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Sample records for aging skeletal muscle

  1. Aging of skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Miljkovic, Natasa; Lim, Jae-Young; Miljkovic, Iva; Frontera, Walter R

    2015-04-01

    Aging has become an important topic for scientific research because life expectancy and the number of men and women in older age groups have increased dramatically in the last century. This is true in most countries of the world including the Republic of Korea and the United States. From a rehabilitation perspective, the most important associated issue is a progressive decline in functional capacity and independence. Sarcopenia is partly responsible for this decline. Many changes underlying the loss of muscle mass and force-generating capacity of skeletal muscle can be understood at the cellular and molecular levels. Muscle size and architecture are both altered with advanced adult age. Further, changes in myofibers include impairments in several physiological domains including muscle fiber activation, excitation-contraction coupling, actin-myosin cross-bridge interaction, energy production, and repair and regeneration. A thorough understanding of these alterations can lead to the design of improved preventative and rehabilitative interventions, such as personalized exercise training programs.

  2. Exercise Promotes Healthy Aging of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cartee, Gregory D.; Hepple, Russell T.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Zierath, Juleen R.

    2016-01-01

    Primary aging is the progressive and inevitable process of bodily deterioration during adulthood. In skeletal muscle, primary aging causes defective mitochondrial energetics, and reduced muscle mass. Secondary aging refers to additional deleterious structural and functional age-related changes caused by diseases and lifestyle factors. Secondary aging can exacerbate deficits in mitochondrial function and muscle mass, concomitant with the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Exercise opposes deleterious effects of secondary aging by preventing the decline in mitochondrial respiration, mitigating aging-related loss of muscle mass and enhancing insulin sensitivity. This review focuses on mechanisms by which exercise promotes “healthy aging” by inducing modifications in skeletal muscle. PMID:27304505

  3. Heterogeneous ageing of skeletal muscle microvascular function.

    PubMed

    Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2016-04-15

    The distribution of blood flow to skeletal muscle during exercise is altered with advancing age. Changes in arteriolar function that are muscle specific underlie age-induced changes in blood flow distribution. With advancing age, functional adaptations that occur in resistance arterioles from oxidative muscles differ from those that occur in glycolytic muscles. Age-related adaptations of morphology, as well as changes in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle signalling, differ in muscle of diverse fibre type. Age-induced endothelial dysfunction has been reported in most skeletal muscle arterioles; however, unique alterations in signalling contribute to the dysfunction in arterioles from oxidative muscles as compared with those from glycolytic muscles. In resistance arterioles from oxidative muscle, loss of nitric oxide signalling contributes significantly to endothelial dysfunction, whereas in resistance arterioles from glycolytic muscle, alterations in both nitric oxide and prostanoid signalling underlie endothelial dysfunction. Similarly, adaptations of the vascular smooth muscle that occur with advancing age are heterogeneous between arterioles from oxidative and glycolytic muscles. In both oxidative and glycolytic muscle, late-life exercise training reverses age-related microvascular dysfunction, and exercise training appears to be particularly effective in reversing endothelial dysfunction. Patterns of microvascular ageing that develop among muscles of diverse fibre type and function may be attributable to changing patterns of physical activity with ageing. Importantly, aerobic exercise training, initiated even at an advanced age, restores muscle blood flow distribution patterns and vascular function in old animals to those seen in their young counterparts.

  4. Skeletal muscle aging and the mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2013-01-01

    The decline in human muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) is a hallmark of the aging process. A growing body of research in the areas of bioenergetics and protein turnover has placed the mitochondria at the center of this process. It is now clear that unless an active life style is rigorously followed, skeletal muscle mitochondrial decline occurs as humans’ age. Increasing research on mitochondrial biology has elucidated the regulatory pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, many of which are potential therapeutic targets, and highlight the beneficial effects of vigorous physical activity on skeletal muscle health for an aging population. PMID:23375520

  5. Oxidative system in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Daniela; Rucci, Sara; Vandoni, Matteo; Negro, Massimo; Marzatico, Fulvio

    2011-07-01

    Aging is an inevitable biological process that is characterized by a general decline in the physiological and biochemical functions of the major systems. In the case of the neuromuscular system, reductions in strength and mobility cause a deterioration in motor performance, impaired mobility and disability. At the cellular level, aging is caused by a progressive decline in mitochondrial function that results in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). As the level of oxidative stress in skeletal muscle increases with age, the age-process is characterized by an imbalance between an increase in ROS production in the organism, and antioxidant defences as a whole. We have reviewed the literature on oxidative stress in aging human skeletal muscles, and to assesss the impact of differences in physiological factors (sex, fiber composition, muscle type and function).

  6. Oxidative proteome alterations during skeletal muscle ageing

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço dos Santos, Sofia; Baraibar, Martin A.; Lundberg, Staffan; Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar; Larsson, Lars; Friguet, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia corresponds to the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality, and strength associated with ageing and leads to a progressive impairment of mobility and quality of life. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are not completely understood. A hallmark of cellular and tissular ageing is the accumulation of oxidatively modified (carbonylated) proteins, leading to a decreased quality of the cellular proteome that could directly impact on normal cellular functions. Although increased oxidative stress has been reported during skeletal muscle ageing, the oxidized protein targets, also referred as to the ‘oxi-proteome’ or ‘carbonylome’, have not been characterized yet. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins build up and potentially affect muscle function, proteins targeted by these modifications have been identified in human rectus abdominis muscle obtained from young and old healthy donors using a bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach coupled with immunodetection of carbonylated proteins. Among evidenced protein spots, 17 were found as increased carbonylated in biopsies from old donors comparing to young counterparts. These proteins are involved in key cellular functions such as cellular morphology and transport, muscle contraction and energy metabolism. Importantly, impairment of these pathways has been described in skeletal muscle during ageing. Functional decline of these proteins due to irreversible oxidation may therefore impact directly on the above-mentioned pathways, hence contributing to the generation of the sarcopenic phenotype. PMID:26073261

  7. Oxidative proteome alterations during skeletal muscle ageing.

    PubMed

    Lourenço dos Santos, Sofia; Baraibar, Martin A; Lundberg, Staffan; Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar; Larsson, Lars; Friguet, Bertrand

    2015-08-01

    Sarcopenia corresponds to the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality, and strength associated with ageing and leads to a progressive impairment of mobility and quality of life. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are not completely understood. A hallmark of cellular and tissular ageing is the accumulation of oxidatively modified (carbonylated) proteins, leading to a decreased quality of the cellular proteome that could directly impact on normal cellular functions. Although increased oxidative stress has been reported during skeletal muscle ageing, the oxidized protein targets, also referred as to the 'oxi-proteome' or 'carbonylome', have not been characterized yet. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins build up and potentially affect muscle function, proteins targeted by these modifications have been identified in human rectus abdominis muscle obtained from young and old healthy donors using a bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach coupled with immunodetection of carbonylated proteins. Among evidenced protein spots, 17 were found as increased carbonylated in biopsies from old donors comparing to young counterparts. These proteins are involved in key cellular functions such as cellular morphology and transport, muscle contraction and energy metabolism. Importantly, impairment of these pathways has been described in skeletal muscle during ageing. Functional decline of these proteins due to irreversible oxidation may therefore impact directly on the above-mentioned pathways, hence contributing to the generation of the sarcopenic phenotype.

  8. Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria and Aging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Courtney M.; Johannsen, Darcy L.; Ravussin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle mass and muscle strength. Declines in skeletal muscle mitochondria are thought to play a primary role in this process. Mitochondria are the major producers of reactive oxygen species, which damage DNA, proteins, and lipids if not rapidly quenched. Animal and human studies typically show that skeletal muscle mitochondria are altered with aging, including increased mutations in mitochondrial DNA, decreased activity of some mitochondrial enzymes, altered respiration with reduced maximal capacity at least in sedentary individuals, and reduced total mitochondrial content with increased morphological changes. However, there has been much controversy over measurements of mitochondrial energy production, which may largely be explained by differences in approach and by whether physical activity is controlled for. These changes may in turn alter mitochondrial dynamics, such as fusion and fission rates, and mitochondrially induced apoptosis, which may also lead to net muscle fiber loss and age-related sarcopenia. Fortunately, strategies such as exercise and caloric restriction that reduce oxidative damage also improve mitochondrial function. While these strategies may not completely prevent the primary effects of aging, they may help to attenuate the rate of decline. PMID:22888430

  9. Amino acids in healthy aging skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Emily S; Stipanuk, Martha H; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy in the U.S. and globally continues to increase. Despite increased life expectancy quality of life is not enhanced, and older adults often experience chronic age-related disease and functional disability, including frailty. Additionally, changes in body composition such as the involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) and subsequent increases in adipose tissue can augment disease and disability in this population. Furthermore, increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant concentrations may also lead to metabolic dysfunction in older adults. Specific amino acids, including leucine, cysteine and its derivative taurine, and arginine can play various roles in healthy aging, especially in regards to skeletal muscle health. Leucine and arginine play important roles in muscle protein synthesis and cell growth while cysteine and arginine play important roles in quenching oxidative stress. Evidence suggests that supplemental doses of each of these amino acids may improve the aging phenotype. However, additional research is required to establish the doses required to achieve positive outcomes in humans.

  10. Skeletal muscle regeneration and impact of aging and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Domingues-Faria, Carla; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Goncalves-Mendes, Nicolas; Boirie, Yves; Walrand, Stephane

    2016-03-01

    After skeletal muscle injury a regeneration process takes place to repair muscle. Skeletal muscle recovery is a highly coordinated process involving cross-talk between immune and muscle cells. It is well known that the physiological activities of both immune cells and muscle stem cells decline with advancing age, thereby blunting the capacity of skeletal muscle to regenerate. The age-related reduction in muscle repair efficiency contributes to the development of sarcopenia, one of the most important factors of disability in elderly people. Preserving muscle regeneration capacity may slow the development of this syndrome. In this context, nutrition has drawn much attention: studies have demonstrated that nutrients such as amino acids, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polyphenols and vitamin D can improve skeletal muscle regeneration by targeting key functions of immune cells, muscle cells or both. Here we review the process of skeletal muscle regeneration with a special focus on the cross-talk between immune and muscle cells. We address the effect of aging on immune and skeletal muscle cells involved in muscle regeneration. Finally, the mechanisms of nutrient action on muscle regeneration are described, showing that quality of nutrition may help to preserve the capacity for skeletal muscle regeneration with age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitochondrial energetics is impaired in vivo in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gouspillou, Gilles; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Rouland, Richard; Calmettes, Guillaume; Biran, Marc; Deschodt-Arsac, Véronique; Miraux, Sylvain; Thiaudiere, Eric; Pasdois, Philippe; Detaille, Dominique; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Babot, Marion; Trézéguet, Véronique; Arsac, Laurent; Diolez, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    With aging, most skeletal muscles undergo a progressive loss of mass and strength, a process termed sarcopenia. Aging-related defects in mitochondrial energetics have been proposed to be causally involved in sarcopenia. However, changes in muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation with aging remain a highly controversial issue, creating a pressing need for integrative approaches to determine whether mitochondrial bioenergetics are impaired in aged skeletal muscle. To address this issue, mitochondrial bioenergetics was first investigated in vivo in the gastrocnemius muscle of adult (6 months) and aged (21 months) male Wistar rats by combining a modular control analysis approach with (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of energetic metabolites. Using this innovative approach, we revealed that the in vivo responsiveness ('elasticity') of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to contraction-induced increase in ATP demand is significantly reduced in aged skeletal muscle, a reduction especially pronounced under low contractile activities. In line with this in vivo aging-related defect in mitochondrial energetics, we found that the mitochondrial affinity for ADP is significantly decreased in mitochondria isolated from aged skeletal muscle. Collectively, the results of this study demonstrate that mitochondrial bioenergetics are effectively altered in vivo in aged skeletal muscle and provide a novel cellular basis for this phenomenon.

  12. Mitochondrial energetics is impaired in vivo in aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gouspillou, Gilles; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Rouland, Richard; Calmettes, Guillaume; Biran, Marc; Deschodt-Arsac, Véronique; Miraux, Sylvain; Thiaudiere, Eric; Pasdois, Philippe; Detaille, Dominique; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Babot, Marion; Trézéguet, Véronique; Arsac, Laurent; Diolez, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    With aging, most skeletal muscles undergo a progressive loss of mass and strength, a process termed sarcopenia. Aging-related defects in mitochondrial energetics have been proposed to be causally involved in sarcopenia. However, changes in muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation with aging remain a highly controversial issue, creating a pressing need for integrative approaches to determine whether mitochondrial bioenergetics are impaired in aged skeletal muscle. To address this issue, mitochondrial bioenergetics was first investigated in vivo in the gastrocnemius muscle of adult (6 months) and aged (21 months) male Wistar rats by combining a modular control analysis approach with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of energetic metabolites. Using this innovative approach, we revealed that the in vivo responsiveness (‘elasticity’) of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to contraction-induced increase in ATP demand is significantly reduced in aged skeletal muscle, a reduction especially pronounced under low contractile activities. In line with this in vivo aging-related defect in mitochondrial energetics, we found that the mitochondrial affinity for ADP is significantly decreased in mitochondria isolated from aged skeletal muscle. Collectively, the results of this study demonstrate that mitochondrial bioenergetics are effectively altered in vivo in aged skeletal muscle and provide a novel cellular basis for this phenomenon. PMID:23919652

  13. Mitochondrial Involvement and Impact in Aging Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hepple, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Atrophy is a defining feature of aging skeletal muscle that contributes to progressive weakness and an increased risk of mobility impairment, falls, and physical frailty in very advanced age. Amongst the most frequently implicated mechanisms of aging muscle atrophy is mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent studies employing methods that are well-suited to interrogating intrinsic mitochondrial function find that mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species emission changes are inconsistent between aging rat muscles undergoing atrophy and appear normal in human skeletal muscle from septuagenarian physically active subjects. On the other hand, a sensitization to permeability transition seems to be a general property of atrophying muscle with aging and this effect is even seen in atrophying muscle from physically active septuagenarian subjects. In addition to this intrinsic alteration in mitochondrial function, factors extrinsic to the mitochondria may also modulate mitochondrial function in aging muscle. In particular, recent evidence implicates oxidative stress in the aging milieu as a factor that depresses respiratory function in vivo (an effect that is not present ex vivo). Furthermore, in very advanced age, not only does muscle atrophy become more severe and clinically relevant in terms of its impact, but also there is evidence that this is driven by an accumulation of severely atrophied denervated myofibers. As denervation can itself modulate mitochondrial function and recruit mitochondrial-mediated atrophy pathways, future investigations need to address the degree to which skeletal muscle mitochondrial alterations in very advanced age are a consequence of denervation, rather than a primary organelle defect, to refine our understanding of the relevance of mitochondria as a therapeutic target at this more advanced age. PMID:25309422

  14. Changes in skeletal muscle with aging: effects of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M A; Evans, W J

    1993-01-01

    There is an approximate 30% decline in muscle strength and a 40% reduction in muscle area between the second and seventh decades of life. Thus, the loss of muscle mass with aging appears to be the major factor in the age-related loss of muscle strength. The loss of muscle mass is partially due to a significant decline in the numbers of both Type I and Type II muscle fibers plus a decrease in the size of the muscle cells, with the Type II fibers showing a preferential atrophy. There appears to be no loss of glycolytic capacity in senescent skeletal muscle whereas muscle oxidative enzyme activity and muscle capillarization decrease by about 25%. Vigorous endurance exercise training in older people, where the stimulus is progressively increased, elicits a proliferation of muscle capillaries, an increase in oxidative enzyme activity, and a significant improvement in VO2max. Likewise, progressive resistive training in older individuals results in muscle hypertrophy and increased strength, if the training stimulus is of a sufficient intensity and duration. Since older individuals adapt to resistive and endurance exercise training in a similar fashion to young people, the decline in the muscle's metabolic and force-producing capacity can no longer be considered as an inevitable consequence of the aging process. Rather, the adaptations in aging skeletal muscle to exercise training may prevent sarcopenia, enhance the ease of carrying out the activities of daily living, and exert a beneficial effect on such age-associated diseases as Type II diabetes, coronary artery disease, hypertension, osteoporosis, and obesity.

  15. Lifelong physical exercise delays age-associated skeletal muscle decline.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, S; Pietrangelo, L; Loefler, S; Fruhmann, H; Vogelauer, M; Burggraf, S; Pond, A; Grim-Stieger, M; Cvecka, J; Sedliak, M; Tirpáková, V; Mayr, W; Sarabon, N; Rossini, K; Barberi, L; De Rossi, M; Romanello, V; Boncompagni, S; Musarò, A; Sandri, M; Protasi, F; Carraro, U; Kern, H

    2015-02-01

    Aging is usually accompanied by a significant reduction in muscle mass and force. To determine the relative contribution of inactivity and aging per se to this decay, we compared muscle function and structure in (a) male participants belonging to a group of well-trained seniors (average of 70 years) who exercised regularly in their previous 30 years and (b) age-matched healthy sedentary seniors with (c) active young men (average of 27 years). The results collected show that relative to their sedentary cohorts, muscle from senior sportsmen have: (a) greater maximal isometric force and function, (b) better preserved fiber morphology and ultrastructure of intracellular organelles involved in Ca(2+) handling and ATP production, (c) preserved muscle fibers size resulting from fiber rescue by reinnervation, and (d) lowered expression of genes related to autophagy and reactive oxygen species detoxification. All together, our results indicate that: (a) skeletal muscle of senior sportsmen is actually more similar to that of adults than to that of age-matched sedentaries and (b) signaling pathways controlling muscle mass and metabolism are differently modulated in senior sportsmen to guarantee maintenance of skeletal muscle structure, function, bioenergetic characteristics, and phenotype. Thus, regular physical activity is a good strategy to attenuate age-related general decay of muscle structure and function (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01679977).

  16. Molecular studies of exercise, skeletal muscle, and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, James A.; Gallagher, Iain J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of an F1000 review is to reflect on the bigger picture, exploring controversies and new concepts as well as providing opinion as to what is limiting progress in a particular field. We reviewed about 200 titles published in 2015 that included reference to ‘skeletal muscle, exercise, and ageing’ with the aim of identifying key articles that help progress our understanding or research capacity while identifying methodological issues which represent, in our opinion, major barriers to progress. Loss of neuromuscular function with chronological age impacts on both health and quality of life. We prioritised articles that studied human skeletal muscle within the context of age or exercise and identified new molecular observations that may explain how muscle responds to exercise or age. An important aspect of this short review is perspective: providing a view on the likely ‘size effect’ of a potential mechanism on physiological capacity or ageing. PMID:27303646

  17. Altered Ca2+ sparks in aging skeletal and cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Weisleder, Noah; Ma, Jianjie

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ sparks are the fundamental units that comprise Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) in striated muscle cells. In cardiac muscle, spontaneous Ca2+ sparks underlie the rhythmic CICR activity during heart contraction. In skeletal muscle, Ca2+ sparks remain quiescent during the resting state and are activated in a plastic fashion to accommodate various levels of stress. With aging, the plastic Ca2+ spark signal becomes static in skeletal muscle, whereas loss of CICR control leads to leaky Ca2+ spark activity in aged cardiomyocytes. Ca2+ spark responses reflect the integrated function of the intracellular Ca2+ regulatory machinery centered around the triad or dyad junctional complexes of striated muscles, which harbor the principal molecular players of excitation-contraction coupling. This review highlights the contribution of age-related modification of the Ca2+ release machinery and the effect of membrane structure and membrane cross-talk on the altered Ca2+ spark signaling during aging of striated muscles. PMID:18272434

  18. Understanding Age-Related Changes in Skeletal Muscle Metabolism: Differences Between Females and Males.

    PubMed

    Gheller, Brandon J F; Riddle, Emily S; Lem, Melinda R; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E

    2016-07-17

    Skeletal muscle is the largest metabolic organ system in the human body. As such, metabolic dysfunction occurring in skeletal muscle impacts whole-body nutrient homeostasis. Macronutrient metabolism changes within the skeletal muscle with aging, and these changes are associated in part with age-related skeletal muscle remodeling. Moreover, age-related changes in skeletal muscle metabolism are affected differentially between males and females and are likely driven by changes in sex hormones. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors impact observed age-related changes and sex-related differences in skeletal muscle metabolism. Despite some support for sex-specific differences in skeletal muscle metabolism with aging, more research is necessary to identify underlying differences in mechanisms. Understanding sex-specific aging skeletal muscle will assist with the development of therapies to attenuate adverse metabolic and functional outcomes.

  19. Skeletal muscle apoptosis, sarcopenia and frailty at old age.

    PubMed

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2006-12-01

    The loss of muscle mass and strength with aging, also referred to as sarcopenia of aging, is a highly prevalent condition among older adults and predicts several adverse outcomes, including disability, institutionalization and mortality. Although the exact mechanisms underlying sarcopenia are far to be unveiled, accumulating preclinical evidence suggests that an age-related acceleration of myocytes loss via apoptosis might represent a key mechanism driving the onset and progression of muscle loss. Furthermore, increased levels of apoptosis have also been reported in old rats undergoing acute muscle atrophy subsequent to muscle unloading, a condition that mimics the muscle loss observed during prolonged bed rest. Notably, preliminary evidence seems to confirm a causative role for apoptosis in age-related muscle loss in human subjects. Several signaling pathways of skeletal muscle apoptosis are currently under intense investigation, with a particular focus on the role played by mitochondria. Here, we will review the most recent evidence regarding various pathways of muscle apoptosis and their modulation by several interventions (caloric restriction, physical exercise, muscle unloading).

  20. Skeletal muscle aging: influence of oxidative stress and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mariana Janini; Martinez, Paula Felippe; Pagan, Luana Urbano; Damatto, Ricardo Luiz; Cezar, Marcelo Diacardia Mariano; Lima, Aline Regina Ruiz; Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2017-01-15

    Skeletal muscle abnormalities are responsible for significant disability in the elderly. Sarcopenia is the main alteration occurring during senescence and a key public health issue as it predicts frailty, poor quality of life, and mortality. Several factors such as reduced physical activity, hormonal changes, insulin resistance, genetic susceptibility, appetite loss, and nutritional deficiencies are involved in the physiopathology of muscle changes. Sarcopenia is characterized by structural, biochemical, molecular and functional muscle changes. An imbalance between anabolic and catabolic intracellular signaling pathways and an increase in oxidative stress both play important roles in muscle abnormalities. Currently, despite the discovery of new targets and development of new drugs, nonpharmacological therapies such as physical exercise and nutritional support are considered the basis for prevention and treatment of age-associated muscle abnormalities. There has been an increase in information on signaling pathways beneficially modulated by exercise; nonetheless, studies are needed to establish the best type, intensity, and frequency of exercise to prevent or treat age-induced skeletal muscle alterations.

  1. Nutritional influences on age-related skeletal muscle loss.

    PubMed

    Welch, Ailsa A

    2014-02-01

    Age-related muscle loss impacts on whole-body metabolism and leads to frailty and sarcopenia, which are risk factors for fractures and mortality. Although nutrients are integral to muscle metabolism the relationship between nutrition and muscle loss has only been extensively investigated for protein and amino acids. The objective of the present paper is to describe other aspects of nutrition and their association with skeletal muscle mass. Mechanisms for muscle loss relate to imbalance in protein turnover with a number of anabolic pathways of which the mechanistic TOR pathway and the IGF-1-Akt-FoxO pathways are the most characterised. In terms of catabolism the ubiquitin proteasome system, apoptosis, autophagy, inflammation, oxidation and insulin resistance are among the major mechanisms proposed. The limited research associating vitamin D, alcohol, dietary acid-base load, dietary fat and anti-oxidant nutrients with age-related muscle loss is described. Vitamin D may be protective for muscle loss; a more alkalinogenic diet and diets higher in the anti-oxidant nutrients vitamin C and vitamin E may also prevent muscle loss. Although present recommendations for prevention of sarcopenia focus on protein, and to some extent on vitamin D, other aspects of the diet including fruits and vegetables should be considered. Clearly, more research into other aspects of nutrition and their role in prevention of muscle loss is required.

  2. The adipokine leptin increases skeletal muscle mass and significantly alters skeletal muscle miRNA expression profile in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, Mark W.; Herberg, Samuel; Arounleut, Phonepasong; He, Hong-Zhi; Shiver, Austin; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhou, Li; Isales, Carlos M.; and others

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Aging is associated with muscle atrophy and loss of muscle mass, known as the sarcopenia of aging. {yields} We demonstrate that age-related muscle atrophy is associated with marked changes in miRNA expression in muscle. {yields} Treating aged mice with the adipokine leptin significantly increased muscle mass and the expression of miRNAs involved in muscle repair. {yields} Recombinant leptin therapy may therefore be a novel approach for treating age-related muscle atrophy. -- Abstract: Age-associated loss of muscle mass, or sarcopenia, contributes directly to frailty and an increased risk of falls and fractures among the elderly. Aged mice and elderly adults both show decreased muscle mass as well as relatively low levels of the fat-derived hormone leptin. Here we demonstrate that loss of muscle mass and myofiber size with aging in mice is associated with significant changes in the expression of specific miRNAs. Aging altered the expression of 57 miRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle, and many of these miRNAs are now reported to be associated specifically with age-related muscle atrophy. These include miR-221, previously identified in studies of myogenesis and muscle development as playing a role in the proliferation and terminal differentiation of myogenic precursors. We also treated aged mice with recombinant leptin, to determine whether leptin therapy could improve muscle mass and alter the miRNA expression profile of aging skeletal muscle. Leptin treatment significantly increased hindlimb muscle mass and extensor digitorum longus fiber size in aged mice. Furthermore, the expression of 37 miRNAs was altered in muscles of leptin-treated mice. In particular, leptin treatment increased the expression of miR-31 and miR-223, miRNAs known to be elevated during muscle regeneration and repair. These findings suggest that aging in skeletal muscle is associated with marked changes in the expression of specific miRNAs, and that nutrient

  3. Skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  4. Prostaglandin E2/cyclooxygenase pathway in human skeletal muscle: influence of muscle fiber type and age.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sophia Z; Jemiolo, Bozena; Lavin, Kaleen M; Lester, Bridget E; Trappe, Scott W; Trappe, Todd A

    2016-03-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway regulates skeletal muscle protein turnover and exercise training adaptations. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) define the PGE2/COX pathway enzymes and receptors in human skeletal muscle, with a focus on type I and II muscle fibers; and 2) examine the influence of aging on this pathway. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the soleus (primarily type I fibers) and vastus lateralis (proportionally more type II fibers than soleus) of young men and women (n = 8; 26 ± 2 yr), and from the vastus lateralis of young (n = 8; 25 ± 1 yr) and old (n = 12; 79 ± 2 yr) men and women. PGE2/COX pathway proteins [COX enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2), PGE2 synthases (cPGES, mPGES-1, and mPGES-2), and PGE2 receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4)] were quantified via Western blot. COX-1, cPGES, mPGES-2, and all four PGE2 receptors were detected in all skeletal muscle samples examined. COX-1 (P < 0.1) and mPGES-2 were ∼20% higher, while EP3 was 99% higher and EP4 57% lower in soleus compared with vastus lateralis (P < 0.05). Aging did not change the level of skeletal muscle COX-1, while cPGES increased 45% and EP1 (P < 0.1), EP3, and EP4 decreased ∼33% (P < 0.05). In summary, PGE2 production capacity and receptor levels are different in human skeletal muscles with markedly different type I and II muscle fiber composition. In aging skeletal muscle, PGE2 production capacity is elevated and receptor levels are downregulated. These findings have implications for understanding the regulation of skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise and aging by the PGE2/COX pathway and related inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Sexually dimorphic effect of aging on skeletal muscle protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there appear to be no differences in muscle protein turnover in young and middle aged men and women, we have reported significant differences in the rate of muscle protein synthesis between older adult men and women. This suggests that aging may affect muscle protein turnover differently in men and women. Methods We measured the skeletal muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) by using stable isotope-labeled tracer methods during basal postabsorptive conditions and during a hyperaminoacidemic-hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in eight young men (25–45 y), ten young women (25–45 y), ten old men (65–85 y) and ten old women (65–85 y). Results The basal muscle protein FSR was not different in young and old men (0.040 ± 0.004 and 0.043 ± 0.005%·h-1, respectively) and combined insulin, glucose and amino acid infusion significantly increased the muscle protein FSR both in young (to 0.063 ± 0.006%·h-1) and old (to 0.051 ± 0.008%·h-1) men but the increase (0.023 ± 0.004 vs. 0.009 ± 0.004%·h-1, respectively) was ~60% less in the old men (P = 0.03). In contrast, the basal muscle protein FSR was ~30% greater in old than young women (0.060 ± 0.003 vs. 0.046 ± 0.004%·h-1, respectively; P < 0.05) and combined insulin, glucose and amino acid infusion significantly increased the muscle protein FSR in young (P < 0.01) but not in old women (P = 0.10) so that the FSR was not different between young and old women during the clamp (0.074 ± 0.006%·h-1 vs. 0.072 ± 0.006%·h-1, respectively). Conclusions There is sexual dimorphism in the age-related changes in muscle protein synthesis and thus the metabolic processes responsible for the age-related decline in muscle mass. PMID:22620287

  6. Age-related changes in metabolic properties of equine skeletal muscle associated with muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-su; Hinchcliff, Kenneth W; Yamaguchi, Mamoru; Beard, Laurie A; Markert, Chad D; Devor, Steven T

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the age-related changes in myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition and muscle oxidative and glycolytic capacity in 18 horses ranging in age from two to 30 years. Muscle samples were collected by excisional biopsy of the semimebranosus muscle. MHC expression and the key enzymatic activities were measured. There was no significant correlation between horse age and the proportions of type-IIA and type-IIX MHC isoforms. The percentage of type-I MHC isoforms decreased with advancing age. Muscle citrate synthase activity decreased, whereas lactate dehydrogenase activity increased with increasing age. Muscle 3-OH acyl CoA dehydrogenase activity did not change with ageing. The results suggest that, similar to humans, the oxidative capacity of equine skeletal muscle decreases with age. The age-related changes in muscle metabolic properties appear to be consistent with an age-related transition in MHC isoforms of equine skeletal muscle that shifts toward more glycolytic isoforms with age.

  7. Age- and Stroke-Related Skeletal Muscle Changes: A Review for the Geriatric Clinician

    PubMed Central

    Sions, J. Megan; Tyrell, Christine M.; Knarr, Brian A.; Jancosko, Angela; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A.

    2011-01-01

    Independently, aging and stroke each have a significant negative impact on skeletal muscle, but the potential cumulative effects of aging and stroke have not been explored. Optimal interventions for individuals post-stroke may include those that specifically target skeletal muscle. Addressing changes in muscles may minimize activity limitations and enhance participation post-stroke. This paper reviews the impact of aging and stroke on muscle morphology and composition, including fiber atrophy, reductions in muscle cross-sectional area, changes in muscle fiber distributions, and increases in intramuscular fat. Relationships between changes in muscle structure, muscle function, and physical mobility are reviewed. Clinical recommendations that preserve and enhance skeletal muscle in the aging adult and individuals post-stroke are discussed. Future research directions that include systematic comparison of the differences in skeletal muscle between younger and older adults who have sustained a stroke are suggested. PMID:22107952

  8. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) contributes to normal skeletal muscle contractility in young but not in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Angela M; Zhao, Xiaoli; Weisleder, Noah; Brotto, Leticia S; Bougoin, Sylvain; Nosek, Thomas M; Reid, Michael; Hardin, Brian; Pan, Zui; Ma, Jianjie; Parness, Jerome; Brotto, Marco

    2011-06-01

    Muscle atrophy alone is insufficient to explain the significant decline in contractile force of skeletal muscle during normal aging. One contributing factor to decreased contractile force in aging skeletal muscle could be compromised excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling, without sufficient available Ca(2+) to allow for repetitive muscle contractility, skeletal muscles naturally become weaker. Using biophysical approaches, we previously showed that store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is compromised in aged skeletal muscle but not in young ones. While important, a missing component from previous studies is whether or not SOCE function correlates with contractile function during aging. Here we test the contribution of extracellular Ca(2+) to contractile function of skeletal muscle during aging. First, we demonstrate graded coupling between SR Ca(2+) release channel-mediated Ca(2+) release and activation of SOCE. Inhibition of SOCE produced significant reduction of contractile force in young skeletal muscle, particularly at high frequency stimulation, and such effects were completely absent in aged skeletal muscle. Our data indicate that SOCE contributes to the normal physiological contractile response of young healthy skeletal muscle and that defective extracellular Ca(2+) entry through SOCE contributes to the reduced contractile force characteristic of aged skeletal muscle.

  9. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry (SOCE) Contributes to Normal Skeletal Muscle Contractility in young but not in aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Brotto, Leticia S.; Bougoin, Sylvain; Nosek, Thomas M.; Reid, Michael; Hardin, Brian; Pan, Zui; Ma, Jianjie; Parness, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Muscle atrophy alone is insufficient to explain the significant decline in contractile force of skeletal muscle during normal aging. One contributing factor to decreased contractile force in aging skeletal muscle could be compromised excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling, without sufficient available Ca2+ to allow for repetitive muscle contractility, skeletal muscles naturally become weaker. Using biophysical approaches, we previously showed that store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is compromised in aged skeletal muscle but not in young ones. While important, a missing component from previous studies is whether or not SOCE function correlates with contractile function during aging. Here we test the contribution of extracellular Ca2+ to contractile function of skeletal muscle during aging. First, we demonstrate graded coupling between SR Ca2+ release channel-mediated Ca2+ release and activation of SOCE. Inhibition of SOCE produced significant reduction of contractile force in young skeletal muscle, particularly at high frequency stimulation, and such effects were completely absent in aged skeletal muscle. Our data indicate that SOCE contributes to the normal physiological contractile response of young healthy skeletal muscle and that defective extracellular Ca2+ entry through SOCE contributes to the reduced contractile force characteristic of aged skeletal muscle. PMID:21666285

  10. Age-related loss of muscle fibres is highly variable amongst mouse skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Sheard, Philip W; Anderson, Ross D

    2012-04-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, attributable in part to muscle fibre loss. We are currently unable to prevent fibre loss because we do not know what causes it. To provide a platform from which to better understand the causes of muscle fibre death we have quantified fibre loss in several muscles of aged C57Bl/6J mice. Comparison of muscle fibre numbers on dystrophin-immunostained transverse tissue sections at 6 months of age with those at 24 months shows a significant fibre loss in extensor digitorum longus and soleus, but not in sternomastoid or cleidomastoid muscles. The muscles of the elderly mice were mostly lighter than their younger counterparts, but fibres in the elderly muscles were of about the same cross-sectional area. This study shows that the contribution of fibre death to sarcopenia is highly variable and that there is no consistent pattern of age-related fibre loss between skeletal muscles.

  11. Increased Stiffness in Aged Skeletal Muscle Impairs Muscle Progenitor Cell Proliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Vanessa; Söllrald, Thomas; Drouin, Geneviève; Veillette, Noémie; Grandbois, Michel; Grenier, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle aging is associated with a decreased regenerative potential due to the loss of function of endogenous stem cells or myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs). Aged skeletal muscle is characterized by the deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), which in turn influences the biomechanical properties of myofibers by increasing their stiffness. Since the stiffness of the MPC microenvironment directly impacts MPC function, we hypothesized that the increase in muscle stiffness that occurs with aging impairs the behavior of MPCs, ultimately leading to a decrease in regenerative potential. Results We showed that freshly isolated individual myofibers from aged mouse muscles contain fewer MPCs overall than myofibers from adult muscles, with fewer quiescent MPCs and more proliferative and differentiating MPCs. We observed alterations in cultured MPC behavior in aged animals, where the proliferation and differentiation of MPCs were lower and higher, respectively. These alterations were not linked to the intrinsic properties of aged myofibers, as shown by the similar values for the cumulative population-doubling values and fusion indexes. However, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation experiments revealed a nearly 4-fold increase in the stiffness of the MPC microenvironment. We further showed that the increase in stiffness is associated with alterations to muscle ECM, including the accumulation of collagen, which was correlated with higher hydroxyproline and advanced glycation end-product content. Lastly, we recapitulated the impaired MPC behavior observed in aging using a hydrogel substrate that mimics the stiffness of myofibers. Conclusions These findings provide novel evidence that the low regenerative potential of aged skeletal muscle is independent of intrinsic MPC properties but is related to the increase in the stiffness of the MPC microenvironment. PMID:26295702

  12. Redox Signaling in Skeletal Muscle: Role of Aging and Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ji, Li Li

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is associated with the production of ROS due to altered O[subscript 2] distribution and flux in the cell. Despite a highly efficient antioxidant defense, a small surplus of ROS, such as hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, may serve as signaling molecules to stimulate cellular adaptation to reach new homeostasis largely…

  13. Redox Signaling in Skeletal Muscle: Role of Aging and Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ji, Li Li

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is associated with the production of ROS due to altered O[subscript 2] distribution and flux in the cell. Despite a highly efficient antioxidant defense, a small surplus of ROS, such as hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, may serve as signaling molecules to stimulate cellular adaptation to reach new homeostasis largely…

  14. The effect of aging on skeletal-muscle recovery from exercise: possible implications for aging athletes.

    PubMed

    Fell, James; Williams, Dafydd

    2008-01-01

    Recovery from exercise is integral to the physical training process. There is a perception among older athletes that aging negatively affects the recovery process. Plausible arguments for an impaired recovery with aging are a greater susceptibility of older muscle to exercise-induced skeletal-muscle damage and a slower repair and adaptation response. Differences in the physical activity level of the research participants are rarely considered, however. This makes it difficult to differentiate the respective roles of declining physical activity and aging on the recovery process. Furthermore, the type of exercise used to induce damage and monitor recovery is often not indicative of a normal training stimulus for athletes. This review discusses the effects of aging on skeletal-muscle damage and recovery processes and highlights the limitations of many of these studies with respect to older athletes. Future research should use an exercise intervention representative of a normal training stimulus and take the physical activity level of the participants into account.

  15. Regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise in ageing humans.

    PubMed

    Hearon, Christopher M; Dinenno, Frank A

    2016-04-15

    The regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery to contracting skeletal muscle is complex and involves the mechanical effects of muscle contraction; local metabolic, red blood cell and endothelium-derived substances; and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). With advancing age in humans, skeletal muscle blood flow is typically reduced during dynamic exercise and this is due to a lower vascular conductance, which could ultimately contribute to age-associated reductions in aerobic exercise capacity, a primary predictor of mortality in both healthy and diseased ageing populations. Recent findings have highlighted the contribution of endothelium-derived substances to blood flow control in contracting muscle of older adults. With advancing age, impaired nitric oxide availability due to scavenging by reactive oxygen species, in conjunction with elevated vasoconstrictor signalling via endothelin-1, reduces the local vasodilatory response to muscle contraction. Additionally, ageing impairs the ability of contracting skeletal muscle to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction (i.e. 'functional sympatholysis'), which is critical for the proper regulation of tissue blood flow distribution and oxygen delivery, and could further reduce skeletal muscle perfusion during high intensity and/or large muscle mass exercise in older adults. We propose that initiation of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization is the underlying signalling event necessary to properly modulate sympathetic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle, and that age-associated impairments in red blood cell adenosine triphosphate release and stimulation of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation may explain impairments in both local vasodilatation and functional sympatholysis with advancing age in humans.

  16. IL-10 prevents aging-associated inflammation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Sezin; Jung, Dae Young; Friedline, Randall H; Noh, Hye Lim; Kim, Jong Hun; Patel, Payal R; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Inashima, Kunikazu; Tran, Duy A; Hu, Xiaodi; Loubato, Marilia M; Craige, Siobhan M; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K

    2017-02-01

    Altered energy balance and insulin resistance are important characteristics of aging. Skeletal muscle is a major site of glucose disposal, and the role of aging-associated inflammation in skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains unclear. To investigate, we examined glucose metabolism in 18-mo-old transgenic mice with muscle-specific overexpression of IL-10 (M(IL10)) and in wild-type mice during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping. Despite similar fat mass and energy balance, M(IL10) mice were protected from aging-associated insulin resistance with significant increases in glucose infusion rates, whole-body glucose turnover, and skeletal muscle glucose uptake (∼60%; P < 0.05), as compared to age-matched WT mice. This protective effect was associated with decreased muscle inflammation, but no changes in adipose tissue inflammation in aging M(IL10) mice. These results demonstrate the importance of skeletal muscle inflammation in aging-mediated insulin resistance, and our findings further implicate a potential therapeutic role of anti-inflammatory cytokine in the treatment of aging-mediated insulin resistance.-Dagdeviren, S., Jung, D. Y., Friedline, R. H., Noh, H. L., Kim, J. H., Patel, P. R., Tsitsilianos, N., Inashima, K., Tran, D. A., Hu, X., Loubato, M. M., Craige, S. M., Kwon, J. Y., Lee, K. W., Kim, J. K. IL-10 prevents aging-associated inflammation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. © FASEB.

  17. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle.

  18. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E.; Hernandez, Jessica Soto; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  19. Interleukin-15 responses to aging and unloading-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Siu, Parco M; Alway, Stephen E

    2007-04-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) mRNA is constitutively expressed in skeletal muscle. Although IL-15 has proposed hypertrophic and anti-apoptotic roles in vitro, its role in skeletal muscle cells in vivo is less clear. The purpose of this study was to determine if skeletal muscle aging and unloading, two conditions known to promote muscle atrophy, would alter basal IL-15 expression in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that IL-15 mRNA expression would increase as a result of both aging and muscle unloading and that muscle would express the mRNA for a functional trimeric IL-15 receptor (IL-15R). Two models of unloading were used in this study: hindlimb suspension (HS) in rats and wing unloading in quail. The absolute muscle wet weight of plantaris and soleus muscles from aged rats was significantly less when compared with muscles from young adult rats. Although 14 days of HS resulted in reduced muscle mass of plantaris and soleus muscles from young adult animals, this effect was not observed in muscles from aged animals. A significant aging times unloading interaction was observed for IL-15 mRNA in both rat soleus and plantaris muscles. Patagialis (PAT) muscles from aged quail retained a significant 12 and 6% of stretch-induced hypertrophy after 7 and 14 days of unloading, respectively. PAT muscles from young quail retained 15% hypertrophy at 7 days of unloading but regressed to control levels following 14 days of unloading. A main effect of age was observed on IL-15 mRNA expression in PAT muscles at 14 days of overload, 7 days of unloading, and 14 days of unloading. Skeletal muscle also expressed the mRNAs for a functional IL-15R composed of IL-15Ralpha, IL-2/15R-beta, and -gammac. Based on these data, we speculate that increases in IL-15 mRNA in response to atrophic stimuli may be an attempt to counteract muscle mass loss in skeletal muscles of old animals. Additional research is warranted to determine the importance of the IL-15/IL-15R system to counter muscle wasting.

  20. Altered microRNA expression in bovine skeletal muscle with age

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Age dependent decline in skeletal muscle function leads to several inherited and acquired muscular disorders in elderly individuals. The levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) could be altered during muscle maintenance and repair. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive investigation for miRNAs from 5 differe...

  1. Aging alters contractile properties and fiber morphology in pigeon skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Alway, Stephen E; Hollander, John M; Wimsatt, Jeffrey H

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that skeletal muscle from pigeons would display age-related alterations in isometric force and contractile parameters as well as a shift of the single muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) distribution toward smaller fiber sizes. Maximal force output, twitch contraction durations and the force-frequency relationship were determined in tensor propatagialis pars biceps muscle from young 3-year-old pigeons, middle-aged 18-year-old pigeons, and aged 30-year-old pigeons. The fiber CSA distribution was determined by planimetry from muscle sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Maximal force output of twitch and tetanic contractions was greatest in muscles from young pigeons, while the time to peak force of twitch contractions was longest in muscles from aged pigeons. There were no changes in the force-frequency relationship between the age groups. Interestingly, the fiber CSA distribution in aged muscles revealed a greater number of larger sized muscle fibers, which was verified visually in histological images. Middle-aged and aged muscles also displayed a greater amount of slow myosin containing muscle fibers. These data demonstrate that muscles from middle-aged and aged pigeons are susceptible to alterations in contractile properties that are consistent with aging, including lower force production and longer contraction durations. These functional changes were supported by the appearance of slow myosin containing muscle fibers in muscles from middle-aged and aged pigeons. Therefore, the pigeon may represent an appropriate animal model for the study of aging-related alterations in skeletal muscle function and structure.

  2. Regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise in ageing humans

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery to contracting skeletal muscle is complex and involves the mechanical effects of muscle contraction; local metabolic, red blood cell and endothelium‐derived substances; and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). With advancing age in humans, skeletal muscle blood flow is typically reduced during dynamic exercise and this is due to a lower vascular conductance, which could ultimately contribute to age‐associated reductions in aerobic exercise capacity, a primary predictor of mortality in both healthy and diseased ageing populations. Recent findings have highlighted the contribution of endothelium‐derived substances to blood flow control in contracting muscle of older adults. With advancing age, impaired nitric oxide availability due to scavenging by reactive oxygen species, in conjunction with elevated vasoconstrictor signalling via endothelin‐1, reduces the local vasodilatory response to muscle contraction. Additionally, ageing impairs the ability of contracting skeletal muscle to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction (i.e. ‘functional sympatholysis’), which is critical for the proper regulation of tissue blood flow distribution and oxygen delivery, and could further reduce skeletal muscle perfusion during high intensity and/or large muscle mass exercise in older adults. We propose that initiation of endothelium‐dependent hyperpolarization is the underlying signalling event necessary to properly modulate sympathetic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle, and that age‐associated impairments in red blood cell adenosine triphosphate release and stimulation of endothelium‐dependent vasodilatation may explain impairments in both local vasodilatation and functional sympatholysis with advancing age in humans. PMID:26332887

  3. Effects of aging on the lateral transmission of force in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Gao, Yingxin

    2014-03-21

    The age-related reduction in muscle force cannot be fully explained by the loss of muscle fiber mass or degeneration of myofibers. Our previous study showed that changes in lateral transmission of force could affect the total force transmitted to the tendon. The extracellular matrix (ECM) of skeletal muscle plays an important role in lateral transmission of force. The objective of this study was to define the effects of aging on lateral transmission of force in skeletal muscles, and explore possible underlying mechanisms. In vitro contractile tests were performed on extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of young and old rats with series of tenotomy and myotomy. We concluded that lateral transmission of force was impaired in the old rats, and this deficit could be partly due to increased thickness of the ECM induced by aging.

  4. Type-1 pericytes participate in fibrous tissue deposition in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-12-01

    In older adults, changes in skeletal muscle composition are associated with increased fibrosis, loss of mass, and decreased force, which can lead to dependency, morbidity, and mortality. Understanding the biological mechanisms responsible is essential to sustaining and improving their quality of life. Compared with young mice, aged mice take longer to recover from muscle injury; their tissue fibrosis is more extensive, and regenerated myofibers are smaller. Strong evidence indicates that cells called pericytes, embedded in the basement membrane of capillaries, contribute to the satellite-cell pool and muscle growth. In addition to their role in skeletal muscle repair, after tissue damage, they detach from capillaries and migrate to the interstitial space to participate in fibrosis formation. Here we distinguish two bona fide pericyte subtypes in the skeletal muscle interstitium, type-1 (Nestin-GFP(-)/NG2-DsRed(+)) and type-2 (Nestin-GFP(+)/NG2-DsRed(+)), and characterize their heretofore unknown specific roles in the aging environment. Our in vitro results show that type-1 and type-2 pericytes are either fibrogenic or myogenic, respectively. Transplantation studies in young animals indicate that type-2 pericytes are myogenic, while type-1 pericytes remain in the interstitial space. In older mice, however, the muscular regenerative capacity of type-2 pericytes is limited, and type-1 pericytes produce collagen, contributing to fibrous tissue deposition. We conclude that in injured muscles from aging mice, the pericytes involved in skeletal muscle repair differ from those associated with scar formation.

  5. Type-1 pericytes participate in fibrous tissue deposition in aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Mintz, Akiva

    2013-01-01

    In older adults, changes in skeletal muscle composition are associated with increased fibrosis, loss of mass, and decreased force, which can lead to dependency, morbidity, and mortality. Understanding the biological mechanisms responsible is essential to sustaining and improving their quality of life. Compared with young mice, aged mice take longer to recover from muscle injury; their tissue fibrosis is more extensive, and regenerated myofibers are smaller. Strong evidence indicates that cells called pericytes, embedded in the basement membrane of capillaries, contribute to the satellite-cell pool and muscle growth. In addition to their role in skeletal muscle repair, after tissue damage, they detach from capillaries and migrate to the interstitial space to participate in fibrosis formation. Here we distinguish two bona fide pericyte subtypes in the skeletal muscle interstitium, type-1 (Nestin-GFP−/NG2-DsRed+) and type-2 (Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+), and characterize their heretofore unknown specific roles in the aging environment. Our in vitro results show that type-1 and type-2 pericytes are either fibrogenic or myogenic, respectively. Transplantation studies in young animals indicate that type-2 pericytes are myogenic, while type-1 pericytes remain in the interstitial space. In older mice, however, the muscular regenerative capacity of type-2 pericytes is limited, and type-1 pericytes produce collagen, contributing to fibrous tissue deposition. We conclude that in injured muscles from aging mice, the pericytes involved in skeletal muscle repair differ from those associated with scar formation. PMID:24067916

  6. Ursolic acid ameliorates aging-metabolic phenotype through promoting of skeletal muscle rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiari, Nuredin; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Tashakor, Amin; Hemmati, Roohullah

    2015-07-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is a lipophilic compound, which highly found in apple peels. UA has some certain features, of the most important is its anabolic effects on skeletal muscles, which in turn plays a prominent role in the aging process, encouraged us to evaluate skeletal muscle rejuvenation. This study seeks to address the two following questions: primarily, we wonder to know if UA increases anti-aging biomarkers (SIRT1 and PGC-1α) in the isolated satellite cells, to pave the way for satellite cells proliferation. The results revealed that UA elevated the expression of SIRT1 (∼ 35 folds) and PGC-1α (∼ 175 folds) genes. The other question that needs to be asked, however, is to understand whether it is possible to generalize the in vitro findings to in vivo. For this, a study was designed to investigate the effects of UA on the cellular energy status in the animal models (C57BL/6 mice). We found that UA decreased cellular energy charges such as ATP (∼ 3 times) and ADP (∼ 18 times). With respect to the role of UA in energy expenditure and as an anti-aging biomarker, one might wonder to elucidate skeletal muscle rejuvenation as well as satellite cells proliferation and neomyogenesis. The results illustrated that UA boosted neomyogenesis through enhancing the number of satellite cells. In addition, rejuvenation effects of UA on the skeletal muscle promptly encouraged us to reexamine the performance of skeletal muscles. The results indicated that UA through increasing myoglobin expression (∼ 2 folds) accompanied with transforming of glycolytic to fast oxidative status chiefly and slow-twitch muscle fibers. To the best of our knowledge, it seems that UA might be considered as a potential candidate for treatment of pathological conditions associated with muscular atrophy and dysfunction, including skeletal muscle atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), sarcopenia and metabolic diseases of the muscles.

  7. Impact of Aging and Exercise on Mitochondrial Quality Control in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuho; Triolo, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are characterized by its pivotal roles in managing energy production, reactive oxygen species, and calcium, whose aging-related structural and functional deteriorations are observed in aging muscle. Although it is still unclear how aging alters mitochondrial quality and quantity in skeletal muscle, dysregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamic controls has been suggested as key players for that. In this paper, we summarize current understandings on how aging regulates muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, while focusing on transcriptional regulations including PGC-1α, AMPK, p53, mtDNA, and Tfam. Further, we review current findings on the muscle mitochondrial dynamic systems in aging muscle: fusion/fission, autophagy/mitophagy, and protein import. Next, we also discuss how endurance and resistance exercises impact on the mitochondrial quality controls in aging muscle, suggesting possible effective exercise strategies to improve/maintain mitochondrial health. PMID:28656072

  8. Improvement of skeletal muscle performance in ageing by the metabolic modulator Trimetazidine.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Elisabetta; Pin, Fabrizio; Gorini, Stefania; Pontecorvo, Laura; Ferri, Alberto; Mollace, Vincenzo; Costelli, Paola; Rosano, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    The loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) and the associated reduced muscle strength are key limiting factors for elderly people's quality of life. Improving muscle performance does not necessarily correlate with increasing muscle mass. In fact, particularly in the elderly, the main explanation for muscle weakness is a reduction of muscle quality rather than a loss of muscle mass, and the main goal to be achieved is to increase muscle strength. The effectiveness of Trimetazidine (TMZ) in preventing muscle functional impairment during ageing was assessed in our laboratory. Aged mice received TMZ or vehicle for 12 consecutive days. Muscle function was evaluated at the end of the treatment by a grip test as well as by an inverted screen test at 0, 5, 7 and 12 days of TMZ treatment. After sacrifice, muscles were stored for myofiber cross-sectional area assessment and myosin heavy chain expression evaluation by western blotting. Chronic TMZ treatment does not affect the mass of both gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles, while it significantly increases muscle strength. Indeed, both latency to fall and grip force are markedly enhanced in TMZ-treated versus untreated mice. In addition, TMZ administration results in higher expression of slow myosin heavy chain isoform and increased number of small-sized myofibers. We report here some data showing that the modulation of skeletal muscle metabolism by TMZ increases muscle strength in aged mice. Reprogramming metabolism might therefore be a strategy worth to be further investigated in view of improving muscle performance in the elderly.

  9. Effects of Age on Na+,K+-ATPase Expression in Human and Rodent Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wyckelsma, Victoria L.; McKenna, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of transmembrane Na+ and K+ concentration gradients and membrane potential is vital for the production of force in skeletal muscle. In aging an inability to maintain ion regulation and membrane potential would have adverse consequences on the capacity for performing repeated muscle contractions, which are critical for everyday activities and functional independence. This short review focusses on the effects of aging on one major and vital component affecting muscle Na+ and K+ concentrations, membrane potential and excitability in skeletal muscle, the Na+,K+-ATPase (Na+,K+-pump, NKA) protein. The review examines the effects of age on NKA in both human and rodent models and highlights a distant lack of research in NKA with aging. In rodents, the muscle NKA measured by [3H]ouabain binding site content, declines with advanced age from peak values in early life. In human skeletal muscle, however, there appears to be no age effect on [3H]ouabain binding site content in physically active older adults between 55 and 76 years compared to those aged between 18 and 30 years of age. Analysis of the NKA isoforms reveal differential changes with age in fiber-types in both rat and humans. The data show considerable disparities, suggesting different regulation of NKA isoforms between rodents and humans. Finally we review the importance of physical activity on NKA content in older humans. Findings suggest that physical activity levels of an individual may have a greater effect on regulating the NKA content in skeletal muscle rather than aging per se, at least up until 80 years of age. PMID:27531982

  10. The Pleiotropic Effect of Physical Exercise on Mitochondrial Dynamics in Aging Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Elena; Agostini, Deborah; Polidori, Emanuela; Potenza, Lucia; Guescini, Michele; Lucertini, Francesco; Annibalini, Giosuè; Stocchi, Laura; De Santi, Mauro; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2015-01-01

    Decline in human muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) is one of the principal hallmarks of the aging process. Regular physical exercise and training programs are certain powerful stimuli to attenuate the physiological skeletal muscle alterations occurring during aging and contribute to promote health and well-being. Although the series of events that led to these muscle adaptations are poorly understood, the mechanisms that regulate these processes involve the “quality” of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Aerobic/endurance exercise helps to maintain and improve cardiovascular fitness and respiratory function, whereas strength/resistance-exercise programs increase muscle strength, power development, and function. Due to the different effect of both exercises in improving mitochondrial content and quality, in terms of biogenesis, dynamics, turnover, and genotype, combined physical activity programs should be individually prescribed to maximize the antiaging effects of exercise. PMID:25945152

  11. Nitric oxide availability is increased in contracting skeletal muscle from aged mice, but does not differentially decrease muscle superoxide.

    PubMed

    Pearson, T; McArdle, A; Jackson, M J

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species have been implicated in the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function that occurs during aging. Nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide are generated by skeletal muscle and where these are generated in proximity their chemical reaction to form peroxynitrite can compete with the superoxide dismutation to hydrogen peroxide. Changes in NO availability may therefore theoretically modify superoxide and peroxynitrite activities in tissues, but published data are contradictory regarding aging effects on muscle NO availability. We hypothesised that an age-related increase in NO generation might increase peroxynitrite generation in muscles from old mice, leading to an increased nitration of muscle proteins and decreased superoxide availability. This was examined using fluorescent probes and an isolated fiber preparation to examine NO content and superoxide in the cytosol and mitochondria of muscle fibers from adult and old mice both at rest and following contractile activity. We also examined the 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and peroxiredoxin 5 (Prx5) content of muscles from mice as markers of peroxynitrite activity. Data indicate that a substantial age-related increase in NO levels occurred in muscle fibers during contractile activity and this was associated with an increase in muscle eNOS. Muscle proteins from old mice also showed an increased 3-NT content. Inhibition of NOS indicated that NO decreased superoxide bioavailability in muscle mitochondria, although this effect was not age related. Thus increased NO in muscles of old mice was associated with an increased 3-NT content that may potentially contribute to age-related degenerative changes in skeletal muscle.

  12. Death receptor-associated pro-apoptotic signaling in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Jackson, Janna R; Alway, Stephen E

    2006-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is elevated in the serum as a result of aging and it promotes pro-apoptotic signaling upon binding to the type I TNF receptor. It is not known if activation of this apoptotic pathway contributes to the well-documented age-associated decline in muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia). We tested the hypothesis that skeletal muscles from aged rodents would exhibit elevations in markers involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway when compared to muscles from young adult rodents, thereby contributing to an increased incidence of nuclear apoptosis in these muscles. The plantaris (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles were studied in young adult (5-7 mo, n=8) and aged (33 mo, n=8) Fischer(344) x Brown Norway rats. Muscles from aged rats were significantly smaller while exhibiting a greater incidence of apoptosis. Furthermore, muscles from aged rats had higher type I TNF receptor and Fas associated death domain protein (FADD) mRNA, protein contents for FADD, BCL-2 Interacting Domain (Bid), FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), and enzymatic activities of caspase-8 and caspase-3 than muscles from young adult rats. Significant correlations were observed in the plantaris muscle between caspase activity and muscle weight and the apoptotic index, while similar relationships were not found in the soleus. These data demonstrate that pro-apoptotic signaling downstream of the TNF receptor is active in aged muscles. Furthermore, our data extend the previous demonstration that type II fibers are preferentially affected by aging and support the hypothesis that type II fiber containing skeletal muscles may be more susceptible to muscle mass loses via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  13. Prmt7 Deficiency Causes Reduced Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Metabolism and Age-Related Obesity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ju; Lee, Hye-Jin; Vuong, Tuan Anh; Choi, Kyu-Sil; Choi, Dahee; Koo, Sung-Hoi; Cho, Sung Chun; Cho, Hana; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2016-07-01

    Maintenance of skeletal muscle function is critical for metabolic health and the disruption of which exacerbates many chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Skeletal muscle responds to exercise or metabolic demands by a fiber-type switch regulated by signaling-transcription networks that remains to be fully defined. Here, we report that protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (Prmt7) is a key regulator for skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. Prmt7 is expressed at the highest levels in skeletal muscle and decreased in skeletal muscles with age or obesity. Prmt7(-/-) muscles exhibit decreased oxidative metabolism with decreased expression of genes involved in muscle oxidative metabolism, including PGC-1α. Consistently, Prmt7(-/-) mice exhibited significantly reduced endurance exercise capacities. Furthermore, Prmt7(-/-) mice exhibit decreased energy expenditure, which might contribute to the exacerbated age-related obesity of Prmt7(-/-) mice. Similarly to Prmt7(-/-) muscles, Prmt7 depletion in myoblasts also reduces PGC-1α expression and PGC-1α-promoter driven reporter activities. Prmt7 regulates PGC-1α expression through interaction with and activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), which in turn activates ATF2, an upstream transcriptional activator for PGC-1α. Taken together, Prmt7 is a novel regulator for muscle oxidative metabolism via activation of p38MAPK/ATF2/PGC-1α. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  14. Effects of aging on vasoconstrictor and mechanical properties of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller-Delp, Judy; Spier, Scott A.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Lesniewski, Lisa A.; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Humphrey, J. D.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise capacity and skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise are reduced with advancing age. This reduction in blood flow capacity may be related to increased reactivity of skeletal muscle resistance vessels to vasoconstrictor stimuli. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that aging results in increased vasoconstrictor responses of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles. First-order (1A) arterioles (90-220 microm) from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of young (4 mo) and aged (24 mo) Fischer-344 rats were isolated, cannulated, and pressurized via hydrostatic reservoirs. Vasoconstriction in response to increases in norepinephrine (NE; 1 x 10(-9)-1 x 10(-4) M) and KCl (20-100 mM) concentrations and increases in intraluminal pressure (10-130 cmH(2)O) were evaluated in the absence of flow. Responses to NE and KCl were similar in both soleus and gastrocnemius muscle arterioles from young and aged rats. In contrast, active myogenic responses to changes in intraluminal pressure were diminished in soleus and gastrocnemius arterioles from aged rats. To assess whether alterations in the mechanical properties of resistance arterioles underlie altered myogenic responsiveness, passive diameter responses to pressure and mechanical stiffness were evaluated. There was no effect of age on the structural behavior (passive pressure-diameter relationship) or stiffness of arterioles from either the soleus or gastrocnemius muscles. These results suggest that aging does not result in a nonspecific decrease in vasoconstrictor responsiveness of skeletal muscle arterioles. Rather, aging-induced adaptations of vasoreactivity of resistance arterioles appear to be limited to mechanisms that are uniquely involved in the signaling of the myogenic response.

  15. Effects of aging on vasoconstrictor and mechanical properties of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller-Delp, Judy; Spier, Scott A.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Lesniewski, Lisa A.; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Humphrey, J. D.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise capacity and skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise are reduced with advancing age. This reduction in blood flow capacity may be related to increased reactivity of skeletal muscle resistance vessels to vasoconstrictor stimuli. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that aging results in increased vasoconstrictor responses of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles. First-order (1A) arterioles (90-220 microm) from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of young (4 mo) and aged (24 mo) Fischer-344 rats were isolated, cannulated, and pressurized via hydrostatic reservoirs. Vasoconstriction in response to increases in norepinephrine (NE; 1 x 10(-9)-1 x 10(-4) M) and KCl (20-100 mM) concentrations and increases in intraluminal pressure (10-130 cmH(2)O) were evaluated in the absence of flow. Responses to NE and KCl were similar in both soleus and gastrocnemius muscle arterioles from young and aged rats. In contrast, active myogenic responses to changes in intraluminal pressure were diminished in soleus and gastrocnemius arterioles from aged rats. To assess whether alterations in the mechanical properties of resistance arterioles underlie altered myogenic responsiveness, passive diameter responses to pressure and mechanical stiffness were evaluated. There was no effect of age on the structural behavior (passive pressure-diameter relationship) or stiffness of arterioles from either the soleus or gastrocnemius muscles. These results suggest that aging does not result in a nonspecific decrease in vasoconstrictor responsiveness of skeletal muscle arterioles. Rather, aging-induced adaptations of vasoreactivity of resistance arterioles appear to be limited to mechanisms that are uniquely involved in the signaling of the myogenic response.

  16. The TWEAK–Fn14 dyad is involved in age-associated pathological changes in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Sato, Shuichi; Shin, Jonghyun; Zheng, Timothy S.; Burkly, Linda C.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The levels of TWEAK receptor Fn14 are increased in skeletal muscle during aging. • Deletion of Fn14 attenuates age-associated skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. • Deletion of Fn14 inhibits proteolysis in skeletal muscle during aging. • TWEAK–Fn14 signaling activates transcription factor NF-κB in aging skeletal muscle. • TWEAK–Fn14 dyad is involved in age-associated fibrosis in skeletal muscle. - Abstract: Progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) is a major clinical problem in the elderly. Recently, proinflammatory cytokine TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 were identified as key mediators of muscle wasting in various catabolic states. However, the role of the TWEAK–Fn14 pathway in pathological changes in skeletal muscle during aging remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the levels of Fn14 are increased in skeletal muscle of 18-month old (aged) mice compared with adult mice. Genetic ablation of Fn14 significantly increased the levels of specific muscle proteins and blunted the age-associated fiber atrophy in mice. While gene expression of two prominent muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases MAFBx and MuRF1 remained comparable, levels of ubiquitinated proteins and the expression of autophagy-related molecule Atg12 were significantly reduced in Fn14-knockout (KO) mice compared with wild-type mice during aging. Ablation of Fn14 significantly diminished the DNA-binding activity of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), gene expression of various inflammatory molecules, and interstitial fibrosis in skeletal muscle of aged mice. Collectively, our study suggests that the TWEAK–Fn14 signaling axis contributes to age-associated muscle atrophy and fibrosis potentially through its local activation of proteolytic systems and inflammatory pathways.

  17. Identification of morphological markers of sarcopenia at early stage of aging in skeletal muscle of mice.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Ramy K A; de Leonardis, Erika Chacin; Guerrero-Martínez, José A; Rahim, Ibtissem; Mokhtar, Doaa M; Saleh, Abdelmohaimen M; Abdalla, Kamal E H; Pozo, María J; Escames, Germaine; López, Luis C; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2016-10-01

    The gastrocnemius muscle (GM) of young (3months) and aged (12months) female wild-type C57/BL6 mice was examined by light and electron microscopy, looking for the presence of structural changes at early stage of the aging process. Morphometrical parameters including body and gastrocnemius weights, number and type of muscle fibers, cross section area (CSA), perimeter, and Feret's diameter of single muscle fiber, were measured. Moreover, lengths of the sarcomere, A-band, I-band, H-zone, and number and CSA of intermyofibrillar mitochondria (IFM), were also determined. The results provide evidence that 12month-old mice had significant changes on skeletal muscle structure, beginning with the reduction of gastrocnemius weight to body weight ratio, compatible with an early loss of skeletal muscle function and strength. Moreover, light microscopy revealed increased muscle fibers size, with a significant increase on their CSA, perimeter, and diameter of both type I and type II muscle fibers, and a reduction in the percentage of muscle area occupied by type II fibers. Enhanced connective tissue infiltrations, and the presence of centrally nucleated muscle fibers, were also found in aged mice. These changes may underlie an attempt to compensate the loss of muscle mass and muscle fibers number. Furthermore, electron microscopy discovered a significant age-dependent increase in the length of sarcomeres, I and H bands, and reduction on the overlapped actin/myosin length, supporting contractile force loss with age. Electron microscopy also showed an increased number and CSA of IFM with age, which may reveal more endurance at 12months of age. Together, mice at early stage of aging already show significant changes in gastrocnemius muscle morphology and ultrastructure that are suggestive of the onset of sarcopenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Does skeletal muscle have an 'epi'-memory? The role of epigenetics in nutritional programming, metabolic disease, aging and exercise.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Adam P; Stewart, Claire E; Seaborne, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mass, quality and adaptability are fundamental in promoting muscle performance, maintaining metabolic function and supporting longevity and healthspan. Skeletal muscle is programmable and can 'remember' early-life metabolic stimuli affecting its function in adult life. In this review, the authors pose the question as to whether skeletal muscle has an 'epi'-memory? Following an initial encounter with an environmental stimulus, we discuss the underlying molecular and epigenetic mechanisms enabling skeletal muscle to adapt, should it re-encounter the stimulus in later life. We also define skeletal muscle memory and outline the scientific literature contributing to this field. Furthermore, we review the evidence for early-life nutrient stress and low birth weight in animals and human cohort studies, respectively, and discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms culminating in skeletal muscle dysfunction, metabolic disease and loss of skeletal muscle mass across the lifespan. We also summarize and discuss studies that isolate muscle stem cells from different environmental niches in vivo (physically active, diabetic, cachectic, aged) and how they reportedly remember this environment once isolated in vitro. Finally, we will outline the molecular and epigenetic mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle memory and review the epigenetic regulation of exercise-induced skeletal muscle adaptation, highlighting exercise interventions as suitable models to investigate skeletal muscle memory in humans. We believe that understanding the 'epi'-memory of skeletal muscle will enable the next generation of targeted therapies to promote muscle growth and reduce muscle loss to enable healthy aging. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The impact of obesity on skeletal muscle strength and structure through adolescence to old age.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, D J; Erskine, R M; Morse, C I; Winwood, K; Onambélé-Pearson, Gladys

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is associated with functional limitations in muscle performance and increased likelihood of developing a functional disability such as mobility, strength, postural and dynamic balance limitations. The consensus is that obese individuals, regardless of age, have a greater absolute maximum muscle strength compared to non-obese persons, suggesting that increased adiposity acts as a chronic overload stimulus on the antigravity muscles (e.g., quadriceps and calf), thus increasing muscle size and strength. However, when maximum muscular strength is normalised to body mass, obese individuals appear weaker. This relative weakness may be caused by reduced mobility, neural adaptations and changes in muscle morphology. Discrepancies in the literature remain for maximal strength normalised to muscle mass (muscle quality) and can potentially be explained through accounting for the measurement protocol contributing to muscle strength capacity that need to be explored in more depth such as antagonist muscle co-activation, muscle architecture, a criterion valid measurement of muscle size and an accurate measurement of physical activity levels. Current evidence demonstrating the effect of obesity on muscle quality is limited. These factors not being recorded in some of the existing literature suggest a potential underestimation of muscle force either in terms of absolute force production or relative to muscle mass; thus the true effect of obesity upon skeletal muscle size, structure and function, including any interactions with ageing effects, remains to be elucidated.

  20. Modelling in vivo skeletal muscle ageing in vitro using three-dimensional bioengineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Adam P; Player, Darren J; Martin, Neil R W; Mudera, Vivek; Stewart, Claire E; Lewis, Mark P

    2012-12-01

    Degeneration of skeletal muscle (SkM) with age (sarcopenia) is a major contributor to functional decline, morbidity and mortality. Methodological implications often make it difficult to embark on interventions in already frail and diseased elderly individuals. Using in vitro three-dimensional (3D) bioengineered skeletal muscle constructs that model aged phenotypes and incorporate a representative extracellular matrix (collagen), are under tension, and display morphological and transcript expression of mature skeletal muscle may more accurately characterize the SkM niche. Furthermore, an in vitro model would provide greater experimental manipulation with regard to gene, pharmacological and exercise (mechanical stretch/electrical stimulation) therapies and thus strategies for combating muscle wasting with age. The present study utilized multiple population-doubled (MPD) murine myoblasts compared with parental controls (CON), previously shown to have an aged phenotype in monolayer cultures (Sharples et al., 2011), seeded into 3D type I collagen matrices under uniaxial tension. 3D bioengineered constructs incorporating MPD cells had reduced myotube size and diameter vs. CON constructs. MPD constructs were characterized by reduced peak force development over 24 h after cell seeding, reduced transcript expression of remodelling matrix metalloproteinases, MMP2 and MMP9, with reduced differentiation/hypertrophic potential shown by reduced IGF-I, IGF-IR, IGF-IEa, MGF mRNA. Increased IGFBP2 and myostatin in MPD vs. CON constructs also suggested impaired differentiation/reduced regenerative potential. Overall, 3D bioengineered skeletal muscle constructs represent an in vitro model of the in vivo cell niche with MPD constructs displaying similar characteristics to ageing/atrophied muscle in vivo, thus potentially providing a future test bed for therapeutic interventions to contest muscle degeneration with age. © 2012 The Authors. Aging Cell © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

  1. Comparison of skeletal muscle strength between cardiac patients and age-matched healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Baum, K.; Hildebrandt, U.; Edel, K.; Bertram, R.; Hahmann, H.; Bremer, F.J.; Böhmen, S.; Kammerlander, C.; Serafin, M.; Rüther, Th.; Miche, E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare muscular strength of knee extensors and arm flexor muscles of cardiac patients (n = 638) and healthy controls (n = 961) in different age groups. Isometric torques were measured in a sitting position with the elbow, hip, and knee flexed to 900. For statistical analysis, age groups were pooled in decades from the age of 30 to 90 years. Additionally, the influence of physical lifestyle prior to disease on muscular strength was obtained in the patients. For statistical analysis three-way ANOVA (factors age, gender, and physical activity level) was used. Both in patients and in controls a significant age-dependent decline in maximal torque could be observed for arm flexors and knee extensors. Maximal leg extensor muscle showed statistically significant differences between healthy controls and cardiac patients as well as between subgroups of patients: Physically inactive patients showed lowest torques (male: 148 ± 18 Nm; female: 82 ± 25 Nm) while highest values were measured in control subjects (male: 167 ± 16 Nm; female: 93 ± 17 Nm). In contrast, arm flexor muscles did not show any significant influence of health status or sports history. This qualitative difference between weight-bearing leg muscles and the muscle group of the upper extremity suggest that lower skeletal muscle strength in heart patients is mainly a consequence of selective disuse of leg muscles rather than any pathological skeletal muscle metabolism. Since a certain level of skeletal muscle strength is a prerequisite to cope with everyday activities, strength training is recommended as an important part of cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:19584952

  2. Comparison of skeletal muscle strength between cardiac patients and age-matched healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Baum, K; Hildebrandt, U; Edel, K; Bertram, R; Hahmann, H; Bremer, F J; Böhmen, S; Kammerlander, C; Serafin, M; Rüther, Th; Miche, E

    2009-07-06

    The purpose of the present study was to compare muscular strength of knee extensors and arm flexor muscles of cardiac patients (n = 638) and healthy controls (n = 961) in different age groups. Isometric torques were measured in a sitting position with the elbow, hip, and knee flexed to 90(0). For statistical analysis, age groups were pooled in decades from the age of 30 to 90 years. Additionally, the influence of physical lifestyle prior to disease on muscular strength was obtained in the patients. For statistical analysis three-way ANOVA (factors age, gender, and physical activity level) was used.Both in patients and in controls a significant age-dependent decline in maximal torque could be observed for arm flexors and knee extensors. Maximal leg extensor muscle showed statistically significant differences between healthy controls and cardiac patients as well as between subgroups of patients: Physically inactive patients showed lowest torques (male: 148 +/- 18 Nm; female: 82 +/- 25 Nm) while highest values were measured in control subjects (male: 167 +/- 16 Nm; female: 93 +/- 17 Nm). In contrast, arm flexor muscles did not show any significant influence of health status or sports history.This qualitative difference between weight-bearing leg muscles and the muscle group of the upper extremity suggest that lower skeletal muscle strength in heart patients is mainly a consequence of selective disuse of leg muscles rather than any pathological skeletal muscle metabolism. Since a certain level of skeletal muscle strength is a prerequisite to cope with everyday activities, strength training is recommended as an important part of cardiac rehabilitation.

  3. Deletion of Pofut1 in mouse skeletal myofibers induces muscle aging-related phenotypes in cis and in trans.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Deborah A; Singhal, Neha; Kim, Mi-Lyang; Cramer, Megan L; Crowe, Kelly E; Xu, Rui; Jia, Ying; Adair, Jessica; Martinez-Pena Y Valenzuela, Isabel; Akaaboune, Mohammed; White, Peter; Janssen, Paulus M; Martin, Paul T

    2017-03-06

    Sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass and strength during normal aging, involves coordinate changes in skeletal myofibers and the cells that contact them, including satellite cells and motor neurons. Here we show that Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1), a gene that encodes a glycosyltransferase required for NotchR-mediated cell-cell signaling, has reduced expression in aging skeletal muscle. Moreover, premature postnatal deletion of Pofut1 in skeletal myofibers can induce aging-related phenotypes in cis within skeletal myofibers and in trans within satellite cells and within motor neurons via the neuromuscular junction. Changed phenotypes include reduced skeletal muscle size and strength, decreased myofiber size and increased slow (type 1) fiber density, increased muscle degeneration and regeneration in aged muscles, decreased satellite cell self-renewal and regenerative potential, and increased neuromuscular fragmentation and occasional denervation. Pofut1 deletion in skeletal myofibers reduced NotchR signaling in young adult muscles, but this effect was lost with age. Increasing muscle NotchR signaling also reduced muscle size. Gene expression studies point to regulation of cell cycle genes, muscle myosins, NotchR and Wnt pathway genes, and connective tissue growth factor by Pofut1 in skeletal muscle, with additional effects on α dystroglycan glycosylation.

  4. Effects of aging, exercise, and disease on force transfer in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, David C.; Wallace, Marita A.

    2015-01-01

    The loss of muscle strength and increased injury rate in aging skeletal muscle has previously been attributed to loss of muscle protein (cross-sectional area) and/or decreased neural activation. However, it is becoming clear that force transfer within and between fibers plays a significant role in this process as well. Force transfer involves a secondary matrix of proteins that align and transmit the force produced by the thick and thin filaments along muscle fibers and out to the extracellular matrix. These specialized networks of cytoskeletal proteins aid in passing force through the muscle and also serve to protect individual fibers from injury. This review discusses the cytoskeleton proteins that have been identified as playing a role in muscle force transmission, both longitudinally and laterally, and where possible highlights how disease, aging, and exercise influence the expression and function of these proteins. PMID:25968577

  5. Genome-wide DNA methylation changes with age in disease-free human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zykovich, Artem; Hubbard, Alan; Flynn, James M; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Fraga, Mario F; Kerksick, Chad; Ogborn, Dan; MacNeil, Lauren; Mooney, Sean D; Melov, Simon

    2014-04-01

    A decline in skeletal muscle mass and function with aging is well recognized, but remains poorly characterized at the molecular level. Here, we report for the first time a genome-wide study of DNA methylation dynamics in skeletal muscle of healthy male individuals during normal human aging. We predominantly observed hypermethylation throughout the genome within the aged group as compared to the young subjects. Differentially methylated CpG (dmCpG) nucleotides tend to arise intragenically and are underrepresented in promoters and are overrepresented in the middle and 3' end of genes. The intragenic methylation changes are overrepresented in genes that guide the formation of the junction of the motor neuron and myofibers. We report a low level of correlation of gene expression from previous studies of aged muscle with our current analysis of DNA methylation status. For those genes that had both changes in methylation and gene expression with age, we observed a reverse correlation, with the exception of intragenic hypermethylated genes that were correlated with an increased gene expression. We suggest that a minimal number of dmCpG sites or select sites are required to be altered in order to correlate with gene expression changes. Finally, we identified 500 dmCpG sites that perform well in discriminating young from old samples. Our findings highlight epigenetic links between aging postmitotic skeletal muscle and DNA methylation.

  6. Protein carbonylation and heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle: relationships to age and sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Beltran Valls, Maria R; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Narici, Marco V; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E; Caporossi, Daniela; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into "old" and "old sarcopenic") were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r (2) = -.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r (2) = -.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  7. Protein Carbonylation and Heat Shock Proteins in Human Skeletal Muscle: Relationships to Age and Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Beltran Valls, Maria R.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Narici, Marco V.; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E.; Caporossi, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into “old” and “old sarcopenic”) were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r 2 = −.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r 2 = −.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se. PMID:24621945

  8. Contributions of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and apoptosis to human skeletal muscle wasting with age.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Samantha A; Wacker, Michael J; Richmond, Scott R; Godard, Michael P

    2005-09-01

    The primary mechanism that contributes to decreasing skeletal muscle strength and size with healthy aging is not presently known. This study examined the contribution of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and apoptosis to skeletal muscle wasting in older adults (n = 21; mean age = 72.76 +/- 8.31 years) and young controls (n = 21; mean age = 21.48 +/- 2.93 years). Subjects underwent a percutaneous muscle biopsy of the vastus lateralis to determine: (1) ubiquitin ligase gene expression (MAFbx and MuRF1); (2) frequency of apoptosis; and (3) individual fiber type and cross-sectional area. In addition, a whole muscle strength test was also performed. A one-way ANOVA revealed significant increases in the number of positive TUNEL cells in older adults (87%; p < 0.05), although no significant increase in caspase-3/7 activity was detected. Additionally, ubiquitin ligase gene expression, individual muscle fiber type and CSA were not different between old and young subjects. Muscle strength was also significantly lower in old compared to young subjects (p < 0.05). In conclusion, this study indicates a preferential role for apoptosis contributing to decreases in muscle function with age.

  9. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Alpha is Essential to Maintain the Satellite Cell Niche During Skeletal Muscle Injury and Sarcopenia of Aging.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Anna; Lee, Jang-Won; Yang, An; Liu, Yan-Yun; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Perin, Laura; Brent, Gregory A

    2017-10-01

    Myopathic changes are commonly described in hypothyroid and hyperthyroid patients, including muscular atrophy and weakness. Satellite cells (SCs) play a major role in skeletal muscle maintenance and regeneration after injury. A mouse model of resistance to thyroid hormone-TRα1PV demonstrated impaired skeletal muscle regeneration after injury with significant reduction of SCs, suggesting that exhaustion of the SC pool contributes to the impaired regeneration. To test this hypothesis, SC activation and proliferation were analyzed in vivo in response to skeletal muscle injury and during aging. SCs of TRα1PV male mice were analyzed four days after cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury, and they were compared to wild-type (WT) male animals. TRα-knockdown C2C12 myoblasts were injected into injured skeletal muscle, and four days after transplantation, the in vivo behavior was compared to control C2C12 myoblasts. Skeletal muscle regeneration was compared in younger and older TRα1PV and WT animals. The total number of SCs in skeletal muscle of TRα1PV mice was significantly lower than control, both before and shortly after muscle injury, with significant impairment of SC activation, consistent with SC pool exhaustion. TRα-knockdown myoblasts showed impaired in vivo proliferation and migration. TRα1PV mice had skeletal muscle loss and significant impairment in skeletal muscle regeneration with aging. This translated to a significant reduction of the SC pool with aging compared to WT mice. TRα plays an important role in the maintenance of the SC pool. Impaired skeletal muscle regeneration in TRα1PV mice is associated with insufficient SC activation and proliferation, as well as the progressive loss of the SC pool with aging. Regulation of the SC pool and SC proliferation provides a therapeutic target to enhance skeletal muscle regeneration and possibly slow age-associated sarcopenia.

  10. Altered satellite cell dynamics accompany skeletal muscle atrophy during chronic illness, disuse, and aging.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Colleen F; Fry, Christopher S

    2017-08-08

    This review explores recent research investigating the contribution of satellite cells (skeletal muscle stem cells) during muscle fiber atrophy as seen in periods of disuse, illness, and aging. Studies indicate reduced satellite cell activity and density in a variety of acute and chronic conditions characterized by robust muscle wasting. The direct contribution of satellite cells to unloading/denervation and chronic illness-induced atrophy remains controversial. Inflammation that accompanies acute trauma and illness likely impedes proper satellite cell differentiation and myogenesis, promoting the rapid onset of muscle wasting in these conditions. Transgenic mouse studies provide surprising evidence that age-related declines in satellite cell function and abundance are not causally related to the onset of sarcopenia in sedentary animals. Recent clinical and preclinical studies indicate reduced abundance and dysregulated satellite cell activity that accompany muscle atrophy during periods of disuse, illness, and aging, providing evidence for their therapeutic potential.

  11. Subproteomic analysis of basic proteins in aged skeletal muscle following offgel pre-fractionation.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Joan; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-04-01

    The progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass is a serious pathophysiological problem in the elderly, which warrants detailed biochemical studies into the underlying mechanism of age-related fiber degeneration. Over the last few years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has identified a considerable number of new biomarkers of muscle aging in humans and animal models of sarcopenia. However, interpretation of the proteomic findings is often complicated by technical and biological limitations. Although gel electrophoresis-based approaches represent a highly sensitive analytical way for the large-scale and high-throughput survey of global changes in skeletal muscle proteins during aging, often the presence of components with an isoelectric point in the basic range is underestimated. We, therefore, carried out a comparative subproteomic study of young versus aged rat muscle focusing on potential changes in muscle proteins with an alkaline isoelectric point, using a combination of offgel electrophoresis and two-dimensional (2D) slab gel electrophoresis. Offgel electrophoresis was successfully applied as a prefractionation step to enrich basic protein species from crude tissue extracts representing young adult versus senescent muscle specimens. Proteomics has demonstrated alterations in a small cohort of basic proteins during muscle aging. The mass spectrometric identification of altered proteins and immunoblotting revealed a decrease in the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and a concomitant increase in mitochondrial creatine kinase (CK) and ubiquinol cytochrome‑c reductase. This agrees with the idea of a glycolytic-to-oxidative shift during muscle aging, which is indicative of an overall fast-to-slow transition process in senescent rat muscle. Thus, alterations in the abundance of metabolic enzymes appear to play a central role in the molecular pathogenesis of age‑dependent muscle wasting.

  12. Aging and the Skeletal Muscle Angiogenic Response to Exercise in Women.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Timothy P; Kraus, Raymond M; Carrithers, John A; Garry, Joseph P; Hickner, Robert C

    2015-10-01

    Whether aging lowers skeletal muscle basal capillarization and angiogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the effects of aging on skeletal muscle capillarization, eight young (YW) and eight aged (AW) women completed 8 weeks of exercise training. The response and relationships of muscle capillarization, interstitial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and microvascular blood flow to aerobic exercise training were investigated. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained before and after exercise training for the measurement of capillarization. Muscle interstitial VEGF protein and microvascular blood flow were measured at rest and during submaximal exercise at PRE, 1-WK, and 8-WKS by microdialysis. Exercise training increased (20%-25%) capillary contacts of type I, IIA, and IIB fibers in YW and AW. Interstitial VEGF protein was higher in AW than YW at rest and was higher in YW than AW during exercise independent of training status. Differences in muscle capillarization were not explained by secreted VEGF nor were differences in VEGF explained by microvascular blood flow. These results confirm that aging (57-76 years age range) does not impair the muscle angiogenic response to exercise training, although sex differences may exist in similarly trained women and men.

  13. Aging and the Skeletal Muscle Angiogenic Response to Exercise in Women

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Raymond M.; Carrithers, John A.; Garry, Joseph P.; Hickner, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Whether aging lowers skeletal muscle basal capillarization and angiogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the effects of aging on skeletal muscle capillarization, eight young (YW) and eight aged (AW) women completed 8 weeks of exercise training. The response and relationships of muscle capillarization, interstitial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and microvascular blood flow to aerobic exercise training were investigated. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained before and after exercise training for the measurement of capillarization. Muscle interstitial VEGF protein and microvascular blood flow were measured at rest and during submaximal exercise at PRE, 1-WK, and 8-WKS by microdialysis. Exercise training increased (20%–25%) capillary contacts of type I, IIA, and IIB fibers in YW and AW. Interstitial VEGF protein was higher in AW than YW at rest and was higher in YW than AW during exercise independent of training status. Differences in muscle capillarization were not explained by secreted VEGF nor were differences in VEGF explained by microvascular blood flow. These results confirm that aging (57–76 years age range) does not impair the muscle angiogenic response to exercise training, although sex differences may exist in similarly trained women and men. PMID:25182597

  14. Metabolomic profiling reveals severe skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of metabolism in aged FBN rats.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sean M; Dugle, Janis E; Kennedy, Adam D; McDunn, Jonathan E; Kline, William; Guo, Lining; Guttridge, Denis C; Pereira, Suzette L; Edens, Neile K

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles exhibit age-related adaptive and pathological remodeling. Several muscles in particular undergo progressive atrophy and degeneration beyond median lifespan. To better understand myocellular responses to aging, we used semi-quantitative global metabolomic profiling to characterize trends in metabolic changes between 15-month-old adult and 32-month-old aged Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (FBN) male rats. The FBN rat gastrocnemius muscle exhibits age-dependent atrophy, whereas the soleus muscle, up until 32 months, exhibits markedly fewer signs of atrophy. Both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed, as well as plasma and urine. Compared to adult gastrocnemius, aged gastrocnemius showed evidence of reduced glycolytic metabolism, including accumulation of glycolytic, glycogenolytic, and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates. Pyruvate was elevated with age, yet levels of citrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide were reduced, consistent with mitochondrial abnormalities. Indicative of muscle atrophy, 3-methylhistidine and free amino acids were elevated in aged gastrocnemius. The monounsaturated fatty acids oleate, cis-vaccenate, and palmitoleate also increased in aged gastrocnemius, suggesting altered lipid metabolism. Compared to gastrocnemius, aged soleus exhibited far fewer changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but did show reductions in several glycolytic intermediates, fumarate, malate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. Plasma biochemicals showing the largest age-related increases included glycocholate, heme, 1,5-anhydroglucitol, 1-palmitoleoyl-glycerophosphocholine, palmitoleate, and creatine. These changes suggest reduced insulin sensitivity in aged FBN rats. Altogether, these data highlight skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of glucose and lipid metabolism consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction in aged FBN rats.

  15. Functional dysregulation of stem cells during aging: a focus on skeletal muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Sousa-Victor, Pedro; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2013-09-01

    Aging of an organism is associated with the functional decline of tissues and organs, as well as a sharp decline in the regenerative capacity of stem cells. A prevailing view holds that the aging rate of an individual depends on the ratio of tissue attrition to tissue regeneration. Therefore, manipulations that favor the balance towards regeneration may prevent or delay aging. Skeletal muscle is a specialized tissue composed of postmitotic myofibers that contract to generate force. Satellite cells are the adult stem cells responsible for skeletal muscle regeneration. Recent studies on the biology of skeletal muscle and satellite cells in aging have uncovered the critical impact of systemic and niche factors on stem cell functionality and demonstrated the capacity of aged satellite cells to rejuvenate and increase their regenerative potential when exposed to a youthful environment. Here we review the current literature on the coordinated relationship between cell extrinsic and intrinsic factors that regulate the function of satellite cells, and ultimately determine tissue homeostasis and repair during aging, and which encourage the search for new anti-aging strategies. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  16. Improvement of skeletal muscle performance in ageing by the metabolic modulator Trimetazidine

    PubMed Central

    Pin, Fabrizio; Gorini, Stefania; Pontecorvo, Laura; Ferri, Alberto; Mollace, Vincenzo; Costelli, Paola; Rosano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) and the associated reduced muscle strength are key limiting factors for elderly people's quality of life. Improving muscle performance does not necessarily correlate with increasing muscle mass. In fact, particularly in the elderly, the main explanation for muscle weakness is a reduction of muscle quality rather than a loss of muscle mass, and the main goal to be achieved is to increase muscle strength. The effectiveness of Trimetazidine (TMZ) in preventing muscle functional impairment during ageing was assessed in our laboratory. Methods Aged mice received TMZ or vehicle for 12 consecutive days. Muscle function was evaluated at the end of the treatment by a grip test as well as by an inverted screen test at 0, 5, 7 and 12 days of TMZ treatment. After sacrifice, muscles were stored for myofiber cross‐sectional area assessment and myosin heavy chain expression evaluation by western blotting. Results Chronic TMZ treatment does not affect the mass of both gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles, while it significantly increases muscle strength. Indeed, both latency to fall and grip force are markedly enhanced in TMZ‐treated versus untreated mice. In addition, TMZ administration results in higher expression of slow myosin heavy chain isoform and increased number of small‐sized myofibers. Conclusions We report here some data showing that the modulation of skeletal muscle metabolism by TMZ increases muscle strength in aged mice. Reprogramming metabolism might therefore be a strategy worth to be further investigated in view of improving muscle performance in the elderly. PMID:27239426

  17. Skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion injury and cyclosporine A in the aging rat.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Kindo, Michel; Chamaraux-Tran, Thiên-Nga; Charles, Anne-Laure; Lejay, Anne; Kemmel, Véronique; Vogel, Thomas; Chakfe, Nabil; Zoll, Joffrey; Diemunsch, Pierre; Geny, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    Old patients exhibit muscle impairments and increased perioperative risk during vascular surgery procedures. Although aging generally impairs protective mechanisms, data are lacking concerning skeletal muscle in elderly. We tested whether cyclosporine A (CsA), which protects skeletal muscle from ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in young rats, might reduce skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in aging rats submitted to hindlimb IR. Wistar rats aged 71-73 weeks were randomized to IR (3 h unilateral tourniquet application and 2 h reperfusion) or IR + CsA (10 mg/kg cyclosporine IV before reperfusion). Maximal oxidative capacity (VM ax ), acceptor control ratio (ACR), and relative contribution of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes II, III, IV (VS ucc ), and IV (VTMPD /Asc ), together with calcium retention capacity (CRC) a marker of apoptosis, and tissue reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were determined in gastrocnemius muscles from both hindlimbs. Compared to the nonischemic hindlimb, IR significantly reduced mitochondrial coupling, VMax (from 7.34 ± 1.50 to 2.87 ± 1.22 μMO2 /min/g; P < 0.05; -70%), and VS ucc (from 6.14 ± 1.07 to 3.82 ± 0.83 μMO2 /min/g; P < 0.05; -42%) but not VTMPD /Asc . IR also decreased the CRC from 15.58 ± 3.85 to 6.19 ± 0.86 μMCa(2+) /min/g; P < 0.05; -42%). These alterations were not corrected by CsA (-77%, -49%, and -32% after IR for VM ax, VS ucc , and CRC, respectively). Further, CsA significantly increased ROS production in both hindlimbs (P < 0.05; +73%). In old rats, hindlimb IR impairs skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and increases oxidative stress. Cyclosporine A did not show protective effects. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  18. Mitochondrial morphology is altered in atrophied skeletal muscle of aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Leduc-Gaudet, Jean-Philippe; Picard, Martin; Pelletier, Félix St-Jean; Sgarioto, Nicolas; Auger, Marie-Joëlle; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; St-Pierre, David H.; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle aging is associated with a progressive decline in muscle mass and strength, a process termed sarcopenia. Evidence suggests that accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction plays a causal role in sarcopenia, which could be triggered by impaired mitophagy. Mitochondrial function, mitophagy and mitochondrial morphology are interconnected aspects of mitochondrial biology, and may coordinately be altered with aging. However, mitochondrial morphology has remained challenging to characterize in muscle, and whether sarcopenia is associated with abnormal mitochondrial morphology remains unknown. Therefore, we assessed the morphology of SubSarcolemmal (SS) and InterMyoFibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in skeletal muscle of young (8-12wk-old) and old (88-96wk-old) mice using a quantitative 2-dimensional transmission electron microscopy approach. We show that sarcopenia is associated with larger and less circular SS mitochondria. Likewise, aged IMF mitochondria were longer and more branched, suggesting increased fusion and/or decreased fission. Accordingly, although no difference in the content of proteins regulating mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1, Mfn2, Opa1 and Drp1) was observed, a mitochondrial fusion index (Mfn2-to-Drp1 ratio) was significantly increased in aged muscles. Our results reveal that sarcopenia is associated with complex changes in mitochondrial morphology that could interfere with mitochondrial function and mitophagy, and thus contribute to aging-related accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia. PMID:26053100

  19. Mitochondrial morphology is altered in atrophied skeletal muscle of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Leduc-Gaudet, Jean-Philippe; Picard, Martin; St-Jean Pelletier, Félix; Sgarioto, Nicolas; Auger, Marie-Joëlle; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; St-Pierre, David H; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-07-20

    Skeletal muscle aging is associated with a progressive decline in muscle mass and strength, a process termed sarcopenia. Evidence suggests that accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction plays a causal role in sarcopenia, which could be triggered by impaired mitophagy. Mitochondrial function, mitophagy and mitochondrial morphology are interconnected aspects of mitochondrial biology, and may coordinately be altered with aging. However, mitochondrial morphology has remained challenging to characterize in muscle, and whether sarcopenia is associated with abnormal mitochondrial morphology remains unknown. Therefore, we assessed the morphology of SubSarcolemmal (SS) and InterMyoFibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in skeletal muscle of young (8-12wk-old) and old (88-96wk-old) mice using a quantitative 2-dimensional transmission electron microscopy approach. We show that sarcopenia is associated with larger and less circular SS mitochondria. Likewise, aged IMF mitochondria were longer and more branched, suggesting increased fusion and/or decreased fission. Accordingly, although no difference in the content of proteins regulating mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1, Mfn2, Opa1 and Drp1) was observed, a mitochondrial fusion index (Mfn2-to-Drp1 ratio) was significantly increased in aged muscles. Our results reveal that sarcopenia is associated with complex changes in mitochondrial morphology that could interfere with mitochondrial function and mitophagy, and thus contribute to aging-related accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia.

  20. Skeletal muscle autophagy and apoptosis during aging: effects of calorie restriction and life-long exercise

    PubMed Central

    Wohlgemuth, Stephanie Eva; Seo, Arnold Young; Marzetti, Emanuele; Lees, Hazel Anne; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2009-01-01

    Sarcopenia, loss of muscle mass and function, is a common feature of aging. Oxidative damage and apoptosis are likely underlying factors. Autophagy, a process for the degradation of cellular constituents, may be a mechanism to combat cell damage and death. We investigated the effect of age on autophagy and apoptosis in plantaris muscle of male Fischer344 rats that were either fed ad libitum, or mild, life-long calorie restricted (CR) alone or combined with life-long voluntary exercise. Upstream autophagy regulatory proteins were either upregulated with age (Beclin-1) or unchanged (Atg7 and 9). LC3 gene and protein expression pattern as well as LAMP-2 gene expression, both downstream regulators of autophagy, however, suggested an age-related decline in autophagic degradation. Atg protein expression and LC3 and LAMP-2 gene expression were improved in CR rats with or without exercise. The age-related increase in oxidative damage and apoptosis were attenuated by the treatments. Both, oxidative damage and apoptosis correlated negatively with autophagy. We conclude that mild CR attenuates the age-related impairment of autophagy in rodent skeletal muscle, which might be one of the mechanisms by which CR attenuates age-related cellular damage and cell death in skeletal muscle in vivo. PMID:19903516

  1. Aging of the skeletal muscle extracellular matrix drives a stem cell fibrogenic conversion.

    PubMed

    Stearns-Reider, Kristen M; D'Amore, Antonio; Beezhold, Kevin; Rothrauff, Benjamin; Cavalli, Loredana; Wagner, William R; Vorp, David A; Tsamis, Alkiviadis; Shinde, Sunita; Zhang, Changqing; Barchowsky, Aaron; Rando, Thomas A; Tuan, Rocky S; Ambrosio, Fabrisia

    2017-03-30

    Age-related declines in skeletal muscle regeneration have been attributed to muscle stem cell (MuSC) dysfunction. Aged MuSCs display a fibrogenic conversion, leading to fibrosis and impaired recovery after injury. Although studies have demonstrated the influence of in vitro substrate characteristics on stem cell fate, whether and how aging of the extracellular matrix (ECM) affects stem cell behavior has not been investigated. Here, we investigated the direct effect of the aged muscle ECM on MuSC lineage specification. Quantification of ECM topology and muscle mechanical properties reveals decreased collagen tortuosity and muscle stiffening with increasing age. Age-related ECM alterations directly disrupt MuSC responses, and MuSCs seeded ex vivo onto decellularized ECM constructs derived from aged muscle display increased expression of fibrogenic markers and decreased myogenicity, compared to MuSCs seeded onto young ECM. This fibrogenic conversion is recapitulated in vitro when MuSCs are seeded directly onto matrices elaborated by aged fibroblasts. When compared to young fibroblasts, fibroblasts isolated from aged muscle display increased nuclear levels of the mechanosensors, Yes-associated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), consistent with exposure to a stiff microenvironment in vivo. Accordingly, preconditioning of young fibroblasts by seeding them onto a substrate engineered to mimic the stiffness of aged muscle increases YAP/TAZ nuclear translocation and promotes secretion of a matrix that favors MuSC fibrogenesis. The findings here suggest that an age-related increase in muscle stiffness drives YAP/TAZ-mediated pathogenic expression of matricellular proteins by fibroblasts, ultimately disrupting MuSC fate.

  2. Effects of Age and Sedentary Lifestyle on Skeletal Muscle NF-κB Signaling in Men

    PubMed Central

    Buford, Thomas W.; Cooke, Matthew B.; Manini, Todd M.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2010-01-01

    Background. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical signaling molecule of disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. However, few studies have carefully investigated whether similar pathways are modulated with physical activity and age. Methods. The present study examined lean mass, maximal force production, and skeletal muscle NF-κB signaling in 41 men categorized as sedentary (OS, N = 13, 63.85 ± 6.59 year), physically active (OA, N = 14, 60.71 ± 5.54 year), or young and sedentary (YS, N = 14, 21.35 ± 3.84 year). Muscle tissue from the vastus lateralis was assayed for messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of the β subunit of IkB kinase (IKKβ), cytosolic protein content of phosphorylated inhibitor of kappa B alpha (pIKBα), and nuclear content of NF-κB subunits p50 and p65. Results. When compared with YS, OS demonstrated age-related muscle atrophy and reduced isokinetic knee extension torque. Physical activity in older individuals preserved maximal isokinetic knee extension torque. OS muscle contained 50% more pIKBα than OA and 61% more pIKBα than YS. Furthermore, nuclear p65 was significantly elevated in OS compared with YS. OS muscle did not differ from either of the other two groups for nuclear p50 or for mRNA expression of IKKβ. Conclusions. These results indicate that skeletal muscle content of nuclear-bound p65 is elevated by age in humans. The elevation in nuclear-bound p65 appears to be at least partially due to significant increases in pIKBα. A sedentary lifestyle appears to play some role in increased IKBα; however, further research is needed to identify downstream effects of this increase. PMID:20045871

  3. Age related skeletal muscle atrophy and upregulation of autophagy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Teresa B; Wojcik, Slawomir; Costagliola, Alessandro; De Biase, Davide; Iovino, Salvatore; Iovane, Valentina; Russo, Valeria; Papparella, Serenella; Paciello, Orlando

    2015-10-01

    Sarcopenia, the age related loss of muscle mass and strength, is a multifactorial condition that occurs in a variety of species and represents a major healthcare concern for older adults in human medicine. In veterinary medicine, skeletal muscle atrophy is often observed in dogs as they reach old age, but the process is not well understood. Autophagy is a mechanism for degradation and recycling of cellular constituents and is potentially involved in sarcopenia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of three markers of autophagy, Beclin 1, LC3 and p62, in muscle wasting of geriatric dogs, to establish whether the levels of autophagy change with increasing age. Muscle biopsies from 25 geriatric dogs were examined and compared with those from five healthy young dogs. Samples from older dogs, assessed by routine histology, histoenzymatic staining and immunohistochemistry, showed evidence of muscle atrophy, sarcoplasmic vacuolisation and mitochondrial alterations. Furthermore, in 80% of the muscle samples from the older dogs, marked intracytoplasmic staining for Beclin 1 and LC3 was observed. Significantly greater expression of LC3 II and Beclin 1, but lower expression of p62, was found by Western blotting, comparing muscle samples from old vs. young dogs. The results of the study suggest that enhanced autophagy might be one of the factors underlying muscle atrophy in dogs as they age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Type IIB human skeletal muscle fibers positively correlate with bone mineral density irrespective to age.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Lee, Wing-Sze; Qin, Ling; Tang, Ning; Hung, Vivian Wing-Yin; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2010-11-01

    Age-associated decrease in type IIA/B human skeletal muscle fibers was detected in human biopsies in our previous study. The relationship between change in muscle fiber typing and bone mineral density (BMD) is, however, unknown either cross-sectionally or longitudinally. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate their correlation using human muscle biopsies. Forty human subjects aged (53.4 ± 20.2) years were recruited. Histomorphometric parameters of their muscle biopsies were measured by ATPase staining and image analysis, including average area percentage, fiber number percentage, mean fiber area, and area percentage of connective tissues. Hip and spine BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Partial correlation with adjusting age was performed. Type IIB muscle fiber was found positively correlated with hip BMD irrespective to age and demonstrated significantly stronger relationship with BMD among all fiber types, in terms of its cross-sectional area (r = 0.380, P = 0.029) and size (r = 0.389, P = 0.025). Type IIA muscle fibers associated with hip BMD in mean fiber area only (r = 0.420, P = 0.015). Type IIB muscle fiber may play an important role in maintaining bone quality. This may also be a relatively more sensitive fiber type of sarcopenia and osteoporosis. These findings further consolidate the muscle-bone relationship.

  5. Age-related impairment of T cell-induced skeletal muscle precursor cell function

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Breanna R.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. Recent evidence suggests that an age-associated loss of muscle precursor cell (MPC) functionality contributes to sarcopenia. The objectives of the present study were to examine the influence of activated T cells on MPCs and determine whether an age-related defect in this signaling occurs. MPCs were collected from the gastrocnemius and plantaris of 3-mo-old (young) and 32-mo-old (old) animals. Splenic T cells were harvested using anti-CD3 Dynabead isolation. T cells were activated for 48 h with costimulation of 100 IU/ml interleukin-2 (IL-2) and 5 μg/ml of anti-CD28. Costimulation increased 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation of T cells from 13.4 ± 4.6% in control to 64.8 ± 6.0% in costimulated cells. Additionally, T cell cytokines increased proliferation on MPCs isolated from young muscle by 24.0 ± 5.7%, whereas there was no effect on MPCs isolated from aged muscle. T cell cytokines were also found to be a chemoattractant. T cells were able to promote migration of MPCs isolated from young muscle; however, MPCs isolated from aged muscle did not respond to the T cell-released chemokines. Conversely, whereas T cell-released cytokines did not affect myogenesis of MPCs isolated from young animals, there was a decrease in MPCs isolated from old animals. These data suggest that T cells may play a critical role in mediating MPC function. Furthermore, aging may alter T cell-induced MPC function. These findings have implications for developing strategies aimed at increasing MPC migration and proliferation leading to an improved regenerative capacity of aged skeletal muscle. PMID:21325640

  6. Dysregulation of SIRT-1 in aging mice increases skeletal muscle fatigue by a PARP-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Junaith S; Wilson, Joseph C; Myers, Matthew J; Sisson, Kayla J; Alway, Stephen E

    2014-10-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skeletal muscles and the resulting decline in muscle performance are hallmarks of sarcopenia. However, the precise mechanism by which ROS results in a decline in muscle performance is unclear. We demonstrate that isometric-exercise concomitantly increases the activities of Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT-1) and Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase (PARP-1), and that activated SIRT-1 physically binds with and inhibits PARP-1 activity by a deacetylation dependent mechanism in skeletal muscle from young mice. In contrast, skeletal muscle from aged mice displays higher PARP-1 activity and lower SIRT-1 activity due to decreased intracellular NAD+ content, and as a result reduced muscle performance in response to exercise. Interestingly, injection of PJ34, a PARP-1 inhibitor, in aged mice increased SIRT-1 activity by preserving intracellular NAD+ content, which resulted in higher skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and performance. We found that the higher activity of PARP-1 in H2O2-treated myotubes or in exercised-skeletal muscles from aged mice is due to an elevated level of PARP-1 acetylation by the histone acetyltransferase General control of amino acid synthesis protein 5-like 2 (GCN-5). These results suggest that activation of SIRT-1 and/or inhibition of PARP-1 may ameliorate skeletal muscle performance in pathophysiological conditions such as sarcopenia and disuse-induced atrophy in aging.

  7. Mechanisms of skeletal muscle aging: insights from Drosophila and mammalian models

    PubMed Central

    Demontis, Fabio; Piccirillo, Rosanna; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    A characteristic feature of aged humans and other mammals is the debilitating, progressive loss of skeletal muscle function and mass that is known as sarcopenia. Age-related muscle dysfunction occurs to an even greater extent during the relatively short lifespan of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Studies in model organisms indicate that sarcopenia is driven by a combination of muscle tissue extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and that it fundamentally differs from the rapid atrophy of muscles observed following disuse and fasting. Extrinsic changes in innervation, stem cell function and endocrine regulation of muscle homeostasis contribute to muscle aging. In addition, organelle dysfunction and compromised protein homeostasis are among the primary intrinsic causes. Some of these age-related changes can in turn contribute to the induction of compensatory stress responses that have a protective role during muscle aging. In this Review, we outline how studies in Drosophila and mammalian model organisms can each provide distinct advantages to facilitate the understanding of this complex multifactorial condition and how they can be used to identify suitable therapies. PMID:24092876

  8. Mechanisms of skeletal muscle aging: insights from Drosophila and mammalian models.

    PubMed

    Demontis, Fabio; Piccirillo, Rosanna; Goldberg, Alfred L; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-11-01

    A characteristic feature of aged humans and other mammals is the debilitating, progressive loss of skeletal muscle function and mass that is known as sarcopenia. Age-related muscle dysfunction occurs to an even greater extent during the relatively short lifespan of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Studies in model organisms indicate that sarcopenia is driven by a combination of muscle tissue extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and that it fundamentally differs from the rapid atrophy of muscles observed following disuse and fasting. Extrinsic changes in innervation, stem cell function and endocrine regulation of muscle homeostasis contribute to muscle aging. In addition, organelle dysfunction and compromised protein homeostasis are among the primary intrinsic causes. Some of these age-related changes can in turn contribute to the induction of compensatory stress responses that have a protective role during muscle aging. In this Review, we outline how studies in Drosophila and mammalian model organisms can each provide distinct advantages to facilitate the understanding of this complex multifactorial condition and how they can be used to identify suitable therapies.

  9. The Need for Standardized Assessment of Muscle Quality in Skeletal Muscle Function Deficit and Other Aging-Related Muscle Dysfunctions: A Symposium Report

    PubMed Central

    Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly; Harris-Love, Michael O.; Miljkovic, Iva; Fragala, Maren S.; Anthony, Brian W.; Manini, Todd M.

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of scientific literature suggests that not only changes in skeletal muscle mass, but also other factors underpinning muscle quality, play a role in the decline in skeletal muscle function and impaired mobility associated with aging. A symposium on muscle quality and the need for standardized assessment was held on April 28, 2016 at the International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a venue for basic science and clinical researchers and expert clinicians to discuss muscle quality in the context of skeletal muscle function deficit and other aging-related muscle dysfunctions. The present article provides an expanded introduction concerning the emerging definitions of muscle quality and a potential framework for scientific inquiry within the field. Changes in muscle tissue composition, based on excessive levels of inter- and intra-muscular adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipids, have been found to adversely impact metabolism and peak force generation. However, methods to easily and rapidly assess muscle tissue composition in multiple clinical settings and with minimal patient burden are needed. Diagnostic ultrasound and other assessment methods continue to be developed for characterizing muscle pathology, and enhanced sonography using sensors to provide user feedback and improve reliability is currently the subject of ongoing investigation and development. In addition, measures of relative muscle force such as specific force or grip strength adjusted for body size have been proposed as methods to assess changes in muscle quality. Furthermore, performance-based assessments of muscle power via timed tests of function and body size estimates, are associated with lower extremity muscle strength may be responsive to age-related changes in muscle quality. Future aims include reaching consensus on the definition and standardized assessments of muscle quality, and

  10. The Need for Standardized Assessment of Muscle Quality in Skeletal Muscle Function Deficit and Other Aging-Related Muscle Dysfunctions: A Symposium Report.

    PubMed

    Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly; Harris-Love, Michael O; Miljkovic, Iva; Fragala, Maren S; Anthony, Brian W; Manini, Todd M

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of scientific literature suggests that not only changes in skeletal muscle mass, but also other factors underpinning muscle quality, play a role in the decline in skeletal muscle function and impaired mobility associated with aging. A symposium on muscle quality and the need for standardized assessment was held on April 28, 2016 at the International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a venue for basic science and clinical researchers and expert clinicians to discuss muscle quality in the context of skeletal muscle function deficit and other aging-related muscle dysfunctions. The present article provides an expanded introduction concerning the emerging definitions of muscle quality and a potential framework for scientific inquiry within the field. Changes in muscle tissue composition, based on excessive levels of inter- and intra-muscular adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipids, have been found to adversely impact metabolism and peak force generation. However, methods to easily and rapidly assess muscle tissue composition in multiple clinical settings and with minimal patient burden are needed. Diagnostic ultrasound and other assessment methods continue to be developed for characterizing muscle pathology, and enhanced sonography using sensors to provide user feedback and improve reliability is currently the subject of ongoing investigation and development. In addition, measures of relative muscle force such as specific force or grip strength adjusted for body size have been proposed as methods to assess changes in muscle quality. Furthermore, performance-based assessments of muscle power via timed tests of function and body size estimates, are associated with lower extremity muscle strength may be responsive to age-related changes in muscle quality. Future aims include reaching consensus on the definition and standardized assessments of muscle quality, and

  11. Aging and microRNA expression in human skeletal muscle: a microarray and bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Micah J; McCarthy, John J; Sinha, Mala; Spratt, Heidi M; Volpi, Elena; Esser, Karyn A; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2011-05-01

    A common characteristic of aging is loss of skeletal muscle (sarcopenia), which can lead to falls and fractures. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are novel posttranscriptional modulators of gene expression with potential roles as regulators of skeletal muscle mass and function. The purpose of this study was to profile miRNA expression patterns in aging human skeletal muscle with a miRNA array followed by in-depth functional and network analysis. Muscle biopsy samples from 36 men [young: 31 ± 2 (n = 19); older: 73 ± 3 (n = 17)] were 1) analyzed for expression of miRNAs with a miRNA array, 2) validated with TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR assays, and 3) identified (and later validated) for potential gene targets with the bioinformatics knowledge base software Ingenuity Pathways Analysis. Eighteen miRNAs were differentially expressed in older humans (P < 0.05 and >500 expression level). Let-7 family members Let-7b and Let-7e were significantly elevated and further validated in older subjects (P < 0.05). Functional and network analysis from Ingenuity determined that gene targets of the Let-7s were associated with molecular networks involved in cell cycle control such as cellular proliferation and differentiation. We confirmed with real-time PCR that mRNA expression of cell cycle regulators CDK6, CDC25A, and CDC34 were downregulated in older compared with young subjects (P < 0.05). In addition, PAX7 mRNA expression was lower in older subjects (P < 0.05). These data suggest that aging is characterized by a higher expression of Let-7 family members that may downregulate genes related to cellular proliferation. We propose that higher Let-7 expression may be an indicator of impaired cell cycle function possibly contributing to reduced muscle cell renewal and regeneration in older human muscle.

  12. Lactate dehydrogenase regulation in aged skeletal muscle: Regulation by anabolic steroids and functional overload.

    PubMed

    Washington, Tyrone A; Healey, Julie M; Thompson, Raymond W; Lowe, Larry L; Carson, James A

    2014-09-01

    Aging alters the skeletal muscle response to overload-induced growth. The onset of functional overload is characterized by increased myoblast proliferation and an altered muscle metabolic profile. The onset of functional overload is associated with increased energy demands that are met through the interconversion of lactate and pyruvate via the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Testosterone targets many of the processes activated at the onset of functional overload. However, the effect of aging on this metabolic plasticity at the onset of functional overload and how anabolic steroid administration modulates this response is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine if aging would alter overload-induced LDH activity and expression at the onset of functional overload and whether anabolic steroid administration would modulate this response. Five-month and 25-month male Fischer 344xF1 BRN were given nandrolone decanoate (ND) or sham injections for 14days and then the plantaris was functionally overloaded (OV) for 3days by synergist ablation. Aging reduced muscle LDH-A & LDH-B activity 70% (p<0.05). Aging also reduced LDH-A mRNA abundance, however there was no age effect on LDH-B mRNA abundance. In 5-month muscle, both ND and OV decreased LDH-A and LDH-B activity. However, there was no synergistic or additive effect. In 5-month muscle, ND and OV decreased LDH-A mRNA expression with no change in LDH-B expression. In 25-month muscle, ND and OV increased LDH-A and LDH-B activity. LDH-A mRNA expression was not altered by ND or OV in aged muscle. However, there was a main effect of OV to decrease LDH-B mRNA expression. There was also an age-induced LDH isoform shift. ND and OV treatment increased the "fast" LDH isoforms in aged muscle, whereas ND and OV increased the "slow" isoforms in young muscle. Our study provides evidence that aging alters aspects of skeletal muscle metabolic plasticity normally induced by overload and anabolic steroid

  13. Regrowth after skeletal muscle atrophy is impaired in aged rats, despite similar responses in signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    White, Jena R.; Confides, Amy L.; Moore-Reed, Stephanie; Hoch, Johanna M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regrowth after atrophy is impaired in the aged and in this study we hypothesized that this can be explained by a blunted response of signaling pathways and cellular processes during reloading after hind limb suspension in muscles from old rats. Male Brown Norway Fisher 344 rats at 6 (young) and 32 (old) months of age were subjected to normal ambulatory conditions (amb), hind limb suspension for 14 days (HS), and HS followed by reloading through normal ambulation for 14 days (RE); soleus muscles were used for analysis of intracellular signaling pathways and cellular processes. Soleus muscle regrowth was blunted in old compared to young rats which coincided with a recovery of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in young but not old. However, the response to reloading for p-Akt, p-p70s6k and p-GSK3β protein abundance was similar between muscles from young and old rats, even though main effects for age indicate an increase in activation of this protein synthesis pathway in the aged. Similarly, MAFbx mRNA levels in soleus muscle from old rats recovered to the same extent as in the young, while Murf-1 was unchanged. mRNA abundance of autophagy markers Atg5 and Atg7 showed an identical response in muscle from old compared to young rats, but beclin did not. Autophagic flux was not changed at either age at the measured time point. Apoptosis was elevated in soleus muscle from old rats particularly with HS, but recovered in HSRE and these changes were not associated with differences in caspase-3, -8 or-9 activity in any group. Protein abundance of apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruitment domain (ARC), cytosolic EndoG, as well as cytosolic and nuclear apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were lower in muscle from old rats, and there was no age-related difference in the response to atrophy or regrowth. Soleus muscles from old rats had a higher number of ED2 positive macrophages in all groups and these decreased with HS, but recovered in HSRE in the old, while no

  14. Regrowth after skeletal muscle atrophy is impaired in aged rats, despite similar responses in signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    White, Jena R; Confides, Amy L; Moore-Reed, Stephanie; Hoch, Johanna M; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle regrowth after atrophy is impaired in the aged and in this study we hypothesized that this can be explained by a blunted response of signaling pathways and cellular processes during reloading after hind limb suspension in muscles from old rats. Male Brown Norway Fisher 344 rats at 6 (young) and 32 (old) months of age were subjected to normal ambulatory conditions (amb), hind limb suspension for 14 days (HS), and HS followed by reloading through normal ambulation for 14 days (RE); soleus muscles were used for analysis of intracellular signaling pathways and cellular processes. Soleus muscle regrowth was blunted in old compared to young rats which coincided with a recovery of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in young but not old. However, the response to reloading for p-Akt, p-p70s6k and p-GSK3β protein abundance was similar between muscles from young and old rats, even though main effects for age indicate an increase in activation of this protein synthesis pathway in the aged. Similarly, MAFbx mRNA levels in soleus muscle from old rats recovered to the same extent as in the young, while Murf-1 was unchanged. mRNA abundance of autophagy markers Atg5 and Atg7 showed an identical response in muscle from old compared to young rats, but beclin did not. Autophagic flux was not changed at either age at the measured time point. Apoptosis was elevated in soleus muscle from old rats particularly with HS, but recovered in HSRE and these changes were not associated with differences in caspase-3, -8 or -9 activity in any group. Protein abundance of apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruitment domain (ARC), cytosolic EndoG, as well as cytosolic and nuclear apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were lower in muscle from old rats, and there was no age-related difference in the response to atrophy or regrowth. Soleus muscles from old rats had a higher number of ED2 positive macrophages in all groups and these decreased with HS, but recovered in HSRE in the old, while no

  15. Exercise training, but not resveratrol, improves metabolic and inflammatory status in skeletal muscle of aged men

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Jesper; Gliemann, Lasse; Biensø, Rasmus; Schmidt, Jakob; Hellsten, Ylva; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol alone and when combined with exercise training in skeletal muscle of aged human subjects. Healthy, physically inactive men (60–72 years old) were randomized to either 8 weeks of daily intake of 250 mg resveratrol or placebo or to 8 weeks of high-intensity exercise training with 250 mg resveratrol or placebo. Before and after the interventions, resting blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained and a one-legged knee-extensor endurance exercise test was performed. Exercise training increased skeletal muscle peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α mRNA ∼1.5-fold, cytochrome c protein ∼1.3-fold, cytochrome c oxidase I protein ∼1.5-fold, citrate synthase activity ∼1.3-fold, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity ∼1.3-fold, inhibitor of κB-α and inhibitor of κB-β protein content ∼1.3-fold and time to exhaustion in the one-legged knee-extensor endurance exercise test by ∼1.2-fold, with no significant additive or adverse effects of resveratrol on these parameters. Despite an overall ∼25% reduction in total acetylation level in skeletal muscle with resveratrol, no exclusive resveratrol-mediated metabolic effects were observed on the investigated parameters. Notably, however, resveratrol blunted an exercise training-induced decrease (∼20%) in protein carbonylation and decrease (∼40%) in tumour necrosis factor α mRNA content in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, resveratrol did not elicit metabolic improvements in healthy aged subjects; in fact, resveratrol even impaired the observed exercise training-induced improvements in markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in skeletal muscle. Collectively, this highlights the metabolic efficacy of exercise training in aged subjects and does not support the contention that resveratrol is a potential exercise mimetic in healthy aged subjects. PMID:24514907

  16. Advancing age produces sex differences in vasomotor kinetics during and after skeletal muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Bearden, Shawn E

    2007-09-01

    Little is known of the vasomotor responses of skeletal muscle arterioles during and following muscle contraction. We hypothesized that aging leads to impaired arteriolar responses to muscle contraction and recovery. Nitric oxide (NO) availability, which is age dependent, has been implicated in components of these kinetics. Therefore, we also hypothesized that changes in the kinetics of vascular responses are associated with the NO pathway. Groups were young (3 mo), old (24 mo), endothelial NO synthase knockout (eNOS-/-), and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA)-treated male and female C57BL/6 mice. The kinetics of vasodilation during and following 1 min of contractions of the gluteus maximus muscle were recorded in second-order (regional distribution) and third-order (local control) arterioles. Baseline, peak (during contraction), and maximal diameters (pharmacological) were not affected by age or sex. The kinetics of dilation and recovery were not different between males and females at the young age. There was a significant slowing of vasodilation at the onset of contractions (approximately 2-fold; P < 0.05) and a significant speeding of recovery ( approximately 5-fold; P < 0.05) in old males vs. old females and vs. young eNOS-/-, and L-NA did not affect the kinetics at the onset of muscle contraction. eNOS-/- mimicked the rapid recovery of old males in second-order arterioles; acute NO production (L-NA) explained approximately 50% of this effect. These data demonstrate fundamental age-related differences between the sexes in the dynamic function of skeletal muscle arterioles. Understanding how youthful function persists in females but not males may provide therapeutic insight into clinical interventions to maintain dynamic microvascular control of nutrient supply with age.

  17. Overexpression of the mitochondrial T3 receptor induces skeletal muscle atrophy during aging.

    PubMed

    Casas, François; Pessemesse, Laurence; Grandemange, Stéphanie; Seyer, Pascal; Baris, Olivier; Gueguen, Naïg; Ramonatxo, Christelle; Perrin, Florence; Fouret, Gilles; Lepourry, Laurence; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2009-05-20

    In previous studies, we characterized a new hormonal pathway involving a mitochondrial T3 receptor (p43) acting as a mitochondrial transcription factor. In in vitro and in vivo studies, we have shown that p43 increases mitochondrial transcription and mitochondrial biogenesis. In addition, p43 overexpression in skeletal muscle stimulates mitochondrial respiration and induces a shift in metabolic and contractile features of muscle fibers which became more oxidative.Here we have studied the influence of p43 overexpression in skeletal muscle of mice during aging. We report that p43 overexpression initially increased mitochondrial mass. However, after the early rise in mitochondrial DNA occurring at 2 months of age in transgenic mice, we observed a progressive decrease of mitochondrial DNA content which became 2-fold lower at 23 months of age relatively to control animals. Moreover, p43 overexpression induced an oxidative stress characterized by a strong increase of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in quadriceps muscle, although antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase and superoxide dismutase) were stimulated. In addition, muscle atrophy became detectable at 6 months of age, probably through a stimulation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway via two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases E3, Atrogin-1/MAFbx and MuRF1.Taken together, these results demonstrate that a prolonged stimulation of mitochondrial activity induces muscle atrophy. In addition, these data underline the importance of a tight control of p43 expression and suggest that a deregulation of the direct T3 mitochondrial pathway could be one of the parameters involved in the occurrence of sarcopenia.

  18. Combined Training Enhances Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Oxidative Capacity Independent of Age

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Ian R.; Henderson, Gregory C.; Rao, Rajesh R.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Skeletal muscle from sedentary older adults exhibits reduced mitochondrial abundance and oxidative capacity. Objective: The primary objective was to determine whether 8 weeks of combined training (CT) has a more robust effect than endurance training (ET) or resistance training (RT) on mitochondrial physiology in healthy young (18–30 years) and older (≥65 years) adults. Intervention: Thirty-four young and 31 older adults were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of ET, RT, and control/CT. Control subjects completed 8 weeks of no exercise (control) followed by 8 weeks of CT. Body composition, skeletal muscle strength, and peak oxygen uptake were measured before and after the intervention. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples were obtained before and 48 hours after the intervention. Mitochondrial physiology was evaluated by high-resolution respirometry and expression of mitochondrial proteins and transcription factors by quantitative PCR and immunoblotting. Results: ET and CT significantly increased oxidative capacity and expression of mitochondrial proteins and transcription factors. All training modalities improved body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, and skeletal muscle strength. CT induced the most robust improvements in mitochondria-related outcomes and physical characteristics despite lower training volumes for the ET and RT components. Importantly, most of the adaptations to training occurred independent of age. Conclusion: Collectively, these results demonstrate that both ET and CT increase muscle mitochondrial abundance and capacity although CT induced the most robust improvements in the outcomes measured. In conclusion, CT provides a robust exercise regimen to improve muscle mitochondrial outcomes and physical characteristics independent of age. PMID:25599385

  19. Role of extracellular matrix in development of skeletal muscle and postmortem aging of meat.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-11-01

    The integrity of skeletal muscle is maintained by the intramuscular connective tissues (IMCTs) that are composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules such as collagens, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins. The ECM plays an important role not only in providing biomechanical strength of the IMCT, but also in regulating muscle cell behavior. Some ECM molecules, such as decorin and laminin, modulate the activity of myostatin that regulates skeletal muscle mass. Furthermore, it has been shown that decorin activates Akt downstream of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) and enhances the differentiation of myogenic cells, suggesting that decorin acts as a signaling molecule to myogenic cells. With animal growth, the structural integrity of IMCT increases; collagen fibrils within the endomysium associate more closely with each other, and the collagen fibers in the perimysium become increasingly thick and their wavy pattern grows more regular. These changes increase the mechanical strength of IMCT, contributing to the toughening of meat. However, in highly marbled beef cattle like Wagyu, intramuscular fat deposits mainly in the perimysium between muscle fiber bundles during the fattening period. The development of adipose tissues appears to disorganize the structure of IMCT and contributes to the tenderness of Wagyu beef. The IMCT was considered to be rather immutable compared to myofibrils during postmortem aging of meat. However, several studies have shown that collagen networks in the IMCT are disintegrated and proteoglycan components are degraded during postmortem aging. These changes in ECM appear to reduce the mechanical strength of IMCT and contribute to the tenderness of uncooked meat or cooked meat at low temperature. Thus, the ECM plays a multifunctional role in skeletal muscle development and postmortem aging of meat.

  20. Enhancement of Skeletal Muscle in Aged Rats Following High-Intensity Stretch-Shortening Contraction Training.

    PubMed

    Rader, Erik P; Naimo, Marshall A; Layner, Kayla N; Triscuit, Alyssa M; Chetlin, Robert D; Ensey, James; Baker, Brent A

    2017-04-01

    Exercise is the most accessible, efficacious, and multifactorial intervention to improve health and treat chronic disease. High-intensity resistance exercise, in particular, also maximizes skeletal muscle size and strength-outcomes crucial at advanced age. However, such training is capable of inducing muscle maladaptation when misapplied at old age. Therefore, characterization of parameters (e.g., mode and frequency) that foster adaptation is an active research area. To address this issue, we utilized a rodent model that allowed training at maximal intensity in terms of muscle activation and tested the hypothesis that muscles of old rats adapt to stretch-shortening contraction (SSC) training, provided the training frequency is sufficiently low. At termination of training, normalized muscle mass (i.e., muscle mass divided by tibia length) and muscle quality (isometric force divided by normalized muscle mass) were determined. For young rats, normalized muscle mass increased by ∼20% regardless of training frequency. No difference was observed for muscle quality values after 2 days versus 3 days per week training (0.65 ± 0.09 N/mg/mm vs. 0.59 ± 0.05 N/mg/mm, respectively). For old rats following 3 days per week training, normalized muscle mass was unaltered and muscle quality was 30% lower than young levels. Following 2 days per week training at old age, normalized muscle mass increased by 17% and muscle quality was restored to young levels. To investigate this enhanced response, oxidative stress was assessed by lipid peroxidation quantification. For young rats, lipid peroxidation levels were unaltered by training. With aging, baseline levels of lipid peroxidation increased by 1.5-fold. For old rats, only 2 days per week training decreased lipid peroxidation to levels indistinguishable from young values. These results imply that, appropriately scheduled high-intensity SSC training at old age is capable of restoring muscle to a younger phenotype in terms

  1. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  2. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  3. Effects of aging and exercise training on skeletal muscle blood flow and resistance artery morphology.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Bradley J; Ramsey, Michael W; Stabley, John N; Dominguez, James M; Davis, Robert T; McCullough, Danielle J; Muller-Delp, Judy M; Delp, Michael D

    2012-12-01

    With old age, blood flow to the high-oxidative red skeletal muscle is reduced and blood flow to the low-oxidative white muscle is elevated during exercise. Changes in the number of feed arteries perforating the muscle are thought to contribute to this altered hyperemic response during exercise. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training would ameliorate age-related differences in blood flow during exercise and feed artery structure in skeletal muscle. Young (6-7 mo old, n = 36) and old (24 mo old, n = 25) male Fischer 344 rats were divided into young sedentary (Sed), old Sed, young exercise-trained (ET), and old ET groups, where training consisted of 10-12 wk of treadmill exercise. In Sed and ET rats, blood flow to the red and white portions of the gastrocnemius muscle (Gast(Red) and Gast(White)) and the number and luminal cross-sectional area (CSA) of all feed arteries perforating the muscle were measured at rest and during exercise. In the old ET group, blood flow was greater to Gast(Red) (264 ± 13 and 195 ± 9 ml · min(-1) · 100 g(-1) in old ET and old Sed, respectively) and lower to Gast(White) (78 ± 5 and 120 ± 6 ml · min(-1) · 100 g(-1) in old ET and old Sed, respectively) than in the old Sed group. There was no difference in the number of feed arteries between the old ET and old Sed group, although the CSA of feed arteries from old ET rats was larger. In young ET rats, there was an increase in the number of feed arteries perforating the muscle. Exercise training mitigated old age-associated differences in blood flow during exercise within gastrocnemius muscle. However, training-induced adaptations in resistance artery morphology differed between young (increase in feed artery number) and old (increase in artery CSA) animals. The altered blood flow pattern induced by exercise training with old age would improve the local matching of O(2) delivery to consumption within the skeletal muscle.

  4. Age-related changes in skeletal muscle composition: A pilot nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study in mice.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Anatoly P; Mannina, Luisa; Costanzo, Manuela; Cisterna, Barbara; Malatesta, Manuela; Zancanaro, Carlo

    2017-03-07

    The composition of skeletal muscle was investigated in the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscle of 13-month-old (n=15) and 23-month-old (n=19) mice by means of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Muscle specimens were dissected out, frozen in liquid nitrogen and extracted in chloroform/methanol, and proton NMR spectra of the resulting aqueous and organic fractions were obtained at 600MHz. Several metabolites were unambiguously identified and quantified. Multivariate ANOVA (factor: age, muscle, age×muscle) showed a significant main effect of age (P=0.031) on the amount of muscle metabolites, suggesting that the aging process affects the composition of skeletal muscle. Univariate tests showed significant differences for lactate, acetate, taurine, and uridine in 13- and 23-month-old mice. A trend for the effect of muscle (quadriceps vs. gastrocnemius; P=0.128) was also found. No significant muscle x age interaction was present. When the same data were used in principal component analysis, the first two principal components separated muscles (quadriceps and gastrocnemius) and ages (13- and 23-month-old), explaining 66.7% of total variance. The results of this pilot study show that high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is able to detect age-associated changes in skeletal muscle metabolites, thereby paving the way to future detailed metabolomics investigation in sarcopenia of aging.

  5. Stuck in gear: age-related loss of variable gearing in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Holt, Natalie C; Danos, Nicole; Roberts, Thomas J; Azizi, Emanuel

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal muscles power a broad diversity of animal movements, despite only being able to produce high forces over a limited range of velocities. Pennate muscles use a range of gear ratios, the ratio of muscle shortening velocity to fiber shortening velocity, to partially circumvent these force-velocity constraints. Muscles operate with a high gear ratio at low forces; fibers rotate to greater angles of pennation, enhancing velocity but compromising force. At higher forces, muscles operate with a lower gear ratio; fibers rotate little so limiting muscle shortening velocity, but helping to preserve force. This ability to shift gears is thought to be due to the interplay of contractile force and connective tissue constraints. In order to test this hypothesis, gear ratios were determined in the medial gastrocnemius muscles of both healthy young rats, and old rats where the interaction between contractile and connective tissue properties was assumed to be disrupted. Muscle fiber and aponeurosis stiffness increased with age (P<0.05) from 19.1±5.0 kPa and 188.5±24.2 MPa, respectively, in young rats to 39.1±4.2 kPa and 328.0±48.3 MPa in old rats, indicating a mechanical change in the interaction between contractile and connective tissues. Gear ratio decreased with increasing force in young (P<0.001) but not old (P=0.72) muscles, indicating that variable gearing is lost in old muscle. These findings support the hypothesis that variable gearing results from the interaction between contractile and connective tissues and suggest novel explanations for the decline in muscle performance with age.

  6. Stuck in gear: age-related loss of variable gearing in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Natalie C.; Danos, Nicole; Roberts, Thomas J.; Azizi, Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Skeletal muscles power a broad diversity of animal movements, despite only being able to produce high forces over a limited range of velocities. Pennate muscles use a range of gear ratios, the ratio of muscle shortening velocity to fiber shortening velocity, to partially circumvent these force–velocity constraints. Muscles operate with a high gear ratio at low forces; fibers rotate to greater angles of pennation, enhancing velocity but compromising force. At higher forces, muscles operate with a lower gear ratio; fibers rotate little so limiting muscle shortening velocity, but helping to preserve force. This ability to shift gears is thought to be due to the interplay of contractile force and connective tissue constraints. In order to test this hypothesis, gear ratios were determined in the medial gastrocnemius muscles of both healthy young rats, and old rats where the interaction between contractile and connective tissue properties was assumed to be disrupted. Muscle fiber and aponeurosis stiffness increased with age (P<0.05) from 19.1±5.0 kPa and 188.5±24.2 MPa, respectively, in young rats to 39.1±4.2 kPa and 328.0±48.3 MPa in old rats, indicating a mechanical change in the interaction between contractile and connective tissues. Gear ratio decreased with increasing force in young (P<0.001) but not old (P=0.72) muscles, indicating that variable gearing is lost in old muscle. These findings support the hypothesis that variable gearing results from the interaction between contractile and connective tissues and suggest novel explanations for the decline in muscle performance with age. PMID:27030778

  7. Age-dependent capacity to accelerate protein synthesis dictates the extent of compensatory growth in skeletal muscle following undernutrition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In both humans and animals, impaired growth during early life compromises adult lean body mass and muscle strength despite skeletal muscle’s large regenerative capacity. To identify the significance of developmental age on skeletal muscle’s capacity for catch-up growth following an episode of under ...

  8. Troponin T nuclear localization and its role in aging skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Taylor, Jackson; Messi, María Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-04-01

    Troponin T (TnT) is known to mediate the interaction between Tn complex and tropomyosin (Tm), which is essential for calcium-activated striated muscle contraction. This regulatory function takes place in the myoplasm, where TnT binds Tm. However, recent findings of troponin I and Tm nuclear translocation in Drosophila and mammalian cells imply other roles for the Tn-Tm complex. We hypothesized that TnT plays a nonclassical role through nuclear translocation. Immunoblotting with different antibodies targeting the NH2- or COOH-terminal region uncovered a pool of fast skeletal muscle TnT3 localized in the nuclear fraction of mouse skeletal muscle as either an intact or fragmented protein. Construction of TnT3-DsRed fusion proteins led to the further observation that TnT3 fragments are closely related to nucleolus and RNA polymerase activity, suggesting a role for TnT3 in regulating transcription. Functionally, overexpression of TnT3 fragments produced significant defects in nuclear shape and caused high levels of apoptosis. Interestingly, nuclear TnT3 and its fragments were highly regulated by aging, thus creating a possible link between the deleterious effects of TnT3 and sarcopenia. We propose that changes in nuclear TnT3 and its fragments cause the number of myonuclei to decrease with age, contributing to muscle damage and wasting.

  9. Naked mole-rats maintain healthy skeletal muscle and Complex IV mitochondrial enzyme function into old age.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Elizabeth A; Karapavlovic, Nevena; Rosa, Hannah; Woodmass, Michael; Rygiel, Karolina; White, Kathryn; Turnbull, Douglass M; Faulkes, Chris G

    2016-12-19

    The naked mole-rat (NMR) Heterocephalus glaber is an exceptionally long-lived rodent, living up to 32 years in captivity. This extended lifespan is accompanied by a phenotype of negligible senescence, a phenomenon of very slow changes in the expected physiological characteristics with age. One of the many consequences of normal aging in mammals is the devastating and progressive loss of skeletal muscle, termed sarcopenia, caused in part by respiratory enzyme dysfunction within the mitochondria of skeletal muscle fibers. Here we report that NMRs avoid sarcopenia for decades. Muscle fiber integrity and mitochondrial ultrastructure are largely maintained in aged animals. While mitochondrial Complex IV expression and activity remains stable, Complex I expression is significantly decreased. We show that aged naked mole-rat skeletal muscle tissue contains some mitochondrial DNA rearrangements, although the common mitochondrial DNA deletions associated with aging in human and other rodent skeletal muscles are not present. Interestingly, NMR skeletal muscle fibers demonstrate a significant increase in mitochondrial DNA copy number. These results have intriguing implications for the role of mitochondria in aging, suggesting Complex IV, but not Complex I, function is maintained in the long-lived naked mole rat, where sarcopenia is avoided and healthy muscle function is maintained for decades.

  10. Naked mole-rats maintain healthy skeletal muscle and Complex IV mitochondrial enzyme function into old age

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Elizabeth A; Karapavlovic, Nevena; Rosa, Hannah; Woodmass, Michael; Rygiel, Karolina; White, Kathryn; Turnbull, Douglass M; Faulkes, Chris G

    2016-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR) Heterocephalus glaber is an exceptionally long-lived rodent, living up to 32 years in captivity. This extended lifespan is accompanied by a phenotype of negligible senescence, a phenomenon of very slow changes in the expected physiological characteristics with age. One of the many consequences of normal aging in mammals is the devastating and progressive loss of skeletal muscle, termed sarcopenia, caused in part by respiratory enzyme dysfunction within the mitochondria of skeletal muscle fibers. Here we report that NMRs avoid sarcopenia for decades. Muscle fiber integrity and mitochondrial ultrastructure are largely maintained in aged animals. While mitochondrial Complex IV expression and activity remains stable, Complex I expression is significantly decreased. We show that aged naked mole-rat skeletal muscle tissue contains some mitochondrial DNA rearrangements, although the common mitochondrial DNA deletions associated with aging in human and other rodent skeletal muscles are not present. Interestingly, NMR skeletal muscle fibers demonstrate a significant increase in mitochondrial DNA copy number. These results have intriguing implications for the role of mitochondria in aging, suggesting Complex IV, but not Complex I, function is maintained in the long-lived naked mole rat, where sarcopenia is avoided and healthy muscle function is maintained for decades. PMID:27997359

  11. Conserved and species-specific molecular denominators in mammalian skeletal muscle aging.

    PubMed

    Mercken, Evi M; Capri, Miriam; Carboneau, Bethany A; Conte, Maria; Heidler, Juliana; Santoro, Aurelia; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Freire, Marta; Khraiwesh, Husam; González-Reyes, José A; Moaddel, Ruin; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Villalba, José M; Mattison, Julie A; Wittig, Ilka; Franceschi, Claudio; de Cabo, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Aging is a complex phenomenon involving functional decline in multiple physiological systems. We undertook a comparative analysis of skeletal muscle from four different species, i.e. mice, rats, rhesus monkeys, and humans, at three different representative stages during their lifespan (young, middle, and old) to identify pathways that modulate function and healthspan. Gene expression profiling and computational analysis revealed that pathway complexity increases from mice to humans, and as mammals age, there is predominantly an upregulation of pathways in all species. Two downregulated pathways, the electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation, were common among all four species in response to aging. Quantitative PCR, biochemical analysis, mitochondrial DNA measurements, and electron microscopy revealed a conserved age-dependent decrease in mitochondrial content, and a reduction in oxidative phosphorylation complexes in monkeys and humans. Western blot analysis of key proteins in mitochondrial biogenesis discovered that (i) an imbalance toward mitochondrial fusion occurs in aged skeletal muscle and (ii) mitophagy is not overtly affected, presumably leading to the observed accumulation of abnormally large, damaged mitochondria with age. Select transcript expression analysis uncovered that the skeletal inflammatory profile differentially increases with age, but is most pronounced in humans, while increased oxidative stress (as assessed by protein carbonyl adducts and 4-hydroxynonenal) is common among all species. Expression studies also found that there is unique dysregulation of the nutrient sensing pathways among the different species with age. The identification of conserved pathways indicates common molecular mechanisms intrinsic to health and lifespan, whereas the recognition of species-specific pathways emphasizes the importance of human studies for devising optimal therapeutic modalities to slow the aging process.

  12. Impact of age on the vasodilatory function of human skeletal muscle feed arteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Ives, Stephen J; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Hyngstrom, John R; Reese, Van; Layec, Gwenael; Bharath, Leena P; Symons, John D; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-01-15

    Although advancing age is often associated with attenuated skeletal muscle blood flow and skeletal muscle feed arteries (SMFAs) have been recognized to play a regulatory role in the vasculature, little is known about the impact of age on the vasodilatory capacity of human SMFAs. Therefore, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation were assessed in SMFAs (diameter: 544 ± 63 μm) obtained from 24 (equally represented) young (33 ± 2 yr) and old (71 ± 2 yr) subjects in response to three stimuli: 1) flow-induced shear stress, 2) ACh, and 3) sodium nitropusside (SNP). Both assessments of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, flow (young subjects: 68 ± 1% and old subjects: 32 ± 7%) and ACh (young subjects: 92 ± 3% and old subjects: 73 ± 4%), were significantly blunted (P < 0.05) in SMFAs of old compared with young subjects, with no such age-related differences in endothelium-independent vasodilation (SNP). In response to an increase in flow-induced shear stress, vasodilation kinetics (time constant to reach 63% of the amplitude of the response: 55 ± 1 s in young subjects and 92 ± 7 s in old subjects) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation (phospho-eNOS(s1177)/total eNOS: 1.0 ± 0.1 in young subjects and 0.2 ± 0.1 in old subjects) were also significantly attenuated in old compared with young subjects (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the vessel superoxide concentration was greater in old subjects (old subjects: 3.9 ± 1.0 area under curve/mg and young subjects: 1.7 ± 0.1 area under the curve/mg, P < 0.05). These findings reveal that the endothelium-dependent vasodilatory capacity, including vasodilation kinetics but not smooth muscle function, of human SMFAs is blunted with age and may be due to free radicals. Given the potential regulatory role of SMFAs in skeletal muscle blood flow, these findings may explain, at least in part, the often observed attenuated perfusion of skeletal muscle with advancing age that may contribute to exercise

  13. Impact of age on the vasodilatory function of human skeletal muscle feed arteries

    PubMed Central

    Park, Song-Young; Ives, Stephen J.; Gifford, Jayson R.; Andtbacka, Robert H. I.; Hyngstrom, John R.; Reese, Van; Layec, Gwenael; Bharath, Leena P.; Symons, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Although advancing age is often associated with attenuated skeletal muscle blood flow and skeletal muscle feed arteries (SMFAs) have been recognized to play a regulatory role in the vasculature, little is known about the impact of age on the vasodilatory capacity of human SMFAs. Therefore, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation were assessed in SMFAs (diameter: 544 ± 63 μm) obtained from 24 (equally represented) young (33 ± 2 yr) and old (71 ± 2 yr) subjects in response to three stimuli: 1) flow-induced shear stress, 2) ACh, and 3) sodium nitropusside (SNP). Both assessments of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, flow (young subjects: 68 ± 1% and old subjects: 32 ± 7%) and ACh (young subjects: 92 ± 3% and old subjects: 73 ± 4%), were significantly blunted (P < 0.05) in SMFAs of old compared with young subjects, with no such age-related differences in endothelium-independent vasodilation (SNP). In response to an increase in flow-induced shear stress, vasodilation kinetics (time constant to reach 63% of the amplitude of the response: 55 ± 1 s in young subjects and 92 ± 7 s in old subjects) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation (phospho-eNOSs1177/total eNOS: 1.0 ± 0.1 in young subjects and 0.2 ± 0.1 in old subjects) were also significantly attenuated in old compared with young subjects (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the vessel superoxide concentration was greater in old subjects (old subjects: 3.9 ± 1.0 area under curve/mg and young subjects: 1.7 ± 0.1 area under the curve/mg, P < 0.05). These findings reveal that the endothelium-dependent vasodilatory capacity, including vasodilation kinetics but not smooth muscle function, of human SMFAs is blunted with age and may be due to free radicals. Given the potential regulatory role of SMFAs in skeletal muscle blood flow, these findings may explain, at least in part, the often observed attenuated perfusion of skeletal muscle with advancing age that may contribute to exercise

  14. Age, Obesity, and Sex Effects on Insulin Sensitivity and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Karakelides, Helen; Irving, Brian A.; Short, Kevin R.; O'Brien, Peter; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Reductions in insulin sensitivity in conjunction with muscle mitochondrial dysfunction have been reported to occur in many conditions including aging. The objective was to determine whether insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction are directly related to chronological age or are related to age-related changes in body composition. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twelve young lean, 12 young obese, 12 elderly lean, and 12 elderly obese sedentary adults were studied. Insulin sensitivity was measured by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production rates (MAPRs) were measured in freshly isolated mitochondria obtained from vastus lateralis biopsy samples using the luciferase reaction. RESULTS Obese participants, independent of age, had reduced insulin sensitivity based on lower rates of glucose infusion during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. In contrast, age had no independent effect on insulin sensitivity. However, the elderly participants had lower muscle MAPRs than the young participants, independent of obesity. Elderly participants also had higher levels inflammatory cytokines and total adiponectin. In addition, higher muscle MAPRs were also noted in men than in women, whereas glucose infusion rates were higher in women. CONCLUSIONS The results demonstrate that age-related reductions in insulin sensitivity are likely due to an age-related increase in adiposity rather than a consequence of advanced chronological age. The results also indicate that an age-related decrease in muscle mitochondrial function is neither related to adiposity nor insulin sensitivity. Of interest, a higher mitochondrial ATP production capacity was noted in the men, whereas the women were more insulin sensitive, demonstrating further dissociation between insulin sensitivity and muscle mitochondrial function. PMID:19833885

  15. Skeletal muscle homeostasis and plasticity in youth and ageing: impact of nutrition and exercise.

    PubMed

    Brook, M S; Wilkinson, D J; Phillips, B E; Perez-Schindler, J; Philp, A; Smith, K; Atherton, P J

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscles comprise a substantial portion of whole body mass and are integral for locomotion and metabolic health. Increasing age is associated with declines in both muscle mass and function (e.g. strength-related performance, power) with declines in muscle function quantitatively outweighing those in muscle volume. The mechanisms behind these declines are multi-faceted involving both intrinsic age-related metabolic dysregulation and environmental influences such as nutritional and physical activity. Ageing is associated with a degree of 'anabolic resistance' to these key environmental inputs, which likely accelerates the intrinsic processes driving ageing. On this basis, strategies to sensitize and/or promote anabolic responses to nutrition and physical activity are likely to be imperative in alleviating the progression and trajectory of sarcopenia. Both resistance- and aerobic-type exercises are likely to confer functional and health benefits in older age, and a clutch of research suggests that enhancement of anabolic responsiveness to exercise and/or nutrition may be achieved by optimizing modifications of muscle-loading paradigms (workload, volume, blood flow restriction) or nutritional support (e.g. essential amino acid/leucine) patterns. Nonetheless, more work is needed in which a more holistic view in ageing studies is taken into account. This should include improved characterization of older study recruits, that is physical activity/nutritional behaviours, to limit confounding variables influencing whether findings are attributable to age, or other environmental influences. Nonetheless, on balance, ageing is associated with declines in muscle mass and function and a partially related decline in aerobic capacity. There is also good evidence that metabolic flexibility is impaired in older age.

  16. Molecular basis for an attenuated mitochondrial adaptive plasticity in aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ljubicic, Vladimir; Joseph, Anna-Maria; Adhihetty, Peter J.; Huang, Julianna H.; Saleem, Ayesha; Uguccioni, Giulia; Hood, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Our intent was to investigate the mechanisms driving the adaptive potential of subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in young (6 mo) and senescent (36 mo) animals in response to a potent stimulus for organelle biogenesis. We employed chronic electrical stimulation (10 Hz, 3 h/day, 7 days) to induce contractile activity of skeletal muscle in 6 and 36 mo F344XBN rats. Subsequent to chronic activity, acute stimulation (1 Hz, 5 min) in situ revealed greater fatigue resistance in both age groups. However, the improvement in endurance was significantly greater in the young, compared to the old animals. Chronic muscle use also augmented SS and IMF mitochondrial volume to a greater extent in young muscle. The molecular basis for the diminished organelle expansion in aged muscle was due, in part, to the collective attenuation of the chronic stimulation-evoked increase in regulatory proteins involved in mediating mitochondrial protein import and biogenesis. Furthermore, adaptations in mitochondrial function were also blunted in old animals. However, chronic contractile activity evoked greater reductions in mitochondrially-mediated proapoptotic signaling in aged muscle. Thus, mitochondrial plasticity is retained in aged animals, however the magnitude of the changes are less compared to young animals due to attenuated molecular processes regulating organelle biogenesis. PMID:20157569

  17. Molecular basis of the myogenic profile of aged human skeletal muscle satellite cells during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Puglielli, Cristina; Mancinelli, Rosa; Beccafico, Sara; Fanò, Giorgio; Fulle, Stefania

    2009-08-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of muscle mass, strength and function. Human muscle proteins are synthesized at a slower rate in the elderly than in young adults, leading to atrophy and muscle mass loss with a decline in the functional capability. Additionally, aging is accompanied by a decrease in the ability of muscle tissue to regenerate following injury or overuse due to the impairment of intervening satellite cells, in which we previously reported oxidative damage evidences. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of aging on myoblasts and myotubes obtained from human skeletal muscle, and characterize the transcriptional profile as molecular expression patterns in relation to age-dependent modifications in their regenerative capacity. Our data show that the failure to differentiate does not depend on reduced myogenic cell number, but difficulty to complete the differentiation program. Data reported here suggested the following findings: (i) oxidative damage accumulation in molecular substrates, probably due to impaired antioxidant activity and insufficient repair capability, (ii) limited capability of elderly myoblasts to execute a complete differentiation program; restricted fusion, possibly due to altered cytoskeleton turnover and extracellular matrix degradation and (iii) activation of atrophy mechanism by activation of a specific FOXO-dependent program.

  18. Live strong and prosper: the importance of skeletal muscle strength for healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Michael; Breen, Leigh; Hamilton, D Lee; Philp, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Due to improved health care, diet and infrastructure in developed countries, since 1840 life expectancy has increased by approximately 2 years per decade. Accordingly, by 2050, a quarter of Europe's population will be over 65 years, representing a 10 % rise in half a century. With this rapid rise comes an increased prevalence of diseases of ageing and associated healthcare expenditure. To address the health consequences of global ageing, research in model systems (worms, flies and mice) has indicated that reducing the rate of organ growth, via reductions in protein synthetic rates, has multi-organ health benefits that collectively lead to improvements in lifespan. In contrast, human pre-clinical, clinical and large cohort prospective studies demonstrate that ageing leads to anabolic (i.e. growth) impairments in skeletal muscle, which in turn leads to reductions in muscle mass and strength, factors directly associated with mortality rates in the elderly. As such, increasing muscle protein synthesis via exercise or protein-based nutrition maintains a strong, healthy muscle mass, which in turn leads to improved health, independence and functionality. The aim of this review is to critique current literature relating to the maintenance of muscle mass across lifespan and discuss whether maintaining or reducing protein synthesis is the most logical approach to support musculoskeletal function and by extension healthy human ageing.

  19. Pericytes: multitasking cells in the regeneration of injured, diseased, and aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria L; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are perivascular cells that envelop and make intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells. Recent studies show that they may have a profound impact in skeletal muscle regeneration, innervation, vessel formation, fibrosis, fat accumulation, and ectopic bone formation throughout life. In this review, we summarize and evaluate recent advances in our understanding of pericytes' influence on adult skeletal muscle pathophysiology. We also discuss how further elucidating their biology may offer new approaches to the treatment of conditions characterized by muscle wasting.

  20. Changes in macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy, and mitochondrial metabolism in murine skeletal and cardiac muscle during aging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Yun Chong, Shu; Lim, Andrea; Singh, Brijesh K.; Sinha, Rohit A.; Salmon, Adam B.; Yen, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Aging causes a general decline in cellular metabolic activity, and function in different tissues and whole body homeostasis. However, the understanding about the metabolomic and autophagy changes in skeletal muscle and heart during aging is still limited. We thus examined markers for macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), mitochondrial quality control, as well as cellular metabolites in skeletal and cardiac muscle from young (5 months old) and aged (27 months old) mice. We found decreased autophagic degradation of p62 and increased ubiquitinated proteins in both tissues from aged mice, suggesting a decline in macroautophagy during aging. In skeletal muscle from aged mice, there also was a decline in LC3B-I conjugation to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) possibly due to decreased protein levels of ATG3 and ATG12-ATG5. The CMA markers, LAMP-2A and Hsc70, and mitochondrial turnover markers, Drp1, PINK1 and PGC1α also were decreased. Metabolomics analysis showed impaired β-oxidation in heart of aged mice, whereas increased branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and ceramide levels were found in skeletal muscle of aged mice that in turn, may contribute to insulin resistance in muscle. Taken together, our studies showed similar declines in macroautophagy but distinct effects on CMA, mitochondrial turnover, and metabolic dysfunction in muscle vs. heart during aging. PMID:28238968

  1. Amino Acid Sensing in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Moro, Tatiana; Ebert, Scott M; Adams, Christopher M; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2016-11-01

    Aging impairs skeletal muscle protein synthesis, leading to muscle weakness and atrophy. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we review evidence that mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-mediated and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)-mediated amino acid (AA) sensing pathways, triggered by impaired AA delivery to aged skeletal muscle, may play important roles in skeletal muscle aging. Interventions that alleviate age-related impairments in muscle protein synthesis, strength, and/or muscle mass appear to do so by reversing age-related changes in skeletal muscle AA delivery, mTORC1 activity, and/or ATF4 activity. An improved understanding of the mechanisms and roles of AA sensing pathways in skeletal muscle may lead to evidence-based strategies to attenuate sarcopenia.

  2. Effect of old age on human skeletal muscle force-velocity and fatigue properties.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Damien M; Kent-Braun, Jane A

    2011-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the muscles of aged individuals contract with less force, have slower relaxation rates, and demonstrate a downward shift in their force-velocity relationship. The factors mediating age-related differences in skeletal muscle fatigue are less clear. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that age-related shifts in the force-velocity relationship impact the fatigue response in a velocity-dependent manner. Three fatigue protocols, consisting of intermittent, maximum voluntary knee extension contractions performed for 4 min, were performed by 11 young (23.5 ± 0.9 yr, mean ± SE) and 10 older (68.9 ± 4.3) women. The older group fatigued less during isometric contractions than the young group (to 71.1 ± 3.7% initial torque and 59.8 ± 2.5%, respectively; P = 0.02), while the opposite was true during contractions performed at a relatively high angular velocity of 270°·s(-1) (old: 28.0 ± 3.9% initial power, young: 52.1 ± 6.9%; P < 0.01). Fatigue was not different (P = 0.74) between groups during contractions at an intermediate velocity, which was selected for each participant based on their force-velocity relationship. There was a significant association between force-velocity properties and fatigue induced by the intermediate-velocity fatigue protocol in the older (r = 0.72; P = 0.02) and young (r = 0.63; P = 0.04) groups. These results indicate that contractile velocity has a profound impact on age-related skeletal muscle fatigue resistance and suggest that changes in the force-velocity relationship partially mediate this effect.

  3. Effect of old age on human skeletal muscle force-velocity and fatigue properties

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Damien M.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the muscles of aged individuals contract with less force, have slower relaxation rates, and demonstrate a downward shift in their force-velocity relationship. The factors mediating age-related differences in skeletal muscle fatigue are less clear. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that age-related shifts in the force-velocity relationship impact the fatigue response in a velocity-dependent manner. Three fatigue protocols, consisting of intermittent, maximum voluntary knee extension contractions performed for 4 min, were performed by 11 young (23.5 ± 0.9 yr, mean ± SE) and 10 older (68.9 ± 4.3) women. The older group fatigued less during isometric contractions than the young group (to 71.1 ± 3.7% initial torque and 59.8 ± 2.5%, respectively; P = 0.02), while the opposite was true during contractions performed at a relatively high angular velocity of 270°·s−1 (old: 28.0 ± 3.9% initial power, young: 52.1 ± 6.9%; P < 0.01). Fatigue was not different (P = 0.74) between groups during contractions at an intermediate velocity, which was selected for each participant based on their force-velocity relationship. There was a significant association between force-velocity properties and fatigue induced by the intermediate-velocity fatigue protocol in the older (r = 0.72; P = 0.02) and young (r = 0.63; P = 0.04) groups. These results indicate that contractile velocity has a profound impact on age-related skeletal muscle fatigue resistance and suggest that changes in the force-velocity relationship partially mediate this effect. PMID:21868683

  4. Age-dependent regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondria by the thrombospondin-1 receptor CD47.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Elfaridah P; Isenberg, Jeff S; Shiva, Sruti; Zhao, Lei; Schlesinger, Paul; Dimitry, Julie; Abu-Asab, Mones S; Tsokos, Maria; Roberts, David D; Frazier, William A

    2011-03-01

    CD47, a receptor for thrombospondin-1, limits two important regulatory axes: nitric oxide-cGMP signaling and cAMP signaling, both of which can promote mitochondrial biogenesis. Electron microscopy revealed increased mitochondrial densities in skeletal muscle from both CD47 null and thrombospondin-1 null mice. We further assessed the mitochondria status of CD47-null vs WT mice. Quantitative RT-PCR of RNA extracted from tissues of 3 month old mice revealed dramatically elevated expression of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins and PGC-1α in both fast and slow-twitch skeletal muscle from CD47-null mice, but modest to no elevation in other tissues. These observations were confirmed by Western blotting of mitochondrial proteins. Relative amounts of electron transport enzymes and ATP/O(2) ratios of isolated mitochondria were not different between mitochondria from CD47-null and WT cells. Young CD47-null mice displayed enhanced treadmill endurance relative to WTs and CD47-null gastrocnemius had undergone fiber type switching to a slow-twitch pattern of myoglobin and myosin heavy chain expression. In 12 month old mice, both skeletal muscle mitochondrial volume density and endurance had decreased to wild type levels. Expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms and myoglobin also reverted to a fast twitch pattern in gastrocnemius. Both CD47 and TSP1 null mice are leaner than WTs, use less oxygen and produce less heat than WT mice. CD47-null cells produce substantially less reactive oxygen species than WT cells. These data indicate that loss of signaling from the TSP1-CD47 system promotes accumulation of normally functioning mitochondria in a tissue-specific and age-dependent fashion leading to enhanced physical performance, lower reactive oxygen species production and more efficient metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of aging and exercise training on the dynamics of vasoconstriction in skeletal muscle resistance vessels.

    PubMed

    Gittemeier, Elizabeth M; Ericson, Tyler; Ghosh, Payal; Copp, Steven W; Opoku-Acheampong, Alexander B; Behnke, Bradley J

    2017-03-01

    It is unknown whether aging or exercise training affect the dynamics of arteriolar vasoconstriction. We hypothesized that old age will slow, and exercise training will speed, the dynamics of skeletal muscle arteriolar vasoconstriction in resistance vessels of aged rats. Young (6 month old) and aged (24 month old) male Fischer-344 rats were assigned to sedentary (Sed: n = 6/age group) or exercise-trained (ET: n = 5 aged and 6 young; via treadmill running for 10-12 weeks) groups. After completion of training, arterioles from the red portion of the gastrocnemius muscle were removed, cannulated, and exposed to 10(-4) M norepinephrine (NE) or 20 mM caffeine. Changes in luminal diameter were recorded for analysis of constrictor dynamics. Old age blunted all kinetic parameters (i.e., time delay, time constant) resulting in vasoconstriction taking ~3 times as long to reach a steady state (SS) versus younger counterparts for NE (aged-sed: 15.6 ± 6.0 versus young-sed: 4.6 ± 0.5 s; P < 0.05) with a similar time course to caffeine. Exercise training resulted in a similar time to SS between age groups for NE (aged-ET: 6.8 ± 1.6 versus young-ET: 7.0 ± 0.6 s) and caffeine (aged-ET: 7.8 ± 0.6 versus young-ET: 8.6 ± 1.0 s). The results of this study demonstrate that aging blunts the rate of vasoconstriction in skeletal muscle resistance vessels to the sympathetic neurotransmitter NE due, in part, to an attenuated rate of contraction from intracellular calcium release. Further, exercise training speeds the dynamics of constriction to both NE and caffeine with old age.

  6. Acute Treatment of Resveratrol Alleviates Doxorubicin-Induced Myotoxicity in Aged Skeletal Muscle Through SIRT1-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sin, Thomas K; Tam, Bjorn T; Yu, Angus P; Yip, Shea P; Yung, Benjamin Y; Chan, Lawrence W; Wong, Cesar S; Rudd, John A; Siu, Parco M

    2016-06-01

    Study of the exacerbating effects of chemotherapeutics, such as doxorubicin, on the impairment of insulin metabolic signaling in aged skeletal muscle is very limited. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activation of sirtuin 1 deacetylase activity by resveratrol would prevent the disruption of insulin signaling and augmentation of catabolic markers induced by doxorubicin in aged skeletal muscle. Two- and 10-month-old senescence-accelerated mice (prone 8) were randomized to receive saline, doxorubicin, doxorubicin and resveratrol, or a combination of doxorubicin, resveratrol, and sirtinol or EX527. Doxorubicin reduced the sirtuin 1 activity without affecting the phosphorylation levels of IRS1(Ser307), mTOR(Ser2481), Akt(Thr308/Ser473), membranous glucose transporter 4, protein abundance of PDK4, and enzymatic activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase in aged muscles. Intriguingly, resveratrol attenuated the doxorubicin-induced elevations of apoptotic and catabolic markers measured as Bax, caspase 3 activity, apoptotic DNA fragmentation, MuRF-1, ubiquitinated proteins, and proteasomal activity in aged muscles, whereas these beneficial effects were abolished on inhibition of sirtuin 1 by sirtinol or EX527. Markers of insulin signaling were not affected by doxorubicin or resveratrol in the senescent skeletal muscle. Nevertheless, the antiapoptotic and anticatabolic effects of resveratrol in aged skeletal muscle treated with doxorubicin were mediated in a sirtuin 1-dependent signaling manner. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Systemic elevation of interleukin-15 in vivo promotes apoptosis in skeletal muscles of young adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Alway, Stephen E

    2008-08-15

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that systemic elevation of IL-15 would attenuate apoptosis in skeletal muscles of aged rats. IL-15 was administered to young adult (n=6) and aged (n=6) rats for 14 days. Apoptosis was quantified using an ELISA assay and verified through TUNEL staining of muscle sections. As expected, apoptosis was greater in muscles from aged control rats, compared to age-matched control. Apoptosis was also greater in the muscles from young adult and aged rats treated with IL-15. These increases in apoptosis were associated with decreases in muscle mass of IL-15 treated rats. These data do not support our initial hypothesis and suggest that systemic elevation of IL-15 promotes apoptosis in skeletal muscle. The proposed anti-apoptotic property of IL-15 may be specific to cell-type and/or the degree of muscle pathology present; however, additional research is required to more clearly decipher its role in skeletal muscle.

  8. Influence of ageing and essential amino acids on quantitative patterns of troponin T alternative splicing in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Arthur; Drummond, Micah J.; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Kimball, Scot R.

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a loss of skeletal muscle performance, a condition referred to as sarcopenia. In part, the age-related reduction in performance is due to a selective loss in muscle fiber mass, but mass-independent effects have also been demonstrated. An important mass-independent determinant of muscle performance is the pattern of expression of isoforms of proteins that participate in muscle contraction, e.g. the troponins. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that ageing impairs alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding fast troponin T (Tnnt3) in human vastus lateralis muscle. Furthermore, we hypothesized that resistance exercise alone or in combination with consumption of essential amino acids will attenuate age-associated effects on Tnnt3 alternative splicing. Our results indicate that ageing negatively affects the pattern of Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing in a manner that correlates quantitatively with age-associated reductions in muscle performance. Interestingly, whereas vastus lateralis Tnnt3 alternative splicing was unaffected by a bout of resistance exercise 24 hour prior to muscle biopsy, ingestion of a mixture of essential amino acids after resistance exercise resulted in a significant shift in the pattern of Tnnt3 spliceform expression in both age groups to one predicted to promote greater muscle performance. We conclude that essential amino acid supplementation after resistance exercise may provide a means to reduce impairments in skeletal muscle quality during ageing in humans. PMID:26201856

  9. Altered turnover of calcium regulatory proteins of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ferrington, D A; Krainev, A G; Bigelow, D J

    1998-03-06

    We have measured the in vivo protein turnover for the major calcium regulatory proteins of the sarcoplasmic reticulum from the skeletal muscle of young adult (7 months) and aged (28 months) Fischer 344 rats. From the time course of the incorporation and decay of protein-associated radioactivity after a pulse injection of [14C]leucine and correcting for leucine reutilization, in young rats, the apparent half-lives for calsequestrin, the 53-kDa glycoprotein, and ryanodine receptor are 5.4 +/- 0.4, 6.3 +/- 1.3, and 8.3 +/- 1.3 days, respectively. A half-life of 14.5 +/- 2.5 days was estimated for the Ca-ATPase isolated from young muscle. Differences in protein turnover associated with aging were determined using sequential injection of two different isotopic labels ([14C]leucine and [3H]leucine) to provide an estimate of protein synthesis and degradation within the same animal. The Ca-ATPase and ryanodine receptor isolated from aged muscle exhibits 27 +/- 5% and 25 +/- 3% slower protein turnover, respectively, relative to that from young muscle. In contrast, the 53-kDa glycoprotein exhibits a 25 +/- 5% more rapid turnover in aged SR, while calsequestrin exhibits no age-dependent alteration in turnover. Statistical analysis comparing the sensitivity of various methods for discriminating different rates of protein turnover validates the approach used in this study and demonstrates that the use of two isotopic labels provides at least a 6-fold more sensitive means to detect age-related differences in protein turnover relative to other methods.

  10. Age-dependent uncoupling of mitochondria from Ca2+ release units in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ainbinder, Alina; Michelucci, Antonio; Kern, Helmut; Dirksen, Robert T.; Boncompagni, Simona; Protasi, Feliciano

    2015-01-01

    Calcium release units (CRUs) and mitochondria control myoplasmic [Ca2+] levels and ATP production in muscle, respectively. We recently reported that these two organelles are structurally connected by tethers, which promote proximity and proper Ca2+ signaling. Here we show that disposition, ultrastructure, and density of CRUs and mitochondria and their reciprocal association are compromised in muscle from aged mice. Specifically, the density of CRUs and mitochondria is decreased in muscle fibers from aged (>24 months) vs. adult (3-12 months), with an increased percentage of mitochondria being damaged and misplaced from their normal triadic position. A significant reduction in tether (13.8±0.4 vs. 5.5±0.3 tethers/100μm2) and CRU-mitochondrial pair density (37.4±0.8 vs. 27.0±0.7 pairs/100μm2) was also observed in aged mice. In addition, myoplasmic Ca2+ transient (1.68±0.08 vs 1.37±0.03) and mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (9.6±0.050 vs 6.58±0.54) during repetitive high frequency tetanic stimulation were significantly decreased. Finally oxidative stress, assessed from levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), Cu/Zn superoxide-dismutase (SOD1) and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD2) expression, were significantly increased in aged mice. The reduced association between CRUs and mitochondria with aging may contribute to impaired cross-talk between the two organelles, possibly resulting in reduced efficiency in activity-dependent ATP production and, thus, to age-dependent decline of skeletal muscle performance. PMID:26485763

  11. Bioenergetics of the aging heart and skeletal muscles: Modern concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Tepp, Kersti; Timohhina, Natalja; Puurand, Marju; Klepinin, Aleksandr; Chekulayev, Vladimir; Shevchuk, Igor; Kaambre, Tuuli

    2016-07-01

    Age-related alterations in the bioenergetics of the heart and oxidative skeletal muscle tissues are of crucial influence on their performance. Until now the prevailing concept of aging was the mitochondrial theory, the increased production of reactive oxygen species, mediated by deficiency in the activity of respiratory chain complexes. However, studies with mitochondria in situ have presented results which, to some extent, disagree with previous ones, indicating that the mitochondrial theory of aging may be overestimated. The studies reporting age-related decline in mitochondrial function were performed using mainly isolated mitochondria. Measurements on this level are not able to take into account the system level properties. The relevant information can be obtained only from appropriate studies using cells or tissue fibers. The functional interactions between the components of Intracellular Energetic Unit (ICEU) regulate the energy production and consumption in oxidative muscle cells. The alterations of these interactions in ICEU should be studied in order to find a more effective protocol to decelerate the age-related changes taking place in the energy metabolism. In this article, an overview is given of the present theories and controversies of causes of age-related alterations in bioenergetics. Also, branches of study, which need more emphasis, are indicated. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The aging of elite male athletes: age-related changes in performance and skeletal muscle structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, John A.; Davis, Carol S.; Mendias, Christopher L.; Brooks, Susan V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The paper addresses the degree to which the attainment of the status as an elite athlete in different sports ameliorates the known age-related losses in skeletal muscle structure and function. Design The retrospective design, based on comparisons of published data on former elite and masters athletes and data on control subjects, assessed the degree to which the attainment of ‘elite and masters athlete status’ ameliorated the known age-related changes in skeletal muscle structure and function. Setting Institutional. Participants Elite male athletes. Interventions Participation in selected individual and team sports. Main Outcome Measurements Strength, power, VO2 max and performance. Results For elite athletes in all sports, as for the general population, age-related muscle atrophy begins at about 50 years of age. Despite the loss of muscle mass, elite athletes who maintain an active life style age gracefully with few health problems. Conversely, those who lapse into inactivity regress toward general population norms for fitness, weight control, and health problems. Elite athletes in the dual and team sports have careers that rarely extend into the thirties. Conclusions Life long physical activity does not appear to have any impact on the loss in fiber number. The loss of fibers can be buffered to some degree by hypertrophy of fibers that remain. Surprisingly, the performance of elite athletes in all sports appears to be impaired before the onset of the fiber loss. Even with major losses in physical capacity and muscle mass, the performance of elite and masters athletes is remarkable. PMID:19001883

  13. Elevated skeletal muscle glucose transporter levels in exercise-trained middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Houmard, J A; Egan, P C; Neufer, P D; Friedman, J E; Wheeler, W S; Israel, R G; Dohm, G L

    1991-10-01

    Exercise training has been proposed to improve whole body insulin sensitivity through a postreceptor adaptation in skeletal muscle. This study examined if levels of the insulin-responsive muscle glucose transporter protein (GLUT-4) were associated with improved insulin sensitivity in trained vs. sedentary middle-aged individuals. Muscle GLUT-4 levels and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) responses were obtained in age-matched trained and sedentary men (n = 11). Plasma insulin levels during the OGTT were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in the trained men, whereas no differences were seen in plasma glucose responses. GLUT-4 protein content was approximately twofold higher in the trained men (2.41 +/- 0.17 vs. 1.36 +/- 0.11 micrograms standard, P less than 0.001). OGTT responses and GLUT-4 levels were not altered 15-18 h after a standard exercise bout in six representative sedentary subjects. These data suggest that GLUT-4 levels are increased in conjunction with insulin sensitivity in chronically exercise-trained middle-aged men. This finding suggests a possible mechanism for the improved insulin sensitivity observed with exercise training in humans.

  14. 'From death, lead me to immortality' - mantra of ageing skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amarjit; Mastana, Sarabjit; Myers, Fiona; Lewis, Mark Peter

    2013-06-01

    Skeletal muscle is a post-mitotic tissue maintained by repair and regeneration through a population of stem cell-like satellite cells. Following muscle injury, satellite cell proliferation is mediated by local signals ensuring sufficient progeny for tissue repair. Age-related changes in satellite cells as well as to the local and systemic environment potentially impact on the capacity of satellite cells to generate sufficient progeny in an ageing organism resulting in diminished regeneration. 'Rejuvenation' of satellite cell progeny and regenerative capacity by environmental stimuli effectors suggest that a subset of age-dependent satellite cell changes may be reversible. Epigenetic regulation of satellite stem cells that include DNA methylation and histone modifications which regulate gene expression are potential mechanisms for such reversible changes and have been shown to control organismal longevity. The area of health and ageing that is likely to benefit soonest from advances in the biology of adult stem cells is the emerging field of regenerative medicine. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which epigenetic modifications regulate satellite stem cell function and will require an increased understanding of stem-cell biology, the environment of the aged tissue and the interaction between the two.

  15. The influence of premedication, anaesthesia, age and weight on glucose uptake into human isolated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, M J; Leighton, M; Turner, P

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the anaesthetic procedures and of the sex, age and weight of each patient on glucose uptake and glycogen content of human skeletal muscle has been studied in vitro in the presence and absence of insulin. Statistical analysis indicated that the relationships between age and both glucose uptake and the response to insulin were significant, older patients in general having higher uptakes. The blucose uptake was highly correlated with the three obesity indices (ponderal index, body mass index and percentage of the ideal weight). The anaesthetic agents had no significant effect on glucose uptake. The choice of premedication appeared to have a small effect on the basal glucose uptake level, but as the choice of premedication was also age related and age itself was a significant factor, this effect may not be of importance. It is concluded that the age and the degree of obesity of the patients ought to be taken into account when studying samples of human muscle. PMID:973964

  16. Skeletal muscle myofilament adaptations to aging, disease, and disuse and their effects on whole muscle performance in older adult humans

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark S.; Callahan, Damien M.; Toth, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contractile function declines with aging, disease, and disuse. In vivo muscle contractile function depends on a variety of factors, but force, contractile velocity and power generating capacity ultimately derive from the summed contribution of single muscle fibers. The contractile performance of these fibers are, in turn, dependent upon the isoform and function of myofilament proteins they express, with myosin protein expression and its mechanical and kinetic characteristics playing a predominant role. Alterations in myofilament protein biology, therefore, may contribute to the development of functional limitations and disability in these conditions. Recent studies suggest that these conditions are associated with altered single fiber performance due to decreased expression of myofilament proteins and/or changes in myosin-actin cross-bridge interactions. Furthermore, cellular and myofilament-level adaptations are related to diminished whole muscle and whole body performance. Notably, the effect of these various conditions on myofilament and single fiber function tends to be larger in older women compared to older men, which may partially contribute to their higher rates of disability. To maintain functionality and provide the most appropriate and effective countermeasures to aging, disease, and disuse in both sexes, a more thorough understanding is needed of the contribution of myofilament adaptations to functional disability in older men and women and their contribution to tissue level function and mobility impairment. PMID:25309456

  17. Investigation of age-related changes in LMNA splicing and expression of progerin in human skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yue-Bei; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; Johnsen, Russell D; Fabian, Victoria A; Fletcher, Sue; Mastaglia, Frank L; Wilton, Steve D

    2013-01-01

    Age-related changes in splice-forms of LMNA, which encodes the nuclear lamina proteins lamin A/C, have not been investigated in skeletal muscle. In the rare premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), de novo point mutations in LMNA activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11, resulting in a 150 base deletion in LMNA mRNA and accumulation of a truncated protein isoform, progerin. The LMNA Δ150 progerin transcript has also been found in trace quantities in tissues of healthy people and its implication in 'natural' ageing has been proposed. We therefore investigated the expression of progerin and lamin A/C in normal human and mouse skeletal muscles of different ages. LMNA Δ150 was detected in most muscle samples from healthy individuals aged 16-71 years, but was not present in any mouse muscle samples up to the age of 18 months. Real time qPCR of human muscle samples showed that there was an age-related increase in both the full length lamin A and LMNA Δ150 transcripts, whereas their protein levels did not change significantly with age. These findings indicate that there is a basal level of mis-splicing during LMNA expression that does not change with ageing in human muscle, but at levels that do not result in increased aberrant protein. The significance of these findings in the pathophysiology of muscle ageing is uncertain and warrants further investigation.

  18. Resveratrol modulates the angiogenic response to exercise training in skeletal muscles of aged men.

    PubMed

    Gliemann, Lasse; Olesen, Jesper; Biensø, Rasmus Sjørup; Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Akerstrom, Thorbjorn; Nyberg, Michael; Lindqvist, Anna; Bangsbo, Jens; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-10-15

    In animal studies, the polyphenol resveratrol has been shown to influence several pathways of importance for angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. The aim of the present study was to examine the angiogenic effect of resveratrol supplementation with parallel exercise training in aged men. Forty-three healthy physically inactive aged men (65 ± 1 yr) were divided into 1) a training group that conducted 8 wk of intense exercise training where half of the subjects received a daily intake of either 250 mg trans-resveratrol (n = 14) and the other half received placebo (n = 13) and 2) a nontraining group that received either 250 mg trans-resveratrol (n = 9) or placebo (n = 7). The group that trained with placebo showed a ~20% increase in the capillary-to-fiber ratio, an increase in muscle protein expression of VEGF, VEGF receptor-2, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) but unaltered thrombospodin-1 levels. Muscle interstitial VEGF and thrombospodin-1 protein levels were unchanged after the training period. The group that trained with resveratrol supplementation did not show an increase in the capillary-to-fiber ratio or an increase in muscle VEGF protein. Muscle TIMP-1 protein levels were lower in the training and resveratrol group than in the training and placebo group. Both training groups showed an increase in forkhead box O1 protein. In nontraining groups, TIMP-1 protein was lower in the resveratrol-treated group than the placebo-treated group after 8 wk. In conclusion, these data show that exercise training has a strong angiogenic effect, whereas resveratrol supplementation may limit basal and training-induced angiogenesis.

  19. Pericytes: multitasking cells in the regeneration of injured, diseased, and aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria L.; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are perivascular cells that envelop and make intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells. Recent studies show that they may have a profound impact in skeletal muscle regeneration, innervation, vessel formation, fibrosis, fat accumulation, and ectopic bone formation throughout life. In this review, we summarize and evaluate recent advances in our understanding of pericytes' influence on adult skeletal muscle pathophysiology. We also discuss how further elucidating their biology may offer new approaches to the treatment of conditions characterized by muscle wasting. PMID:25278877

  20. Effects of Heat Stress Treatment on Age-dependent Unfolded Protein Response in Different Types of Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yuki; Matsunaga, Yutaka; Kitaoka, Yu; Hatta, Hideo

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and subsequently activated responses (mitochondrial/ER unfolded protein responses; UPRmt/UPRER), are involved in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia. To extend both basic and translational knowledge, we examined (i) whether age-induced mitochondrial and ER stress depend on skeletal muscle type in mice and (ii) whether heat stress treatment, a suggested strategy for sarcopenia, improves age-induced mitochondrial and ER stress. Aged (21-month-old) mice showed more severe mitochondrial stress and UPRmt than young (12-week-old) mice, based on increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial proteases, and mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase. The aged mice also showed ER stress and UPRER, based on decreased ER enzymes and increased ER stress-related cell death. These changes were much more evident in soleus muscle than in gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles. After daily heat stress treatment (40 °C chamber for 30 minutes per day) for 4 weeks, mice showed remarkable improvements in age-related changes in soleus muscle. Heat stress had only minor effects in gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles. Based on these findings, age-associated mitochondrial stress, ER stress, and UPRmt/ER vary qualitatively with skeletal muscle type. Our results suggest a molecular basis for the beneficial effects of heat stress on muscle atrophy with age in soleus muscle. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Role of microRNAs in the age-related changes in skeletal muscle and diet or exercise interventions to promote healthy aging in humans.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Robin A; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2014-09-01

    Progressive age-related changes in skeletal muscle mass and composition, underpin decreases in muscle function, which can inturn lead to impaired mobility and quality of life in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in skeletal muscle and are associated with aging. Accumulating evidence suggests that miRNAs play an important role in the age-related changes in skeletal muscle mass, composition and function. At the cellular level, miRNAs have been demonstrated to regulate muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, miRNAs are involved in the transitioning of muscle stem cells from a quiescent, to either an activated or senescence state. Evidence from animal and human studies has shown miRNAs are modulated in muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. In addition, miRNAs have been implicated in changes in muscle fiber composition, fat infiltration and insulin resistance. Both exercise and dietary interventions can combat age-related changes in muscle mass, composition and function, which may be mediated by miRNA modulation in skeletal muscle. Circulating miRNA species derived from myogenic cell populations represent potential biomarkers of aging muscle and the molecular responses to exercise or diet interventions, but larger validation studies are required. In future therapeutic approaches targeting miRNAs, either through exercise, diet or drugs may be able to slow down or prevent the age-related changes in skeletal muscle mass, composition, function, hence help maintain mobility and quality of life in old age.

  2. Age-related alterations of skeletal muscle metabolism by intermittent hypoxia and TRH-analogue treatment.

    PubMed

    Pastoris, O; Dossena, M; Arnaboldi, R; Gorini, A; Villa, R F

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of the energy metabolism were evaluated in the gastrocnemius muscle from 3- and 24-month-old rats in normoxia or subjected to either mild or severe chronic (4 weeks) intermittent normobaric hypoxia. Furthermore, 4-week treatment with saline or the TRH-analogue posatireline was performed. The muscular concentration of the following metabolites related to the energy metabolism was evaluated: glycogen, glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate, lactate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio; citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, succinate, malate; aspartate, glutamate, alanine; ammonia; ATP, ADP, AMP, creatine phosphate; energy charge potential. Furthermore the maximum rate of the following muscular enzymes was evaluated: hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase; citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase; total NADH cytochrome c reductase; cytochrome oxidase. The age-related decrease in muscular glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate and alanine concentrations and increase in citrate concentration were consistent with the age-related decreased hexokinase and increased citrate synthase activities. Ageing was characterized by a decrease in muscular creatine phosphate concentration, while the energy mediators and the energy charge potential were unchanged. The chronic (4 weeks) intermittent normobaric mild and severe hypoxia-induced alterations of the components in the anaerobic glycolytic pathway, tricarboxylic acid cycle and energy storage, that were magnified in the skeletal muscle from the oldest animals. The effect of the chronic treatment with the TRH-analogue posatireline suggests that the action of central nervous system-acting drugs could also be related to their direct influence on the muscular biochemical mechanisms related to the energy transduction.

  3. Age-dependent changes in skeletal muscle mass and visceral fat area in Japanese adults from 40 to 79 years-of-age.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Minoru; Moriguch, Yoko; Mitani, Takahiro; Aoyama, Tomoki; Arai, Hidenori

    2014-02-01

    The age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle mass is highly concerning in diverse aging populations. However, age-dependent changes in muscle mass and the visceral fat area have not been well documented in Asian populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the age-dependent changes in skeletal muscle mass and the visceral fat area in Japanese adults from 40 to 79 years-of-age. This was a cross-sectional study. Healthy men (n = 16,379) and women (n = 21,660) aged 40-79 years participated in the present study. The skeletal muscle mass and visceral fat area were measured in the study participants by bioelectrical impedance. The muscle mass data were converted into the skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) by dividing the weight by the height squared (kg/m(2)). The SMI showed an age-dependent decrease in both sexes. Between 40 and 79 years, the total SMI decreased by 10.8% in men and by 6.4% in women. The arm SMI decreased by 12.6% in men and 4.1% in women, and the leg SMI decreased by 10.1% in men and by 7.1% in women in the same period. In contrast, the visceral fat area showed an age-dependent increase in both sexes. The visceral fat area increased by 42.9% in men and by 65.3% in women. The multiple regression analysis showed that the SMI was negatively associated with visceral obesity in both sexes. In Japanese adults, sex-specific changes in skeletal muscle mass are more prominent in the arm than in the leg. Furthermore, the age-dependent increases in visceral adipose tissue might lead to loss of skeletal muscle mass. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. Adipose triglyceride lipase decrement affects skeletal muscle homeostasis during aging through FAs-PPARα-PGC-1α antioxidant response

    PubMed Central

    Aquilano, Katia; Baldelli, Sara; Barbera, Livia La; Barbato, Daniele Lettieri; Tatulli, Giuseppe; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    During aging skeletal muscle shows an accumulation of oxidative damage as well as intramyocellular lipid droplets (IMLDs). However, although the impact of these modifications on muscle tissue physiology is well established, the direct effectors critical for their occurrence are poorly understood. Here we show that during aging the main lipase of triacylglycerols, ATGL, significantly declines in gastrocnemius and its downregulation in C2C12 myoblast leads to the accumulation of lipid droplets. Indeed, we observed an increase of oxidative damage to proteins in terms of carbonylation, S-nitrosylation and ubiquitination that is dependent on a defective antioxidant cell response mediated by ATGL-PPARα-PGC-1α. Overall our findings describe a pivotal role for ATGL in the antioxidant/anti-inflammatory response of muscle cells highlighting this lipase as a therapeutic target for fighting the progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength. PMID:27056902

  5. Altered S-nitrosylation of p53 is responsible for impaired antioxidant response in skeletal muscle during aging

    PubMed Central

    Baldelli, Sara; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    p53 transcriptional activity has been proposed to regulate both homeostasis and sarcopenia of skeletal muscle during aging. However, the exact molecular function of p53 remains to be clearly defined. We demonstrated a requirement of nuclear p53 S-nitrosylation in inducing a nitric oxide/PGC-1α-mediated antioxidant pathway in skeletal muscle. Importantly, mutant form of p53-DNA binding domain (C124S) did not undergo nuclear S-nitrosylation and failed in inducing the expression of antioxidant genes (i.e. SOD2 and GCLC). Moreover, we found that during aging the nuclear S-nitrosylation of p53 significantly declines in gastrocnemius/soleus leading to an impairment of redox homeostasis of skeletal muscle. We suggested that decreased level of nuclear neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/Syntrophin complex, which we observed during aging, could be responsible for impaired nuclear S-nitrosylation. Taken together, our data indicate that altered S-nitrosylation of p53 during aging could be a contributing factor of sarcopenia condition and of other skeletal muscle pathologies associated with oxidative/nitrosative stress. PMID:28025407

  6. Relation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status with skeletal muscle mass by sex and age group among Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Ko, Min Jung; Yun, Sungha; Oh, Kyungwon; Kim, Kirang

    2015-12-14

    The objective of this study was to examine whether high serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration was associated with high skeletal muscle mass, taking into account the effects of sex and age among the participants of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) aged 40 years or older. This was a cross-sectional study using data from the 2009 to 2010 KNHANES; a total of 8406 subjects (3671 men and 4735 women) were included. The appendicular skeletal muscle mass index (ASMMI, kg/m2) was estimated to measure the skeletal muscle mass. Hypovitaminosis was classified when the level of serum 25(OH)D was <20 ng/ml. The general linear model adjusted for confounding factors was used to determine differences in means of ASMMI by 25(OH)D status. The mean values of ASMMI were higher for men when compared with women. Women had a greater proportion of hypovitaminosis (71·1%) compared with men (53·2%). After adjusting for multiple factors, men were seen to have significant differences in ASMMI based on 25(OH)D status regardless of age, showing a lower mean value of ASSMI in those with hypovitaminosis. However, there was no difference in ASMMI by 25(OH)D status among women in both younger and older age groups. In conclusion, we found that there might be a positive relationship between 25(OH)D and skeletal muscle mass in men, indicating that interventions to improve 25(OH)D levels that are aimed at increasing muscle mass could be beneficial for men with more rapid decreased rate of skeletal muscle mass.

  7. Differential cysteine labeling and global label-free proteomics reveals an altered metabolic state in skeletal muscle aging.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Brian; Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Smith, Neil T; Brownridge, Philip; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2014-11-07

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle aging and associated sarcopenia have been linked to an altered oxidative status of redox-sensitive proteins. Reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generated by contracting skeletal muscle are necessary for optimal protein function, signaling, and adaptation. To investigate the redox proteome of aging gastrocnemius muscles from adult and old male mice, we developed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach that includes a differential cysteine labeling step. The approach allows simultaneous identification of up- and downregulated proteins between samples in addition to the identification and relative quantification of the reversible oxidation state of susceptible redox cysteine residues. Results from muscles of adult and old mice indicate significant changes in the content of chaperone, glucose metabolism, and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, including Protein DJ-1, cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein, and a reduction in the number of redox-responsive proteins identified in muscle of old mice. Results demonstrate skeletal muscle aging causes a reduction in redox-sensitive proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response. Data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001054.

  8. Differential Cysteine Labeling and Global Label-Free Proteomics Reveals an Altered Metabolic State in Skeletal Muscle Aging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle aging and associated sarcopenia have been linked to an altered oxidative status of redox-sensitive proteins. Reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generated by contracting skeletal muscle are necessary for optimal protein function, signaling, and adaptation. To investigate the redox proteome of aging gastrocnemius muscles from adult and old male mice, we developed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach that includes a differential cysteine labeling step. The approach allows simultaneous identification of up- and downregulated proteins between samples in addition to the identification and relative quantification of the reversible oxidation state of susceptible redox cysteine residues. Results from muscles of adult and old mice indicate significant changes in the content of chaperone, glucose metabolism, and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, including Protein DJ-1, cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein, and a reduction in the number of redox-responsive proteins identified in muscle of old mice. Results demonstrate skeletal muscle aging causes a reduction in redox-sensitive proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response. Data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001054. PMID:25181601

  9. Loss of FHL1 induces an age-dependent skeletal muscle myopathy associated with myofibrillar and intermyofibrillar disorganization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Domenighetti, Andrea A.; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Wu, Tongbin; Sheikh, Farah; Gokhin, David S.; Guo, Ling T.; Cui, Ziyou; Peter, Angela K.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Li, Daniel Y.; Banerjee, Indroneal; Lai, Xianyin; Witzmann, Frank A.; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Gomes, Aldrin V.; Shelton, G. Diane; Lieber, Richard L.; Chen, Ju

    2014-01-01

    Recent human genetic studies have provided evidences that sporadic or inherited missense mutations in four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 1 (FHL1), resulting in alterations in FHL1 protein expression, are associated with rare congenital myopathies, including reducing body myopathy and Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. However, it remains to be clarified whether mutations in FHL1 cause skeletal muscle remodeling owing to gain- or loss of FHL1 function. In this study, we used FHL1-null mice lacking global FHL1 expression to evaluate loss-of-function effects on skeletal muscle homeostasis. Histological and functional analyses of soleus, tibialis anterior and sternohyoideus muscles demonstrated that FHL1-null mice develop an age-dependent myopathy associated with myofibrillar and intermyofibrillar (mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum) disorganization, impaired muscle oxidative capacity and increased autophagic activity. A longitudinal study established decreased survival rates in FHL1-null mice, associated with age-dependent impairment of muscle contractile function and a significantly lower exercise capacity. Analysis of primary myoblasts isolated from FHL1-null muscles demonstrated early muscle fiber differentiation and maturation defects, which could be rescued by re-expression of the FHL1A isoform, highlighting that FHL1A is necessary for proper muscle fiber differentiation and maturation in vitro. Overall, our data show that loss of FHL1 function leads to myopathy in vivo and suggest that loss of function of FHL1 may be one of the mechanisms underlying muscle dystrophy in patients with FHL1 mutations. PMID:23975679

  10. Physical exercise in aging human skeletal muscle increases mitochondrial calcium uniporter expression levels and affects mitochondria dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Sandra; Mammucari, Cristina; Romanello, Vanina; Barberi, Laura; Pietrangelo, Laura; Fusella, Aurora; Mosole, Simone; Gherardi, Gaia; Höfer, Christian; Löfler, Stefan; Sarabon, Nejc; Cvecka, Jan; Krenn, Matthias; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Protasi, Feliciano; Musarò, Antonio; Sandri, Marco; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2016-12-01

    Age-related sarcopenia is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle mass with decline in specific force, having dramatic consequences on mobility and quality of life in seniors. The etiology of sarcopenia is multifactorial and underlying mechanisms are currently not fully elucidated. Physical exercise is known to have beneficial effects on muscle trophism and force production. Alterations of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis regulated by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) have been recently shown to affect muscle trophism in vivo in mice. To understand the relevance of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in aging and to investigate the effect of physical exercise on MCU expression and mitochondria dynamics, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies from 70-year-old subjects 9 weeks trained with either neuromuscular electrical stimulation (ES) or leg press. Here, we demonstrate that improved muscle function and structure induced by both trainings are linked to increased protein levels of MCU Ultrastructural analyses by electron microscopy showed remodeling of mitochondrial apparatus in ES-trained muscles that is consistent with an adaptation to physical exercise, a response likely mediated by an increased expression of mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. Altogether these results indicate that the ES-dependent physiological effects on skeletal muscle size and force are associated with changes in mitochondrial-related proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis and mitochondrial shape. These original findings in aging human skeletal muscle confirm the data obtained in mice and propose MCU and mitochondria-related proteins as potential pharmacological targets to counteract age-related muscle loss.

  11. Muscle-specific inositide phosphatase (MIP/MTMR14) is reduced with age and its loss accelerates skeletal muscle aging process by altering calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Suarez, Sandra; Shen, Jinhua; Brotto, Leticia; Hall, Todd; Mo, ChengLin; Valdivia, Héctor H.; Andresen, Jon; Wacker, Michael; Nosek, Thomas M.; Qu, Cheng-Kui; Brotto, Marco

    2010-01-01

    We have recently reported that a novel muscle-specific inositide phosphatase (MIP/MTMR14) plays a critical role in [Ca2+]i homeostasis through dephosphorylation of sn-1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidylinositol (3,5) bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2). Loss of function mutations in MIP have been identified in human centronuclear myopathy. We developed a MIP knockout (MIPKO) animal model and found that MIPKO mice were more susceptible to exercise-induced muscle damage, a trademark of muscle functional changes in older subjects. We used wild-type (Wt) mice and MIPKO mice to elucidate the roles of MIP in muscle function during aging. We found MIP mRNA expression, MIP protein levels, and MIP phosphatase activity significantly decreased in old Wt mice. The mature MIPKO mice displayed phenotypes that closely resembled those seen in old Wt mice: i) decreased walking speed, ii) decreased treadmill activity, iii) decreased contractile force, and iv) decreased power generation, classical features of sarcopenia in rodents and humans. Defective Ca2+ homeostasis is also present in mature MIPKO and old Wt mice, suggesting a putative role of MIP in the decline of muscle function during aging. Our studies offer a new avenue for the investigation of MIP roles in skeletal muscle function and as a potential therapeutic target to treat aging sarcopenia. PMID:20817957

  12. Preparation and Culture of Myogenic Precursor Cells/Primary Myoblasts from Skeletal Muscle of Adult and Aged Humans.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Arroquia, Ana; Clegg, Peter D; Molloy, Andrew P; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna

    2017-02-16

    Skeletal muscle homeostasis depends on muscle growth (hypertrophy), atrophy and regeneration. During ageing and in several diseases, muscle wasting occurs. Loss of muscle mass and function is associated with muscle fiber type atrophy, fiber type switching, defective muscle regeneration associated with dysfunction of satellite cells, muscle stem cells, and other pathophysiological processes. These changes are associated with changes in intracellular as well as local and systemic niches. In addition to most commonly used rodent models of muscle ageing, there is a need to study muscle homeostasis and wasting using human models, which due to ethical implications, consist predominantly of in vitro cultures. Despite the wide use of human Myogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs) and primary myoblasts in myogenesis, there is limited data on using human primary myoblast and myotube cultures to study molecular mechanisms regulating different aspects of age-associated muscle wasting, aiding in the validation of mechanisms of ageing proposed in rodent muscle. The use of human MPCs, primary myoblasts and myotubes isolated from adult and aged people, provides a physiologically relevant model of molecular mechanisms of processes associated with muscle growth, atrophy and regeneration. Here we describe in detail a robust, inexpensive, reproducible and efficient protocol for the isolation and maintenance of human MPCs and their progeny - myoblasts and myotubes from human muscle samples using enzymatic digestion. Furthermore, we have determined the passage number at which primary myoblasts from adult and aged people undergo senescence in an in vitro culture. Finally, we show the ability to transfect these myoblasts and the ability to characterize their proliferative and differentiation capacity and propose their suitability for performing functional studies of molecular mechanisms of myogenesis and muscle wasting in vitro.

  13. Roles of sedentary aging and lifelong physical activity in exchange of glutathione across exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Cabo, Helena; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari-Carmen; Viña, Jose; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules with regulatory functions, and in young and adult organisms, the formation of ROS is increased during skeletal muscle contractions. However, ROS can be deleterious to cells when not sufficiently counterbalanced by the antioxidant system. Aging is associated with accumulation of oxidative damage to lipids, DNA, and proteins. Given the pro-oxidant effect of skeletal muscle contractions, this effect of age could be a result of excessive ROS formation. We evaluated the effect of acute exercise on changes in blood redox state across the leg of young (23 ± 1 years) and older (66 ± 2 years) sedentary humans by measuring the whole blood concentration of the reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) forms of the antioxidant glutathione. To assess the role of physical activity, lifelong physically active older subjects (62 ± 2 years) were included. Exercise increased the venous concentration of GSSG in an intensity-dependent manner in young sedentary subjects, suggesting an exercise-induced increase in ROS formation. In contrast, venous GSSG levels remained unaltered during exercise in the older sedentary and active groups despite a higher skeletal muscle expression of the superoxide-generating enzyme NADPH oxidase. Arterial concentration of GSH and expression of antioxidant enzymes in skeletal muscle of older active subjects were increased. The potential impairment in exercise-induced ROS formation may be an important mechanism underlying skeletal muscle and vascular dysfunction with sedentary aging. Lifelong physical activity upregulates antioxidant systems, which may be one of the mechanisms underlying the lack of exercise-induced increase in GSSG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of middle-aged vs. aged vastus lateralis reveals increased levels of carbonic anhydrase isoform 3 in senescent human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Staunton, Lisa; Zweyer, Margit; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-10-01

    The age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and associated progressive decline in contractile strength is a serious pathophysiological issue in the elderly. In order to investigate global changes in the skeletal muscle proteome after the fifth decade of life, this study analysed total extracts from human vastus lateralis muscle by fluorescence difference in-gel electrophoresis. Tissue specimens were derived from middle-aged (47-62 years) vs. aged (76-82 years) individuals and potential changes in the protein expression profiles were compared between these two age groups by a comprehensive gel electrophoresis-based survey. Age-dependent alterations in the concentration of 19 protein spots were revealed and mass spectrometry identified these components as being involved in the excitation-contraction-relaxation cycle, muscle metabolism, ion handling and the cellular stress response. This indicates a generally perturbed protein expression pattern in senescent human muscle. Increased levels of mitochondrial enzymes and isoform switching of the key contractile protein, actin, support the idea of glycolytic-to-oxidative and fast-to-slow transition processes during muscle aging. Importantly, the carbonic anhydrase (CA)3 isoform displayed an increased abundance during muscle aging, which was independently verified by immunoblotting of differently aged human skeletal muscle samples. Since the CA3 isoform is relatively muscle-specific and exhibits a fibre type-specific expression pattern, this enzyme may represent an interesting new biomarker of sarcopenia. Increased levels of CA are indicative of an increased demand of CO₂-removal in senescent muscle, and also suggest age-related fibre type shifting to slower-contracting muscles during human aging.

  15. Redox Control of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Le Moal, Emmeran; Pialoux, Vincent; Juban, Gaëtan; Groussard, Carole; Zouhal, Hassane; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-08-10

    Skeletal muscle shows high plasticity in response to external demand. Moreover, adult skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration after injury, due to the properties of muscle stem cells (MuSCs), the satellite cells, which follow a tightly regulated myogenic program to generate both new myofibers and new MuSCs for further needs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have long been associated with skeletal muscle physiology, their implication in the cell and molecular processes at work during muscle regeneration is more recent. This review focuses on redox regulation during skeletal muscle regeneration. An overview of the basics of ROS/RNS and antioxidant chemistry and biology occurring in skeletal muscle is first provided. Then, the comprehensive knowledge on redox regulation of MuSCs and their surrounding cell partners (macrophages, endothelial cells) during skeletal muscle regeneration is presented in normal muscle and in specific physiological (exercise-induced muscle damage, aging) and pathological (muscular dystrophies) contexts. Recent advances in the comprehension of these processes has led to the development of therapeutic assays using antioxidant supplementation, which result in inconsistent efficiency, underlying the need for new tools that are aimed at precisely deciphering and targeting ROS networks. This review should provide an overall insight of the redox regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration while highlighting the limits of the use of nonspecific antioxidants to improve muscle function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 276-310.

  16. Increased CaVbeta1A expression with aging contributes to skeletal muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jackson R; Zheng, Zhenlin; Wang, Zhong-Min; Payne, Anthony M; Messi, María L; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2009-09-01

    Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into the cytosol is a crucial part of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. Excitation-contraction uncoupling, a deficit in Ca2+ release from the SR, is thought to be responsible for at least some of the loss in specific force observed in aging skeletal muscle. Excitation-contraction uncoupling may be caused by alterations in expression of the voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha1s (CaV1.1) and beta1a (CaVbeta1a) subunits, both of which are necessary for E-C coupling to occur. While previous studies have found CaV1.1 expression declines in old rodents, CaVbeta1a expression has not been previously examined in aging models. Western blot analysis shows a substantial increase of CaVbeta1a expression over the full lifespan of Friend Virus B (FVB) mice. To examine the specific effects of CaVbeta1a overexpression, a CaVbeta1a-YFP plasmid was electroporated in vivo into young animals. The resulting increase in expression of CaVbeta1a corresponded to decline of CaV1.1 over the same time period. YFP fluorescence, used as a measure of CaVbeta1a-YFP expression in individual fibers, also showed an inverse relationship with charge movement, measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Specific force was significantly reduced in young CaVbeta1a-YFP electroporated muscle fibers compared with sham-electroporated, age-matched controls. siRNA interference of CaVbeta1a in young muscles reduced charge movement, while charge movement in old was restored to young control levels. These studies imply CaVbeta1a serves as both a positive and negative regulator CaV1.1 expression, and that endogenous overexpression of CaVbeta1a during old age may play a role in the loss of specific force.

  17. Expression of Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) in Aged Skeletal Muscles Depends on the Frequency and Duration of Exercise Training.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Seok; Lee, Young-Hee; Choi, Do-Yourl; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2015-06-01

    The skeletal muscle in aged rats adapts rapidly following a period of exercise. This adaptation includes structural remodeling and biochemical changes such as an up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, content of stress and heat shock proteins (HSPs). However, the associated molecular mechanisms mediating different types of exercise training-induced adaptations are not yet completely understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of duration and frequency exercise on the expression of HSPs, antioxidant enzymes, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) in the skeletal muscles of aged rats. Young (3-month-old) and aged (20-month-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 6 groups and extensor digitorum longus (EDL; fast twitch muscle fiber) and soleus (SOL; slow twitch muscle fiber) skeletal muscles were collected immediately. The expression pattern of HSPs in skeletal muscles was decreased in old groups compared with young groups. Especially, HSPs showed lower expression in SOL than EDL muscle. Interestingly, HSPs in aged rats was increased significantly after S1 (single long-duration; 1×30 min, 5 days/week for 6 weeks) and M1 types (multiple short-duration; 3×10 min·day(-1), 5 days·week(-1) for 6 weeks) than S2 (single long-duration; 1×30 min, 3 days/week for 6 weeks) and M2 (multiple short-duration; 3×10 min·day(-1), 3 days·week(-1) for 6 weeks) types of exercise training. Also, superoxide dismutase (SODs) showed similar expression as HSP did. On the contrary, the p-ERK and p-JNK were down regulated. In addition, p-p38 level in the SOL muscle was activated markedly in all exercise groups. These results demonstrate that increasing of HSP expression through duration and frequency exercise can lead to protection and training-induced adaptation against aging-induced structural weakness in skeletal muscles. Key pointsThe expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in aged rats was increased significantly after single

  18. Effects of aging, TNF-α, and exercise training on angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction of rat skeletal muscle arterioles.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoonjung; Prisby, Rhonda D; Behnke, Brad J; Dominguez, James M; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Donato, Anthony J; Muller-Delp, Judy; Delp, Michael D

    2012-10-01

    Skeletal muscle vascular resistance during physical exertion is higher with old age. The purpose of this study was to determine whether 1) aging enhances angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced vasoconstriction; 2) the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α contributes to alterations in ANG II-mediated vasoconstriction with aging; 3) exercise training attenuates putative age-associated increases in ANG II-mediated vasoconstriction; and 4) the mechanism(s) through which aging and exercise training alters ANG II-induced vasoconstriction in skeletal muscle arterioles. Male Fischer 344 rats were assigned to four groups: young sedentary (4 mo), old sedentary (24 mo), young trained, and old trained. In a separate group of young sedentary and old sedentary animals, a TNF type 1 receptor inhibitor was administered subcutaneously for 10 wk. First-order arterioles were isolated from soleus and gastrocnemius muscles for in vitro experimentation. Old age augmented ANG II-induced vasoconstriction in both soleus (young: 27 ± 3%; old: 38 ± 4%) and gastrocnemius (young: 42 ± 6%; old: 64 ± 9%) muscle arterioles; this augmented vasoconstriction was abolished with the removal of the endothelium, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and chronic inhibition of TNF-α. In addition, exercise training ameliorated the age-induced increase in ANG II vasoconstriction. These findings demonstrate that old age enhances and exercise training diminishes ANG II-induced vasoconstrictor responses in skeletal muscle arterioles through an endothelium-dependent nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway. In addition, the enhancement of ANG II vasoconstriction with old age appears to be related to a proinflammatory state.

  19. In vitro susceptibility of thioredoxins and glutathione to redox modification and aging-related changes in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dimauro, Ivan; Pearson, Timothy; Caporossi, Daniela; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2012-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trx's) regulate redox signaling and are localized to various cellular compartments. Specific redox-regulated pathways for adaptation of skeletal muscle to contractions are attenuated during aging, but little is known about the roles of Trx's in regulating these pathways. This study investigated the susceptibility of Trx1 and Trx2 in skeletal muscle to oxidation and reduction in vitro and the effects of aging and contractions on Trx1, Trx2, and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) 1 and 2 contents and nuclear and cytosolic Trx1 and mitochondrial Trx2 redox potentials in vivo. The proportions of cytosolic and nuclear Trx1 and mitochondrial Trx2 in the oxidized or reduced forms were analyzed using redox Western blotting. In myotubes, the mean redox potentials were nuclear Trx1, −251 mV; cytosolic Trx1, −242 mV; mitochondrial Trx2, −346 mV, data supporting the occurrence of differing redox potentials between cell compartments. Exogenous treatment of myoblasts and myotubes with hydrogen peroxide or dithiothreitol modified glutathione redox status and nuclear and cytosolic Trx1, but mitochondrial Trx2 was unchanged. Tibialis anterior muscles from young and old mice were exposed to isometric muscle contractions in vivo. Aging increased muscle contents of Trx1, Trx2, and TrxR2, but neither aging nor endogenous ROS generated during contractions modified Trx redox potentials, although oxidation of glutathione and other thiols occurred. We conclude that glutathione redox couples in skeletal muscle are more susceptible to oxidation than Trx and that Trx proteins are upregulated during aging, but do not appear to modulate redox-regulated adaptations to contractions that fail during aging. PMID:23022873

  20. Genome-wide profiling of the microRNA-mRNA regulatory network in skeletal muscle with aging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Park, Young-Kyu; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Lee, Seung-Min; Kang, Tae-Wook; Kim, Hee-Jin; Dho, So Hee; Kim, Seon-Young; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle degenerates progressively, losing mass (sarcopenia) over time, which leads to reduced physical ability and often results in secondary diseases such as diabetes and obesity. The regulation of gene expression by microRNAs is a key event in muscle development and disease. To understand genome-wide changes in microRNAs and mRNAs during muscle aging, we sequenced microRNAs and mRNAs from mouse gastrocnemius muscles at two different ages (6 and 24 months). Thirty-four microRNAs (15 up-regulated and 19 down-regulated) were differentially expressed with age, including the microRNAs miR-206 and -434, which were differentially expressed in aged muscle in previous studies. Interestingly, eight microRNAs in a microRNA cluster at the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 locus on chromosome 12 were coordinately down-regulated. In addition, sixteen novel microRNAs were identified. Integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression revealed that microRNAs may contribute to muscle aging through the positive regulation of transcription, metabolic processes, and kinase activity. Many of the age-related microRNAs have been implicated in human muscular diseases. We suggest that genome-wide microRNA profiling will expand our knowledge of microRNA function in the muscle aging process. PMID:25063768

  1. Imaging of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Douglas W

    2011-05-01

    Various diagnostic imaging techniques such as sonography, computed tomography, scintigraphy, radiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have made possible the noninvasive evaluation of skeletal muscle injury and disease. Although these different modalities have roles to play, MRI is especially sensitive in the diagnosis of muscle disorders and injury and has proved to be useful in determining the extent of disease, in directing interventions, and in monitoring the response to therapies. This article describes how magnetic resonance images are formed and how the signal intensities in T1- and T2-weighted images may be used for diagnosis of the above-mentioned conditions and injuries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intrinsic stiffness of extracellular matrix increases with age in skeletal muscles of mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lauren K; Kayupov, Erdan; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Mendias, Christopher L; Claflin, Dennis R; Brooks, Susan V

    2014-08-15

    Advanced age is associated with increases in muscle passive stiffness, but the contributors to the changes remain unclear. Our purpose was to determine the relative contributions of muscle fibers and extracellular matrix (ECM) to muscle passive stiffness in both adult and old animals. Passive mechanical properties were determined for isolated individual muscle fibers and bundles of muscle fibers that included their associated ECM, obtained from tibialis anterior muscles of adult (8-12 mo old) and old (28-30 mo old) mice. Maximum tangent moduli of individual muscle fibers from adult and old muscles were not different at any sarcomere length tested. In contrast, the moduli of bundles of fibers from old mice was more than twofold greater than that of fiber bundles from adult muscles at sarcomere lengths >2.5 μm. Because ECM mechanical behavior is determined by the composition and arrangement of its molecular constituents, we also examined the effect of aging on ECM collagen characteristics. With aging, muscle ECM hydroxyproline content increased twofold and advanced glycation end-product protein adducts increased threefold, whereas collagen fibril orientation and total ECM area were not different between muscles from adult and old mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that the ECM of tibialis anterior muscles from old mice has a higher modulus than the ECM of adult muscles, likely driven by an accumulation of densely packed extensively crosslinked collagen.

  3. Genome-wide profiling of the microRNA-mRNA regulatory network in skeletal muscle with aging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Park, Young-Kyu; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Lee, Seung-Min; Kang, Tae-Wook; Kim, Hee-Jin; Dho, So Hee; Kim, Seon-Young; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2014-07-01

    Skeletal muscle degenerates progressively, losing mass (sarcopenia) over time, which leads to reduced physical ability and often results in secondary diseases such as diabetes and obesity. The regulation of gene expression by microRNAs is a key event in muscle development and disease. To understand genome‐wide changes in microRNAs and mRNAs during muscle aging, we sequenced microRNAs and mRNAs from mouse gastrocnemius muscles at two different ages (6 and 24 months). Thirty‐four microRNAs (15 up‐regulated and 19 down‐regulated) were differentially expressed with age, including the microRNAs miR‐206 and ‐434, which were differentially expressed in aged muscle in previous studies. Interestingly, eight microRNAs in a microRNA cluster at the imprinted Dlk1‐Dio3 locus on chromosome 12 were coordinately down‐regulated. In addition, sixteen novel microRNAs were identified. Integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression revealed that microRNAs may contribute to muscle aging through the positive regulation of transcription, metabolic processes, and kinase activity. Many of the age‐related microRNAs have been implicated in human muscular diseases. We suggest that genome‐wide microRNA profiling will expand our knowledge of microRNA function in the muscle aging process.

  4. Proteomic profiling of skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ohlendieck, Kay

    2011-10-01

    One of the most striking physiological features of skeletal muscle tissues are their enormous capacity to adapt to changed functional demands. Muscle plasticity has been extensively studied by histological, biochemical, physiological and genetic methods over the last few decades. With the recent emergence of high-throughput and large-scale proteomic techniques, mass spectrometry-based surveys have also been applied to the global analysis of the skeletal muscle protein complement during physiological modifications and pathophysiological alterations. This review outlines and discusses the impact of recent proteomic profiling studies of skeletal muscle transitions, including the effects of chronic electro-stimulation, physical exercise, denervation, disuse atrophy, hypoxia, myotonia, motor neuron disease and age-related fibre type shifting. This includes studies on the human skeletal muscle proteome, animal models of muscle plasticity and major neuromuscular pathologies. The biomedical importance of establishing reliable biomarker signatures for the various molecular and cellular transition phases involved in muscle transformation is critically examined.

  5. Identification and Small Molecule Inhibition of an Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4)-dependent Pathway to Age-related Skeletal Muscle Weakness and Atrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Murry, Daryl J.; Fox, Daniel K.; Bongers, Kale S.; Lira, Vitor A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Talley, John J.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Aging reduces skeletal muscle mass and strength, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we used mouse models to investigate molecular mechanisms of age-related skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy as well as new potential interventions for these conditions. We identified two small molecules that significantly reduce age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass: ursolic acid (a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in apples) and tomatidine (a steroidal alkaloid derived from green tomatoes). Because small molecule inhibitors can sometimes provide mechanistic insight into disease processes, we used ursolic acid and tomatidine to investigate the pathogenesis of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that ursolic acid and tomatidine generate hundreds of small positive and negative changes in mRNA levels in aged skeletal muscle, and the mRNA expression signatures of the two compounds are remarkably similar. Interestingly, a subset of the mRNAs repressed by ursolic acid and tomatidine in aged muscle are positively regulated by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Based on this finding, we investigated ATF4 as a potential mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that a targeted reduction in skeletal muscle ATF4 expression reduces age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass, similar to ursolic acid and tomatidine. These results elucidate ATF4 as a critical mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. In addition, these results identify ursolic acid and tomatidine as potential agents and/or lead compounds for reducing ATF4 activity, weakness, and atrophy in aged skeletal muscle. PMID:26338703

  6. Identification and Small Molecule Inhibition of an Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4)-dependent Pathway to Age-related Skeletal Muscle Weakness and Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Scott M; Dyle, Michael C; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Murry, Daryl J; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Lira, Vitor A; Meyerholz, David K; Talley, John J; Adams, Christopher M

    2015-10-16

    Aging reduces skeletal muscle mass and strength, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we used mouse models to investigate molecular mechanisms of age-related skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy as well as new potential interventions for these conditions. We identified two small molecules that significantly reduce age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass: ursolic acid (a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in apples) and tomatidine (a steroidal alkaloid derived from green tomatoes). Because small molecule inhibitors can sometimes provide mechanistic insight into disease processes, we used ursolic acid and tomatidine to investigate the pathogenesis of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that ursolic acid and tomatidine generate hundreds of small positive and negative changes in mRNA levels in aged skeletal muscle, and the mRNA expression signatures of the two compounds are remarkably similar. Interestingly, a subset of the mRNAs repressed by ursolic acid and tomatidine in aged muscle are positively regulated by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Based on this finding, we investigated ATF4 as a potential mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that a targeted reduction in skeletal muscle ATF4 expression reduces age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass, similar to ursolic acid and tomatidine. These results elucidate ATF4 as a critical mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. In addition, these results identify ursolic acid and tomatidine as potential agents and/or lead compounds for reducing ATF4 activity, weakness, and atrophy in aged skeletal muscle.

  7. Nrf2 Deficiency Promotes Apoptosis and Impairs Pax7/MyoD Expression in Aging Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Narashimhan, Madhusudhanan; Hong, Jennifer; Atieno, Nancy; Muthusamy, Vasanthi R.; Davidson, Christopher J.; Abu-Rmaileh, Naser; Richardson, Russell; Gomes, Aldrin V.; Hoidal, John R.; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle redox homoeostasis is transcriptionally regulated by nuclear erythroid-2-p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2). We recently demonstrated that age-associated stress impairs Nrf2-ARE (antioxidant response element) transcriptional signaling. Here, we hypothesize that age-dependent decline or genetic ablation of Nrf2 leads to accelerated apoptosis and skeletal muscle degeneration. Under basal-physiological conditions, disruption of Nrf2 significantly down regulates antioxidants and causes oxidative stress. Surprisingly, Nrf2-null mice had enhanced antioxidant capacity identical to wild-type (WT) upon acute endurance exercise stress (AEES), suggesting activation of Nrf2-independent mechanisms (i.e. PGC1α) against oxidative stress. Analysis of pro-survival pathways under the basal state reveals decreased Akt levels, while pp53, a repressor of Akt, was increased in Nrf2-null versus WT mice. Upon AEES, Akt and p-Akt levels were significantly (p<0.001) increased (>10 fold) along with profound down regulation of pp53 (p<0.01) in Nrf2-null versus WT skeletal muscle, indicating the onset of pro-survival mechanisms to compensate the loss of Nrf2 signaling. However, we found a decreased stem cell population (Pax7) and MyoD expression (differentiation) along with profound activation of ubiquitin and apoptotic pathways in Nrf2- null versus WT mice upon AEES, suggesting that compensatory pro-survival mechanisms failed to overcome the programed cell death and degeneration in skeletal muscle. Further, the impaired regeneration was sustained in Nrf2-null vs. WT mice after 1 week of post-AEES recovery. In an age-associated oxidative stress condition, ablation of Nrf2 results in induction of apoptosis and impaired muscle regeneration. PMID:24613379

  8. Estimation of age at death based on quantitation of the 4977-bp deletion of human mitochondrial DNA in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Meissner, C; von Wurmb, N; Schimansky, B; Oehmichen, M

    1999-11-01

    The 4977-bp deletion in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is known to accumulate in various tissues with age. Since this deletion in mtDNA correlates closest with age in muscle tissue, iliopsoas muscle tissue was taken at autopsy from 50 persons aged 24-97 years to determine whether age at death can be estimated based on the amount of the 4977-bp deletion in skeletal muscle. Total DNA (nuclear and mtDNA) was extracted from 100 mg tissue and the 4977-bp deletion quantified using a kinetic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by visualization of the products on silver stained polyacrylamide gels. The amount of the 4977-bp deletion of mtDNA ranged from 0.00049% to 0.14% depending on age, with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.83 (P = 0.0001). In forensic practice this method can aid in the estimation of age at death with a relatively wide confidence interval, thus enabling a discrimination between young and elderly persons in the identification of human remains based solely on skeletal muscle.

  9. Modified forelimb grip strength test detects aging-associated physiological decline in skeletal muscle function in male mice.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Hikari; Yamamoto, Koichi; Nozato, Satoko; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Imaizumi, Yuki; Hongyo, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Serina; Takeda, Masao; Oguro, Ryosuke; Takami, Yoichi; Itoh, Norihisa; Takeya, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Ken; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2017-02-08

    The conventional forelimb grip strength test is a widely used method to assess skeletal muscle function in rodents; in this study, we modified this method to improve its variability and consistency. The modified test had lower variability among trials and days than the conventional test in young C57BL6 mice, especially by improving the variabilities in male. The modified test was more sensitive than the conventional test to detect a difference in motor function between female and male mice, or between young and old male mice. When the modified test was performed on male mice during the aging process, reduction of grip strength manifested between 18 and 24 months of age at the group level and at the individual level. The modified test was similar to the conventional test in detecting skeletal muscle dysfunction in young male dystrophic mice. Thus, the modified forelimb grip strength test, with its improved validity and reliability may be an ideal substitute for the conventional method.

  10. Motor neuron targeting of IGF-1 attenuates age-related external Ca2+-dependent skeletal muscle contraction in senescent mice.

    PubMed

    Payne, Anthony M; Messi, María Laura; Zheng, Zhenlin; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2007-04-01

    A population of fast muscle fibers from aging mice is dependent on external Ca(2+) to maintain tetanic force during repeated contractions. We hypothesized that age-related denervation in muscle fibers plays a role in initiating this contractile deficit, and that prevention of denervation by IGF-1 overexpression would prevent external Ca(2+)-dependent contraction in aging mice. IGF-1 overexpression in skeletal muscle prevents age-related denervation, and prevented external Ca(2+)-dependent contraction in this work. To determine if the effects of IGF-1 overexpression are on muscle or nerve, aging mice were injected with a tetanus toxin fragment-C (TTC) fusion protein that targets IGF-1 to spinal cord motor neurons. This treatment prevented external Ca(2+)-dependent contraction. We also show evidence that injections of the IGF-1-TTC fusion protein prevent age-related alterations to the nerve terminals at the neuromuscular junctions. We conclude that the slow age-related denervation of fast muscle fibers underlies dependence on external Ca(2+) to maintain tetanic force in a population of muscle fibers from senescent mice.

  11. Diminished skeletal muscle microRNA expression with aging is associated with attenuated muscle plasticity and inhibition of IGF-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Donato A; Lessard, Sarah J; Rice, Nicholas P; Lustgarten, Michael S; So, Kawai; Goodyear, Laurie J; Parnell, Laurence D; Fielding, Roger A

    2014-09-01

    Older individuals have a reduced capacity to induce muscle hypertrophy with resistance exercise (RE), which may contribute to the age-induced loss of muscle mass and function, sarcopenia. We tested the novel hypothesis that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) may contribute to reduced muscle plasticity with aging. Skeletal muscle expression profiling of protein-coding genes and miRNA was performed in younger (YNG) and older (OLD) men after an acute bout of RE. 21 miRNAs were altered by RE in YNG men, while no RE-induced changes in miRNA expression were observed in OLD men. This striking absence in miRNA regulation in OLD men was associated with blunted transcription of mRNAs, with only 42 genes altered in OLD men vs. 175 in YNG men following RE, demonstrating a reduced adaptability of aging muscle to exercise. Integrated bioinformatics analysis identified miR-126 as an important regulator of the transcriptional response to exercise and reduced lean mass in OLD men. Manipulation of miR-126 levels in myocytes, in vitro, revealed its direct effects on the expression of regulators of skeletal muscle growth and activation of insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling. This work identifies a mechanistic role of miRNA in the adaptation of muscle to anabolic stimulation and reveals a significant impairment in exercise-induced miRNA/mRNA regulation with aging.

  12. Folic acid ingestion improves skeletal muscle blood flow during graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise in aged humans.

    PubMed

    Romero, Steven A; Gagnon, Daniel; Adams, Amy N; Moralez, Gilbert; Kouda, Ken; Jaffery, Manall F; Cramer, Matthew N; Crandall, Craig G

    2017-09-01

    Skeletal muscle blood flow is attenuated in aged humans performing dynamic exercise, which is due, in part, to impaired local vasodilatory mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that folic acid improves cutaneous vasodilation during localized and whole body heating through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether folic acid improves vasodilation in other vascular beds during conditions of increased metabolism (i.e., exercise). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that folic acid ingestion improves skeletal muscle blood flow in aged adults performing graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise via increased vascular conductance. Nine healthy, aged adults (two men and seven women; age: 68 ± 5 yr) performed graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise before (control), 2 h after (acute, 5 mg), and after 6 wk (chronic, 5 mg/day) folic acid ingestion. Forearm (brachial artery) and leg (superficial femoral artery) blood velocity and diameter were measured via Duplex ultrasonography and used to calculate blood flow. Acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased serum folate (both P < 0.05 vs. control). During handgrip exercise, acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased forearm blood flow (both conditions P < 0.05 vs. control) and vascular conductance (both P < 0.05 vs. control). During plantar flexion exercise, acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased leg blood flow (both P < 0.05 vs. control), but only acute folic acid ingestion increased vascular conductance (P < 0.05 vs. control). Taken together, folic acid ingestion increases blood flow to active skeletal muscle primarily via improved local vasodilation in aged adults.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our findings demonstrate that folic acid ingestion improves blood flow via enhanced vascular conductance in the exercising skeletal muscle of aged humans. These findings provide evidence for the therapeutic use of folic acid to improve skeletal muscle blood flow, and perhaps

  13. The role of weight loss and exercise in correcting skeletal muscle mitochondrial abnormalities in obesity, diabetes and aging.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Frederico G S; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2013-10-15

    Mitochondria within skeletal muscle have been implicated in insulin resistance of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as impaired muscle function with normal aging. Evaluating the potential of interventions to improve mitochondria is clearly relevant to the prevention or treatment of metabolic diseases and age-related dysfunction. This review provides an overview and critical evaluation of the effects of weight loss and exercise interventions on skeletal muscle mitochondria, along with implications for insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes and aging. The available literature strongly suggests that the lower mitochondrial capacity associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and aging is not an irreversible lesion. However, weight loss does not appear to affect this response, even when the weight loss is extreme. In contrast, increasing physical activity improves mitochondrial content and perhaps the function of individual mitochondrion. Despite the consistent effect of exercise to improve mitochondrial capacity, studies mechanistically linking mitochondria to insulin resistance, reductions in intramyocellular lipid or improvement in muscle function remain inconclusive. In summary, studies of diet and exercise training have advanced our understanding of the link between mitochondrial oxidative capacity and insulin resistance in obesity, type 2 diabetes and aging. Nevertheless, additional inquiry is necessary to establish the significance and clinical relevance of those perturbations, which could lead to targeted therapies for a myriad of conditions and diseases involving mitochondria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular circuitry of stem cell fate in skeletal muscle regeneration, ageing, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Almada, Albert E.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite cells are adult myogenic stem cells that function to repair damaged muscle. The enduring capacity for muscle regeneration requires efficient satellite cell expansion after injury, differentiation to produce myoblasts that can reconstitute damaged fibers, and self-renewal to replenish the muscle stem cell pool for subsequent rounds of injury and repair. Emerging studies indicate that misregulations of satellite cell fate and function contribute to age-associated muscle dysfunction and influence the severity of muscle diseases, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). It has also become apparent that satellite cell fate during muscle regeneration, aging, and in the context of DMD is governed by an intricate network of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators. Targeted manipulation of this network may offer unique opportunities for muscle regenerative medicine. PMID:26956195

  15. Lifelong training preserves some redox-regulated adaptive responses after an acute exercise stimulus in aged human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cobley, J N; Sakellariou, G K; Owens, D J; Murray, S; Waldron, S; Gregson, W; Fraser, W D; Burniston, J G; Iwanejko, L A; McArdle, A; Morton, J P; Jackson, M J; Close, G L

    2014-05-01

    Several redox-regulated responses to an acute exercise bout fail in aged animal skeletal muscle, including the ability to upregulate the expression of antioxidant defense enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs). These findings are generally derived from studies on sedentary rodent models and thus may be related to reduced physical activity and/or intraspecies differences as opposed to aging per se. This study, therefore, aimed to determine the influence of age and training status on the expression of HSPs, antioxidant enzymes, and NO synthase isoenzymes in quiescent and exercised human skeletal muscle. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from the vastus lateralis before and 3 days after an acute high-intensity-interval exercise bout in young trained, young untrained, old trained, and old untrained subjects. Levels of HSP72, PRX5, and eNOS were significantly higher in quiescent muscle of older compared with younger subjects, irrespective of training status. 3-NT levels were elevated in muscles of the old untrained but not the old trained state, suggesting that lifelong training may reduce age-related macromolecule damage. SOD1, CAT, and HSP27 levels were not significantly different between groups. HSP27 content was upregulated in all groups studied postexercise. HSP72 content was upregulated to a greater extent in muscle of trained compared with untrained subjects postexercise, irrespective of age. In contrast to every other group, old untrained subjects failed to upregulate CAT postexercise. Aging was associated with a failure to upregulate SOD2 and a downregulation of PRX5 in muscle postexercise, irrespective of training status. In conclusion, lifelong training is unable to fully prevent the progression toward a more stressed muscular state as evidenced by increased HSP72, PRX5, and eNOS protein levels in quiescent muscle. Moreover, lifelong training preserves some (e.g., CAT) but not all (e.g., SOD2, HSP72, PRX5) of the adaptive redox-regulated responses after an

  16. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  17. An olive oil-derived antioxidant mixture ameliorates the age-related decline of skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Pierno, Sabata; Tricarico, Domenico; Liantonio, Antonella; Mele, Antonietta; Digennaro, Claudio; Rolland, Jean-François; Bianco, Gianpatrizio; Villanova, Luciano; Merendino, Alessandro; Camerino, Giulia Maria; De Luca, Annamaria; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2014-02-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle decline is characterized by the modification of sarcolemma ion channels important to sustain fiber excitability and to prevent metabolic dysfunction. Also, calcium homeostasis and contractile function are impaired. In the aim to understand whether these modifications are related to oxidative damage and can be reverted by antioxidant treatment, we examined the effects of in vivo treatment with an waste water polyphenolic mixture (LACHI MIX HT) supplied by LACHIFARMA S.r.l. Italy containing hydroxytirosol (HT), gallic acid, and homovanillic acid on the skeletal muscles of 27-month-old rats. After 6-week treatment, we found an improvement of chloride ClC-1 channel conductance, pivotal for membrane electrical stability, and of ATP-dependent potassium channel activity, important in coupling excitability with fiber metabolism. Both of them were analyzed using electrophysiological techniques. The treatment also restored the resting cytosolic calcium concentration, the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release, and the mechanical threshold for contraction, an index of excitation-contraction coupling mechanism. Muscle weight and blood creatine kinase levels were preserved in LACHI MIX HT-treated aged rats. The antioxidant activity of LACHI MIX HT was confirmed by the reduction of malondialdehyde levels in the brain of the LACHI MIX HT-treated aged rats. In comparison, the administration of purified HT was less effective on all the parameters studied. Although muscle function was not completely recovered, the present study provides evidence of the beneficial effects of LACHI MIX HT, a natural compound, to ameliorate skeletal muscle functional decline due to aging-associated oxidative stress.

  18. Mild eccentric exercise increases Hsp72 content in skeletal muscles from adult and late middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Evan J H; Ramsook, Andrew H; Locke, Marius; Amara, Catherine E

    2013-09-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age or sarcopenia contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. Thus, preventing muscle loss with age is important for maintaining health. Hsp72, the inducible member of the Hsp70 family, is known to provide protection to skeletal muscle and can be increased by exercise. However, ability to increase Hsp72 by exercise is intensity-dependent and appears to diminish with advanced age. Thus, other exercise modalities capable of increasing HSP content and potentially preventing the age related loss of muscle need to be explored. The purpose of this study was to determine if the stress from one bout of mild eccentric exercise was sufficient to elicit an increase in Hsp72 content in the vastus intermedius (VI) and white gastrocnemius (WG) muscles, and if the Hsp72 response differed between adult and late middle-aged rats. To do this, 30 adult (6 months) and late middle-aged (24 months) F344BN rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 6/group): control (C), level exercise (16 m x min(-1)) and eccentric exercise (16 m x min(-1), 16 degree decline). Exercised animals were sacrificed immediately post-exercise or after 48 hours. Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was used to assess muscle damage, while Western Blotting was used to measure muscle Hsp72 content. A nested ANOVA with Tukey post hoc analysis was performed to determine significant difference (p < 0.05) between groups. Hsp72 content was increased in the VI for both adult and late middle-aged rats 48 hours after eccentric exercise when compared to level and control groups but no differences between age groups was observed. Hsp72 was not detected in the WG following any type of exercise. In conclusion, mild eccentric exercise can increase Hsp72 content in the rat VI muscle and this response is maintained into late middle-age.

  19. The correlation between insulin resistance and the visceral fat to skeletal muscle ratio in middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul Sik; Nam, Joo Young; Park, Jong Suk; Kim, Dol Mi; Yoon, Soo Jee; Ahn, Chul Woo; Lim, Sung Kil; Kim, Kyung Rae; Lee, Hyun Chul; Huh, Kap Bum; Cha, Bong Soo

    2004-06-30

    Central obesity with visceral fat accumulation and the amount of skeletal muscle mass may influence insulin sensitivity via its capacity for glucose load uptake. We investigated the relationships among the following metabolic variables: ratio of fat area to skeletal muscle area (VMR), percent ideal body weight, body mass index, waist-to-hip circumference (WHR) and visceral fat to subcutaneous fat ratio (VSR) in 114 nondiabetic middle-aged women. Anthropometric parameters, lipid profiles and sex hormone- binding globulin were measured. Visceral and subcutaneous fat areas at the umbilical level and the skeletal muscle area at the mid-thigh level were measured and computed. 75-gram OGTT tests were performed, along with measuring plasma glucose, insulin and free fatty acid levels, according to which area under the curve of glucose (Glu-AUC), insulin (Ins-AUC), free fatty acid (FFA-AUC) and glucose/insulin ratio (GIR=Glu- AUC/Ins-AUC), were calculated. 1) Triglyceride was more correlated with VSR than VMR. 2) The independent anthropometric parameters for each metabolic variable were In conclusion, VMR for Ins-AUC, WHR for Glu-AUC and total cholesterol, and VSR for triglyceride. 3) For subjects with higher VMR, age, Ins-AUC and triglyceride were significantly higher. 4) Subjects with higher VMR were older and showed higher Ins-AUC and lower GIR than the subjects with lower VMR. In conclusion, VMR is an anthropometric parameter that reflects insulin resistance concerning glucose metabolism, and VSR is thought to be a good parameter that that reflects the serum lipid levels. Further prospective studies are necessary to reevaluate the visceral fat vs. skeletal muscle relationship.

  20. Disproportionate changes in skeletal muscle strength and size with resistance training and ageing.

    PubMed

    Degens, H; Erskine, R M; Morse, C I

    2009-01-01

    The ability of a muscle to shorten and produce force is crucial for locomotion, posture, balance and respiration. During a contraction, myosin heads on the myosin filament propel the actin filament via ATP hydrolysis, resulting in shortening of the muscle and/or force generation. The maximal shortening velocity of a muscle fibre is largely determined by the myosin ATPase activity, while maximal force is primarily determined by the cross-sectional area. Since most muscles are pennate rather than parallel-fibred and work at different lever ratios, muscle architecture and joint-tendon anatomy has to be taken into account to obtain the force and velocity characteristics of a muscle. Additionally, the recruitment of agonistic and antagonistic muscles will contribute to the torque generated during a contraction. Finally, tendon compliance may impact on the rate of force rise and force generated if it is such that the muscle contraction proceeds in the ascending limb of the length-tension relation. Even when magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, combined with EMG and/or electrical stimulation, have been applied to relate changes in muscle contractile properties to alterations in muscle size and architecture during ageing and resistance training, a disproportionate change in muscle strength and size remains to be explained.

  1. Testosterone is essential for skeletal muscle growth in aged mice in a heterochronic parabiosis model

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Indranil; Sinha-Hikim, Amiya P.; Wagers, Amy J.; Sinha-Hikim, Indrani

    2014-01-01

    Summary As humans age, they lose both muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia). Testosterone, a circulating hormone, progressively declines in aging and is associated with loss of muscle mass and strength. Joining of a young and old mouse (heterochronic parabiosis) activates Notch signaling and restores muscle regenerative potential in aged mice. We hypothesize that testosterone is at least one of the factor required for the improvement seen in muscles in old mice in heterochronic parabiosis with young mice. To test this hypothesis, we established the following heterochronic parabioses between young (Y; 5 months old) and old (O; 22–23 months old) C57BL6 male mice: 1) Y: O; 2) castrated Y: O (ØY: O); and 3) castrated + testosterone-treated Y: O (ØY+T: O). A group of normal young received empty implants and old mice were used as controls. Parabiotic pairings were maintained for 4 weeks prior to analysis. Serum testosterone levels were 3-fold higher in young in comparison with old mice. ØY+T: O pairing demonstrated significantly elevated levels of serum testosterone and improvement in gastrocnemius muscle weight, muscle ultrastructure, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, and Notch-1 expression in old mice. These changes were not present in aged mice in ØY: O pairing. Together, these data point to a critical role for testosterone in mediating improved muscle mass and ultrastructure seen in an experimental model of heterochronic parabiosis. PMID:24859218

  2. Acute antioxidant supplementation and skeletal muscle vascular conductance in aged rats: role of exercise and fiber type.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Daniel M; Copp, Steven W; Schwagerl, Peter J; Haub, Mark D; Poole, David C; Musch, Timothy I

    2011-04-01

    Age-related increases in oxidative stress contribute to impaired skeletal muscle vascular control. However, recent evidence indicates that antioxidant treatment with tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) attenuates flow-mediated vasodilation in isolated arterioles from the highly oxidative soleus muscle of aged rats. Whether antioxidant treatment with tempol evokes similar responses in vivo at rest and during exercise in senescent individuals and whether this effect varies based on muscle fiber type composition are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that redox modulation via acute systemic tempol administration decreases vascular conductance (VC) primarily in oxidative hindlimb locomotor muscles at rest and during submaximal whole body exercise (treadmill running at 20 m/min, 5% grade) in aged rats. Eighteen old (25-26 mo) male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were assigned to either rest (n = 8) or exercise (n = 10) groups. Regional VC was determined via radiolabeled microspheres before and after intra-arterial administration of tempol (302 μmol/kg). Tempol decreased mean arterial pressure significantly by 9% at rest and 16% during exercise. At rest, similar VC in 26 out of 28 individual hindlimb muscles or muscle parts following tempol administration compared with control resulted in unchanged total hindlimb muscle VC (control: 0.18 ± 0.02; tempol: 0.17 ± 0.05 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)·mmHg(-1); P > 0.05). During exercise, all individual hindlimb muscles or muscle parts irrespective of fiber type composition exhibited either an increase or no change in VC with tempol (i.e., ↑11 and ↔17 muscles or muscle parts), such that total hindlimb VC increased by 25% (control: 0.93 ± 0.04; tempol: 1.15 ± 0.09 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)·mmHg(-1); P ≤ 0.05). These results demonstrate that acute systemic administration of the antioxidant tempol significantly impacts the control of regional vascular tone in vivo presumably via redox modulation and improves

  3. Improved fatigue resistance in Gsα-deficient and aging mouse skeletal muscles due to adaptive increases in slow fibers

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S.

    2011-01-01

    Genetically modified mice with deficiency of the G protein α-subunit (Gsα) in skeletal muscle showed metabolic abnormality with reduced glucose tolerance, low muscle mass, and low contractile force, along with a fast-to-slow-fiber-type switch (Chen M, Feng HZ, Gupta D, Kelleher J, Dickerson KE, Wang J, Hunt D, Jou W, Gavrilova O, Jin JP, Weinstein LS. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 296: C930–C940, 2009). Here we investigated a hypothesis that the switching to more slow fibers is an adaptive response with specific benefit. The results showed that, corresponding to the switch of myosin isoforms, the thin-filament regulatory proteins troponin T and troponin I both switched to their slow isoforms in the atrophic soleus muscle of 3-mo-old Gsα-deficient mice. This fiber-type switch involving coordinated changes of both thick- and thin-myofilament proteins progressed in the Gsα-deficient soleus muscles of 18- to 24-mo-old mice, as reflected by the expression of solely slow isoforms of myosin and troponin. Compared with age-matched controls, Gsα-deficient soleus muscles with higher proportion of slow fibers exhibited slower contractile and relaxation kinetics and lower developed force, but significantly increased resistance to fatigue, followed by a better recovery. Gsα-deficient soleus muscles of neonatal and 3-wk-old mice did not show the increase in slow fibers. Therefore, the fast-to-slow-fiber-type switch in Gsα deficiency at older ages was likely an adaptive response. The benefit of higher fatigue resistance in adaption to metabolic deficiency and aging provides a mechanism to sustain skeletal muscle function in diabetic patients and elderly individuals. PMID:21680879

  4. Skeletal muscle mass and body fat in relation to successful ageing of older adults: The multi-national MEDIS study.

    PubMed

    Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Haro, Josep-Maria; Mariolis, Anargiros; Piscopo, Suzanne; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Anastasiou, Foteini; Zeimbekis, Akis; Tyrovola, Dimitra; Foscolou, Alexandra; Gotsis, Efthimios; Metallinos, George; Tur, Josep-Antoni; Matalas, Antonia; Lionis, Christos; Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes

    2016-01-01

    The determinants that promote successful ageing still remain unknown. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the role of skeletal muscle mass and body fat percentage (BF%), in the level of successful ageing. during 2005-2011, 2663 older (aged 65-100 years) from 21 Mediterranean islands and the rural Mani region (Peloponnesus) of Greece were voluntarily enrolled in the study. Appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM), skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) and BF% were calculated using population formulas. Dietary habits, energy intake, expenditure and energy balance were derived throughout standard procedures. A successful ageing index ranging from 0 to 10 was used. The mean ASM mass was 24±6.0kg, the SMI was 0.84±0.21 and the BF% was 44%. Females had lower SMI and higher BF% in comparison with males, respectively [(SMI: 0.66±0.09 vs. 1.03±0.11; BF%: 51% vs. 34%, (p<0.001)]. High successful agers had better rates in ASM (p=0.01), SMI (p<0.001) and BF% (p<0.001), compared with the medium and low successful ones. Changes in SMI [b-coefficient (95% CI):2.14 (1.57 to 2.71)] were positively associated with successful ageing, while changes in BF% [b-coefficient (95% CI): -0.04 (-0.05 to -0.03)] were inversely associated with successful ageing. Results from sensitivity analysis showed that the effects of variations on body composition were consistent, less pronounced in the positive energy balance group and more pronounced among the oldest old. Body composition changes seem to be associated with lower quality of life in the older adults, as measured through successful ageing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Skeletal muscle protein metabolism in the elderly: Interventions to counteract the 'anabolic resistance' of ageing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Age-related muscle wasting (sarcopenia) is accompanied by a loss of strength which can compromise the functional abilities of the elderly. Muscle proteins are in a dynamic equilibrium between their respective rates of synthesis and breakdown. It has been suggested that age-related sarcopenia is due to: i) elevated basal-fasted rates of muscle protein breakdown, ii) a reduction in basal muscle protein synthesis (MPS), or iii) a combination of the two factors. However, basal rates of muscle protein synthesis and breakdown are unchanged with advancing healthy age. Instead, it appears that the muscles of the elderly are resistant to normally robust anabolic stimuli such as amino acids and resistance exercise. Ageing muscle is less sensitive to lower doses of amino acids than the young and may require higher quantities of protein to acutely stimulate equivalent muscle protein synthesis above rest and accrue muscle proteins. With regard to dietary protein recommendations, emerging evidence suggests that the elderly may need to distribute protein intake evenly throughout the day, so as to promote an optimal per meal stimulation of MPS. The branched-chain amino acid leucine is thought to play a central role in mediating mRNA translation for MPS, and the elderly should ensure sufficient leucine is provided with dietary protein intake. With regards to physical activity, lower, than previously realized, intensity high-volume resistance exercise can stimulate a robust muscle protein synthetic response similar to traditional high-intensity low volume training, which may be beneficial for older adults. Resistance exercise combined with amino acid ingestion elicits the greatest anabolic response and may assist elderly in producing a 'youthful' muscle protein synthetic response provided sufficient protein is ingested following exercise. PMID:21975196

  6. Mechanotransduction in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical signals are critical to the development and maintenance of skeletal muscle, but the mechanisms that convert these shape changes to biochemical signals is not known. When a deformation is imposed on a muscle, changes in cellular and molecular conformations link the mechanical forces with biochemical signals, and the close integration of mechanical signals with electrical, metabolic, and hormonal signaling may disguise the aspect of the response that is specific to the mechanical forces. The mechanically induced conformational change may directly activate downstream signaling and may trigger messenger systems to activate signaling indirectly. Major effectors of mechanotransduction include the ubiquitous mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP) and phosphatidylinositol-3’ kinase (PI-3K), which have well described receptor dependent cascades, but the chain of events leading from mechanical stimulation to biochemical cascade is not clear. This review will discuss the mechanics of biological deformation, loading of cellular and molecular structures, and some of the principal signaling mechanisms associated with mechanotransduction. PMID:17127292

  7. Cellular adaptation contributes to calorie restriction-induced preservation of skeletal muscle in aged rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    McKiernan, Susan H.; Colman, Ricki J.; Aiken, Erik; Evans, Trent D.; Beasley, T.Mark; Aiken, Judd M.; Weindruch, Richard; Anderson, Rozalyn M.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that a 30% reduced calorie intake diet delayed the onset of muscle mass loss in adult monkeys between ~16 and ~22 years of age and prevented multiple cellular phenotypes of aging. In the present study we show the impact of long term (~17 years) calorie restriction (CR) on muscle aging in very old monkeys (27–33yrs) compared to age-matched Control monkeys fed ad libitum, and describe these data in the context of the whole longitudinal study. Muscle mass was preserved in very old calorie restricted (CR) monkeys compared to age-matched Controls. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an age-associated increase in the proportion of Type I fibers in the VL from Control animals that was prevented with CR. The cross sectional area (CSA) of Type II fibers was reduced in old CR animals compared to earlier time points (16–22 years of age); however, the total loss in CSA was only 15% in CR animals compared to 36% in old Controls at ~27 years of age. Atrophy was not detected in Type I fibers from either group. Notably, Type I fiber CSA was ~1.6 fold greater in VL from CR animals compared to Control animals at ~27 years of age. The frequency of VL muscle fibers with defects in mitochondrial electron transport system enzymes (ETSab), the absence of cytochrome c oxidase and hyper-reactive succinate dehydrogenase, were identical between Control and CR. We describe changes in ETSab fiber CSA and determined that CR fibers respond differently to the challenge of mitochondrial deficiency. Fiber counts of intact rectus femoris muscles revealed that muscle fiber density was preserved in old CR animals. We suggest that muscle fibers from CR animals are better poised to endure and adapt to changes in muscle mass than those of Control animals. PMID:22226624

  8. Exercise training in late middle-aged male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1-hybrid rats improves skeletal muscle aerobic function.

    PubMed

    Betik, Andrew C; Baker, David J; Krause, Daniel J; McConkey, Marina J; Hepple, Russell T

    2008-07-01

    The Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1-hybrid (F344BN) rat has become an increasingly popular and useful strain for studying age-related declines in skeletal muscle function because this strain lives long enough to experience significant declines in muscle mass. Since exercise is often considered a mechanism to combat age-related declines in muscle function, determining the utility of this strain of rat for studying the effects of exercise on the ageing process is necessary. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the plasticity of skeletal muscle aerobic function in late middle-aged male rats following 7 weeks of treadmill exercise training. Training consisted of 60 min per day, 5 days per week with velocity gradually increasing over the training period according to the capabilities of individual rats. The final 3 weeks involved 2 min high-intensity intervals to increase the training stimulus. We used in situ skeletal muscle aerobic metabolic responses and in vitro assessment of muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity to describe the adaptations of aerobic function from the training. Training increased running endurance from 11.3 +/- 0.6 to 15.5 +/- 0.8 min, an improvement of approximately 60%. Similarly, distal hindlimb muscles from trained rats exhibited a higher maximal oxygen consumption in situ (23.2 +/- 1.3 versus 19.7 +/- 0.8 mumol min(-1) for trained versus sedentary rats, respectively) and greater citrate synthase and complex IV enzyme activities in gastrocnemius (29 and 19%, respectively) and plantaris muscles (24 and 28%, respectively) compared with age-matched sedentary control animals. Our results demonstrate that skeletal muscles from late middle-aged rats adapt to treadmill exercise by improving skeletal muscle aerobic function and mitochondrial enzyme activities. This rat strain seems suitable for further investigations using exercise as an intervention to combat ageing-related declines of skeletal muscle aerobic function.

  9. Proteins that accumulate with age in human skeletal-muscle aggregates contribute to declines in muscle mass and function in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Balasubramaniam, Meenakshisundaram; Suri, Pooja; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Tackett, Alan J.; Sullivan, Dennis H.; Shmookler Reis, Robert J.; Dennis, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation increases with age in normal tissues, and with pathology and age in Alzheimer's hippocampus and mouse cardiac muscle. We now ask whether human skeletal muscle accumulates aggregates with age. Detergent-insoluble protein aggregates were isolated from vastus lateralis biopsies from 5 young (23–27 years of age) and 5 older (64–80 years) adults. Aggregates, quantified after gel electrophoresis, contain 2.1-fold more protein (P<0.0001) when isolated from older subjects relative to young. Of 515 proteins identified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, 56 (11%) were significantly more abundant in older muscle, while 21 (4%) were depleted with age (each P<0.05). Orthologs to seven of these proteins were then targeted in C. elegans by RNA interference. Six of the seven knockdown treatments decreased protein aggregation (range 6–45%, P<0.01 to <0.0001) and increased muscle mass (range 1.5- to 1.85-fold, P<0.01 to <0.0001) in aged nematodes, and rescued mobility (range 1.4 to 1.65-fold, P≤0.0005 each) in a nematode amyloidopathy model. We conclude that specific aggregate proteins, discovered as differentially abundant in aging human muscle, have orthologs that contribute functionally to aggregation and age-associated muscle loss in nematodes, and thus can be considered potential drug targets for sarcopenia in humans. PMID:27992858

  10. Aerobic exercise training induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and age-dependent adaptations in myofiber function in young and older men.

    PubMed

    Harber, Matthew P; Konopka, Adam R; Undem, Miranda K; Hinkley, James M; Minchev, Kiril; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Trappe, Todd A; Trappe, Scott

    2012-11-01

    To examine potential age-specific adaptations in skeletal muscle size and myofiber contractile physiology in response to aerobic exercise, seven young (YM; 20 ± 1 yr) and six older men (OM; 74 ± 3 yr) performed 12 wk of cycle ergometer training. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis to determine size and contractile properties of isolated slow [myosin heavy chain (MHC) I] and fast (MHC IIa) myofibers, MHC composition, and muscle protein concentration. Aerobic capacity was higher (P < 0.05) after training in both YM (16 ± 2%) and OM (13 ± 3%). Quadriceps muscle volume, determined via MRI, was 5 ± 1 and 6 ± 1% greater (P < 0.05) after training for YM and OM, respectively, which was associated with an increase in MHC I myofiber cross-sectional area (CSA), independent of age. MHC I peak power was higher (P < 0.05) after training for both YM and OM, while MHC IIa peak power was increased (P < 0.05) with training in OM only. MHC I and MHC IIa myofiber peak and normalized (peak force/CSA) force were preserved with training in OM, while MHC I peak force/CSA and MHC IIa peak force were lower (P < 0.05) after training in YM. The age-dependent adaptations in myofiber function were not due to changes in protein content, as total muscle protein and myofibrillar protein concentration were unchanged (P > 0.05) with training. Training reduced (P < 0.05) the proportion of MHC IIx isoform, independent of age, whereas no other changes in MHC composition were observed. These data suggest relative improvements in muscle size and aerobic capacity are similar between YM and OM, while adaptations in myofiber contractile function showed a general improvement in OM. Training-related increases in MHC I and MHC IIa peak power reveal that skeletal muscle of OM is responsive to aerobic exercise training and further support the use of aerobic exercise for improving cardiovascular and skeletal muscle health in older individuals.

  11. Effects of chronic administration of arachidonic acid on lipid profiles and morphology in the skeletal muscles of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Michio; Katakura, Masanori; Tanabe, Yoko; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Otani, Hiroki; Shido, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (20:4n-6, ARA) is a major component of the cell membrane, whereas ARA-derived eicosanoids are formed when cells are damaged. Aging is associated with an accretion of oxidative stress in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the effects of chronic administration (13 weeks) of ARA (240 mg/kg/day) on fatty acid composition, antioxidative status, and morphology of slow (soleus muscles) and fast (extensor digitorum longus muscles; EDL)-twitch muscles in aged rats (21 months old). The level of reactive oxygen species was higher in the EDL of ARA-administered rats than in that of control rats. ARA administration decreased the muscle cell volumes and increased the number of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive cells in the EDL. The relative content of MHC2X was increased whereas the relative content of MHC2B was decreased in the EDL of ARA-administered rats. These results suggest that ARA deposition in the fast-twitch muscle of aged rats reduced cell volume with an increase in oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cancer cachexia in the age of obesity: skeletal muscle depletion is a powerful prognostic factor, independent of body mass index.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lisa; Birdsell, Laura; Macdonald, Neil; Reiman, Tony; Clandinin, M Thomas; McCargar, Linda J; Murphy, Rachel; Ghosh, Sunita; Sawyer, Michael B; Baracos, Vickie E

    2013-04-20

    Emerging evidence suggests muscle depletion predicts survival of patients with cancer. At a cancer center in Alberta, Canada, consecutive patients with cancer (lung or GI; N = 1,473) were assessed at presentation for weight loss history, lumbar skeletal muscle index, and mean muscle attenuation (Hounsfield units) by computed tomography (CT). Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Concordance (c) statistics were used to test predictive accuracy of survival models. Body mass index (BMI) distribution was 17% obese, 35% overweight, 36% normal weight, and 12% underweight. Patients in all BMI categories varied widely in weight loss, muscle index, and muscle attenuation. Thresholds defining associations between these three variables and survival were determined using optimal stratification. High weight loss, low muscle index, and low muscle attenuation were independently prognostic of survival. A survival model containing conventional covariates (cancer diagnosis, stage, age, performance status) gave a c statistic of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.67 to 0.79), whereas a model ignoring conventional variables and including only BMI, weight loss, muscle index, and muscle attenuation gave a c statistic of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.88 to 0.95; P < .001). Patients who possessed all three of these poor prognostic variables survived 8.4 months (95% CI, 6.5 to 10.3), regardless of whether they presented as obese, overweight, normal weight, or underweight, in contrast to patients who had none of these features, who survived 28.4 months (95% CI, 24.2 to 32.6; P < .001). CT images reveal otherwise occult muscle depletion. Patients with cancer who are cachexic by the conventional criterion (involuntary weight loss) and by two additional criteria (muscle depletion and low muscle attenuation) share a poor prognosis, regardless of overall body weight.

  13. Aging increases the oxidation of dichlorohydrofluorescein in single isolated skeletal muscle fibers at rest, but not during contractions

    PubMed Central

    Palomero, Jesus; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Pye, Deborah; McArdle, Anne

    2013-01-01

    An increase in the activity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in the mechanisms of loss of skeletal muscle that occurs during aging, but few studies have attempted to directly assess activities in intact muscle fibers. The current project used the nonspecific fluorescent probe for ROS and reactive nitrogen species, 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (CM-DCFH), in single, isolated, mature skeletal muscle fibers from adult and old mice in addition to biochemical measurements of key regulatory proteins for ROS in muscles of these animals. Data confirmed the changes in key regulatory processes for ROS (increased glutathione peroxidase 1 and catalase activities and reduced total glutathione content) previously reported in muscle from old mice and showed increased CM-DCFH oxidation in muscle fibers from old mice at rest and indicate that these changes are likely due to an increase in generation of oxidants rather than a lack of scavenging capacity. The increased CM-DCFH oxidation persisted even when cellular defenses against oxidants were increased by loading fibers from young and old mice with glutathione. During contractile activity, and in contrast to the increase observed in fibers from young mice, there was no further increase in CM-DCFH oxidation in muscle fibers from old mice. These data also suggest that the defect in short-term adaptations to contractions that occurs in old mice may be related to a diminished, or absent, increase in the muscle generation of ROS and/or reactive nitrogen species that normally accompanies contractile activity in young mice. PMID:23697797

  14. Ageing is associated with diminished muscle re-growth and myogenic precursor cell expansion early after immobility-induced atrophy in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Suetta, C; Frandsen, U; Mackey, A L; Jensen, L; Hvid, L G; Bayer, M L; Petersson, S J; Schrøder, H D; Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P; Schjerling, P; Kjaer, M

    2013-08-01

    Recovery of skeletal muscle mass from immobilisation-induced atrophy is faster in young than older individuals, yet the cellular mechanisms remain unknown. We examined the cellular and molecular regulation of muscle recovery in young and older human subjects subsequent to 2 weeks of immobility-induced muscle atrophy. Retraining consisted of 4 weeks of supervised resistive exercise in 9 older (OM: mean age) 67.3, range 61-74 yrs) and 11 young (YM: mean age 24.4, range 21-30 yrs) males. Measures of myofibre area (MFA), Pax7-positive satellite cells (SCs) associated with type I and type II muscle fibres, as well as gene expression analysis of key growth and transcription factors associated with local skeletal muscle milieu, were performed after 2 weeks immobility (Imm) and following 3 days (+3d) and 4 weeks (+4wks) of retraining. OM demonstrated no detectable gains in MFA (vastus lateralis muscle) and no increases in number of Pax7-positive SCs following 4wks retraining, whereas YM increased their MFA (P < 0.05), number of Pax7-positive cells, and had more Pax7-positive cells per type II fibre than OM at +3d and +4wks (P < 0.05). No age-related differences were observed in mRNA expression of IGF-1Ea, MGF, MyoD1 and HGF with retraining, whereas myostatin expression levels were more down-regulated in YM compared to OM at +3d (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the diminished muscle re-growth after immobilisation in elderly humans was associated with a lesser response in satellite cell proliferation in combination with an age-specific regulation of myostatin. In contrast, expression of local growth factors did not seem to explain the age-related difference in muscle mass recovery.

  15. Exercise training from late middle age until senescence does not attenuate the declines in skeletal muscle aerobic function.

    PubMed

    Betik, Andrew C; Thomas, Melissa M; Wright, Kathryn J; Riel, Caitlin D; Hepple, Russell T

    2009-09-01

    We previously showed that 7 wk of treadmill exercise training in late-middle-aged rats can reverse the modest reductions in skeletal muscle aerobic function and enzyme activity relative to values in young adult rats (Exp Physiol 93: 863-871, 2008). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether extending this training program into senescence would attenuate the accelerated decline in the muscle aerobic machinery normally seen at this advanced age. For this purpose, 29-mo-old Fisher 344 Brown-Norway rats underwent 5 or 7 mo of treadmill exercise training. Training resulted in greater exercise capacity during an incremental treadmill exercise test and reduced percent body fat in 34- and 36-mo-old rats and improved survival. Despite these benefits at the whole body level, in situ muscle aerobic capacity and muscle mass were not greater in the trained groups at 34 mo or 36 mo of age. Similarly, the trained groups did not have higher activities of citrate synthase (CS) or Complex IV in homogenates of either the plantaris (fast twitch) or the soleus (slow twitch) muscles at either age. Finally, protein expression of CS (a marker of mitochondrial content) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (relating to the drive on mitochondrial biogenesis) were not higher in the trained groups. Therefore, although treadmill training from late middle age into senescence had significant benefits on running capacity, survival, and body fat, it did not prevent the declines in muscle mass, muscle aerobic capacity, or mitochondrial enzyme activities normally seen across this age, revealing a markedly diminished plasticity of the aerobic machinery in response to endurance exercise at advanced age.

  16. [Regeneration capacity of skeletal muscle].

    PubMed

    Wernig, A

    2003-07-01

    while the other is free to divide. Divide how often? Important for the human cells since the cell ages and proliferates slower and slower till it stops to divide at all, at least in culture. The same is true for the new satellite cell. This we know from recent experiments in which human biopsies derived myogenic cells were grown in vitro and in vivo (by implanting them into skeletal muscles of immunoincompetent mice): Growth correlates negatively with age of the donor. Between age 2 and some 70 years, about two divisions are performed by each satellite cell in human vastus lateralis and biceps brachii muscle in 10 years in the average. Most important for the older among us: at age 76 there are still some 13 divisions left before complete exhaustion. However, there are diseases like Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in which muscle fibers lack a structural protein with the effect of enhanced vulnerability to mechanical stress. There the enhanced use of the satellite cell pool makes the remaining growth capacity in an 8-years-old child as low as otherwise found at age 80. Some time ago, implantation of genetically intact myoblasts obtained from healthy relatives has been proposed as a treatment of DMD. Every logic would have predicted that some local implantation of whatever numbers of cells was bound to fail rescue the complete masculature or at least the muscles for breathing. The human as guinea pig? Now, even years later, we still collect the basic information on growth of human myoblasts and start thinking of ways for systemic application and quantitatively relevant incorporation of the myogenic stem cell or other--possibly pluripotent--stem cells derived from bone marrow.

  17. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks: effects of dietary leucine and age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huiling; Zheng, Aijuan; Liu, Guohua; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is necessary for cellular protein synthesis regulation. Leucine was reported to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in mammalian embryos and neonates, but in higher animals (chickens) the effect of dietary leucine on mTOR signaling is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effects of dietary leucine and age on mRNA expression and phosphorylation of mTOR as well as its downstream targets, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in chick pectoral muscles. One hundred eighty newly hatched male chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary leucine treatment groups (1.43, 1.73, and 2.03% leucine) for 14 d, respectively. Each treatment group consisted of 6 cages with 10 chicks each. On d 3, 7, and 14, plasma insulin and leucine were measured and target gene expression and phosphorylation was assessed. Dietary leucine influenced plasma leucine but not insulin, and plasma leucine and insulin declined with chick age. The mTOR, S6K1, and 4E-BP1 mRNA expression and phosphorylation within chick pectoral muscles were upregulated with increased dietary leucine but downregulated with increased chick age. Thus, high dietary leucine activates target of rapamycin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks to stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and this pathway is attenuated with aging.

  18. Effect of Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle SIRT1 and PGC-1α Expression Levels in Rats of Different Age

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Chang; Wang, Ting; Tung, Yu-Tang; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2016-01-01

    The protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathway drives the muscular fiber-type switching, and can directly regulate the biophysiological functions of skeletal muscle. To investigate whether 12-week swimming exercise training modulates the SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway associated proteins expression in rats of different age. Male 3-month-old (3M), 12-month-old (12M) and 18-month-old (18M) Sprague-Dawley rats were used and assigned to sedentary control (C) or 12-week swimming exercise training (E) and divided into six groups: 3MC (n = 8), 12MC (n = 6), 18MC (n = 8), 3ME (n = 8), 12ME (n = 5) and 18ME (n = 6). Body weight, muscle weight, epididymal fat mass and muscle morphology were performed at the end of the experiment. The protein levels of SIRT1, PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were examined. The SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK levels in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were up-regulated in the three exercise training groups than three control groups. The FOXO3a level in the 12ME group significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscles than 12MC group, but significantly decreased in the soleus muscles. In 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats with and without exercise, there was a significant main effect of exercise on PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius muscles, and SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK in the soleus muscles. Our result suggests that swimming training can regulate the SIRT1/PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a proteins expression of the soleus muscles in aged rats. PMID:27076782

  19. Effect of Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle SIRT1 and PGC-1α Expression Levels in Rats of Different Age.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Chang; Wang, Ting; Tung, Yu-Tang; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2016-01-01

    The protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathway drives the muscular fiber-type switching, and can directly regulate the biophysiological functions of skeletal muscle. To investigate whether 12-week swimming exercise training modulates the SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway associated proteins expression in rats of different age. Male 3-month-old (3M), 12-month-old (12M) and 18-month-old (18M) Sprague-Dawley rats were used and assigned to sedentary control (C) or 12-week swimming exercise training (E) and divided into six groups: 3MC (n = 8), 12MC (n = 6), 18MC (n = 8), 3ME (n = 8), 12ME (n = 5) and 18ME (n = 6). Body weight, muscle weight, epididymal fat mass and muscle morphology were performed at the end of the experiment. The protein levels of SIRT1, PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were examined. The SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK levels in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were up-regulated in the three exercise training groups than three control groups. The FOXO3a level in the 12ME group significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscles than 12MC group, but significantly decreased in the soleus muscles. In 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats with and without exercise, there was a significant main effect of exercise on PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius muscles, and SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK in the soleus muscles. Our result suggests that swimming training can regulate the SIRT1/PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a proteins expression of the soleus muscles in aged rats.

  20. Skeletal muscle morphology and regulatory signalling in endurance-trained and sedentary individuals: The influence of ageing.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, U R; Agergaard, J; Couppé, C; Grosset, J F; Karlsen, A; Magnusson, S P; Schjerling, P; Kjaer, M; Mackey, A L

    2017-07-01

    Muscle mass in humans is inversely associated with circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines, but the interaction between ageing and training on muscle composition and the intra-muscular signalling behind inflammation and contractile protein synthesis and degradation is unknown. We studied 15 healthy life-long endurance runners, 12 age-matched untrained controls, 10 young trained and 12 young untrained individuals. Thigh muscle composition was investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where non-contractile intramuscular tissue (NCIT) area (fat and connective tissue) was found to be greater in older but lower in trained individuals. Subcutaneous adipose tissue was also lower in trained individuals but was not affected by age. In vastus lateralis biopsies, no influence of age or training was found on levels of endomysial collagen, determined by Sirius Red and Collagen III staining, whereas perimysial organisation tended to be more complex in older individuals. No clear difference with training was seen on intramuscular inflammatory signalling, whereas lower protein levels of NFkB subunits p105, p50 and p65 were observed with ageing. Gene expression of IL6 and TNFα was not different between groups, while IL1-receptor and TNFα-receptor1 levels were lower with age. Myostatin mRNA was lower in older and trained groups, while expression of MuRF1 was lower in trained individuals and FoxO3 expression was greater in aged groups. The association of increased muscle NCIT with age-associated muscle loss in humans is not accompanied by any major alterations in intramuscular signalling for inflammation, but rather by direct regulatory factors for protein synthesis and proteolysis in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Early effects of ageing on the mechanical performance of isolated locomotory (EDL) and respiratory (diaphragm) skeletal muscle using the work-loop technique.

    PubMed

    Tallis, Jason; James, Rob S; Little, Alexander G; Cox, Val M; Duncan, Michael J; Seebacher, Frank

    2014-09-15

    Previous isolated muscle studies examining the effects of ageing on contractility have used isometric protocols, which have been shown to have poor relevance to dynamic muscle performance in vivo. The present study uniquely uses the work-loop technique for a more realistic estimation of in vivo muscle function to examine changes in mammalian skeletal muscle mechanical properties with age. Measurements of maximal isometric stress, activation and relaxation time, maximal power output, and sustained power output during repetitive activation and recovery are compared in locomotory extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and core diaphragm muscle isolated from 3-, 10-, 30-, and 50-wk-old female mice to examine the early onset of ageing. A progressive age-related reduction in maximal isometric stress that was of greater magnitude than the decrease in maximal power output occurred in both muscles. Maximal force and power developed earlier in diaphragm than EDL muscle but demonstrated a greater age-related decline. The present study indicates that ability to sustain skeletal muscle power output through repetitive contraction is age- and muscle-dependent, which may help rationalize previously reported equivocal results from examination of the effect of age on muscular endurance. The age-related decline in EDL muscle performance is prevalent without a significant reduction in muscle mass, and biochemical analysis of key marker enzymes suggests that although there is some evidence of a more oxidative fiber type, this is not the primary contributor to the early age-related reduction in muscle contractility.

  2. Effects of ageing and exercise training on endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and structure of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Spier, Scott A; Delp, Michael D; Meininger, Cynthia J; Donato, Anthony J; Ramsey, Michael W; Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2004-01-01

    Ageing reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in humans and animals, and in humans, exercise training reverses the ageing-associated reduction in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) by which 10–12 weeks of treadmill exercise enhances endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in muscles of differing fibre composition from young and old rats. Three- and 22-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were assigned to young sedentary, young exercise-trained, old sedentary, or old exercise-trained groups. Arterioles were isolated from the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles; luminal diameter changes were determined in response to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh, 10−9–10−4 mol l−1) alone and in the presence of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor l-NAME (10−5 mol l−1) or the combination of l-NAME and the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (10−5 mol l−1). Training ameliorated the ageing-induced reduction in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in soleus muscle arterioles. Treatment with l-NAME alone and in combination with indomethacin abolished differences in ACh vasodilatation occurring with ageing and training. Expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS) mRNA in soleus arterioles was unaltered by ageing, whereas eNOS protein was increased with age; training elevated both eNOS mRNA and protein. In gastrocnemius muscle arterioles, ageing did not alter maximal vasodilatation, but ageing and training increased maximal arteriolar diameter. These results demonstrate that ageing-induced reductions and training-induced enhancement of endothelial vasodilatation both occur through the nitric oxide signalling mechanism in highly oxidative skeletal muscle, but ageing and training do not appear to act on the same portion of the signalling cascade. PMID:15004211

  3. Chronic administration of taurine to aged rats improves the electrical and contractile properties of skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Pierno, S; De Luca, A; Camerino, C; Huxtable, R J; Camerino, D C

    1998-09-01

    A reduction of resting chloride conductance (GCl) and a decrease of the voltage threshold for contraction are observed during aging in rat skeletal muscle. The above alterations are also observed in muscle of adult rat after taurine depletion. As lower levels of taurine were found by others in aged rats compared to young rats, we tested the hypothesis that a depletion of taurine may contribute to the alteration of the electrical and contractile properties we found in skeletal muscle during aging. This was accomplished by evaluating the potential benefit of a pharmacological treatment with the amino acid. To this aim 25-mo-old Wistar rats were chronically treated (2-3 mo) with taurine (1 g/kg p.o. daily) and the effects of such a treatment were evaluated in vitro on the passive and active membrane electrical properties of extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers by means of current-clamp intracellular microelectrode technique. Excitation-contraction coupling was also evaluated by measuring the voltage threshold for contraction with the intracellular microelectrode "point" voltage clamp method. In parallel muscle and blood taurine contents were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Taurine supplementation significantly raised taurine content in muscle toward that found in adult rats. Supplementation also significantly increased GCl vs. the adult value, in parallel the excitability characteristics (threshold current and latency) related to this parameter were ameliorated. The increase of GCl induced by taurine was accompanied by a restoration of the pharmacological sensitivity to the R(+) enantiomer of 2-(p-chlorophenoxy) propionic acid, a specific chloride channel ligand. In parallel also the protein kinase C-mediated modulation of the channel was restored; in fact the potency of 4-beta-phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate in reducing GCl was lower in taurine-treated muscles vs. untreated aged, being rather similar to that observed in adult. The treatment also

  4. Sarcopenia, Dynapenia, and the Impact of Advancing Age on Human Skeletal Muscle Size and Strength; a Quantitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, W. Kyle; Williams, John; Atherton, Philip; Larvin, Mike; Lund, John; Narici, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Changing demographics make it ever more important to understand the modifiable risk factors for disability and loss of independence with advancing age. For more than two decades there has been increasing interest in the role of sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle or lean mass, in curtailing active and healthy aging. There is now evidence to suggest that lack of strength, or dynapenia, is a more constant factor in compromised wellbeing in old age and it is apparent that the decline in muscle mass and the decline in strength can take quite different trajectories. This demands recognition of the concept of muscle quality; that is the force generating per capacity per unit cross-sectional area (CSA). An understanding of the impact of aging on skeletal muscle will require attention to both the changes in muscle size and the changes in muscle quality. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of the decline in human muscle mass and strength with advancing age and the associated risk to health and survival and to review the underlying changes in muscle characteristics and the etiology of sarcopenia. Cross-sectional studies comparing young (18–45 years) and old (>65 years) samples show dramatic variation based on the technique used and population studied. The median of values of rate of loss reported across studies is 0.47% per year in men and 0.37% per year in women. Longitudinal studies show that in people aged 75 years, muscle mass is lost at a rate of 0.64–0.70% per year in women and 0.80–00.98% per year in men. Strength is lost more rapidly. Longitudinal studies show that at age 75 years, strength is lost at a rate of 3–4% per year in men and 2.5–3% per year in women. Studies that assessed changes in mass and strength in the same sample report a loss of strength 2–5 times faster than loss of mass. Loss of strength is a more consistent risk for disability and death than is loss of muscle mass. PMID:22934016

  5. Blunting of rapid onset vasodilatation and blood flow restriction in arterioles of exercising skeletal muscle with ageing in male mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dwayne N; Moore, Alex W; Segal, Steven S

    2010-06-15

    Exercise capacity and skeletal muscle blood flow are diminished with ageing but little is known of underlying changes in microvascular haemodynamics. Further, it is not clear how the sympathetic nervous system affects the microcirculation of skeletal muscle with ageing or whether sex differences prevail in the regulation of arteriolar diameter in response to muscle contractions. In the gluteus maximus muscle of C57BL/6 mice, we tested the hypothesis that ageing would impair 'rapid onset vasodilatation' (ROV) in distributing arterioles (second-order, 2A) of old (20-month) males (OM) and females (OF) relative to young (3-month) males (YM) and females (YF). Neither resting (approximately 17 microm) nor maximum (approximately 30 microm) 2A diameters differed between groups. In response to single tetanic contractions at 100 Hz (duration, 100-1000 ms), ROV responses were blunted by half in OM relative to OF, YM or YF. With no effect in YM, blockade of alpha-adrenoreceptors with phentolamine (1 mum) restored ROV in OM. Topical noradrenaline (1 nM) blunted ROV in YM and YF to levels seen in OM and further suppressed ROV in OM (P < 0.05). To evaluate arteriolar blood flow, red blood cell velocity was measured in 2A of OM and YM; respective heart rates (353 +/- 22 vs. 378 +/- 15 beats min(1)) and carotid arterial blood pressures (76 +/- 3 vs. 76 +/- 1 mmHg) were not different. Blood flows at rest (0.6 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.6 +/- 0.2 nl s(1)) and during maximum dilatation (2.0 +/- 0.8 vs. 5.4 +/- 0.8 nl s(1)) with sodium nitroprusside (10 microM) were attenuated >60% (P < 0.05) in OM. Blood flow at peak ROV was blunted by 75-80% in OM vs. YM (P < 0.05). In response to 30 s of rhythmic contractions at 2, 4 and 8 Hz, progressive dilatations did not differ with age or sex. Nevertheless, resting and peak blood flows in YM were 2- to 3-fold greater (P < 0.05) than OM. We suggest that ageing blunts ROV and restricts blood flow to skeletal muscle of OM through subtle activation of alpha

  6. Blunting of rapid onset vasodilatation and blood flow restriction in arterioles of exercising skeletal muscle with ageing in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Dwayne N; Moore, Alex W; Segal, Steven S

    2010-01-01

    Exercise capacity and skeletal muscle blood flow are diminished with ageing but little is known of underlying changes in microvascular haemodynamics. Further, it is not clear how the sympathetic nervous system affects the microcirculation of skeletal muscle with ageing or whether sex differences prevail in the regulation of arteriolar diameter in response to muscle contractions. In the gluteus maximus muscle of C57BL/6 mice, we tested the hypothesis that ageing would impair ‘rapid onset vasodilatation’ (ROV) in distributing arterioles (second-order, 2A) of old (20-month) males (OM) and females (OF) relative to young (3-month) males (YM) and females (YF). Neither resting (∼17 μm) nor maximum (∼30 μm) 2A diameters differed between groups. In response to single tetanic contractions at 100 Hz (duration, 100–1000 ms), ROV responses were blunted by half in OM relative to OF, YM or YF. With no effect in YM, blockade of α-adrenoreceptors with phentolamine (1 μm) restored ROV in OM. Topical noradrenaline (1 nm) blunted ROV in YM and YF to levels seen in OM and further suppressed ROV in OM (P < 0.05). To evaluate arteriolar blood flow, red blood cell velocity was measured in 2A of OM and YM; respective heart rates (353 ± 22 vs. 378 ± 15 beats min−1) and carotid arterial blood pressures (76 ± 3 vs. 76 ± 1 mmHg) were not different. Blood flows at rest (0.6 ± 0.1 vs. 1.6 ± 0.2 nl s−1) and during maximum dilatation (2.0 ± 0.8 vs. 5.4 ± 0.8 nl s−1) with sodium nitroprusside (10 μm) were attenuated >60% (P < 0.05) in OM. Blood flow at peak ROV was blunted by 75–80% in OM vs. YM (P < 0.05). In response to 30 s of rhythmic contractions at 2, 4 and 8 Hz, progressive dilatations did not differ with age or sex. Nevertheless, resting and peak blood flows in YM were 2- to 3-fold greater (P < 0.05) than OM. We suggest that ageing blunts ROV and restricts blood flow to skeletal muscle of OM through subtle activation of α-adrenoreceptors in microvascular

  7. Lipogenic regulators are elevated with age and chronic overload in rat skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both muscle mass and strength decline with ageing, but the loss of strength far surpasses what is projected based on the decline in mass. Interestingly, the accumulation of fat mass has been shown to be a strong predictor of functional loss and disability. Furthermore, there is a known attenuated hy...

  8. Age and sex influence on oxidative damage and functional status in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fanò, G; Mecocci, P; Vecchiet, J; Belia, S; Fulle, S; Polidori, M C; Felzani, G; Senin, U; Vecchiet, L; Beal, M F

    2001-01-01

    A reduction in muscle mass, with consequent decrease in strength and resistance, is commonly observed with advancing age. In this study we measured markers of oxidative damage to DNA, lipids and proteins, some antioxidant enzyme activities as well Ca2+ transport in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes in muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis of young and elderly healthy subjects of both sexes in order to evaluate the presence of age- and sex-related differences. We found a significant increase in oxidation of DNA and lipids in the elderly group, more evident in males, and a reduction in catalase and glutathione transferase activities. The experiments on Ca2+ transport showed an abnormal functional response of aged muscle after exposure to caffeine, which increases the opening of Ca2+ channels, as well a reduced activity of the Ca2+ pump in elderly males. From these results we conclude that oxidative stress play an important role in muscle aging and that oxidative damage is much more evident in elderly males, suggesting a gender difference maybe related to hormonal factors.

  9. Age-related differences of neutrophil activation in a skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion model.

    PubMed

    Mowlavi, Arian; Reynolds, Christopher; Neumeister, Michael W; Wilhelmi, Bradon J; Song, Yao-Hua; Naffziger, Ryan; Glatz, Frank R; Russell, Robert C

    2003-04-01

    Free tissue transfers and replantation of amputated limbs are better tolerated by young adolescents than mature adults. The authors hypothesized that this observation may be, in part, because of an attenuated ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in younger patients. Because neutrophils have been identified as a critical cell line responsible for IR injury, the authors investigated the effects of animal age on the degree of neutrophil activation in a rat model. Activation was evaluated by monitoring expression of integrin surface markers (mean fluorescence intensity [MFI] of CD11b) and oxidative burst potential (MFI of dihydrorhodamine [DHR] oxidation) by flow cytometry in neutrophils analyzed after 4 hours of ischemia and 1, 4, and 16 hours of reperfusion in a gracilis muscle flap model in mature adult and young adolescent rats. Neutrophil activation was also evaluated in control sham-operated animals, which underwent elevation of gracilis muscle flaps without exposure to an ischemic insult. Muscle edema, determined by wet-to-dry muscle weight ratio, and muscle viability, determined by nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) staining, were completed for gracilis muscles exposed to ischemia after 24 hours of reperfusion for each of the groups. Integrin expression, assessed by MFI of CD11b, was increased significantly in ischemic muscles of mature adult rats at 4 hours of reperfusion (71.10+/-3.53 MFI vs. 54.88+/-12.73 MFI, p=0.025). Neutrophil oxidative potential, assessed by MFI of DHR oxidation, was increased significantly in ischemic muscles of mature adult rats compared with young adolescent rats at 1 hour of reperfusion (78.10+/-9.53 MFI vs. 51.78+/-16.91 MFI, p=0.035) and 4 hours of reperfusion (83.69+/-15.29 MFI vs. 46.55+/-8.09 MFI, p=0.005). Increased edema formation was observed in the ischemic muscles of mature adult rats when compared with young adolescent rats (1.25+/-0.04 vs. 1.12+/-0.05, p=0.031) after 24 hours of reperfusion. A trend toward decreased muscle

  10. Age-related differences in skeletal muscle microvascular response to exercise as detected by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Wulf; Schwarzbach, Hans; Pardun, Anita; Hannemann, Lena; Bogs, Björn; König, Alexander M.; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hildebrandt, Olaf; Koehler, Ulrich; Kinscherf, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Background Aging involves reductions in exercise total limb blood flow and exercise capacity. We hypothesized that this may involve early age-related impairments of skeletal muscle microvascular responsiveness as previously reported for insulin but not for exercise stimuli in humans. Methods Using an isometric exercise model, we studied the effect of age on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) parameters, i.e. microvascular blood volume (MBV), flow velocity (MFV) and blood flow (MBF) calculated from replenishment of Sonovue contrast-agent microbubbles after their destruction. CEUS was applied to the vastus lateralis (VLat) and intermedius (VInt) muscle in 15 middle-aged (MA, 43.6±1.5 years) and 11 young (YG, 24.1±0.6 years) healthy males before, during, and after 2 min of isometric knee extension at 15% of peak torque (PT). In addition, total leg blood flow as recorded by femoral artery Doppler-flow. Moreover, fiber-type-specific and overall capillarisation as well as fiber composition were additionally assessed in Vlat biopsies obtained from CEUS site. MA and YG had similar quadriceps muscle MRT-volume or PT and maximal oxygen uptake as well as a normal cardiovascular risk factors and intima-media-thickness. Results During isometric exercise MA compared to YG reached significantly lower levels in MFV (0.123±0.016 vs. 0.208±0.036 a.u.) and MBF (0.007±0.001 vs. 0.012±0.002 a.u.). In the VInt the (post-occlusive hyperemia) post-exercise peaks in MBV and MBF were significantly lower in MA vs. YG. Capillary density, capillary fiber contacts and femoral artery Doppler were similar between MA and YG. Conclusions In the absence of significant age-related reductions in capillarisation, total leg blood flow or muscle mass, healthy middle-aged males reveal impaired skeletal muscle microcirculatory responses to isometric exercise. Whether this limits isometric muscle performance remains to be assessed. PMID:28273102

  11. The Effect of Physiological Stimuli on Sarcopenia; Impact of Notch and Wnt Signaling on Impaired Aged Skeletal Muscle Repair

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Susan Tsivitse; Cooley, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    The age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function that is associated with sarcopenia can result in ultimate consequences such as decreased quality of life. The causes of sarcopenia are multifactorial and include environmental and biological factors. The purpose of this review is to synthesize what the literature reveals in regards to the cellular regulation of sarcopenia, including impaired muscle regenerative capacity in the aged, and to discuss if physiological stimuli have the potential to slow the loss of myogenic potential that is associated with sarcopenia. In addition, this review article will discuss the effect of aging on Notch and Wnt signaling, and whether physiological stimuli have the ability to restore Notch and Wnt signaling resulting in rejuvenated aged muscle repair. The intention of this summary is to bring awareness to the benefits of consistent physiological stimulus (exercise) to combating sarcopenia as well as proclaiming the usefulness of contraction-induced injury models to studying the effects of local and systemic influences on aged myogenic capability. PMID:22701343

  12. The effect of physiological stimuli on sarcopenia; impact of Notch and Wnt signaling on impaired aged skeletal muscle repair.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Susan Tsivitse; Cooley, Ian D

    2012-01-01

    The age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function that is associated with sarcopenia can result in ultimate consequences such as decreased quality of life. The causes of sarcopenia are multifactorial and include environmental and biological factors. The purpose of this review is to synthesize what the literature reveals in regards to the cellular regulation of sarcopenia, including impaired muscle regenerative capacity in the aged, and to discuss if physiological stimuli have the potential to slow the loss of myogenic potential that is associated with sarcopenia. In addition, this review article will discuss the effect of aging on Notch and Wnt signaling, and whether physiological stimuli have the ability to restore Notch and Wnt signaling resulting in rejuvenated aged muscle repair. The intention of this summary is to bring awareness to the benefits of consistent physiological stimulus (exercise) to combating sarcopenia as well as proclaiming the usefulness of contraction-induced injury models to studying the effects of local and systemic influences on aged myogenic capability.

  13. Effects of chronic high-fat feeding on skeletal muscle mass and function in middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Rok; Khamoui, Andy V; Jo, Edward; Park, Bong-Sup; Zourdos, Michael C; Panton, Lynn B; Ormsbee, Michael J; Kim, Jeong-Su

    2015-08-01

    Increased adipose tissue may promote catabolic events in skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to test whether high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity would accelerate the onset of muscle wasting in middle-aged mice. Muscle was collected from C57BL/6 mice at 9 months of age (baseline) and 14 months of age after consuming a control (C) or HFD. Mice in C and HFD were also subjected to evaluations of body composition and function before and after their respective diets. HFD demonstrated significant (p < 0.05) losses of grip strength (-15 %) and sensorimotor coordination (-11 %), whereas C did not. Lean mass decreased to a greater degree in HFD although not significantly (C: -20.69 ± 7.94 vs. HFD: -31.14 ± 5.49 %, p > 0.05). Gastrocnemius, quadriceps, and hamstrings mass in C and HFD were significantly reduced from baseline (-27 to 43 and -39 to 47 %, respectively, p < 0.05) with no differences between the two; however, soleus mass was lower only in HFD (-24 %, p = 0.03). Myofiber area, satellite cells, and myonuclei of the gastrocnemius were lower only in HFD (-23, -19, and -16 %, respectively, p < 0.05) compared to baseline. HFD-induced obesity adversely affected function in middle-aged mice. Atrophy of the soleus in HFD but not C suggests sensitivity of oxidative muscle to HFD-dependent catabolism more so than aging. In the muscles containing fast/mixed fibers, aging effects may have concealed the catabolic nature of HFD; however, morphological changes in the gastrocnemius including decreased fiber area, satellite cells, and myonuclei are consistent with an atrophic phenotype related to HFD.

  14. Ageing and exercise training alter adrenergic vasomotor responses of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Anthony J; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Delp, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    Ageing is associated with increased leg vascular resistance and reductions in leg blood flow during rest and exercise, potentially predisposing older adults to a host of functional and cardiovascular complications. The purpose of these studies was to examine the effects and possible mechanisms of ageing and exercise training on arteriolar adrenergic vasoreactivity. Young and old male Fischer 344 rats were divided into young sedentary (YS), old sedentary (OS), young exercise-trained (YT) or old exercise-trained (OT) groups, where training consisted of chronic treadmill exercise. Isolated soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscle arterioles were studied in vitro. Responses to noradrenaline in endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded arterioles, as well as during nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition were determined. Vasodilator responses to isoproterenol and forskolin were also determined. Results: Noradrenaline-mediated vasoconstriction was increased in SOL arterioles with ageing, and exercise training in old rats attenuated α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in arterioles from both muscle types. Removal of the endothelium and NOS inhibition eliminated these ageing and training effects. Isoproterenol-mediated vasodilatation was impaired with ageing in SOL and GAS arterioles, and exercise training had little effect on this response. Forskolin-induced vasodilatation was not affected by age. The data demonstrate that ageing augments α-adrenergic vasoconstriction while exercise training attenuates this response, and both of these alterations are mediated through an endothelial α-receptor-NOS-signalling pathway. In contrast, ageing diminishes β-receptor-mediated vasodilatation, but this impairment is specific to the smooth muscle. These studies indicate that α- and β-adrenergic mechanisms may serve to increase systemic vascular resistance with ageing, and that the effects of exercise training on adrenergic vasomotor properties could contribute to the beneficial

  15. The effects of age upon the expression of three miRNAs in muscle stem cells isolated from two different porcine skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, Zoe; Sweetman, Dylan; Loughna, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and an impaired ability of this tissue to compensate for trauma. Studies in rodents and humans have also shown that resident stem cells within muscle have a reduced ability to proliferate and differentiate. In this study muscle stem cells have been isolated from two muscles, the diaphragm (DIA) and the semimembranosus (SM), from young and old pigs. The levels of three micro-RNAs (miRNAs) were measured when cells were in a proliferative phase and after 24 and 72h in differentiation medium. All three miRNAs are abundant in skeletal muscle with miR-1 and miR-206 known to regulate myogenic differentiation and miR-24 is involved in cell cycle regulation. The levels of expression of Pax7 and the myogenic regulatory factors MyoD and myogenin were also measured. There were marked differences in expression of all three miRNAs between the two age groups. Both miR-1 and miR-206 were reduced in the cells from the older animals. In contrast miR-24 expression was significantly higher in cells from older animals under differentiation conditions. There were also significant differences in the relative expression of all three miRNAs between cells from the SM and DIA in both young and old animals. The changes in miRNA expression described in this study that relate to age, may play a role in the impaired differentiation capacity of older muscle stem cells.

  16. Skeletal Muscle Mass Indices in Healthy Young Mexican Adults Aged 20–40 Years: Implications for Diagnoses of Sarcopenia in the Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Alemán-Mateo, H.; Ruiz Valenzuela, Roxana E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Skeletal muscle and skeletal muscle indices in young adults from developing countries are sparse. Indices and the corresponding cut-off points can be a reference for diagnoses of sarcopenia. This study assessed skeletal muscle using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in healthy male and female subjects aged 20–40 years and compared their appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) and total-body skeletal muscle (TBSM) indices using certain cut-off points published in the literature. Methods. A sample of 216 healthy adults men and women from northwest Mexico was included. Body composition was assessed by DXA and several published DXA-derived skeletal muscle indices were compared. Results. Both, ASM and TBSM were higher in men compared to the women group (23.0 ± 3.4 versus 15.9 ± 1.6 kg; P < 0.05 and 26.5 ± 4.1 versus 16.9 ± 1.9 kg; P < 0.05, resp.). These differences were also valid for both indices. When derived cut-off points were compared with the most reported indices, significant differences were found. Interpretation and Conclusion. Published cut-off points from Caucasians are higher than cut-off point derived in this sample of Mexican subjects. The new DXA-derived cut-off points for ASM proposed herein may improve diagnoses of sarcopenia in the geriatric Mexican population. PMID:24688417

  17. Modified forelimb grip strength test detects aging-associated physiological decline in skeletal muscle function in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Hikari; Yamamoto, Koichi; Nozato, Satoko; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Imaizumi, Yuki; Hongyo, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Serina; Takeda, Masao; Oguro, Ryosuke; Takami, Yoichi; Itoh, Norihisa; Takeya, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Ken; Fukada, So-ichiro; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    The conventional forelimb grip strength test is a widely used method to assess skeletal muscle function in rodents; in this study, we modified this method to improve its variability and consistency. The modified test had lower variability among trials and days than the conventional test in young C57BL6 mice, especially by improving the variabilities in male. The modified test was more sensitive than the conventional test to detect a difference in motor function between female and male mice, or between young and old male mice. When the modified test was performed on male mice during the aging process, reduction of grip strength manifested between 18 and 24 months of age at the group level and at the individual level. The modified test was similar to the conventional test in detecting skeletal muscle dysfunction in young male dystrophic mice. Thus, the modified forelimb grip strength test, with its improved validity and reliability may be an ideal substitute for the conventional method. PMID:28176863

  18. Early-age heat exposure affects skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation and differentiation in chicks.

    PubMed

    Halevy, O; Krispin, A; Leshem, Y; McMurtry, J P; Yahav, S

    2001-07-01

    Exposure of young chicks to thermal conditioning (TC; i.e., 37 degrees C for 24 h) resulted in significantly improved body and muscle growth at a later age. We hypothesized that TC causes an increase in satellite cell proliferation, necessary for further muscle hypertrophy. An immediate increase was observed in satellite cell DNA synthesis in culture and in vivo in response to TC of 3-day-old chicks to levels that were significantly higher than those of control chicks. This was accompanied by a marked induction of insulin-like growth factor-I (IFG-I), but not hepatocyte growth factor in the breast muscle. No significant difference between treatments in plasma IGF-I levels was observed. A marked elevation in muscle regulatory factors on day 5, followed by a decline in cell proliferation on day 6 together with continuous high levels of IGF-I in the TC chick muscle may indicate accelerated cell differentiation. These data suggest a central role for IGF-I in the immediate stimulation of satellite cell myogenic processes in response to heat exposure.

  19. Treatment with a corticotrophin releasing factor 2 receptor agonist modulates skeletal muscle mass and force production in aged and chronically ill animals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Muscle weakness is associated with a variety of chronic disorders such as emphysema (EMP) and congestive heart failure (CHF) as well as aging. Therapies to treat muscle weakness associated with chronic disease or aging are lacking. Corticotrophin releasing factor 2 receptor (CRF2R) agonists have been shown to maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production in a variety of acute conditions that lead to skeletal muscle wasting. Hypothesis We hypothesize that treating animals with a CRF2R agonist will maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production in animals with chronic disease and in aged animals. Methods We utilized animal models of aging, CHF and EMP to evaluate the potential of CRF2R agonist treatment to maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production in aged animals and animals with CHF and EMP. Results In aged rats, we demonstrate that treatment with a CRF2R agonist for up to 3 months results in greater extensor digitorum longus (EDL) force production, EDL mass, soleus mass and soleus force production compared to age matched untreated animals. In the hamster EMP model, we demonstrate that treatment with a CRF2R agonist for up to 5 months results in greater EDL force production in EMP hamsters when compared to vehicle treated EMP hamsters and greater EDL mass and force in normal hamsters when compared to vehicle treated normal hamsters. In the rat CHF model, we demonstrate that treatment with a CRF2R agonist for up to 3 months results in greater EDL and soleus muscle mass and force production in CHF rats and normal rats when compared to the corresponding vehicle treated animals. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the underlying physiological conditions associated with chronic diseases such as CHF and emphysema in addition to aging do not reduce the potential of CRF2R agonists to maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production. PMID:21235761

  20. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) prevents age-associated skeletal muscle loss.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Halade, Ganesh V; El Jamali, Amina; Fernandes, Gabriel

    2009-06-12

    In this study, we examined the effect of CLA isomers in preventing age-associated muscle loss and the mechanisms underlying this effect, using 12-months-old C57BL/6 mice fed 10% corn oil (CO) or a diet supplemented with 0.5% c9t11-CLA, t10c12-CLA, or c9t11-CLA+t10c12-CLA (CLA-mix) for 6months. Both t10c12-CLA and CLA-mix groups showed significantly higher muscle mass, as compared to CO and c9t11-CLA groups, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and muscle wet weight. Enhanced mitochondrial ATP production, with higher membrane potential, and elevated muscle antioxidant enzymes (catalase and glutathione peroxidase) production, accompanied by slight increase in H(2)O(2) production was noted in t10c12-CLA and CLA-mix groups, as compared to that of CO and c9t11-CLA groups. Oxidative stress, as measured by serum malondialdehyde and inflammation, as measured by LPS-treated splenocyte IL-6 and TNF-alpha, were significantly less in CLA isomers groups. Thus, CLA may be a novel dietary supplement that will prevent sarcopenia by maintaining redox balance during aging.

  1. Identification of skeletal muscle mass depletion across age and BMI groups in health and disease--there is need for a unified definition.

    PubMed

    Bosy-Westphal, A; Müller, M J

    2015-03-01

    Although reduced skeletal muscle mass is a major predictor of impaired physical function and survival, it remains inconsistently diagnosed to a lack of standardized diagnostic approaches that is reflected by the variable combination of body composition indices and cutoffs. In this review, we summarized basic determinants of a normal lean mass (age, gender, fat mass, body region) and demonstrate limitations of different lean mass parameters as indices for skeletal muscle mass. A unique definition of lean mass depletion should be based on an indirect or direct measure of skeletal muscle mass normalized for height (fat-free mass index (FFMI), appendicular or lumbal skeletal muscle index (SMI)) in combination with fat mass. Age-specific reference values for FFMI or SMI are more advantageous because defining lean mass depletion on the basis of total FFMI or appendicular SMI could be misleading in the case of advanced age due to an increased contribution of connective tissue to lean mass. Mathematical modeling of a normal lean mass based on age, gender, fat mass, ethnicity and height can be used in the absence of risk-defined cutoffs to identify skeletal muscle mass depletion. This definition can be applied to identify different clinical phenotypes like sarcopenia, sarcopenic obesity or cachexia.

  2. Factors related to skeletal muscle mass in the frail elderly.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Keiichiro; Kikutani, Takeshi; Tamura, Fumiyo; Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    It is important for the elderly to maintain their skeletal muscle mass, which in turn helps to maintain physical functions. This study aimed to clarify factors related to skeletal muscle mass maintenance. Home-bound elderly (94 men and 216 women), at least 75 years of age, attending a day-care center in Tokyo, were enrolled in this study. Dentists specializing in dysphagia rehabilitation evaluated skeletal muscle mass, occlusal status and swallowing function. Physical function, cognitive function and nutritional status were also evaluated by interviewing caregivers. Correlations of skeletal muscle mass with various factors were determined in each gender group. Multiple regression analysis revealed that skeletal muscle mass was significantly related to nutritional status in both men and women. In men, there was a significant difference in skeletal muscle mass between those with and without occlusion of the natural teeth. Our results suggest that dental treatments and dentures would be useful for maintaining skeletal muscle mass, especially in men.

  3. Age-dependent uncoupling of mitochondria from Ca2⁺ release units in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pietrangelo, Laura; D'Incecco, Alessandra; Ainbinder, Alina; Michelucci, Antonio; Kern, Helmut; Dirksen, Robert T; Boncompagni, Simona; Protasi, Feliciano

    2015-11-03

    Calcium release units (CRUs) and mitochondria control myoplasmic [Ca2+] levels and ATP production in muscle, respectively. We recently reported that these two organelles are structurally connected by tethers, which promote proximity and proper Ca2+ signaling.Here we show that disposition, ultrastructure, and density of CRUs and mitochondria and their reciprocal association are compromised in muscle from aged mice. Specifically, the density of CRUs and mitochondria is decreased in muscle fibers from aged (>24 months) vs. adult (3-12 months), with an increased percentage of mitochondria being damaged and misplaced from their normal triadic position. A significant reduction in tether (13.8 ± 0.4 vs. 5.5 ± 0.3 tethers/100 µm2) and CRU-mitochondrial pair density (37.4 ± 0.8 vs. 27.0 ± 0.7 pairs/100 µm2) was also observed in aged mice. In addition, myoplasmic Ca2+ transient (1.68 ± 0.08 vs 1.37 ± 0.03) and mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (9.6 ± 0.050 vs 6.58 ± 0.54) during repetitive high frequency tetanic stimulation were significantly decreased. Finally oxidative stress, assessed from levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), Cu/Zn superoxide-dismutase (SOD1) and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD2) expression, were significantly increased in aged mice. The reduced association between CRUs and mitochondria with aging may contribute to impaired cross-talk between the two organelles, possibly resulting in reduced efficiency in activity-dependent ATP production and, thus, to age-dependent decline of skeletal muscle performance.

  4. Paraplegia increases skeletal muscle autophagy.

    PubMed

    Fry, Christopher S; Drummond, Micah J; Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2012-11-01

    Paraplegia results in significant skeletal muscle atrophy through increases in skeletal muscle protein breakdown. Recent work has identified a novel SIRT1-p53 pathway that is capable of regulating autophagy and protein breakdown. Soleus muscle was collected from 6 male Sprague-Dawley rats 10 weeks after complete T4-5 spinal cord transection (paraplegia group) and 6 male sham-operated rats (control group). We utilized immunoblotting methods to measure intracellular proteins and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to measure the expression of skeletal muscle microRNAs. SIRT1 protein expression was 37% lower, and p53 acetylation (LYS379) was increased in the paraplegic rats (P < 0.05). Atg7 and Beclin-1, markers of autophagy induction, were elevated in the paraplegia group compared with controls (P < 0.05). Severe muscle atrophy resulting from chronic paraplegia appears to increase skeletal muscle autophagy independent of SIRT1 signaling. We conclude that chronic paraplegia may cause an increase in autophagic cell death and negatively impact skeletal muscle protein balance. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Paraplegia increases skeletal muscle autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Christopher S.; Drummond, Micah J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Paraplegia results in significant skeletal muscle atrophy through increases in skeletal muscle protein breakdown. Recent work has identified a novel SIRT1-p53 pathway that is capable of regulating autophagy and protein breakdown. METHODS Soleus muscle was collected from 6 male Sprague-Dawley rats 10 weeks following complete T(4)-T(5) spinal-cord transection (paraplegia) and 6 male sham-operated rats (control). We utilized immunoblotting methods to measure intracellular proteins and qRT-PCR to measure the expression of skeletal muscle microRNAs. RESULTS SIRT1 protein expression was 37% lower, and p53 acetylation (LYS379) was increased in the paraplegia rats (P<0.05). Atg7 and Beclin-1, markers of autophagy induction, were elevated in paraplegia compared to controls (P<0.05). DISCUSSION Severe muscle atrophy resulting from chronic paraplegia appears to increase skeletal muscle autophagy independent of SIRT1 signaling. We conclude that chronic paraplegia may cause an increase in autophagic cell-death and negatively impact skeletal muscle protein balance. PMID:23055316

  6. Molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity on skeletal muscle in late middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sean M; Russ, David W; Skelding, Mary B; Dugle, Janis E; Edens, Neile K

    2015-02-01

    We examined the molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity in late middle-aged male Sprague Dawley rats (16-17 months). Rats were assigned either continuous voluntary running wheel access for 8 weeks (RW+) or cage-matched without running wheel access (RW-). The 9 RW+ rats averaged 83 m/day (range: 8-163 m), yet exhibited both 84% reduced individual body weight gain (4.3 g vs. 26.3 g, P = 0.02) and 6.5% reduced individual average daily food intake (20.6 g vs. 22.0 g, P = 0.09) over the 8 weeks. Hindlimb muscles were harvested following an overnight fast. Muscle weights and myofiber cross-sectional area showed no difference between groups. Western blots of gastrocnemius muscle lysates with a panel of antibodies suggest that running wheel activity improved oxidative metabolism (53% increase in PGC1α, P = 0.03), increased autophagy (36% increase in LC3B-II/-I ratio, P = 0.03), and modulated growth signaling (26% increase in myostatin, P = 0.04). RW+ muscle also showed 43% increased glycogen phosphorylase expression (P = 0.04) and 45% increased glycogen content (P = 0.04). Metabolomic profiling of plantaris and soleus muscles indicated that even low-volume voluntary running wheel activity is associated with decreases in many long-chain fatty acids (e.g., palmitoleate, myristoleate, and eicosatrienoate) relative to RW- rats. Relative increases in acylcarnitines and acyl glycerophospholipids were also observed in RW+ plantaris. These data establish that even modest amounts of physical activity during late middle-age promote extensive metabolic remodeling of skeletal muscle.

  7. Molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity on skeletal muscle in late middle-aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Sean M; Russ, David W; Skelding, Mary B; Dugle, Janis E; Edens, Neile K

    2015-01-01

    We examined the molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity in late middle-aged male Sprague Dawley rats (16–17 months). Rats were assigned either continuous voluntary running wheel access for 8 weeks (RW+) or cage-matched without running wheel access (RW−). The 9 RW+ rats averaged 83 m/day (range: 8–163 m), yet exhibited both 84% reduced individual body weight gain (4.3 g vs. 26.3 g, P = 0.02) and 6.5% reduced individual average daily food intake (20.6 g vs. 22.0 g, P = 0.09) over the 8 weeks. Hindlimb muscles were harvested following an overnight fast. Muscle weights and myofiber cross-sectional area showed no difference between groups. Western blots of gastrocnemius muscle lysates with a panel of antibodies suggest that running wheel activity improved oxidative metabolism (53% increase in PGC1α, P = 0.03), increased autophagy (36% increase in LC3B-II/-I ratio, P = 0.03), and modulated growth signaling (26% increase in myostatin, P = 0.04). RW+ muscle also showed 43% increased glycogen phosphorylase expression (P = 0.04) and 45% increased glycogen content (P = 0.04). Metabolomic profiling of plantaris and soleus muscles indicated that even low-volume voluntary running wheel activity is associated with decreases in many long-chain fatty acids (e.g., palmitoleate, myristoleate, and eicosatrienoate) relative to RW− rats. Relative increases in acylcarnitines and acyl glycerophospholipids were also observed in RW+ plantaris. These data establish that even modest amounts of physical activity during late middle-age promote extensive metabolic remodeling of skeletal muscle. PMID:25716928

  8. Age dependent accumulation patterns of advanced glycation end product receptor (RAGE) ligands and binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands differ in the liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Son, Myeongjoo; Chung, Wook-Jin; Oh, Seyeon; Ahn, Hyosang; Choi, Chang Hu; Hong, Suntaek; Park, Kook Yang; Son, Kuk Hui; Byun, Kyunghee

    2017-01-01

    Much evidence indicates receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) related inflammation play essential roles during aging. However, the majority of studies have focused on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and not on other RAGE ligands. In the present study, the authors evaluated whether the accumulation of RAGE ligands and binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands differ in kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle during aging. In C57BL/6 N mice aged 12 weeks, 12 months, and 22 months, ligands accumulation, binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands, activated macrophage infiltration, M1/M2 macrophage expression, glyoxalase-1expression, and signal pathways related to inflammation were evaluated. The RAGE ligands age-associated accumulation patterns were found to be organ dependent. Binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands in kidney and liver increased with age, but those in skeletal muscle were unchanged. Infiltration of activated macrophages in kidney and liver increased with age, but infiltration in the skeletal muscle was unchanged. M1 expression increased and M2 and glyoxalase-1 expression decreased with age in kidney and liver, but their expressions in skeletal muscle were not changed. These findings indicate patterns of RAGE ligands accumulation, RAGE/ligands binding intensities, or inflammation markers changes during aging are organs dependent.

  9. Eccentric exercise in aging and diseased skeletal muscle: good or bad?

    PubMed

    Lovering, Richard M; Brooks, Susan V

    2014-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating regarding the benefits of exercise in people who are more susceptible to injury, such as the elderly, or those with a neuromuscular disease, for example Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). There appears to be a consensus that exercise can be safely performed in aging and diseased muscles, but the role of eccentric exercise is not as clear. Eccentric (lengthening) contractions have risks and benefits. Eccentric contractions are commonly performed on a daily basis, and high-force voluntary eccentric contractions are often employed in strength training paradigms with excellent results; however, high-force eccentric contractions are also linked to muscle damage. This minireview examines the benefits and safety issues of using eccentric exercise in at-risk populations. A common recommendation for all individuals is difficult to achieve, and guidelines are still being established. Some form of exercise is generally recommended with aging and even with diseased muscles, but the prescription (frequency, intensity, and duration) and type (resistance vs. aerobic) of exercise requires personal attention, as there is great diversity in the functional level and comorbidities in the elderly and those with neuromuscular disease.

  10. Coaxing stem cells for skeletal muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Karl J.A.; Perlingeiro, Rita C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a tremendous ability to regenerate, attributed to a well-defined population of muscle stem cells called satellite cells. However, this ability to regenerate diminishes with age and can also be dramatically affected by multiple types of muscle diseases, or injury. Extrinsic and/or intrinsic defects in the regulation of satellite cells are considered to be major determinants for the diminished regenerative capacity. Maintenance and replenishment of the satellite cell pool is one focus for muscle regenerative medicine, which will be discussed. There are other sources of progenitor cells with myogenic capacity, which may also support skeletal muscle repair. However, all of these myogenic cell populations have inherent difficulties and challenges in maintaining or coaxing their derivation for therapeutic purpose. This review will highlight recent reported attributes of these cells and new bioengineering approaches to creating a supply of myogenic stem cells or implants applicable for acute and/or chronic muscle disorders. PMID:25049085

  11. Human skeletal muscle metabolic economy in vivo: effects of contraction intensity, age, and mobility impairment

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Anita D.; Tonson, Anne; Larsen, Ryan G.; DeBlois, Jacob P.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that older muscle has greater metabolic economy (ME) in vivo than young, in a manner dependent, in part, on contraction intensity. Twenty young (Y; 24 ± 1 yr, 10 women), 18 older healthy (O; 73 ± 2, 9 women) and 9 older individuals with mild-to-moderate mobility impairment (OI; 74 ± 1, 7 women) received stimulated twitches (2 Hz, 3 min) and performed nonfatiguing voluntary (20, 50, and 100% maximal; 12 s each) isometric dorsiflexion contractions. Torque-time integrals (TTI; Nm·s) were calculated and expressed relative to maximal fat-free muscle cross-sectional area (cm2), and torque variability during voluntary contractions was calculated as the coefficient of variation. Total ATP cost of contraction (mM) was determined from flux through the creatine kinase reaction, nonoxidative glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, and used to calculate ME (Nm·s·cm−2·mM ATP−1). While twitch torque relaxation was slower in O and OI compared with Y (P ≤ 0.001), twitch TTI, ATP cost, and economy were similar across groups (P ≥ 0.15), indicating comparable intrinsic muscle economy during electrically induced isometric contractions in vivo. During voluntary contractions, normalized TTI and total ATP cost did not differ significantly across groups (P ≥ 0.20). However, ME was lower in OI than Y or O at 20% and 50% MVC (P ≤ 0.02), and torque variability was greater in OI than Y or O at 20% MVC (P ≤ 0.05). These results refute the hypothesis of greater muscle ME in old age, and provide support for lower ME in impaired older adults as a potential mechanism or consequence of age-related reductions in functional mobility. PMID:25163917

  12. Human skeletal muscle metabolic economy in vivo: effects of contraction intensity, age, and mobility impairment.

    PubMed

    Christie, Anita D; Tonson, Anne; Larsen, Ryan G; DeBlois, Jacob P; Kent, Jane A

    2014-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that older muscle has greater metabolic economy (ME) in vivo than young, in a manner dependent, in part, on contraction intensity. Twenty young (Y; 24±1 yr, 10 women), 18 older healthy (O; 73±2, 9 women) and 9 older individuals with mild-to-moderate mobility impairment (OI; 74±1, 7 women) received stimulated twitches (2 Hz, 3 min) and performed nonfatiguing voluntary (20, 50, and 100% maximal; 12 s each) isometric dorsiflexion contractions. Torque-time integrals (TTI; Nm·s) were calculated and expressed relative to maximal fat-free muscle cross-sectional area (cm2), and torque variability during voluntary contractions was calculated as the coefficient of variation. Total ATP cost of contraction (mM) was determined from flux through the creatine kinase reaction, nonoxidative glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, and used to calculate ME (Nm·s·cm(-2)·mM ATP(-1)). While twitch torque relaxation was slower in O and OI compared with Y (P≤0.001), twitch TTI, ATP cost, and economy were similar across groups (P≥0.15), indicating comparable intrinsic muscle economy during electrically induced isometric contractions in vivo. During voluntary contractions, normalized TTI and total ATP cost did not differ significantly across groups (P≥0.20). However, ME was lower in OI than Y or O at 20% and 50% MVC (P≤0.02), and torque variability was greater in OI than Y or O at 20% MVC (P≤0.05). These results refute the hypothesis of greater muscle ME in old age, and provide support for lower ME in impaired older adults as a potential mechanism or consequence of age-related reductions in functional mobility.

  13. Expression of human amyloid precursor protein in the skeletal muscles of Drosophila results in age- and activity-dependent muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, and several other degenerative disorders such as Inclusion Body Myositis, is the abnormal accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its proteolytic amyloid peptides. To better understand the pathological consequences of inappropriate APP expression on developing tissues, we generated transgenic flies that express wild-type human APP in the skeletal muscles, and then performed anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral analysis of the adults. Results We observed that neither muscle development nor animal longevity was compromised in these transgenic animals. However, human APP expressing adults developed age-dependent defects in both climbing and flying. We could advance or retard the onset of symptoms by rearing animals in vials with different surface properties, suggesting that human APP expression-mediated behavioral defects are influenced by muscle activity. Muscles from transgenic animals did not display protein aggregates or structural abnormalities at the light or transmission electron microscopic levels. In agreement with genetic studies performed with developing mammalian myoblasts, we observed that co-expression of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Parkin could ameliorate human APP-induced defects. Conclusions These data suggest that: 1) ectopic expression of human APP in fruit flies leads to age- and activity-dependent behavioral defects without overt changes to muscle development or structure; 2) environmental influences can greatly alter the phenotypic consequences of human APP toxicity; and 3) genetic modifiers of APP-induced pathology can be identified and analyzed in this model. PMID:21518451

  14. Lack of age-related increase of mitochondrial DNA amount in brain, skeletal muscle and human heart.

    PubMed

    Frahm, Thomas; Mohamed, Salaheldien A; Bruse, Petra; Gemünd, Christine; Oehmichen, Manfred; Meissner, Christoph

    2005-11-01

    During the ageing process, an increase of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions and other mutations have been reported. These structural alterations of mtDNA are assumed to cause a reduction in the respiratory chain activity and may contribute to the ageing process. Therefore, the question arises if the accumulation of deleted mtDNA is compensated in vivo by an increase of mtDNA synthesis via a feedback mechanism. We designed two human mtDNA-specific oligonucleotide probes for quantitative mtDNA analysis of 5 different tissues from 50 individuals aged from 8 weeks to 93 years. The amount of mtDNA was approximately 1.1 +/- 0.5% (4617 +/- 2099 copies) in the caudate nucleus, 1.0 +/- 0.5% (4198 +/- 2099 copies) in the frontal lobe cortex, 0.3 +/- 0.2% (1259 +/- 840 copies) in the cerebellar cortex, 1.0 +/- 0.4% (4198 +/- 1679 copies) in skeletal muscle and 2.2+/-1.3% (9235 +/- 5457 copies) in heart muscle. We did not observe any significant change in the absolute copy number during ageing in five different tissues, and therefore, found no evidence for the postulated feedback mechanism. Our study indicates that mtDNA copy number is tissue-specific and depends on the energy demand of the tissue.

  15. Angiotensin II receptor blockade promotes repair of skeletal muscle through down-regulation of aging-promoting C1q expression

    PubMed Central

    Yabumoto, Chizuru; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Rie; Yano, Masamichi; Kudo-Sakamoto, Yoko; Sumida, Tomokazu; Kamo, Takehiro; Yagi, Hiroki; Shimizu, Yu; Saga-Kamo, Akiko; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Yasushi; Uejima, Etsuko; Komuro, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor prolonged life span in mice. Since aging-related decline in skeletal muscle function was retarded in Atgr1a−/− mice, we examined the role of AT1 receptor in muscle regeneration after injury. Administration of AT1 receptor blocker irbesartan increased the size of regenerating myofibers, decreased fibrosis, and enhanced functional muscle recovery after cryoinjury. We recently reported that complement C1q, secreted by macrophages, activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and promoted aging-related decline in regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. Notably, irbesartan induced M2 polarization of macrophages, but reduced C1q expression in cryoinjured muscles and in cultured macrophage cells. Irbesartan inhibited up-regulation of Axin2, a downstream gene of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, in cryoinjured muscles. In addition, topical administration of C1q reversed beneficial effects of irbesartan on skeletal muscle regeneration after injury. These results suggest that AT1 receptor blockade improves muscle repair and regeneration through down-regulation of the aging-promoting C1q-Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26571361

  16. Hypothesis on Skeletal Muscle Aging: Mitochondrial Adenine Nucleotide Translocator Decreases Reactive Oxygen Species Production While Preserving Coupling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Diolez, Philippe; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Calmettes, Guillaume; Pasdois, Philippe; Detaille, Dominique; Rouland, Richard; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential is the major regulator of mitochondrial functions, including coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both functions are crucial for cell bioenergetics. We previously presented evidences for a specific modulation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) appearing during aging that results in a decrease in membrane potential - and therefore ROS production—but surprisingly increases coupling efficiency under conditions of low ATP turnover. Careful study of the bioenergetic parameters (oxidation and phosphorylation rates, membrane potential) of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius) of aged and young rats revealed a remodeling at the level of the phosphorylation system, in the absence of alteration of the inner mitochondrial membrane (uncoupling) or respiratory chain complexes regulation. We further observed a decrease in mitochondrial affinity for ADP in aged isolated mitochondria, and higher sensitivity of ANT to its specific inhibitor atractyloside. This age-induced modification of ANT results in an increase in the ADP concentration required to sustain the same ATP turnover as compared to young muscle, and therefore in a lower membrane potential under phosphorylating—in vivo—conditions. Thus, for equivalent ATP turnover (cellular ATP demand), coupling efficiency is even higher in aged muscle mitochondria, due to the down-regulation of inner membrane proton leak caused by the decrease in membrane potential. In the framework of the radical theory of aging, these modifications in ANT function may be the result of oxidative damage caused by intra mitochondrial ROS and may appear like a virtuous circle where ROS induce a mechanism that reduces their production, without causing uncoupling, and even leading in improved efficiency. Because of the importance of ROS as therapeutic targets, this new mechanism deserves further studies. PMID:26733871

  17. Alternate Mediterranean diet score is positively associated with skeletal muscle mass index in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hui-Yuan; Qiu, Rui; Jing, Li-Peng; Chen, Zhan-Yong; Chen, Geng-Dong; Chen, Yu-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Researches have suggested Mediterranean diet might lower the risk of chronic diseases, but data on skeletal muscle mass (SMM) are limited. This community-based cross-sectional study examined the association between the alternate Mediterranean diet score (aMDS) and SMM in 2230 females and 1059 males aged 40-75 years in Guangzhou, China. General information and habitual dietary information were assessed in face-to-face interviews conducted during 2008-2010 and 3 years later. The aMDS was calculated by summing the dichotomous points for the items of higher intakes of whole grain, vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, fish and ratio of MUFA:SFA, lower red meat and moderate ethanol consumption. The SMM of the whole body, limbs, arms and legs were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry during 2011-2013. After adjusting for potential covariates, higher aMDS was positively associated with skeletal muscle mass index (SMI, SMM/height2, kg/m2) at all of the studied sites in males (all P trend<0·05). The multiple covariate-adjusted SMI means were 2·70 % (whole body), 2·65 % (limbs), 2·50 % (arms) and 2·70 % (legs) higher in the high (v. low) category aMDS in males (all P<0·05). In females, the corresponding values were 1·35 % (P trend=0·03), 1·05, 0·52 and 1·20 %, (P trend>0·05). Age-stratified analyses showed that the favourable associations tended to be more pronounced in the younger subjects aged less than the medians of 59·2 and 62·2 years in females and males (P interaction>0·10). In conclusion, the aMDS shows protective associations with SMM in Chinese adults, particularly in male and younger subjects.

  18. Striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) is reduced in ageing human skeletal muscle and targeted by miR-628-5p.

    PubMed

    Russell, A P; Wallace, M A; Kalanon, M; Zacharewicz, E; Della Gatta, P A; Garnham, A; Lamon, S

    2017-06-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) is a muscle-specific actin-binding protein. The STARS signalling pathway is activated by resistance exercise and is anticipated to play a role in signal mechanotransduction. Animal studies have reported a negative regulation of STARS signalling with age, but such regulation has not been investigated in humans. Ten young (18-30 years) and 10 older (60-75 years) subjects completed an acute bout of resistance exercise. Gene and protein expression of members of the STARS signalling pathway and miRNA expression of a subset of miRNAs, predicted or known to target members of STARS signalling pathway, were measured in muscle biopsies collected pre-exercise and 2 h post-exercise. For the first time, we report a significant downregulation of the STARS protein in older subjects. However, there was no effect of age on the magnitude of STARS activation in response to an acute bout of exercise. Finally, we established that miR-628-5p, a miRNA regulated by age and exercise, binds to the STARS 3'UTR to directly downregulate its transcription. This study describes for the first time the resistance exercise-induced regulation of STARS signalling in skeletal muscle from older humans and identifies a new miRNA involved in the transcriptional control of STARS. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Physiologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  19. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  20. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy after aerobic exercise training.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Adam R; Harber, Matthew P

    2014-04-01

    Current dogma suggests that aerobic exercise training has minimal effects on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss.

  1. Skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism in an animal model of pulmonary emphysema: formoterol and skeletal muscle dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sullo, Nikol; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Matteis, Maria; Spaziano, Giuseppe; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Lombardi, Assunta; Lucattelli, Monica; Polverino, Francesca; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Cirino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Francesco; D'Agostino, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction is a significant contributor to exercise limitation in pulmonary emphysema. This study investigated skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism before and after aerosol exposure to a long-acting β-agonist (LABA), such as formoterol, in the pallid mouse (B6.Cg-Pldnpa/J), which has a deficiency in serum α(1)-antitrypsin (α(1)-PI) and develops spontaneous pulmonary emphysema. C57 BL/6J and its congener pallid mice of 8-12 and 16 months of age were treated with vehicle or formoterol aerosol challenge for 120 seconds. Morphological and morphometric studies and evaluations of mitochondrial adenosine diphosphate-stimulated respiration and of cytochrome oxidase activity on skeletal muscle were performed. Moreover, the mtDNA content in skeletal muscle and the mediators linked to muscle mitochondrial function and biogenesis, as well as TNF-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), were also evaluated. The lungs of pallid mice at 12 and 16 months of age showed patchy areas of airspace enlargements, with the destruction of alveolar septa. No significant differences were observed in basal values of mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes between C57 BL/6J and pallid mice. Exposure to LABA significantly improved mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes in emphysematous mice, where the mtDNA content was significantly higher with respect to 8-month-old pallid mice. This effect was compared with a significant increase of PGC-1α in skeletal muscles of 16-month-old pallid mice, with no significant changes in TNF-α concentrations. In conclusion, in emphysematous mice that showed an increased mtDNA content, exposure to inhaled LABA can improve mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes. PGC-1α may serve as a possible mediator of this effect.

  2. Aging and sequential resistance exercise bout effects on housekeeping gene messenger RNA expression in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Kyle L; Roberts, Michael D; Dalbo, Vincent J; Kerksick, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how age and 1 week of conventional resistance exercise affects commonly used housekeeping gene (HKG) messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in skeletal muscle. Ten college-aged (18-25 years) and 10 older (60-76 years) men completed 3 lower-body resistance exercise bouts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and muscle samples were obtained before bout 1 (T1), 48 hours after the first (T2) and second bouts (T3), and 24 hours after the third bout (T4). Raw Ct values indicated that β-actin and cyclophilin were more highly expressed in older vs. younger males (p < 0.01) at T1. When normalizing each HKG mRNA to the other 4 HKG mRNAs, CYC increased at T3 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase decreased at T2 (p < 0.05) in younger men. This is one of the few studies to suggest that explicit HKG mRNAs should be used depending upon age group and resistance exercise intervention.

  3. Molecular regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Russell, Aaron P

    2010-03-01

    1. The maintenance of skeletal muscle mass is determined by a fine balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. Skeletal mass is increased when there is a net gain in protein synthesis, which can occur following progressive exercise training. In contrast, skeletal muscle mass is lost when degradation occurs more rapidly than synthesis and is observed in numerous conditions, including neuromuscular disease, chronic disease, ageing, as well as following limb immobilization or prolonged bed rest due to injury or trauma. 2. Understanding the molecular pathways that regulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis and degradation is vital for identifying potential therapeutic targets that can attenuate muscle atrophy during disease and disuse. 3. The regulation of skeletal mass is complex and involves the precise coordination of several intracellular signalling pathways. The present review focuses on the role and regulation of pathways involving Akt, atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1; atrogenes), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and striated activator of Rho signalling (STARS), with exercise and disease.

  4. Long-term administration of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate fails to attenuate age-related oxidative damage or rescue the loss of muscle mass and function associated with aging of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P; Nye, Gareth A; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I; Griffiths, Richard D; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2016-11-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is the underlying cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 and over. Considerable evidence indicates that oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the sarcopenic phenotype that occurs with aging. To examine this, we administered the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate {[10-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-3,6-dioxo-1,4-cyclohexadien-1-yl)decyl] triphenylphosphonium; 100 μM} to wild-type C57BL/6 mice for 15 wk (from 24 to 28 mo of age) and investigated the effects on age-related loss of muscle mass and function, changes in redox homeostasis, and mitochondrial organelle integrity and function. We found that mitoquinone mesylate treatment failed to prevent age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with myofiber atrophy or alter a variety of in situ and ex vivo muscle function analyses, including maximum isometric tetanic force, decline in force after a tetanic fatiguing protocol, and single-fiber-specific force. We also found evidence that long-term mitoquinone mesylate administration did not reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or induce significant changes in muscle redox homeostasis, as assessed by changes in 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, protein carbonyl content, protein nitration, and DNA damage determined by the content of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. Mitochondrial membrane potential, abundance, and respiration assessed in permeabilized myofibers were not significantly altered in response to mitoquinone mesylate treatment. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that long-term mitochondria-targeted mitoquinone mesylate administration failed to attenuate age-related oxidative damage in skeletal muscle of old mice or provide any protective effect in the context of muscle aging.-Sakellariou, G. K., Pearson, T., Lightfoot, A. P., Nye, G. A., Wells, N., Giakoumaki, I. I., Griffiths, R. D., McArdle, A., Jackson, M. J. Long-term administration of the

  5. Long-term administration of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate fails to attenuate age-related oxidative damage or rescue the loss of muscle mass and function associated with aging of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K.; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P.; Nye, Gareth A.; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I.; Griffiths, Richard D.; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is the underlying cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 and over. Considerable evidence indicates that oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the sarcopenic phenotype that occurs with aging. To examine this, we administered the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate {[10-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-3,6-dioxo-1,4-cyclohexadien-1-yl)decyl] triphenylphosphonium; 100 μM} to wild-type C57BL/6 mice for 15 wk (from 24 to 28 mo of age) and investigated the effects on age-related loss of muscle mass and function, changes in redox homeostasis, and mitochondrial organelle integrity and function. We found that mitoquinone mesylate treatment failed to prevent age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with myofiber atrophy or alter a variety of in situ and ex vivo muscle function analyses, including maximum isometric tetanic force, decline in force after a tetanic fatiguing protocol, and single-fiber-specific force. We also found evidence that long-term mitoquinone mesylate administration did not reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or induce significant changes in muscle redox homeostasis, as assessed by changes in 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, protein carbonyl content, protein nitration, and DNA damage determined by the content of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. Mitochondrial membrane potential, abundance, and respiration assessed in permeabilized myofibers were not significantly altered in response to mitoquinone mesylate treatment. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that long-term mitochondria-targeted mitoquinone mesylate administration failed to attenuate age-related oxidative damage in skeletal muscle of old mice or provide any protective effect in the context of muscle aging.—Sakellariou, G. K., Pearson, T., Lightfoot, A. P., Nye, G. A., Wells, N., Giakoumaki, I. I., Griffiths, R. D., McArdle, A., Jackson, M. J. Long-term administration of the

  6. Short-duration increases in intraluminal pressure improve vasoconstrictor responses in aged skeletal muscle feed arteries.

    PubMed

    Seawright, John W; Trache, Andreea; Wilson, Emily; Woodman, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that exposure to a short-duration (1 h) increase in intraluminal pressure, to mimic pressure associated with a bout of exercise, would attenuate age-induced impairments of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) constrictor responses in soleus muscle feed arteries (SFA) via the Rho pathway. SFA from young (4 months) and old (24 months) Fischer 344 rats were cannulated and pressurized to 90 or 130 cmH2O for 1 h. Following the 1-h treatment, pressure in P130 arteries was lowered to 90 cmH2O for examination of vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine (NE), angiotensin II (Ang II), and phenylephrine (PE). To assess the role of the Rho pathway, vasoconstrictor responses were assessed in the absence or presence of a RhoA-kinase inhibitor (Y27632) or RhoA-kinase activator (LPA). Vasoconstrictor responses to NE, Ang II, and PE were impaired in old P90 SFA. Pretreatment of old SFA with increased pressure improved vasoconstrictor responses to NE, PE and Ang II. The beneficial effect of the pressure pretreatment in old SFA was eliminated in the presence of Y27632. In the presence of LPA, vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II were improved in old SFA such that responses were not different than young P90 SFA. These results indicate that a short-duration exposure to increased intraluminal pressure, to mimic pressure associated with a bout of exercise, attenuates or reverses the age-related decrement in VSM constrictor responses in SFA and that the beneficial response is mediated through Rho kinase.

  7. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  8. Repairing skeletal muscle: regenerative potential of skeletal muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Dellavalle, Arianna; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Messina, Graziella; Cossu, Giulio

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle damaged by injury or by degenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophy is able to regenerate new muscle fibers. Regeneration mainly depends upon satellite cells, myogenic progenitors localized between the basal lamina and the muscle fiber membrane. However, other cell types outside the basal lamina, such as pericytes, also have myogenic potency. Here, we discuss the main properties of satellite cells and other myogenic progenitors as well as recent efforts to obtain myogenic cells from pluripotent stem cells for patient-tailored cell therapy. Clinical trials utilizing these cells to treat muscular dystrophies, heart failure, and stress urinary incontinence are also briefly outlined. PMID:20051632

  9. Age-associated oxidative modifications of mitochondrial α-subunit of F1 ATP synthase from mouse skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Das, N; Jana, C K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern of age-associated oxidative post-translational modifications in the skeletal muscles of a mammalian species and to address whether the modifications result in the loss of function of the oxidatively modified protein(s). Accordingly, proteins in the mitochondrial matrix of the hind limb of C57BL/6Nnia mice were examined for modifications by carbonylation--an established marker of oxidative post-translational modifications--by Western blotting using anti-2,4-dinitrophenyl antibodies and tritiated sodium borohydride methods. An age-associated increase in carbonylation of mitochondrial matrix proteins was observed, but not all proteins were equally susceptible. A 55 kDa protein, identified as the α-subunit of the F1 complex of ATP synthase (ATP phosphohydrolase [H(+)-transporting]), had approximately 17% and 27% higher levels of protein carbonyls in adult and old animals, respectively, in comparison to the young controls as estimated using tritiated sodium borohydride. In addition, an age-associated decline in its activity was observed, with approximately 9% and 28% decrease in the activity in the adult and old animals, respectively, in comparison to young controls. It may be concluded that such oxidative post-translational modifications and the resultant attenuation of the protein activity may contribute to the age-related energy loss and muscular degeneracy.

  10. Age and exercise training alter signaling through reactive oxygen species in the endothelium of skeletal muscle arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Sindler, Amy L.; Reyes, Rafael; Chen, Bei; Ghosh, Payal; Gurovich, Alvaro N.; Kang, Lori S.; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training ameliorates age-related impairments in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in skeletal muscle arterioles. Additionally, exercise training is associated with increased superoxide production. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of superoxide and superoxide-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling in mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation of soleus muscle resistance arterioles from young and old, sedentary and exercise-trained rats. Young (3 mo) and old (22 mo) male rats were either exercise trained or remained sedentary for 10 wk. To determine the impact of ROS signaling on endothelium-dependent vasodilation, responses to acetylcholine were studied under control conditions and during the scavenging of superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide. To determine the impact of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS, endothelium-dependent vasodilation was determined following NADPH oxidase inhibition. Reactivity to superoxide and hydrogen peroxide was also determined. Tempol, a scavenger of superoxide, and inhibitors of NADPH oxidase reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in all groups. Similarly, treatment with catalase and simultaneous treatment with tempol and catalase reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in all groups. Decomposition of peroxynitrite also reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Aging had no effect on arteriolar protein content of SOD-1, catalase, or glutathione peroxidase-1; however, exercise training increased protein content of SOD-1 in young and old rats, catalase in young rats, and glutathione peroxidase-1 in old rats. These data indicate that ROS signaling is necessary for endothelium-dependent vasodilation in soleus muscle arterioles, and that exercise training-induced enhancement of endothelial function occurs, in part, through an increase in ROS signaling. PMID:23288555

  11. Cholesterol removal from adult skeletal muscle impairs excitation–contraction coupling and aging reduces caveolin-3 and alters the expression of other triadic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Genaro; Llanos, Paola; Hidalgo, Jorge; Bolaños, Pura; Caputo, Carlo; Riquelme, Alexander; Sánchez, Gina; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol and caveolin are integral membrane components that modulate the function/location of many cellular proteins. Skeletal muscle fibers, which have unusually high cholesterol levels in transverse tubules, express the caveolin-3 isoform but its association with transverse tubules remains contentious. Cholesterol removal impairs excitation–contraction (E–C) coupling in amphibian and mammalian fetal skeletal muscle fibers. Here, we show that treating single muscle fibers from adult mice with the cholesterol removing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased fiber cholesterol by 26%, altered the location pattern of caveolin-3 and of the voltage dependent calcium channel Cav1.1, and suppressed or reduced electrically evoked Ca2+ transients without affecting membrane integrity or causing sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium depletion. We found that transverse tubules from adult muscle and triad fractions that contain ~10% attached transverse tubules, but not SR membranes, contained caveolin-3 and Cav1.1; both proteins partitioned into detergent-resistant membrane fractions highly enriched in cholesterol. Aging entails significant deterioration of skeletal muscle function. We found that triad fractions from aged rats had similar cholesterol and RyR1 protein levels compared to triads from young rats, but had lower caveolin-3 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and increased Na+/K+-ATPase protein levels. Both triad fractions had comparable NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity and protein content of NOX2 subunits (p47phox and gp91phox), implying that NOX activity does not increase during aging. These findings show that partial cholesterol removal impairs E–C coupling and alters caveolin-3 and Cav1.1 location pattern, and that aging reduces caveolin-3 protein content and modifies the expression of other triadic proteins. We discuss the possible implications of these findings for skeletal muscle function in young and aged animals. PMID:25914646

  12. Study of Age-Dependent Structural and Functional Changes of Mitochondria in Skeletal Muscles and Heart of Naked Mole Rats (Heterocephalus glaber).

    PubMed

    Holtze, S; Eldarov, C M; Vays, V B; Vangeli, I M; Vysokikh, M Yu; Bakeeva, L E; Skulachev, V P; Hildebrandt, T B

    2016-12-01

    Morphometric analysis of mitochondria in skeletal muscles and heart of 6- and 60-month-old naked mole rats (Heterocephalus glaber) revealed a significant age-dependent increase in the total area of mitochondrial cross-sections in studied muscle fibers. For 6- and 60-month-old animals, these values were 4.8 ± 0.4 and 12.7 ± 1.8%, respectively. This effect is mainly based on an increase in the number of mitochondria. In 6-month-old naked mole rats, there were 0.23 ± 0.02 mitochondrial cross-sections per µm(2) of muscle fiber, while in 60-month-old animals this value was 0.47 ± 0.03. The average area of a single mitochondrial cross-section also increased with age in skeletal muscles - from 0.21 ± 0.01 to 0.29 ± 0.03 µm(2). Thus, naked mole rats show a drastic enlargement of the mitochondrial apparatus in skeletal muscles with age due to an increase in the number of mitochondria and their size. They possess a neotenic type of chondriome accompanied by specific features of mitochondrial functioning in the state of oxidative phosphorylation and a significant decrease in the level of matrix adenine nucleotides.

  13. Fourteen days of bed rest induces a decline in satellite cell content and robust atrophy of skeletal muscle fibers in middle-aged adults

    PubMed Central

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily J.; English, Kirk L.; Paddon-Jones, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Bed rest, a ground-based spaceflight analog, induces robust atrophy of skeletal muscle, an effect that is exacerbated with increasing age. We examined the effect of 14 days of bed rest on skeletal muscle satellite cell content and fiber type atrophy in middle-aged adults, an understudied age demographic with few overt signs of muscle aging that is representative of astronauts who perform long-duration spaceflight. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis of healthy middle-aged adults [n = 7 (4 male, 3 female); age: 51 ± 1 yr] before (Pre-BR) and after (Post-BR) 14 days of bed rest. Immunohistochemical analyses were used to quantify myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform expression, cross-sectional area (CSA), satellite cell and myonuclear content, and capillary density. Peak oxygen consumption, knee extensor strength, and body composition were also measured Pre-BR and Post-BR. Post-BR MyHC type 2a fiber percentage was reduced, and mean CSA decreased in all fiber types (−24 ± 5%; P < 0.05). Satellite cell content was also reduced Post-BR (−39 ± 9%; P < 0.05), and the change in satellite cell content was significantly correlated with the change in mean fiber CSA (r2 = 0.60; P < 0.05). A decline in capillary density was observed Post-BR (−23 ± 6%; P < 0.05), and Post-BR capillary content was significantly associated with Post-BR peak aerobic capacity (r2 = 0.59; P < 0.05). A subtle decline in myonuclear content occurred during bed rest (−5 ± 1%; P < 0.05). The rapid maladaptation of skeletal muscle to 14 days of mechanical unloading in middle-aged adults emphasizes the need for robust countermeasures to preserve muscle function in astronauts. PMID:26796754

  14. Mechanisms modulating skeletal muscle phenotype.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Bert; Schiaffino, Stefano; Reggiani, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are composed of a variety of highly specialized fibers whose selective recruitment allows muscles to fulfill their diverse functional tasks. In addition, skeletal muscle fibers can change their structural and functional properties to perform new tasks or respond to new conditions. The adaptive changes of muscle fibers can occur in response to variations in the pattern of neural stimulation, loading conditions, availability of substrates, and hormonal signals. The new conditions can be detected by multiple sensors, from membrane receptors for hormones and cytokines, to metabolic sensors, which detect high-energy phosphate concentration, oxygen and oxygen free radicals, to calcium binding proteins, which sense variations in intracellular calcium induced by nerve activity, to load sensors located in the sarcomeric and sarcolemmal cytoskeleton. These sensors trigger cascades of signaling pathways which may ultimately lead to changes in fiber size and fiber type. Changes in fiber size reflect an imbalance in protein turnover with either protein accumulation, leading to muscle hypertrophy, or protein loss, with consequent muscle atrophy. Changes in fiber type reflect a reprogramming of gene transcription leading to a remodeling of fiber contractile properties (slow-fast transitions) or metabolic profile (glycolytic-oxidative transitions). While myonuclei are in postmitotic state, satellite cells represent a reserve of new nuclei and can be involved in the adaptive response. © 2013 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 3:1645-1687, 2013.

  15. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  16. The molecular responses of skeletal muscle satellite cells to continuous expression of IGF-1: implications for the rescue of induced muscular atrophy in aged rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Booth, F. W.; Spangenburg, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    Approximately 50% of humans older than 85 years have physical frailty due to weak skeletal muscles. This indicates a need for determining mechanisms to combat this problem. A critical cellular factor for postnatal muscle growth is a population of myogenic precursor cells called satellite cells. Given the complex process of sarcopenia, it has been postulated that, at some point in this process, a limited satellite cell proliferation potential could become rate-limiting to the regrowth of old muscles. It is conceivable that if satellite cell proliferative capacity can be maintained or enhanced with advanced age, sarcopenia could potentially be delayed or prevented. Therefore, the purposes of this paper are to describe whether IGF-I can prevent muscular atrophy induced by repeated cycles of hindlimb immobilization, increase the in vitro proliferation in satellite cells from these muscles and, if so, the molecular mechanisms by which IGF-I mediates this increased proliferation. Our results provide evidence that IGF-I can enhance aged muscle regrowth possibly through increased satellite cell proliferation. The results also suggest that IGF-I enhances satellite cell proliferation by decreasing the cell cycle inhibitor, p27Kip1, through the PI3'-K/Akt pathway. These data provide molecular evidence for IGF-I's rescue effect upon aging-associated skeletal muscle atrophy.

  17. The molecular responses of skeletal muscle satellite cells to continuous expression of IGF-1: implications for the rescue of induced muscular atrophy in aged rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Booth, F. W.; Spangenburg, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    Approximately 50% of humans older than 85 years have physical frailty due to weak skeletal muscles. This indicates a need for determining mechanisms to combat this problem. A critical cellular factor for postnatal muscle growth is a population of myogenic precursor cells called satellite cells. Given the complex process of sarcopenia, it has been postulated that, at some point in this process, a limited satellite cell proliferation potential could become rate-limiting to the regrowth of old muscles. It is conceivable that if satellite cell proliferative capacity can be maintained or enhanced with advanced age, sarcopenia could potentially be delayed or prevented. Therefore, the purposes of this paper are to describe whether IGF-I can prevent muscular atrophy induced by repeated cycles of hindlimb immobilization, increase the in vitro proliferation in satellite cells from these muscles and, if so, the molecular mechanisms by which IGF-I mediates this increased proliferation. Our results provide evidence that IGF-I can enhance aged muscle regrowth possibly through increased satellite cell proliferation. The results also suggest that IGF-I enhances satellite cell proliferation by decreasing the cell cycle inhibitor, p27Kip1, through the PI3'-K/Akt pathway. These data provide molecular evidence for IGF-I's rescue effect upon aging-associated skeletal muscle atrophy.

  18. Attenuation of p38α MAPK stress response signaling delays the in vivo aging of skeletal muscle myofibers and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Papaconstantinou, John; Wang, Chen Z; Zhang, Min; Yang, San; Deford, James; Bulavin, Dmitry V; Ansari, Naseem H

    2015-09-01

    Functional competence and self-renewal of mammalian skeletal muscle myofibers and progenitor cells declines with age. Progression of the muscle aging phenotype involves the decline of juvenile protective factorsi.e., proteins whose beneficial functions translate directly to the quality of life, and self-renewal of progenitor cells. These characteristics occur simultaneously with the age-associated increase of p38α stress response signaling. This suggests that the maintenance of low levels of p38α activity of juvenile tissues may delay or attenuate aging. We used the dominant negative haploinsufficient p38α mouse (DN-p38α(AF/+)) to demonstrate that in vivo attenuation of p38α activity in the gastrocnemius of the aged mutant delays age-associated processes that include: a) the decline of the juvenile protective factors, BubR1, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A (ALDH1A1), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2); b) attenuated expression of p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf) tumor suppressor genes of the Cdkn2a locus; c) decreased levels of hydroxynonenal protein adducts, expression of COX2 and iNOS; d) decline of the senescent progenitor cell pool level and d) the loss of gastrocnemius muscle mass. We propose that elevated P-p38α activity promotes skeletal muscle aging and that the homeostasis of p38α impacts the maintenance of a beneficial healthspan.

  19. Attenuation of p38α MAPK stress response signaling delays the in vivo aging of skeletal muscle myofibers and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Papaconstantinou, John; Wang, Chen Z.; Zhang, Min; Yang, San; Deford, James; Bulavin, Dmitry V.; Ansari, Naseem H.

    2015-01-01

    Functional competence and self-renewal of mammalian skeletal muscle myofibers and progenitor cells declines with age. Progression of the muscle aging phenotype involves the decline of juvenile protective factors i.e., proteins whose beneficial functions translate directly to the quality of life, and self-renewal of progenitor cells. These characteristics occur simultaneously with the age-associated increase of p38α stress response signaling. This suggests that the maintenance of low levels of p38α activity of juvenile tissues may delay or attenuate aging. We used the dominant negative haploinsufficient p38α mouse (DN-p38αAF/+) to demonstrate that in vivo attenuation of p38α activity in the gastrocnemius of the aged mutant delays age-associated processes that include: a) the decline of the juvenile protective factors, BubR1, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A (ALDH1A1), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2); b) attenuated expression of p16Ink4a and p19Arf tumor suppressor genes of the Cdkn2a locus; c) decreased levels of hydroxynonenal protein adducts, expression of COX2 and iNOS; d) decline of the senescent progenitor cell pool level and d) the loss of gastrocnemius muscle mass. We propose that elevated P-p38α activity promotes skeletal muscle aging and that the homeostasis of p38α impacts the maintenance of a beneficial healthspan. PMID:26423835

  20. The Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cell

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The skeletal muscle satellite cell was first described and named based on its anatomic location between the myofiber plasma and basement membranes. In 1961, two independent studies by Alexander Mauro and Bernard Katz provided the first electron microscopic descriptions of satellite cells in frog and rat muscles. These cells were soon detected in other vertebrates and acquired candidacy as the source of myogenic cells needed for myofiber growth and repair throughout life. Cultures of isolated myofibers and, subsequently, transplantation of single myofibers demonstrated that satellite cells were myogenic progenitors. More recently, satellite cells were redefined as myogenic stem cells given their ability to self-renew in addition to producing differentiated progeny. Identification of distinctively expressed molecular markers, in particular Pax7, has facilitated detection of satellite cells using light microscopy. Notwithstanding the remarkable progress made since the discovery of satellite cells, researchers have looked for alternative cells with myogenic capacity that can potentially be used for whole body cell-based therapy of skeletal muscle. Yet, new studies show that inducible ablation of satellite cells in adult muscle impairs myofiber regeneration. Thus, on the 50th anniversary since its discovery, the satellite cell’s indispensable role in muscle repair has been reaffirmed. PMID:22147605

  1. Taurine and skeletal muscle disorders.

    PubMed

    Conte Camerino, Diana; Tricarico, Domenico; Pierno, Sabata; Desaphy, Jean-François; Liantonio, Antonella; Pusch, Michael; Burdi, Rosa; Camerino, Claudia; Fraysse, Bodvael; De Luca, Annamaria

    2004-01-01

    Taurine is abundantly present in skeletal muscle. We give evidence that this amino acid exerts both short-term and long-term actions in the control of ion channel function and calcium homeostasis in striated fibers. Short-term actions can be estimated as the ability of this amino acid to acutely modulate both ion channel gating and the function of the structures involved in calcium handling. Long-term effects can be disclosed in situations of tissue taurine depletion and are likely related to the ability of the intracellular taurine to control transducing pathways as well as homeostatic and osmotic equilibrium in the tissue. The two activities are strictly linked because the intracellular level of taurine modulates the sensitivity of skeletal muscle to the exogenous application of taurine. Myopathies in which ion channels are directly or indirectly involved, as well as inherited or acquired pathologies characterized by metabolic alterations and change in calcium homeostasis, are often correlated with change in muscle taurine concentration and consequently with an enhanced therapeutic activity of this amino acid. We discuss both in vivo and in vitro evidence that taurine, through its ability to control sarcolemmal excitability and muscle contractility, can prove beneficial effects in many muscle dysfunctions.

  2. Effects of aestivation on skeletal muscle performance.

    PubMed

    James, Rob S

    2010-01-01

    Fitness, ecology, and behaviour of vertebrates are dependent upon locomotor performance. Locomotor performance can be constrained by underlying intrinsic skeletal muscle properties. Skeletal muscle is a highly plastic tissue undergoing phenotypic change in response to alteration in environment. Clinical and experimental models of muscle disuse cause decreases in skeletal muscle size and mechanical performance. However, in natural models of skeletal muscle disuse, both atrophy and changes in mechanical properties are more limited. Aestivation in frogs can cause decreases in muscle cross-sectional area and changes in some enzyme activities, with effects varying among muscles. However, long-term aestivation causes limited changes in muscle mechanics during simulated sprint or endurance type activities. Therefore, at least in frogs, there is maintenance of skeletal muscle performance during prolonged periods of aestivation, allowing avoidance of harsh environmental conditions without compromising the locomotor capacity to perform fitness-related activities when favourable environmental conditions return.

  3. Dietary (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate Supplementation Counteracts Aging-Associated Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance and Fatty Liver in Senescence-Accelerated Mouse.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hung-Wen; Chan, Yin-Ching; Wang, Ming-Fu; Wei, Chu-Chun; Chang, Sue-Joan

    2015-09-30

    Aging is accompanied by pathophysiological changes including insulin resistance and fatty liver. Dietary supplementation with (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) improves insulin sensitivity and attenuates fatty liver disease. We hypothesized that EGCG could effectively modulate aging-associated changes in glucose and lipid metabolism in senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) prone 8 (SAMP8). Higher levels of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid, inhibited Akt activity, and decreased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) expression were observed in SAMP8 mice compared to the normal aging group, SAM resistant 1 mice. EGCG supplementation for 12 weeks successfully decreased blood glucose and insulin levels via restoring Akt activity and GLUT4 expression and stimulating AMPKα activation in skeletal muscle. EGCG up-regulated genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and subsequently restored mitochondrial DNA copy number in skeletal muscle of SAMP8 mice. Decreased adipose triglyceride lipase and increased sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1c (SREBP-1c) and carbohydrate responsive element binding protein at mRNA levels were observed in SAMP8 mice in accordance with hepatocellular ballooning and excess lipid accumulation. The pevention of hepatic lipid accumulation by EGCG was mainly attributed to down-regulation of mTOR and SREBP-1c-mediated lipid biosynthesis via suppression of the positive regulator, Akt, and activation of the negative regulator, AMPKα, in the liver. EGCG beneficially modulates glucose and lipid homeostasis in skeletal muscle and liver, leading to alleviation of aging-associated metabolic disorders.

  4. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase reduces oxidative stress and improves skeletal muscle function in response to electrically stimulated isometric contractions in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J.; Jackson, Janna R.; Hao, Yanlei; Leonard, Stephen S.; Alway, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a putative factor responsible for reducing function and increasing apoptotic signaling in skeletal muscle with aging. This study examined the contribution and functional significance of the xanthine oxidase enzyme as a potential source of oxidant production in aged skeletal muscle during repetitive in situ electrically stimulated isometric contractions. Xanthine oxidase activity was inhibited in young adult and aged mice via a subcutaneously placed time release (2.5 mg/day) allopurinol pellet, 7 days prior to the start of in situ electrically stimulated isometric contractions. Gastrocnemius muscles were electrically activated with 20 maximal contractions for three consecutive days. Xanthine oxidase activity was 65% greater in the gastrocnemius muscle of aged mice compared to young mice. Xanthine oxidase activity also increased after in situ electrically stimulated isometric contractions in muscles from both young (33%) and aged (28%) mice, relative to contralateral non-contracted muscles. Allopurinol attenuated the exercise-induced increase in oxidative stress, but it did not affect the elevated basal levels of oxidative stress that was associated with aging. In addition, inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity decreased caspase 3 activity, but it had no effect on other markers of mitochondrial associated apoptosis. Our results show that compared to control conditions, suppression of xanthine oxidase activity by allopurinol reduced xanthine oxidase activity, H2O2 levels, lipid peroxidation and caspase-3 activity, prevented the in situ electrically stimulated isometric contraction-induced loss of glutathione, prevented the increase of catalase and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase activities, and increased maximal isometric force in the plantar flexor muscles of aged mice after repetitive electrically evoked contractions. PMID:21530649

  5. Combined association of chronic disease and low skeletal muscle mass with physical performance in older adults in the Sarcopenia and Translational Aging Research in Taiwan (START) study.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Ing; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Hsiung, Chao A; Chen, Ching-Yu; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Wang, Ching-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2015-02-18

    Multiple chronic conditions and low skeletal muscle mass are common features of aging that are detrimental to physical performance. This study evaluates the simultaneous impact of these conditions on physical performance in older adults. Five studies from 2003 to 2012 were pooled to include 2,398 adults aged ≥65 years with diagnosed chronic diseases measured by self-administered questionnaire. Low muscle mass was defined as an appendicular skeletal muscle mass index less than that of the sex-specific lowest quintile in the population of older adults. Poor physical performances were defined as the lowest quintile of grip strength and gait speed in the population of older adults and the slowest sex-specific 20% of Timed Up and Go (TUG) test at each study site. Chi-squared and logistic regression tests were applied for data analysis. Mean age of the study participants, of whom approximately 50% were men, was 74.3 years. Slow gait speed was nearly three times more likely to occur in the presence of low muscle mass coupled with chronic disease than in the absence of both factors after adjustment for study site, age, sex, education, marital status, body mass index, tobacco and alcohol use, and comorbidities. The independent effect of low muscle mass was generally stronger than that of each disease. Participants with more than two chronic diseases and low muscle mass were significantly more likely to perform poorly than those with no risk factors (odds ratio [OR] = 2.51 in patients with low grip strength, OR = 3.89 in patients with low gait speed, and OR = 3.67 in patients with poor TUG test scores, all P < 0 .05) after adjustment. The combined association of chronic disease and low skeletal mass with physical performance was stronger than the effect of either factor alone.

  6. Muscle Bioenergetic Considerations for Intrinsic Laryngeal Skeletal Muscle Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandage, Mary J.; Smith, Audrey G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Intrinsic laryngeal skeletal muscle bioenergetics, the means by which muscles produce fuel for muscle metabolism, is an understudied aspect of laryngeal physiology with direct implications for voice habilitation and rehabilitation. The purpose of this review is to describe bioenergetic pathways identified in limb skeletal muscle and…

  7. Detection of satellite cells during skeletal muscle wound healing in rats: time-dependent expressions of Pax7 and MyoD in relation to wound age.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhi-Ling; Jiang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Meng; Li, Jiao-Yong; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Lin-Lin; Li, Shan-Shan; Liu, Min; Zhang, Meng-Zhou; Guan, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The study was focused on time-dependent expressions of paired-box transcription factor 7 (Pax7) and myoblast determination protein (MyoD) during skeletal muscle wound healing. An animal model of skeletal muscle contusion was established in 40 Sprague-Dawley male rats. Samples were taken at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, and 21 days after injury, respectively (five rats in each posttraumatic interval). Five rats were employed as control. By morphometric analysis, the data based on the number of Pax7(+)/MyoD(-), Pax7(+)/MyoD(+), and Pax7(-)/MyoD(+) cells were highly correlated with the wound age. Pax7 and MyoD expressions were upregulated after injury by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR assays. The relative quantity of Pax7 protein peaked at 5 days after injury, which was >1.13, and decreased thereafter. Similarly, the relative quantity of MyoD mRNA expression peaked at 3 days after injury, which was >2.59. The relative quantity of Pax7 protein >0.73 or mRNA expression >2.38 or the relative quantity of MyoD protein >1.33 suggested a wound age of 3 to 7 days. The relative quantity of MyoD mRNA expression >2.02 suggested a wound age of 1 to 7 days post-injury. In conclusion, the expressions of Pax7 and MyoD are upregulated in a time-dependent manner during skeletal muscle wound healing, suggesting that Pax7 and MyoD may be potential markers for wound age estimation in skeletal muscle.

  8. Influence of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction on the blunted skeletal muscle contraction-induced rapid vasodilation with aging.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Joyner, Michael J

    2012-10-15

    We tested the hypothesis that elevated sympathetic tone is responsible for lower peak vasodilation after single muscle contractions in older adults. Young (n = 13, 7 men and 6 women, age: 27 ± 1 yr) and older (n = 13, 7 men and 6 women, age: 69 ± 2 yr) adults performed single forearm contractions at 10%, 20%, and 40% of maximum during 1) control, 2) sympathetic activation via lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -20 mmHg), and 3) intra-arterial infusion of phentolamine (α-adrenergic antagonist). Brachial artery diameter and velocities were measured via Doppler ultrasound, and forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). Peak vasodilator responses [change in (Δ) FVC from baseline] were attenuated in older adults at 20% and 40% of maximum (P < 0.05). LBNP reduced peak ΔFVC at 10% (98 ± 17 vs. 70 ± 12 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)), 20% (144 ± 12 vs. 98 ± 3 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)), and 40% (209 ± 20 vs. 161 ± 21 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1), P < 0.01 vs. control) in younger adults but not in older adults (71 ± 11 vs. 68 ± 11, 107 ± 13 vs. 106 ± 16, and 161 ± 22 vs. 144 ± 22 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1), respectively, P = 0.22-0.99). With phentolamine, peak ΔFVC was enhanced in older adults at each contraction intensity (100 ± 14, 147 ± 22, and 200 ± 26 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1), respectively, P < 0.01 vs. control) but not in younger adults (94 ± 13, 153 ± 13, and 224 ± 27 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1), respectively, P = 0.30-0.81 vs. control). Our data indicate that α-adrenergic vasoconstriction and/or blunted functional sympatholysis might contribute to the age-related decreases in skeletal muscle contraction-induced rapid vasodilation in humans.

  9. Sarcopenic obesity or obese sarcopenia: A cross talk between age-associated adipose tissue and skeletal muscle inflammation as a main mechanism of the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kalinkovich, Alexander; Livshits, Gregory

    2017-05-01

    Sarcopenia, an age-associated decline in skeletal muscle mass coupled with functional deterioration, may be exacerbated by obesity leading to higher disability, frailty, morbidity and mortality rates. In the combination of sarcopenia and obesity, the state called sarcopenic obesity (SOB), some key age- and obesity-mediated factors and pathways may aggravate sarcopenia. This review will analyze the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of SOB. In obese adipose tissue (AT), adipocytes undergo hypertrophy, hyperplasia and activation resulted in accumulation of pro-inflammatory macrophages and other immune cells as well as dysregulated production of various adipokines that together with senescent cells and the immune cell-released cytokines and chemokines create a local pro-inflammatory status. In addition, obese AT is characterized by excessive production and disturbed capacity to store lipids, which accumulate ectopically in skeletal muscle. These intramuscular lipids and their derivatives induce mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by impaired β-oxidation capacity and increased reactive oxygen species formation providing lipotoxic environment and insulin resistance as well as enhanced secretion of some pro-inflammatory myokines capable of inducing muscle dysfunction by auto/paracrine manner. In turn, by endocrine manner, these myokines may exacerbate AT inflammation and also support chronic low grade systemic inflammation (inflammaging), overall establishing a detrimental vicious circle maintaining AT and skeletal muscle inflammation, thus triggering and supporting SOB development. Under these circumstances, we believe that AT inflammation dominates over skeletal muscle inflammation. Thus, in essence, it redirects the vector of processes from "sarcopenia→obesity" to "obesity→sarcopenia". We therefore propose that this condition be defined as "obese sarcopenia", to reflect the direction of the pathological pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. Satellite cells: the architects of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha C; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle is attributed to the resident muscle stem cell termed satellite cell. Satellite cells are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration as they ultimately provide the myogenic precursors that rebuild damaged muscle tissue. Satellite cells characteristically are a heterogeneous population of stem cells and committed progenitor cells. Delineation of cellular hierarchy and understanding how lineage fate choices are determined within the satellite cell population will be invaluable for the advancement of muscle regenerative therapies.

  11. Coaxing stem cells for skeletal muscle repair.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Karl J A; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle has a tremendous ability to regenerate, attributed to a well-defined population of muscle stem cells called satellite cells. However, this ability to regenerate diminishes with age and can also be dramatically affected by multiple types of muscle diseases, or injury. Extrinsic and/or intrinsic defects in the regulation of satellite cells are considered to be major determinants for the diminished regenerative capacity. Maintenance and replenishment of the satellite cell pool is one focus for muscle regenerative medicine, which will be discussed. There are other sources of progenitor cells with myogenic capacity, which may also support skeletal muscle repair. However, all of these myogenic cell populations have inherent difficulties and challenges in maintaining or coaxing their derivation for therapeutic purpose. This review will highlight recent reported attributes of these cells and new bioengineering approaches to creating a supply of myogenic stem cells or implants applicable for acute and/or chronic muscle disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Skeletal muscle proteomics in livestock production.

    PubMed

    Picard, Brigitte; Berri, Cécile; Lefaucheur, Louis; Molette, Caroline; Sayd, Thierry; Terlouw, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    Proteomics allows studying large numbers of proteins, including their post-translational modifications. Proteomics has been, and still are, used in numerous studies on skeletal muscle. In this article, we focus on its use in the study of livestock muscle development and meat quality. Changes in protein profiles during myogenesis are described in cattle, pigs and fowl using comparative analyses across different ontogenetic stages. This approach allows a better understanding of the key stages of myogenesis and helps identifying processes that are similar or divergent between species. Genetic variability of muscle properties analysed by the study of hypertrophied cattle and sheep are discussed. Biological markers of meat quality, particularly tenderness in cattle, pigs and fowl are presented, including protein modifications during meat ageing in cattle, protein markers of PSE meat in turkeys and of post-mortem muscle metabolism in pigs. Finally, we discuss the interest of proteomics as a tool to understand better biochemical mechanisms underlying the effects of stress during the pre-slaughter period on meat quality traits. In conclusion, the study of proteomics in skeletal muscles allows generating large amounts of scientific knowledge that helps to improve our understanding of myogenesis and muscle growth and to control better meat quality.

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health.

    PubMed

    Jeromson, Stewart; Gallagher, Iain J; Galloway, Stuart D R; Hamilton, D Lee

    2015-11-19

    Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle.

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health

    PubMed Central

    Jeromson, Stewart; Gallagher, Iain J.; Galloway, Stuart D. R.; Hamilton, D. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle. PMID:26610527

  15. GAPDH and β-actin protein decreases with aging, making Stain-Free technology a superior loading control in Western blotting of human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Dybboe, Rie; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Dela, Flemming; Helge, Jørn W; Guadalupe Grau, Amelia

    2015-02-01

    Reference proteins (RP) or the total protein (TP) loaded is used to correct for uneven loading and/or transfer in Western blotting. However, the signal sensitivity and the influence of physiological conditions may question the normalization methods. Therefore, three widely used reference proteins [β-actin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and α-tubulin], as well as TP loaded measured by Stain-Free technology (SF) as normalization tool were tested. This was done using skeletal muscle samples from men subjected to physiological conditions often investigated in applied physiology where the intervention has been suggested to impede normalization (ageing, muscle atrophy, and different muscle fiber type composition). The linearity of signal and the methodological variation coefficient was obtained. Furthermore, the inter- and intraindividual variation in signals obtained from SF and RP was measured in relation to ageing, muscle atrophy, and different muscle fiber type composition, respectively. A stronger linearity of SF and β-actin compared with GAPDH and α-tubulin was observed. The methodological variation was relatively low in all four methods (4-11%). Protein level of β-actin and GAPDH was lower in older men compared with young men. In conclusion, β-actin, GAPDH, and α-tubulin may not be used for normalization in studies that include subjects with a large age difference. In contrast, the RPs may not be affected in studies that include muscle wasting and differences in muscle fiber type. The novel SF technology adds lower variation to the results compared with the existing methods for correcting for loading inaccuracy in Western blotting of human skeletal muscle in applied physiology.

  16. Alpha-Lipoic acid increases energy expenditure by enhancing adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha signaling in the skeletal muscle of aged mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with aging and diabetes, which decreases respiratory capacity and increases reactive oxygen species. Lipoic acid (LA) possesses antioxidative and antidiabetic properties. Metabolic action of LA is mediated by activation of adenosine monophospha...

  17. Calpain inhibition rescues troponin T3 fragmentation, increases Cav1.1, and enhances skeletal muscle force in aging sedentary mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Pereyra, Andrea S; Wang, Zhong-Min; Birbrair, Alexander; Reisz, Julie A; Files, Daniel Clark; Purcell, Lina; Feng, Xin; Messi, Maria L; Feng, Hanzhong; Chalovich, Joseph; Jin, Jian-Ping; Furdui, Cristina; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-06-01

    Loss of strength in human and animal models of aging can be partially attributed to a well-recognized decrease in muscle mass; however, starting at middle-age, the normalized force (force/muscle cross-sectional area) in the knee extensors and single muscle fibers declines in a curvilinear manner. Strength is lost faster than muscle mass and is a more consistent risk factor for disability and death. Reduced expression of the voltage sensor Ca(2+) channel α1 subunit (Cav1.1) with aging leads to excitation-contraction uncoupling, which accounts for a significant fraction of the decrease in skeletal muscle function. We recently reported that in addition to its classical cytoplasmic location, fast skeletal muscle troponin T3 (TnT3) is fragmented in aging mice, and both full-length TnT3 (FL-TnT3) and its carboxyl-terminal (CT-TnT3) fragment shuttle to the nucleus. Here, we demonstrate that it regulates transcription of Cacna1s, the gene encoding Cav1.1. Knocking down TnT3 in vivo downregulated Cav1.1. TnT3 downregulation or overexpression decreased or increased, respectively, Cacna1s promoter activity, and the effect was ablated by truncating the TnT3 nuclear localization sequence. Further, we mapped the Cacna1s promoter region and established the consensus sequence for TnT3 binding to Cacna1s promoter. Systemic administration of BDA-410, a specific calpain inhibitor, prevented TnT3 fragmentation, and Cacna1s and Cav1.1 downregulation and improved muscle force generation in sedentary old mice.

  18. Elevated Serum Uric Acid Is Associated with Greater Bone Mineral Density and Skeletal Muscle Mass in Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    He, Juan; Wang, Chen; Qiu, Rui; Chen, Yu-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Previous studies have suggested a positive link between serum uric acid (UA) and bone mineral density (BMD). In this study, we re-examined the association between UA and BMD and further explored whether this was mediated by skeletal muscle mass in a general Chinese population. Method This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 3079 (963 men and 2116 women) Chinese adults aged 40–75 years. Face-to-face interviews and laboratory analyses were performed to determine serum UA and various covariates. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess the BMD and appendicular skeletal muscle mass. The skeletal muscle mass index (SMI = ASM/Height2, kg/m2) for the total limbs, arms, and legs was then calculated. Results The serum UA was graded and, in general, was significantly and positively associated with the BMD and muscle mass, after adjustment for multiple covariates in the total sample. Compared with participants in lowest quartile of UA, those participants in highest quartile showed a 2.3%(whole body), 4.1%(lumbar spine), 2.4%(total hip), and 2.0% (femoral neck) greater BMDs. The mean SMIs in the highest (vs. lowest) quartile increased by 2.7% (total), 2.5% (arm), 2.7% (leg) respectively. In addition, path analysis suggested that the favorable association between UA and BMD might be mediated by increasing SMI. Conclusion The elevated serum UA was associated with a higher BMD and a greater muscle mass in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population and the UA-BMD association was partly mediated by muscle mass. PMID:27144737

  19. Regulatory T cells and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schiaffino, Stefano; Pereira, Marcelo G; Ciciliot, Stefano; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration results from the activation and differentiation of myogenic stem cells, called satellite cells, located beneath the basal lamina of the muscle fibers. Inflammatory and immune cells have a crucial role in the regeneration process. Acute muscle injury causes an immediate transient wave of neutrophils followed by a more persistent infiltration of M1 (proinflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory/proregenerative) macrophages. New studies show that injured muscle is also infiltrated by a specialized population of regulatory T (Treg) cells, which control both the inflammatory response, by promoting the M1-to-M2 switch, and the activation of satellite cells. Treg cells accumulate in injured muscle in response to specific cytokines, such as IL-33, and promote muscle growth by releasing growth factors, such as amphiregulin. Muscle repair during aging is impaired due to reduced number of Treg cells and can be enhanced by IL-33 supplementation. Migration of Treg cells could also contribute to explain the effect of heterochronic parabiosis, whereby muscle regeneration of aged mice can be improved by a parabiotically linked young partners. In mdx dystrophin-deficient mice, a model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy, muscle injury, and inflammation is mitigated by expansion of the Treg-cell population but exacerbated by Treg-cell depletion. These findings support the notion that immunological mechanisms are not only essential in the response to pathogenic microbes and tumor cells but also have a wider homeostatic role in tissue repair, and open new perspectives for boosting muscle growth in chronic muscle disease and during aging.

  20. Age-related changes in relative expression of real-time PCR housekeeping genes in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Touchberry, Chad D; Wacker, Michael J; Richmond, Scott R; Whitman, Samantha A; Godard, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the expression of three commonly used housekeeping genes -- glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)M), and RNA polymerase 2a (polR2a) -- in elderly (E) compared to young (Y) subjects. Nine young subjects (22.7 +/- 3.4 yrs) and 11 elderly subjects (73.0 +/- 9.5 yrs) underwent a percutaneous skeletal muscle biopsy of the vastus lateralis. Equal concentrations of isolated mRNA from these samples were used to perform real-time polymerase chain reaction with primer/probe combinations specific to each gene of interest. The expression of GAPDH, beta(2)M, and polR2a was obtained as the value of cycle threshold (C(T)). An independent t-test with a level of significance at p < or = 0.05 was used to determine differences between groups. There was no difference in average C(T) of GAPDH between groups (p=0.869) (Y = 16.92 +/- 2.25 vs. E = 17.08 +/- 2.09) and polR2a (p = 0.089) (Y = 28.00 +/- 0.89 vs. E = 26.73 +/- 1.91). However, there was a significant difference (p < or = 0.05) in the average C(T) of beta(2)M (Y =21.79 +/- 0.44 vs. E = 21.05 +/- 0.51). The results indicate that special consideration needs to be made when selecting housekeeping genes for comparisons in real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, depending upon the age of the populations of interest.

  1. Sex- and age-dependent expression of Pax7, Myf 5, MyoG, and Myostatin in yak skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Zhang, J; Wang, L; Xu, S; Zhou, J; Xiang, A; Yang, C

    2016-06-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate the myogenic factor mRNA expression pattern of Pax7, Myf5, MyoG, and Myostatin mRNA at different ages, sexes, and muscle tissues of Datong yaks. The expression patterns in semimembranosus (SM), quadriceps femoris (QF), and triceps muscle of arm (TM) were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and compared using biostatistics. The results showed that the Pax7 gene expression levels were higher in the hindquarters (SM and QF) than in the forequarters, and was higher in male compared to in female muscle (P ≤ 0.05). The Myf5 gene expression levels of male yaks were highest in QF (P ≤ 0.05), whereas the expression levels of female yaks were highest in TM (P ≤ 0.05). Female MyoG gene expression levels were higher in QF and TM compared to in male yaks. The MyoG expression was higher in all muscles at 6 months old compared to in 3-year-old muscle. The highest MSTN gene expression was found in 6-month-old TM muscle and in QF muscle of 3 years (P ≥ 0.05). In conclusion, yak muscles showed different growth patterns depending on position. At 6 months of age, the satellite cells in the male hindquarter muscles and the female forequarter muscle showed a strong proliferative ability, at the same time the satellite cells in all female muscles had a powerful differentiation ability. Hindquarter muscles appear to mainly grow at younger ages and forequarters mainly grow at older ages.

  2. Detection of an aging-related increase in advanced glycation end products in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, B; Larsson, L

    2013-06-01

    Glycation, a non-enzymatic addition of reducing sugars to ε-amino groups of proteins, is a post-translational modification that results in the formation of irreversible advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Ageing related decline in myofibrillar protein function is effected by a number of structural and functional modifications including glycation. Functional properties of skeletal muscles, such as maximum velocity of unloaded shortening, are known to be profoundly affected by ageing at the motor unit, cellular and tissue levels. However, the contribution of protein modifications to a decline in muscle function is not well understood. In this study we measured AGEs of intracellular and sarcolemmal proteins, using an anti-AGE antibody in soleus (SOL) and extensor digiotorum longus (EDL) muscles of male and female rats of five different age groups. Using a fluorescent secondary antibody to visualize AGEs in the confocal microscope, we found that myosin is glycated in both fiber types in all age groups; an ageing related increase in AGEs was observed in both intracellular and sarcolemmal regions in all age groups, with the exception of sarcolemma of SOL (unchanged) and EDL (reduced) in female rats; the greatest concentration of AGEs was found intracellularly in the SOL of the oldest age group (27-30) of females. While an ageing related decline in motor properties can be partially attributed to the observed increase in myofibrillar protein glycation, our results also indicate that intracellular and the less well studied sarcolemmal protein modification likely contribute to an aging-related decline in muscle function. Further studies are required to establish a link between the observed ageing related increase in glycation and muscle function at the motor unit, cellular and tissue levels.

  3. Signaling pathways controlling skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Egerman, Marc A; Glass, David J

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle maintenance involve interplay between multiple signaling pathways. Under normal physiological conditions, a network of interconnected signals serves to control and coordinate hypertrophic and atrophic messages, culminating in a delicate balance between muscle protein synthesis and proteolysis. Loss of skeletal muscle mass, termed "atrophy", is a diagnostic feature of cachexia seen in settings of cancer, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney disease, and burns. Cachexia increases the likelihood of death from these already serious diseases. Recent studies have further defined the pathways leading to gain and loss of skeletal muscle as well as the signaling events that induce differentiation and post-injury regeneration, which are also essential for the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass. In this review, we summarize and discuss the relevant recent literature demonstrating these previously undiscovered mediators governing anabolism and catabolism of skeletal muscle.

  4. Signaling pathways controlling skeletal muscle mass

    PubMed Central

    Egerman, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle maintenance involve interplay between multiple signaling pathways. Under normal physiological conditions, a network of interconnected signals serves to control and coordinate hypertrophic and atrophic messages, culminating in a delicate balance between muscle protein synthesis and proteolysis. Loss of skeletal muscle mass, termed “atrophy”, is a diagnostic feature of cachexia seen in settings of cancer, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney disease, and burns. Cachexia increases the likelihood of death from these already serious diseases. Recent studies have further defined the pathways leading to gain and loss of skeletal muscle as well as the signaling events that induce differentiation and post-injury regeneration, which are also essential for the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass. In this review, we summarize and discuss the relevant recent literature demonstrating these previously undiscovered mediators governing anabolism and catabolism of skeletal muscle. PMID:24237131

  5. Diminished skeletal muscle microRNA expression with aging is associated with attenuated muscle plasticity and inhibition of IGF-1 signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Older individuals have a reduced capacity to induce muscle hypertrophy with resistance exercise (RE), which may contribute to the age-induced loss of muscle mass and function, sarcopenia. We tested the novel hypothesis that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) may contribute to reduced muscle plastic...

  6. Dietary fat and fatty acid profile are associated with indices of skeletal muscle mass in women aged 18-79 years.

    PubMed

    Welch, Ailsa A; MacGregor, Alex J; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Skinner, Jane; Valdes, Anna A; Spector, Tim D; Cassidy, Aedin

    2014-03-01

    Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass results in a reduction in metabolically active tissue and has been related to the onset of obesity and sarcopenia. Although the causes of muscle loss are poorly understood, dietary fat has been postulated to have a role in determining protein turnover through an influence on both inflammation and insulin resistance. This study was designed to investigate the cross-sectional relation between dietary fat intake, as dietary percentage of fat energy (PFE) and fatty acid profile, with indices of skeletal muscle mass in the population setting. Body composition [fat-free mass (FFM; in kg)] and the fat-free mass index (FFMI; kg FFM/m(2)) was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 2689 women aged 18-79 y from the TwinsUK Study and calculated according to quintile of dietary fat (by food-frequency questionnaire) after multivariate adjustment. Positive associations were found between the polyunsaturated-to-saturated fatty acid (SFA) ratio and indices of FFM, and inverse associations were found with PFE, SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and trans fatty acids (TFAs) (all as % of energy). Extreme quintile dietary differences for PFE were -0.6 kg for FFM and -0.28 kg/m(2) for FFMI; for SFAs, MUFAs, and TFAs, these were -0.5 to -0.8 kg for FFM and -0.26 to -0.38 kg/m(2) for FFMI. These associations were of a similar magnitude to the expected decline in muscle mass that occurs over 10 y. To our knowledge, this is the first population-based study to demonstrate an association between a comprehensive range of dietary fat intake and FFM. These findings indicate that a dietary fat profile already associated with cardiovascular disease protection may also be beneficial for conservation of skeletal muscle mass.

  7. Exercise and the Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    McGlory, Chris; Phillips, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a critical organ serving as the primary site for postprandial glucose disposal and the generation of contractile force. The size of human skeletal muscle mass is dependent upon the temporal relationship between changes in muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle protein breakdown. The aim of this chapter is to review our current understanding of how resistance exercise influences protein turnover with a specific emphasis on the molecular factors regulating MPS. We also will discuss recent data relating to the prescription of resistance exercise to maximize skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Finally, we evaluate the impact of age and periods of disuse on the loss of muscle mass and the controversy surround the etiology of muscle disuse atrophy.

  8. Loss of the antioxidant enzyme CuZnSOD (Sod1) mimics an age-related increase in absolute mitochondrial DNA copy number in the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Masser, Dustin R; Clark, Nicholas W; Van Remmen, Holly; Freeman, Willard M

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of the circular mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) that encodes ribosomal RNAs and proteins locally translated for oxidative phosphorylation. Loss of mtDNA integrity, both altered copy number and increased mutations, is implicated in cellular dysfunction with aging. Published data on mtDNA copy number and aging is discordant which may be due to methodological limitations for quantifying mtDNA copy number. Existing quantitative PCR (qPCR) mtDNA copy number quantification methods provide only relative abundances and are problematic to normalize to different template input amounts and across tissues/sample types. As well, existing methods cannot quantify mtDNA copy number in subcellular isolates, such as isolated mitochondria and neuronal synaptic terminals, which lack nuclear genomic DNA for normalization. We have developed and validated a novel absolute mtDNA copy number quantitation method that uses chip-based digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) to count the number of copies of mtDNA and used this novel method to assess the literature discrepancy in which there is no clear consensus whether mtDNA numbers change with aging in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle in old mice was found to have increased absolute mtDNA numbers compared to young controls. Furthermore, young Sod1 (-/-) mice were assessed and show an age-mimicking increase in skeletal muscle mtDNA. These findings reproduce a number of previous studies that demonstrate age-related increases in mtDNA. This simple and cost effective dPCR approach should enable precise and accurate mtDNA copy number quantitation in mitochondrial studies, eliminating contradictory studies of mitochondrial DNA content with aging.

  9. Sympathetic actions on the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Roatta, Silvestro; Farina, Dario

    2010-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) modulates several functions in skeletal muscle fibers, including metabolism, ionic transport across the membrane, and contractility. These actions, together with the sympathetic control of other organ systems, support intense motor activity. However, some SNS actions on skeletal muscles may not always be functionally advantageous. Implications for motor control and sport performance are discussed.

  10. Six-year longitudinal changes in body composition of middle-aged and elderly Japanese: age and sex differences in appendicular skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Itsuko; Koda, Michiko; Otsuka, Rei; Ando, Fujiko; Shimokata, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about longitudinal changes of body composition measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in middle-aged and elderly individuals. We evaluated longitudinal changes of body composition, and age and sex differences in appendicular skeletal muscle mass. Participants were 1454 community-dwelling Japanese men and women aged 40-79 years. Body composition at baseline and 6-year follow up was measured by DXA. Fat increased significantly in men of all ages, and in women aged in their 40s and 50s. Among men, arm lean tissue mass (LTM) changed by 0.9%, -0.5%, -1.4% and -3.7%, respectively, for the 40s to the 70s, and decreased significantly in the 60s and 70s. Leg LTM in men changed by -0.4%, -1.3%, -1.7% and -3.9%, respectively, and decreased significantly from the 50s to the 70s. Compared with the preceding age groups, significant differences were observed between the 60s and 70s in arm and leg LTM change in men. Among women, arm LTM changed by 0.7%, 0.2%, 1.6% and -1.5%, respectively, which was significant in the 60s and 70s. Leg LTM decreased significantly in all age groups of women by -2.0%, -2.8%, -2.4% and -3.9%, respectively. With respect to sex differences, leg LTM loss rates were significantly higher in women than men at the 40s and 50s. Longitudinal data suggest that arm and leg LTM decreased markedly in men in their 70s, and leg LTM had already decreased in women in their 40s. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. Anatomic capillarization is maintained in relative excess of fiber oxidative capacity in some skeletal muscles of late middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Hepple, Russell T; Vogell, Janis E

    2004-06-01

    The anatomic size of the capillary-to-fiber (C/F) interface plays an important role in O(2) flux from blood to tissue by determining the surface area available for diffusion and is maintained in relative proportion to fiber mitochondrial volume across a wide range of muscle aerobic capacity. In the present study, we examined an estimate of the anatomic size of the C/F interface [the quotient of the individual C/F ratio and fiber perimeter, C/F perimeter exchange (CFPE) index] and fiber oxidative capacity in different skeletal muscles, or muscle regions, to test the hypothesis that capillarization would be maintained in relative excess of reduced fiber oxidative capacity in aged muscles. The right gastrocnemius, plantaris, and soleus muscles from young adult (8 mo old) and late middle-aged (28-30 mo old) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats were excised for evaluation of flux through electron transport chain complexes I-III and/or morphometric estimation of capillarization. Muscle mass was lower in the gastrocnemius muscles of the older animals (2,076 +/- 32 vs. 1,825 +/- 47 mg in young adult vs. late middle-aged, respectively; mean +/- SE) but not the plantaris or soleus muscles. Fibers were smaller in the white region of gastrocnemius muscles but larger in the red region of gastrocnemius muscles of the older animals. There was no difference in the number of capillaries around a fiber, the individual C/F ratio, or the CFPE index between groups for any muscle/region, whereas flux through complexes I-III was reduced by 29-43% in late middle-aged animals. Thus the greater quotient of indexes of anatomic capillarity (individual C/F ratio or CFPE index) and fiber oxidative capacity in soleus and the white region of gastrocnemius muscles, but not in the red region of gastrocnemius muscles of the older animals, shows that anatomic capillarity is maintained in relative excess of oxidative capacity in some muscle regions in late middle-aged rats.

  12. REGULATION OF NADPH OXIDASES IN SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    The only known function of NAD(P)H oxidases is to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Skeletal muscles express three isoforms of NAD(P)H oxidases (Nox1, Nox2, and Nox4) that have been identified as critical modulators of redox homeostasis. Nox2 acts as the main source of skeletal muscle ROS during contractions, participates insulin signaling and glucose transport, and mediates the myocyte response to osmotic stress. Nox2 and Nox4 contribute to skeletal muscle abnormalities elicited by angiotensin II, muscular dystrophy, heart failure, and high fat diet. Our review addresses the expression and regulation of NAD(P)H oxidases with emphasis on aspects that are relevant to skeletal muscle. We also summarize: i) the most widely used NAD(P)H oxidases activity assays and inhibitors, and ii) studies that have defined Nox enzymes as protagonists of skeletal muscle redox homeostasis in a variety of health and disease conditions. PMID:27184955

  13. Relative appendicular skeletal muscle mass is associated with isokinetic muscle strength and balance in healthy collegiate men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Hong, Ju; Cha, Jun-Youl; Park, Jung-Min; Eun, Denny; Yoo, Jaehyun; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2016-11-01

    There are few studies on the relationship between skeletal muscle mass and balance in the young ages. We investigated the relationship between appendicular skeletal muscle mass, isokinetic muscle strength of lower extremity, and balance among healthy young men using relative skeletal muscle index. Thirty men were grouped according to relative appendicular skeletal muscle mass index: higher skeletal muscle group (n = 15) and lower skeletal muscle group (n = 15). Static and dynamic balance abilities were measured using the following: a test where participants stood on one leg with eyes closed, a modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (mCTSIB) with eyes open and eyes closed, a stability test, and limits of stability test. The muscle strength of lower extremities was measured with an isokinetic analyser in hip, knee, and ankle joints. Participants with higher appendicular skeletal muscle mass were significantly more stable in maintaining dynamic balance than those with lower appendicular skeletal muscle mass. Moreover, appendicular skeletal muscle mass index was positively correlated with dynamic balance ability. Participants with higher appendicular skeletal muscle mass had stronger strength in the lower extremity, and there were significant differences in the isokinetic torque ratios between groups. From these results, it can be inferred that higher appendicular skeletal muscle mass relates to muscle strength and the alteration in the peak torque ratio of the lower extremity, contributing to the maintenance of balance.

  14. Angiotensin II: role in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Córdova, Gonzalo; Salas, José Diego

    2012-09-01

    Skeletal muscle, the main protein reservoir in the body, is a tissue that exhibits high plasticity when exposed to changes. Muscle proteins can be mobilized into free amino acids when skeletal muscle wasting occurs, a process called skeletal muscle atrophy. This wasting is an important systemic or local manifestation under disuse conditions (e.g., bed rest or immobilization), in starvation, in older adults, and in several diseases. The molecular mechanisms involved in muscle wasting imply the activation of specific signaling pathways which ultimately manage muscle responses to modulate biological events such as increases in protein catabolism, oxidative stress, and cell death by apoptosis. Many factors have been involved in the generation and maintenance of atrophy in skeletal muscle, among them angiotensin II (Ang-II), the main peptide of renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Together with Ang-II, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and the Ang-II receptor type 1 (AT-1 receptor) are expressed in skeletal muscle, forming an important local axis that can regulate its function. In many of the conditions that lead to muscle wasting, there is an impairment of RAS in a global or local fashion. At this point, there are several pieces of evidence that suggest the participation of Ang-II, ACE, and AT-1 receptor in the generation of skeletal muscle atrophy. Interestingly, the Ang-II participation in muscle atrophy is strongly ligated to the regulation of hypertrophic activity of factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). In this article, we reviewed the current state of Ang-II and RAS function on skeletal muscle wasting and its possible use as a therapeutic target to improve skeletal muscle function under atrophic conditions.

  15. Redox control of skeletal muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Scott K.; Morton, Aaron B.; Ahn, Bumsoo; Smuder, Ashley J.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscles comprise the largest organ system in the body and play an essential role in body movement, breathing, and glucose homeostasis. Skeletal muscle is also an important endocrine organ that contributes to the health of numerous body organs. Therefore, maintaining healthy skeletal muscles is important to support overall health of the body. Prolonged periods of muscle inactivity (e.g., bed rest or limb immobilization) or chronic inflammatory diseases (i.e., cancer, kidney failure, etc.) result in skeletal muscle atrophy. An excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with a poor prognosis in several diseases and significant muscle weakness impairs the quality of life. The skeletal muscle atrophy that occurs in response to inflammatory diseases or prolonged inactivity is often associated with both oxidative and nitrosative stress. In this report, we critically review the experimental evidence that provides support for a causative link between oxidants and muscle atrophy. More specifically, this review will debate the sources of oxidant production in skeletal muscle undergoing atrophy as well as provide a detailed discussion on how reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species modulate the signaling pathways that regulate both protein synthesis and protein breakdown. PMID:26912035

  16. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  17. [Molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Astratenkova, I V; Rogozkin, V A

    2014-06-01

    Enzymes Akt, AMPK, mTOR, S6K and PGC-1a coactivator take part in skeletal muscles in the regulation of synthesis of proteins. The expression of these proteins is regulated by growth factors, hormones, nutrients, mechanical loading and leads to an increase in muscle mass and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The review presents the results of studies published in the past four years, which expand knowledge on the effects of various factors on protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. The attention is focused on the achievements that reveal and clarify the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. The central place is taken by mTOR enzyme which controls and regulates the main stages of the cascade of reactions of muscle proteins providing synthesis in the conditions of human life. coactivator PGC-1a.

  18. Skeletal muscle-smooth muscle interaction: an unusual myoelastic system.

    PubMed

    Hikida, R S; Peterson, W J

    1983-09-01

    The serratus superficialis metapatagialis (SSM) of pigeons is a skeletal muscle with unusual properties. It lies between the ribs and the trailing edge of the wing, where it is attached to the skin by a system of smooth muscles having elastic tendons. Wing movements during flight induce marked changes in this muscle's length. The SSM inserts onto the deep fascia, and at its termination the skeletal muscle contains large numbers of microtubules. Many myofibrils attach to leptomeric organelles, which then attach to the terminal end of the skeletal muscle fiber. The deep fascia next connects to the dermis of the skin by bundles of smooth muscles that have elastic tendons at both ends. This system allows large movements of the muscle while preventing its fibers from overstretching. The movements and presumed forces acting at this muscle make the presence of sensory receptors such as muscle spindles unlikely. Spindles are absent in this muscle.

  19. Damage to Liver and Skeletal Muscles in Marathon Runners During a 100 km Run With Regard to Age and Running Speed

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzębski, Zbigniew; Żychowska, Małgorzata; Radzimiński, Łukasz; Konieczna, Anna; Kortas, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine: (1) whether damage to liver and skeletal muscles occurs during a 100 km run; (2) whether the metabolic response to extreme exertion is related to the age or running speed of the participant; (3) whether it is possible to determine the optimal running speed and distance for long-distance runners’ health by examining biochemical parameters in venous blood. Fourteen experienced male amateur ultra-marathon runners, divided into two age groups, took part in a 100 km run. Blood samples for liver and skeletal muscle damage indexes were collected from the ulnar vein just before the run, after 25, 50, 75 and 100 km, and 24 hours after termination of the run. A considerable increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was observed with the distance covered (p < 0.05), which continued during recovery. An increase in the mean values of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p < 0.05) was observed with each sequential course. The biggest differences between the age groups were found for the activity of liver enzymes and LDH after completing 75 km as well as after 24 hours of recovery. It can be concluded that the response to extreme exertion deteriorates with age in terms of the active movement apparatus. PMID:25964813

  20. Damage to Liver and Skeletal Muscles in Marathon Runners During a 100 km Run With Regard to Age and Running Speed.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębski, Zbigniew; Żychowska, Małgorzata; Radzimiński, Łukasz; Konieczna, Anna; Kortas, Jakub

    2015-03-29

    The purpose of this study was to determine: (1) whether damage to liver and skeletal muscles occurs during a 100 km run; (2) whether the metabolic response to extreme exertion is related to the age or running speed of the participant; (3) whether it is possible to determine the optimal running speed and distance for long-distance runners' health by examining biochemical parameters in venous blood. Fourteen experienced male amateur ultra-marathon runners, divided into two age groups, took part in a 100 km run. Blood samples for liver and skeletal muscle damage indexes were collected from the ulnar vein just before the run, after 25, 50, 75 and 100 km, and 24 hours after termination of the run. A considerable increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was observed with the distance covered (p < 0.05), which continued during recovery. An increase in the mean values of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p < 0.05) was observed with each sequential course. The biggest differences between the age groups were found for the activity of liver enzymes and LDH after completing 75 km as well as after 24 hours of recovery. It can be concluded that the response to extreme exertion deteriorates with age in terms of the active movement apparatus.

  1. [In vitro construction of skeletal muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yuya; Takeuchi, Shoji

    In conventional culture methods using culture dishes, myotubes formed by fusion of myoblasts adhere to the surface of the culture dishes. Because the adherence causes interruption of myotube contractions and immobilization of myotubes from the culture dishes, the conventional culture methods have limitations to applications of the myotubes into drug developments and medical treatments. In order to avoid their adherence, many researchers have proposed in vitro construction of skeletal muscle tissues which both ends are fixed to anchors. The skeletal muscle tissues achieve their contractions freely according to electrical stimulations or optical stimulations, and transfer of them to other experimental setup by releasing them form the anchors. By combining the skeletal muscle tissues with force sensors, the skeletal muscle tissues are available to drug screening tests based on contractile force as a functional index. Furthermore, survival of the skeletal muscle tissues are demonstrated by implantation of them to animals. Thus, in vitro constructed skeletal muscle tissues is now recognized as attractive tools in medical fields. This review will summarize fabrication methods, properties and medical applicability of the skeletal muscle tissues.

  2. Effect of age, potassium depletion and denervation on specific displaceable [3H]ouabain binding in rat skeletal muscle in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Torben; Hansen, Otto; Kjeldsen, Keld; Nørgaard, Aage

    1982-01-01

    1. Following intraperitoneal injection of [3H]ouabain in rats, the isotope is rapidly distributed in blood plasma available for binding to the Na-K-ATPase in the plasma membranes of most tissues. In skeletal muscle tissue excised and washed 4 × 30 min in ice-cold buffer, 95% of the 3H activity retained was shown to be [3H]ouabain using a specific binding assay. 2. The [3H]ouabain bound to soleus and extensor digitorum longus (e.d.l.) muscles in vivo and retained following wash-out in the cold showed the same saturation characteristics as those determined when binding took place in vitro. 3. In soleus and e.d.l. muscles obtained from 28-day-old rats, the number of [3H]ouabain binding sites measured in vivo was 583±19 and 720±22 pmol/g wet wt., respectively, i.e. in good agreement with previous and present results obtained in vitro. 4. In vivo measurements showed that 7 days after denervation, the number of [3H]ouabain binding sites in soleus and e.d.l. muscles was reduced by 22 and 13%, respectively. 5. In the age interval from 28 to 85 days, the number of [3H]ouabain binding sites in soleus was found to decrease by 58%. Following I.P. injection of [3H]ouabain, the 85-day-old rats showed a more pronounced and sustained rise in plasma 3H activity, which in part can be due to the reduced capacity for [3H]ouabain binding in skeletal muscle. 6. K depletion induced by the administration of K-deficient diet for 3 weeks reduced [3H]ouabain binding by 63% in soleus muscles. In the K-depleted animals, the plasma 3H activity measured 15 min after I.P. injection of [3H]ouabain was 77% higher than in controls receiving the same dose per kg body weight. 7. The present in vivo results provide further support for the idea that increased digitalis toxicity due to increasing age or K depletion is related to reduced binding capacity for digitalis glycosides in skeletal muscle. PMID:6304285

  3. Vascular innervation in human skeletal muscle with and without neuromuscular disease. A quantitative ultrastructural study with references to the effects of age and different blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Case, C P; Girling, A J

    1988-01-01

    A quantitative ultrastructural study has been made of the innervation of 461 arterioles in 114 skeletal muscle biopsies of patients with or without neuromuscular disease excluding diabetes and autonomic neuropathy. In 18 controls the number of nerves and Schwann cells around each vessel was related to the size of the vessel, whether the vessel was within a muscle fascicle or between muscle fascicles. The innervation of arterioles increased with increased diastolic blood pressure. There was no statistically significant change in innervation with increased systolic blood pressure or with age, from 4 to 85 years. In 96 cases of neuromuscular disease and especially in motor neurone disease, axonal varicosities in cross section tended to be larger, more often contained no vesicles or only a few and had altered satellite cell cover depending on the location of the arteriole. Whilst the numerical density of Schwann cells did not change with disease, fewer varicosities were identified within Schwann cells in motor neurone disease, metabolic myopathy and neuropathy and myopathy due to toxins or vascular disease. Preterminal axons in nerve fascicles adjacent to arterioles were lost in polymyositis and muscle disease due to toxins or vascular disease. In polymyositis, metabolic myopathy and motor neurone disease there was some evidence of compensatory nerve sprouting, either in the nerve fascicles or in the adventitia of the arterioles. These structural changes may be related to the changes in blood flow or vascular reactivity described by others in motor neurone disease, polymyositis and metabolic myopathy. It is concluded that the ultrastructure of the vascular innervation of human skeletal muscle is similar to that in other mammals and is changed more with increased diastolic blood pressure and neuromuscular disease than with age.

  4. The depletion of skeletal muscle satellite cells with age is concomitant with reduced capacity of single progenitors to produce reserve progeny

    PubMed Central

    Day, Kenneth; Shefer, Gabi; Shearer, Andrew; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora

    2010-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic progenitors residing on the myofiber surface that support skeletal muscle repair. We used mice in which satellite cells were detected by GFP expression driven by nestin gene regulatory elements to define age-related changes in both numbers of satellite cells that occupy hindlimb myofibers and their individual performance. We demonstrate a reduction in satellite cells per myofiber with age that is more prominent in females compared to males. Satellite cell loss also persists with age in myostatin-null mice regardless of increased muscle mass. Immunofluorescent analysis of isolated myofibers from nestin-GFP/Myf5nLacZ/+ mice reveals a decline with age in the number of satellite cells that express detectable levels of βgal. Nestin-GFP expression typically diminishes in primary cultures of satellite cells as myogenic progeny proliferate and differentiate, but GFP subsequently reappears in the Pax7+ reserve population. Clonal analysis of sorted GFP+ satellite cells from hindlimb muscles shows heterogeneity in the extent of cell density and myotube formation among colonies. Reserve cells emerge primarily within high-density colonies, and the number of clones that produce reserve cells is reduced with age. Thus, satellite cell depletion with age could be attributed to a reduced capacity to generate a reserve population. PMID:20079729

  5. Lipid droplet dynamics in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Madeleen

    2016-01-15

    The skeletal muscle is subjected to high mechanical and energetic demands. Lipid droplets are an important source of energy substrates for the working muscle. Muscle cells contain a variety of lipid droplets, which are fundamentally smaller than those found in adipocytes. This translates into a greater lipid droplet surface area serving as the interface for intracellular lipid metabolism. The skeletal muscle has a high plasticity, it is subjected to major remodeling following training and detraining. This coincides with adaptations in lipid droplet characteristics and dynamics. The majority of lipid droplets in skeletal muscle are located in the subsarcolemmal region or in-between the myofibrils, in close vicinity to mitochondria. The vastly organized nature of skeletal muscle fibers limits organelle mobility. The high metabolic rate and substrate turnover in skeletal muscle demands a strict coordination of intramyocellular lipid metabolism and LD dynamics, in which lipid droplet coat proteins play an important role. This review provides insights into the characteristics, diversity and dynamics of skeletal muscle lipid droplets.

  6. Cardiac and skeletal muscle myosin polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Lowey, S

    1986-06-01

    Skeletal muscles, unlike cardiac tissue, express several myosin isozymes during development which differ in primary structure from adult myosin. Monoclonal antibodies have shown the presence of at least two embryonic myosins, followed by a post-hatch myosin that persists until the appearance of adult myosin in chicken pectoralis muscle. Although the two major cardiac isozymes differ in enzymatic activity, the avian skeletal myosin isozymes all share the same high level of ATPase activity found for adult pectoralis myosin. The functional basis for the extensive myosin polymorphism in skeletal muscles thus remains to be determined.

  7. Effect of age on metabolic fatigue and on indirect symptoms of skeletal muscle damage after stretch-shortening exercise.

    PubMed

    Skurvydas, A; Streckis, V; Mickeviciene, D; Kamandulis, S; Stanislovaitis, A; Mamkus, G

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the main differences between men (M) and adolescents (A) (males) in metabolic fatigue and damage induced by exercise performed at maximal intensity. Healthy A (age 13.4 0.6 years, n = 12) and healthy adult M (age 25.4 1.7 years, n = 12) participated in this study. To induce muscle damage and metabolic fatigue stretch-shortening exercise (SSE) (5 bouts of 20 jumps with counter-movement to 90 degrees angle in the knee with 10 s between bouts) has been chosen. The following data were measured: the force of the quadriceps muscle, aroused by electrical stimulation at different frequencies, maximal voluntary contraction force, height of jump (JH), muscle soreness, lactate (La) concentration and creatine kinase (CK) activity in the blood. All the parameters mentioned were measured before exercise and 2-5 min, 20 min, 24 h and 48 h after the SSE, except for La concentration changes in the blood measured before exercise, 2 min and 20 min after the SSE. The main findings in this study are the following: 1) during SSE JH decreased significantly (P < 0.05) more in M than in A, whereas La concentration in the blood after SSE increased more in M than in A; 2) indirect symptoms of muscle damage were more evident in M than in A; 3) there was secondary decrease in electrically induced muscle force at 10-20 Hz from 3 min until 20 min after SSE but only in the muscles of M; 4) low frequency fatigue after SSE was more evident in M than A. The results of the present study indicate that the muscles of adolescents are more resistant to both metabolic fatigue and exercise-induced damage than those of men.

  8. Anabolic and catabolic pathways regulating skeletal muscle mass

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John J.; Esser, Karyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review the purpose of this review is to discuss recent findings as they pertain to anabolic and catabolic signaling pathways involved in the regulation of adult skeletal muscle mass. Recent findings research conducted over the past few years has continued to refine our understanding of the pathways that govern skeletal muscle mass, in particular the mTOR, FoxO and NF-κB pathways. Alternative signaling pathways have also emerged as important regulators of muscle mass such as the β-catenin pathway. Summary a better understanding of the anabolic and catabolic processes which regulate skeletal muscle mass is critical for the development of more effective therapeutics to prevent the loss of muscle with disuse, aging and disease. PMID:20154608

  9. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  10. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  11. Effects of ageing on expression of the muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases and Akt-dependent regulation of Foxo transcription factors in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Akira; Shiozuka, Masataka; Takayama, Yuzo; Hoshino, Takayuki; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists as to whether the muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases MAFbx and MuRF1 are transcriptionally upregulated in the process of sarcopenia. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ageing on mRNA/protein expression of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases and Akt/Foxo signalling in gastrocnemius muscles of female mice. Old mice exhibited a typical sarcopenic phenotype, characterized by loss of muscle mass and strength, decreased amount of myofibrillar proteins, incidence of aberrant muscle fibres, and genetic signature to sarcopenia. Activation levels of Akt were lower in adult and old mice than in young mice. Consequently, Akt-mediated phosphorylation levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3 proteins were decreased. Nuclear levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3 proteins showed an overall increasing trend in old mice. MAFbx mRNA expression was decreased in old mice relative to adult mice, whereas MuRF1 mRNA expression was less affected by ageing. At the protein level, MAFbx was less affected by ageing, whereas MuRF1 was increased in old mice relative to adult mice, with ubiquitin-protein conjugates being increased with ageing. In conclusion, we provided evidence for no mRNA upregulation of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases and disconnection between their expression and Akt/Foxo signalling in sarcopenic mice. Their different responsiveness to ageing may reflect different roles in sarcopenia.

  12. Skeletal muscle degeneration and regeneration in mice and flies.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mamta; Nongthomba, Upendra; Grounds, Miranda D

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of skeletal muscle biology are remarkably similar between mammals and tiny insects, and experimental models of mice and flies (Drosophila) provide powerful tools to understand factors controlling the growth, maintenance, degeneration (atrophy and necrosis), and regeneration of normal and diseased muscles, with potential applications to the human condition. This review compares the limb muscles of mice and the indirect flight muscles of flies, with respect to the mechanisms of adult myofiber formation, homeostasis, atrophy, hypertrophy, and the response to muscle degeneration, with some comment on myogenic precursor cells and common gene regulatory pathways. There is a striking similarity between the species for events related to muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, without contribution of any myoblast fusion. Since the flight muscles of adult flies lack a population of reserve myogenic cells (equivalent to satellite cells), this indicates that such cells are not required for maintenance of normal muscle function. However, since satellite cells are essential in postnatal mammals for myogenesis and regeneration in response to myofiber necrosis, the extent to which such regeneration might be possible in flight muscles of adult flies remains unclear. Common cellular and molecular pathways for both species are outlined related to neuromuscular disorders and to age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function (sarcopenia). The commonality of events related to skeletal muscles in these disparate species (with vast differences in size, growth duration, longevity, and muscle activities) emphasizes the combined value and power of these experimental animal models.

  13. Sumoylated α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscle of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Uda, Munehiro; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Shigenaga, Ayako; Baba, Takeshi; Naito, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Yamakura, Fumiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of two major muscle fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative fibers and fast-twitch glycolytic fibers. The proteins in these muscle fibers are known to differ in their expression, relative abundance, and post-translational modifications. In this study, we report a previously unreported post-translational modification of α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscles of adult male F344 rats in vivo. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), we first examined the differences in the protein expression profiles between the soleus and plantaris muscles. We found higher intensity protein spots at approximately 60 kDa and pH 9 on 2D-PAGE for the soleus muscle compared with the plantaris muscle. These spots were identified as α-skeletal muscle actin by liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and western blot analyses. In addition, we found that the 60 kDa α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1, using 2D-PAGE and western blot analyses. Furthermore, we found that α-skeletal muscle actin with larger molecular weight was localized in the nuclear and cytosol of the skeletal muscle, but not in the myofibrillar fraction by the combination of subcellular fractionation and western blot analyses. These results suggest that α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by SUMO-1 in the skeletal muscles, localized in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, and the extent of this modification is much higher in the slow muscles than in the fast muscles. This is the first study to show the presence of SUMOylated actin in animal tissues.

  14. Skeletal muscle design to meet functional demands.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2011-05-27

    Skeletal muscles are length- and velocity-sensitive force producers, constructed of a vast array of sarcomeres. Muscles come in a variety of sizes and shapes to accomplish a wide variety of tasks. How does muscle design match task performance? In this review, we outline muscle's basic properties and strategies that are used to produce movement. Several examples are provided, primarily for human muscles, in which skeletal muscle architecture and moment arms are tailored to a particular performance requirement. In addition, the concept that muscles may have a preferred sarcomere length operating range is also introduced. Taken together, the case is made that muscles can be fine-tuned to perform specific tasks that require actuators with a wide range of properties.

  15. Skeletal muscle design to meet functional demands

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Richard L.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscles are length- and velocity-sensitive force producers, constructed of a vast array of sarcomeres. Muscles come in a variety of sizes and shapes to accomplish a wide variety of tasks. How does muscle design match task performance? In this review, we outline muscle's basic properties and strategies that are used to produce movement. Several examples are provided, primarily for human muscles, in which skeletal muscle architecture and moment arms are tailored to a particular performance requirement. In addition, the concept that muscles may have a preferred sarcomere length operating range is also introduced. Taken together, the case is made that muscles can be fine-tuned to perform specific tasks that require actuators with a wide range of properties. PMID:21502118

  16. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  17. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vandenburgh, H; Chromiak, J; Shansky, J; Del Tatto, M; Lemaire, J

    1999-06-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  18. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  19. Male ironman triathletes lose skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Baumann, Barbara; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether male triathletes in an Ironman triathlon lose body mass in the form of fat mass or skeletal muscle mass in a field study at the Ironman Switzerland in 27 male Caucasian non-professional Ironman triathletes. Pre- and post-race body mass, fat mass and skeletal muscle mass were determined. In addition, total body water, hematological and urinary parameters were measured in order to quantify hydration status. Body mass decreased by 1.8 kg (p< 0.05), skeletal muscle decreased by 1.0 kg (p< 0.05) whereas fat mass showed no changes. Urinary specific gravity, plasma urea and plasma volume increased (p< 0.05). Pre- to post-race change (Delta) in body mass was not associated with ? skeletal muscle mass. Additionally, there was no association between Delta plasma urea and Delta skeletal muscle mass; Delta plasma volume was not associated with Delta total body water (p< 0.05). We concluded that male triathletes in an Ironman triathlon lose 1.8 kg of body mass and 1 kg of skeletal muscle mass, presumably due to a depletion of intramyocellular stored glycogen and lipids.

  20. Estimation of skeletal muscle mass from body creatine content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Rahlmann, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures have been developed for studying the effect of changes in gravitational loading on skeletal muscle mass through measurements of the body creatine content. These procedures were developed for studies of gravitational scale effects in a four-species model, comprising the hamster, rat, guinea pig, and rabbit, which provides a sufficient range of body size for assessment of allometric parameters. Since intracellular muscle creatine concentration varies among species, and with age within a given species, the concentration values for metabolically mature individuals of these four species were established. The creatine content of the carcass, skin, viscera, smooth muscle, and skeletal muscle was determined for each species. In addition, the skeletal muscle mass of the major body components was determined, as well as the total and fat-free masses of the body and carcass, and the percent skeletal muscle in each. It is concluded that these procedures are particularly useful for studying the effect of gravitational loading on the skeletal muscle content of the animal carcass, which is the principal weight-bearing organ of the body.

  1. Estimation of skeletal muscle mass from body creatine content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Rahlmann, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures have been developed for studying the effect of changes in gravitational loading on skeletal muscle mass through measurements of the body creatine content. These procedures were developed for studies of gravitational scale effects in a four-species model, comprising the hamster, rat, guinea pig, and rabbit, which provides a sufficient range of body size for assessment of allometric parameters. Since intracellular muscle creatine concentration varies among species, and with age within a given species, the concentration values for metabolically mature individuals of these four species were established. The creatine content of the carcass, skin, viscera, smooth muscle, and skeletal muscle was determined for each species. In addition, the skeletal muscle mass of the major body components was determined, as well as the total and fat-free masses of the body and carcass, and the percent skeletal muscle in each. It is concluded that these procedures are particularly useful for studying the effect of gravitational loading on the skeletal muscle content of the animal carcass, which is the principal weight-bearing organ of the body.

  2. ISOLATION OF SKELETAL MUSCLE NUCLEI

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Jean C.; Edelman, P. Michael; Knigge, Karl M.; Schwartz, Irving L.

    1965-01-01

    A method employing aqueous media for isolation of nuclei from rat skeletal muscle is described. The technique involves (a) mincing and then homogenizing in a 0.32 M sucrose-salt solution with a Potter-Elvehjem type homogenizer using a Delrin (an acetal resin) pestle and a carefully controlled, relatively large pestle-to-glass clearance, (b) filtering through fiberglass and stainless steel screens of predetermined mesh size to remove myofibrils and connective tissue, and (c) centrifuging in a 2.15 M sucrose-salt solution containing 0.7 mM ATP. Electron and phase-contrast microscopic observations show that the nuclei are intact, unencumbered by cytoplasmic tags, and possess well preserved distinct nucleoli, nucleoplasm, and nuclear membranes. Cytoplasmic contamination is minimal and mainly mitochondrial. Chemical assays of the nuclear fraction show that the DNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios are comparable to those obtained in other tissues. These ratios, as well as the low specific activity obtained for cytochrome c oxidase and the virtual absence of myofibrillar ATPase, indicate a high degree of purity with minimal mitochondrial and myofibrillar contamination. The steps comprising the technique and the reasons for their selection are discussed. PMID:4287141

  3. Bone and skeletal muscle: neighbors with close ties.

    PubMed

    DiGirolamo, Douglas J; Kiel, Douglas P; Esser, Karyn A

    2013-07-01

    The musculoskeletal system evolved in mammals to perform diverse functions that include locomotion, facilitating breathing, protecting internal organs, and coordinating global energy expenditure. Bone and skeletal muscles involved with locomotion are both derived from somitic mesoderm and accumulate peak tissue mass synchronously, according to genetic information and environmental stimuli. Aging results in the progressive and parallel loss of bone (osteopenia) and skeletal muscle (sarcopenia) with profound consequences for quality of life. Age-associated sarcopenia results in reduced endurance, poor balance, and reduced mobility that predispose elderly individuals to falls, which more frequently result in fracture because of concomitant osteoporosis. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the parallel development and involution of these tissues is critical to developing new and more effective means to combat osteoporosis and sarcopenia in our increasingly aged population. This perspective highlights recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms coupling bone and skeletal muscle mass, and identify critical areas where further work is needed.

  4. Skeletal muscle weakness in osteogeneis imperfecta mice

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Bettina A; Ferreira, J. Andries; McCambridge, Amanda J.; Brown, Marybeth; Phillips, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01

    Exercise intolerance, muscle fatigue and weakness are often-reported, little-investigated concerns of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a heritable connective tissue disorder hallmarked by bone fragility resulting primarily from dominant mutations in the proα1(I) or proα2(I) collagen genes and the recently discovered recessive mutations in post-translational modifying proteins of type I collagen. In this study we examined the soleus (S), plantaris (P), gastrocnemius (G), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (Q) muscles of mice expressing mild (+/oim) and moderately severe (oim/oim) OI for evidence of inherent muscle pathology. In particular, muscle weight, fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber type, fiber histomorphology, fibrillar collagen content, absolute, relative and specific peak tetanic force (Po, Po/mg and Po/CSA respectively) of individual muscles were evaluated. Oim/oim mouse muscles were generally smaller, contained less fibrillar collagen, had decreased Po and an inability to sustain Po for the 300 ms testing duration for specific muscles; +/oim mice had a similar but milder skeletal muscle phenotype. +/oim mice had mild weakness of specific muscles but were less affected than their oim/oim counterparts which demonstrated readily apparent skeletal muscle pathology. Therefore muscle weakness in oim mice reflects inherent skeletal muscle pathology. PMID:20619344

  5. Do inflammatory cells influence skeletal muscle hypertrophy?

    PubMed

    Koh, Timothy J; Pizza, Francis X

    2009-06-01

    Most research on muscle hypertrophy has focused on the responses of muscle cells to mechanical loading; however, a number of studies also suggest that inflammatory cells may influence muscle hypertrophy. Neutrophils and macrophages accumulate in skeletal muscle following increased mechanical loading, and we have demonstrated that macrophages are essential for hypertrophy following synergist ablation. Whether neutrophils are required remains to be determined. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs impair adaptive responses of skeletal muscle in both human and animal experiments suggesting that the routine use of such drugs could impair muscle performance. Much remains to be learned about the role of inflammatory cells in muscle hypertrophy, including the molecular signals involved in calling neutrophils and macrophages to skeletal muscle as well as those that regulate their function in muscle. In addition, although we have demonstrated that macrophages produce growth promoting factors during muscle hypertrophy, the full range of functional activities involved in muscle hypertrophy remains to be determined. Further investigation should provide insight into the intriguing hypothesis that inflammatory cells play integral roles in regulating muscle hypertrophy.

  6. Overweight in elderly people induces impaired autophagy in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Potes, Yaiza; de Luxán-Delgado, Beatriz; Rodriguez-González, Susana; Guimarães, Marcela Rodrigues Moreira; Solano, Juan J; Fernández-Fernández, María; Bermúdez, Manuel; Boga, Jose A; Vega-Naredo, Ignacio; Coto-Montes, Ana

    2017-09-01

    Sarcopenia is the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and quality associated with aging. Changes in body composition, especially in skeletal muscle and fat mass are crucial steps in the development of chronic diseases. We studied the effect of overweight on skeletal muscle tissue in elderly people without reaching obesity to prevent this extreme situation. Overweight induces a progressive protein breakdown reflected as a progressive withdrawal of anabolism against the promoted catabolic state leading to muscle wasting. Protein turnover is regulated by a network of signaling pathways. Muscle damage derived from overweight displayed by oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces inflammation and insulin resistance and forces the muscle to increase requirements from autophagy mechanisms. Our findings showed that failure of autophagy in the elderly deprives it to deal with the cell damage caused by overweight. This insufficiently efficient autophagy leads to an accumulation of p62 and NBR1, which are robust markers of protein aggregations. This impaired autophagy affects myogenesis activity. Depletion of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) without links to variations in myostatin levels in overweight patients suggest a possible reduction of satellite cells in muscle tissue, which contributes to declined muscle quality. This discovery has important implications that improve the understanding of aged-related atrophy caused by overweight and demonstrates how impaired autophagy is one of the main responsible mechanisms that aggravate muscle wasting. Therefore, autophagy could be an interesting target for therapeutic interventions in humans against muscle impairment diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pleiotropic effects of sphingolipids in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bruni, P; Donati, C

    2008-11-01

    Studies of the last two decades have demonstrated that sphingolipids are important signalling molecules exerting key roles in the control of fundamental biological processes including proliferation, differentiation, motility and survival. Here we review the role of bioactive sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine 1-phosphate, ganglioside GM3, in the regulation of skeletal muscle biology. The emerging picture is in favour of a complex role of these molecules, which appear implicated in the activation of muscle resident stem cells, their proliferation and differentiation, finalized at skeletal muscle regeneration. Moreover, they are involved in the regulation of contractile properties, tissue responsiveness to insulin and muscle fiber trophism. Hopefully, this article will provide a framework for future investigation into the field, aimed at establishing whether altered sphingolipid metabolism is implicated in the onset of skeletal muscle diseases and identifying new pharmacological targets for the therapy of multiple illnesses, including muscular dystrophies and diabetes.

  8. Skeletal muscle tensile strain dependence: hyperviscoelastic nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Benjamin B; Morrow, Duane A; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R; Donahue, Tammy L Haut

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Computational modeling of skeletal muscle requires characterization at the tissue level. While most skeletal muscle studies focus on hyperelasticity, the goal of this study was to examine and model the nonlinear behavior of both time-independent and time-dependent properties of skeletal muscle as a function of strain. Materials and Methods Nine tibialis anterior muscles from New Zealand White rabbits were subject to five consecutive stress relaxation cycles of roughly 3% strain. Individual relaxation steps were fit with a three-term linear Prony series. Prony series coefficients and relaxation ratio were assessed for strain dependence using a general linear statistical model. A fully nonlinear constitutive model was employed to capture the strain dependence of both the viscoelastic and instantaneous components. Results Instantaneous modulus (p<0.0005) and mid-range relaxation (p<0.0005) increased significantly with strain level, while relaxation at longer time periods decreased with strain (p<0.0005). Time constants and overall relaxation ratio did not change with strain level (p>0.1). Additionally, the fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic constitutive model provided an excellent fit to experimental data, while other models which included linear components failed to capture muscle function as accurately. Conclusions Material properties of skeletal muscle are strain-dependent at the tissue level. This strain dependence can be included in computational models of skeletal muscle performance with a fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic model. PMID:26409235

  9. The individual and combined effects of obesity- and ageing-induced systemic inflammation on human skeletal muscle properties

    PubMed Central

    Erskine, R M; Tomlinson, D J; Morse, C I; Winwood, K; Hampson, P; Lord, J M; Onambélé, G L

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine whether circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, elevated with increased fat mass and ageing, were associated with muscle properties in young and older people with variable adiposity. Subjects/Methods: Seventy-five young (18–49 yrs) and 67 older (50–80 yrs) healthy, untrained men and women (BMI: 17–49 kg/m2) performed isometric and isokinetic plantar flexor maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs). Volume (Vm), fascicle pennation angle (FPA), and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle were measured using ultrasonography. Voluntary muscle activation (VA) was assessed using electrical stimulation. GM specific force was calculated as GM fascicle force/PCSA. Percentage body fat (BF%), body fat mass (BFM), and lean mass (BLM) were assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum concentration of 12 cytokines was measured using multiplex luminometry. Results: Despite greater Vm, FPA, and PCSA (P<0.05), young individuals with BF% ⩾40 exhibited 37% less GM specific force compared to young BF%<40 (P<0.05). Older adults with BF% ⩾40 showed greater isokinetic MVC compared to older BF%<40 (P=0.019) but this was reversed when normalised to body mass (P<0.001). IL-6 correlated inversely with VA in young (r=−0.376; P=0.022) but not older adults (p>0.05), while IL-8 correlated with VA in older but not young adults (r⩾0.378, P⩽0.027). TNF-alpha correlated with MVC, lean mass, GM FPA and maximum force in older adults (r⩾0.458; P⩽0.048). Conclusions: The age- and adiposity-dependent relationships found here provide evidence that circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines may play different roles in muscle remodelling according to the age and adiposity of the individual. PMID:27569681

  10. Role of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in regulating skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance during forearm exercise in ageing humans

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jennifer C; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    In healthy humans, ageing is typically associated with reduced skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance during exercise. Further, there is a marked increase in resting sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity with age, yet whether augmented SNS-mediated α-adrenergic vasoconstriction contributes to the age-associated impairment in exercising muscle blood flow and vascular tone in humans is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that SNS-mediated vasoconstriction is greater in older than young adults and limits muscle (forearm) blood flow (FBF) during graded handgrip exercise (5, 15, 25% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)). FBF was measured (Doppler ultrasound) and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated in 11 young (21 ± 1 years) and 12 older (62 ± 2 years) adults in control conditions and during combined local α- and β-adrenoreceptor blockade via intra-arterial infusions of phentolamine and propranolol, respectively. Under control conditions, older adults exhibited significantly lower FBF and FVC at 15% MVC exercise (22.6 ± 1.3 vs. 29 ± 3.3 ml min−1 100 g forearm fat-free mass (FFM)−1 and 21.7 ± 1.2 vs. 33.6 ± 4.0 ml min−1 100 g FFM−1 100 mmHg−1; P < 0.05) and 25% MVC exercise (37.4 ± 1.4 vs. 46.0 ± 4.9 ml min−1 100 g FFM−1 and 33.7 ± 1.4 vs. 49.0 ± 5.7 ml min−1 100 g FFM−1 100 mmHg−1; P < 0.05), whereas there was no age group difference at 5% MVC exercise. Local adrenoreceptor blockade increased FBF and FVC at rest and during exercise in both groups, although the increase in FBF and FVC from rest to steady-state exercise was similar in young and older adults across exercise intensities, and thus the age-associated impairment in FBF and FVC persisted. Our data indicate that during graded intensity handgrip exercise, the reduced FVC and subsequently lower skeletal muscle blood flow in older healthy adults is not due to augmented sympathetic vasoconstriction, but rather due to

  11. Role of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in regulating skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance during forearm exercise in ageing humans.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jennifer C; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2014-11-01

    In healthy humans, ageing is typically associated with reduced skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance during exercise. Further, there is a marked increase in resting sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity with age, yet whether augmented SNS-mediated α-adrenergic vasoconstriction contributes to the age-associated impairment in exercising muscle blood flow and vascular tone in humans is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that SNS-mediated vasoconstriction is greater in older than young adults and limits muscle (forearm) blood flow (FBF) during graded handgrip exercise (5, 15, 25% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)). FBF was measured (Doppler ultrasound) and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated in 11 young (21 ± 1 years) and 12 older (62 ± 2 years) adults in control conditions and during combined local α- and β-adrenoreceptor blockade via intra-arterial infusions of phentolamine and propranolol, respectively. Under control conditions, older adults exhibited significantly lower FBF and FVC at 15% MVC exercise (22.6 ± 1.3 vs. 29 ± 3.3 ml min(-1) 100 g forearm fat-free mass (FFM)(-1) and 21.7 ± 1.2 vs. 33.6 ± 4.0 ml min(-1) 100 g FFM(-1) 100 mmHg(-1); P < 0.05) and 25% MVC exercise (37.4 ± 1.4 vs. 46.0 ± 4.9 ml min(-1) 100 g FFM(-1) and 33.7 ± 1.4 vs. 49.0 ± 5.7 ml min(-1) 100 g FFM(-1) 100 mmHg(-1); P < 0.05), whereas there was no age group difference at 5% MVC exercise. Local adrenoreceptor blockade increased FBF and FVC at rest and during exercise in both groups, although the increase in FBF and FVC from rest to steady-state exercise was similar in young and older adults across exercise intensities, and thus the age-associated impairment in FBF and FVC persisted. Our data indicate that during graded intensity handgrip exercise, the reduced FVC and subsequently lower skeletal muscle blood flow in older healthy adults is not due to augmented sympathetic vasoconstriction, but rather due to

  12. Sustained overexpression of IGF-1 prevents age-dependent decrease in charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2002-03-01

    In this work we tested the hypothesis that transgenic sustained overexpression of IGF-1 prevents age-dependent decreases in charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) in skeletal muscle fibers. To this end, short flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle fibers from 5-7- and 21-24-month-old FVB (wild-type) and S1S2 (IGF-1 transgenic) mice were studied. Fibers were voltage-clamped in the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique according to described procedures (Wang, Z. M., M. L. Messi, and O. Delbono. 1999. Biophys. J. 77:2709-2716). Charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration were recorded simultaneously. The maximum charge movement (Q(max)) recorded in young wild-type and transgenic mice was (mean +/- SEM, in nC microF(-1)): 52 +/- 2.1 (n = 46) and 54 +/- 1.9 (n = 38) (non-significant, ns), respectively, whereas in old wild-type and old transgenic mice the values were 36 +/- 2.1 (n = 32) and 49 +/- 2.3 (n = 35), respectively (p < 0.01). The peak intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)](i) recorded in young wild-type and transgenic mice was (in muM): 14.5 +/- 0.9 and 16 +/- 2.1 (ns), whereas in old wild-type and transgenic mice the values were 9.9 +/- 0.1 and 14 +/- 1.1 (p < 0.01), respectively. No significant changes in the voltage distribution or steepness of the Q-V or [Ca(2+)]-V relationship were found. These data support the concept that overexpression of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle prevents age-dependent reduction in charge movement and peak [Ca(2+)](i).

  13. Systemic skeletal muscle necrosis induced by crotoxin.

    PubMed

    Salvini, T F; Amaral, A C; Miyabara, E H; Turri, J A; Danella, P M; Selistre de Araújo, H S

    2001-08-01

    Systemic skeletal muscle necrosis induced by crotoxin, the major component of the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus, was investigated. Mice received an intramuscular injection of crotoxin (0.35mg/kg body weight) into the right tibialis anterior (TA) muscles, which were evaluated 3h, 24h and 3 days later. Control mice were injected with saline. Right and left TAs, gastrocnemius, soleus and right masseter and longissimus dorsi were removed and frozen. Histological sections were stained with Toluidine Blue or incubated for acidic phosphatase reaction. Three and 24h after the injection, signals of muscle fiber injury were found: (a) in the injected TA muscles; (b) in both right and contralateral soleus and red gastrocnemius; and (c) in the masseter muscles. Contralateral TA, longissimus dorsi and white gastrocnemius muscles were not injured. In conclusion, crotoxin induced a systemic and selective muscle injury in muscles or muscle regions composed by oxidative muscle fibers.

  14. Sex differences with aging in nutritive skeletal muscle blood flow: impact of exercise training, nitric oxide, and α-adrenergic-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    La Favor, Justin D.; Kraus, Raymond M.; Carrithers, Jonathan A.; Roseno, Steven L.; Gavin, Timothy P.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases progressively with age, but aging may affect men and women differently. Age-associated changes in vascular structure and function may manifest in impaired nutritive blood flow, although the regulation of nutritive blood flow in healthy aging is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine if nitric oxide (NO)-mediated or α-adrenergic-mediated regulation of nutritive skeletal muscle blood flow is impaired with advanced age, and if exercise training improves age-related deficiencies. Nutritive blood flow was monitored in the vastus lateralis of healthy young and aged men and women via the microdialysis-ethanol technique prior to and following seven consecutive days of exercise training. NO-mediated and α-adrenergic-mediated regulation of nutritive blood flow was assessed by microdialysis perfusion of acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, NG-monomethyl-l-arginine, norepinephrine, or phentolamine. Pretraining nutritive blood flow was attenuated in aged compared with young women (7.39 ± 1.5 vs. 15.5 ± 1.9 ml·100 g−1·min−1, P = 0.018), but not aged men (aged 13.5 ± 3.7 vs. young 9.4 ± 1.3 ml·100 g−1·min−1, P = 0.747). There were no age-associated differences in NO-mediated or α-adrenergic-mediated nutritive blood flow. Exercise training increased resting nutritive blood flow only in young men (9.4 ± 1.3 vs. 19.7 ml·100 g−1·min−1, P = 0.005). The vasodilatory effect of phentolamine was significantly reduced following exercise training only in young men (12.3 ± 6.14 vs. −3.68 ± 3.26 ml·100 g−1·min−1, P = 0.048). In conclusion, the age-associated attenuation of resting nutritive skeletal muscle blood flow was specific to women, while the exercise-induced alleviation of α-adrenergic mediated vasoconstriction that was specific to young men suggests an age-associated modulation of the sympathetic response to exercise training. PMID:24951753

  15. Sex differences with aging in nutritive skeletal muscle blood flow: impact of exercise training, nitric oxide, and α-adrenergic-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    La Favor, Justin D; Kraus, Raymond M; Carrithers, Jonathan A; Roseno, Steven L; Gavin, Timothy P; Hickner, Robert C

    2014-08-15

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases progressively with age, but aging may affect men and women differently. Age-associated changes in vascular structure and function may manifest in impaired nutritive blood flow, although the regulation of nutritive blood flow in healthy aging is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine if nitric oxide (NO)-mediated or α-adrenergic-mediated regulation of nutritive skeletal muscle blood flow is impaired with advanced age, and if exercise training improves age-related deficiencies. Nutritive blood flow was monitored in the vastus lateralis of healthy young and aged men and women via the microdialysis-ethanol technique prior to and following seven consecutive days of exercise training. NO-mediated and α-adrenergic-mediated regulation of nutritive blood flow was assessed by microdialysis perfusion of acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, norepinephrine, or phentolamine. Pretraining nutritive blood flow was attenuated in aged compared with young women (7.39 ± 1.5 vs. 15.5 ± 1.9 ml·100 g(−1)·min(−1), P = 0.018), but not aged men (aged 13.5 ± 3.7 vs. young 9.4 ± 1.3 ml·100 g(−1)·min(−1), P = 0.747). There were no age-associated differences in NO-mediated or α-adrenergic-mediated nutritive blood flow. Exercise training increased resting nutritive blood flow only in young men (9.4 ± 1.3 vs. 19.7 ml·100 g(−1)·min(−1), P = 0.005). The vasodilatory effect of phentolamine was significantly reduced following exercise training only in young men (12.3 ± 6.14 vs. −3.68 ± 3.26 ml·100 g(−1)·min(−1), P = 0.048). In conclusion, the age-associated attenuation of resting nutritive skeletal muscle blood flow was specific to women, while the exercise-induced alleviation of α-adrenergic mediated vasoconstriction that was specific to young men suggests an age-associated modulation of the sympathetic response to exercise training.

  16. Circadian clock regulation of skeletal muscle growth and repair

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Somik; Ma, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the circadian clock, a transcriptional/translational feedback circuit that generates ~24-hour oscillations in behavior and physiology, is a key temporal regulatory mechanism involved in many important aspects of muscle physiology. Given the clock as an evolutionarily-conserved time-keeping mechanism that synchronizes internal physiology to environmental cues, locomotor activities initiated by skeletal muscle enable entrainment to the light-dark cycles on earth, thus ensuring organismal survival and fitness. Despite the current understanding of the role of molecular clock in preventing age-related sarcopenia, investigations into the underlying molecular pathways that transmit clock signals to the maintenance of skeletal muscle growth and function are only emerging. In the current review, the importance of the muscle clock in maintaining muscle mass during development, repair and aging, together with its contribution to muscle metabolism, will be discussed. Based on our current understandings of how tissue-intrinsic muscle clock functions in the key aspects muscle physiology, interventions targeting the myogenic-modulatory activities of the clock circuit may offer new avenues for prevention and treatment of muscular diseases. Studies of mechanisms underlying circadian clock function and regulation in skeletal muscle warrant continued efforts. PMID:27540471

  17. Circadian clock regulation of skeletal muscle growth and repair.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Somik; Ma, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the circadian clock, a transcriptional/translational feedback circuit that generates ~24-hour oscillations in behavior and physiology, is a key temporal regulatory mechanism involved in many important aspects of muscle physiology. Given the clock as an evolutionarily-conserved time-keeping mechanism that synchronizes internal physiology to environmental cues, locomotor activities initiated by skeletal muscle enable entrainment to the light-dark cycles on earth, thus ensuring organismal survival and fitness. Despite the current understanding of the role of molecular clock in preventing age-related sarcopenia, investigations into the underlying molecular pathways that transmit clock signals to the maintenance of skeletal muscle growth and function are only emerging. In the current review, the importance of the muscle clock in maintaining muscle mass during development, repair and aging, together with its contribution to muscle metabolism, will be discussed. Based on our current understandings of how tissue-intrinsic muscle clock functions in the key aspects muscle physiology, interventions targeting the myogenic-modulatory activities of the clock circuit may offer new avenues for prevention and treatment of muscular diseases. Studies of mechanisms underlying circadian clock function and regulation in skeletal muscle warrant continued efforts.

  18. Spermidine coupled with exercise rescues skeletal muscle atrophy from D-gal-induced aging rats through enhanced autophagy and reduced apoptosis via AMPK-FOXO3a signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jingjing; Yang, Xiaoqi; Li, Jie; Shu, Ziyang; Dai, Jun; Liu, Xingran; Li, Biao; Jia, Shaohui; Kou, Xianjuan; Yang, Yi; Chen, Ning

    2017-01-01

    The quality control of skeletal muscle is a continuous requirement throughout the lifetime, although its functions and quality present as a declining trend during aging process. Dysfunctional or deficient autophagy and excessive apoptosis may contribute to the atrophy of senescent skeletal muscle. Spermidine, as a natural polyamine, can be involved in important cellular functions for lifespan extension and stress resistance in several model organisms through activating autophagy. Similarly, cellular autophagic responses to exercise have also been extensively investigated. In the present study, in order to confirm the mitigation or amelioration of skeletal muscle atrophy in aging rats through spermidine coupled with exercise intervention and explore corresponding mechanisms, the rat model with aging-related atrophy of skeletal muscle was established by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactose (D-gal) (200 mg/kgd), and model rats were subjected to the intervention with spermidine (5 mg/kgd) or swimming (60 min/d, 5 d/wk) or combination for 42 days. Spermidine coupled with exercise could attenuate D-gal-induced aging-related atrophy of skeletal muscle through induced autophagy and reduced apoptosis with characteristics of more autophagosomes, activated mitophagy, enhanced mitochondrial quality, alleviated cell shrinkage, and less swollen mitochondria under transmission scanning microscopic observation. Meanwhile, spermidine coupled with exercise could induce autophagy through activating AMPK-FOXO3a signal pathway with characterization of increased Beclin1 and LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, up-regulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, down-regulated pro-apoptotic Bax and caspase-3, as well as activated AMPK and FOXO3a. Therefore, spermidine combined with exercise can execute the prevention or treatment of D-gal-induced aging-related skeletal muscle atrophy through enhanced autophagy and reduced apoptosis mediated by AMPK-FOXO3a signal pathway. PMID:28407698

  19. Role of pericytes in skeletal muscle regeneration and fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-08-15

    Stem cells ensure tissue regeneration, while overgrowth of adipogenic cells may compromise organ recovery and impair function. In myopathies and muscle atrophy associated with aging, fat accumulation increases dysfunction, and after chronic injury, the process of fatty degeneration, in which muscle is replaced by white adipocytes, further compromises tissue function and environment. Some studies suggest that pericytes may contribute to muscle regeneration as well as fat formation. This work reports the presence of two pericyte subpopulations in the skeletal muscle and characterizes their specific roles. Skeletal muscle from Nestin-GFP/NG2-DsRed mice show two types of pericytes, Nestin-GFP-/NG2-DsRed+ (type-1) and Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+ (type-2), in close proximity to endothelial cells. We also found that both Nestin-GFP-/NG2-DsRed+ and Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+ cells colocalize with staining of two pericyte markers, PDGFRβ and CD146, but only type-1 pericyte express the adipogenic progenitor marker PDGFRα. Type-2 pericytes participate in muscle regeneration, while type-1 contribute to fat accumulation. Transplantation studies indicate that type-1 pericytes do not form muscle in vivo, but contribute to fat deposition in the skeletal muscle, while type-2 pericytes contribute only to the new muscle formation after injury, but not to the fat accumulation. Our results suggest that type-1 and type-2 pericytes contribute to successful muscle regeneration which results from a balance of myogenic and nonmyogenic cells activation.

  20. The benefits of coffee on skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J

    2015-12-15

    Coffee is consumed worldwide with greater than a billion cups of coffee ingested every day. Epidemiological studies have revealed an association of coffee consumption with reduced incidence of a variety of chronic diseases as well as all-cause mortality. Current research has primarily focused on the effects of coffee or its components on various organ systems such as the cardiovascular system, with relatively little attention on skeletal muscle. Summary of current literature suggests that coffee has beneficial effects on skeletal muscle. Coffee has been shown to induce autophagy, improve insulin sensitivity, stimulate glucose uptake, slow the progression of sarcopenia, and promote the regeneration of injured muscle. Much more research is needed to reveal the full scope of benefits that coffee consumption may exert on skeletal muscle structure and function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of PKCδ in Insulin Sensitivity and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengyao; Vienberg, Sara G.; Bezy, Olivier; O’Neill, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)δ has been shown to be increased in liver in obesity and plays an important role in the development of hepatic insulin resistance in both mice and humans. In the current study, we explored the role of PKCδ in skeletal muscle in the control of insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism by generating mice in which PKCδ was deleted specifically in muscle using Cre-lox recombination. Deletion of PKCδ in muscle improved insulin signaling in young mice, especially at low insulin doses; however, this did not change glucose tolerance or insulin tolerance tests done with pharmacological levels of insulin. Likewise, in young mice, muscle-specific deletion of PKCδ did not rescue high-fat diet–induced insulin resistance or glucose intolerance. However, with an increase in age, PKCδ levels in muscle increased, and by 6 to 7 months of age, muscle-specific deletion of PKCδ improved whole-body insulin sensitivity and muscle insulin resistance and by 15 months of age improved the age-related decline in whole-body glucose tolerance. At 15 months of age, M-PKCδKO mice also exhibited decreased metabolic rate and lower levels of some proteins of the OXPHOS complex suggesting a role for PKCδ in the regulation of mitochondrial mass at older age. These data indicate an important role of PKCδ in the regulation of insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial homeostasis in skeletal muscle with aging. PMID:26307588

  2. [Transdisciplinary Approach for Sarcopenia. The effects of exercise on skeletal muscle hypertrophy and satellite cells].

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Shin; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle has a high degree of plasticity. The mass of skeletal muscle maintains owing to muscle protein synthesis and the regeneration by satellite cells. Skeletal muscle atrophy with aging (sarcopenia) is developed by decline of muscle protein synthesis and dysfunction of satellite cells. It is urgently necessary for today's highly aged society to elucidate the mechanism of sarcopenia and to establish prevention measure. This review shows that the positive effects of "exercise" on muscle protein synthesis and satellite cell function including their main molecular mechanism.

  3. Denervation and reinnervation of skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, R. F.; Max, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of the physiological and biochemical changes that occur in mammalian skeletal muscle after denervation and reinnervation. These changes are compared with those observed after altered motor function. Also considered is the nature of the trophic influence by which nerves control muscle properties. Topics examined include the membrane and contractile properties of denervated and reinnervated muscle; the cholinergic proteins, such as choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase, and the acetylcholine receptor; and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

  4. Myoglobin Function in Exercising Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Randolph P.

    1982-04-01

    Short-term perfusion of the isolated dog gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle with hydrogen peroxide resulted in a decrease in steady-state muscle oxygen consumption and isometric tension generation. Hydrogen peroxide converted intracellular myoglobin to products incapable of combination with oxygen, but had no deleterious effect on neuromuscular transmission or on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. It is concluded that functional intracellular myoglobin is important in maintaining oxygen consumption and tension generation in exercising skeletal muscle.

  5. Regulation of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Monica N.; Corbett, Anita H.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    Proper skeletal muscle function is dependent on spatial and temporal control of gene expression in multinucleated myofibers. In addition, satellite cells, which are tissue-specific stem cells that contribute critically to repair and maintenance of skeletal muscle, are also required for normal muscle physiology. Gene expression in both myofibers and satellite cells is dependent upon nuclear proteins that require facilitated nuclear transport. A unique challenge for myofibers is controlling the transcriptional activity of hundreds of nuclei in a common cytoplasm yet achieving nuclear selectivity in transcription at specific locations such as neuromuscular synapses and myotendinous junctions. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of macromolecular cargoes is regulated by a complex interplay among various components of the nuclear transport machinery, namely nuclear pore complexes, nuclear envelope proteins, and various soluble transport receptors. The focus of this review is to highlight what is known about the nuclear transport machinery and its regulation in skeletal muscle and to consider the unique challenges that multinucleated muscle cells as well as satellite cells encounter in regulating nucleocytoplasmic transport during cell differentiation and tissue adaptation. Understanding how regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport controls gene expression in skeletal muscle may lead to further insights into the mechanisms contributing to muscle growth and maintenance throughout the lifespan of an individual. PMID:21621074

  6. Leucine stimulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, D.K.; Grogan, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated a stimulatory effect of leucine on skeletal muscle protein synthesis measured in vitro during catabolic conditions. Studies in other laboratories have consistently found this effect in diaphragm muscle, however, studies examining effects on nitrogen balance or with in vivo protein synthesis in skeletal muscle are equivocal. This experiment was designed to determine the potential of leucine to stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis in vivo. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200 g were fasted for 12 hrs, anesthetized, a jugular cannula inserted, and protein synthesis measured using a primed continuous infusion of /sup 14/C-tyrosine. A plateau in specific activity was reached after 30 to 60 min and maintained for 3 hrs. The leucine dose consisted of a 240 umole priming dose followed by a continuous infusion of 160 umoles/hr. Leucine infusion stimulated protein synthesis in the soleus muscle (28%) and in the red (28%) and white portions (12%) of the gastrocnemius muscle compared with controls infused with only tyrosine. The increased rates of protein synthesis were due to increased incorporation of tyrosine into protein and to decreased specific activity of the free tyrosine pool. These data indicate that infusion of leucine has the potential to stimulate in vivo protein synthesis in skeletal muscles.

  7. Generalized Model of a Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shil'ko, S. V.; Chernous, D. A.; Bondarenko, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    A new phenomenological model of a skeletal muscle consisting of a contractile and two nonlinear viscoelastic elements is proposed. The corresponding system of differential equations of the model is obtained, which allows one to derive time-dependent relations between the axial stress and the longitudinal strain in passive and activated states of the muscle. Methods for determining the viscoelastic and functional characteristics of the muscle as input parameters of the equations mentioned above are developed. These methods are based on the joint application of known experimental relations for a single muscle fiber and the results of muscle indentation in vivo on a "Miometer UT 98-01" device.

  8. Human Skeletal Muscle Health with Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappe, Scott

    2012-07-01

    This lecture will overview the most recent aerobic and resistance exercise programs used by crewmembers while aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for six months and examine its effectiveness for protecting skeletal muscle health. Detailed information on the exercise prescription program, whole muscle size, whole muscle performance, and cellular data obtained from muscle biopsy samples will be presented. Historically, detailed information on the exercise program while in space has not been available. These most recent exercise and muscle physiology findings provide a critical foundation to guide the exercise countermeasure program forward for future long-duration space missions.

  9. Are antioxidants useful for treating skeletal muscle atrophy?

    PubMed

    Bonetto, Andrea; Penna, Fabio; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Minero, Valerio G; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Baccino, Francesco M; Costelli, Paola

    2009-10-01

    Changes in the skeletal muscle protein mass frequently occur in both physiological and pathological states. Muscle hypotrophy, in particular, is commonly observed during aging and is characteristic of several pathological conditions such as neurological diseases, cancer, diabetes, and sepsis. The skeletal muscle protein content depends on the relative rates of synthesis and degradation, which must be coordinately regulated to maintain the equilibrium. Pathological muscle depletion is characterized by a negative nitrogen balance, which results from disruption of this equilibrium due to reduced synthesis, increased breakdown, or both. The current view, mainly based on experimental data, considers hypercatabolism as the major cause of muscle protein depletion. Several signaling pathways that probably contribute to muscle atrophy have been identified, and there is increasing evidence that oxidative stress, due to reactive oxygen species production overwhelming the intracellular antioxidant systems, plays a role in causing muscle depletion both during aging and in chronic pathological states. In particular, oxidative stress has been proposed to enhance protein breakdown, directly or by interacting with other factors. This review focuses on the possibility of using antioxidant treatments to target molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle wasting.

  10. Effects of exercise and dietary epigallocatechin gallate and β-alanine on skeletal muscle in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Pence, Brandt D; Gibbons, Trisha E; Bhattacharya, Tushar K; Mach, Houston; Ossyra, Jessica M; Petr, Geraldine; Martin, Stephen A; Wang, Lin; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Sweedler, Jonathan V; McCusker, Robert H; Kelley, Keith W; Rhodes, Justin S; Johnson, Rodney W; Woods, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-01

    Aging leads to sarcopenia and loss of physical function. We examined whether voluntary wheel running, when combined with dietary supplementation with (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and β-alanine (β-ALA), could improve muscle function and alter gene expression in the gastrocnemius of aged mice. Seventeen-month-old BALB/cByJ mice were given access to a running wheel or remained sedentary for 41 days while receiving either AIN-93M (standard feed) or AIN-93M containing 1.5 mg·kg(-1) EGCG and 3.43 mg·kg(-1) β-ALA. Mice underwent tests over 11 days from day 29 to day 39 of the study period, including muscle function testing (grip strength, treadmill exhaustive fatigue, rotarod). Following a rest day, mice were euthanized and gastrocnemii were collected for analysis of gene expression by quantitative PCR. Voluntary wheel running (VWR) improved rotarod and treadmill exhaustive fatigue performance and maintained grip strength in aged mice, while dietary intervention had no effect. VWR increased gastrocnemius expression of several genes, including those encoding interleukin-6 (Il6, p = 0.001), superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1, p = 0.046), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1a, p = 0.013), forkhead box protein O3 (Foxo3, p = 0.005), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf, p = 0.008), while reducing gastrocnemius levels of the lipid peroxidation marker 4-hydroxynonenal (p = 0.019). Dietary intervention alone increased gastrocnemius expression of Ppargc1a (p = 0.033) and genes encoding NAD-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin-1 (Sirt1, p = 0.039), insulin-like growth factor I (Igf1, p = 0.003), and macrophage marker CD11b (Itgam, p = 0.016). Exercise and a diet containing β-ALA and EGCG differentially regulated gene expression in the gastrocnemius of aged mice, while VWR but not dietary intervention improved muscle function. We found no synergistic effects between dietary intervention and VWR.

  11. Contractile properties and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content in type I and type II skeletal muscle fibres in active aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Lamboley, C R; Wyckelsma, V L; Dutka, T L; McKenna, M J; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the contractile properties and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content in mechanically skinned vastus lateralis muscle fibres of Old (70 ± 4 years) and Young (22 ± 3 years) humans to investigate whether changes in muscle fibre properties contribute to muscle weakness in old age. In type II fibres of Old subjects, specific force was reduced by ∼17% and Ca2+ sensitivity was also reduced (pCa50 decreased ∼0.05 pCa units) relative to that in Young. S-Glutathionylation of fast troponin I (TnIf) markedly increased Ca2+ sensitivity in type II fibres, but the increase was significantly smaller in Old versus Young (+0.136 and +0.164 pCa unit increases, respectively). Endogenous and maximal SR Ca2+ content were significantly smaller in both type I and type II fibres in Old subjects. In fibres of Young, the SR could be nearly fully depleted of Ca2+ by a combined caffeine and low Mg2+ stimulus, whereas in fibres of Old the amount of non-releasable Ca2+ was significantly increased (by > 12% of endogenous Ca2+ content). Western blotting showed an increased proportion of type I fibres in Old subjects, and increased amounts of calsequestrin-2 and calsequestrin-like protein. The findings suggest that muscle weakness in old age is probably attributable in part to (i) an increased proportion of type I fibres, (ii) a reduction in both maximum specific force and Ca2+ sensitivity in type II fibres, and also a decreased ability of S-glutathionylation of TnIf to counter the fatiguing effects of metabolites on Ca2+ sensitivity, and (iii) a reduction in the amount of releasable SR Ca2+ in both fibre types. Key points Muscle weakness in old age is due in large part to an overall loss of skeletal muscle tissue, but it remains uncertain how much also stems from alterations in the properties of the individual muscle fibres. This study examined the contractile properties and amount of stored intracellular calcium in single muscle fibres of Old (70

  12. Regulation and phylogeny of skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Meryem B; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2017-08-12

    One of the most fascinating questions in regenerative biology is why some animals can regenerate injured structures while others cannot. Skeletal muscle has a remarkable capacity to regenerate even after repeated traumas, yet limited information is available on muscle repair mechanisms and how they have evolved. For decades, the main focus in the study of muscle regeneration was on muscle stem cells, however, their interaction with their progeny and stromal cells is only starting to emerge, and this is crucial for successful repair and re-establishment of homeostasis after injury. In addition, numerous murine injury models are used to investigate the regeneration process, and some can lead to discrepancies in observed phenotypes. This review addresses these issues and provides an overview of the some of the main regulatory cellular and molecular players involved in skeletal muscle repair. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Lactate oxidation in human skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Robert A; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Nordsborg, Nikolai B; Lundby, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    Lactate is an important intermediate metabolite in human bioenergetics and is oxidized in many different tissues including the heart, brain, kidney, adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscle. The mechanism(s) explaining the metabolism of lactate in these tissues, however, remains unclear. Here, we analyze the ability of skeletal muscle to respire lactate by using an in situ mitochondrial preparation that leaves the native tubular reticulum and subcellular interactions of the organelle unaltered. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis muscle in 16 human subjects. Samples were chemically permeabilized with saponin, which selectively perforates the sarcolemma and facilitates the loss of cytosolic content without altering mitochondrial membranes, structure, and subcellular interactions. High-resolution respirometry was performed on permeabilized muscle biopsy preparations. By use of four separate and specific substrate titration protocols, the respirometric analysis revealed that mitochondria were capable of oxidizing lactate in the absence of exogenous LDH. The titration of lactate and NAD(+) into the respiration medium stimulated respiration (P ≤ 0.003). The addition of exogenous LDH failed to increase lactate-stimulated respiration (P = 1.0). The results further demonstrate that human skeletal muscle mitochondria cannot directly oxidize lactate within the mitochondrial matrix. Alternately, these data support previous claims that lactate is converted to pyruvate within the mitochondrial intermembrane space with the pyruvate subsequently taken into the mitochondrial matrix where it enters the TCA cycle and is ultimately oxidized.

  14. Skeletal Muscle Laminopathies: A Review of Clinical and Molecular Features

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Lorenzo; Carboni, Nicola; Bernasconi, Pia

    2016-01-01

    LMNA-related disorders are caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes for the nuclear envelope proteins, lamin A and C, via alternative splicing. Laminopathies are associated with a wide range of disease phenotypes, including neuromuscular, cardiac, metabolic disorders and premature aging syndromes. The most frequent diseases associated with mutations in the LMNA gene are characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement. This review will focus on genetics and clinical features of laminopathies affecting primarily skeletal muscle. Although only symptomatic treatment is available for these patients, many achievements have been made in clarifying the pathogenesis and improving the management of these diseases. PMID:27529282

  15. Role of skeletal muscle in lung development.

    PubMed

    Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; Gugic, Dijana; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Kablar, Boris

    2012-07-01

    Skeletal (striated) muscle is one of the four basic tissue types, together with the epithelium, connective and nervous tissues. Lungs, on the other hand, develop from the foregut and among various cell types contain smooth, but not skeletal muscle. Therefore, during earlier stages of development, it is unlikely that skeletal muscle and lung depend on each other. However, during the later stages of development, respiratory muscle, primarily the diaphragm and the intercostal muscles, execute so called fetal breathing-like movements (FBMs), that are essential for lung growth and cell differentiation. In fact, the absence of FBMs results in pulmonary hypoplasia, the most common cause of death in the first week of human neonatal life. Most knowledge on this topic arises from in vivo experiments on larger animals and from various in vitro experiments. In the current era of mouse mutagenesis and functional genomics, it was our goal to develop a mouse model for pulmonary hypoplasia. We employed various genetically engineered mice lacking different groups of respiratory muscles or lacking all the skeletal muscle and established the criteria for pulmonary hypoplasia in mice, and therefore established a mouse model for this disease. We followed up this discovery with systematic subtractive microarray analysis approach and revealed novel functions in lung development and disease for several molecules. We believe that our approach combines elements of both in vivo and in vitro approaches and allows us to study the function of a series of molecules in the context of lung development and disease and, simultaneously, in the context of lung's dependence on skeletal muscle-executed FBMs.

  16. Gene Regions Responding to Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W.

    1997-01-01

    Our stated specific aims for this project were: 1) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb myosin heavy chain (MHC) promoter necessary for in vivo expression in mouse fast-twitch muscle, and 2) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb MHC promoter responsive to immobilization in mouse slow-twitch muscle in vivo. We sought to address these specific aims by introducing various MHC IIb promoter/reporter gene constructs directly into the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of living mice. Although the method of somatic gene transfer into skeletal muscle by direct injection has been successfully used in our laboratory to study the regulation of the skeletal alpha actin gene in chicken skeletal muscle, we had many difficulties utilizing this procedure in the mouse. Because of the small size of the mouse soleus and the difficulty in obtaining consistent results, we elected not to study this muscle as first proposed. Rather, our MHC IIb promoter deletion experiments were performed in the gastrocnemius. Further, we decided to use hindlimb unloading via tail suspension to induce an upregulation of the MHC IIb gene, rather than immobilization of the hindlimbs via plaster casts. This change was made because tail suspension more closely mimics spaceflight, and this procedure in our lab results in a smaller loss of overall body mass than the mouse hindlimb immobilization procedure. This suggests that the stress level during tail suspension is less than during immobilization. This research has provided an important beginning point towards understanding the molecular regulation of the MHC lIb gene in response to unweighting of skeletal muscle Future work will focus on the regulation of MHC IIb mRNA stability in response to altered loading of skeletal muscle

  17. Skeletal muscle as an endogenous nitrate reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Piknova, Barbora; Park, Ji Won; Swanson, Kathryn M.; Dey, Soumyadeep; Noguchi, Constance Tom; Schechter, Alan N

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family of enzymes form nitric oxide (NO) from arginine in the presence of oxygen. At reduced oxygen availability NO is also generated from nitrate in a two step process by bacterial and mammalian molybdopterin proteins, and also directly from nitrite by a variety of five-coordinated ferrous hemoproteins. The mammalian NO cycle also involves direct oxidation of NO to nitrite, and both NO and nitrite to nitrate by oxy-ferrous hemoproteins. The liver and blood are considered the sites of active mammalian NO metabolism and nitrite and nitrate concentrations in the liver and blood of several mammalian species, including human, have been determined. However, the large tissue mass of skeletal muscle had not been generally considered in the analysis of the NO cycle, in spite of its long-known presence of significant levels of active neuronal NOS (nNOS or NOS1). We hypothesized that skeletal muscle participates in the NO cycle and, due to its NO oxidizing heme protein, oxymyoglobin, has high concentrations of nitrate ions. We measured nitrite and nitrate concentrations in rat and mouse leg skeletal muscle and found unusually high concentrations of nitrate but similar levels of nitrite, when compared to the liver. The nitrate reservoir in muscle is easily accessible via the bloodstream and therefore nitrate is available for transport to internal organs where it can be reduced to nitrite and NO. Nitrate levels in skeletal muscle and blood in nNOS−/− mice were dramatically lower when compared with controls, which support further our hypothesis. Although the nitrate reductase activity of xanthine oxidoreductase in muscle is less than that of liver, the residual activity in muscle could be very important in view of its total mass and the high basal level of nitrate. We suggest that skeletal muscle participates in overall NO metabolism, serving as a nitrate reservoir, for direct formation of nitrite and NO, and for determining levels of nitrate

  18. REDD2 expression in rat skeletal muscle correlates with nutrient-induced activation of mTORC1: responses to aging, immobilization, and remobilization

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Andrew R.; Pereira, Suzette L.; Jefferson, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study (Kelleher AR, Kimball SR, Dennis MD, Schilder RJ, and Jefferson LS. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 304: E229–236, 2013.), we observed a rapid (i.e., 1–3 days) immobilization-induced repression of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in hindlimb skeletal muscle of young (2-mo-old) rats that was associated with elevated expression of regulated in development and DNA-damage response (REDD) 1 and REDD2. The present study extends that observation to include an assessment of those parameters in soleus muscle of the immobilized hindlimb of various-aged rats as well as in response to remobilization. Male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 2, 9, and 18 mo were subjected to unilateral hindlimb immobilization for 7 days, whereas one group of the 9-mo-old animals underwent 7 days of remobilization. Soleus muscle mass-to-body mass ratio declined with age, with the loss of muscle mass following hindlimb immobilization being inversely proportional to age. Compared with 2-mo-old rats, the older rats exhibited reduced mTORC1 signaling in the nonimmobilized limb in association with elevated REDD2, but not REDD1, mRNA expression. In the 2-mo-old rats, 7 days of hindlimb immobilization attenuated mTORC1 signaling and induced REDD2, but not REDD1, mRNA expression. In contrast, hindlimb immobilization did not further attenuate the age-related reduction in mTORC1 signaling nor further enhance the age-related induction of REDD2 mRNA expression in 9- and 18-mo-old rats. Across ages, REDD1 mRNA was not impacted by immobilization. Finally, remobilization elevated mTORC1 signaling and lowered REDD2 mRNA expression, with no impact on REDD1 gene expression. In conclusion, changes in mTORC1 signaling associated with aging, immobilization, and remobilization were inversely proportional to alterations in REDD2 mRNA expression. PMID:25406262

  19. REDD2 expression in rat skeletal muscle correlates with nutrient-induced activation of mTORC1: responses to aging, immobilization, and remobilization.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Andrew R; Pereira, Suzette L; Jefferson, Leonard S; Kimball, Scot R

    2015-01-15

    In a previous study (Kelleher AR, Kimball SR, Dennis MD, Schilder RJ, and Jefferson LS. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 304: E229-236, 2013.), we observed a rapid (i.e., 1-3 days) immobilization-induced repression of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in hindlimb skeletal muscle of young (2-mo-old) rats that was associated with elevated expression of regulated in development and DNA-damage response (REDD) 1 and REDD2. The present study extends that observation to include an assessment of those parameters in soleus muscle of the immobilized hindlimb of various-aged rats as well as in response to remobilization. Male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 2, 9, and 18 mo were subjected to unilateral hindlimb immobilization for 7 days, whereas one group of the 9-mo-old animals underwent 7 days of remobilization. Soleus muscle mass-to-body mass ratio declined with age, with the loss of muscle mass following hindlimb immobilization being inversely proportional to age. Compared with 2-mo-old rats, the older rats exhibited reduced mTORC1 signaling in the nonimmobilized limb in association with elevated REDD2, but not REDD1, mRNA expression. In the 2-mo-old rats, 7 days of hindlimb immobilization attenuated mTORC1 signaling and induced REDD2, but not REDD1, mRNA expression. In contrast, hindlimb immobilization did not further attenuate the age-related reduction in mTORC1 signaling nor further enhance the age-related induction of REDD2 mRNA expression in 9- and 18-mo-old rats. Across ages, REDD1 mRNA was not impacted by immobilization. Finally, remobilization elevated mTORC1 signaling and lowered REDD2 mRNA expression, with no impact on REDD1 gene expression. In conclusion, changes in mTORC1 signaling associated with aging, immobilization, and remobilization were inversely proportional to alterations in REDD2 mRNA expression. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Acute skeletal muscle wasting in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Puthucheary, Zudin A; Rawal, Jaikitry; McPhail, Mark; Connolly, Bronwen; Ratnayake, Gamunu; Chan, Pearl; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Phadke, Rahul; Padhke, Rahul; Dew, Tracy; Sidhu, Paul S; Velloso, Cristiana; Seymour, John; Agley, Chibeza C; Selby, Anna; Limb, Marie; Edwards, Lindsay M; Smith, Kenneth; Rowlerson, Anthea; Rennie, Michael John; Moxham, John; Harridge, Stephen D R; Hart, Nicholas; Montgomery, Hugh E

    2013-10-16

    Survivors of critical illness demonstrate skeletal muscle wasting with associated functional impairment. To perform a comprehensive prospective characterization of skeletal muscle wasting, defining the pathogenic roles of altered protein synthesis and breakdown. Sixty-three critically ill patients (59% male; mean age: 54.7 years [95% CI, 50.0-59.6 years]) with an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 23.5 (95% CI, 21.9-25.2) were prospectively recruited within 24 hours following intensive care unit (ICU) admission from August 2009 to April 2011 at a university teaching and a community hospital in England. Patients were recruited if older than 18 years and were anticipated to be intubated for longer than 48 hours, to spend more than 7 days in critical care, and to survive ICU stay. Muscle loss was determined through serial ultrasound measurement of the rectus femoris cross-sectional area (CSA) on days 1, 3, 7, and 10. In a subset of patients, the fiber CSA area was quantified along with the ratio of protein to DNA on days 1 and 7. Histopathological analysis was performed. In addition, muscle protein synthesis, breakdown rates, and respective signaling pathways were characterized. There were significant reductions in the rectus femoris CSA observed at day 10 (−17.7% [95% CI, −25.9% to 8.1%]; P < .001). In the 28 patients assessed by all 3 measurement methods on days 1 and 7, the rectus femoris CSA decreased by 10.3% (95% CI, 6.1% to 14.5%), the fiber CSA by 17.5% (95% CI, 5.8% to 29.3%), and the ratio of protein to DNA by 29.5% (95% CI, 13.4% to 45.6%). Decrease in the rectus femoris CSA was greater in patients who experienced multiorgan failure by day 7 (−15.7%; 95% CI, −27.7% to 11.4%) compared with single organ failure (−3.0%; 95% CI, −5.3% to 2.1%) (P < .001), even by day 3 (−8.7% [95% CI, −59.3% to 50.6%] vs −1.8% [95% CI, −12.3% to 10.5%], respectively; P = .03). Myofiber necrosis occurred in 20 of 37

  1. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G. )

    1990-10-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white (extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius) muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding.

  2. Transmission of polarized light in skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, Ali; Li, Xin; Yao, Gang

    2011-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to study polarized light transmission in fresh bovine skeletal muscle of varying thicknesses. Two-dimensional polarization-sensitive transmission images were acquired and analyzed using a numerical parametric fitting algorithm. The total transmittance intensity and degree-of-polarization were calculated for both central ballistic and surrounding scattering regions. Full Mueller matrix images were derived from the raw polarization images and the polar decomposition algorithm was applied to extract polarization parameters. The results suggest that polarized light propagation through skeletal muscle is affected by strong birefringence, diattenuation, multiple scattering induced depolarization and the sarcomere diffraction effect.

  3. GRMD cardiac and skeletal muscle metabolism gene profiles are distinct.

    PubMed

    Markham, Larry W; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Soslow, Jonathan H; Gupte, Manisha; Sawyer, Douglas B; Kornegay, Joe N; Galindo, Cristi L

    2017-04-08

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the DMD gene, which codes for the dystrophin protein. While progress has been made in defining the molecular basis and pathogenesis of DMD, major gaps remain in understanding mechanisms that contribute to the marked delay in cardiac compared to skeletal muscle dysfunction. To address this question, we analyzed cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue microarrays from golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs, a genetically and clinically homologous model for DMD. A total of 15 dogs, 3 each GRMD and controls at 6 and 12 months plus 3 older (47-93 months) GRMD dogs, were assessed. GRMD dogs exhibited tissue- and age-specific transcriptional profiles and enriched functions in skeletal but not cardiac muscle, consistent with a "metabolic crisis" seen with DMD microarray studies. Most notably, dozens of energy production-associated molecules, including all of the TCA cycle enzymes and multiple electron transport components, were down regulated. Glycolytic and glycolysis shunt pathway-associated enzymes, such as those of the anabolic pentose phosphate pathway, were also altered, in keeping with gene expression in other forms of muscle atrophy. On the other hand, GRMD cardiac muscle genes were enriched in nucleotide metabolism and pathways that are critical for neuromuscular junction maintenance, synaptic function and conduction. These findings suggest differential metabolic dysfunction may contribute to distinct pathological phenotypes in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

  4. Regulation of skeletal muscle stem cells by fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Vogler, Thomas Orion; Gadek, Katherine; Olwin, Bradley B

    2017-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are essential for self-renewal of skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and required for maintenance and repair of skeletal muscle. Satellite cells express high levels of FGF receptors 1 and 4, low levels of FGF receptor 3, and little or no detectable FGF receptor 2. Of the multiple FGFs that influence satellite cell function in culture, FGF2 and FGF6 are the only members that regulate satellite cell function in vivo by activating ERK MAPK, p38α/β MAPKs, PI3 kinase, PLCγ and STATs. Regulation of FGF signaling is complex in satellite cells, requiring Syndecan-4, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, as well as ß1-integrin and fibronectin. During aging, reduced responsiveness to FGF diminishes satellite cell self-renewal, leading to impaired skeletal muscle regeneration and depletion of satellite cells. Mislocalization of ß1-integrin, reductions in fibronectin, and alterations in heparan sulfate content all contribute to reduced FGF responsiveness in satellite cells. How these cell surface proteins regulate satellite cell self-renewal is incompletely understood. Here we summarize the current knowledge, highlighting the role(s) for FGF signaling in skeletal muscle regeneration, satellite cell behavior, and age-induced muscle wasting. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sandra; Dowling, Paul; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2016-09-09

    The pioneering work by Patrick H. O'Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry1975, 250, 4007-4021). The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O'Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins.

  6. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sandra; Dowling, Paul; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2016-01-01

    The pioneering work by Patrick H. O’Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry 1975, 250, 4007–4021). The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O’Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:28248237

  7. Mechanotransduction pathways in skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, André Katayama; Verlengia, Rozangela; Bueno Junior, Carlos Roberto

    2012-02-01

    In the last decade, molecular biology has contributed to define some of the cellular events that trigger skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Recent evidence shows that insulin like growth factor 1/phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (IGF-1/PI3K/Akt) signaling is not the main pathway towards load-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy. During load-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy process, activation of mTORC1 does not require classical growth factor signaling. One potential mechanism that would activate mTORC1 is increased synthesis of phosphatidic acid (PA). Despite the huge progress in this field, it is still early to affirm which molecular event induces hypertrophy in response to mechanical overload. Until now, it seems that mTORC1 is the key regulator of load-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy. On the other hand, how mTORC1 is activated by PA is unclear, and therefore these mechanisms have to be determined in the following years. The understanding of these molecular events may result in promising therapies for the treatment of muscle-wasting diseases. For now, the best approach is a good regime of resistance exercise training. The objective of this point-of-view paper is to highlight mechanotransduction events, with focus on the mechanisms of mTORC1 and PA activation, and the role of IGF-1 on hypertrophy process.

  8. Age-related differences in lean mass, protein synthesis and skeletal muscle markers of proteolysis after bed rest and exercise rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Ruth E; Brunker, Lucille B; Agergaard, Jakob; Barrows, Katherine M; Briggs, Robert A; Kwon, Oh Sung; Young, Laura M; Hopkins, Paul N; Volpi, Elena; Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Drummond, Micah J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bed rest-induced muscle loss and impaired muscle recovery may contribute to age-related sarcopenia. It is unknown if there are age-related differences in muscle mass and muscle anabolic and catabolic responses to bed rest. A secondary objective was to determine if rehabilitation could reverse bed rest responses. Nine older and fourteen young adults participated in a 5-day bed rest challenge (BED REST). This was followed by 8 weeks of high intensity resistance exercise (REHAB). Leg lean mass (via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) and strength were determined. Muscle biopsies were collected during a constant stable isotope infusion in the postabsorptive state and after essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion on three occasions: before (PRE), after bed rest and after rehabilitation. Samples were assessed for protein synthesis, mTORC1 signalling, REDD1/2 expression and molecular markers related to muscle proteolysis (MURF1, MAFBX, AMPKα, LC3II/I, Beclin1). We found that leg lean mass and strength decreased in older but not younger adults after bedrest (P < 0.05) and was restored after rehabilitation. EAA-induced mTORC1 signalling and protein synthesis increased before bed rest in both age groups (P < 0.05). Although both groups had blunted mTORC1 signalling, increased REDD2 and MURF1 mRNA after bedrest, only older adults had reduced EAA-induced protein synthesis rates and increased MAFBX mRNA, p-AMPKα and the LC3II/I ratio (P < 0.05). We conclude that older adults are more susceptible than young persons to muscle loss after short-term bed rest. This may be partially explained by a combined suppression of protein synthesis and a marginal increase in proteolytic markers. Finally, rehabilitation restored bed rest-induced deficits in lean mass and strength in older adults. Key points Five days of bed rest resulted in a reduction in leg lean mass and strength in older adults. After bed rest, older (but not younger) adults had reduced amino acid

  9. Acute loading and aging effects on myostatin pathway biomarkers in human skeletal muscle after three sequential bouts of resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Dalbo, Vincent J; Roberts, Michael D; Sunderland, Kyle L; Poole, Chris N; Stout, Jeff R; Beck, Travis W; Bemben, Mike; Kerksick, Chad M

    2011-08-01

    To determine the influence of age and resistance exercise on myostatin pathway-related genes, younger (n = 10; 28 ± 5 years) and older (n = 10; 68 ± 6 years) men underwent four testing conditions (T1-T4). A baseline (T1) muscle sample was obtained, whereas the second and third biopsies were obtained 48 hours following the first and second training sessions (T2, T3), and a final biopsy was taken 24 hours following T3. The training sessions consisted of 3 sets of 10 repetitions (80% of one repetition maximum) on leg press, hack squat, and leg extension exercises. Follistatin (FST) messenger RNA was greater in older compared with younger men at T1 and T2 (p < .05). Follistatin-like 3 (FSTL3) messenger RNA was greater in older compared with younger men at T1 and T4 (p < .05). In older men, there was a significant decrease in myostatin (MSTN) messenger RNA at T4 (p < .05). Older men contained less active (Ser-425 phosphorylated) SMAD3 (p-SMAD3) protein than younger men at T3 and T4 (p < .05).Although it is well known that younger individuals possess a greater hypertrophic potential to resistance exercise, it appears that older individuals may paradoxically possess a more favorable resistance exercise response regarding myostatin pathway-related genes and a protein marker of pathway activity. Future research is warranted to examine the physiological significance of this age-dependent mechanism.

  10. Muscle tissue changes with aging.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana Fátima; Silva, António José; Matos Costa, Aldo; Monteiro, António Miguel; Bastos, Estela Maria; Cardoso Marques, Mário

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia is characterized by a progressive generalized decrease of skeletal muscle mass, strength and function with aging. Recently, the genetic determination has been associated with muscle mass and muscle strength in elderly. These two phenotypes of risk are the most commonly recognized and studied for sarcopenia, with heritability ranging from 30 to 85% for muscle strength and 45-90% for muscle mass. It is well known that the development and maintenance of muscle mass in early adulthood reduces the risk of developing sarcopenia and leads to a healthy aging. For that reason it seems important to identify which genetic factors interact with aging and in particular with the musculoskeletal response to exercise in such individuals. This review is designed to summarize the most important and representative studies about the possible association between certain genetic polymorphisms and muscle phenotypes in older populations. Also we will focuses on nutrition and some concerns associated with aging, including the role that exercise can have on reducing the negative effects of this phenomenon. Some results are inconsistent between studies and more replication studies underlying sarcopenia are needed, with larger samples and with different life cycles, particularly in the type and level of physical activity throughout life. In future we believe that further progress in understanding the genetic etiology and the metabolic pathways will provide valuable information on important biological mechanisms underlying the muscle physiology. This will enable better recognition of individuals at higher risk and the ability to more adequately address this debilitating condition.

  11. Laminin-211 in skeletal muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Johan; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    A chain is no stronger than its weakest link is an old idiom that holds true for muscle biology. As the name implies, skeletal muscle’s main function is to move the bones. However, for a muscle to transmit force and withstand the stress that contractions give rise to, it relies on a chain of proteins attaching the cytoskeleton of the muscle fiber to the surrounding extracellular matrix. The importance of this attachment is illustrated by a large number of muscular dystrophies caused by interruption of the cytoskeletal-extracellular matrix interaction. One of the major components of the extracellular matrix is laminin, a heterotrimeric glycoprotein and a major constituent of the basement membrane. It has become increasingly apparent that laminins are involved in a multitude of biological functions, including cell adhesion, differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival. This review will focus on the importance of laminin-211 for normal skeletal muscle function. PMID:23154401

  12. YAP-Mediated Mechanotransduction in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martina; Rikeit, Paul; Knaus, Petra; Coirault, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is not only translating chemical energy into mechanical work, it is also a highly adaptive and regenerative tissue whose architecture and functionality is determined by its mechanical and physical environment. Processing intra- and extracellular mechanical signaling cues contributes to the regulation of cell growth, survival, migration and differentiation. Yes-associated Protein (YAP), a transcriptional coactivator downstream of the Hippo pathway and its paralog, the transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), were recently found to play a key role in mechanotransduction in various tissues including skeletal muscle. Furthermore, YAP/TAZ modulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration and abnormal YAP activity has been reported in muscular dystrophy and rhabdomyosarcoma. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of mechanosensing and -signaling in striated muscle. We highlight the role of YAP signaling and discuss the different routes and hypotheses of its regulation in the context of mechanotransduction. PMID:26909043

  13. Skeletal muscle atrophy in bioengineered skeletal muscle: a new model system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter H U; Vandenburgh, Herman H

    2013-10-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy has been well characterized in various animal models, and while certain pathways that lead to disuse atrophy and its associated functional deficits have been well studied, available drugs to counteract these deficiencies are limited. An ex vivo tissue-engineered skeletal muscle offers a unique opportunity to study skeletal muscle physiology in a controlled in vitro setting. Primary mouse myoblasts isolated from adult muscle were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles (BAMs) containing hundreds of aligned postmitotic muscle fibers expressing sarcomeric proteins. When electrically stimulated, BAMs generated measureable active forces within 2-3 days of formation. The maximum isometric tetanic force (Po) increased for ∼3 weeks to 2587±502 μN/BAM and was maintained at this level for greater than 80 days. When BAMs were reduced in length by 25% to 50%, muscle atrophy occurred in as little as 6 days. Length reduction resulted in significant decreases in Po (50.4%), mean myofiber cross-sectional area (21.7%), total protein synthesis rate (22.0%), and noncollagenous protein content (6.9%). No significant changes occurred in either the total metabolic activity or protein degradation rates. This study is the first in vitro demonstration that length reduction alone can induce skeletal muscle atrophy, and establishes a novel in vitro model for the study of skeletal muscle atrophy.

  14. Spot light on skeletal muscles: optogenetic stimulation to understand and restore skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    van Bremen, Tobias; Send, Thorsten; Sasse, Philipp; Bruegmann, Tobias

    2017-09-16

    Damage of peripheral nerves results in paralysis of skeletal muscle. Currently, the only treatment option to restore proper function is electrical stimulation of the innervating nerve or of the skeletal muscles directly. However this approach has low spatial and temporal precision leading to co-activation of antagonistic muscles and lacks cell-type selectivity resulting in pain or discomfort by stimulation of sensible nerves. In contrast to electrical stimulation, optogenetic methods enable spatially confined and cell-type selective stimulation of cells expressing the light sensitive channel Channelrhodopsin-2 with precise temporal control over the membrane potential. Herein we summarize the current knowledge about the use of this technology to control skeletal muscle function with the focus on the direct, non-neuronal stimulation of muscle fibers. The high temporal flexibility of using light pulses allows new stimulation patterns to investigate skeletal muscle physiology. Furthermore, the high spatial precision of focused illumination was shown to be beneficial for selective stimulation of distinct nearby muscle groups. Finally, the cell-type specific expression of the light-sensitive effector proteins in muscle fibers will allow pain-free stimulation and open new options for clinical treatments. Therefore, we believe that direct optogenetic stimulation of skeletal muscles is a very potent method for basic scientists that also harbors several distinct advantages over electrical stimulation to be considered for clinical use in the future.

  15. Developing and Validating an Age-Independent Equation Using Multi-Frequency Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for Estimation of Appendicular Skeletal Muscle Mass and Establishing a Cutoff for Sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yosuke; Nishizawa, Miyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoka; Kasahara, Yasuhiro; Shindo, Mikio; Miyachi, Motohiko; Tanaka, Shigeho

    2017-07-19

    Background: Appendicular skeletal muscle (or lean) mass (ALM) estimated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is considered to be a preferred method for sarcopenia studies. However, DXA is expensive, has limited portability, and requires radiation exposure. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is inexpensive, easy to use, and portable; thus BIA might be useful in sarcopenia investigations. However, a large variety of models have been commercially supplied by different companies, and for most consumer products, the equations estimating ALM are not disclosed. It is therefore difficult to use these equations for research purposes. In particular, the BIA equation is often age-dependent, which leads to fundamental difficulty in examining age-related ALM loss. The aims of the current study were as follows: (1) to develop and validate an equation to estimate ALM using multi-frequency BIA (MF-BIA) based on theoretical models, and (2) to establish sarcopenia cutoff values using the equation for the Japanese population. Methods: We measured height (Ht), weight, and ALM obtained using DXA and a standing-posture 8-electrode MF-BIA (5, 50, 250 kHz) in 756 Japanese individuals aged 18 to 86-years-old (222 men and 301 women as developing equation group and 97 men and 136 women as a cross validation group). The traditional impedance index (Ht²/Z50) and impedance ratio of high and low frequency (Z250/Z₅) of hand to foot values were calculated. Multiple regression analyses were conducted with ALM as dependent variable in men and women separately. Results: We created the following equations: ALM = (0.6947 × (Ht²/Z50)) + (-55.24 × (Z250/Z₅)) + (-10,940 × (1/Z50)) + 51.33 for men, and ALM = (0.6144 × (Ht²/Z50)) + (-36.61 × (Z250/Z₅)) + (-9332 × (1/Z50)) + 37.91 for women. Additionally, we conducted measurements in 1624 men and 1368 women aged 18 to 40 years to establish sarcopenia cutoff values in the Japanese population. The mean values minus 2 standard

  16. Overexpression of SMPX in adult skeletal muscle does not change skeletal muscle fiber type or size.

    PubMed

    Eftestøl, Einar; Alver, Tine Norman; Gundersen, Kristian; Bruusgaard, Jo C

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical factors such as stretch are thought to be important in the regulation of muscle phenotype. Small muscle protein X-linked (SMPX) is upregulated by stretch in skeletal muscle and has been suggested to serve both as a transcription factor and a mechanosensor, possibly giving rise to changes in both fiber size and fiber type. We have used in vivo confocal imaging to study the subcellular localization of SMPX in skeletal muscle fibers of adult rats using a SMPX-EGFP fusion protein. The fusion protein was localized predominantly in repetitive double stripes flanking the Z-disc, and was excluded from all nuclei. This localization would be consistent with SMPX being a mechanoreceptor, but not with SMPX playing a role as a transcription factor. In vivo overexpression of ectopic SMPX in skeletal muscle of adult mice gave no significant changes in fiber type distribution or cross sectional area, thus a role of SMPX in regulating muscle phenotype remains unclear.

  17. Pericapillary basement membrane thickening in human skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Baum, Oliver; Bigler, Marius

    2016-09-01

    The basement membrane (BM) surrounding capillaries in skeletal muscles varies physiologically in thickness according to age, physical fitness, and anatomical site in humans. Furthermore, the pericapillary BM thickness (CBMT) increases pathophysiologically during several common disease states, including peripheral arterial disease and diabetes mellitus. This review on CBM thickening in human skeletal muscles is two pronged. First, it addresses the advantages/disadvantages of grid- and tablet-based measuring and morphometric techniques that are implemented to assess the CBMT on transmission electron micrographs. Second, it deals with the biology of CBM thickening in skeletal muscles, particularly its possible causes, molecular mechanisms, and functional impact. CBM thickening is triggered by several physical factors, including diabetes-associated glycation, hydrostatic pressure, and inflammation. Increased biosynthesis of type IV collagen expression or repetitive cycles in pericyte or endothelial cell degeneration/proliferation appear to be most critical for CBM accumulation. A thickened CBM obviously poses a greater barrier for diffusion, lowers the microvascular elasticity, and impedes transcytosis of inflammatory cells. Our own morphometric data reveal the CBM enlargement to be not accompanied by the pericyte coverage. Owing to an overlap or redundancy in the capillary supply, CBM thickening in skeletal muscles might not be such a devastating occurrence as in organs with endarterial circulation (e.g., kidney and retina). CBM growth in skeletal muscles can be reversed by training or administration of antidiabetic drugs. In conclusion, CBM thickening in skeletal muscles is a microvascular remodeling process by which metabolic, hemodynamic, and inflammatory forces are integrated together and which could play a hitherto underestimated role in etiology/progression of human diseases. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Parvalbumin gene transfer impairs skeletal muscle contractility in old mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kate T; Ham, Daniel J; Church, Jarrod E; Naim, Timur; Trieu, Jennifer; Williams, David A; Lynch, Gordon S

    2012-08-01

    Sarcopenia is the progressive age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with functional impairments that reduce mobility and quality of life. Overt muscle wasting with sarcopenia is usually preceded by a slowing of the rate of relaxation and a reduction in maximum force production. Parvalbumin (PV) is a cytosolic Ca(2+) buffer thought to facilitate relaxation in muscle. We tested the hypothesis that restoration of PV levels in muscles of old mice would increase the magnitude and hasten relaxation of submaximal and maximal force responses. The tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of young (6 month), adult (13 month), and old (26 month) C57BL/6 mice received electroporation-assisted gene transfer of plasmid encoding PV or empty plasmid (pcDNA3.1). Contractile properties of TA muscles were assessed in situ 14 days after transfer. In old mice, muscles with increased PV expression had a 40% slower rate of tetanic force development (p<0.01), and maximum twitch and tetanic force were 22% and 16% lower than control values, respectively (p<0.05). Muscles with increased PV expression from old mice had an 18% lower maximum specific (normalized) force than controls, and absolute force was `26% lower at higher stimulation frequencies (150-300 Hz, p<0.05). In contrast, there was no effect of increased PV expression on TA muscle contractile properties in young and adult mice. The impairments in skeletal muscle function in old mice argue against PV overexpression as a therapeutic strategy for ameliorating aspects of contractile dysfunction with sarcopenia and help clarify directions for therapeutic interventions for age-related changes in skeletal muscle structure and function.

  19. Parvalbumin Gene Transfer Impairs Skeletal Muscle Contractility in Old Mice

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Kate T.; Ham, Daniel J.; Church, Jarrod E.; Naim, Timur; Trieu, Jennifer; Williams, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Sarcopenia is the progressive age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with functional impairments that reduce mobility and quality of life. Overt muscle wasting with sarcopenia is usually preceded by a slowing of the rate of relaxation and a reduction in maximum force production. Parvalbumin (PV) is a cytosolic Ca2+ buffer thought to facilitate relaxation in muscle. We tested the hypothesis that restoration of PV levels in muscles of old mice would increase the magnitude and hasten relaxation of submaximal and maximal force responses. The tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of young (6 month), adult (13 month), and old (26 month) C57BL/6 mice received electroporation-assisted gene transfer of plasmid encoding PV or empty plasmid (pcDNA3.1). Contractile properties of TA muscles were assessed in situ 14 days after transfer. In old mice, muscles with increased PV expression had a 40% slower rate of tetanic force development (p<0.01), and maximum twitch and tetanic force were 22% and 16% lower than control values, respectively (p<0.05). Muscles with increased PV expression from old mice had an 18% lower maximum specific (normalized) force than controls, and absolute force was ∼26% lower at higher stimulation frequencies (150–300 Hz, p<0.05). In contrast, there was no effect of increased PV expression on TA muscle contractile properties in young and adult mice. The impairments in skeletal muscle function in old mice argue against PV overexpression as a therapeutic strategy for ameliorating aspects of contractile dysfunction with sarcopenia and help clarify directions for therapeutic interventions for age-related changes in skeletal muscle structure and function. PMID:22455364

  20. Introduction to respiratory control in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Starnes, J W

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that a linear relationship exists for submaximum exercise intensity and oxygen consumption. Most of the increase in oxygen consumption is by skeletal muscle mitochondria for the purpose of producing enough ATP to match the energy needs of the muscle. The control of mitochondrial ATP production in muscle when workload is varied is a complex process and remains a very active area of research. Thus, the purpose of this symposium is to discuss the factors involved in the coupling between increases in work and increased oxygen consumption by muscle. The program will begin with a consideration of the challenges faced by skeletal muscle when attempting to meet its energy demands and the intracellular strategies that have evolved to optimize energy delivery. Next the major control theories for mitochondrial respiration will be discussed. Finally, experiments will be presented that are designed to determine which of these theories are best suited for specific skeletal muscle fiber types. It is hoped that the information presented will increase our awareness of different energy supply-demand strategies among fiber types and how supply-demand strategies are optimized by endurance training.

  1. Spermine oxidase maintains basal skeletal muscle gene expression and fiber size and is strongly repressed by conditions that cause skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Bongers, Kale S; Fox, Daniel K; Kunkel, Steven D; Stebounova, Larissa V; Murry, Daryl J; Pufall, Miles A; Ebert, Scott M; Dyle, Michael C; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2015-01-15

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. To better understand the mechanisms of muscle atrophy, we used mouse models to search for a skeletal muscle protein that helps to maintain muscle mass and is specifically lost during muscle atrophy. We discovered that diverse causes of muscle atrophy (limb immobilization, fasting, muscle denervation, and aging) strongly reduced expression of the enzyme spermine oxidase. Importantly, a reduction in spermine oxidase was sufficient to induce muscle fiber atrophy. Conversely, forced expression of spermine oxidase increased muscle fiber size in multiple models of muscle atrophy (immobilization, fasting, and denervation). Interestingly, the reduction of spermine oxidase during muscle atrophy was mediated by p21, a protein that is highly induced during muscle atrophy and actively promotes muscle atrophy. In addition, we found that spermine oxidase decreased skeletal muscle mRNAs that promote muscle atrophy (e.g., myogenin) and increased mRNAs that help to maintain muscle mass (e.g., mitofusin-2). Thus, in healthy skeletal muscle, a relatively low level of p21 permits expression of spermine oxidase, which helps to maintain basal muscle gene expression and fiber size; conversely, during conditions that cause muscle atrophy, p21 expression rises, leading to reduced spermine oxidase expression, disruption of basal muscle gene expression, and muscle fiber atrophy. Collectively, these results identify spermine oxidase as an important positive regulator of muscle gene expression and fiber size, and elucidate p21-mediated repression of spermine oxidase as a key step in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle atrophy.

  2. Spermine oxidase maintains basal skeletal muscle gene expression and fiber size and is strongly repressed by conditions that cause skeletal muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bongers, Kale S.; Fox, Daniel K.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Stebounova, Larissa V.; Murry, Daryl J.; Pufall, Miles A.; Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. To better understand the mechanisms of muscle atrophy, we used mouse models to search for a skeletal muscle protein that helps to maintain muscle mass and is specifically lost during muscle atrophy. We discovered that diverse causes of muscle atrophy (limb immobilization, fasting, muscle denervation, and aging) strongly reduced expression of the enzyme spermine oxidase. Importantly, a reduction in spermine oxidase was sufficient to induce muscle fiber atrophy. Conversely, forced expression of spermine oxidase increased muscle fiber size in multiple models of muscle atrophy (immobilization, fasting, and denervation). Interestingly, the reduction of spermine oxidase during muscle atrophy was mediated by p21, a protein that is highly induced during muscle atrophy and actively promotes muscle atrophy. In addition, we found that spermine oxidase decreased skeletal muscle mRNAs that promote muscle atrophy (e.g., myogenin) and increased mRNAs that help to maintain muscle mass (e.g., mitofusin-2). Thus, in healthy skeletal muscle, a relatively low level of p21 permits expression of spermine oxidase, which helps to maintain basal muscle gene expression and fiber size; conversely, during conditions that cause muscle atrophy, p21 expression rises, leading to reduced spermine oxidase expression, disruption of basal muscle gene expression, and muscle fiber atrophy. Collectively, these results identify spermine oxidase as an important positive regulator of muscle gene expression and fiber size, and elucidate p21-mediated repression of spermine oxidase as a key step in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:25406264

  3. Fat cell invasion in long-term denervated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    de Castro Rodrigues, Antonio; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Rosa, Geraldo Marco; dos Santos, Nícolas Bertolaccini; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; Lauris, José Roberto P

    2007-01-01

    There are several differences between red and white muscles submitted to different experimental conditions, especially following denervation: a) denervation atrophy is more pronounced in red than white muscles; b) the size of the fibers in the red muscles does not vary between different parts of the muscle before and after denervation, when compared to white muscles; c) the regional difference in the white muscles initially more pronounced after denervation than red muscle; d) red muscle fibers and fibers of the deep white muscle present degenerative changes such as disordered myofibrils and sarcolemmal folds after long-term denervation; e) myotube-like fibers with central nuclei occur in the red muscle more rapidly than white after denervation. Denervation of skeletal muscles causes, in addition to fibers atrophy, loss of fibers with subsequent regeneration, but the extent of fat cell percentage invasion is currently unknown. The present article describes a quantitative study on fat cell invasion percentage in red m. soleus and white m. extensor digitorum longus (EDL) rat muscles at 7 weeks for up to 32 weeks postdenervation. The results indicate that the percentage of fat cells increase after denervation and it is steeper than the age-related fat invasion in normal muscles. The fat percentage invasion is more pronounced in red compared with white muscle. All experimental groups present a statistically significant difference as regard fat cell percentage invasion.

  4. Evidence and age-related distribution of mtDNA D-loop point mutations in skeletal muscle from healthy subjects and mitochondrial patients.

    PubMed

    Del Bo, Roberto; Bordoni, Andreina; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Crimi, Marco; Sciacco, Monica; Bresolin, Nereo; Scarlato, Guglielmo; Comi, Giacomo Pietri

    2002-10-15

    The progressive accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations, ranging from single mutations to large-scale deletions, in both the normal ageing process and pathological conditions is a relevant phenomenon in terms of frequency and heteroplasmic degree. Recently, two point mutations (A189G and T408A) within the Displacement loop (D-loop) region, the control region for mtDNA replication, were shown to occur in skeletal muscles from aged individuals. We evaluated the presence and the heteroplasmy levels of these two mutations in muscle biopsies from 91 unrelated individuals of different ages (21 healthy subjects and 70 patients affected by mitochondrial encephalomyopathies). Overall, both mutations significantly accumulate with age. However, a different relationship was discovered among the different subgroups of patients: a higher number of A189G positive subjects younger than 53 years was detected in the subgroup of multiple-deleted patients; furthermore, a trend towards an increased risk for the mutations was evidenced among patients carrying multiple deletions when compared to healthy controls. These findings support the idea that a common biological mechanism determines the accumulation of somatic point mutations in the D-loop region, both in healthy subjects and in mitochondrial myopathy patients. At the same time, it appears that disorders caused by mutations of nuclear genes controlling mtDNA replication (the "mtDNA multiple deletions" syndromes) present a temporal advantage to mutate in the D-loop region. This observation may be relevant to the definition of the molecular pathogenesis of these latter syndromes. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  5. Development of Sensory Receptors in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSantis, Mark

    2000-01-01

    The two major goals for this project is to (1) examine the hindlimb walking pattern of offspring from the Flight dams as compared with offspring of the ground control groups from initiation of walking up to two months thereafter; and (2) examine skeletal muscle.

  6. Skeletal muscle fibre types in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, R; Gil, F; Vázquez, J M; Moreno, F; Mascarello, F; Ramirez, G

    1993-01-01

    Using a variety of histochemical methods we have investigated the mATPase reaction of skeletal muscle fibres in the dog. Types I, IIA, IIDog (peculiar to the dog) and IIC fibres were identified. The results reveal that the interpretation of the fibre type composition depends on the methods used. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8226288

  7. Tissue engineering skeletal muscle for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payumo, Francis C.; Kim, Hyun D.; Sherling, Michael A.; Smith, Lee P.; Powell, Courtney; Wang, Xiao; Keeping, Hugh S.; Valentini, Robert F.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    With current technology, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle analogues (bioartificial muscles) generate too little active force to be clinically useful in orthopaedic applications. They have been engineered genetically with numerous transgenes (growth hormone, insulinlike growth factor-1, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor), and have been shown to deliver these therapeutic proteins either locally or systemically for months in vivo. Bone morphogenetic proteins belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily are osteoinductive molecules that drive the differentiation pathway of mesenchymal cells toward the chondroblastic or osteoblastic lineage, and stimulate bone formation in vivo. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells endogenously expressing bone morphogenetic proteins might serve as a vehicle for systemic bone morphogenetic protein delivery in vivo, proliferating skeletal myoblasts (C2C12) were transduced with a replication defective retrovirus containing the gene for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (C2BMP-6). The C2BMP-6 cells constitutively expressed recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 and synthesized bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, based on increased alkaline phosphatase activity in coincubated mesenchymal cells. C2BMP-6 cells did not secrete soluble, bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, but retained the bioactivity in the cell layer. Therefore, genetically-engineered skeletal muscle cells might serve as a platform for long-term delivery of osteoinductive bone morphogenetic proteins locally.

  8. Metabolism and Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis in Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Weinberg, Samuel E; Chandel, Navdeep S; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2017-07-01

    There is increased awareness that patients with lung diseases develop muscle dysfunction. Muscle dysfunction is a major contributor to a decreased quality of life in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases. Furthermore, muscle dysfunction exacerbates lung disease outcome, as a decrease in muscle mass and function are associated with increased morbidity, often long after critical illness or lung disease has been resolved. As we are learning more about the role of metabolism in health and disease, we are appreciating more the direct role of metabolism in skeletal muscle homeostasis. Altered metabolism is associated with numerous skeletal muscle pathologies and, conversely, skeletal muscle diseases are associated with significant changes in metabolic pathways. In this review, we highlight the role of metabolism in the regulation of skeletal muscle homeostasis. Understanding the metabolic pathways that underlie skeletal muscle wasting is of significant clinical interest for critically ill patients as well as patients with chronic lung disease, in which proper skeletal muscle function is essential to disease outcome.

  9. Study of photon migration in skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranasinghesagara, J.; Yao, G.

    2007-09-01

    A clear understanding of how light propagation in muscle is important for developing optical methods for muscle characterization. We investigated photon migration in muscle by imaging the optical reflectance from fresh prerigor skeletal muscles. We found the acquired reflectance patterns can not be described using existing theories. In order to quantify the equi-intensity contours of acquired reflectance images, we developed a numerical fitting function. Using this model, we studied the changes of reflectance profile during stretching and rigor process. The observed unique anisotropic features diminished after rigor completion. These results suggested that muscle sarcomere structures played important roles in modulating light propagation in whole muscle. To explain the observed patterns, we incorporated the sarcomere diffraction in a Monte Carlo model and we showed that the resulting reflectance profiles quantitatively resembled the experimental observation.

  10. In skeletal muscle advanced glycation end products (AGEs) inhibit insulin action and induce the formation of multimolecular complexes including the receptor for AGEs.

    PubMed

    Cassese, Angela; Esposito, Iolanda; Fiory, Francesca; Barbagallo, Alessia P M; Paturzo, Flora; Mirra, Paola; Ulianich, Luca; Giacco, Ferdinando; Iadicicco, Claudia; Lombardi, Angela; Oriente, Francesco; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia

    2008-12-26

    Chronic hyperglycemia promotes insulin resistance at least in part by increasing the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). We have previously shown that in L6 myotubes human glycated albumin (HGA) induces insulin resistance by activating protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha). Here we show that HGA-induced PKCalpha activation is mediated by Src. Coprecipitation experiments showed that Src interacts with both the receptor for AGE (RAGE) and PKCalpha in HGA-treated L6 cells. A direct interaction of PKCalpha with Src and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) has also been detected. In addition, silencing of IRS-1 expression abolished HGA-induced RAGE-PKCalpha co-precipitation. AGEs were able to induce insulin resistance also in vivo, as insulin tolerance tests revealed a significant impairment of insulin sensitivity in C57/BL6 mice fed a high AGEs diet (HAD). In tibialis muscle of HAD-fed mice, insulin-induced glucose uptake and protein kinase B phosphorylation were reduced. This was paralleled by a 2.5-fold increase in PKCalpha activity. Similarly to in vitro observations, Src phosphorylation was increased in tibialis muscle of HAD-fed mice, and co-precipitation experiments showed that Src interacts with both RAGE and PKCalpha. These results indicate that AGEs impairment of insulin action in the muscle might be mediated by the formation of a multimolecular complex including RAGE/IRS-1/Src and PKCalpha.

  11. MicroRNAs in skeletal muscle: their role and regulation in development, disease and function.

    PubMed

    Güller, Isabelle; Russell, Aaron P

    2010-11-01

    Maintaining skeletal muscle function throughout the lifespan is a prerequisite for good health and independent living. For skeletal muscle to consistently function at optimal levels, the efficient activation of processes that regulate muscle development, growth, regeneration and metabolism is required. Numerous conditions including neuromuscular disorders, physical inactivity, chronic disease and ageing are associated with perturbations in skeletal muscle function. A loss or reduction in skeletal muscle function often leads to increased morbidity and mortality either directly, or indirectly, via the development of secondary diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Identifying mechanisms which influence the processes regulating skeletal muscle function is a key priority. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) provides a new avenue that will extend our knowledge of factors controlling skeletal muscle function. miRNAs may also improve our understanding and application of current therapeutic approaches as well as enable the identification of new therapeutic strategies and targets aimed at maintaining and/or improving skeletal muscle health. This review brings together the latest developments in skeletal muscle miRNA biology and focuses on their role and regulation under physiological and patho-physiological conditions with an emphasis on: myogenesis, hypertrophy, atrophy and regeneration; exercise and nutrition; muscle disease, ageing, diabetes and obesity.

  12. Maximal Voluntary Static Force Production Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle in Children 8-11 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Going, Scott B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of maximal voluntary isometric muscle contraction force-time curves among 32 normal, healthy 8- to 11-year-olds performing tasks involving separate muscle groups found that force and maximal rate of force increase were quite reproducible, but time to selected force levels reflected considerable variations. (Author/CB)

  13. Maximal Voluntary Static Force Production Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle in Children 8-11 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Going, Scott B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of maximal voluntary isometric muscle contraction force-time curves among 32 normal, healthy 8- to 11-year-olds performing tasks involving separate muscle groups found that force and maximal rate of force increase were quite reproducible, but time to selected force levels reflected considerable variations. (Author/CB)

  14. Skeletal muscle dysfunction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Cheol; Mofarrahi, Mahroo; Hussain, Sabah NA

    2008-01-01

    <