (a few days) and young age does not predict prolonged recovery (>4 wk). The findings support the inclusion of young age as a specific modifier in the treatment of SRC and have implications for the clinical management of this common injury.

  5. Objective assessment of facial skin aging and the associated environmental factors in Japanese monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Ichibori, Ryoko; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanigawa, Tomoko; Kanazawa, Shigeyuki; Shingaki, Kenta; Torii, Kosuke; Tomita, Koichi; Yano, Kenji; Sakai, Yasuo; Hosokawa, Ko

    2014-06-01

    Twin studies, especially those involving monozygotic (MZ) twins, facilitate the analysis of factors affecting skin aging while controlling for age, gender, and genetic susceptibility. The purpose of this study was to objectively assess various features of facial skin and analyze the effects of environmental factors on these features in MZ twins. At the Osaka Twin Research Center, 67 pairs of MZ twins underwent medical interviews and photographic assessments, using the VISIA(®) Complexion Analysis System. First, the average scores of the right and left cheek skin spots, wrinkles, pores, texture, and erythema were calculated; the differences between the scores were then compared in each pair of twins. Next, using the results of medical interviews and VISIA data, we investigated the effects of environmental factors on skin aging. The data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The intrapair differences in facial texture scores significantly increased as the age of the twins increased (P = 0.03). Among the twin pairs who provided answers to the questions regarding history differences in medical interviews, the twins who smoked or did not use skin protection showed significantly higher facial texture or wrinkle scores compared with the twins not exposed to cigarettes or protectants (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively). The study demonstrated that skin aging among Japanese MZ twins, especially in terms of facial texture, was significantly influenced by environmental factors. In addition, smoking and skin protectant use were important environmental factors influencing skin aging.

  6. Global Shifts in Cardiovascular Disease, the Epidemiologic Transition, and Other Contributing Factors: Toward a New Practice of Global Health Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Walter; Miranda, J Jaime

    2017-02-01

    One of the major drivers of change in the practice of cardiology is population change. This article discusses the current debate about epidemiologic transition paired with other ongoing transitions with direct relevance to cardiovascular conditions. Challenges specific to patterns of risk factors over time; readiness for disease surveillance and meeting global targets; health system, prevention, and treatment efforts; and physiologic traits and human-environment interactions are identified. This article concludes that a focus on the most populated regions of the world will contribute substantially to protecting the large gains in global survival and life expectancy accrued over the last decades.

  7. Factors promoting resident deaths at aged care facilities in Japan: a review.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Kentaro; Ogata, Yasuko; Kashiwagi, Masayo

    2016-10-03

    Due to an increasingly ageing population, the Japanese government has promoted elderly deaths in aged care facilities. However, existing facilities were not designed to provide resident end-of-life care and the proportion of aged care facility deaths is currently less than 10%. Consequently, the present review evaluated the factors that promote aged care facility resident deaths in Japan from individual- and facility-level perspectives to exploring factors associated with increased resident deaths. To achieve this, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science and Ichushi databases were searched on 23 January 2016. Influential factors were reviewed for two healthcare services (insourcing and outsourcing facilities) as well as external healthcare agencies operating outside facilities. Of the original 2324 studies retrieved, 42 were included in analysis. Of these studies, five focused on insourcing, two on outsourcing, seven on external agencies and observed facility/agency-level factors. The other 28 studies identified individual-level factors related to death in aged care facilities. The present review found that at both facility and individual levels, in-facility resident deaths were associated with healthcare service provision, confirmation of resident/family end-of-life care preference and staff education. Additionally, while outsourcing facilities did not require employment of physicians/nursing staff to accommodate resident death, these facilities required visits by physicians and nursing staff from external healthcare agencies as well as residents' healthcare input. This review also found few studies examining outsourcing facilities. The number of healthcare outsourcing facilities is rapidly increasing as a result of the Japanese government's new tax incentives. Consequently, there may be an increase in elderly deaths in outsourcing healthcare facilities. Accordingly, it is necessary to identify the factors associated with residents' deaths at outsourcing facilities.

  8. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  9. Seasonal Shift in Climatic Limiting Factors on Tree Transpiration: Evidence from Sap Flow Observations at Alpine Treelines in Southeast Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinsheng; Nie, Yuqin; Luo, Tianxiang; Yu, Jiehui; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Alpine and northern treelines are primarily controlled by low temperatures. However, little is known about the impact of low soil temperature on tree transpiration at treelines. We aim to test the hypothesis that in cold-limited forests, the main limiting factors for tree transpiration switch from low soil temperature before summer solstice to atmospheric evaporative demand after summer solstice, which generally results in low transpiration in the early growing season. Sap flow, meteorological factors and predawn needle water potential were continuously monitored throughout one growing season across Smith fir (Abies georgei var. smithii) and juniper (Juniperus saltuaria) treelines in southeast Tibet. Sap flow started in early May and corresponded to a threshold mean air-temperature of 0°C. Across tree species, transpiration was mainly limited by low soil temperature prior to the summer solstice but by vapor pressure deficit and solar radiation post-summer solstice, which was further confirmed on a daily scale. As a result, tree transpiration for both tree species was significantly reduced in the pre-summer solstice period as compared to post-summer solstice, resulting in a lower predawn needle water potential for Smith fir trees in the early growing season. Our data supported the hypothesis, suggesting that tree transpiration mainly responds to soil temperature variations in the early growing season. The results are important for understanding the hydrological response of cold-limited forest ecosystems to climate change. PMID:27468289

  10. Seasonal Shift in Climatic Limiting Factors on Tree Transpiration: Evidence from Sap Flow Observations at Alpine Treelines in Southeast Tibet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinsheng; Nie, Yuqin; Luo, Tianxiang; Yu, Jiehui; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Alpine and northern treelines are primarily controlled by low temperatures. However, little is known about the impact of low soil temperature on tree transpiration at treelines. We aim to test the hypothesis that in cold-limited forests, the main limiting factors for tree transpiration switch from low soil temperature before summer solstice to atmospheric evaporative demand after summer solstice, which generally results in low transpiration in the early growing season. Sap flow, meteorological factors and predawn needle water potential were continuously monitored throughout one growing season across Smith fir (Abies georgei var. smithii) and juniper (Juniperus saltuaria) treelines in southeast Tibet. Sap flow started in early May and corresponded to a threshold mean air-temperature of 0°C. Across tree species, transpiration was mainly limited by low soil temperature prior to the summer solstice but by vapor pressure deficit and solar radiation post-summer solstice, which was further confirmed on a daily scale. As a result, tree transpiration for both tree species was significantly reduced in the pre-summer solstice period as compared to post-summer solstice, resulting in a lower predawn needle water potential for Smith fir trees in the early growing season. Our data supported the hypothesis, suggesting that tree transpiration mainly responds to soil temperature variations in the early growing season. The results are important for understanding the hydrological response of cold-limited forest ecosystems to climate change.

  11. Exploratory and hierarchical factor analysis of the WJ-IV Cognitive at school age.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Stefan C; McGill, Ryan J; Canivez, Gary L

    2017-04-01

    Exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic studies were not reported in the Technical Manual for the Woodcock-Johnson, 4th ed. Cognitive (WJ IV Cognitive; Schrank, McGrew, & Mather, 2014b) Instead, the internal structure of the WJ IV Cognitive was extrapolated from analyses based on the full WJ IV test battery (Schrank, McGrew, & Mather, 2014b). Even if the veracity of extrapolating from the WJ IV full battery were accepted, there were shortcomings in the choices of analyses used and only limited information regarding those analyses was presented in the WJ IV Technical Manual (McGrew, Laforte, & Shrank, 2014). The present study examined the structure of the WJ IV Cognitive using exploratory factor analysis procedures (principal axis factoring with oblique [promax] rotation followed by application of the Schmid-Leiman, 1957, procedure) applied to standardization sample correlation matrices for 2 school age groups (ages 9-13; 14-19). Four factors emerged for both the 9-13 and 14-19 age groups in contrast to the publisher's proposed 7 factors. Results of these analyses indicated a robust manifestation of general intelligence (g) that exceeded the variance attributed to the lower-order factors. Model-based reliability estimates supported interpretation of the higher-order factor (i.e., g). Additional analyses were conducted by forcing extraction of the 7 theoretically posited factors; however, the resulting solution was only partially aligned (i.e., Gs, Gwm) with the theoretical structure promoted in the Technical Manual and suggested the preeminence of the higher-order factor. Results challenge the hypothesized structure of the WJ IV Cognitive and raise concerns about its alignment with Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Structure shows that a glycosaminoglycan and protein recognition site in factor H is perturbed by age-related macular degeneration-linked single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Andrew P; Deakin, Jon A; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Blaum, Bärbel S; Egan, Claire; Ferreira, Viviana P; Pangburn, Michael K; Lyon, Malcolm; Uhrín, Dusan; Barlow, Paul N

    2007-06-29

    A common single nucleotide polymorphism in the factor H gene predisposes to age-related macular degeneration. Factor H blocks the alternative pathway of complement on self-surfaces bearing specific polyanions, including the glycosaminoglycan chains of proteoglycans. Factor H also binds C-reactive protein, potentially contributing to noninflammatory apoptotic processes. The at risk sequence contains His (rather than Tyr) at position 402 (384 in the mature protein), in the seventh of the 20 complement control protein (CCP) modules (CCP7) of factor H. We expressed both His(402) and Tyr(402) variants of CCP7, CCP7,8, and CCP6-8. We determined structures of His(402) and Tyr(402) CCP7 and showed them to be nearly identical. The side chains of His/Tyr(402) have similar, solvent-exposed orientations far from interfaces with CCP6 and -8. Tyr(402) CCP7 bound significantly more tightly than His(402) CCP7 to a heparin affinity column as well as to defined-length sulfated heparin oligosaccharides employed in gel mobility shift assays. This observation is consistent with the position of the 402 side chain on the edge of one of two glycosaminoglycan-binding surface patches on CCP7 that we inferred on the basis of chemical shift perturbation studies with a sulfated heparin tetrasaccharide. According to surface plasmon resonance measurements, Tyr(402) CCP6-8 binds significantly more tightly than His(402) CCP6-8 to immobilized C-reactive protein. The data support a causal link between H402Y and age-related macular degeneration in which variation at position 402 modulates the response of factor H to age-related changes in the glycosaminoglycan composition and apoptotic activity of the macula.

  13. Reduced neuroplasticity in aged rats: a role for the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Francesca; Guidotti, Gianluigi; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A

    2013-12-01

    Aging is a physiological process characterized by a significant reduction of neuronal plasticity that might contribute to the functional defects observed in old subjects. Even if the neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to such impairment remain largely unknown, a role for neurotrophic molecules, such as the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), has been postulated. On this basis, the purpose of this study was to provide a detailed investigation of the BDNF system, at transcriptional and translational levels, in the ventral and dorsal hippocampus and in the prefrontal cortex of middle-aged and old rats, compared with in adult animals. The expression of major players in BDNF regulation and response, including the transcription factors, calcium-responsive transcription factor, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive element-binding protein (CREB), and neuronal Per Arnt Sim (PAS) domain protein 4, and the high-affinity receptor tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), was also analyzed. Our results demonstrate that the BDNF system is affected at different levels in aged rats with global impairment including reduced transcription, impaired protein synthesis and processing, and decreased activation of the TrkB receptors. These modifications might contribute to the cognitive deficits associated with aging and suggest that pharmacological strategies aimed at restoring reduced neurotrophism might be useful to counteract age-related cognitive decline.

  14. "Inflamm-aging" influences immune cell survival factors in human bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Pangrazzi, Luca; Meryk, Andreas; Naismith, Erin; Koziel, Rafal; Lair, Julian; Krismer, Martin; Trieb, Klemens; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2017-03-01

    The bone marrow (BM) plays a key role in the long-term maintenance of immunological memory. However, the impact of aging on the production of survival factors for effector/memory T cells and plasma cells in the human BM has not been studied. We now show that the expression of molecules involved in the maintenance of immunological memory in the human BM changes with age. While IL-15, which protects potentially harmful CD8(+) CD28(-) senescent T cells, increases, IL-7 decreases. IL-6, which may synergize with IL-15, is also overexpressed. In contrast, a proliferation-inducing ligand, a plasma cell survival factor, is reduced. IFN-y, TNF, and ROS accumulate in the BM in old age. IL-15 and IL-6 expression are stimulated by IFN-y and correlate with ROS levels in BM mononuclear cells. Both cytokines are reduced by incubation with the ROS scavengers N-acetylcysteine and vitamin C. IL-15 and IL-6 are also overexpressed in the BM of superoxide dismutase 1 knockout mice compared to their WT counterparts. In summary, our results demonstrate the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in age-related changes of immune cell survival factors in the BM, suggesting that antioxidants may be beneficial in counteracting immunosenescence by improving immunological memory in old age.

  15. Dynamic shifts in occupancy by TAL1 are guided by GATA factors and drive large-scale reprogramming of gene expression during hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Keller, Cheryl A.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Pimkin, Maxim; Blobel, Gerd A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    We used mouse ENCODE data along with complementary data from other laboratories to study the dynamics of occupancy and the role in gene regulation of the transcription factor TAL1, a critical regulator of hematopoiesis, at multiple stages of hematopoietic differentiation. We combined ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data in six mouse cell types representing a progression from multilineage precursors to differentiated erythroblasts and megakaryocytes. We found that sites of occupancy shift dramatically during commitment to the erythroid lineage, vary further during terminal maturation, and are strongly associated with changes in gene expression. In multilineage progenitors, the likely target genes are enriched for hematopoietic growth and functions associated with the mature cells of specific daughter lineages (such as megakaryocytes). In contrast, target genes in erythroblasts are specifically enriched for red cell functions. Furthermore, shifts in TAL1 occupancy during erythroid differentiation are associated with gene repression (dissociation) and induction (co-occupancy with GATA1). Based on both enrichment for transcription factor binding site motifs and co-occupancy determined by ChIP-seq, recruitment by GATA transcription factors appears to be a stronger determinant of TAL1 binding to chromatin than the canonical E-box binding site motif. Studies of additional proteins lead to the model that TAL1 regulates expression after being directed to a distinct subset of genomic binding sites in each cell type via its association with different complexes containing master regulators such as GATA2, ERG, and RUNX1 in multilineage cells and the lineage-specific master regulator GATA1 in erythroblasts. PMID:25319994

  16. Frailty in Older Breast Cancer Survivors: Age, Prevalence, and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jill A.; Winters-Stone, Kerri M.; Dobek, Jessica; Nail, Lillian M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Describe frailty and associated factors in breast cancer survivors Design Cross-sectional descriptive Setting School of nursing Sample 216 breast cancer survivors (BCS) aged 53–87 not currently participating in exercise Methods Performance tests, clinical measures, and self-reported questionnaires provided baseline data analyzed for this study Main Research Variables Frailty was defined as meeting 3 of the 5 criteria of the Frailty Phenotype: shrinking, exhaustion, low activity, slowness, and weakness. Data were compared to published data from women in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) and Women’s Health and Aging Study (WHAS). Findings 18% of BCS aged 70–79 were frail, compared to 11% of CHS and WHAS women aged 70–79. Frailty was more common at a younger age in BCS and more BCS were frail in all age groups compared to CHS women until approximately age 80 when prevalence of frailty was similar in the two groups. 50% of BCS were classified as prefrail because they met 1–2 of the 5 frailty criteria. Higher body mass index increased the odds of frailty and higher physical activity decreased the odds of frailty (OR= 1.12, p=.003 and OR=.99, p=.000 respectively). Conclusions Frailty and prefrailty may be common in BCS and may occur at an earlier age than in adults without a history of cancer. PMID:23615146

  17. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on dopaminergic function and motor behavior during aging

    PubMed Central

    Boger, Heather A.; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Saylor, Alicia J.; Bender, Tara S.; McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Fortress, Ashley M.; Zaman, Vandana; Huang, Peng; Middaugh, Lawrence D.; Randall, Patrick K.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.; Rohrer, Baerbel; Helke, Kristi L.; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical in synaptic plasticity and in the survival and function of midbrain dopamine neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of a partial genetic deletion of BDNF on motor function and dopamine (DA) neurotransmitter measures by comparing (Bdnf+/−) with wildtype mice (WT) at different ages. Bdnf+/ and WT mice had similar body weights until 12 months of age; however, at 21 months, Bdnf+/− mice were significantly heavier than WT mice. Horizontal and vertical motor activity was reduced for Bdnf+/− compared to WT mice; but was not influenced by Age. Performance on an accelerating rotarod declined with age for both genotypes and was exacerbated for Bdnf+/− mice. Body weight did not correlate with any of the three behavioral measures studied. DA neurotransmitter markers indicated no genotypic difference in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT), or vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) immunoreactivity at any age. However, DA transport via DAT (starting at 12 months) and VMAT2 (starting at 3 months) as well as KCl-stimulated DA release were reduced in Bdnf+/− mice and declined with age suggesting an increasingly important role for BDNF in the release and uptake of DA with the aging process. These findings suggest that a BDNF expression deficit becomes more critical to dopaminergic dynamics and related behavioral activities with increasing age. PMID:20860702

  18. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Contributes to a Shift in the Angioregulatory Activity of Retinal Glial (Müller) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yafai, Yousef; Iandiev, Ianors; Lange, Johannes; Yang, Xiu Mei; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Eichler, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine with pro-angiogenic and neurotrophic effects. The angioregulatory role of this molecule may become especially significant in retinal neovascularization, which is a hallmark of a number of ischemic eye diseases. This study was undertaken to reveal expression characteristics of bFGF, produced by retinal glial (Müller) cells, and to determine conditions under which glial bFGF may stimulate the proliferation of retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Immunofluorescence labeling detected bFGF in Müller cells of the rat retina and in acutely isolated Müller cells with bFGF levels, which increased after ischemia-reperfusion in postischemic retinas. In patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy or myopia, the immunoreactivity of bFGF co-localized to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells in surgically excised retinal tissues. RT-PCR and ELISA analyses indicated that cultured Müller cells produce bFGF, which is elevated under hypoxia or oxidative stress, as well as under stimulation with various growth factors and cytokines, including pro-inflammatory factors. When retinal endothelial cells were cultured in the presence of media from hypoxia (0.2%)-conditioned Müller cells, a distinct picture of endothelial cell proliferation emerged. Media from 24-h cultured Müller cells inhibited proliferation, whereas 72-h conditioned media elicited a stimulatory effect. BFGF-neutralizing antibodies suppressed the enhanced endothelial cell proliferation to a similar extent as anti-VEGF antibodies. Furthermore, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK−1/−2) in retinal endothelial cells was increased when the cells were cultured in 72-h conditioned media, while neutralizing bFGF attenuated the activation of this signaling pathway. These data provide evidence that retinal (glial) Müller cells are major sources of bFGF in the ischemic retina. Müller cells under

  19. Relationship of Selected Factors to Traditional-Age Undergraduate Women's Development of Autonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Deborah J.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the independent contribution of interpersonal relationships, parental attachment, and racial/ethnic identity to traditional-age undergraduate women's autonomy development, removing the effect of biographical correlates. Differences by race/ethnicity and by residence status in relationship to factors of autonomy are investigated.…

  20. Age- and Sex-Specific Causal Effects of Adiposity on Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Tove; Hägg, Sara; Ploner, Alexander; Mägi, Reedik; Fischer, Krista; Draisma, Harmen H.M.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Benyamin, Beben; Ladenvall, Claes; Åkerlund, Mikael; Kals, Mart; Esko, Tõnu; Nelson, Christopher P.; Kaakinen, Marika; Huikari, Ville; Mangino, Massimo; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Kristiansson, Kati; Nuotio, Marja-Liisa; Kobl, Michael; Grallert, Harald; Dehghan, Abbas; Kuningas, Maris; de Vries, Paul S.; de Bruijn, Renée F.A.G.; Willems, Sara M.; Heikkilä, Kauko; Silventoinen, Karri; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Legry, Vanessa; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Goumidi, Louisa; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Strauch, Konstantin; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Herder, Christian; Palotie, Aarno; Menni, Cristina; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Havulinna, Aki S.; Moreno, Luis A.; Gonzalez-Gross, Marcela; Evans, Alun; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Yarnell, John W.G.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Ferrières, Jean; Veronesi, Giovanni; Perola, Markus; Arveiler, Dominique; Brambilla, Paolo; Lind, Lars; Kaprio, Jaakko; Hofman, Albert; Stricker, Bruno H.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Franco, Oscar H.; Cottel, Dominique; Dallongeville, Jean; Hall, Alistair S.; Jula, Antti; Tobin, Martin D.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Samani, Nilesh J.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Whitfield, John B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Groop, Leif; Spector, Tim D.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Amouyel, Philippe; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Nilsson, Peter M.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies have reported different effects of adiposity on cardiovascular risk factors across age and sex. Since cardiovascular risk factors are enriched in obese individuals, it has not been easy to dissect the effects of adiposity from those of other risk factors. We used a Mendelian randomization approach, applying a set of 32 genetic markers to estimate the causal effect of adiposity on blood pressure, glycemic indices, circulating lipid levels, and markers of inflammation and liver disease in up to 67,553 individuals. All analyses were stratified by age (cutoff 55 years of age) and sex. The genetic score was associated with BMI in both nonstratified analysis (P = 2.8 × 10−107) and stratified analyses (all P < 3.3 × 10−30). We found evidence of a causal effect of adiposity on blood pressure, fasting levels of insulin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides in a nonstratified analysis and in the <55-year stratum. Further, we found evidence of a smaller causal effect on total cholesterol (P for difference = 0.015) in the ≥55-year stratum than in the <55-year stratum, a finding that could be explained by biology, survival bias, or differential medication. In conclusion, this study extends previous knowledge of the effects of adiposity by providing sex- and age-specific causal estimates on cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25712996

  1. Biological factors and age-dependence of primary motor cortex experimental plasticity.

    PubMed

    Polimanti, Renato; Simonelli, Ilaria; Zappasodi, Filippo; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Pellicciari, Maria Concetta; Benussi, Luisa; Squitti, Rosanna; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Tecchio, Franca

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate whether the age-dependence of brain plasticity correlates with the levels of proteins involved in hormone and brain functions we executed a paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocol and blood tests. We measured the PAS-induced plasticity in the primary motor cortex. Blood levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), estradiol, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3, progesterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone, and the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) were determined in 15 healthy men and 20 healthy women. We observed an age-related reduction of PAS-induced plasticity in females that it is not present in males. In females, PAS-induced plasticity displayed a correlation with testosterone (p = 0.006) that became a trend after the adjustment for the age effect (p = 0.078). In males, IGF-1 showed a nominally significant correlation with the PAS-induced plasticity (p = 0.043). In conclusion, we observed that hormone blood levels (testosterone in females and IGF-1 in males) may be involved in the age-dependence of brain plasticity.

  2. Factors Affecting Sensitivity to Frequency Change in School-Age Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buss, Emily; Taylor, Crystal N.; Leibold, Lori J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-age children are poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to evaluate developmental effects related to memory for pitch and the utilization of temporal fine structure. Method: Listeners were 5.1- to 13.6-year-olds and adults, all with normal hearing. A subgroup of…

  3. Factors Affecting Sensitivity to Frequency Change in School-Age Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buss, Emily; Taylor, Crystal N.; Leibold, Lori J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-age children are poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to evaluate developmental effects related to memory for pitch and the utilization of temporal fine structure. Method: Listeners were 5.1- to 13.6-year-olds and adults, all with normal hearing. A subgroup of…

  4. Factors Affecting the Age at Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Nova Scotia, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenette, Priscilla; Dodds, Linda; MacPherson, Kathleen; Flowerdew, Gordon; Hennen, Brian; Bryson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    While early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is essential for ensuring timely access to early intervention services, there is limited existing literature investigating factors that delay this diagnosis. This population-based cohort study explored the age at which children in Nova Scotia, Canada, are diagnosed with ASDs and the factors…

  5. Twinship as a Protective Factor against Behavioural and Emotional Problems at Preschool Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirkkonen, Tiina; Joskitt, Leena; Kunelius, Anne; Huhtaniska, Marika; Ebeling, Hanna; Moilanen, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Early attachment has both protective and risk factors as regards later mental health. In Finland, insecure-avoidant-type attachment is overrepresented. Does this indicate a risk for emotional and behavioural problems at preschool age? In this study, we examined and compared the association between attachment and mental health in Finnish singletons…

  6. Aerobic Exercise and Other Healthy Lifestyle Factors That Influence Vascular Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Parker, Jessica R.; LaRocca, Thomas J.; Seals, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) remain the leading cause of death in the United States and other modern societies. Advancing age is the major risk factor for CVD, primarily due to stiffening of the large elastic arteries and the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, regular aerobic exercise protects against the development…

  7. META-ANALYSIS OF THE LIFE STYLE FACTORS RELEVANT TO ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS FOR THE AGING POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) study is to characterize activity patterns, physiological changes, and environmental exposures for the aging population. Meta analysis was performed on more than 2000 reviewed articles to evaluate the lifestyle factors ...

  8. Ergonomics/Human factors needs of an ageing workforce in the manufacturing sector.

    PubMed

    W Stedmon, Alex; Howells, Hannah; R Wilson, John; Dianat, Iman

    2012-01-01

    As the effects of demographic transition are realised around the world, many in-dustrial societies are facing the effects of a baby boom generation, increased life expectancies, decreased birth rates and recent changes to retirement legislation with the result that older work¬ers are set to comprise a greater proportion of the labour force. This paper reviews the evidence for the physical and cognitive factors that characterise an ageing workforce in manufacturing. From an ergonomics and human factors (E/HF) pers¬pective, characteristics of manufacturing tasks and the effects of ageing provide an insight into how the industry will have to adapt to support the user needs of the older worker in the future. The approach taken is drawn from Ilmarinen's framework of age, experience, and work performance, from which specific E/HF issues are explored. There would appear to potential to support physical decline in older workers within manufacturing jobs through increased mechanisation and automation; however, those factors associated with cognitive human factors are less clear. Increased mechanisation and automation can place greater loads and demands on the older worker where cognitive decline is more subtle and varied between workers. Using historical and contemporary findings and the relationship between age, experience, and work performance is redrawn to include both cognitive skills and physical attributes to provide recommendations for future job design and worker needs.

  9. Age-Related Differences in Emotion Regulation Strategies: Examining the Role of Contextual Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirda, Brittney; Valentine, Thomas R.; Aldao, Amelia; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya

    2016-01-01

    Increasing age is characterized by greater positive affective states. However, there is mixed evidence on the implementation of emotion regulation strategies across the life span. To clarify the discrepancies in the literature, we examined the modulating influence of contextual factors in understanding emotion regulation strategy use in older and…

  10. Twinship as a Protective Factor against Behavioural and Emotional Problems at Preschool Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirkkonen, Tiina; Joskitt, Leena; Kunelius, Anne; Huhtaniska, Marika; Ebeling, Hanna; Moilanen, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Early attachment has both protective and risk factors as regards later mental health. In Finland, insecure-avoidant-type attachment is overrepresented. Does this indicate a risk for emotional and behavioural problems at preschool age? In this study, we examined and compared the association between attachment and mental health in Finnish singletons…

  11. Age-Related Differences in Emotion Regulation Strategies: Examining the Role of Contextual Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirda, Brittney; Valentine, Thomas R.; Aldao, Amelia; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya

    2016-01-01

    Increasing age is characterized by greater positive affective states. However, there is mixed evidence on the implementation of emotion regulation strategies across the life span. To clarify the discrepancies in the literature, we examined the modulating influence of contextual factors in understanding emotion regulation strategy use in older and…

  12. Ergonomics/Human Factors Needs of an Ageing Workforce in the Manufacturing Sector

    PubMed Central

    W. Stedmon, Alex; Howells, Hannah; R. Wilson, John; Dianat, Iman

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the effects of demographic transition are realised around the world, many in-dustrial societies are facing the effects of a baby boom generation, increased life expectancies, decreased birth rates and recent changes to retirement legislation with the result that older work¬ers are set to comprise a greater proportion of the labour force. Methods: This paper reviews the evidence for the physical and cognitive factors that characterise an ageing workforce in manufacturing. From an ergonomics and human factors (E/HF) pers¬pective, characteristics of manufacturing tasks and the effects of ageing provide an insight into how the industry will have to adapt to support the user needs of the older worker in the future. The approach taken is drawn from Ilmarinen’s framework of age, experience, and work performance, from which specific E/HF issues are explored. Results: There would appear to potential to support physical decline in older workers within manufacturing jobs through increased mechanisation and automation; however, those factors associated with cognitive human factors are less clear. Increased mechanisation and automation can place greater loads and demands on the older worker where cognitive decline is more subtle and varied between workers. Conclusion: Using historical and contemporary findings and the relationship between age, experience, and work performance is redrawn to include both cognitive skills and physical attributes to provide recommendations for future job design and worker needs. PMID:24688925

  13. Factors Affecting the Age at Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Nova Scotia, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenette, Priscilla; Dodds, Linda; MacPherson, Kathleen; Flowerdew, Gordon; Hennen, Brian; Bryson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    While early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is essential for ensuring timely access to early intervention services, there is limited existing literature investigating factors that delay this diagnosis. This population-based cohort study explored the age at which children in Nova Scotia, Canada, are diagnosed with ASDs and the factors…

  14. Profiling risk for acute rejection in kidney transplantation: recipient age is a robust risk factor.

    PubMed

    Rana, Abbas; Murthy, Bhamidipati; Pallister, Zachery; Kueht, Michael; Cotton, Ronald; Galvan, N Thao N; Etheridge, Whiston; Liu, Hau; Goss, John; O'Mahony, Christine

    2016-09-29

    Careful management of immunosuppression is paramount to prevent acute rejection in kidney transplantation. We studied a cohort of 139,875 kidney transplant recipients from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) database between 2002 and 2013. We confirmed the analysis with a cohort of 35,277 who received thymoglobulin induction with tacrolimus maintenance, and a third cohort of 12,161 recipients who received basiliximab induction with tacrolimus maintenance. We performed multivariate logistic regression analyses on data from all three cohorts and identified independent risk factors for treated acute rejection at 1 year. Recipient age was a robust risk factor for rejection in all three cohorts in a dose response pattern. Young age (18-25 years) was among the strongest risk factors for rejection in all three cohorts; thymoglobulin cohort: OR 1.87 (1.59-2.19); basiliximab cohort: OR 2.41 (1.89-3.05); and inclusive cohort: OR 1.97 (1.83-2.12). The opposite was true for old age (65-69 years); thymoglobulin cohort: OR 0.69 (0.59-0.81); basiliximab cohort: OR 0.77 (0.62-0.96); and inclusive cohort: OR 0.75 (0.70-0.80). This study is unique because it is the largest and most comprehensive multivariate analysis that demonstrates recipient age is a robust risk factor for acute rejection in an inverse dose response pattern.

  15. Aerobic Exercise and Other Healthy Lifestyle Factors That Influence Vascular Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Parker, Jessica R.; LaRocca, Thomas J.; Seals, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) remain the leading cause of death in the United States and other modern societies. Advancing age is the major risk factor for CVD, primarily due to stiffening of the large elastic arteries and the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, regular aerobic exercise protects against the development…

  16. META-ANALYSIS OF THE LIFE STYLE FACTORS RELEVANT TO ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS FOR THE AGING POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) study is to characterize activity patterns, physiological changes, and environmental exposures for the aging population. Meta analysis was performed on more than 2000 reviewed articles to evaluate the lifestyle factors ...

  17. Risk factors for the onset of prostatic cancer: age, location, and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Leitzmann, Michael F; Rohrmann, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    At present, only three risk factors for prostate cancer have been firmly established; these are all nonmodifiable: age, race, and a positive family history of prostate cancer. However, numerous modifiable factors have also been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. In the current review, we summarize the epidemiologic data for age, location, and selected behavioral factors in relation to the onset of prostate cancer. Although the available data are not entirely consistent, possible preventative behavioral factors include increased physical activity, intakes of tomatoes, cruciferous vegetables, and soy. Factors that may enhance prostate cancer risk include frequent consumption of dairy products and, possibly, meat. By comparison, alcohol probably exerts no important influence on prostate cancer development. Similarly, dietary supplements are unlikely to protect against the onset of prostate cancer in healthy men. Several factors, such as smoking and obesity, show a weak association with prostate cancer incidence but a positive relation with prostate cancer mortality. Other factors, such as fish intake, also appear to be unassociated with incident prostate cancer but show an inverse relation with fatal prostate cancer. Such heterogeneity in the relationship between behavioral factors and nonadvanced, advanced, or fatal prostate cancers helps shed light on the carcinogenetic process because it discerns the impact of exposure on early and late stages of prostate cancer development. Inconsistent associations between behavioral factors and prostate cancer risk seen in previous studies may in part be due to uncontrolled detection bias because of current widespread use of prostate-specific antigen testing for prostate cancer, and the possibility that certain behavioral factors are systematically related to the likelihood of undergoing screening examinations. In addition, several genes may modify the study results, but data concerning specific gene

  18. Age as a factor in sensory integration function in Taiwanese children.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Kai; Wu, Huey-Min; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Tseng, Mei-Hui; Lin, Chung-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Sensory integration progresses along a normal developmental sequence. However, few studies have explored how age difference affects the way sensory integration functions in Taiwanese children as they develop. Therefore, this study aims to pinpoint the role of age in sensory integration. A purposive sampling plan was employed. The study population comprised 1,000 Chinese children aged 36 to 131 months (mean = 74.48 months, standard deviation = 25.69 months). Subjects were scored on seven subsets of the Test of Sensory Integration Function (TSIF). An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to identify differences between four age groups (ages 3-4, 5-6, 7-8, and 9-10 years), in the categories of the TSIF. ANOVA revealed that age is a significant factor in each of the seven tasks of sensory integration associated with various stages of development. The effect of age was significant in all four groups for the subscale of Bilateral Integration Sequences. The function of sensory integration for the children aged 5-8 years did not produce statistically significant results for the subscale of Postural Movement, Sensory Discrimination, Sensory Seeking, or Attention and Activity. For the subscale of Sensory Modulation and Emotional Behavior, the effect of age was significant in only group 1 (children aged 3-4 years) and group 2 (children aged 5-6 years). There was significant difference between group 1 and group 2 for seven categories. Significant differences were contributed by the differences from group 1 (3-4 years) and group 4 (9-10 years) in five subscales (Postural Movement, Bilateral Integration Sequences, Sensory Discrimination, Sensory Seeking, and Attention and Activity). There were three developmental trends in the seven categories of the TSIF.

  19. A feasibility study on age-related factors of wrist pulse using principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Jang-Han Bae; Young Ju Jeon; Sanghun Lee; Jaeuk U Kim

    2016-08-01

    Various analysis methods for examining wrist pulse characteristics are needed for accurate pulse diagnosis. In this feasibility study, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to observe age-related factors of wrist pulse from various analysis parameters. Forty subjects in the age group of 20s and 40s were participated, and their wrist pulse signal and respiration signal were acquired with the pulse tonometric device. After pre-processing of the signals, twenty analysis parameters which have been regarded as values reflecting pulse characteristics were calculated and PCA was performed. As a results, we could reduce complex parameters to lower dimension and age-related factors of wrist pulse were observed by combining-new analysis parameter derived from PCA. These results demonstrate that PCA can be useful tool for analyzing wrist pulse signal.

  20. Moving from aged care facilities to community-based accommodation: outcomes and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Dianne; Farnworth, Louise; Sloan, Sue; Brown, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 3500 people under 60 years of age are living in residential aged care in Australia, a situation which is generally recognized as incompatible with optimum quality of life. The objective of the current study is to explore the transition experiences of young people with acquired brain injury who have lived in aged care facilities and moved into community-based settings. Grounded theory, qualitative design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven individuals with very severe ABI, seven family caregivers and two disability support workers. Each interview was recorded and transcribed verbatim. Participants identified a range of positive outcomes that resulted from the transition from aged care settings to community living environments including increased independence in everyday activities, improved well-being and a greater degree of social inclusion. Participants also identified environmental factors that they deemed as crucial to facilitating positive outcomes. People with very severe ABI have the potential to increase their level of independence in community-based accommodation settings; a potential that is not fostered in most aged care environments. The findings inform the outcome variables and environmental factors that should be measured in studies of transition from aged care to the community.

  1. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  2. Age trends in prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in Roma minority population of Croatia.

    PubMed

    Zeljko, Hrvojka Marija; Skarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Narančić, Nina Smolej; Barešić, Ana; Tomas, Zeljka; Petranović, Matea Zajc; Miličić, Jasna; Salihović, Marijana Peričić; Janićijević, Branka

    2013-07-01

    The Roma (Gypsy) are the largest European minority population characterized by poverty, social exclusion as well as by numerous life-style and cultural specificities, which all could have an adverse impact on their cardiovascular health. This study assesses the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk factors in community-based sample of 430 adult Roma, living in rural area of Croatia, by providing the actual and age-adjusted estimates using the European standard population. The most prominent classical CVD risk phenotypes (blood pressure, obesity, smoking, glucose and lipid profile) were selected, and the standard risk cut-offs were applied. The study has shown that compared to general population of Croatia, the Roma population bears a high CVD risk factors load related to smoking and high glucose level. The CVD risk factors prevalence in Roma also showed important sex and age patterns, the most imposing of which are the findings of higher prevalence of CVD risks in women (especially obesity and triglyceride levels) and the trend of higher body mass index (BMI) level in younger age group (18-34 years) which both stand in contrast to the trends characterizing the general population of Croatia. These findings are complemented by the trend of decreased risk in the oldest age group (65+ years) for all investigated CVD risk factors (with exception of triglycerides level) compared to the 50-64 age group. We conclude that the age and sex CVD risks pattern point to the health transition of this rural Roma population. As we expect the proportion of CVD in the Roma minority of Croatia to increase in the future along with further modernization of their lifestyle, the CVD prevention measures in this population are urgent and should be primarily targeted at women and at the younger segment of this population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk factors for binge eating and purging eating disorders: differences based on age of onset.

    PubMed

    Allen, Karina L; Byrne, Susan M; Oddy, Wendy H; Schmidt, Ulrike; Crosby, Ross D

    2014-11-01

    To (1) determine whether childhood risk factors for early onset binge eating and purging eating disorders also predict risk for later-onset binge eating and purging disorders, and (2) compare the utility of childhood and early adolescent variables in predicting later-onset disorders. Participants (N = 1,383) were drawn from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, which has followed children from pre-birth to age 20. Eating disorders were assessed when participants were aged 14, 17, and 20. Risk factors for early onset eating disorders have been reported previously (Allen et al., J Am Acad Child Psychiat, 48, 800-809, 2009). This study used logistic regression to determine whether childhood risk factors for early onset disorders, as previously identified, would also predict risk for later-onset disorders (n = 145). Early adolescent predictors of later-onset disorders were also examined. Consistent with early onset cases, female sex and parent-perceived child overweight at age 10 were significant multivariate predictors of binge eating and purging disorders with onset in later adolescence. Eating, weight, and shape concerns at age 14 were also significant in predicting later-onset disorders. In the final stepwise multivariate model, female sex and eating, weight, and shape concerns at age 14 were significant in predicting later-onset eating disorders, while parent-perceived child overweight at age 10 was not. There is overlap between risk factors for binge eating and purging disorders with early and later onset. However, childhood exposures may be more important for early than later onset cases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor and other endogenous interplayers in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Grisanti, Salvatore; Tatar, Olcay

    2008-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifaceted disease characterized by early subclinical changes at the choroidea-retinal pigment epithelium interface. Both the causal and formal pathogenesis of the disease is still puzzling. Similarly, the reason for progression into two distinct late forms which are "geographic atrophy" and "choroidal neovascularization" remains enigmatic. Late changes are usually responsible for the dramatic loss in central function that has a devastating effect on quality of life. In industrialized countries the disease is a major cause for visual disability among persons over 60 years of age. Due to demographic right-shift and increased life expectancy, AMD is not only a medical problem but will have a pronounced socio-economic effect. Neovascular AMD with the development of choroidal neovascularization in the macular area accounts for 80% of the severe loss of visual acuity due to AMD. In the last decades, treatment modes were merely based on the destruction or surgical removal of the neovascular complex. In the present, however, the philosophical approach to treat the disease is changing to a pathology modifying manner. Intelligent targeting of the involved relevant factors and pathways should stop disease progression, reduce complications and improve vision. The first step into this new era has been accomplished with the introduction of antiangiogenic agents. The new agents act either directly on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or indirectly on its functional cascade. VEGF makes a fundamental contribution to neovascular processes but it also acts in physiological pathways. The main purpose of this review is to summarize its physiological role especially within the eye, the role in the development of AMD and to understand and foresee both the benefits and potential side-effects of the anti-VEGF-based therapy.

  5. The Shi