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Sample records for aging steps snas

  1. Timing of Complementary Food Introduction and Age at Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes: the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary STUDY (SNAS)

    PubMed Central

    Crume, Tessa L.; Crandell, Jamie; Norris, Jill M.; Dabelea, Dana; Fangman, Mary T.; Pettitt, David J.; Dolan, Lawrence; Rodriguez, Beatriz L.; O'Connor, Rebecca; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    The association between timing of complementary food introduction and age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was investigated among 1077 children in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study. Age at diagnosis was 5-month earlier for children introduced to sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in the first 12 months of life compared to those who were not (9.0 ± 0.2 vs. 9.5 ± 0.1; p=0.02), independent of HLA-risk status. Analyses stratified by HLA-risk status found that children with a high risk HLA genotype had an earlier age at diagnosis if they were introduced to fruit juice in the first year of life (mean age of diagnosis=9.3 ± 0.1, 9.1 ± 0.1 and 9.6 ± 0.2 for introduction at ≤ 6 months, between 7 and 11 months, and ≤12 months, respectively; p=0.04). Introduction of SSB in the first year of life may accelerate onset of type 1 diabetes independent of HLA-risk status. PMID:25117987

  2. Design Considerations for RNA Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs).

    PubMed

    Barnaby, Stacey N; Perelman, Grant A; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Chinen, Alyssa B; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-09-21

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are key components in many cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, growth, aging, and death. RNA spherical nucleic acids (RNA-SNAs), which consist of dense shells of double-stranded RNA on nanoparticle surfaces, are powerful and promising therapeutic modalities because they confer advantages over linear RNA such as high cellular uptake and enhanced stability. Due to their three-dimensional shell of oligonucleotides, SNAs, in comparison to linear nucleic acids, interact with the biological environment in unique ways. Herein, the modularity of the RNA-SNA is used to systematically study structure-function relationships in order to understand how the oligonucleotide shell affects interactions with a specific type of biological environment, namely, one that contains serum nucleases. We use a combination of experiment and theory to determine the key architectural properties (i.e., sequence, density, spacer moiety, and backfill molecule) that affect how RNA-SNAs interact with serum nucleases. These data establish a set of design parameters for SNA architectures that are optimized in terms of stability. PMID:27523252

  3. Design Considerations for RNA Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are key components in many cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, growth, aging, and death. RNA spherical nucleic acids (RNA-SNAs), which consist of dense shells of double-stranded RNA on nanoparticle surfaces, are powerful and promising therapeutic modalities because they confer advantages over linear RNA such as high cellular uptake and enhanced stability. Due to their three-dimensional shell of oligonucleotides, SNAs, in comparison to linear nucleic acids, interact with the biological environment in unique ways. Herein, the modularity of the RNA-SNA is used to systematically study structure–function relationships in order to understand how the oligonucleotide shell affects interactions with a specific type of biological environment, namely, one that contains serum nucleases. We use a combination of experiment and theory to determine the key architectural properties (i.e., sequence, density, spacer moiety, and backfill molecule) that affect how RNA-SNAs interact with serum nucleases. These data establish a set of design parameters for SNA architectures that are optimized in terms of stability. PMID:27523252

  4. Design Considerations for RNA Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs).

    PubMed

    Barnaby, Stacey N; Perelman, Grant A; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Chinen, Alyssa B; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-09-21

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are key components in many cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, growth, aging, and death. RNA spherical nucleic acids (RNA-SNAs), which consist of dense shells of double-stranded RNA on nanoparticle surfaces, are powerful and promising therapeutic modalities because they confer advantages over linear RNA such as high cellular uptake and enhanced stability. Due to their three-dimensional shell of oligonucleotides, SNAs, in comparison to linear nucleic acids, interact with the biological environment in unique ways. Herein, the modularity of the RNA-SNA is used to systematically study structure-function relationships in order to understand how the oligonucleotide shell affects interactions with a specific type of biological environment, namely, one that contains serum nucleases. We use a combination of experiment and theory to determine the key architectural properties (i.e., sequence, density, spacer moiety, and backfill molecule) that affect how RNA-SNAs interact with serum nucleases. These data establish a set of design parameters for SNA architectures that are optimized in terms of stability.

  5. Effects of age and step length on joint kinetics during stepping task.

    PubMed

    Bieryla, Kathleen A; Buffinton, Christine

    2015-07-16

    Following a balance perturbation, a stepping response is commonly used to regain support, and the distance of the recovery step can vary. To date, no other studies have examined joint kinetics in young and old adults during increasing step distances, when participants are required to bring their rear foot forward. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine age-related differences in joint kinetics with increasing step distance. Twenty young and 20 old adults completed the study. Participants completed a step starting from double support, at an initial distance equal to the individual's average step length. The distance was increased by 10% body height until an unsuccessful attempt. A one-way, repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine the effects of age on joint kinetics during the maximum step distance. A two-way, repeated measures, mixed model ANOVA was used to determine the effects of age, step distance, and their interaction on joint kinetics during the first three step distances for all participants. Young adults completed a significantly longer step than old adults. During the maximum step, in general, kinetic measures were greater in the young than in the old. As step distance increased, all but one kinetic measure increased for both young and old adults. This study has shown the ability to discriminate between young and old adults, and could potentially be used in the future to distinguish between fallers and non-fallers.

  6. Age-related differences in stepping performance during step cycle-related removal of vision.

    PubMed

    Chapman, G J; Hollands, M A

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether there are age-related changes in the ability of individuals to use vision to plan (feedforward control) and guide (on-line control) foot placement during locomotion. This aim was achieved by constraining the availability of vision and comparing the effects on the stepping performances of older and young adults during a precision stepping task. We experimentally controlled the availability of visual information such that: (1) vision was only available during each stance phase of the targeting limb, (2) vision was only available during each swing phase of the targeting limb or (3) vision was always available. Our visual manipulations had relatively little effect on younger adults' stepping performance as demonstrated by their missing the target on less than 10% of occasions. However, there were clear visual condition-related differences in older adults' stepping performance. When vision was only available during the stance phase of the targeting limb, older adults demonstrated significantly larger foot placement error and associated task failure rate (23%) than trials in which vision was always available (10%). There was an even greater increase in older adults' foot placement error and task failure rate (42%) during trials in which vision was only available in the swing phase than the other visual conditions. These findings suggest that older adults need vision at particular times during the step cycle, to effectively pre-plan future stepping movements. We discuss the evidence that these age-related changes in performance reflect decline in visual and visuomotor CNS pathways.

  7. Structural phase transition, electronic and elastic properties of rocksalt structure SnAs and SnSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Deepika; Dabhi, Shweta D.; Jha, Prafulla K.; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2016-10-01

    Pressure induced structural phase transitions in SnAs and SnSb have been studied using ab-initio density functional theory. The phase transition from NaCl to CsCl structure occurs at 29.8 GPa for SnAs, which agrees well with experimental data, while the same for SnSb is found to be 10.6 GPa, reported for the first time. The calculated ground state properties are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical results. The electronic and bonding properties have also been analyzed. The elastic constants along with other secondary elasticity properties in B1 (NaCl-type) phase are also estimated at ambient as well as high pressure.

  8. Effects of aging and dual tasking on step adjustments to perturbations in visually cued walking.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Masood; Hoogkamer, Wouter; Potocanac, Zrinka; Verschueren, Sabine; Roerdink, Melvyn; Beek, Peter J; Peper, C E; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Making step adjustments is an essential component of walking. However, the ability to make step adjustments may be compromised when the walker's attentional capacity is limited. This study compared the effects of aging and dual tasking on step adjustments in response to stepping-target perturbations during visually cued treadmill walking. Fifteen older adults (69.4 ± 5.0 years; mean ± SD) and fifteen young adults (25.4 ± 3.0 years) walked at a speed of 3 km/h on a treadmill. Both groups performed visually cued step adjustments in response to unpredictable shifts of projected stepping targets in forward (FW), backward (BW) or sideward (SW) directions, at different levels of task difficulty [which increased as the available response distance (ARD) decreased], and with and without dual tasking (auditory Stroop task). In both groups, step adjustments were smaller than required. For FW and BW shifts, older adults undershot more under dual-task conditions. For these shifts, ARD affected the age groups differentially. For SW shifts, larger errors were found for older adults, dual tasking and the most difficult ARD. Stroop task performance did not differ between groups in all conditions. Older adults have more difficulty than young adults to make corrective step adjustments while walking, especially under dual-tasking conditions. Furthermore, they seemed to prioritize the cognitive task over the step adjustment task, a strategy that may pose aging populations at a greater fall risk. For comparable task difficulty, the older adults performed considerably worse than the young adults, indicating a decreased ability to adjust steps under time pressure.

  9. Effects of aging and dual tasking on step adjustments to perturbations in visually cued walking.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Masood; Hoogkamer, Wouter; Potocanac, Zrinka; Verschueren, Sabine; Roerdink, Melvyn; Beek, Peter J; Peper, C E; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Making step adjustments is an essential component of walking. However, the ability to make step adjustments may be compromised when the walker's attentional capacity is limited. This study compared the effects of aging and dual tasking on step adjustments in response to stepping-target perturbations during visually cued treadmill walking. Fifteen older adults (69.4 ± 5.0 years; mean ± SD) and fifteen young adults (25.4 ± 3.0 years) walked at a speed of 3 km/h on a treadmill. Both groups performed visually cued step adjustments in response to unpredictable shifts of projected stepping targets in forward (FW), backward (BW) or sideward (SW) directions, at different levels of task difficulty [which increased as the available response distance (ARD) decreased], and with and without dual tasking (auditory Stroop task). In both groups, step adjustments were smaller than required. For FW and BW shifts, older adults undershot more under dual-task conditions. For these shifts, ARD affected the age groups differentially. For SW shifts, larger errors were found for older adults, dual tasking and the most difficult ARD. Stroop task performance did not differ between groups in all conditions. Older adults have more difficulty than young adults to make corrective step adjustments while walking, especially under dual-tasking conditions. Furthermore, they seemed to prioritize the cognitive task over the step adjustment task, a strategy that may pose aging populations at a greater fall risk. For comparable task difficulty, the older adults performed considerably worse than the young adults, indicating a decreased ability to adjust steps under time pressure. PMID:26298043

  10. Influence of age and of desmotropic drugs on the step phenomenon observed in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Vogel, H G; Hilgner, W

    1979-03-31

    Comprehensive analysis of the mechanical properties of rat skin revealed the "step phenomenon". This particular observation was made after constant strain rate (analysis of stress strain curves) as well as after constant load (creep experiments). Relative low extensions or low loads were necessary to provoke the steps. In most cases two, sometimes three steps were observed. The step phenomenon was found mainly in skin strips punched out perpendicularly to the body axis. Probably some bonds in the fibrous network are broken giving way to additional elongation whereafter stronger links take over the stress. Since earlier studies demonstrated a pronounced influence of age and of desmotropic drugs on mechanical properties at ultimate load, e.g., tensile strength, ultimate modulus of elasticity, and ultimate strain, also the step phenomenon was studied under these conditions. In stress-strain experiments most of the steps were found at the ages of 2 and 4 months. Total stress loss and total work loss due to the steps were the highest at the age of 4 months. If, however, these values were calculated as percentage of ultimate values, the highest figures were found in young animals. Elongation gain due to the steps also showed a maximum at time of maturation, e.g., 4 months. Similar findings were achieved in creep experiments at medium load (200 g). After treatment with prednisolone acetate more steps and after treatment with D-penicillamine fewer steps were observed. In stress-strain experiments total stress loss and total work loss due to steps were more than twice as high than controls after prednisolone treatment and only one half after D-penicillamine. If calculated as percentage of ultimate stress or percentage of work input, these changes disappeared because of similar changes at ultimate load. However, elongation gain due to steps, which was not significantly influenced by prednisolone acetate but significantly decreased by D-penicillamine, showed the same changes

  11. Age effects on the control of dynamic balance during step adjustments under temporal constraints.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Wataru; Fukaya, Takashi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Ohashi, Yukari

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the age effects on the control of dynamic balance during step adjustments under temporal constraints. Fifteen young adults and 14 older adults avoided a virtual white planar obstacle by lengthening or shortening their steps under free or constrained conditions. In the anterior-posterior direction, older adults demonstrated significantly decreased center of mass velocity at the swing foot contact under temporal constraints. Additionally, the distances between the 'extrapolated center of mass' position and base of support at the swing foot contact were greater in older adults than young adults. In the mediolateral direction, center of mass displacement was significantly increased in older adults compared with young adults. Consequently, older adults showed a significantly increased step width at the swing foot contact in the constraint condition. Overall, these data suggest that older adults demonstrate a conservative strategy to maintain anterior-posterior stability. By contrast, although older adults are able to modulate their step width to maintain mediolateral dynamic balance, age-related changes in mediolateral balance control under temporal constraints may increase the risk of falls in the lateral direction during obstacle negotiation.

  12. The Effects of Age Composition of 12-Step Groups on Adolescent 12-Step Participation and Substance Use Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, John F.; Myers, Mark G.; Brown, Sandra A.; Myers, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Youth substance use disorder treatment programs frequently advocate integration into 12-Step fellowships to help prevent relapse. However, the effects of the predominantly adult composition of 12-step groups on adolescent involvement and substance use outcome remain unstudied. Greater knowledge could enhance the specificity of treatment…

  13. Step-wise kinetics of natural physical ageing in arsenic selenide glasses.

    PubMed

    Golovchak, R; Kozdras, A; Balitska, V; Shpotyuk, O

    2012-12-19

    The long-term kinetics of physical ageing at ambient temperature is studied in Se-rich As-Se glasses using the conventional differential scanning calorimetry technique. It is analysed through the changes in the structural relaxation parameters occurring during the glass-to-supercooled liquid transition in the heating mode. Along with the time dependences of the glass transition temperature (T(g)) and partial area (A) under the endothermic relaxation peak, the enthalpy losses (ΔH) and calculated fictive temperature (T(F)) are analysed as key parameters, characterizing the kinetics of physical ageing. The latter is shown to have step-wise character, revealing some kinds of subsequent plateaus and steep regions. A phenomenological description of physical ageing in the investigated glasses is proposed on the basis of an alignment-shrinkage mechanism and first-order kinetic equations.

  14. Attentional costs of visually guided walking: effects of age, executive function and stepping-task demands.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Masood; Roerdink, Melvyn; Bood, Robert Jan; Duysens, Jacques; Beek, Peter J; Peper, C Lieke E

    2014-01-01

    During walking, attention needs to be flexibly allocated to deal with varying environmental constraints. This ability may be affected by aging and lower overall executive function. The present study examined the influence of aging and executive function on the attentional costs of visually guided walking under different task demands. Three groups, young adults (n=15) and elderly adults with higher (n=16) and lower (n=10) executive function, walked on a treadmill in three conditions: uncued walking and walking with regular and irregular patterns of visual stepping targets projected onto the belt. Attentional costs were assessed using a secondary probe reaction time task and corrected by subtracting baseline single-task reaction time, yielding an estimate of the additional attentional costs of each walking condition. We found that uncued walking was more attentionally demanding for elderly than for young participants. In young participants, the attentional costs increased significantly from uncued to regularly cued to irregularly cued walking, whereas for the higher executive function group, attentional costs only increased significantly from regularly cued to irregularly cued walking. For the group with lower executive function, no significant differences were observed. The observed decreased flexibility of elderly, especially those with lower executive function, to allocate additional attentional resources to more challenging walking conditions may be attributed to the already increased attentional costs of uncued walking, presumably required for visuomotor and/or balance control of walking.

  15. One Small Step for a Man: Estimation of Gender, Age and Height from Recordings of One Step by a Single Inertial Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Qaiser; Vögele, Anna; Krüger, Björn; Weber, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A number of previous works have shown that information about a subject is encoded in sparse kinematic information, such as the one revealed by so-called point light walkers. With the work at hand, we extend these results to classifications of soft biometrics from inertial sensor recordings at a single body location from a single step. We recorded accelerations and angular velocities of 26 subjects using integrated measurement units (IMUs) attached at four locations (chest, lower back, right wrist and left ankle) when performing standardized gait tasks. The collected data were segmented into individual walking steps. We trained random forest classifiers in order to estimate soft biometrics (gender, age and height). We applied two different validation methods to the process, 10-fold cross-validation and subject-wise cross-validation. For all three classification tasks, we achieve high accuracy values for all four sensor locations. From these results, we can conclude that the data of a single walking step (6D: accelerations and angular velocities) allow for a robust estimation of the gender, height and age of a person. PMID:26703601

  16. Effects of conflicting constraints and age on strategy choice in stepping down during gait.

    PubMed

    van Dieën, Jaap H; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    2009-02-01

    For negotiating a step down during gait, as in stepping from a curb, two different strategies can be used, i.e. heel landing and toe landing. Toe landing allows more negative work by the leading leg to reduce the momentum gained during the descent, which facilitates maintaining stability but reduces walking velocity. We therefore hypothesized that subjects would use a toe landing less frequently when instructed to walk faster and when negotiating smaller height differences. Furthermore, expecting that older adults would prioritize stability over maintaining gait velocity, we hypothesized that they would use toe landing more frequently than young adults. Two groups (young: 23+/-1 years, n=8; old: 73+/-5 years, n=17) walked over a 10-m walkway at 3-5 km/h to step down a single step of 5-15 cm halfway. In both groups, toe landing was used less frequently for lower steps and less frequently at higher velocities. Older participants used toe landing more frequently and more consistently than young participants. This preference for toe landing is suggested to reflect adaptive behavior to enhance gait stability, rather than an inability to use a heel landing. PMID:18829320

  17. Second Step: A Violence-Prevention Curriculum. Preschool-Kindergarten (Ages 4-6). Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee for Children, Seattle, WA.

    "Second Step" for preschoolers and kindergartners is a curriculum kit designed to reduce impulsive and aggressive behavior in young children and to increase their levels of social competence by teaching skills in empathy, impulse control, and anger management. The kit, which is part of a series that includes curricula for grades 1-3, 4-5, and 6-8,…

  18. Before You Leap into the Computer Age with Both Feet, Take These Five Deliberate Steps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Robert V.

    1983-01-01

    Describes steps taken by Lake Washington School District in Kirkland (Washington) in acquiring microcomputers, including (1) doing preliminary research, (2) forming a steering committee, (3) attending a conference on educational data systems, (4) defining 10 objectives for a computer awareness program, and (5) launching the program in three pilot…

  19. The STEP model: Characterizing simultaneous time effects on practice for flight simulator performance among middle-aged and older pilots.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome; Lazzeroni, Laura C

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the possible effects of the number of practice sessions (practice) and time between practice sessions (interval) among middle-aged and older adults in real-world tasks has important implications for skill maintenance. Prior training and cognitive ability may impact practice and interval effects on real-world tasks. In this study, we took advantage of existing practice data from 5 simulated flights among 263 middle-aged and older pilots with varying levels of flight expertise (defined by U.S. Federal Aviation Administration proficiency ratings). We developed a new Simultaneous Time Effects on Practice (STEP) model: (a) to model the simultaneous effects of practice and interval on performance of the 5 flights, and (b) to examine the effects of selected covariates (i.e., age, flight expertise, and 3 composite measures of cognitive ability). The STEP model demonstrated consistent positive practice effects, negative interval effects, and predicted covariate effects. Age negatively moderated the beneficial effects of practice. Additionally, cognitive processing speed and intraindividual variability (IIV) in processing speed moderated the benefits of practice and/or the negative influence of interval for particular flight performance measures. Expertise did not interact with practice or interval. Results indicated that practice and interval effects occur in simulated flight tasks. However, processing speed and IIV may influence these effects, even among high-functioning adults. Results have implications for the design and assessment of training interventions targeted at middle-aged and older adults for complex real-world tasks. PMID:26280383

  20. The STEP model: Characterizing simultaneous time effects on practice for flight simulator performance among middle-aged and older pilots.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome; Lazzeroni, Laura C

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the possible effects of the number of practice sessions (practice) and time between practice sessions (interval) among middle-aged and older adults in real-world tasks has important implications for skill maintenance. Prior training and cognitive ability may impact practice and interval effects on real-world tasks. In this study, we took advantage of existing practice data from 5 simulated flights among 263 middle-aged and older pilots with varying levels of flight expertise (defined by U.S. Federal Aviation Administration proficiency ratings). We developed a new Simultaneous Time Effects on Practice (STEP) model: (a) to model the simultaneous effects of practice and interval on performance of the 5 flights, and (b) to examine the effects of selected covariates (i.e., age, flight expertise, and 3 composite measures of cognitive ability). The STEP model demonstrated consistent positive practice effects, negative interval effects, and predicted covariate effects. Age negatively moderated the beneficial effects of practice. Additionally, cognitive processing speed and intraindividual variability (IIV) in processing speed moderated the benefits of practice and/or the negative influence of interval for particular flight performance measures. Expertise did not interact with practice or interval. Results indicated that practice and interval effects occur in simulated flight tasks. However, processing speed and IIV may influence these effects, even among high-functioning adults. Results have implications for the design and assessment of training interventions targeted at middle-aged and older adults for complex real-world tasks.

  1. The STEP model: Characterizing simultaneous time effects on practice for flight simulator performance among middle-aged and older pilots

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome; Lazzeroni, Laura C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the possible effects of the number of practice sessions (practice) and time between practice sessions (interval) among middle-aged and older adults in real world tasks has important implications for skill maintenance. Prior training and cognitive ability may impact practice and interval effects on real world tasks. In this study, we took advantage of existing practice data from five simulated flights among 263 middle-aged and older pilots with varying levels of flight expertise (defined by FAA proficiency ratings). We developed a new STEP (Simultaneous Time Effects on Practice) model to: (1) model the simultaneous effects of practice and interval on performance of the five flights, and (2) examine the effects of selected covariates (age, flight expertise, and three composite measures of cognitive ability). The STEP model demonstrated consistent positive practice effects, negative interval effects, and predicted covariate effects. Age negatively moderated the beneficial effects of practice. Additionally, cognitive processing speed and intra-individual variability (IIV) in processing speed moderated the benefits of practice and/or the negative influence of interval for particular flight performance measures. Expertise did not interact with either practice or interval. Results indicate that practice and interval effects occur in simulated flight tasks. However, processing speed and IIV may influence these effects, even among high functioning adults. Results have implications for the design and assessment of training interventions targeted at middle-aged and older adults for complex real world tasks. PMID:26280383

  2. Age-related challenges in reactive control of mediolateral stability during compensatory stepping: A focus on the dynamics of restabilisation.

    PubMed

    Singer, Jonathan C; Prentice, Stephen D; McIlroy, William E

    2016-03-21

    Age-related mediolateral instability during forward stepping reactions evoked by whole-body perturbation is believed to occur independent of the initial temporospatial parameters prior to step-contact. Recent research is beginning to explore the restabilisation phase, following step-contact, as the origin of such instability. This work sought to uncover potential mechanisms underlying age-related mediolateral instability during restabilisation by examining whole-body centre of mass (COM) kinematics and the orientation of the net ground reaction force relative to the COM. Healthy younger (n=20) and older adults (n=20) were anchored to a rigid frame, via adjustable cable. After establishing a standardised initial forward lean, cable release occurred with pseudorandom timing. Participants regained their balance using a single self-selected step. The potential for lateral instability was quantified by COM kinematics. The angle of divergence of the line of action of the net ground reaction force relative to the COM was quantified and examined at three discrete points during restabilisation, as indices of COM control. Age-related differences in magnitude and trial-to-trial variability were analysed. Older adults exhibited increased ML COM incongruity and trial-to-trial variability, which were reduced with trial repetition. Older adults required an increased time to reorient the net ground reaction force, which was correlated with the increased lateral COM displacement during restabilisation. The present results support the idea that age-related mediolateral instability occurs during restabilisation and may be linked to the reactive control of the orientation of the net ground reaction force with respect to the centre of mass. PMID:26920512

  3. Age Effects in Second Language Learning: Stepping Stones toward Better Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKeyser, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of age of acquisition on ultimate attainment in second language learning has been a controversial topic for years. After providing a very brief overview of the ideas that are at the core of the controversy, I discuss the two main reasons why these issues are so controversial: conceptual misunderstandings and methodological difficulties.…

  4. sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar ages of six Apollo 15 impact melt rocks by laser step heating

    SciTech Connect

    Dalrymple, G.B. ); Ryder, G. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors have obtained 15 high resolution (21-51 step) {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age spectra on six Apollo 15 impact melt rocks of different compositions using a continuous laser system on submilligram subsamples and on single crystal plagioclase clasts. Four of the six samples gave reproducible age spectra with well-defined intermediate temperature plateaus over 48% or more of the {sup 39}AR released; the plateaus are interpreted as crystallization ages. Samples 15304,7,69, 15294,6,21, and 15314,26,156 gave virtually identical plateau ages whose weighted mean is 3,870 {plus minus} 6 Ma. These three melt rocks differ in composition and likely formed in three separate impact events. Sample 15356,9 gave replicate plateau ages that average 3,836 {plus minus} 12 Ma and date a fourth and younger impact event. The age spectra for samples 15308,9 and 15414,3,36 increase with increasing increment temperature and may have been formed in or affected by impacts at about 2,700 Ma and 3,870 Ma, respectively. So far there continues to be no convincing evidence in the lunar record for impact melts older than about 3.9 Ga.

  5. Decreasing arterial aging by controlling blood pressure levels and hypertension: a step forward.

    PubMed

    Scuteri, Angelo; Cunha, Pedro Guimarães

    2012-11-01

    Arterial aging, characterized by arterial stiffening that is clinically evaluable as aortic pulse wave velocity, is risky for CV events, disability, and loss of cognitive function. Today the only adopted strategy to decrease arterial aging/ arterial stiffness is represented by decreasing BP. Selective antihypertensive drug classes (calcium channel blockers, converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists) showed a beneficial effect on the arterial wall and on both large and small arteries over and above the reduction in BP levels. Still, the lower the better paradigm seems only to expose older subjects to higher rate of side effects, that via hypotension result in even transient organ hypoperfusion. This vicious circle may be particularly detrimental for cerebral district and, thus, for cognitive impairment onset and progression until dementia.

  6. Periodontal Care as a Fundamental Step for an Active and Healthy Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Cafiero, Carlo; Matarasso, Marco; Marenzi, Gaetano; Iorio Siciliano, Vincenzo; Bellia, Loredana; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    In the industrialized part of the world, an increasing number of people live the old age without too many restrictions due to illness or physiological impairment. This group is known as the young elderly. On the contrary, a consistent part of seniors develops a greater number of medical conditions and become more and more dependent, these are the old elderly. The first cause of tooth lost in industrialized word is periodontitis that generally strikes people older than 40 years and determines serious detriment of the stomatognatic organ. Smoking and stress are risk factors for periodontitis that are common and shared between young, adult, and older age. Diabetes mellitus, obesity, and osteoporosis are very frequent pathological situations in older age. They have been identified as cofactors in the progression of periodontitis. Many dental associations recognize the importance of continued research on oral fluids diagnostics and welcome the development of rapid point-of-care tests providing accurate measurements of clinically validated biomarkers. At present, well-studied molecules associated with host response factors and with derived tissue destruction mediators have been proposed as diagnostic biomarkers for periodontitis detected in the oral fluids. PMID:24453788

  7. Study of the SCC Behavior of 7075 Aluminum Alloy After One-Step Aging at 163 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, G.; Rivolta, B.; Gerosa, R.; Derudi, U.

    2013-01-01

    For the past many years, 7075 aluminum alloys have been widely used especially in those applications for which high mechanical performances are required. It is well known that the alloy in the T6 condition is characterized by the highest ultimate and yield strengths, but, at the same time, by poor stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance. For this reason, in the aeronautic applications, new heat treatments have been introduced to produce T7X conditions, which are characterized by lower mechanical strength, but very good SCC behavior, when compared with the T6 condition. The aim of this study is to study the tensile properties and the SCC behavior of 7075 thick plates when submitted to a single-step aging by varying the aging times. The tests were carried out according to the standards and the data obtained from the SCC tests were analyzed quantitatively using an image analysis software. The results show that, when compared with the T7X conditions, the single-step aging performed in the laboratory can produce acceptable tensile and SCC properties.

  8. Methylglyoxal-induced dicarbonyl stress in aging and disease: first steps towards glyoxalase 1-based treatments.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Xue, Mingzhan; Thornalley, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Dicarbonyl stress is the abnormal accumulation of dicarbonyl metabolites leading to increased protein and DNA modification contributing to cell and tissue dysfunction in aging and disease. It is produced by increased formation and/or decreased metabolism of dicarbonyl metabolites. MG (methylglyoxal) is a dicarbonyl metabolite of relatively high flux of formation and precursor of the most quantitatively and functionally important spontaneous modifications of protein and DNA clinically. Major MG-derived adducts are arginine-derived hydroimidazolones of protein and deoxyguanosine-derived imidazopurinones of DNA. These are formed non-oxidatively. The glyoxalase system provides an efficient and essential basal and stress-response-inducible enzymatic defence against dicarbonyl stress by the reduced glutathione-dependent metabolism of methylglyoxal by glyoxalase 1. The GLO1 gene encoding glyoxalase 1 has low prevalence duplication and high prevalence amplification in some tumours. Dicarbonyl stress contributes to aging, disease and activity of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. It is found at a low, moderate and severe level in obesity, diabetes and renal failure respectively, where it contributes to the development of metabolic and vascular complications. Increased glyoxalase 1 expression confers multidrug resistance to cancer chemotherapy and has relatively high prevalence in liver, lung and breast cancers. Studies of dicarbonyl stress are providing improved understanding of aging and disease and the basis for rational design of novel pharmaceuticals: glyoxalase 1 inducers for obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease and glyoxalase 1 inhibitors for multidrug-resistant tumours. The first clinical trial of a glyoxalase 1 inducer in overweight and obese subjects showed improved glycaemic control, insulin resistance and vascular function. PMID:27555612

  9. Argon-40/Argon-39 Age Spectra of Apollo 17 Highlands Breccia Samples by Laser Step Heating and the Age of the Serenitatis Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalrymple, G. Brent; Ryder, Graham

    1996-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (21-63 steps) Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra using a continuous laser system on 19 submilligram samples of melt rocks and clasts from Apollo 17 samples collected from the pre-Imbrian highlands in the easternmost part of the Serenitatis basin. The samples include poikilitic melt rocks inferred to have been formed in the Serenitatis basin-forming impact, aphanitic melt rock whose compositions vary and whose provenance is uncertain, and granulite, gabbro, and melt clasts. Three of the poikilitic melts have similar age spectrum plateau ages (72395,96, 3893 +/- 16 Ma (2sigma); 72535,7, 3887 +/- 16 Ma; 76315,150, 3900 +/- 16 Ma) with a weighted mean age of 3893 +/- 9 Ma, which we interpret as the best age for the Serenitatis basin- forming impact. Published Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum ages of Apollo 17 poikilitic melts are consistent with our new age but are much less precise. Two poikilitic melts did not give plateaus and the maxima in their age spectra indicate ages of greater than or equal to 3869 Ma (72558,7) and greater than or equal to 3743 Ma (77135,178). Plateau ages of two poikilitic melts and two gabbro clasts from 73155 range from 3854 +/- 16 Ma to 3937 +/- 16 Ma and have probably been affected by the ubiquitous (older?) clasts and by post- formation heating (impact) events. Plateau ages from two of the aphanitic melt 'blobs' and two granulites in sample 72255 fall in the narrow range of 3850 q 16 Ma to 3869 q 16 Ma with a weighted mean of 3862 +/- 8 Ma. Two of the aphanitic melt blobs from 72255 have ages of 3883 +/- 16 Ma and greater than or equal to 3894 Ma, whereas a poikilitic melt clast (of different composition from the 'Serenitatis' melts) has an age of 3835 +/- 16 Ma, which is the upper limit for the accretion of 72255. These data suggest that either the aphanitic melts vary in age, as is also suggested by their varying chemical compositions, or they formed in the 72255 accretionary event about 3.84-3.85 Ga and older relict

  10. Developing a two-step heat treatment for inactivating desiccation-adapted Salmonella spp. in aged chicken litter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao; Wang, Hongye; Jiang, Xiuping

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of a two-step heat treatment for eliminating desiccation-adapted Salmonella spp. in aged chicken litter was evaluated. The aged chicken litter with 20, 30, 40, and 50% moisture contents was inoculated with a mixture of four Salmonella serotypes for a 24-h adaptation. Afterwards, the inoculated chicken litter was added into the chicken litter with the adjusted moisture content for a 1-h moist-heat treatment at 65 °C and 100% relative humidity inside a water bath, followed by a dry-heat treatment in a convection oven at 85 °C for 1 h to the desired moisture level (<10-12%). After moist-heat treatment, the populations of Salmonella in aged chicken litter at 20 and 30% moisture contents declined from ≈6.70 log colony-forming units (CFU)/g to 3.31 and 3.00 log CFU/g, respectively. After subsequent 1-h dry-heat treatment, the populations further decreased to 2.97 and 2.57 log CFU/g, respectively. Salmonella cells in chicken litter with 40% and 50% moisture contents were only detectable by enrichment after 40 and 20 min of moist-heat treatment, respectively. Moisture contents in all samples were reduced to <10% after a 1-h dry-heat process. Our results demonstrated that the two-step heat treatment was effective in reducing >5.5 logs of desiccation-adapted Salmonella in aged chicken litter with moisture content at or above 40%. Clearly, the findings from this study may provide the chicken litter processing industry with an effective heat treatment method for producing Salmonella-free chicken litter. PMID:25405539

  11. Visual deprivation leads to gait adaptations that are age- and context-specific: I. Step-time parameters.

    PubMed

    Hallemans, Ann; Beccu, Sofie; Van Loock, Kelly; Ortibus, Els; Truijen, Steven; Aerts, Peter

    2009-07-01

    In children, visual information is crucial for static postural control, although age-related differences exist in the impact of visual perturbation on postural sway. Since static postural control and locomotion are closely related, we expect age-related differences in the impact of visual deprivation on dynamic stability and gait. It is hypothesised that this is related to the important role of vision in postural control. Postural stability and gait was tested in 20 adults and 40 children (3-11 years old) under two different visual conditions: eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC). Significant differences were found between EO and EC for postural sway, dimensionless walking speed, dimensionless stride length and duration of double support. Thus, we can state that visual deprivation affects locomotion both in adults and children. Concerning walking speed a significant interaction effect was observed with age. The difference in walking speed between EO and EC is larger in children than in adults. Furthermore, we found significant correlations between postural sway and walking speed, step frequency and stride length. These observations support the hypothesis that gait adaptations in situations of visual deprivation are related to balance problems.

  12. Use of step scan FT-IR and multivariate curve resolution to understand aging of propellant binder as a function of depth into the polymer material.

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Dion Arledge; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    A sample of polymeric propellant binder was aged from 0 to 60 days at 95 C and analyzed using FT-IR step scan photoacoustic spectroscopy. This technique has the ability of to obtain spectra of the polymer as a function of depth into the polymer material. Multivariate curve resolution was applied to the spectra data obtained to extract the contributions of the aged and un-aged spectral components from the spectra. It was found that multivariate curve resolution could efficiently separate highly overlapped spectra and yielded insights into the aging process.

  13. Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra of Apollo 15 impact melt rocks by laser step-heating and their bearing on the history of lunar basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalrymple, G. B.; Ryder, G.

    1993-07-01

    Results are reported on 26 high-resolution (16-51 steps) Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra obtained on 12 Apollo-15 melt rocks of different composition using a continuous laser system on submg fragments of recrystallized melt and single-crystal plagioclase clasts from impact melt rocks collected at the Apennine Front where the Imbrium and Serenitatis basins intersect. A table is presented with the summary of the Ar-40/Ar-39 spectrum data, which represent 891 individual temperature step analyses. Also presented are 20 of the 26 age spectra along with their respective K/Ca plots. Melt rock fragments and plagioclase clasts from seven of the 12 samples analyzed yielded reproducible, intermediate-T Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateaus, which were interpreted as crystallization ages that represent the times of impact of bolides onto the lunar surface.

  14. Technical note: The two step procedure (TSP) for the determination of age at death of adult human remains in forensic cases.

    PubMed

    Baccino, Eric; Sinfield, Laura; Colomb, Sophie; Baum, Thierry Pascal; Martrille, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the principles and results of TSP (the two step procedure), a comprehensive (combined) method of age estimation in mature human skeletal remains. The first step consists of the examination of the pubic symphysis using the Suchey-Brooks system for a "pre-choice". Then for SBS phases I, II, III, (young adults up to about 40) the age estimate is given using the chronological interval corresponding to each phase. For SBS phase is IV, V or VI (mature adults, about 40 to 60), then (second step) the dental method of Lamendin (using single rooted tooth) will be applied alone. Both methods are fast, easy to learn and to use (requiring no preparation except cleaning soft tissues from the pubic bone) and are not expensive, making TSP usable by all pathologists or anthropologists in any Forensic unit. It is also of great practical use in mass disaster and mass grave situation. After 15 years of use, a literature review and four evaluation studies we confirm that TSP is more accurate than any single method for aging adults and at least as good as more complicated combined methods. Despite its advantages TSP is, like all other aging methods, not efficient in adults over 65 years of age.

  15. Influence of multi-step heat treatments in creep age forming of 7075 aluminum alloy: Optimization for springback, strength and exfoliation corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Arabi Jeshvaghani, R.; Zohdi, H.; Shahverdi, H.R.; Bozorg, M.; Hadavi, S.M.M.

    2012-11-15

    Multi-step heat treatments comprise of high temperature forming (150 Degree-Sign C/24 h plus 190 Degree-Sign C for several minutes) and subsequent low temperature forming (120 Degree-Sign C for 24 h) is developed in creep age forming of 7075 aluminum alloy to decrease springback and exfoliation corrosion susceptibility without reduction in tensile properties. The results show that the multi-step heat treatment gives the low springback and the best combination of exfoliation corrosion resistance and tensile strength. The lower springback is attributed to the dislocation recovery and more stress relaxation at higher temperature. Transmission electron microscopy observations show that corrosion resistance is improved due to the enlargement in the size and the inter-particle distance of the grain boundaries precipitates. Furthermore, the achievement of the high strength is related to the uniform distribution of ultrafine {eta} Prime precipitates within grains. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Creep age forming developed for manufacturing of aircraft wing panels by aluminum alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A good combination of properties with minimal springback is required in this component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This requirement can be improved through the appropriate heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multi-step cycles developed in creep age forming of AA7075 for improving of springback and properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results indicate simultaneous enhancing the properties and shape accuracy (lower springback).

  16. "But a Step from College to the Judicial Bench": College and Curriculum in New England's "Age of Improvement"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nivison, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    In 1827, two years after its incorporation as a college and six years removed from its founding as a "collegiate institution," Amherst College revamped its curriculum into what it called a "parallel course of study." In this new scheme, students were allowed to follow one of two tracks during their college years. Amherst's response to the Age of…

  17. Influence of delay step conditions between quenching and aging on the precipitation mechanisms in the alloy AlZnMg AA7028 aging process

    SciTech Connect

    Calatayud, A.; Ferrer, C.; Amigo, V.; Salvador, M.D.

    1997-03-15

    Among precipitation-hardened alloys, the Al-Zn-Mg system includes the aluminium alloys with higher-strength. The relatively high solubility of Zn and Mg in aluminium makes it possible to produce a high density of precipitates, which results in a higher strength increase. AlZnMg low copper or copper free alloys have the advantage of being easily weldable and, moreover, they harden significantly at room temperature with respect to other weldable aluminium alloys. Due to the remarkable degree of natural aging achieved by AA7000 alloys, the time interval at room temperature between quenching and the beginning of the artificial aging treatment is a variable that must be taken into account. This work was undertaken to evaluate the influence of cooling kinetics at quenching on alloy mechanical characteristics in artificial aging at several temperatures T{sub 2}. The effect of variables that define delays after quenching, basically time t{sub 1} and temperature T{sub 1} was also analyzed. Likewise, this work studies microstructural evolution of material exposed to aging treatments, resulting from the combination of the above mentioned variables.

  18. Security: Step by Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetcov, Eric

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a list of the essential steps to keeping a school's or district's network safe and sound. It describes how to establish a security architecture and approach that will continually evolve as the threat environment changes over time. The article discusses the methodology for implementing this approach and then discusses the…

  19. Improved Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance and Strength of a Two-Step Aged Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy Using Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lianghua; Liu, Zhiyi; Ying, Puyou; Liu, Meng

    2015-12-01

    Multi-step heat treatment effectively enhances the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance but usually degrades the mechanical properties of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys. With the aim to enhance SCC resistance as well as strength of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, we have optimized the process parameters during two-step aging of Al-6.1Zn-2.8Mg-1.9Cu alloy by Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array. In this work, analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to find out the significant heat treatment parameters. The slow strain rate testing combined with scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope was employed to study the SCC behaviors of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy. Results showed that the contour map produced by ANOVA offered a reliable reference for selection of optimum heat treatment parameters. By using this method, a desired combination of mechanical performances and SCC resistance was obtained.

  20. Next Step for STEP

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Claire; Bremner, Brenda

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  1. 7 Steps to Aging Well

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as chronic lung disease and heart disease. Smoking during pregnancy can have adverse effects on the unborn child, such as premature delivery and low birth weight. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has smoking cessation guidelines in its Cancer Topics online at ...

  2. PHOEBE - step by step manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.

    2016-03-01

    An easy step-by-step manual of PHOEBE is presented. It should serve as a starting point for the first time users of PHOEBE analyzing the eclipsing binary light curve. It is demonstrated on one particular detached system also with the downloadable data and the whole procedure is described easily till the final trustworthy fit is being reached.

  3. Un Paso Adelante a los Tres Anos de Edad: Guia para las Familias (Step Ahead at Age 3: A Guide for Families).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Pamela, Ed.; And Others

    This publication guides Spanish-speaking parents in Kansas communities as they plan for the transition of young children with special needs from the Infant-Toddler Services program to Early Childhood Special Education Services and/or other community services. Information is provided on the seven-step process: (1) planning ahead; (2) the transition…

  4. Stepped nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, George P.

    1998-01-01

    An insert which allows a supersonic nozzle of a rocket propulsion system to operate at two or more different nozzle area ratios. This provides an improved vehicle flight performance or increased payload. The insert has significant advantages over existing devices for increasing nozzle area ratios. The insert is temporarily fastened by a simple retaining mechanism to the aft end of the diverging segment of the nozzle and provides for a multi-step variation of nozzle area ratio. When mounted in place, the insert provides the nozzle with a low nozzle area ratio. During flight, the retaining mechanism is released and the insert ejected thereby providing a high nozzle area ratio in the diverging nozzle segment.

  5. Stepped nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, G.P.

    1998-07-14

    An insert is described which allows a supersonic nozzle of a rocket propulsion system to operate at two or more different nozzle area ratios. This provides an improved vehicle flight performance or increased payload. The insert has significant advantages over existing devices for increasing nozzle area ratios. The insert is temporarily fastened by a simple retaining mechanism to the aft end of the diverging segment of the nozzle and provides for a multi-step variation of nozzle area ratio. When mounted in place, the insert provides the nozzle with a low nozzle area ratio. During flight, the retaining mechanism is released and the insert ejected thereby providing a high nozzle area ratio in the diverging nozzle segment. 5 figs.

  6. Safety of Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC) with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine plus Amodiaquine when Delivered to Children under 10 Years of Age by District Health Services in Senegal: Results from a Stepped-Wedge Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    NDiaye, J. L.; Cissé, B.; Ba, E. H.; Gomis, J. F.; Ndour, C. T.; Molez, J. F.; Fall, F. B.; Sokhna, C.; Faye, B.; Kouevijdin, E.; Niane, F. K.; Cairns, M.; Trape, J. F.; Rogier, C.; Gaye, O.; Greenwood, B. M.; Milligan, P. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background It is recommended that children aged 3 months to five years of age living in areas of seasonal transmission in the sub-Sahel should receive Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine plus amodiaquine (SPAQ) during the malaria transmission season. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of SMC with SPAQ in children when delivered by community health workers in three districts in Senegal where SMC was introduced over three years, in children from 3 months of age to five years of age in the first year, then in children up to 10 years of age. Methods A surveillance system was established to record all deaths and all malaria cases diagnosed at health facilities and a pharmacovigilance system was established to detect adverse drug reactions. Health posts were randomized to introduce SMC in a stepped wedge design. SMC with SPAQ was administered once per month from September to November, by nine health-posts in 2008, by 27 in 2009 and by 45 in 2010. Results After three years, 780,000 documented courses of SMC had been administered. High coverage was achieved. No serious adverse events attributable to the intervention were detected, despite a high level of surveillance. Conclusions SMC is being implemented in countries of the sub-Sahel for children under 5 years of age, but in some areas the age distribution of cases of malaria may justify extending this age limit, as has been done in Senegal. Our results show that SMC is well tolerated in children under five and in older children. However, pharmacovigilance should be maintained where SMC is implemented and provision for strengthening national pharmacovigilance systems should be included in plans for SMC implementation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00712374 PMID:27764102

  7. Physical modeling of stepped spillways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stepped spillways applied to embankment dams are becoming popular for addressing the rehabilitation of aging watershed dams, especially those situated in the urban landscape. Stepped spillways are typically placed over the existing embankment, which provides for minimal disturbance to the original ...

  8. Quantifying the influence of safe road systems and legal licensing age on road mortality among young adolescents: steps towards system thinking.

    PubMed

    Twisk, Divera; Commandeur, Jacques J F; Bos, Niels; Shope, Jean T; Kok, Gerjo

    2015-01-01

    Based on existing literature, a system thinking approach was used to set up a conceptual model on the interrelationships among the components influencing adolescent road mortality, distinguishing between components at the individual level and at the system level. At the individual level the role of risk behaviour (sometimes deliberate and sometimes from inexperience or other non-deliberate causes) in adolescent road mortality is well documented. However, little is known about the extent to which the 'road system' itself may also have an impact on younger adolescents' road mortality. This, by providing a safe or unsafe road environment for all road users (System-induced exposure) and by allowing access to high-risk vehicles at a young or older age through the legal licensing age. This study seeks to explore these relationships by analysing the extent to which the road mortality of 10 to 17 year olds in various jurisdictions can be predicted from the System-induced Exposure (SiE) in a jurisdiction and from its legal licensing age to drive motor vehicles. SiE was operationalized as the number of road fatalities per 10(5) inhabitants/all ages together, but excluding the 10 to 17 year olds. Data on road fatalities during the years 2001 through 2008 were obtained from the OECD International Road Traffic Accident Database (IRTAD) and from the USA NHTSA's Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) database for 29 early and 10 late licensing jurisdictions. Linear mixed models were fitted with annual 'Adolescent road mortality per capita' for 2001 through 2008 as the dependent variable, and time-dependent 'SiE' and time-independent 'Licensing system' as predictor variables. To control for different levels of motorisation, the time-dependent variable 'Annual per capita vehicle distance travelled' was used as a covariate. Licensing system of a jurisdiction was entered as a categorical predictor variable with late licensing countries as a baseline group. The study found support

  9. Lessons learned in stepped chute research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early research on stepped chutes focused on steep gravity style stepped chutes. Today, the research trend has shifted to stepped chutes applied to more moderate slopes like those for aging embankment dams. Research contributions have been made on hydraulic properties of stepped chutes including ai...

  10. Evaluation of Florida's STEP Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Health and Rehabilitative Services, Tallahassee.

    Project STEP (Short Term Elective Program) is an outdoor-educational program that, through teaching wilderness survival skills and affording a necessity for their use, provides juvenile delinquents with a feeling of self-reliance and self-worth. The program is designed for committed youths, primarily males, at least 13 to 14 years of age, but…

  11. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  12. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, Steven C.; Swansen, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A stepping motor is microprocessingly controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  13. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  14. Step by Step: Avoiding Spiritual Bypass in 12-Step Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Clarke, Philip B.; Graves, Elizabeth G.

    2009-01-01

    With spirituality as a cornerstone, 12-step groups serve a vital role in the recovery community. It is important for counselors to be mindful, however, of the potential for clients to be in spiritual bypass, which likely will undermine the recovery process.

  15. Inception point for embankment dam stepped spillways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stepped spillways applied to embankment dams have become a common design practice with the rehabilitation of aging watershed dams, especially those experiencing a hazard classification change from low to high hazard. Previous research on stepped spillways focused on gravity dams where aerated flow ...

  16. Cyclic steps on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, M.; Izumi, N.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.; Yamada, T.; Greve, R.

    2016-05-01

    Boundary waves often form at the interface between ice and fluid flowing adjacent to it, such as ripples under river ice covers, and steps on the bed of supraglacial meltwater channels. They may also be formed by wind, such as the megadunes on the Antarctic ice sheet. Spiral troughs on the polar ice caps of Mars have been interpreted to be cyclic steps formed by katabatic wind blowing over ice. Cyclic steps are relatives of upstream-migrating antidunes. Cyclic step formation on ice is not only a mechanical but also a thermodynamic process. There have been very few studies on the formation of either cyclic steps or upstream-migrating antidunes on ice. In this study, we performed flume experiments to reproduce cyclic steps on ice by flowing water, and found that trains of steps form when the Froude number is larger than unity. The features of those steps allow them to be identified as ice-bed analogs of cyclic steps in alluvial and bedrock rivers. We performed a linear stability analysis and obtained a physical explanation of the formation of upstream-migrating antidunes, i.e., precursors of cyclic steps. We compared the results of experiments with the predictions of the analysis and found the observed steps fall in the range where the analysis predicts interfacial instability. We also found that short antidune-like undulations formed as a precursor to the appearance of well-defined steps. This fact suggests that such antidune-like undulations correspond to the instability predicted by the analysis and are precursors of cyclic steps.

  17. Golgi-Cox Staining Step by Step

    PubMed Central

    Zaqout, Sami; Kaindl, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Golgi staining remains a key method to study neuronal morphology in vivo. Since most protocols delineating modifications of the original staining method lack details on critical steps, establishing this method in a laboratory can be time-consuming and frustrating. Here, we describe the Golgi-Cox staining in such detail that should turn the staining into an easily feasible method for all scientists working in the neuroscience field. PMID:27065817

  18. STEP Experiment Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, M. L. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    A plan to develop a space technology experiments platform (STEP) was examined. NASA Langley Research Center held a STEP Experiment Requirements Workshop on June 29 and 30 and July 1, 1983, at which experiment proposers were invited to present more detailed information on their experiment concept and requirements. A feasibility and preliminary definition study was conducted and the preliminary definition of STEP capabilities and experiment concepts and expected requirements for support services are presented. The preliminary definition of STEP capabilities based on detailed review of potential experiment requirements is investigated. Topics discussed include: Shuttle on-orbit dynamics; effects of the space environment on damping materials; erectable beam experiment; technology for development of very large solar array deployers; thermal energy management process experiment; photovoltaic concentrater pointing dynamics and plasma interactions; vibration isolation technology; flight tests of a synthetic aperture radar antenna with use of STEP.

  19. Teaching BASIC. A Step by Step Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, M. F.

    This three-chapter guide provides simple explanations about BASIC programming for a teacher to use in a classroom situation, and suggests procedures for a "hands-on" course. Numerous examples are presented of the questions, problems, and level of understanding to expect from first-time, adult users (ages 13 and up). The course materials are…

  20. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  1. A big first step.

    PubMed

    Jones, Howard W

    2004-11-01

    The singleton, term gestation, live birth rate per cycle initiated (BESST) endpoint proposed at the beginning of 2004 is a first big step which should be added to by the consideration of multiple pregnancy rates in relation to singleton rates, by recording of fetal reductions and of pregnancies resulting from cryopreserved material. After three or more steps we may have an accurate reporting system which helps patients to distinguish the pros and cons for singleton term delivery. PMID:15479704

  2. Steps in the Right Direction, against the Odds, an Evaluation of a Community-Based Programme Aiming to Reduce Inactivity and Improve Health and Morale in Overweight and Obese School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Claire; Lewis, Kiara; Manby, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The study describes an evaluation of a 48-week physical activity and nutritional education programme for overweight/obese school-age children using quantitative and qualitative methods. The majority of participants were obese or severely obese when enrolled, and while some improvements in body mass index, self-esteem and engagement in a range of…

  3. Stepped inlet optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    An optical panel includes stacked optical waveguides having stepped inlet facets collectively defining an inlet face for receiving image light, and having beveled outlet faces collectively defining a display screen for displaying the image light channeled through the waveguides by internal reflection.

  4. Converging stepped spillways: Simplified momentum analysis approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roller compacted concrete (RCC) stepped spillways are growing in popularity for providing overtopping protection for aging watershed dams with inadequate auxiliary spillway capacity and for the construction of new dams. Site conditions, such as limited right-of-way, topography, and geological forma...

  5. Micromachine Wedge Stepping Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Schriner, H.K.

    1998-11-04

    A wedge stepping motor, which will index a mechanism, has been designed and fabricated in the surface rnicromachine SUMMiT process. This device has demonstrated the ability to index one gear tooth at a time with speeds up to 205 teeth/see. The wedge stepper motor has the following features, whi:h will be useful in a number of applications. o The ability to precisely position mechanical components. . Simple pulse signals can be used for operation. o Only 2 drive signals are requixed for operation. o Torque and precision capabilities increase with device size . The device to be indexed is restrained at all times by the wedge shaped tooth that is used for actuation. This paper will discuss the theory of operation and desi=m of the wedge stepping motor. The fabrication and testing of I he device will also be presented.

  6. The digital step edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The facet model was used to accomplish step edge detection. The essence of the facet model is that any analysis made on the basis of the pixel values in some neighborhood has its final authoritative interpretation relative to the underlying grey tone intensity surface of which the neighborhood pixel values are observed noisy samples. Pixels which are part of regions have simple grey tone intensity surfaces over their areas. Pixels which have an edge in them have complex grey tone intensity surfaces over their areas. Specially, an edge moves through a pixel only if there is some point in the pixel's area having a zero crossing of the second directional derivative taken in the direction of a non-zero gradient at the pixel's center. To determine whether or not a pixel should be marked as a step edge pixel, its underlying grey tone intensity surface was estimated on the basis of the pixels in its neighborhood.

  7. Comparison of the Effects of Three Stepping Cadences on the Criterion-Related Validity of a Step Test in Chinese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui, Stanley Sai-chuen; Cheung, Peggy Pui-yee

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the criterion-related validity of a 3-min step test using 3 stepping cadences. Chinese children (N = 50; age = 8.92 plus or minus 1.64 years) performed three 3-min bouts of a bench stepping exercise on a 12-in.-high (30.5 cm) bench. Stepping cadences for the 3 step tests were 22, 26, and 30 steps per…

  8. Aging & Health.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    By 2050 an estimated 83.7 million Americans will be ages sixty-five and older, up from 40.3 million in 2010. The shock wave of aging Americans will have profound implications for older people, their families, health care providers, and the economy. Researchers, policy makers, health care leaders, and others are designing responses to the challenges these actuarial shifts will create. For example, delivering health care at home could help keep more older Americans out of costly emergency departments and nursing homes. But such steps require more health care providers, a broader distribution of providers than currently exists, and better use of the resources we have. PMID:27605632

  9. New photolithography stepping machine

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.; Klingmann, J.; Markle, D.

    1995-03-08

    A joint development project to design a new photolithography steeping machine capable of 150 nanometer overlay accuracy was completed by Ultratech Stepper and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The principal result of the project is a next-generation product that will strengthen the US position in step-and-repeat photolithography. The significant challenges addressed and solved in the project are the subject of this report. Design methods and new devices that have broader application to precision machine design are presented in greater detail while project specific information serves primarily as background and motivation.

  10. Steps to the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Dale, Alvin E.

    1976-01-01

    On July 20, 1969, man walked on the surface of the Moon and began a new chapter of his studies that will eventually disclose the geologic nature of the Earth's nearest neighbor. Although he has finally reached the Moon and sampled its substance, much work and study remain before he will know the full scientific significance of the first landing. This booklet briefly summarizes the steps man has taken to understand the Moon and what he thinks he has learned to date as a result of his centuries-long speculations and studies.

  11. Experimentation: the next step

    PubMed Central

    Marinker, Marshall

    1987-01-01

    General practice has entered a period of accelerating change, and those responsible for planning its development now put forward a variety of promising proposals. Unless provision is made for large scale experimentation and scientific evaluation, the direction of future change will be determined not by evidence but by rhetoric. A framework for creating and evaluating a substantial programme of experimentation is suggested. The programme is the logical next step in the process of change which was given impetus by the publication of the government green paper. It should be seen as a professional, moral and political priority. PMID:3681850

  12. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Galyean; A. M. Whaley; D. L. Kelly; R. L. Boring

    2011-05-01

    This guide provides step-by-step guidance on the use of the SPAR-H method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This guide is intended to be used with the worksheets provided in: 'The SPAR-H Human Reliability Analysis Method,' NUREG/CR-6883, dated August 2005. Each step in the process of producing a Human Error Probability (HEP) is discussed. These steps are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff. The discussions on dependence are extensive and include an appendix that describes insights obtained from the psychology literature.

  13. Stair-stepped Mound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-429, 22 July 2003

    This April 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a stair-stepped mound of sedimentary rock (right of center) on the floor of a large impact crater in western Arabia Terra near 11.0oN, 4.4oW. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common in the craters of this region. The repeated thickness and uniformity of the layers that make up this mound suggest that their depositional environment was one in which cyclic or episodic events occurred over some period of time. The sediments might have been deposited in a lake, or they may have settled directly out of the atmosphere. Most of the layered material was later eroded away, leaving this circular mound and the other nearby mesas and knobs. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  14. Step bunching and ordering induced by step-edge barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuegang; Liu, Feng; Tersoff, Jerry; Lagally, Max G.

    2000-03-01

    We derive the equation of motion of steps for step flow growth under the influence of both misfit strain and step-edge barriers. An energy barrier at a step for an atom arriving from the lower terrace causes a step bunching instability. Simulation results show that the bunching is predominantly driven by a coalescence mechanism, leading to multiple transient stages of metastable step bunch arrays, with average bunch size of 2, 4, and 8 steps. The bunch array in these transient stages exhibits a surprisingly good long-range order. Similar kinetic step-bunch ordering has been seen in a a recent experiment[1]. Reference: [1]: C. Schelling, G. Springholz, and F. Schäffler, Phys. Rev. Letts, 83(995)1999.

  15. Green Schools Energy Project: A Step-by-Step Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Gwen

    This publication contains a step-by-step guide for implementing an energy-saving project in local school districts: the installation of newer, more energy-efficient "T-8" fluorescent tube lights in place of "T-12" lights. Eleven steps are explained in detail: (1) find out what kind of lights the school district currently uses; (2) form a group to…

  16. A Step by Step Protocol for Subretinal Surgery in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Al-Nawaiseh, Sami; Thieltges, Fabian; Liu, Zengping; Strack, Claudine; Brinken, Ralf; Braun, Norbert; Wolschendorf, Marc; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Eter, Nicole; Stanzel, Boris V

    2016-09-13

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and other RPE related diseases are the most common causes for irreversible loss of vision in adults in industrially developed countries. RPE transplantation appears to be a promising therapy, as it may replace dysfunctional RPE, restore its function, and thereby vision. Here we describe a method for transplanting a cultured RPE monolayer on a scaffold into the subretinal space (SRS) of rabbits. After vitrectomy xenotransplants were delivered into the SRS using a custom made shooter consisting of a 20-gauge metallic nozzle with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coated plunger. The current technique evolved in over 150 rabbit surgeries over 6 years. Post-operative follow-up can be obtained using non-invasive and repetitive in vivo imaging such as spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) followed by perfusion-fixed histology. The method has well-defined steps for easy learning and high success rate. Rabbits are considered a large eye animal model useful in preclinical studies for clinical translation. In this context rabbits are a cost-efficient and perhaps convenient alternative to other large eye animal models.

  17. A Step by Step Protocol for Subretinal Surgery in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Al-Nawaiseh, Sami; Thieltges, Fabian; Liu, Zengping; Strack, Claudine; Brinken, Ralf; Braun, Norbert; Wolschendorf, Marc; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Eter, Nicole; Stanzel, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and other RPE related diseases are the most common causes for irreversible loss of vision in adults in industrially developed countries. RPE transplantation appears to be a promising therapy, as it may replace dysfunctional RPE, restore its function, and thereby vision. Here we describe a method for transplanting a cultured RPE monolayer on a scaffold into the subretinal space (SRS) of rabbits. After vitrectomy xenotransplants were delivered into the SRS using a custom made shooter consisting of a 20-gauge metallic nozzle with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coated plunger. The current technique evolved in over 150 rabbit surgeries over 6 years. Post-operative follow-up can be obtained using non-invasive and repetitive in vivo imaging such as spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) followed by perfusion-fixed histology. The method has well-defined steps for easy learning and high success rate. Rabbits are considered a large eye animal model useful in preclinical studies for clinical translation. In this context rabbits are a cost-efficient and perhaps convenient alternative to other large eye animal models. PMID:27684952

  18. 1992 STEP Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Tony

    The year 1992 marks the quincentenary jubilee of the famous voyage of Christopher Columbus to the New World, a trip which initiated sustained contact between Europe and the American continent. Courageous explorations often lead to advancement of mankind, be they in uncharted territory or science. As much as Columbus was unaware of what lay in store for his voyage, we were just as poorly informed about what lay beyond our home planet when we began space exploration about three decades ago. There is much similarity among the pioneering spirits characteristic of both endeavors. It is thus fitting to celebrate this quincentenary occasion by declaring 1992 International Space Year (ISY).In conjunction with the COSPAR Meeting and the International Convention of the World Space Congress to be held in Washington, D.C., from August to September 1992, a 4-day symposium on the initial results from the Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program (STEP) Facilities and Theory Campaigns will be held at Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., August 24-27. 1992.

  19. Treadmill-Elicited Stepping in Seven-Month-Old Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelen, Esther

    1986-01-01

    Videotape recordings were made of the kick and step movements of six infants seven months of age, while they were in supine and upright positions on a stationary and moving treadmill. When placed on a moving treadmill, infants performed alternating stepping movements with many characteristics of mature walking. Implications are discussed. (RH)

  20. STEPS: JPL's Astrometric Exoplanet Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaklan, Stuart; Pravdo, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Presentation topics include: STEPS ground-based astrometry at Hale Telescope; the instrument; why astronomy and why M-dwarfs; motion of center of light about center of mass in photocentric orbit; photocentric motion vs. fractional mass; high-resolution imaging of STEPS targets; GU 802 p one possible orbit plotted with data, Keplerian frame; GJ 802 results; STEPS future; and a bibliography of STEPS papers.

  1. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    April M. Whaley; Dana L. Kelly; Ronald L. Boring; William J. Galyean

    2012-06-01

    Step-by-step guidance was developed recently at Idaho National Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the use of the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This work was done to address SPAR-H user needs, specifically requests for additional guidance on the proper application of various aspects of the methodology. This paper overviews the steps of the SPAR-H analysis process and highlights some of the most important insights gained during the development of the step-by-step directions. This supplemental guidance for analysts is applicable when plant-specific information is available, and goes beyond the general guidance provided in existing SPAR-H documentation. The steps highlighted in this paper are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff.

  2. Multiple stage miniature stepping motor

    DOEpatents

    Niven, William A.; Shikany, S. David; Shira, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    A stepping motor comprising a plurality of stages which may be selectively activated to effect stepping movement of the motor, and which are mounted along a common rotor shaft to achieve considerable reduction in motor size and minimum diameter, whereby sequential activation of the stages results in successive rotor steps with direction being determined by the particular activating sequence followed.

  3. Powerlessness Reinterpreted: Reframing Step One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Susan L.

    The 12 steps of the well-known mutual help group, Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), begin with Step One, admitting powerlessness. Although Step One has helped many problem drinkers and other addicts, its spiritual concepts have been criticized. The possibility of reconceptualizing powerlessness as empowering, not only within AA and its offshoot programs,…

  4. Step-step interactions on GaAs (110) nanopatterns

    SciTech Connect

    Galiana, B.; Benedicto, M.; Tejedor, P.

    2013-01-14

    The step-step interactions on vicinal GaAs (110) surface patterns have been extracted from the quantitative analysis of the terrace width distribution (TWD). We have specifically studied the interactions in near-equilibrium faceting and kinetics-driven step bunching and meandering formed by spontaneous self-organization or through the modification of GaAs growth kinetics by atomic hydrogen. We show that the experimental TWDs determined from atomic force microscopy measurements can be accurately described by a weighed sum of a generalized Wigner distribution and several Gaussians. The results of our calculations indicate that straight facets are formed during high temperature homoepitaxy due to attractive interactions between [110] steps. At low temperatures, steady state attractive interactions in [110] step bunches are preceded by a transition regime dominated by entropic and energetic repulsions between meandering [11n]-type steps (n {>=} 2), whose population density exceeds that of the [110] bunched steps. In addition, it has been found that atomic H reduces the attractive interactions between [110] bunched steps and enhances entropic and dipole-induced energetic repulsions between H-terminated [11n] steps through the inhibition of As-As bond formation at step edges. Our analysis has evidenced a correlation between the value of the adjustable parameter that accounts in our model for the specific weight of the secondary peaks in the TWD ({beta}) and the extent of transverse meandering on the vicinal surface.

  5. Estimating V0[subscript 2]max Using a Personalized Step Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Carrie; Vehrs, Pat R.; George, James D.; Hager, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a step test with a personalized step rate and step height to predict cardiorespiratory fitness in 80 college-aged males and females using the self-reported perceived functional ability scale and data collected during the step test. Multiple linear regression analysis yielded a model (R = 0.90, SEE = 3.43…

  6. Enhanced thermal- and photo-stability of acid yellow 17 by incorporation into layered double hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qian; Feng Yongjun; Feng Junting; Li Dianqing

    2011-06-15

    2,5-dichloro-4-(5-hydroxy-3-methyl-4-(sulphophenylazo) pyrazol-1-yl) benzenesulphonate (DHSB) anions, namely acid yellow 17 anions, have been successfully intercalated into Zn-Al layered double hydroxides (LDH) to produce a novel organic-inorganic pigment by a simple method involving separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS), and the dye-intercalated LDH was analyzed by various techniques, e.g., XRD, SEM, FT-IR, TG-DTA and ICP. The d-spacing of the prepared LDH is 2.09 nm. Furthermore, the incorporation of the DHSB aims to enhance the thermal- and photo-stability of the guest dye molecule, for example, the less color change after accelerated thermal- and photo-aging test. - Graphical abstract: Acid yellow anions were successfully assembled into ZnAl layered double hydroxides (LDH) to produce a novel organic-inorganic composite pigment by a simple method involving separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS). Highlights: > Acid yellow 17 was directly intercalated into ZnAl-LDH to form a novel pigment. > The pigment was prepared by a method involving separate nucleation and aging steps. > The intercalation of dye anions enhances its thermal- and photo-stability.

  7. Gestational age

    MedlinePlus

    Fetal age - gestational age; Gestation; Neonatal gestational age; Newborn gestational age ... Gestational age can be determined before or after birth. Before birth, your health care provider will use ultrasound to ...

  8. Leading Change Step-by-Step: Tactics, Tools, and Tales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Jody

    2010-01-01

    "Leading Change Step-by-Step" offers a comprehensive and tactical guide for change leaders. Spiro's approach has been field-tested for more than a decade and proven effective in a wide variety of public sector organizations including K-12 schools, universities, international agencies and non-profits. The book is filled with proven tactics for…

  9. Step by Step to Smoke-Free Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSciver, James H.; Roberts, H. Earl

    1989-01-01

    This ERIC digest discusses ways of effectively banning smoking in schools so that controversies do not continue after implementation of the policy. By advocating a process approach, the document cites steps taken by the Lake Forest School Board to prohibit smoking in and around school grounds. Step one involved committee planning involving…

  10. Step-By-Step Professional Development in Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meltzer, Sarah T.

    2012-01-01

    Don't train your teachers in instructional technology without reading this resource-packed book from Sarah T. Meltzer. Meltzer presents easy-to-follow guidelines for bringing about effective professional development in technology from start to finish. She takes you step-by-step through the process of planning, implementing, and managing…

  11. Development of a "Steps Questionnaire".

    PubMed

    Gilbert, F S

    1991-07-01

    Thousands of men and women have begun their recovery from alcoholism through the support of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and its well-known "12-Step" program. The purpose of the present study was to develop a scale to measure alcoholics' levels of agreement with the first three of AA's 12 Steps and to test the relationship between sobriety and belief in these three steps. Using both factor analysis and Rasch analysis, two versions of a "Steps Questionnaire" were developed. A 96-member subset of the original subject pool was assessed quarterly for 1 year following inpatient treatment to determine the predictive validity of the questionnaire. The results of this study suggested that agreement with AA's first three steps can be measured and that agreement with AA's first step correlates with number of sober days posttreatment. The dichotomization of Steps Questionnaire scores into total agreement versus partial agreement with Step 1, and from this the reduction of uncertainty in the prediction of abstention over a lengthy follow-up period, provides support for AA's contention that total surrender to one's powerlessness over alcohol is part of the process of achieving abstention.

  12. Combined aging of beryllium bronze

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, P.P.; Kaplun, Yu.A.; Pastukhova, Zh.P.; Rakhshtadt, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    This article evaluates the possibility of increasing the resistance of beryllium bronze to small plastic deformations as a result of the application of stepped aging under stress. Low-temperature aging under conditions of bending under a stress of about 100 MPa was applied to alloy BrBNT1, 9Mg at 150, 180, and 210 /sup 0/C, high-temperature aging at 300 and 340 /sup 0/C under stress and without stress. As a result of applying stepped aging under stress, the elastic limit of the alloy BrBNT1, 9Mg was raised to 900 MPa. Stepped aging under stress has a substantial effect on the relaxation stability of the alloy. The procedure suggested in the article for aging may be used efficiently for treating elastic elements made of other brands of bronze as well.

  13. Step-by-step growth of complex oxide microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, Panos G.; Cullen, David A.; Sharma, Jaswinder K.

    2015-06-10

    The synthesis of complex and hybrid oxide microstructures is of fundamental interest and practical applications. However, the design and synthesis of such structures is a challenging task. We developed a solution phase process to synthesize complex silica and silica titania hybrid microstructures by exploiting the emulsion droplet based shape control and step by step growth. The strategy is robust and can be extended to make complex hybrid structures made of two or more materials while each having its own shape.

  14. Two-step electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Satoru; Ovanesyan, Grigory; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze electroweak baryogenesis during a two-step electroweak symmetry-breaking transition, wherein the baryon asymmetry is generated during the first step and preserved during the second. Focusing on the dynamics of C P violation required for asymmetry generation, we discuss general considerations for successful two-step baryogenesis. Using a concrete model realization, we illustrate in detail the viability of this scenario and the implications for present and future electric dipole moment (EDM) searches. We find that C P violation associated with a partially excluded sector may yield the observed baryon asymmetry while evading present and future EDM constraints.

  15. Healthy Family 2009: Assuring Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Assuring Healthy Aging Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... please turn Javascript on. 7 Smart Steps to Aging Well 1. Control Blood Pressure You can have ...

  16. Impaired step up/over in persons with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Joe R; Horvat, Michael; Ray, Christopher T

    2010-04-01

    This study explored the functional movement task of stepping up and over an obstacle in individuals with Parkinson's disease to their aged-matched controls. Ten participants with Parkinson's disease and 10 aged matched participants were assessed on the Step Up/Over task completed on a NeuroCom EquiTest long forceplate and analyzed using Group MANOVAs. The results indicate that individuals with Parkinson's disease produce less lifting force and exhibited an increased time to complete the task of stepping up and over an object when compared with their aged matched peers. Considering the substantial risk of falls demonstrated in this population these preliminary finding demonstrate the need for interventions aimed at improving this component of function. PMID:20440021

  17. Transoral Robotic Surgery: Step-by-Step Radical Tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Millas, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) radical tonsillectomy is an emerging minimally invasive surgical procedure for the treatment of cancer of the tonsil. The detailed surgical technique and claims for its reproducibility have been previously published. Case Presentation. We present a patient with a T2N2bM0 epidermoid carcinoma of the tonsil to illustrate step by step the surgical procedure for TORS radical tonsillectomy. Neck dissection and TORS were staged. No surgical reconstruction of the defect was required. No tracheostomy was necessary. The patient could eat without any feeding tube and was on full oral diet on the fifth postoperative day. Discussion. The transoral approach offers the benefits of minimally invasive surgery to patients with cancer of the tonsil. The excellent exposure and high precision provided by robotic instrumentation allow the surgeon to closely follow and accomplish the surgical steps, which is the best warranty for safety and effectiveness. PMID:24808963

  18. A step-by-step methodology for enterprise interoperability projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmeta, Ricardo; Pazos, Verónica

    2015-05-01

    Enterprise interoperability is one of the key factors for enhancing enterprise competitiveness. Achieving enterprise interoperability is an extremely complex process which involves different technological, human and organisational elements. In this paper we present a framework to help enterprise interoperability. The framework has been developed taking into account the three domains of interoperability: Enterprise Modelling, Architecture and Platform and Ontologies. The main novelty of the framework in comparison to existing ones is that it includes a step-by-step methodology that explains how to carry out an enterprise interoperability project taking into account different interoperability views, like business, process, human resources, technology, knowledge and semantics.

  19. Step-by-Step Growth of Complex Oxide Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Datskos, Panos; Cullen, David A; Sharma, Jaswinder

    2015-07-27

    The synthesis of complex and hybrid oxide microstructures is of fundamental interest and practical applications. However, the design and synthesis of such structures is a challenging task. A solution-phase process to synthesize complex silica and silica-titania hybrid microstructures was developed by exploiting the emulsion-droplet-based step-by-step growth featuring shape control. The strategy is robust and can be extended to the preparation of complex hybrid structures consisting of two or more materials, with each having its own shape. PMID:26095228

  20. Writing a Simulation Scenario: A Step-By-Step Guide.

    PubMed

    Bambini, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    Simulation is becoming a widely used method of helping nurses learn and maintain competency in the clinical area for both staff educators in clinical settings and nursing faculty in academic settings. Designing an effective simulation experience requires thoughtful planning, knowledge of educational principles, and knowledge of best practices in both simulation and clinical practice. An evidence-based strategy for writing a simulation scenario for nurses and other health care providers in any setting is described. A step-by-step process is outlined that incorporates best practices. Examples and suggestions are provided to help readers create quality simulation experiences.

  1. Partial return yoke for MICE step IV and final step

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Plate, S.; Berg, J. S.; Tarrant, J.; Bross, A.

    2015-05-03

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  2. Partial Return Yoke for MICE Step IV and Final Step

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, Holger; Plate, Stephen; Berg, J.Scott; Tarrant, Jason; Bross, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  3. A Step-by-Step Guide to Personalize Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Barbara; McClaskey, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    It is known that every learner is unique and that one-size-fits-all instruction does not work for most. How can a classroom environment be created that gives each learner voice and choice? The co-founders of Personalize Learning, LLC, offer a detailed six-step approach. This article provides the background on what is and what is not Personalized…

  4. Writing the Winning Dissertation: A Step-By-Step Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatthorn, Allan A.

    This book is a practical guide to researching and writing the doctoral dissertation or master's thesis. Part 1 offers seven chapters on preparatory steps: laying the groundwork for the thesis and dissertation; finding a research problem; conducting a focused review of the literature; making a preliminary choice of methodology; organizing and…

  5. Step fluctuations and step interactions on Mo(0 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondrejcek, M.; Swiech, W.; Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2003-09-01

    Step fluctuations have been studied on Mo(0 1 1) thin single crystal films with various orientations of miscut, in order to determine the step stiffnesses. Effects of unseen defect structures were clearly visible in some data. Measurements of fluctuation amplitudes and relaxation times were made in the temperature range 1100-1680 K. The results show an anisotropic stiffness of about 0.36 eV/nm along [0 1¯ 1] and about 0.15 eV/nm along [1 0 0]. No temperature dependence of the stiffness was detected. The step free energies derived from the stiffnesses average about 0.27 eV/nm and are less anisotropic by about a factor 3. From the temperature dependence of the relaxation rates, an activation energy of 0.8 ± 0.2 eV was determined for the mass diffusion of the mobile defects responsible for the fluctuations. An appendix details an investigation of correlations induced in the motions of neighboring steps by diffusion and by energetic interactions.

  6. Publishing Ethical Research: A Step-by-Step Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wester, Kelly L.

    2011-01-01

    To publish ethical research, one must conduct research responsibly, making ethical choices from the inception of the research idea and throughout the research process. Conducting and publishing ethical research is important because of the impact the results will have on the counseling profession. Steps to consider are discussed.

  7. Cataloging Books Step by Step. CSLA Guide No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ruth S.

    Designed as a beginning, how-to guide, this handbook lists 20 short steps to cataloging library materials for a church or synagogue library. The guide opens with a history and a brief explanation of the Dewey Decimal System, with special attention given to the divisions and subdivisions that fall under the category "Religion." Several references…

  8. From raw material to dish: pasta quality step by step.

    PubMed

    Sicignano, Angelo; Di Monaco, Rossella; Masi, Paolo; Cavella, Silvana

    2015-10-01

    Pasta is a traditional Italian cereal-based food that is popular worldwide because of its convenience, versatility, sensory and nutritional value. The aim of this review is to present a step-by-step guide to facilitate the understanding of the most important events that can affect pasta characteristics, directing the reader to the appropriate production steps. Owing to its unique flavor, color, composition and rheological properties, durum wheat semolina is the best raw material for pasta production. Although pasta is traditionally made from only two ingredients, sensory quality and chemical/physical characteristics of the final product may vary greatly. Starting from the same ingredients, there are a lot of different events in each step of pasta production that can result in the development of varieties of pasta with different characteristics. In particular, numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of temperature and humidity conditions of the pasta drying operation as well as the significance of the choice of raw material and operating conditions on pasta quality. PMID:25783568

  9. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana; Charles P.

    2006-10-10

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  10. Shapiro step at nonequilibrium conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Nashaat, M.; Kulikov, K. V.; Dawood, R.; El Samman, H.; El Sherbini, Th. M.

    2016-07-01

    Detailed numerical simulations of intrinsic Josephson junctions of high-temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation are performed taking into account a charge imbalance effect. We demonstrate that the charge imbalance is responsible for a slope in the Shapiro step in the IV-characteristic. The value of slope increases with a nonequilibrium parameter. Coupling between junctions leads to the distribution of the slope's values along the stack. The nonperiodic boundary conditions shift the Shapiro step from the canonical position determined by Vss=\\hbar f /(2e) , where f is a frequency of external radiation. This fact makes the interpretation of the experimentally found Shapiro step shift by the charge imbalance effect ambiguous.

  11. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) A healthy ... Aging email updates. Enter email address Submit Healthy Aging news Accessibility | Privacy policy | Disclaimers | FOIA | Link to ...

  12. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Change Contrast print sign up Share Healthy Aging This category offers tips on how to stay ... with Smell Problems with Taste Skin Care and Aging Sleep and Aging Taking Medicines Talking with Your ...

  13. Highly Hybridizable Spherical Nucleic Acids by Tandem Glutathione Treatment and Polythymine Spacing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Curry, Dennis; Yuan, Qipeng; Zhang, Xu; Liang, Hao

    2016-05-18

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-templated spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) have been demonstrated as an important functional material in bionanotechnology. Fabrication of SNAs having high hybridization capacity to their complementary sequences is critical to ensure their applicability in areas such as antisense gene therapy and cellular sensing. The traditional salt-aging procedure is effective but tedious, requiring 1-3 days to complete. The rapid low-pH assisted protocol is efficient, but causes concerns related to nonspecific DNA adsorption to the AuNP core. To address these issues, we systematically compared the SNAs prepared by these two methods (salt-aging method and low-pH protocol). In terms of the number of complementary DNA that each SNA can bind and the average binding affinity of each thiolated DNA probe to its complementary strand, both methods yielded comparable hybridizability, although higher loading capacity was witnessed with SNAs made using the low-pH method. Additionally, it was found that nonspecific DNA binding could be eliminated almost completely by a simple glutathione (GSH) treatment of SNAs. Compared to conventional methods using toxic mercapto-hexanol or alkanethiols to remove nonspecific DNA adsorption, GSH is mild, cost-effective, and technically easy to use. In addition, GSH-passivated SNAs minimize the toxicity concerns related to AuNP-induced GSH depletion and therefore offer a more biocompatible alternative to previously reported SNAs. Moreover, rational design of probe sequences through inclusion of a polythymine spacer into the DNA sequences resulted in enhanced DNA loading capacity and stability against salt-induced aggregation. This work provides not only efficient and simple technical solutions to the issue of nonspecific DNA adsorption, but also new insights into the hybridizability of SNAs. PMID:27128167

  14. Effect of multifocal lens glasses on the stepping patterns of novice wearers.

    PubMed

    Beschorner, Kurt E; Milanowski, Autumn; Tomashek, Dennis; Smith, Roger O

    2013-09-01

    Multifocal lens glasses (MfLs) negatively affect vision, increase falling risk and contribute to gait changes during stepping. Previous studies on the effects of MfLs on gait have focused on experienced wearers. Thus, the initial response of first-time wearers, who may face significant challenges in adapting to these glasses, is not well understood. This study aimed to quantify the effects of MfLs on novice wearers during stepping up and down. Additionally, young adults were compared against a middle-aged adults to determine the validity of convenience sampling in testing novice response to MfLs. Fifteen young adults (18-34 y.o.) and seven middle-aged adults (46-56 y.o.) were recruited to perform stepping trials while wearing progressive MfLs and blank single lens glasses. Participants stepped up and down from a 75 mm and 150 mm step in randomized order. Step placement, minimum toe clearance, lower body kinematics and stepping time were measured during step up. Step placement, minimum heel clearance, vertical forces and stepping time were measured during step down. MfLs significantly increased toe clearance in the lead and trailing legs, hip flexion, knee flexion and stepping time during step up and increased vertical forces and stepping time during step down. Step placement and hip angle explained 17% of the toe clearance variability. Changes during step up suggest a more conservative adaptation while increased forces during step down suggest a reduced level of control. No age group effects were observed, which supports the use of convenience sampling for evaluating the novice response to MfLs. PMID:23770232

  15. Seven Steps to Successful Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitworth, Jerry

    This report highlights the experiences of the Lighthouse Project, which successfully included students with disabilities in elementary, middle, and high school general education classes in a school district in southwest Tennessee. Drawing on findings from the Lighthouse Project, the report describes the following seven steps that must be present…

  16. Steps to Maturity Program. Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanaimo School District #68 (British Columbia).

    In fall 1989, the Nanaimo (British Columbia) School District No. 68 asked five people, selected from the school system and community, to evaluate the "Steps to Maturity" Program (STMP), a district-wide family life education and affective development program that has developed gradually since 1972. The evaluation team interviewed a large number of…

  17. Ten Steps to "TQM Plus."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Roger; Hirumi, Atsusi

    1992-01-01

    Total Quality Management Plus (TQM) goes beyond customer satisfaction to consider quality of life, environmental conditions, crime rates, and health and well-being. Steps to integrate such concerns into the TQM process include being ready for challenges, creating a quality system to collect performance data, defining the ideal school and world…

  18. Pride Is the First Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rourke, James; Boone, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    When visitors step inside Pocomoke (MD) Middle School, they are immediately surrounded by a profound sense of pride and high expectations. Students are actively engaged in instruction, the classroom walls are covered with student work, and the halls are lined with pictures of students demonstrating success. Beanbag chairs await eager readers,…

  19. One-Step Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Steam injection improves yield and quality of product. Single step process for liquefying coal increases liquid yield and reduces hydrogen consumption. Principal difference between this and earlier processes includes injection of steam into reactor. Steam lowers viscosity of liquid product, so further upgrading unnecessary.

  20. 10 Steps for Implementing Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsee, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Offers steps for adapting the change process to institutional culture: align leadership style with organizational culture, don't overuse change missionaries, protect change agents, define the problem, maintain focus when the project drifts, identify and remove barriers before implementing action plans, assign responsibilities to individuals,…

  1. Initial steps of aerosol growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, M.; Laakso, L.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Riipinen, I.; Dal Maso, M.; Anttila, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Hõrrak, U.; Vana, M.; Tammet, H.

    2004-12-01

    The formation and growth of atmospheric aerosols depend on several steps, namely nucleation, initial steps of growth and subsequent - mainly condensational - growth. This work focuses on the initial steps of growth, meaning the growth right after nucleation, where the interplay of curvature effects and thermodynamics has a significant role on the growth kinetics. More specifically, we investigate how ion clusters and aerosol particles grow from 1.5 nm to 20 nm (diameter) in atmospheric conditions using experimental data obtained by air ion and aerosol spectrometers. The measurements have been performed at a boreal forest site in Finland. The observed trend that the growth rate seems to increase as a function of size can be used to investigate possible growth mechanisms. Such a growth rate is consistent with a recently suggested nano-Köhler mechanism, in which growth is activated at a certain size with respect to condensation of organic vapors. The results also imply that charge-enhanced growth associated with ion-mediated nucleation plays only a minor role in the initial steps of growth, since it would imply a clear decrease of the growth rate with size. Finally, further evidence was obtained on the earlier suggestion that atmospheric nucleation and the subsequent growth of fresh nuclei are likely to be uncoupled phenomena via different participating vapors.

  2. Initial steps of aerosol growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, O.; Laakso, L.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Riipinen, I.; Dal Maso, M.; Anttila, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Hõrrak, U.; Vana, M.; Tammet, H.

    2004-09-01

    The formation and growth of atmospheric aerosols depend on several steps, namely nucleation, initial steps of growth and subsequent - mainly condensational - growth. This work focuses on the initial steps of growth, meaning the growth right after nucleation, where the interplay of curvature effects and thermodynamics has a significant role on the growth kinetics. More specifically, we investigate how ion clusters and aerosol particles grow from 1.5 nm to 20 nm in atmospheric conditions using experimental data obtained by air ion and aerosol spectrometers. The measurements have been performed at a boreal forest site in Finland. The observed trend that the growth rate seems to increase as a function of size can be used to investigate possible growth mechanisms. Such a growth rate is consistent with a recently suggested nano-Köhler mechanism, in which growth is activated at a certain size with respect to condensation of organic vapors. The results also imply that charge-enhance growth associated with ion-mediated nucleation plays only a minor role in the initial steps of growth, since it would imply a clear decrease of the growth rate with size. Finally, further evidence was obtained on the earlier suggestion that atmospheric nucleation and the subsequent growth of fresh nuclei are likely to be uncoupled phenomena via different participating vapors.

  3. 2-Step IMAT and 2-Step IMRT in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bratengeier, Klaus

    2005-12-15

    In two dimensions, 2-Step Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy (2-Step IMAT) and 2-Step Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) were shown to be powerful methods for the optimization of plans with organs at risk (OAR) (partially) surrounded by a target volume (PTV). In three dimensions, some additional boundary conditions have to be considered to establish 2-Step IMAT as an optimization method. A further aim was to create rules for ad hoc adaptations of an IMRT plan to a daily changing PTV-OAR constellation. As a test model, a cylindrically symmetric PTV-OAR combination was used. The centrally placed OAR can adapt arbitrary diameters with different gap widths toward the PTV. Along the rotation axis the OAR diameter can vary, the OAR can even vanish at some axis positions, leaving a circular PTV. The width and weight of the second segment were the free parameters to optimize. The objective function f to minimize was the root of the integral of the squared difference of the dose in the target volume and a reference dose. For the problem, two local minima exist. Therefore, as a secondary criteria, the magnitude of hot and cold spots were taken into account. As a result, the solution with a larger segment width was recommended. From plane to plane for varying radii of PTV and OAR and for different gaps between them, different sets of weights and widths were optimal. Because only one weight for one segment shall be used for all planes (respectively leaf pairs), a strategy for complex three-dimensional (3-D) cases was established to choose a global weight. In a second step, a suitable segment width was chosen, minimizing f for this global weight. The concept was demonstrated in a planning study for a cylindrically symmetric example with a large range of different radii of an OAR along the patient axis. The method is discussed for some classes of tumor/organ at risk combinations. Noncylindrically symmetric cases were treated exemplarily. The product of width and weight of

  4. Meissner-Effect Stepping Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed stepping motor derives torque from diamagnetic repulsion produced by Meissner effect - exclusion of magnetic field from interior of superconductor. Design of motor takes advantage of silver-doped YB2Cu3O and other compounds superconductive at temperatures as high as that of liquid nitrogen. Skin of rotor cooled below its superconducting-transition temperature by liquid nitrogen. O-rings prevent leaks of liquid nitrogen from rotor. Weight, cost, and maintenance reduced.

  5. Segmented Coil Fails In Steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stedman, Ronald S.

    1990-01-01

    Electromagnetic coil degrades in steps when faults occur, continues to operate at reduced level instead of failing catastrophically. Made in segments connected in series and separated by electrically insulating barriers. Fault does not damage adjacent components or create hazard. Used to control valves in such critical applications as cooling systems of power generators and chemical process equipment, where flammable liquids or gases handled. Also adapts to electrical control of motors.

  6. Pacing accuracy during an incremental step test in adolescent swimmers.

    PubMed

    Scruton, Adrian; Baker, James; Roberts, Justin; Basevitch, Itay; Merzbach, Viviane; Gordon, Dan

    2015-01-01

    To assess pacing accuracy in a group of adolescent swimmers during an incremental step test. Fifteen well-trained swimmers (age 15±1.5 years; height 170.2±8.8 cm; mass 60.2±6.6 kg), completed two 7×200 m tests, separated by ~72 hours. They swam to a predetermined incrementally increasing pace per step and were instructed to swim at even pace. Upon completion of each step, rating of perceived exertion, heart rate and blood lactate were recorded. Significant differences observed for both trials between actual and predicted swim time (P<0.05). Significant differences also observed between the first and second 100 m of each step in trial 1 for step 1 (P=0.001, effect size [ES] =0.54), step 2 (P=0.0001, ES =0.57), step 4 (P=0.0001, ES =0.53), step 5 (P=0.005, ES =0.65), step 6 (P=0.0001, ES =0.50), and step 7 (P=0.0001, ES =0.70). Similar responses witnessed for trial 2 (P<0.05). Findings suggest that the finite anaerobic capacity was engaged sooner than would normally be anticipated, as a function of an inability to regulate pace. This is proposed to be a consequence of the volume of exposure to the biological and psychological sensations and cognitive developmental status. Given the apparent error in pacing judgment exhibited in this population group, caution should be applied when adopting such tests to monitor training responses with adolescent athletes, and alternate means of modulating pace be investigated.

  7. Pacing accuracy during an incremental step test in adolescent swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Scruton, Adrian; Baker, James; Roberts, Justin; Basevitch, Itay; Merzbach, Viviane; Gordon, Dan

    2015-01-01

    To assess pacing accuracy in a group of adolescent swimmers during an incremental step test. Fifteen well-trained swimmers (age 15±1.5 years; height 170.2±8.8 cm; mass 60.2±6.6 kg), completed two 7×200 m tests, separated by ~72 hours. They swam to a predetermined incrementally increasing pace per step and were instructed to swim at even pace. Upon completion of each step, rating of perceived exertion, heart rate and blood lactate were recorded. Significant differences observed for both trials between actual and predicted swim time (P<0.05). Significant differences also observed between the first and second 100 m of each step in trial 1 for step 1 (P=0.001, effect size [ES] =0.54), step 2 (P=0.0001, ES =0.57), step 4 (P=0.0001, ES =0.53), step 5 (P=0.005, ES =0.65), step 6 (P=0.0001, ES =0.50), and step 7 (P=0.0001, ES =0.70). Similar responses witnessed for trial 2 (P<0.05). Findings suggest that the finite anaerobic capacity was engaged sooner than would normally be anticipated, as a function of an inability to regulate pace. This is proposed to be a consequence of the volume of exposure to the biological and psychological sensations and cognitive developmental status. Given the apparent error in pacing judgment exhibited in this population group, caution should be applied when adopting such tests to monitor training responses with adolescent athletes, and alternate means of modulating pace be investigated. PMID:26346728

  8. Stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOEpatents

    Vadnais, Kenneth G.; Bashforth, Michael B.; Lewallen, Tricia S.; Nammath, Sharyn R.

    1994-01-01

    A stepped frequency ground penetrating radar system is described comprising an RF signal generating section capable of producing stepped frequency signals in spaced and equal increments of time and frequency over a preselected bandwidth which serves as a common RF signal source for both a transmit portion and a receive portion of the system. In the transmit portion of the system the signal is processed into in-phase and quadrature signals which are then amplified and then transmitted toward a target. The reflected signals from the target are then received by a receive antenna and mixed with a reference signal from the common RF signal source in a mixer whose output is then fed through a low pass filter. The DC output, after amplification and demodulation, is digitized and converted into a frequency domain signal by a Fast Fourier Transform. A plot of the frequency domain signals from all of the stepped frequencies broadcast toward and received from the target yields information concerning the range (distance) and cross section (size) of the target.

  9. Evaluation of one-step luminescent cyanoacrylate fuming.

    PubMed

    Khuu, Alicia; Chadwick, Scott; Spindler, Xanthe; Lam, Rolanda; Moret, Sébastien; Roux, Claude

    2016-06-01

    One-step luminescent cyanoacrylates have recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional cyanoacrylate fuming methods. These new techniques do not require the application of a luminescent post-treatment in order to enhance cyanoacrylate-developed fingermarks. In this study, three one-step polymer cyanoacrylates: CN Yellow Crystals (Aneval Inc.), PolyCyano UV (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) and PECA Multiband (BVDA), and one monomer cyanoacrylate: Lumikit™ (Crime Scene Technology), were evaluated against a conventional two-step cyanoacrylate fuming method (Cyanobloom (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) with rhodamine 6G stain). The manufacturers' recommended conditions or conditions compatible with the MVC™ 1000/D (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) were assessed with fingermarks aged for up to 8 weeks on non-porous and semi-porous substrates. Under white light, Cyanobloom generally gave better development than the one-step treatments across the substrates. Similarly when viewed under the respective luminescent conditions, Cyanobloom with rhodamine 6G stain resulted in improved contrast against the one-step treatments except on polystyrene, where PolyCyano UV and PECA Multiband gave better visualisation. Rhodamine 6G post-treatment of one-step samples did not significantly enhance the contrast of any of the one-step treatments against Cyanobloom/rhodamine 6G-treated samples. PMID:27105155

  10. Evaluation of one-step luminescent cyanoacrylate fuming.

    PubMed

    Khuu, Alicia; Chadwick, Scott; Spindler, Xanthe; Lam, Rolanda; Moret, Sébastien; Roux, Claude

    2016-06-01

    One-step luminescent cyanoacrylates have recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional cyanoacrylate fuming methods. These new techniques do not require the application of a luminescent post-treatment in order to enhance cyanoacrylate-developed fingermarks. In this study, three one-step polymer cyanoacrylates: CN Yellow Crystals (Aneval Inc.), PolyCyano UV (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) and PECA Multiband (BVDA), and one monomer cyanoacrylate: Lumikit™ (Crime Scene Technology), were evaluated against a conventional two-step cyanoacrylate fuming method (Cyanobloom (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) with rhodamine 6G stain). The manufacturers' recommended conditions or conditions compatible with the MVC™ 1000/D (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) were assessed with fingermarks aged for up to 8 weeks on non-porous and semi-porous substrates. Under white light, Cyanobloom generally gave better development than the one-step treatments across the substrates. Similarly when viewed under the respective luminescent conditions, Cyanobloom with rhodamine 6G stain resulted in improved contrast against the one-step treatments except on polystyrene, where PolyCyano UV and PECA Multiband gave better visualisation. Rhodamine 6G post-treatment of one-step samples did not significantly enhance the contrast of any of the one-step treatments against Cyanobloom/rhodamine 6G-treated samples.

  11. Materials Data on Cs2SnAs2Se9 (SG:4) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Counterion Distribution Around Protein-SNAs probed by Small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Kurinji; Bedzyk, Michael; Kewalramani, Sumit; Moreau, Liane; Mirkin, Chad

    Protein-DNA conjugates couple the advanced cell transfection capabilities of spherical DNA architecture and the biocompatible enzymatic activity of a protein core to potentially create therapeutic agents with dual functionality. An understanding of their stabilizing ionic environment is crucial to better understand and predict their properties. Here, we use Small-angle X-ray scattering techniques to decipher the structure of the counterion cloud surrounding these DNA coated nanoparticles. Through the use of anomalous scattering techniques we have mapped the local concentrations of Rb+ ions in the region around the Protein-DNA constructs. These results are further corroborated with simulations using a geometric model for the excess charge density as function of radial distance from the protein core. Further, we investigate the influence of solution ionic strength on the structure of the DNA corona and demonstrate a reduction in the extension of the DNA corona with increasing concentration of NaCl in solution for the case of both single and double stranded DNA shells. Our work reveals the distribution of counterions in the vicinity of Protein-DNA conjugates and decouples the effect of solution ionic strength on the thickness of the DNA layer.

  13. Materials Data on K5SnAs3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Acta Clinica Croatica: progress of a journal step by step.

    PubMed

    Ramljak, Gordana

    2014-03-01

    The journal Acta Clinica Croatica (ACC) was founded in 1962 under the title Anali Bolnice Dr. M. Stojanović. In 1995, the title of the journal was changed into its present form and ever since all papers have been published in English. In 2000, the electronic (online) edition of the ACC was released in addition to the print version. The paper presents development of the journal from 1962 to 2012 based on the analysis of the following SCOPUS citation index parameters: type and number of documents published in the journal; number of citations; and number of domestic and foreign authors. The studied period was analyzed in three time segments: the period from 1995 to 1999, the period from 2000 to 2006 and the period from 2007 to 2012. The same parameters were analyzed in the Web of Science/SCI-Expanded bibliographic and citation index for the 2007-2012 period. The increasing number of documents, authors (both domestic and foreign) and citations demonstrates gradual rise in the quality, visibility and impact of the journal. The fifty years of experience show that a goal, at first very distant and almost unachievable, may be reached by progressing step by step.

  15. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out of ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and ...

  16. 48 CFR 52.214-25 - Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Step Two of Two-Step... Clauses 52.214-25 Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding. As prescribed in 14.201-6(t), insert the following provision: Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding (APR 1985) (a) This invitation for bids is issued to...

  17. 48 CFR 52.214-25 - Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Step Two of Two-Step... Clauses 52.214-25 Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding. As prescribed in 14.201-6(t), insert the following provision: Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding (APR 1985) (a) This invitation for bids is issued to...

  18. Adsorption on a stepped substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikoski, J.; Timonen, J.; Kaski, K.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of substrate steps on the adsorption of particles is considered. The problem is formulated as a lattice-gas model with nearest neighbor interactions and it is studied by a numerical transfer-matrix method. In particular, the influence of the substrate-induced row potential on adsorbed monolayers is discussed. It is found that strong row-transition-like features appear in the presence of a row potential and it is suggested that these may be seen in adsorption on vicinal faces.

  19. Hydraulic Design of Stepped Spillways Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stepped chutes and spillways are commonly used for routing discharges during flood events. In addition, stepped chutes are used for overtopping protection of earthen embankments. Stepped spillways provide significant energy dissipation due to its stepped feature; as a result, the stilling basin as...

  20. What Promotes Wisdom in 12-Step Recovery?

    PubMed

    DiGangi, Julia A; Majer, John M; Mendoza, Leslie; Droege, Jocelyn R; Jason, Leonard A; Contreras, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Research investigations on twelve-step groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) have addressed a number of resources associated with 12-step recovery. However, little is known about the role of wisdom, and whether aspects of 12-step participation might increase this resource among 12-step members. An exploratory analysis revealed that participants who reported having a "spiritual awakening" and considered themselves "members" of 12-step groups reported significantly higher levels of wisdom. Twelve-step meeting attendance was not significantly related to wisdom scores. Findings suggest certain aspects of 12-step involvement are associated with wisdom and may play a role in substance abuse recovery.

  1. Mosaic aging

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lary C.; Herndon, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although all multicellular organisms undergo structural and functional deterioration with age, senescence is not a uniform process. Rather, each organism experiences a constellation of changes that reflect the heterogeneous effects of age on molecules, cells, organs and systems, an idiosyncratic pattern that we refer to as mosaic aging. Varying genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors (local and extrinsic) contribute to the aging phenotype in a given individual, and these agents influence the type and rate of functional decline, as well as the likelihood of developing age-associated afflictions such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Identifying key factors that drive aging, clarifying their activities in different systems, and in particular understanding how they interact will enhance our comprehension of the aging process, and could yield insights into the permissive role that senescence plays in the emergence of acute and chronic diseases of the elderly. PMID:20110150

  2. Aging: overview.

    PubMed

    Harman, D

    2001-04-01

    Aging is a universal process that began with the origination of life about 3.5 billion years ago. Accumulation of the diverse deleterious changes produced by aging throughout the cells and tissues progressively impairs function and can eventually cause death. Aging changes can be attributed to development, genetic defects, the environment, disease, and an inborn process--the aging process. The chance of death at a given age serves as a measure of the average number of aging changes accumulated by persons of that age, that is, of physiologic age, and the rate of change of this measure as the rate of aging. Chances for death are decreased by improvements in general living conditions. As a result, during the past two millennia average life expectancy at birth (ALE-B), determined by the chances for death, of humans has risen from 30 years, in ancient Rome, to almost 80 years today in the developed countries. Chances for death in the developed countries are now near limiting values and ALE-Bs are approaching plateau values that are 6-9 years less than the potential maximum of about 85 years. Chances for death are now largely determined by the inherent aging process after age 28. Only 1.1% of female cohorts in Sweden die before this age; the remainder die off at an exponentially increasing rate with advancing age. The inherent aging process limits ALE-B to around 85 years, and the maximum life span (MLS) to about 122 years. Past efforts to increase ALE-B did not require an understanding of aging. Such knowledge will be necessary in the future to significantly increase ALE-B and MLS, and to satisfactorily ameliorate the medical, economic, and social problems associated with advancing age. The many theories advanced to account for aging should be used, to the extent it is feasible, to help with these important practical problems, including applications of the free radical theory of aging. Past measures evolved by societies to ensure adequate care for older individuals are

  3. 20 CFR 404.231 - Steps in computing your primary insurance amount under the guaranteed alternative-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Insurance Amounts Guaranteed Alternative for People Reaching Age 62 After 1978 But Before 1984 § 404.231... age 62 after 1978 but before 1984, we follow three major steps in finding your guaranteed...

  4. Step-stress analysis for predicting dental ceramic reliability

    PubMed Central

    Borba, Márcia; Cesar, Paulo F.; Griggs, Jason A.; Bona, Álvaro Della

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that step-stress analysis is effective to predict the reliability of an alumina-based dental ceramic (VITA In-Ceram AL blocks) subjected to a mechanical aging test. Methods Bar-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated, polished to 1µm finish and divided into 3 groups (n=10): (1) step-stress accelerating test; (2) flexural strength- control; (3) flexural strength- mechanical aging. Specimens from group 1 were tested in an electromagnetic actuator (MTS Evolution) using a three-point flexure fixture (frequency: 2Hz; R=0.1) in 37°C water bath. Each specimen was subjected to an individual stress profile, and the number of cycles to failure was recorded. A cumulative damage model with an inverse power law lifetime-stress relation and Weibull lifetime distribution were used to fit the fatigue data. The data were used to predict the stress level and number of cycles for mechanical aging (group 3). Groups 2 and 3 were tested for three-point flexural strength (σ) in a universal testing machine with 1.0 s in 37°C water. Data were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney Rank Sum test. Results Step-stress data analysis showed that the profile most likely to weaken the specimens without causing fracture during aging (95% CI: 0–14% failures) was: 80 MPa stress amplitude and 105 cycles. The median σ values (MPa) for groups 2 (493±54) and 3 (423±103) were statistically different (p=0.009). Significance The aging profile determined by step-stress analysis was effective to reduce alumina ceramic strength as predicted by the reliability estimate, confirming the study hypothesis. PMID:23827018

  5. Moral transhumanism: the next step.

    PubMed

    Tennison, Michael N

    2012-08-01

    Although transhumanism offers hope for the transcendence of human biological limitations, it generates many intrinsic and consequential ethical concerns. The latter include issues such as the exacerbation of social inequalities and the exponentially increasing technological capacity to cause harm. To mitigate these risks, many thinkers have initiated investigations into the possibility of moral enhancement that could limit the power disparities facilitated by biotechnological enhancement. The arguments often focus on whether moral enhancement is morally permissible, or even obligatory, and remain largely in the realm of the hypothetical. This paper proposes that psilocybin may represent a viable, practical option for moral enhancement and that its further research in the context of moral psychology could comprise the next step in the development of moral transhumanism.

  6. Staircase Structure of Shapiro Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Nashaat, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate IV-characteristics of coupled Josephson junctions which model the intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation. A staircase structure of Shapiro steps is found in the branching region. Its origin is related to the coupling between junctions and their switching from rotating to oscillating states. This conclusion is tested by detailed analysis of the IV-characteristics as for total stack and for each junction in the stack. IV-curves of junctions in the stack are compared with the average of time derivative of phase difference. Experimental observation of this staircase structure would give us a proof of coupling between junctions and a way for precise measurement of its value. Such investigations would be also useful for a diagnostic of Josephson junctions in the stack.

  7. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  8. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  9. Step One within Stepped Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Young Children: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Robst, John; Scheeringa, Michael S.; Cohen, Judith A.; Wang, Wei; Murphy, Tanya K.; Tolin, David F.; Storch, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study explored the preliminary efficacy, parent acceptability and economic cost of delivering Step One within Stepped Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (SC-TF-CBT). Nine young children ages 3–6 years and their parents participated in SC-TF-CBT. Eighty-three percent (5/6) of the children who completed Step One treatment and 55.6 % (5/9) of the intent-to-treat sample responded to Step One. One case relapsed at post-assessment. Treatment gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Generally, parents found Step One to be acceptable and were satisfied with treatment. At 3-month follow-up, the cost per unit improvement for posttraumatic stress symptoms and severity ranged from $27.65 to $131.33 for the responders and from $36.12 to $208.11 for the intent-to-treat sample. Further research on stepped care for young children is warranted to examine if this approach is more efficient, accessible and cost-effective than traditional therapy. PMID:23584728

  10. Comparison of ActiGraph GT3X+ and StepWatch Step Count Accuracy in Geriatric Rehabilitation Patients.

    PubMed

    Webber, Sandra C; St John, Philip D

    2016-07-01

    Activity monitors may not accurately detect steps in hospitalized older adults who walk slowly. We compared ActiGraph GT3X+ step counts (hip and ankle locations, default and low frequency extension [LFE] analyses) to the StepWatch monitor (ankle) during a hallway walk in 38 geriatric rehabilitation patients (83.2 ± 7.1 years of age, 0.4 ± 0.2 m/s gait speed). Absolute percent error values were low (<3%) and did not differ for the StepWatch and the GT3X+ (ankle, LFE); however, error values were high (19-97%) when the GT3X+ was worn at the hip and/ or analyzed with the default filter. Although these finding suggest the GT3X+ (ankle, LFE) functions as well as the StepWatch in detecting steps during walking in older adults with slow gait speeds, further research is needed to determine whether the GT3X+ is also able to disregard other body movements (e.g., fidgeting) that occur when full day monitoring is utilized. PMID:26751505

  11. Step initiation in Parkinson's disease: influence of initial stance conditions.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Laura; Chiari, Lorenzo; Mancini, Martina; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Gross, Anne; Horak, Fay B

    2006-10-01

    In this study, we investigated how the size of preparatory postural adjustments prior to step initiation, and step length and velocity depend on initial stance width in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) both in the ON and OFF levodopa states and in healthy elderly subjects. Twenty-one subjects with idiopathic PD and 24 age-matched healthy control subjects took two steps starting with feet on a two-plate force-platform, from either narrow or wide stance width. We measured how the magnitude of anticipatory postural adjustments (APA) and step characteristics scaled with stance width. Results showed that preparation for step initiation from wide stance was associated with a larger lateral and backward center of pressure (CoP) displacement than from narrow stance. Velocity and length of the first step were also sensitive to initial stance conditions, probably in relation with the differences in the corresponding APA. On the contrary, the duration of APA was not significantly affected by initial stance width, but it was longer in PD compared to healthy subjects, and speeded up by levodopa. Although subjects with PD did scale up the size of their APA with stance width, they had much more difficulty initiating a step from a wide stance than from a narrow stance, as shown by the greater differences from control subjects in the magnitude of the APA. Our results support the hypothesis that PD subjects maintain a narrow stance as a compensation for their inability to sufficiently increase the size of their lateral APA to allow fast step initiation in wide stance.

  12. Exergaming in Older Adults: Movement Characteristics While Playing Stepping Games

    PubMed Central

    Skjæret-Maroni, Nina; Vonstad, Elise K.; Ihlen, Espen A. F.; Tan, Xiang-Chun; Helbostad, Jorunn L.; Vereijken, Beatrix

    2016-01-01

    Despite frequent use of exergames in intervention studies to improve physical function in older adults, we lack knowledge about the movements performed during exergaming. This causes difficulties for interpreting results of intervention studies and drawing conclusions about the efficacy of exergames to exercise specific functions important for the elderly population. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether game and game level affect older adults’ stepping and upper body movements while playing stepping exergames. A 3D-motion capture experiment was performed with 20 elderly (12 women and 8 men; age range 65–90 years), playing two exergames, The Mole from SilverFit and LightRace in YourShape: Fitness Evolved, on two difficulty levels, with five 1-min trials for each game and level. Reflective markers were placed on bases of first toe, heels, and lower back. Movement characteristics were analyzed with a linear mixed model. Results indicated that both game and game level affected movement characteristics. Participants took shorter steps and had lower step velocity when playing The Mole compared to LightRace, while The Mole prompted more variation in step length and step velocity. Compared to LightRace, The Mole elicited larger upper body movements in both ML- and AP-directions and participants’ feet and upper body covered a larger area. Increasing difficulty level from Easy to Medium resulted in overall decrease of movement, except for number of steps and step speed when playing LightRace. Even with only two games, two levels, and five trials at each, this study indicates that the choice of exergame is not indifferent when aiming to exercise specific functions in older adults and that exergames need to be chosen and designed carefully based on the goals of the intervention. PMID:27445926

  13. Aging Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on aging parents. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include adult children, dementia and Alzheimer's disease in the…

  14. Take Steps to Keep Your Sight | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Vision Take Steps to Keep Your Sight Past Issues / ... protecting your eyes at all ages. 20/20 vision does not necessarily mean perfect vision. Overall visual ...

  15. Second Step: A Violence-Prevention Curriculum. Grades 4-5, Second Edition. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee for Children, Seattle, WA.

    "Second Step" is a curriculum designed to reduce impulsive and aggressive behavior in children aged 9 through 12 years, increasing their levels of social competence by teaching skills in empathy, impulse control, and anger management. This guide is part of the "Second Step" series, which includes curricula for preschool/kindergarten and grades 1-3…

  16. Prediction Equations of Energy Expenditure in Chinese Youth Based on Step Frequency during Walking and Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Bo; Liu, Yu; Li, Jing Xian; Li, Haipeng; Chen, Peijie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to examine the relationship between step frequency and velocity to develop a step frequency-based equation to predict Chinese youth's energy expenditure (EE) during walking and running. Method: A total of 173 boys and girls aged 11 to 18 years old participated in this study. The participants walked and ran on a…

  17. Comparison of Yamax pedometer and GT3X accelerometer steps in a free-living sample

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to compare steps detected by the Yamax pedometer (PEDO) versus the GT3X accelerometer (ACCEL) in free-living adults. Daily PEDO and ACCEL steps were collected from a sample of 23 overweight and obese participants (18 females; mean +/- sd: age = 52.6 +/- 8.4 yr.; body mass index = 3...

  18. Terrace-width distributions of touching steps: Modification of the fermion analogy with implications for measuring step-step interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compute the terrace-width distributions (TWDs) of surfaces in which steps can touch each other, forming multiple-atomic height steps, but cannot cross (no overhangs), and so inconsistent with the standard mapping to spinless fermions. Our results show that the generalized Wigner distribution with minor modifications at small step separations, gives a very good fit for TWDs of touching steps. The interaction strength derived from the fit parameter (ϱ) indicates an effective attraction between steps. The strength of this effective attraction decreases for larger mean-step separations and decreasing step-touching energies; describable via finite-size scaling. Hence, accurate extraction of the true repulsion strength requires multiple vicinalities.

  19. Stepping Up to Science and Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldston, Dee

    2004-01-01

    "Stepping Up to Science and Math" invites teachers to step back and rethink the way they teach both of these essential subjects. Then it illustrates how teachers can step up the pace with Standards-based activities that make learning more effective and efficient. (New lessons featuring gummy worms, school buses, or the planet Mars help teachers…

  20. 7 CFR 65.230 - Production step.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production step. 65.230 Section 65.230 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.230 Production step. Production step means,...

  1. 7 CFR 60.122 - Production step.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Production step. 60.122 Section 60.122 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Definitions § 60.122 Production step. Production step...

  2. 7 CFR 65.230 - Production step.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Production step. 65.230 Section 65.230 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.230 Production step. Production step means,...

  3. Ten Steps to Making Evaluation Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sridharan, Sanjeev; Nakaima, April

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes ten steps to make evaluations matter. The ten steps are a combination of the usual recommended practice such as developing program theory and implementing rigorous evaluation designs with a stronger focus on more unconventional steps including developing learning frameworks, exploring pathways of evaluation influence, and…

  4. Ten steps to successful software process improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandt, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies ten steps for managing change that address organizational and cultural issues. Four of these steps are critical, that if not done, will almost guarantee failure. This ten-step program emphasizes the alignment of business goals, change process goals, and the work performed by the employees of an organization.

  5. STEPS: Moving from Welfare to Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Ann; Cummings, Merrilyn; Kratzer, Connie; Galindo, Vickie

    Cooperative extension service faculty at New Mexico State University started the Steps to Employment and Personal Success (STEPS) program to help Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) clients qualify for and maintain full-time employment and strengthen their families for long-term success. Clients are referred to STEPS by New Mexico…

  6. The 5-Step Method: Principles and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copello, Alex; Templeton, Lorna; Orford, Jim; Velleman, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article includes a description of the 5-Step Method. First, the origins and theoretical basis of the method are briefly described. This is followed by a discussion of the general principles that guide the delivery of the method. Each step is then described in more detail, including the content and focus of each of the five steps that include:…

  7. Kinetic analysis of stair descent: Part 1. Forwards step-over-step descent.

    PubMed

    Cluff, Tyler; Robertson, D Gordon E

    2011-03-01

    This study examined lower extremity biomechanics during the initiation of stair descent from an upright, static posture. Seventeen healthy subjects (aged 23±2.4 years) descended a five-step, steel-reinforced, wooden laboratory staircase (34° decline). Ten trials of stair descent were separated into two blocks of five trials. Beginning from an upright posture, subjects descended the staircase at their preferred velocity (0.53±0.082 m/s) and continued the length of the laboratory walkway (∼4 m). Joint mechanics were contrasted between gait cycles. Relative to the initiation cycle at the top of the staircase, the dissipative knee extensor (K3) and hip flexor (H2) moments and powers were independent of progression velocity and approximated steady-state (i.e., constant) values after the first cycle of the trail limb (Step 5 to Step 3). In contrast, a salient relationship was observed between progression velocity and ankle joint mechanics at initial-contact. The plantiflexor moment, power and work at initial-contact (A1) increased with centre of mass velocity. Our results demonstrate that while the knee extensor moment is the primary dissipater of mechanical energy in stair descent, the ankle plantiflexors are the primary dissipaters associated with increased progression velocity. In addition, the results show that steady-state stair descent may not be attained during the first gait cycle of the trail limb. These data shed light on locomotive strategies used in stair descent and can be applied in biomechanical models of human stair gait. Researchers and practitioners should take into consideration the influence of gait cycle and progression velocity when evaluating lower extremity function in stair descent. PMID:21292489

  8. Executive function is necessary for the regulation of the stepping activity when stepping in place in older adults.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Christopher; Sciadas, Ria; Nantel, Julie

    2016-10-01

    To determine the effect of age on stepping performance and to compare the cognitive demand required to regulate repetitive stepping between older and younger adults while performing a stepping in place task (SIP). Fourteen younger (25.4 ± 6.5) and 15 older adults (71.0 ± 9.0) participated in this study. They performed a seated category fluency task and Stroop test, followed by a 60 s SIP task. Following this, both the cognitive and motor tasks were performed simultaneously. We assessed cognitive performance, SIP cycle duration, asymmetry, and arrhythmicity. Compared to younger adults, older adults had larger SIP arrhythmicity both as a single task and when combined with the Category (p < 0.001) and Stroop (p < 0.01) tasks. Older adults also had larger arrhythmicity when dual tasking compared to SIP alone (p < 0.001). Older adults showed greater SIP asymmetry when combined with Category (p = 0.006) and Stroop (p = 0.06) tasks. Finally, they had lower cognitive performance than younger adults in both single and dual tasks (p < 0.01). Age and type of cognitive task performed with the motor task affected different components of stepping. While SIP arrhythmicity was larger for all conditions in older compared to younger adults, cycle duration was not different, and asymmetry tended to be larger during SIP when paired with a verbal fluency task. SIP does not require a high level of control for dynamic stability, therefore demonstrating that higher-level executive function is necessary for the regulation of stepping activity independently of the regulation of postural balance. Furthermore, older adults may lack the cognitive resources needed to adequately regulate stepping activity while performing a cognitive task relying on the executive function.

  9. Postmenopausal obesity: 12,500 steps per day as a remedy? Relationships between body composition and daily steps in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Zając-Gawlak, Izabela; Pośpiech, Dariusz; Gába, Aleš; Přidalová, Miroslava; Pelclová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To verify relationships between physical activity (steps per day) and obesity (components of body composition) among postmenopausal women. Material and methods Physical activity (ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer; worn for 7 days) and obesity (body composition analyzer InBody 720) were assessed among 79 healthy postmenopausal women (age 63.25 ± 5.51 years; range: 51-81 years). In order to determine differences in body composition in women with different levels of physical activity, one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted, with age of participants as a covariate. Results Significant intergroup differences in almost all analyzed components of the body composition (weight, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, visceral fat area, body fat mass and percent of body fat) were obtained. Highly active women (≥ 12,500 steps/day) had lower weight and adiposity parameters than those that represented low (< 7,500 steps/day) or somewhat active (7,500-9,999 steps/day) groups. Besides, a noteworthy difference between active (10,000-12,499 steps/day) and low active women was recorded. Noticeably, only in the most active group was the BMI within normal ranges. Conclusions The higher physical activity, the lower obesity in postmenopausal women. The recommended 10,000 steps/day seems insufficient for this age group. Based on the obtained results, postmenopausal women should walk at least 12,500 steps per day to improve their health. PMID:26327859

  10. Immunological Aging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunosenescence is associated with an increased incidence and severity of infections with common pathogens, neoplastic disease and autoimmunity. In general, aging is associated with a decline in function at the cellular level, rather than cell loss, although thymic atrophy and ...

  11. Detection of Steps in Single Molecule Data

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Tanuj; Materassi, Donatello; Davison, Robert; Hays, Thomas; Salapaka, Murti

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, single molecule investigations employing optical tweezers, AFM and TIRF microscopy have revealed that molecular behaviors are typically characterized by discrete steps or events that follow changes in protein conformation. These events, that manifest as steps or jumps, are short-lived transitions between otherwise more stable molecular states. A major limiting factor in determining the size and timing of the steps is the noise introduced by the measurement system. To address this impediment to the analysis of single molecule behaviors, step detection algorithms incorporate large records of data and provide objective analysis. However, existing algorithms are mostly based on heuristics that are not reliable and lack objectivity. Most of these step detection methods require the user to supply parameters that inform the search for steps. They work well, only when the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is high and stepping speed is low. In this report, we have developed a novel step detection method that performs an objective analysis on the data without input parameters, and based only on the noise statistics. The noise levels and characteristics can be estimated from the data providing reliable results for much smaller SNR and higher stepping speeds. An iterative learning process drives the optimization of step-size distributions for data that has unimodal step-size distribution, and produces extremely low false positive outcomes and high accuracy in finding true steps. Our novel methodology, also uniquely incorporates compensation for the smoothing affects of probe dynamics. A mechanical measurement probe typically takes a finite time to respond to step changes, and when steps occur faster than the probe response time, the sharp step transitions are smoothed out and can obscure the step events. To address probe dynamics we accept a model for the dynamic behavior of the probe and invert it to reveal the steps. No other existing method addresses

  12. Interaction between step-up versus step-down lighting from four to sixteen weeks on growth and development in turkey hens from two commercial strains.

    PubMed

    Lilburn, M S; Renner, P A; Anthony, N B

    1992-03-01

    British United Turkeys (BUT) and Nicholas (NIC) hens were exposed to a step-up (10 to 16 h/day) or a step-down (16 to 10 h/day) light program from 4 to 16 wk of age. Lights were increased or decreased by .5h/wk. From 1 to 20 wk, weekly BW data were used to calculate growth curve parameters according to the Gompertz equation. Compared with BUT hens, the slope of the growth curve was greater, but the BW and age at the point of inflection (POI) was decreased in NIC hens. The step-down light program significantly increased the slope of the growth curve, but decreased the BW and age at POI compared with the step-up program. A sample of hens from each strain and program was processed at 16 wk. The relative weight of the Pectoralis minor (P. minor) was increased in BUT hens compared with NIC hens. The absolute and relative weights of the Pectoralis major and the absolute weight of the P. minor were increased in hens from the step-down program compared with the step-up program. The step-up program significantly increased the relative weight of the abdominal fat pad compared with the step-down program, and NIC hens had more abdominal fat than BUT hens. Total carcass lipid was significantly increased by the step-up program, compared with the step-down program, and NIC hens had significantly more carcass lipid than BUT hens. PMID:1561207

  13. Age Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    The ages of rocks from the lunar highlands vary widely, even for a single rock sample. This makes it difficult to quantitatively test ideas for early lunar differentiation and formation of the crust. Lars Borg and Amy Gaffney (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), and Charles Shearer (University of New Mexico) have devised a set of guidelines to apply to geochronological data that leads to a relative ranking of the reliability of the age determined for a sample. Applying their guidelines to existing data for lunar highland rocks shows an upper limit on rock ages between 4340 and 4370 million years. This is essentially the same as the so-called model ages of the formation of KREEP (a chemical component enriched in potassium, rare earth elements, and phosphorous) and of the formation of the deep source regions that melted to produce mare basalts. The numerous ages close to 4370 million years suggests a complicated and protracted cooling of the primordial lunar magma ocean or a widespread vigorous period of magmatic activity in the Moon.

  14. Time scaling relations for step bunches from models with step-step attractions (B1-type models)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasteva, A.; Popova, H.; Akutsu, N.; Tonchev, V.

    2016-03-01

    The step bunching instability is studied in three models of step motion defined in terms of ordinary differential equations (ODE). The source of instability in these models is step-step attraction, it is opposed by step-step repulsion and the developing surface patterns reflect the balance between the two. The first model, TE2, is a generalization of the seminal model of Tersoff et al. (1995). The second one, LW2, is obtained from the model of Liu and Weeks (1998) using the repulsions term to construct the attractions one with retained possibility to change the parameters in the two independently. The third model, MM2, is a minimal one constructed ad hoc and in this article it plays a central role. New scheme for scaling the ODE in vicinal studies is applied towards deciphering the pre-factors in the time-scaling relations. In all these models the patterned surface is self-similar - only one length scale is necessary to describe its evolution (hence B1-type). The bunches form finite angles with the terraces. Integrating numerically the equations for step motion and changing systematically the parameters we obtain the overall dependence of time-scaling exponent β on the power of step-step attractions p as β = 1/(3+p) for MM2 and hypothesize based on restricted set of data that it is β = 1/(5+p) for LW2 and TE2.

  15. A Step-by-Step Teaching Technique for Teachers with Adult Students of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Step-by-step teaching is a researcher-designed innovative process that takes the adult learner, step-by-step, from his present level of understanding to the required level. The technique is based on well-researched and accepted pedagogical practices set in their psychological, sociological, and andragogical perspectives. Using a convenience sample…

  16. Martian ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neukum, G.; Hiller, K.

    1981-01-01

    Four discussions are conducted: (1) the methodology of relative age determination by impact crater statistics, (2) a comparison of proposed Martian impact chronologies for the determination of absolute ages from crater frequencies, (3) a report on work dating Martian volcanoes and erosional features by impact crater statistics, and (4) an attempt to understand the main features of Martian history through a synthesis of crater frequency data. Two cratering chronology models are presented and used for inference of absolute ages from crater frequency data, and it is shown that the interpretation of all data available and tractable by the methodology presented leads to a global Martian geological history that is characterized by two epochs of activity. It is concluded that Mars is an ancient planet with respect to its surface features.

  17. Martian ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, G.; Hiller, K.

    1981-04-01

    Four discussions are conducted: (1) the methodology of relative age determination by impact crater statistics, (2) a comparison of proposed Martian impact chronologies for the determination of absolute ages from crater frequencies, (3) a report on work dating Martian volcanoes and erosional features by impact crater statistics, and (4) an attempt to understand the main features of Martian history through a synthesis of crater frequency data. Two cratering chronology models are presented and used for inference of absolute ages from crater frequency data, and it is shown that the interpretation of all data available and tractable by the methodology presented leads to a global Martian geological history that is characterized by two epochs of activity. It is concluded that Mars is an ancient planet with respect to its surface features.

  18. Plutonium aging

    SciTech Connect

    Olivas, J.D.

    1999-03-01

    The author describes the plutonium aging program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The aging of plutonium components in the US nuclear weapons stockpile has become a concern due to several events: the end of the cold war, the cessation of full scale underground nuclear testing as a result of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the closure of the Rocky Flats Plant--the site where the plutonium components were manufactured. As a result, service lifetimes for nuclear weapons have been lengthened. Dr. Olivas will present a brief primer on the metallurgy of plutonium, and will then describe the technical approach to ascertaining the long-term changes that may be attributable to self-radiation damage. Facilities and experimental techniques which are in use to study aging will be described. Some preliminary results will also be presented.

  19. Understanding aging.

    PubMed

    Strehler, B L

    2000-01-01

    Enormous advances in our understanding of human aging have occurred during the last 50 yr. From the late 19th to the mid-20th centuries only four comprehensive and important sources of information were available: 1. August Weismann's book entitled Essays on Heredity and Kindred Biological Problems (the first of these essays dealt with The Duration of Life; 1). Weissmann states (p. 10) "In the first place in regulating the length of life, the advantage to the species, and not to the individual, is alone of any importance. This must be obvious to any one who has once thoroughly thought out the process of natural selection_". 2. A highly systematized second early source of information on aging was the collection of essays edited by Cowdry and published in 1938. This 900+ page volume contains 34 chapters and was appropriately called Problems of Aging. 3. At about the same time Raymond Pearl published his book on aging (2). Pearl believed that aging was the indirect result of cell specialization and that only the germ line was resistant to aging. Unfortunately Pearl died in the late 1930s and is largely remembered now for having been the founding editor of Quarterly Review of Biology while he was at the Johns Hopkins University, this author's alma mater. 4. Alexis Carrel wrote a monumental scientific and philosophical book, Man, the Unknown (3). Carrel believed that he had demonstrated that vertebrate cells could be kept in culture and live indefinitely, a conclusion challenged by others (more on this later). PMID:22351262

  20. Anomalous Growth of Aging Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a discrete-time population dynamics with age-dependent structure. At every time step, one of the alive individuals from the population is chosen randomly and removed with probability q_k depending on its age, whereas a new individual of age 1 is born with probability r. The model can also describe a single queue in which the service order is random while the service efficiency depends on a customer's "age" in the queue. We propose a mean field approximation to investigate the long-time asymptotic behavior of the mean population size. The age dependence is shown to lead to anomalous power-law growth of the population at the critical regime. The scaling exponent is determined by the asymptotic behavior of the probabilities q_k at large k. The mean field approximation is validated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Control Circuit For Two Stepping Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, Roger; Rehmann, Kenneth; Backus, Charles

    1990-01-01

    Control circuit operates two independent stepping motors, one at a time. Provides following operating features: After selected motor stepped to chosen position, power turned off to reduce dissipation; Includes two up/down counters that remember at which one of eight steps each motor set. For selected motor, step indicated by illumination of one of eight light-emitting diodes (LED's) in ring; Selected motor advanced one step at time or repeatedly at rate controlled; Motor current - 30 mA at 90 degree positions, 60 mA at 45 degree positions - indicated by high or low intensity of LED that serves as motor-current monitor; Power-on reset feature provides trouble-free starts; To maintain synchronism between control circuit and motors, stepping of counters inhibited when motor power turned off.

  2. Using pedometers for measuring and increasing physical activity in children and adolescents: The next step

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The science and practice of step counting in children (typically aged 6-11 years) and adolescents (typically aged 12-19 years) has evolved rapidly over a relatively brief period with the commercial availability of research-grade pedometers and accelerometers. Recent reviews have summarized considera...

  3. A Versatile Step-Up/Step-Down Switched-Capacitor-Based DC-DC Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chia-Ling; Wu, Lu-Yao; Yang, Hsiu-Hui; Tsai, Chien-Hung; Liu, Bin-Da; Chang, Soon-Jyh

    For battery-powered electronic products, one way to extend battery life is to use a versatile step-up/step-down DC-DC converter. A new versatile step-up/step-down switched-capacitor-based converter structure is proposed, and its efficiency is analyzed. In the step-down case, the efficiency is the same as, or even better than the efficiency of linear regulators.

  4. Sage Simulation Model for Technology Demonstration Convertor by a Step-by-Step Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demko, Rikako; Penswick, L. Barry

    2006-01-01

    The development of a Stirling model using the 1-D Saga design code was completed using a step-by-step approach. This is a method of gradually increasing the complexity of the Saga model while observing the energy balance and energy losses at each step of the development. This step-by-step model development and energy-flow analysis can clarify where the losses occur, their impact, and suggest possible opportunities for design improvement.

  5. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  6. Surface-Step-Induced Oscillatory Oxide Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Luo, Langli; Ciston, Jim; Saidi, Wissam A.; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-09-01

    We report in situ atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations of the oxidation of stepped Cu surfaces. We find that the presence of surface steps both inhibits oxide film growth and leads to the oxide decomposition, thereby resulting in oscillatory oxide film growth. Using atomistic simulations, we show that the oscillatory oxide film growth is induced by oxygen adsorption on the lower terrace along the step edge, which destabilizes the oxide film formed on the upper terrace.

  7. A vibrators alternation stepping ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiamei; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2006-12-22

    A new concept of a vibrators alternation stepping ultrasonic motor, based on longitudinal vibrations of rectangular Langevin resonators, is presented. The new motor fed by a single-phase resource without feedback is capable of bi-directions step displacements without accumulative displacement error. The step angle is 1.44 degrees, when the 150 grooves on the rotor are used in positioning. The average rotation speed without load in one step is 16.49-14.65 rad/s, and the braking torque is 0.071-0.088 Nm in operating frequency 30 kHz and operation voltage 200 V.

  8. Knee osteoarthritis negatively affects the recovery step following large forward-directed postural perturbations.

    PubMed

    Pater, Mackenzie L; Rosenblatt, Noah J; Grabiner, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    The reasons for higher fall risk of people with osteoarthritis (OA) compared to people without OA are not known. It is possible that following a loss of balance OA may negatively affect the recovery stepping response. Stepping responses have not been reported for people with knee OA. Here, we compared recovery step kinematics following laboratory-induced trip and following a large treadmill-delivered perturbation simulating a trip between a group of women with and without self-reported knee OA. We hypothesized that knee OA would significantly impair recovery step kinematics compared to those of a control group. Following the laboratory-induced trip, step length and trunk flexion velocity at recovery step completion of women with OA were significantly impaired and more so for the women who fell. Following the treadmill-delivered perturbation, the recovery step kinematics of women with OA were not significantly impaired. For both perturbations, the women who fell had significantly impaired recovery step kinematics compared to those who did not fall, regardless of OA. The results are consistent with previous work on healthy middle aged and older women and suggest that the same biomechanical risk factors for trip-related falls are shared by middle age and older women regardless of the presence of knee OA. The results support the need to determine whether training protocols which have been shown to improve recovery step kinematics and reduce prospective falls by healthy older women can have similar outcomes for people with knee OA.

  9. Aging Secret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The canny world of advertising has caught on to the free radical theory of aging, marketing a whole array of antioxidants for preventing anything from wrinkles to dry hair to reducing the risk of heart disease--promising to help slow the hands of time. Working with genetically engineered mice--to produce a natural antioxidant enzyme called…

  10. Gay Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2009-01-01

    The oldest of the baby boomers (boomers) were age 63 in 2009 and on the verge of retirement. This cohort has had a history of making societal changes throughout its life cycle, and it is unlikely that retirement, as we know it, will remain unscathed. This article highlights two events--the Stonewall Inn riots and two prominent professional…

  11. Percutaneous Cystgastrostomy as a Single-Step Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, L. Sookur, P.; Low, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Fotheringham, T.

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of percutaneous transgastric cystgastrostomy as a single-step procedure. We performed a retrospective analysis of single-step percutaneous transgastric cystgastrostomy carried out in 12 patients (8 male, 4 female; mean age 44 years; range 21-70 years), between 2002 and 2007, with large symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts for whom up to 1-year follow-up data (mean 10 months) were available. All pseudocysts were drained by single-step percutaneous cystgastrostomy with the placement of either one or two stents. The procedure was completed successfully in all 12 patients. The pseudocysts showed complete resolution on further imaging in 7 of 12 patients with either enteric passage of the stent or stent removal by endoscopy. In 2 of 12 patients, the pseudocysts showed complete resolution on imaging, with the stents still noted in situ. In 2 of 12 patients, the pseudocysts became infected after 1 month and required surgical intervention. In 1 of 12 patients, the pseudocyst showed partial resolution on imaging, but subsequently reaccumulated and later required external drainage. In our experience, percutaneous cystgastrostomy as a single-step procedure has a high success rate and good short-term outcomes over 1-year follow-up and should be considered in the treatment of large symptomatic cysts.

  12. Twelve Steps to a Winning First Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This article offers 12 steps to jumpstart a new school librarian's career. Being the information specialist will be both challenging and rewarding as one undertakes a myriad of activities. These 12 steps will help a new school librarian's first year successful.

  13. Toilet Training: Children Step Up to Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that mastering the toilet is a significant step for young children, and one of childhood's earliest rites of passage. Suggests that in learning to control body functions, toddlers step toward independence, self-reliance and personal responsibility. Urges child care workers to work with parents to identify a child's readiness and to agree…

  14. 15 CFR 732.1 - Steps overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS STEPS FOR USING THE EAR § 732.1 Steps overview. (a)(1) Introduction. In this part, references to the EAR are references to 15 CFR chapter VII, subchapter C. This part is intended to help you determine your obligations under...

  15. 15 CFR 732.1 - Steps overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS STEPS FOR USING THE EAR § 732.1 Steps overview. (a)(1) Introduction. In this part, references to the EAR are references to 15 CFR chapter VII, subchapter C. This part is intended to help you determine your obligations under...

  16. 15 CFR 732.1 - Steps overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS STEPS FOR USING THE EAR § 732.1 Steps overview. (a)(1) Introduction. In this part, references to the EAR are references to 15 CFR chapter VII, subchapter C. This part is intended to help you determine your obligations under...

  17. 15 CFR 732.1 - Steps overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS STEPS FOR USING THE EAR § 732.1 Steps overview. (a)(1) Introduction. In this part, references to the EAR are references to 15 CFR chapter VII, subchapter C. This part is intended to help you determine your obligations under...

  18. 15 CFR 732.1 - Steps overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS STEPS FOR USING THE EAR § 732.1 Steps overview. (a)(1) Introduction. In this part, references to the EAR are references to 15 CFR chapter VII, subchapter C. This part is intended to help you determine your obligations under...

  19. Teachers: Recognize Important Steps to Reduce Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supon, Viola

    2008-01-01

    Teachers must walk the steps and live the steps if reducing cheating is going to occur. Teachers begin this process by being cognizant and vigilant relative to administering means of measurement and assigning written work. This process includes skill acquisition in regards to: (1) acknowledging cheating, (2) purposeful planning, (3) electronic…

  20. Stepped-Pin Clevis Resists Jamming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killgrove, T. O.

    1985-01-01

    Pin modification allows pyrotechnic release devices to operate more smoothly. New clevis pin has stepped diameters to prevent bending as it exits yoke. In contrast, conventional unstepped clevis pin bends and jams as it is withdrawn. Stepped pin design suitable for explosive and possible hammer driven pin sullers.

  1. Neighbourhood walkability, daily steps and utilitarian walking in Canadian adults

    PubMed Central

    Hajna, Samantha; Ross, Nancy A; Joseph, Lawrence; Harper, Sam; Dasgupta, Kaberi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the associations of neighbourhood walkability (based on Geographic Information System (GIS)-derived measures of street connectivity, land use mix, and population density and the Walk Score) with self-reported utilitarian walking and accelerometer-assessed daily steps in Canadian adults. Design A cross-sectional analysis of data collected as part of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007–2009). Setting Home neighbourhoods (500 m polygonal street network buffers around the centroid of the participant's postal code) located in Atlantic Canada, Québec, Ontario, the Prairies and British Columbia. Participants 5605 individuals participated in the survey. 3727 adults (≥18 years) completed a computer-assisted interview and attended a mobile clinic assessment. Analyses were based on those who had complete exposure, outcome and covariate data (n=2949). Main exposure measures GIS-derived walkability (based on land use mix, street connectivity and population density); Walk Score. Main outcome measures Self-reported utilitarian walking; accelerometer-assessed daily steps. Results No important relationship was observed between neighbourhood walkability and daily steps. Participants who reported more utilitarian walking, however, accumulated more steps (<1 h/week: 6613 steps/day, 95% CI 6251 to 6975; 1 to 5 h/week: 6768 steps/day, 95% CI 6420 to 7117; ≥6 h/week: 7391 steps/day, 95% CI 6972 to 7811). There was a positive graded association between walkability and odds of walking ≥1 h/week for utilitarian purposes (eg, Q4 vs Q1 of GIS-derived walkability: OR=1.66, 95% CI 1.31 to 2.11; Q3 vs Q1: OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.76; Q2 vs Q1: OR=1.13, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.39) independent of age, sex, body mass index, married/common law status, annual household income, having children in the household, immigrant status, mood disorder, perceived health, ever smoker and season. Conclusions Contrary to expectations, living in more walkable Canadian

  2. Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, Paul

    1994-01-01

    This grant provided support for the STEP (Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle) program between October 1991 and September 1993. STEP, previously supported by NASA under Grant NAG8-837 'A Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle,' was selected by the European Space Agency for a Phase A study as a candidate for ESA's next medium size mission (M2). STEP was conceived as a joint NASA/ESA mission with equal participation by both agencies. ESA's contribution to the program would be the spacecraft; NASA would provide the launcher and half of the instrument, while the other half of the instrument would be provided by various European agencies. STEP was in competition with three other programs, INTEGRAL, PRISMA, and MARSNET. The final selection of a single mission for M2 took place in April 1993. STEP was not selected for M2 but made a very close second. The program is continuing in modified form.

  3. Hindlimb loading determines stepping quantity and quality following spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Timoszyk, Wojciech K; Nessler, Jeff A; Acosta, Cynthia; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Reinkensmeyer, David J; de Leon, Ray

    2005-07-19

    We compared the bipedal hindlimb stepping ability of untrained and trained (step-trained 6 min/day) spinal rats (mid-thoracic spinal cord transection at post-natal day 5) at different levels of body weight support on a treadmill over a 40-day period, starting at 69 days of age. A robotic device provided precise levels of body weight support and recorded hindlimb movement. We assessed stepping ability using: (1) step quantity determined from the measured hindlimb movement, (2) ordinal scales of paw placement, weight-bearing, and limb flexion, and (3) the lowest level of body weight support at which stepping was maintained. Stepping quantity and quality depended strongly on the level of support provided. Stepping ability improved with time, but only at the higher levels of weight-bearing, and independently of training. Increasing limb loading by gradually decreasing body weight support altered the spatiotemporal properties of the steps, resulting in an increase in step length and stance duration and a decrease in swing and step cycle duration. The rats progressively improved their ability to support more load before collapsing from a maximum of about 42 g ( approximately 25% of body weight) at Day 1 to 73 g ( approximately 35% of body weight) at Day 40. We conclude that the level of hindlimb loading provided to a spinally transected rat strongly influences the quantity and quality of stepping. Furthermore, the relationship between stepping ability and loading conditions changes with time after spinal cord transection and is unaltered by small amounts of step training. Finally, load-bearing failure point can be a quantitative measure of locomotor recovery following spinal cord injury, especially for severely impaired animals that cannot step unassisted.

  4. Serum levels of protein oxidation products in patients with nickel allergy.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, Sebastiano; Ricciardi, Luisa; Minciullo, Paola Lucia; Cristani, Mariateresa; Saitta, Salvatore; Chirafisi, Joselita; Spatari, Giovanna; Santoro, Giusy; Saija, Antonella

    2009-01-01

    Nickel sensitization can not only induce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), but also can induce an overlapping disease referred to as "systemic nickel allergy syndrome" (SNAS), characterized by urticaria/angioedema and gastrointestinal symptoms correlated to the ingestion of nickel-containing foods. This study was designed to determine if oxidative stress occurs in patients with nickel allergy. Thirty-one female patients (mean age 31.26 + 13.04 years, range 16-64 years) with confirmed nickel CD underwent oral nickel challenge because of clinically suspected SNAS; serum concentrations of protein carbonyl groups (PCGs) and nitrosylated proteins (NPs; biomarkers of oxidative stress) were measured before and after oral nickel challenge as well as in healthy female controls. Twenty-three of these 31 patients were diagnosed with SNAS because they had a positive reaction to the oral nickel challenge, and 8 patients had no reaction and therefore were classified as patients with contact nickel allergy only. Although both nickel-allergic patients and controls presented similar serum levels of PCGs, NP values in nickel-allergic patients appeared higher than in controls and tended to decrease after the challenge; furthermore, serum levels of NPs in patients affected by SNAS were higher (although not significantly) than in patients with nickel ACD only. The involvement of specific biomarkers of oxidative stress such as NPs and the lack of involvement of other biomarkers such as PCGs may help to better understand the alteration of the redox homeostasis occurring in nickel ACD and particularly in SNAS.

  5. Metabolic parameters for ramp versus step incremental cycle ergometer tests.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Jorge M; Housh, Terry J; Camic, Clayton L; Bergstrom, Haley C; Traylor, Daniel A; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine mean differences and the patterns of responses for oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O(2)), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) for ramp (15 W·min(-1)) versus step (30 W increments every 2 min) incremental cycle ergometer tests. Fourteen subjects (age and body mass of 23.2 ± 3.1 (mean ± SD ) years and 71.1 ± 10.1 kg, respectively) visited the laboratory on separate occasions. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs with appropriate follow-up procedures, as well as paired t tests, were used to analyze the data. In addition, polynomial regression analyses were used to determine the patterns of responses for each dependent variable for the ramp and step tests. The ramp protocol resulted in lower mean [Formula: see text]O(2) and HR values at the common power outputs than the step protocol with no differences in RPE. The increased amount of work performed during the step (total work = 75.83 kJ) versus ramp (total work = 65.60 kJ) tests at the common power outputs may have contributed to the greater [Formula: see text]O(2) and HR values. The polynomial regression analyses showed that most subjects had the same patterns of responses for the ramp and step incremental tests for HR (86%) and RPE (93%) but different patterns for [Formula: see text]O(2) (71%). The findings from the present study suggested that the protocol selection for an incremental cycle ergometer test can affect the mean values for [Formula: see text]O(2) and HR, as well as the [Formula: see text]O(2) - power output relationship.

  6. Step length estimation using handheld inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Renaudin, Valérie; Susi, Melania; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a novel step length model using a handheld Micro Electrical Mechanical System (MEMS) is presented. It combines the user's step frequency and height with a set of three parameters for estimating step length. The model has been developed and trained using 12 different subjects: six men and six women. For reliable estimation of the step frequency with a handheld device, the frequency content of the handheld sensor's signal is extracted by applying the Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) independently from the step detection process. The relationship between step and hand frequencies is analyzed for different hand's motions and sensor carrying modes. For this purpose, the frequency content of synchronized signals collected with two sensors placed in the hand and on the foot of a pedestrian has been extracted. Performance of the proposed step length model is assessed with several field tests involving 10 test subjects different from the above 12. The percentages of error over the travelled distance using universal parameters and a set of parameters calibrated for each subject are compared. The fitted solutions show an error between 2.5 and 5% of the travelled distance, which is comparable with that achieved by models proposed in the literature for body fixed sensors only.

  7. "Aging bull'.

    PubMed

    Geelhoed, G W

    1996-12-01

    An old bull, it is said by those who know, can have his troubles. Included among these are vertebral osteosclerosis and ankylosing spondylosis; this stiffening up limits, rather than accentuates, the value and reproductive potential of a stud bull past his prime. Associated with these abnormalities, however-and not seen in age-matched cows of comparable breeds-are fascinating endocrine neoplasms suggestive of a pattern that could be productive as a model of human hereditary endocrine abnormalities. Adjacent to the thyroid gland in other vertebrates are ultimobranchial bodies that are incorporated into the lateral thyroid lobes in primates as the parafollicular "C cells' of the thyroid. These are the cells in man that give rise to medullary thyroid cancer and are associated with calcitonin secretion, useful as a tumor marker. In aging bulls of whatever breed, nearly half exhibit abnormality of these ultimobranchial bodies: 20% show hyperplasia, and 30% have frank neoplasia. These ultimobranchial tumors appear in bulls passing 6 1/2 years in age, and are absent in young bulls and all cows of any age. Calcitonin can be demonstrated in the ultimobranchial tumors from bulls, and secretion is stimulated by calcium infusion, though serum calcium remains normal. The ultimobranchial tumors themselves can range from hyperplasia through adenoma to metastasizing carcinoma-in fact, representing one of the commoner cattle cancers. Parathyroid glands taken from bulls with these ultimobranchial tumors initially show evidence of inhibited secretory activity and morphologic atrophy, but later go on to develop hyperplasia and, eventually, autonomy. Cattle forage on calcium-rich diets. Bulls appear to respond to this calcium excess from the positive balance, but breeding cows have the unique calcium deficits of the high net loss of calcium through lactation and the large requirements of calcifying a fetal skeleton. Chronic stimulation of the APUD-derived ultimobranchial bodies by high

  8. Stepping up, stepping back, stepping forward: Student nurses' experiences as peer mentors in a pre-nursing scholarship.

    PubMed

    Smith, Annetta; Beattie, Michelle; Kyle, Richard G

    2015-11-01

    Mentorship is an essential part of the registered nurse's role, yet few opportunities exist for student nurses to mentor others during pre-registration programmes. This paper reports student nurses' experiences of mentoring school pupils during a pre-nursing scholarship. Focus groups were conducted with fifteen final year student nurses (14 female, 1 male) in two university campuses in Scotland. Discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and data analysed thematically. Three interconnected themes emerged: 1) stepping up; 2) stepping back; 3) stepping forward. 'Stepping up' was a process through which student nurses rapidly assumed responsibility for mentoring pupils, facilitated through the attitudes and actions of students' mentors and students' control over pupils' practice experiences. 'Stepping back' encapsulated attitudes and behaviours that enabled student nurses to mentor pupils that involved considerable judgement around how unfolding events in practice could provide learning and development opportunities, and emotional acuity to support pupils through, sometimes challenging, practice situations. 'Stepping forward' described how students' mentoring experience allowed them to appraise and affirm nursing knowledge and skills, and gain greater appreciation of the reality and complexity of mentorship in clinical practice. Peer mentoring may prepare student nurses for future mentoring roles and aid their transition into clinical practice.

  9. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    SciTech Connect

    Sevinçli, H.; Brandbyge, M.

    2014-10-13

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance in the range between 5% and 47%. We also consider the transmission across linear kinks formed by adsorption of atomic hydrogen at the bends and find that individual kinks suppress thermal conduction substantially, especially at high temperatures. Our analysis show that substrate irregularities can be detrimental for thermal conduction even for small step heights.

  10. First Steps PLUS: Yakima First Steps Mobilization Project for Pregnant Substance Abusers. An Interim Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordlund, Daniel J.; And Others

    The Yakima First Steps Mobilization Project for Pregnant Substance Abusers, known as First Steps PLUS, is a demonstration project. The project seeks to improve the health outcomes of pregnant substance abusing women and their infants by enhancing existing perinatal services provided through Washington's First Steps Maternity Care Program and by…

  11. Organizing Community-Wide Dialogue for Action and Change: A Step-by-Step Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Sarah vL.; Malick, Amy; Landesman, John; Barrett, Molly Holme; Leighninger, Matt; McCoy, Martha L.; Scully, Patrick L.

    This document is a step-by-step guide to organizing a study circle program to serve as a vehicle to achieve communitywide dialogue for action and change. Part 1 provides an overview of communitywide study circle programs, with special emphasis on their operation and impact. Part 2 details the following steps in organizing a communitywide study…

  12. Vocational Power Letters. Step-by-Step Procedures in Writing a Letter to a Legislator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palladino, Dolores

    This packet for vocational educators contains information and materials on writing a letter to a state legislator. A step-by-step procedure is outlined and informative materials that expand upon the various steps are then provided. These materials include a sample Mailgram, a flowchart on how an idea becomes a state law, common sense rules for…

  13. Step-by-Step Solution Possibilities in Different Computer Algebra Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonisson, Eno

    This paper compares a number of different Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) in their solution of one-step and multi-step problems. The CAS programs considered include DERIVE, Maple, Mathematica, and MuPAD while the problems are taken from the final examinations of grades 9 and 12 in Estonian schools. The different outputs to one-step problems with…

  14. Next Steps for Credit Availability Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Velazquez, Nydia M. [D-NY-12

    2012-06-08

    07/11/2012 Referred to the Subcommittee on Capital Markets and Government Sponsored Enterprises. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Optimal time step for incompressible SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violeau, Damien; Leroy, Agnès

    2015-05-01

    A classical incompressible algorithm for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) is analyzed in terms of critical time step for numerical stability. For this purpose, a theoretical linear stability analysis is conducted for unbounded homogeneous flows, leading to an analytical formula for the maximum CFL (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) number as a function of the Fourier number. This gives the maximum time step as a function of the fluid viscosity, the flow velocity scale and the SPH discretization size (kernel standard deviation). Importantly, the maximum CFL number at large Reynolds number appears twice smaller than with the traditional Weakly Compressible (WCSPH) approach. As a consequence, the optimal time step for ISPH is only five times larger than with WCSPH. The theory agrees very well with numerical data for two usual kernels in a 2-D periodic flow. On the other hand, numerical experiments in a plane Poiseuille flow show that the theory overestimates the maximum allowed time step for small Reynolds numbers.

  16. Reducing Stepping-Motor Power Consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    Direct-current stepping motors used in computer peripherals, process control, and precision remote-positioning equipment constantly dissipate power and create heat even when not moving. Circuit design energizes stepper motor only when pulses are present on control input.

  17. Nine Steps to a Successful Lighting Retrofit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ries, Jack

    1998-01-01

    Presents the steps needed to successfully design a lighting retrofit of school classrooms. Tips cover budgeting, technology, financing, contractor selection, assessing area function, and choosing a light source. (GR)

  18. Five Steps to Safer Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Safer Health Care Five Steps to Safer Health Care: Patient Fact Sheet This information is for reference ... safety is one of the Nation's most pressing health care challenges. A 1999 report by the Institute of ...

  19. High-torque precision stepping drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspareck, W. E.

    1968-01-01

    Stepping drive has been designed for precise incremental angular positioning of scale models of spacecraft about a horizontal axis in order to accurately measure antenna receiving and transmitting characteristics. Positioning is insured by spring-loaded, self-locking plungers.

  20. Next Steps for Credit Availability Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Velazquez, Nydia M. [D-NY-12

    2013-01-03

    10/23/2013 Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on Capital Markets and Government Sponsored Enterprises Prior to Referral. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  2. Four Practical Steps to Buying Copiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Presents practical steps for avoiding overbuying when selecting copiers for university administration. Evaluating copying needs, eliminating excessive features, examining the dealer's capabilities, and being patient for the right price are discussed. (GR)

  3. Five basic steps to problem trending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bombara, Elwood L.

    1990-01-01

    Five basic steps to problem trending evolved from experience in trending problems on Space Shuttle hardware are discussed: extracting data; constructing a Pareto chart of all failure modes; constructing normalized subsystem, component, and failure-mode trend charts; identifying trend direction; and providing a summary assessment. The five-step method has been useful for identifying failure modes of concern, evaluating the effectiveness of corrective actions, and determining funding allocation.

  4. Lower limb loading in step aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-W; Hsieh, H-M; Chang, Y-W; Wang, L-H

    2012-11-01

    Participation in aerobic dance is associated with a number of lower extremity injuries, and abnormal joint loading seems to be a factor in these. However, information on joint loading is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of the lower extremity in step aerobic dance and to compare the differences of high-impact and low-impact step aerobic dance in 4 aerobic movements (mambo, kick, L step and leg curl). 18 subjects were recruited for this study. High-impact aerobic dance requires a significantly greater range of motion, joint force and joint moment than low-impact step aerobic dance. The peak joint forces and moments in high-impact step aerobic dance were found to be 1.4 times higher than in low-impact step aerobic dance. Understanding the nature of joint loading may help choreographers develop dance combinations that are less injury-prone. Furthermore, increased knowledge about joint loading may be helpful in lowering the risk of injuries in aerobic dance instructors and students.

  5. Visual accessibility of ramps and steps.

    PubMed

    Legge, Gordon E; Yu, Deyue; Kallie, Christopher S; Bochsler, Tiana M; Gage, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The visual accessibility of a space refers to the effectiveness with which vision can be used to travel safely through the space. For people with low vision, the detection of steps and ramps is an important component of visual accessibility. We used ramps and steps as visual targets to examine the interacting effects of lighting, object geometry, contrast, viewing distance, and spatial resolution. Wooden staging was used to construct a sidewalk with transitions to ramps or steps. Forty-eight normally sighted subjects viewed the sidewalk monocularly through acuity-reducing goggles and made recognition judgments about the presence of the ramps or steps. The effects of variation in lighting were milder than expected. Performance declined for the largest viewing distance but exhibited a surprising reversal for nearer viewing. Of relevance to pedestrian safety, the step up was more visible than the step down. We developed a probabilistic cue model to explain the pattern of target confusions. Cues determined by discontinuities in the edge contours of the sidewalk at the transition to the targets were vulnerable to changes in viewing conditions. Cues associated with the height in the picture plane of the targets were more robust.

  6. Steps in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Thierry; Yu, Howard; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a highly efficient rotary machine used by many bacteria to propel themselves. It has recently been shown that at low speeds its rotation proceeds in steps. Here we propose a simple physical model, based on the storage of energy in protein springs, that accounts for this stepping behavior as a random walk in a tilted corrugated potential that combines torque and contact forces. We argue that the absolute angular position of the rotor is crucial for understanding step properties and show this hypothesis to be consistent with the available data, in particular the observation that backward steps are smaller on average than forward steps. We also predict a sublinear speed versus torque relationship for fixed load at low torque, and a peak in rotor diffusion as a function of torque. Our model provides a comprehensive framework for understanding and analyzing stepping behavior in the bacterial flagellar motor and proposes novel, testable predictions. More broadly, the storage of energy in protein springs by the flagellar motor may provide useful general insights into the design of highly efficient molecular machines. PMID:19851449

  7. Free energy of steps using atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Rodrigo; Frolov, Timofey; Asta, Mark

    The properties of solid-liquid interfaces are known to play critical roles in solidification processes. Particularly special importance is given to thermodynamic quantities that describe the equilibrium state of these surfaces. For example, on the solid-liquid-vapor heteroepitaxial growth of semiconductor nanowires the crystal nucleation process on the faceted solid-liquid interface is influenced by the solid-liquid and vapor-solid interfacial free energies, and also by the free energies of associated steps at these faceted interfaces. Crystal-growth theories and mesoscale simulation methods depend on quantitative information about these properties, which are often poorly characterized from experimental measurements. In this work we propose an extension of the capillary fluctuation method for calculation of the free energy of steps on faceted crystal surfaces. From equilibrium atomistic simulations of steps on (111) surfaces of Copper we computed accurately the step free energy for different step orientations. We show that the step free energy remains finite at all temperature up to the melting point and that the results obtained agree with the more well established method of thermodynamic integration if finite size effects are taken into account. The research of RF and MA at UC Berkeley were supported by the US National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-1105409). TF acknowledges support through a postdoctoral fellowship from the Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science.

  8. Age Relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    12 June 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a group of impact craters in Aonia Planum, Mars. Remarkably, two of the craters are approximately equal in size, however, they clearly differ in age. The left (west) crater has a well-defined rim and its ejecta blanket overlies part of the less pronounced crater to its immediate east. The one with the ejecta blanket is younger. Other circular depressions in this bouldery scene are also old, eroded impact craters.

    Location near: 59.5oS, 78.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  9. Scalable preparation of alginate templated-layered double hydroxide mesoporous composites with enhanced surface areas and surface acidities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Xu, Ting; Lei, Xiaodong; Xu, Sailong; Zhang, Fazhi

    2011-04-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also known as hydrotalcite-like layered clays, have previously been investigated as a potential solid alkaline catalyst. A necessary calcinations/rehydration procedure, however, is utilized to enhance surface area and catalytic activity of LDHs involved. Here we report on a scalable preparation of sodium alginate-templated MgAI-LDH (LDH/SA) mesoporous composites with high surface area and surface acidity. The powdery LDH/SA mesoporous composites are prepared using alginate as template by a scalable method of separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS). Comparison with the pristine MgAl-LDH shows that the obtained LDH/SA composites exhibit the greatly enhanced surface area and surface activity of surface acid sites at the elevated high temperatures which have scarcely been reported previously. Our results may allow designing a variety of mesoporous LDH-containing composites with potential applications in specific catalysis and purification processes.

  10. Impaired Step Up/Over in Persons With Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nocera, Joe R.; Horvat, Michael; Ray, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the functional movement task of stepping up and over an obstacle in individuals with Parkinson’s disease to their aged-matched controls. Ten participants with Parkinson’s disease and 10 aged matched participants were assessed on the Step Up/Over task completed on a NeuroCom EquiTest long force-plate and analyzed using Group MANOVAs. The results indicate that individuals with Parkinson’s disease produce less lifting force and exhibited an increased time to complete the task of stepping up and over an object when compared with their aged matched peers. Considering the substantial risk of falls demonstrated in this population these preliminary finding demonstrate the need for interventions aimed at improving this component of function. PMID:20440021

  11. Postural adjustment errors during lateral step initiation in older and younger adults

    PubMed Central

    Sparto, Patrick J.; Fuhrman, Susan I.; Redfern, Mark S.; Perera, Subashan; Jennings, J. Richard; Furman, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to examine age differences and varying levels of step response inhibition on the performance of a voluntary lateral step initiation task. Seventy older adults (70 – 94 y) and twenty younger adults (21 – 58 y) performed visually-cued step initiation conditions based on direction and spatial location of arrows, ranging from a simple choice reaction time task to a perceptual inhibition task that included incongruous cues about which direction to step (e.g. a left pointing arrow appearing on the right side of a monitor). Evidence of postural adjustment errors and step latencies were recorded from vertical ground reaction forces exerted by the stepping leg. Compared with younger adults, older adults demonstrated greater variability in step behavior, generated more postural adjustment errors during conditions requiring inhibition, and had greater step initiation latencies that increased more than younger adults as the inhibition requirements of the condition became greater. Step task performance was related to clinical balance test performance more than executive function task performance. PMID:25595953

  12. Effects of Age on Maximal Work Capacity in Women Aged 18-48 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, G. Harley; And Others

    Fifty-six healthy nontrained women aged 18 to 48 were tested for maximal work capacity on a bicycle ergometer. The women were divided into three age groups. A continuous step-increment bicycle ergometer work test was administered with the workload starting at 150 kpm (kilometers per minute) and 50 pedal rpm (revolutions per minute). The workload…

  13. Obesity and Related Factors in Iran: The STEPS Survey, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Seifi, Behjat; Rafei, Ali; Biglarian, Akbar; Asgari, Fereshteh; Etemad, Koorosh; Bidhendi Yarandi, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: To date, no study has addressed the association between race/ethnicity and obesity considering other sociodemographic and lifestyle factors in Iran. Objectives: The current study aimed to study lifestyle and the environmental factors affecting obesity in the Iranian subjects of the STEPS Survey, 2011. Patients and Methods: The study was conducted on 8639 subjects (aged ≥ 20 years) in the STEPS Survey 2011 in Iran under supervision of the World Health Organization (WHO). Height and body weight were measured following the standardized procedures. Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) method was used to examine factors associated with obesity. The examined variables were age, gender, race/ethnicity, place of residence, employment status, physical activity, smoking status, and educational level. Results: Overall, 22.3% of the subjects were obese. In a GEE model, a healthy weight status among adults was associated with being younger, male, in a rural residence, employees, spending more time engaged in physical activity, being a smoker and having a moderate or high level of education. These associations were statistically significant after adjusting for other variables. Conclusions: The study results suggest a need for targeted interventions and continued surveillance for the Iranian adults. PMID:26328062

  14. Comparison one-step procedure with two-step procedure in percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Han; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Chou, Yii-Her; Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Tsai, Chia-Chun; Chueh, Kuang-Shun; Hou, Nien-Ting; Chiu, Siou-Jin; Tu, Hung-Pin; Li, Ching-Chia

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of one-step percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) by the urologist alone and two-step PCNL by cooperating with the radiologist. We included 168 patients who underwent surgery by the same surgeon, 83 who underwent two-step PCNL, in which percutaneous nephrostomy insertion was performed by the radiologists on the day before endo-surgery, and 85 who underwent one-step PCNL, which involved the creation of a nephrostomy tract and performing the PCNL at the same time in the operating room, by a urologist. We compared the perioperative and postoperative parameters between these two groups. The result revealed that there were no significant differences between one-step and two-step PCNL in the decreases in haemoglobin level and blood transfusion volume, and the hospital stay was shorter in the one-step PCNL group. In addition, the one-step PCNL group was associated with significantly lower visual analogue score (VAS), which were 2.3, 1.1, and 0.4 on the post-operative days 1, 2, and 3, respectively, compared with 3.2, 1.7, and 1.0 in the two-step PCNL group. The number of parenteral analgesic prescriptions was fewer in the one-step PCNL group (0.8 ± 1.1 amps/vials) than in the two-step PCNL group (4.1 ± 2.4 amps/vials). Furthermore, different stone locations barely affected VAS and analgesic administrations. The results indicate that the one-step PCNL by the urologist alone, compared to two-step PCNL with the radiologist, has better wound pain outcome and shorter hospital stay with comparable successful rate and complication grade.

  15. Contribution of lower limb eccentric work and different step responses to balance recovery among older adults.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Hanatsu; Levinger, Pazit; Downie, Calum; Hayes, Alan; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-09-01

    Falls during walking reflect susceptibility to balance loss and the individual's capacity to recover stability. Balance can be recovered using either one step or multiple steps but both responses are impaired with ageing. To investigate older adults' (n=15, 72.5±4.8 yrs) recovery step control a tether-release procedure was devised to induce unanticipated forward balance loss. Three-dimensional position-time data combined with foot-ground reaction forces were used to measure balance recovery. Dependent variables were; margin of stability (MoS) and available response time (ART) for spatial and temporal balance measures in the transverse and sagittal planes; lower limb joint angles and joint negative/positive work; and spatio-temporal gait parameters. Relative to multi-step responses, single-step recovery was more effective in maintaining balance, indicated by greater MoS and longer ART. MoS in the sagittal plane measure and ART in the transverse plane distinguished single step responses from multiple steps. When MoS and ART were negative (<0), balance was not secured and additional steps would be required to establish the new base of support for balance recovery. Single-step responses demonstrated greater step length and velocity and when the recovery foot landed, greater centre of mass downward velocity. Single-step strategies also showed greater ankle dorsiflexion, increased knee maximum flexion and more negative work at the ankle and knee. Collectively these findings suggest that single-step responses are more effective in forward balance recovery by directing falling momentum downward to be absorbed as lower limb eccentric work. PMID:26077787

  16. Reliability of the Spatiotemporal Determinants of Maximal Sprint Speed in Adolescent Boys Over Single and Multiple Steps.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Robert W; Oliver, Jon L; Hughes, Michael G; Lloyd, Rhodri Steffan; Cronin, John

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of the spatiotemporal determinants of maximal sprinting speed in boys over single and multiple steps. Fifty-four adolescent boys (age = 14.1 ± 0.7 years [range = 12.9-15.7 years]; height = 1.63 ± 0.09 m; body mass = 55.3 ± 13.3 kg; -0.31 ± 0.90 age from Peak Height Velocity (PHV) in years; mean ± s) volunteered to complete a 30 m sprint test on 3 occasions over a 2-week period. Speed, step length, step frequency, contact time, and flight time were assessed via an optical measurement system. Speed and step characteristics were obtained from the single-fastest step and average of the 2 and 4 fastest consecutive steps. Pairwise comparison of consecutive trials revealed the coefficient of variation (CV) for speed was greater in 4-step (CV = 7.3 & 7.5%) compared with 2-step (CV = 4.2 & 4.1%) and 1-step (CV = 4.8 & 4.6%) analysis. The CV of step length, step frequency and contact time ranged from 4.8 to 7.5% for 1-step, 3.8-5.0% for 2-step and 4.2-7.5% for 4-step analyses across all trials. An acceptable degree of reliability was achieved for the spatiotemporal and performance variables assessed in this study. Two-step analysis demonstrated the highest degree of reliability for the key spatiotemporal variables, and therefore may be the most suitable approach to monitor the spatiotemporal characteristics of maximal sprint speed in boys.

  17. Discussion of "Aeration, flow instabilities, and residual energy on pooled stepped spillways of embankment dams" by Stephen Felder and Hubert Chanson

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stepped spillways applied to embankment dams provide overtopping protection and address a common deficiency in aging dams by providing increased spillway capacity. Pooled-stepped spillways offer a design alternative to the traditional flat-stepped spillways. Researchers from the University of Quee...

  18. Compulsory Attendance Policies: About Age or Intervention? SREB Focus Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, SREB state policy-makers have focused on actions to reduce dropout rates and increase high school graduation rates. Some policy-makers have suggested that raising their state's compulsory attendance age (often called the dropout age) to require students to stay in school until age 17 or 18 is an important step. However,…

  19. Particle Swarm Optimization with Dynamic Step Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhihua; Cai, Xingjuan; Zeng, Jianchao; Sun, Guoji

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is a robust swarm intelligent technique inspired from birds flocking and fish schooling. Though many effective improvements have been proposed, however, the premature convergence is still its main problem. Because each particle's movement is a continuous process and can be modelled with differential equation groups, a new variant, particle swarm optimization with dynamic step length (PSO-DSL), with additional control coefficient- step length, is introduced. Then the absolute stability theory is introduced to analyze the stability character of the standard PSO, the theoretical result indicates the PSO with constant step length can not always be stable, this may be one of the reason for premature convergence. Simulation results show the PSO-DSL is effective.

  20. Screw-retained crown restorations of single implants: A step-by-step clinical guide

    PubMed Central

    Assaf, Mohammad; Gharbyeh, Alaa’ Z. Abu

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the clinical steps for preparing a screw-retained crown for the restoration of a single implant. Impression-taking using open-tray technique and delivery of the crown is presented in a step-by-step manner elucidated by detailed photographs. Furthermore, the advantages and disadvantages of screw-retained crowns are discussed in comparison with the cemented restorations. PMID:25512742

  1. Control Software for Piezo Stepping Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel F.

    2013-01-01

    A control system has been developed for the Space Interferometer Mission (SIM) piezo stepping actuator. Piezo stepping actuators are novel because they offer extreme dynamic range (centimeter stroke with nanometer resolution) with power, thermal, mass, and volume advantages over existing motorized actuation technology. These advantages come with the added benefit of greatly reduced complexity in the support electronics. The piezo stepping actuator consists of three fully redundant sets of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs), two sets of brake PZTs, and one set of extension PZTs. These PZTs are used to grasp and move a runner attached to the optic to be moved. By proper cycling of the two brake and extension PZTs, both forward and backward moves of the runner can be achieved. Each brake can be configured for either a power-on or power-off state. For SIM, the brakes and gate of the mechanism are configured in such a manner that, at the end of the step, the actuator is in a parked or power-off state. The control software uses asynchronous sampling of an optical encoder to monitor the position of the runner. These samples are timed to coincide with the end of the previous move, which may consist of a variable number of steps. This sampling technique linearizes the device by avoiding input saturation of the actuator and makes latencies of the plant vanish. The software also estimates, in real time, the scale factor of the device and a disturbance caused by cycling of the brakes. These estimates are used to actively cancel the brake disturbance. The control system also includes feedback and feedforward elements that regulate the position of the runner to a given reference position. Convergence time for smalland medium-sized reference positions (less than 200 microns) to within 10 nanometers can be achieved in under 10 seconds. Convergence times for large moves (greater than 1 millimeter) are limited by the step rate.

  2. One-step fabrication of multifunctional micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenlong; Liu, Mei; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin; Li, Christopher Y.

    2015-08-01

    Although artificial micromotors have undergone tremendous progress in recent years, their fabrication normally requires complex steps or expensive equipment. In this paper, we report a facile one-step method based on an emulsion solvent evaporation process to fabricate multifunctional micromotors. By simultaneously incorporating various components into an oil-in-water droplet, upon emulsification and solidification, a sphere-shaped, asymmetric, and multifunctional micromotor is formed. Some of the attractive functions of this model micromotor include autonomous movement in high ionic strength solution, remote control, enzymatic disassembly and sustained release. This one-step, versatile fabrication method can be easily scaled up and therefore may have great potential in mass production of multifunctional micromotors for a wide range of practical applications.Although artificial micromotors have undergone tremendous progress in recent years, their fabrication normally requires complex steps or expensive equipment. In this paper, we report a facile one-step method based on an emulsion solvent evaporation process to fabricate multifunctional micromotors. By simultaneously incorporating various components into an oil-in-water droplet, upon emulsification and solidification, a sphere-shaped, asymmetric, and multifunctional micromotor is formed. Some of the attractive functions of this model micromotor include autonomous movement in high ionic strength solution, remote control, enzymatic disassembly and sustained release. This one-step, versatile fabrication method can be easily scaled up and therefore may have great potential in mass production of multifunctional micromotors for a wide range of practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Videos S1-S4 and Fig. S1-S3. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03574k

  3. Do lightning positive leaders really "step"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D.

    2015-12-01

    It has been known for some time that positive leaders exhibit impulsive charge motion and optical emissions as they extend. However, laboratory and field observations have not produced any evidence of a process analogous to the space leader mechanism of negative leader extension. Instead, observations have suggested that the positive leader tip undergoes a continuous to intermittent series of corona streamer bursts, each burst resulting in a small forward extension of the positive leader channel. Traditionally, it has been held that lightning positive leaders extend in a continuous or quasi-continuous fashion. Lately, however, many have become concerned that this position is incongruous with observations of impulsive activity during lightning positive leader extension. It is increasingly suggested that this impulsive activity is evidence that positive leaders also undergo "stepping". There are two issues that must be addressed. The first issue concerns whether or not the physical processes underlying impulsive extension in negative and positive leaders are distinct. We argue that these processes are in fact physically distinct, and offer new high-speed video evidence to support this position. The second issue regards the proper use of the term "step" as an identifier for the impulsive forward extension of a leader. Traditional use of this term has been applied only to negative leaders, due primarily to their stronger impulsive charge motions and photographic evidence of clearly discontinuous forward progression of the luminous channel. Recently, due to the increasing understanding of the distinct "space leader" process of negative leader extension, the term "step" has increasingly come to be associated with the space leader process itself. Should this emerging association, "step" = space leader attachment, be canonized? If not, then it seems reasonable to use the term "step" to describe impulsive positive leader extension. If, however, we do wish to associate the

  4. Step bunching process induced by the flow of steps at the sublimated crystal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Załuska-Kotur, Magdalena A.; KrzyŻewski, Filip

    2012-06-01

    Stepped GaN(0001) surface is studied by the kinetic Monte Carlo method and compared with the model based on Burton-Cabrera-Frank equations. Successive stages of surface pattern evolution during high temperature sublimation process are discussed. At low sublimation rates, clear, well defined step bunches form. The process happens in the absence or for very low Schwoebel barriers. Bunches of several steps are well separated, move slowly and stay straight. Character of the process changes for more rapid sublimation process where double step formations become dominant and together with meanders and local bunches assemble into the less ordered surface pattern. Solution of the analytic equations written for one dimensional system confirms that step bunching is induced by the particle advection caused by step movement. Relative particle flow towards moving steps becomes important when due to the low Schwoebel barrier both sides of the step are symmetric. Simulations show that in the opposite limit of very high Schwoebel barrier steps fracture and rough surface builds up.

  5. Magnetostrictive Roller-Drive Stepping Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed motor based on magnetostrictive effect provides stepped angular motion with angular increments of order of 100 microradians. Driven to repeat stepping cycle rapidly enough to achieve maximum speed of about 20 rpm, provides torque an order of magnitude greater than electric motors, and brakes itself when power turned off. Magnetostrictive rods in electromagnet coils push against drive plate, causing it to rotate slightly. This slight rotation jams conical rollers between cam surfaces on outer drive ring and split drum, so rollers transmit rotation to drum. Suitable for precise, high-torque, fail-safe-braking, direct drive of robot joint, without bulk and weight of additional brake mechanism and gear train.

  6. How many steps/day are enough? for children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, public health physical activity guidelines include special emphasis on populations of children (typically 6-11 years) and adolescents (typically 12-19 years). Existing guidelines are commonly expressed in terms of frequency, time, and intensity of behaviour. However, the simple step output from both accelerometers and pedometers is gaining increased credibility in research and practice as a reasonable approximation of daily ambulatory physical activity volume. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review existing child and adolescent objectively monitored step-defined physical activity literature to provide researchers, practitioners, and lay people who use accelerometers and pedometers with evidence-based translations of these public health guidelines in terms of steps/day. In terms of normative data (i.e., expected values), the updated international literature indicates that we can expect 1) among children, boys to average 12,000 to 16,000 steps/day and girls to average 10,000 to 13,000 steps/day; and, 2) adolescents to steadily decrease steps/day until approximately 8,000-9,000 steps/day are observed in 18-year olds. Controlled studies of cadence show that continuous MVPA walking produces 3,300-3,500 steps in 30 minutes or 6,600-7,000 steps in 60 minutes in 10-15 year olds. Limited evidence suggests that a total daily physical activity volume of 10,000-14,000 steps/day is associated with 60-100 minutes of MVPA in preschool children (approximately 4-6 years of age). Across studies, 60 minutes of MVPA in primary/elementary school children appears to be achieved, on average, within a total volume of 13,000 to 15,000 steps/day in boys and 11,000 to 12,000 steps/day in girls. For adolescents (both boys and girls), 10,000 to 11,700 may be associated with 60 minutes of MVPA. Translations of time- and intensity-based guidelines may be higher than existing normative data (e.g., in adolescents) and therefore will be more difficult to achieve (but not

  7. Step Counts and Body Mass Index Among 9-14 Years Old Greek Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulou, Maria; Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Kourtessis, Thomas; Kambas, Antonios; Dimitrou, Martina; Gretziou, Helen

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was the identification of the current pedometer determined physical activity levels of a large sample of 9 -14 years old Greek schoolchildren and the determination of the association between daily step counts and body mass index through the comparison of step counts among overweight, obese and normal-weight children. A total of 532 children (263 boys and 269 girls) were measured for height and weight. Their activity levels were analyzed using pedometers to measure mean steps for 7 consecutive days. Overweight and obese status was determined using the international reference standard (Cole et al., 2000). According to data analysis mean step counts ranged from 15371 to10539 for boys and from 11536 to 7893 for girls. Steps per day were significantly more for boys compared to girls. Children with normal weight performed significantly more steps per day compared to their overweight and obese classmates. Daily step counts reported in this study for 9 -14 year old schoolchildren were relatively low when compared to step counts from other European countries. Only 33.9% of the participants satisfied the body mass index referenced standards for recommended steps per day. Finally, the results of this study provide baseline information on youth pedometer determined physical activity and on youth body mass index levels. High prevalence of low daily step counts and BMI determined obesity was revealed prompting for further exploration of the relationship between objectively measured physical activity and adiposity in particular for children and adolescents that experience both health risk factors. Key points The mean steps/day taken by both boys and girls in Greece 9-14 years old were 13.446 and 10.656 respectively. Daily step counts tended to be leveled for ages 9-12 years and a significant drop in steps/day was apparent for children aged 13 -14 years. According to the IOTF criteria, 23% of the boys that participated in this study were overweight

  8. Four-step reaction for polytriazine elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Korus, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Four step imidoylamidine reaction sequence is used to make crosslinked polyperfluoralkyltriazines with superior elastomeric properties, greater molecular weight, and crosslinking control. Polymers can find useful application in fuel tank sealants, o-ring, wire enamels, pneumatic ducts, and many other applications.

  9. STEPS: An EPSS Tool for Instructional Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northrup, Pamela Taylor; Pilcher, Janet K.

    Support for Teachers Enhancing Performance in Schools (STEPS) is a World Wide Web and CD-ROM electronic performance support system (EPSS) designed for preK-12 and preservice educators to assist in designing and developing lessons, units, or curricula; this tool was developed around school reform and accountability initiatives in Florida. To…

  10. "Stepping Up": A Focus on Facilitator Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostouros, Patricia; Warthe, D. Gaye; Carter-Snell, Catherine; Burnett, Che

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impact on peer facilitators in "Stepping Up," a dating violence prevention program at a Canadian university. A focus group held eight months following the delivery of the program determined the personal impact of involvement in the program. Results indicate that peer facilitators experienced personal growth as…

  11. Seven Steps to Flipped Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Professional development generally follows a pattern of presentation and review, but flipping the sessions has garnered a positive response from staff members and prompted greater collaboration and engagement. In this article the author describes the seven following steps to follow in order to prepare for a successful staff development meeting:…

  12. Specificity of a Maximal Step Exercise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Lynn A.; Marsh, Jennifer L.; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Pohlman, Roberta L.

    2007-01-01

    To adhere to the principle of "exercise specificity" exercise testing should be completed using the same physical activity that is performed during exercise training. The present study was designed to assess whether aerobic step exercisers have a greater maximal oxygen consumption (max VO sub 2) when tested using an activity specific, maximal step…

  13. Webinar: Stepped chute design for embankment dams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changing demographics in the vicinity of dams have led to hazard creep in a number of dams worldwide. Many of these dams now have insufficient spillway capacity as a result of these changes in hazard classification from low to significant or high hazard. Stepped chutes applied to the embankment da...

  14. Two-step single-ionization mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Boeyen, R. W. van; Doering, J. P.; Watanabe, N.; Cooper, J. W.; Coplan, M. A.; Moore, J. H.

    2006-03-15

    In a recent publication [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 233202 (2004)] two different electron impact double ionization (e,3e) mechanisms were identified and the way in which two-electron momentum distributions for atoms and molecules could be obtained by triple coincidence (e,3e) measurements was discussed. The apparatus used detected the two ejected electrons both in and out of the scattering plane at an angle of 45 deg. to the momentum transfer direction in triple coincidence with the scattered electron. Ejected electrons detected out of the scattering plane were shown to be a result of two-step double ionization processes. With the same apparatus we have made double coincidence (e,2e) measurements of electron impact single ionization cross sections for ionization of magnesium 3s (valence) and 2p and 2s (inner) shell electrons at incident energies from 400 to 3000 eV in order to obtain more information about two-step ionization. The experimental results were compared with distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations carried out to second order. For the experimental conditions, two-step ionization processes involving one ionizing collision and a second elastic collision with the atomic core are the dominant contribution to the measured cross sections. Calculations are in moderate agreement with the data. The angular distributions of the ionized electrons in these two-step ionizations reflect the initial momentum distributions of the target electrons, a result that is analogous with the earlier (e,3e) measurements.

  15. Interventional radiology residency: steps to implementation.

    PubMed

    Marx, M Victoria; Sabri, Saher S

    2015-08-01

    Implementation of an interventional radiology (IR) residency program requires significant planning, as well as clear communication and consensus among departmental and institutional stakeholders. The goal of this short article is to highlight key decisions and steps that are needed to launch an IR residency, and to illustrate a possible timeline for implementation of the integrated and independent IR residency models.

  16. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  17. Bottleneck Concepts in Psychology: Exploratory First Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurung, Regan A. R.; Landrum, R. Eric

    2013-01-01

    The authors take an initial step in identifying potential bottleneck concepts in psychology, that is, concepts that are deceptively difficult, perhaps due to student overconfidence. In order to first identify bottleneck concepts, faculty (n = 65) rated the difficulty of 91 psychological concepts from across the discipline. Students (n = 35) rated…

  18. 5 Steps to a Greener School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Sometimes all it takes is a little fate to accomplish something great, or in this case, something green. The Broward County Public School (BCPS) District shows how a natural disaster (Hurricane Wilma) inspired a green revolution. This article presents the five steps that the Broward County School District followed in implementing an Environmental…

  19. Six Easy Steps to Online Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Against his better instincts, the author, an educator at West Texas A&M University, shares his school's recipe for developing a successful online learning program. He discusses six easy steps to online success. These include: (1) clean up one's act; (2) answers in 24 hours; (3) plenty of structure; (4) format phone conferences at midterm; (5) do…

  20. Tandem mirror next step conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, J.N.; Damm, C.C.; Bulmer, R.H.

    1980-10-14

    A study was made to define the features of the experimental mirror fusion device - The Tandem Mirror Next Step, or TMNS - that will bridge the gap between present mirror confinement experiments and a power-producing reactor. We outline the project goals, describe some initial device parameters, and relate the technological requirements to ongoing development programs.

  1. 7 CFR 65.230 - Production step.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Production step. 65.230 Section 65.230 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND...

  2. 7 CFR 65.230 - Production step.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Production step. 65.230 Section 65.230 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND...

  3. 7 CFR 65.230 - Production step.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Production step. 65.230 Section 65.230 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND...

  4. Speckle interferometry using fiber optic phase stepping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1989-01-01

    A system employing closed-loop phase-stepping is used to measure the out-of-plane deformation of a diffusely reflecting object. Optical fibers are used to provide reference and object beam illumination for a standard two-beam speckle interferometer, providing set-up flexibility and ease of alignment. Piezoelectric fiber-stretchers and a phase-measurement/servo system are used to provide highly accurate phase steps. Intensity data is captured with a charge-injection-device camera, and is converted into a phase map using a desktop computer. The closed-loop phase-stepping system provides 90 deg phase steps which are accurate to 0.02 deg, greatly improving this system relative to open-loop interferometers. The system is demonstrated on a speckle interferometer, measuring the rigid-body translation of a diffusely reflecting object with an accuracy + or - 10 deg, or roughly + or - 15 nanometers. This accuracy is achieved without the use of a pneumatically mounted optics table.

  5. Stepping Out: Collaborative Research across Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groen, Janet; Hyland-Russell, Tara

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers the experiences and insights of two faculty members, located in two separate disciplines, as they engaged in collaborative research. While knowledge created by stepping out and reaching across disciplines reflects the reality of an increasingly complex world, their experiences highlight both the benefits of a supportive…

  6. Adaptive time stepping in biomolecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Franklin, J; Doniach, S

    2005-09-22

    We present an adaptive time stepping scheme based on the extrapolative method of Barth and Schlick [LN, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 1633 (1998)] to numerically integrate the Langevin equation with a molecular-dynamics potential. This approach allows us to use (on average) a time step for the strong nonbonded force integration corresponding to half the period of the fastest bond oscillation, without compromising the slow degrees of freedom in the problem. We show with simple examples how the dynamic step size stabilizes integration operators, and discuss some of the limitations of such stability. The method introduced uses a slightly more accurate inner integrator than LN to accommodate the larger steps. The adaptive time step approach reproduces temporal features of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) test system (similar to the one used in the original introduction of LN) compared to short-time integrators, but with energies that are shifted with respect to both LN, and traditional stochastic versions of Verlet. Although the introduction of longer steps has the effect of systematically heating the bonded components of the potential, the temporal fluctuations of the slow degrees of freedom are reproduced accurately. The purpose of this paper is to display a mechanism by which the resonance traditionally associated with using time steps corresponding to half the period of oscillations in molecular dynamics can be avoided. This has theoretical utility in terms of designing numerical integration schemes--the key point is that by factoring a propagator so that time steps are not constant one can recover stability with an overall (average) time step at a resonance frequency. There are, of course, limitations to this approach associated with the complicated, nonlinear nature of the molecular-dynamics (MD) potential (i.e., it is not as straightforward as the linear test problem we use to motivate the method). While the basic notion remains in the full Newtonian problem

  7. A Step by Step Guide for Planning a Japanese Cultural Festival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Carole

    Teachers at all academic levels can adapt the design and content of the sixth grade Japanese cultural festival detailed in this learning packet. Material is divided into 2 sections. Section 1 provides a step-by-step guide to planning and conducting the festival. These instructions, based on 5 years of experience, include a detailed planning…

  8. SPSS for Windows Step by Step: A Simple Guide and Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Darren; Mallery, Paul

    This book is designed to give step-by-step instructions necessary to do most major types of data analysis using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). SPSS is a powerful tool that is capable of conducting nearly any type of data analysis used in the social sciences. This book should enable the reader to do 95% of what the program…

  9. Integrated Marketing for Colleges, Universities, and Schools: A Step-by-Step Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevier, Robert A.

    This book offers a step-by-step approach to marketing for educational institutions, especially colleges and universities. The book is organized into three broad sections. Section 1 makes the case for marketing in six chapters which address: (1) challenges which are or will affect colleges and universities; (2) the role of institutional mission,…

  10. On the Road towards Child-Centered Education: Step by Step in Moldova

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cincilei, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the outcome of the implementation of the Step by Step child-centered education model in Moldova. The implementation began with 12 classrooms of four-to five-year-old children in five kindergartens. The positive response from parents and teachers received at the end of the first year exceeded all expectations. As a result, 60…

  11. Two Steps Forward, One Step Backward: Must This Be the Future of Diversity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Johnnella E.

    2013-01-01

    Johnnella Butler writes here that the title of this article "Two Steps Forward, One Step Backward," expresses the "wicked problem" of diversity as a concrete goal in higher education. The concept of the "wicked problem," is a term coined in the late 1960s by social planners. Consulting Wikipedia, as so many of our…

  12. Step Frequency and Step Length of 200-m Sprint in Able-bodied and Amputee Sprinters.

    PubMed

    Hobara, H; Sano, Y; Kobayashi, Y; Heldoorn, T A; Mochimaru, M

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the hypothesis that the difference in the 200-m sprint performance of amputee and able-bodied sprinters is due to a shorter step length rather than a lower step frequency. Men's elite-level 200-m races with a total of 16 able-bodied, 13 unilateral transtibial, 5 bilateral transtibial, and 16 unilateral transfemoral amputee sprinters were analyzed from publicly available internet broadcasts. For each run, the average forward velocity, step frequency, and step length over the entire 200-m distance were analyzed for each sprinter. The average forward velocity of able-bodied sprinters was faster than that of the other 3 groups, but there was no significant difference in average step frequency between able-bodied and transtibial amputee sprinters. However, the average step length of able-bodied sprinters was significantly longer than that of the transtibial amputee sprinters. In contrast, the step frequency and step length of transfemoral amputees were significantly lower and shorter than those of the other 3 groups. These results suggest that the differences in 200-m sprint performance between able-bodied and amputee sprinters are dependent on amputation level. PMID:26509370

  13. How to Conduct Surveys: A Step-by-Step Guide. Sixth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Arlene

    2016-01-01

    Packed with new topics that reflect today's challenges, the Sixth Edition of the bestselling "How to Conduct Surveys" guides readers through the process of developing their own rigorous surveys and evaluating the credibility and transparency of surveys created by others. Offering practical, step-by-step advice and written in the same…

  14. ACSM Fitness Book: A Proven Step-By-Step Program from the Experts. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coll. of Sports Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.

    This offers advice on the health benefits of regular physical activity. It includes a scientifically proven fitness test to determine one's starting point and monitor ongoing progress, offering step-by-step instructions, sample programs, and insights on nutrition, weight control, motivation, and overcoming setbacks. Seven chapters examine: (1) "An…

  15. Steps Toward Effective Production of Speech (STEPS): No. 7--How to Take Care of Glasses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheeley, Eugene C.; McQuiddy, Doris

    This guide, one of a series of booklets developed by Project STEPS (Steps Toward Effective Production of Speech), presents guidelines for parents of deaf-blind children regarding the care of eyeglasses. Basic concerns with glasses and contact lenses are noted and parents are advised to perform the following daily tasks: checking the frames,…

  16. Listen to Me Listen to You: A Step-By-Step Guide to Communication Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotzman, Mandy; Kotzman, Anne

    2008-01-01

    This step-by-step guide is a companion to the popular "Listen to Me, Listen to You: A Practical Guide to Self-Awareness, Communication Skills and Conflict Management" (New Expanded Edition, Penguin Books, 2007). It is designed for use by anyone working in communication skills and personal development training. Resource material is grouped under…

  17. Step Frequency and Step Length of 200-m Sprint in Able-bodied and Amputee Sprinters.

    PubMed

    Hobara, H; Sano, Y; Kobayashi, Y; Heldoorn, T A; Mochimaru, M

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the hypothesis that the difference in the 200-m sprint performance of amputee and able-bodied sprinters is due to a shorter step length rather than a lower step frequency. Men's elite-level 200-m races with a total of 16 able-bodied, 13 unilateral transtibial, 5 bilateral transtibial, and 16 unilateral transfemoral amputee sprinters were analyzed from publicly available internet broadcasts. For each run, the average forward velocity, step frequency, and step length over the entire 200-m distance were analyzed for each sprinter. The average forward velocity of able-bodied sprinters was faster than that of the other 3 groups, but there was no significant difference in average step frequency between able-bodied and transtibial amputee sprinters. However, the average step length of able-bodied sprinters was significantly longer than that of the transtibial amputee sprinters. In contrast, the step frequency and step length of transfemoral amputees were significantly lower and shorter than those of the other 3 groups. These results suggest that the differences in 200-m sprint performance between able-bodied and amputee sprinters are dependent on amputation level.

  18. A step in the right direction: new flow depth relationships for stepped spillway design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A common deficiency for embankment dams changing from a low hazard to a high hazard dam is inadequate spillway capacity. Roller compacted concrete (RCC) stepped spillways are a popular method to address this issue. Stepped spillway research has gained momentum in recent years due to the need for d...

  19. Impact of Preadmission Variables on USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleshinski, James; Khuder, Sadik A.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Gold, Jeffrey P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the predictive ability of preadmission variables on United States Medical Licensing Examinations (USMLE) step 1 and step 2 performance, incorporating the use of a neural network model. Method: Preadmission data were collected on matriculants from 1998 to 2004. Linear regression analysis was first used to identify predictors of…

  20. Steps Toward Effective Production of Speech (STEPS): No. 6--Rewards and How to Use Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheeley, Eugene C.; McQuiddy, Doris

    This guide, part of a series of booklets for parents of deaf-blind children developed by Project STEP (Steps Toward Effective Production of Speech), considers the use of rewards in shaping or changing the behavior of deaf-blind children. The types of rewards (e.g., food, drink, touch, action, something to listen to or look at) and selection of…

  1. 36 CFR 1192.117 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds... Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 1192.117 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step.... (b) All step edges and thresholds shall have a band of color(s) running the full width of the step...

  2. 36 CFR 1192.117 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds... Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 1192.117 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step.... (b) All step edges and thresholds shall have a band of color(s) running the full width of the step...

  3. Suggested Steps for Planning and Building a New School Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    A listing and short descriptions of eleven steps that should be observed in the planning and building of a new school plant. This step-by-step approach was prepared with the inexperienced school board member in mind, and attempts to offer suggestions and advice for each step in the planning, bonding, and building stages. Steps covered are--(1)…

  4. A Predictive Model for USMLE Step 1 Scores

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, David; Peppler, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 plays a pivotal role in one’s residency application. While prior literature has investigated which factors influence performance on the examination, the authors sought to include factors such as performance on a well-used question bank and financial need to develop a predictive model. Method  After obtaining institutional review board approval, the authors surveyed two consecutive second-year medical school classes and correlated the data to the students’ Step 1 and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Comprehensive Basic Science Examination (CBSE) scores. The survey included questions such as how many days they studied per week, how many days they studied in total, which resources they used, how they performed on question banks, group studying habits, and whether they were receiving financial aid. The authors also assessed whether the students received only A letter grades during the first year of medical school. The authors used SPSS® Statistics V22.0 (IBM® Corporation, NY, USA ) and included one-way analysis of covariance (ANOVA) and multiple linear regression for statistical analysis. Results  Eighty-one students completed the survey with an average Step 1 score of 240.5 and with an average study time of 39.5 days. The Step 1 Scores significantly correlated with the CBSE taken immediately preceding the dedicated study period (r=0.711, P=<0.001), UWorld Question Bank (UWorld) percentage correct (r = 0.622, P<0.001), straight As during first-year (r=0.356, P=0.001), and financial need (r=0.318, P=0.01). The scores were not correlated with age, gender, Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT), prior medical training, number of days studied, or the students’ perception of appropriate time studied. The authors developed a predictive model accounting for 62.3% of the variability. 140.625+(0.319xCBSE)-(3.817xA)+(5.845xN)+(0.452xU), where A=1 if straight As, N=1 if receiving need

  5. Aging and Aged in Organized Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Menachem

    1989-01-01

    Examines problems of the aged in organized crime, basing discussion on organized crime bosses over age 60 operating in Italy, the United States, and Israel. Looks at problems stemming from normative system in organized crime, role of the aged, intergenerational problems, fears of the aged, excuses and justifications, standards of life, and…

  6. Five Steps for Developing Effective Transition Plans for High School Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szidon, Katherine; Ruppar, Andrea; Smith, Leann

    2015-01-01

    The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA; 2006) requires schools to develop transition plans for students with disabilities, beginning at age 16, if not before. For students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the transition planning process includes unique considerations. This article describes five steps for developing effective…

  7. Next Steps: Life after Special Education. Diplomas Count, 2015. Education Week. Volume 34, Number 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Virginia B., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    After spending years in a special education system that carefully spells out their rights and the services they should receive, students with disabilities often find it daunting to contemplate their next steps after high school. Should they apply to college, look for a job, or stay in the special education system until they "age out" at…

  8. Next Steps for "Big Data" in Education: Utilizing Data-Intensive Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Data-informed instructional methods offer tremendous promise for increasing the effectiveness of teaching, learning, and schooling. Yet-to-be-developed data science approaches have the potential to dramatically advance instruction for every student and to enhance learning for people of all ages. Next steps that emerged from a recent National…

  9. Students' Game Performance Improvements during a Hybrid Sport Education-Step-Game-Approach Volleyball Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araújo, Rui; Mesquita, Isabel; Hastie, Peter; Pereira, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a hybrid combination of sport education and the step-game-approach (SGA) on students' gameplay performance in volleyball, taking into account their sex and skill-level. Seventeen seventh-grade students (seven girls, 10 boys, average age 11.8) participated in a 25-lesson volleyball season, in which the…

  10. The Biology of Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprott, Richard L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen articles in this special issue discuss aging theories, biomarkers of aging, aging research, disease, cancer biology, Alzheimer's disease, stress, oxidation of proteins, gene therapy, service delivery, biogerontology, and ethics and aging research. (SK)

  11. Serious Games for Health: Features, Challenges, Next Steps.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Moderators Fran C; Burke, Lauren C; Hodent, Participants Celia; Evans, Michael A; Lane, H Chad; Schell, Jesse

    2014-10-01

    As articles in this journal have demonstrated over the past 3 years, serious game development continues to flourish as a vehicle for formal and informal health education. How best to characterize a "serious" game remains somewhat elusive in the literature. Many researchers and practitioners view serious games as capitalizing on computer technology and state-of-the-art video graphics as an enjoyable means by which to provide and promote instruction and training, or to facilitate attitude change among its players. We invited four distinguished researchers and practitioners to further discuss with us how they view the characteristics of serious games for health, how those characteristics differ from those for academic purposes, the challenges posed for serious game development among players of different ages, and next steps for the development and empirical examination of the effectiveness of serious games for players' psychological and physical well-being. PMID:26192481

  12. Protection of the space environment: the first small steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The development of the space environment - for industry, commerce and tourism - is a natural extension of our current business and domestic agenda. Unfortunately, this brings with it the ability to pollute, degrade and even destroy aspects of the space environment. This paper briefly reviews the evidence of mankind's pollution of the space environment in the first 45 years of the Space Age, and extrapolates the potential for further degradation into its second half-century. It also makes recommendations concerning the first steps towards a solution to the problem, including the formation of an international consultative body and consideration of a `set of guidelines' or `code of practice' as a precursor to more formal policies or legislation.

  13. Serious Games for Health: Features, Challenges, Next Steps.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Moderators Fran C; Burke, Lauren C; Hodent, Participants Celia; Evans, Michael A; Lane, H Chad; Schell, Jesse

    2014-10-01

    As articles in this journal have demonstrated over the past 3 years, serious game development continues to flourish as a vehicle for formal and informal health education. How best to characterize a "serious" game remains somewhat elusive in the literature. Many researchers and practitioners view serious games as capitalizing on computer technology and state-of-the-art video graphics as an enjoyable means by which to provide and promote instruction and training, or to facilitate attitude change among its players. We invited four distinguished researchers and practitioners to further discuss with us how they view the characteristics of serious games for health, how those characteristics differ from those for academic purposes, the challenges posed for serious game development among players of different ages, and next steps for the development and empirical examination of the effectiveness of serious games for players' psychological and physical well-being.

  14. Sex hormones and brain aging.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Sergio; Melcangi, Roberto C; Doncarlos, Lydia L; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Azcoitia, Iñigo

    2004-01-01

    Sex steroids exert pleiotropic effects in the nervous system, preserving neural function and promoting neuronal survival. Therefore, the age-related decrease in sex steroids may have a negative impact on neural function. Progesterone, testosterone and estradiol prevent neuronal loss in the central nervous system in different experimental animal models of neurodegeneration. Furthermore, progesterone and its reduced derivatives dihydroprogesterone and tetrahydroprogesterone reduce aging-associated morphological abnormalities of myelin and aging-associated myelin fiber loss in rat peripheral nerves. However, the results from hormone replacement studies in humans are thus far inconclusive. A possible alternative to hormonal replacement therapy is to increase local steroidogenesis by neural tissues, which express enzymes for steroid synthesis and metabolism. Proteins involved in the intramitochondrial trafficking of cholesterol, the first step in steroidogenesis, such as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor and the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, are up-regulated in the nervous system after injury. Furthermore, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression is increased in the brain of 24-month-old rats compared with young adult rats. This suggests that brain steroidogenesis may be modified in adaptation to neurodegenerative conditions and to the brain aging process. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that local formation of estradiol in the brain, by the enzyme aromatase, is neuroprotective. Therefore, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor and aromatase are attractive pharmacological targets to promote neuroprotection in the aged brain. PMID:15582278

  15. Instantaneous, stepped-frequency, nonlinear radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranney, Kenneth; Gallagher, Kyle; Martone, Anthony; Mazzaro, Gregory; Sherbondy, Kelly; Narayanan, Ram

    2015-05-01

    Researchers have recently developed radar systems capable of exploiting non-linear target responses to precisely locate targets in range. These systems typically achieve the bandwidth necessary for range resolution through transmission of either a stepped-frequency or chirped waveform. The second harmonic of the reflected waveform is then analyzed to isolate the non-linear target response. In other experiments, researchers have identified certain targets through the inter-modulation products they produce in response to a multi-tone stimulus. These experiments, however, do not exploit the phase information available in the inter-modulation products. We present a method for exploiting both the magnitude and phase information available in the inter-modulation products to create an "instantaneous" stepped frequency, non-linear target response. The new approach enables us to both maintain the unambiguous range dictated by the fundamental, multi-tone separation and obtain the entire target signature from a single transmitted waveform.

  16. A 15-step synthesis of (+)-ryanodol.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kangway V; Xu, Chen; Reisman, Sarah E

    2016-08-26

    (+)-Ryanodine and (+)-ryanodol are complex diterpenoids that modulate intracellular calcium-ion release at ryanodine receptors, ion channels critical for skeletal and cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling and synaptic transmission. Chemical derivatization of these diterpenoids has demonstrated that certain peripheral structural modifications can alter binding affinity and selectivity among ryanodine receptor isoforms. Here, we report a short chemical synthesis of (+)-ryanodol that proceeds in only 15 steps from the commercially available terpene (S)-pulegone. The efficiency of the synthesis derives from the use of a Pauson-Khand reaction to rapidly build the carbon framework and a SeO2-mediated oxidation to install three oxygen atoms in a single step. This work highlights how strategic C-O bond constructions can streamline the synthesis of polyhydroxylated terpenes by minimizing protecting group and redox adjustments. PMID:27563092

  17. Extrapolated implicit-explicit time stepping.

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinescu, E. M.; Sandu, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    2010-01-01

    This paper constructs extrapolated implicit-explicit time stepping methods that allow one to efficiently solve problems with both stiff and nonstiff components. The proposed methods are based on Euler steps and can provide very high order discretizations of ODEs, index-1 DAEs, and PDEs in the method-of-lines framework. Implicit-explicit schemes based on extrapolation are simple to construct, easy to implement, and straightforward to parallelize. This work establishes the existence of perturbed asymptotic expansions of global errors, explains the convergence orders of these methods, and studies their linear stability properties. Numerical results with stiff ODE, DAE, and PDE test problems confirm the theoretical findings and illustrate the potential of these methods to solve multiphysics multiscale problems.

  18. OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    LIN-LIU,YR; STAMBAUGH,RD

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS. The dependence of the ideal ballooning {beta} limit on aspect ratio, A, and elongation {kappa} is systematically explored for nearly 100% bootstrap current driven tokamak equilibria in a wide range of the shape parameters (A = 1.2-7.0, {kappa} = 1.5-6.0 with triangularity {delta} = 0.5). The critical {beta}{sub N} is shown to be optimal at {kappa} = 3.0-4.0 for all A studied and increases as A decreases with a dependence close to A{sup -0.5}. The results obtained can be used as a theoretical basis for the choice of optimum aspect ratio and elongation of next step burning plasma tokamaks or tokamak reactors.

  19. The 7-Steps of the Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Y.; Bamba, A.; Hiraga, J. S.; Isobe, N.; Kubota, A.; Ota, N.; Ranalli, P.; Senda, A.; Suzuki, M.; Tamagawa, T.; Ozaki, M.; Ebisawa, K.; Ishisaki, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Yamagishi, I.; Tamura, T.; Mukai, K.; Angelini, L.; Hamaguchi, K.; Suzaku Processing Members

    It may seem to be difficult to analyze the Suzaku data, but the datastructure and the tools are rather simple. We have constructed the way to process Suzaku FITS data and ftools for over ten years. We have prepared three kinds of manuals to analyze the data; Seven step manual of the XIS and the HXD for beginners, first step manual to walk through the analyses, and the ABC guide as a full manual. In the actual analyses, we have to be careful about events in operation and the limitations in the calibration of instruments. In this paper, the data structure, tools, and manuals with activities of help desks, current status of processing are summarized.

  20. A 15-step synthesis of (+)-ryanodol.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kangway V; Xu, Chen; Reisman, Sarah E

    2016-08-26

    (+)-Ryanodine and (+)-ryanodol are complex diterpenoids that modulate intracellular calcium-ion release at ryanodine receptors, ion channels critical for skeletal and cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling and synaptic transmission. Chemical derivatization of these diterpenoids has demonstrated that certain peripheral structural modifications can alter binding affinity and selectivity among ryanodine receptor isoforms. Here, we report a short chemical synthesis of (+)-ryanodol that proceeds in only 15 steps from the commercially available terpene (S)-pulegone. The efficiency of the synthesis derives from the use of a Pauson-Khand reaction to rapidly build the carbon framework and a SeO2-mediated oxidation to install three oxygen atoms in a single step. This work highlights how strategic C-O bond constructions can streamline the synthesis of polyhydroxylated terpenes by minimizing protecting group and redox adjustments.

  1. Rounded Approximate Step Functions For Interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Rounded approximate step functions of form x(Sup m)/(x(Sup n) + 1) and 1/(x(Sup n) + 1) useful in interpolating between local steep slopes or abrupt changes in tabulated data varying more smoothly elsewhere. Used instead of polynomial curve fits. Interpolation formulas based on these functions implemented quickly and easily on computers. Used in real-time control computations to interpolate between tabulated data governing control responses.

  2. A stochastic model for kinesin bidirectional stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Xiaojun; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-02-28

    In this paper, a hand-over-hand stochastic model for the dynamics of the conventional kinesin is constructed. In the model, both forward and backward motions are taken into consideration. First passage time distributions, average velocities, dwell times, and forward/backward step ratios are investigated based on the model. A good agreement between the results of the model and experimental data is achieved under a variety of external loads.

  3. Slip-trace-induced vicinal step destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupeau, C.; Camara, O.; Drouet, M.; Durinck, J.; Bonneville, J.; Colin, J.; Grilhé, J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold single crystals were deformed by uniaxial compression tests with the help of an experimental apparatus that allows one to characterize in situ, by UHV scanning tunneling microscopy, the evolution of surface structures under stress. It is demonstrated that the slip traces resulting from the emergence of moving dislocations at the free surface highly modify the organization of the vicinal steps. A model based on energetic considerations is proposed and discussed to explain the observed phenomenon.

  4. Independent Influence of Gait Speed and Step Length on Stability and Fall Risk

    PubMed Central

    Espy, D. D.; Yang, F.; Bhatt, T.; Pai, Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    With aging, individuals' gaits become slower and their steps shorter; both are thought to improve stability against balance threats. Recent studies have shown that shorter step lengths, which bring the center of mass (COM) closer to the leading foot, improve stability against slip-related falls. However, a slower gait, hence lower COM velocity, does the opposite. Due to the inherent coupling of step length and speed in spontaneous gait, the extent to which the benefit of shorter steps can offset the slower speed is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate, through decoupling, the independent effects of gait speed and step length on gait stability and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Fifty-seven young adults walked at one of three target gait patterns, two of equal speed and two of equal step length; at a later trial, they encountered an unannounced slip. The results supported our hypotheses that faster gait as well as shorter steps each ameliorates fall risk when a slip is encountered. This appeared to be attributable to the maintenance of stability from slip initiation to liftoff of the recovery foot during the slip. Successful decoupling of gait speed from step length reveals for the first time that, although slow gait in itself leads to instability and falls (a one-standard-deviation decrease in gait speed increases the odds of fall by 4 fold), this effect is offset by the related decrease in step length (the same one-standard-deviation decrease in step length lowers fall risk by 6 times). PMID:20655750

  5. Increasing Steps/Day Predicts Improvement in Physical Function and Pain Interference in Adults with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Kaleth, Anthony S.; Slaven, James E.; Ang, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the concurrent and predictive associations between the number of steps taken per day (steps/day) and clinical outcomes in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods 199 adults with FM [mean age = 46.1 yr; 95% females] enrolled in a randomized clinical trial wore a hip-mounted accelerometer for 1 week and completed self-report measures of physical function [Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Physical Impairment (FIQ-PI), SF-36 physical component score (SF-36 PCS)], pain intensity and interference (Brief Pain Inventory; BPI), and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8; PHQ-8) as part of their baseline and follow-up assessments. Associations of steps/day with self-report clinical measures were evaluated from baseline to week 12 using multivariate regression models adjusted for demographic and baseline covariates. Results Study participants were primarily sedentary, averaging 4,019 ± 1,530 steps/day. Our findings demonstrate a linear relationship between the change in steps/day and improvement in health outcomes for FM. Incremental increases on the order of 1,000 steps/day were significantly associated with (and predictive of) improvements in FIQ-PI, SF-36 PCS, BPI pain interference, and PHQ-8 (all p<0.05). Although higher step counts were associated with lower FIQ and BPI pain intensity scores, these were not statistically significant. Conclusion Step counts is an easily obtained and understood objective measure of daily physical activity. An exercise prescription that includes recommendations to gradually accumulate at least 5,000 additional steps/day may result in clinically significant improvements in outcomes relevant to patients with FM. Future studies are needed to elucidate the dose-response relationship between steps/day and patient outcomes in FM. PMID:25049001

  6. Influence of Religiosity on 12-Step Participation and Treatment Response Among Substance-Dependent Adolescents*

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John F.; Pagano, Maria E.; Stout, Robert L.; Johnson, Shannon M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Religious practices among adults are associated with more 12-step participation which, in turn, is linked to better treatment outcomes. Despite recommendations for adolescents to participate in mutual-help groups, little is known about how religious practices influence youth 12-step engagement and outcomes. This study examined the relationships among lifetime religiosity, during-treatment 12-step participation, and outcomes among adolescents, and tested whether any observed beneficial relation between higher religiosity and outcome could be explained by increased 12-step participation. Method: Adolescents (n = 195; 52% female, ages 14–18) court-referred to a 2-month residential treatment were assessed at intake and discharge. Lifetime religiosity was assessed with the Religious Background and Behaviors Questionnaire; 12-step assessments measured meeting attendance, step work (General Alcoholics Anonymous Tools of Recovery), and Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)/Narcotics Anonymous (NA)-related helping. Substance-related outcomes and psychosocial outcomes were assessed with toxicology screens, the Adolescent–Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale, the Children's Global Assessment Scale, and the Narcissistic Personality Inventory. Results: Greater lifetime formal religious practices at intake were associated with increased step work and AA/NA-related helping during treatment, which in turn were linked to improved substance outcomes, global functioning, and reduced narcissistic entitlement. Increased step work mediated the effect of religious practices on increased abstinence, whereas AA/NA-related helping mediated the effect of religiosity on reduced craving and entitlement. Conclusions: Findings extend the evidence for the protective effects of lifetime religious behaviors to an improved treatment response among adolescents and provide preliminary support for the 12-step proposition that helping others in recovery may lead to better outcomes. Youth with low or

  7. Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Hensen, Danielle L.

    2008-01-01

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of 238Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; keff is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (keff = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  8. Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2007-08-01

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  9. Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Hensen, Danielle L.

    2008-01-21

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  10. Rotordynamic coefficients for stepped labyrinth gas seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharrer, Joseph K.

    1989-01-01

    The basic equations are derived for compressible flow in a stepped labyrinth gas seal. The flow is assumed to be completely turbulent in the circumferential direction where the friction factor is determined by the Blasius relation. Linearized zeroth and first-order perturbation equations are developed for small motion about a centered position by an expansion in the eccentricity ratio. The zeroth-order pressure distribution is found by satisfying the leakage equation while the circumferential velocity distribution is determined by satisfying the momentum equations. The first order equations are solved by a separation of variables solution. Integration of the resultant pressure distribution along and around the seal defines the reaction force developed by the seal and the corresponding dynamic coefficients. The results of this analysis are presented in the form of a parametric study, since there are no known experimental data for the rotordynamic coefficients of stepped labyrinth gas seals. The parametric study investigates the relative rotordynamic stability of convergent, straight and divergent stepped labyrinth gas seals. The results show that, generally, the divergent seal is more stable, rotordynamically, than the straight or convergent seals. The results also show that the teeth-on-stator seals are not always more stable, rotordynamically, then the teeth-on-rotor seals as was shown by experiment by Childs and Scharrer (1986b) for a 15 tooth seal.

  11. Walking to meet physical activity guidelines in knee osteoarthritis: Is 10,000 steps enough?

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel K.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Felson, David T.; Gross, K. Doug; Niu, Jingbo; Nevitt, Michael; Lewis, Cora E.; Torner, James; Neogi, Tuhina

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study if step goals (e.g. walking 10,000 steps/day) approximate meeting 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans among adults with or at high risk of knee OA. Design Cross-sectional observational cohort Setting Community Participants People with or at high risk of knee OA Interventions None Main Outcome Measures Objective physical activity data were collected over 7 consecutive days from people with or at high risk of knee (OA) participating in the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study. Using activity monitor data, we determined the proportion that 1) walked ≥10,000 steps/day, 2) met the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines, and 3) achieved both recommendations. Results Of 1788 subjects studied (age 67 ± 8 yrs, BMI 31 ± 6 kg/m2, 60% women), 16.7% of men and 12.6% of women walked ≥10,000 steps/day, while 6% of men and 5% of women met the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Of those walking ≥10,000 steps/day, 16.7% and 26.7% of men and women also met the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines. Conclusions Among this sample of older adults with or at high risk of knee OA, walking ≥10,000 steps/day did not translate into meeting public health guidelines. These findings highlight the disparity between number of steps/day believed to be needed and recommended time-intensity guidelines to achieve positive health benefits. PMID:23228625

  12. Seasonal variation in the distribution of daily stepping in 11-13 year old school children

    PubMed Central

    McCrorie, P.R.W.; Duncan, E.; Granat, M.H.; Stansfield, B.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Seasonality studies in adolescent’s physical activity (PA) tend to report total PA (e.g. steps/day) rather than more specific detail such as steps/hour. This study compared the detailed changes in PA between seasons. Methods Thirty three adolescents (baseline age 12.2 ± 0.3y) wore the activPAL activity monitor for 8 days on two occasions. Results Steps/day were higher in summer (Mdn = 12,879) than winter (Mdn = 10,512), p<.001. Steps/hour were significantly higher in summer compared to winter between 17:00 and 21:00 (p<. 044). No steps/day differences were found between boys and girls at either time point (p>.05), however, boys had significantly higher step counts in summer between ’13:00-14:00’ (p=.023), ’19:00-20:00’ (p=.032) and ‘20:00-21:00’ (p=.023). Conclusion Total steps/day masked sex differences within specific hours of the day, particularly evening times. Detailed daily patterns of PA are required to fully understand differences between sexes and across seasons. PMID:26550098

  13. An accelerated step test to assess dancer pre-season aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Shaw; Rakov, Sara

    2014-03-01

    As the technical performance demands of dance increase, professional companies and pre-professional schools are implementing pre-season screenings that require an efficient, cost effective way to measure dancer aerobic fitness. The aim of this study was to assess an accelerated 3-minute step test (112 beats·min(-1)) by comparing it to the well-studied YMCA step test (96 beats·min(-1)) and a benchmark standard, an incremental treadmill test, using heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) as variables. Twenty-six professional and pre- professional dancers (age 20 ± 2.02 years) were fitted with a telemetric gas analysis system and HR monitor. They were tested in the following order: 96 step, 112 step, and treadmill test, with rest to return to baseline heart rate between each test. The step and treadmill tests were compared using Intra-class Correlation Coefficients [ICC (3, k)] calculated with analysis of variance (p < 0.05). To determine whether there was a relationship between peak and recovery HR (HRpeak, HRrecov) and VO2(VO2peak, VO2recov) variables, Pearson product moment correlations were used. Differences due to gender or group (pre- professionals versus professionals) were explored with MANOVAs for HRpeak, VO2peak, HRrecov, VO2recov, and fitness category. The 112 step test produced higher HRpeak and VO2peak values than the 96 step test, reflecting a greater workload (p < 0.001). For HRpeak, there were high correlations (r = 0.71) and for HRrecov, moderate correlations (r = 0.60) between the 112 step test and treadmill test. For VO2peak and VO2recov, there were moderate correlations between the 112 step test and treadmill test (r = 0.65 and 0.73). No differences between genders for VO2peak values were found for either step test, but males displayed lower HRpeak values for both step tests and higher VO2peak values during the treadmill test (p < 0.001). Recovery HR was lower in males for the 96 and 112 step tests (p < 0.05). This was reflected in higher

  14. Follow These Step-by-Step Instructions to Prevent Avoidable Tumbles at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pater, Robert; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Almost a quarter of disabling work injuries among school employees are caused by slips and falls. Outlines prevention steps and safety programs that can help lower the possibilities of accidents from falls in schools. (MD)

  15. Atomic diffusion on vicinal surfaces: step roughening impact on step permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranguelov, B.; Michailov, M.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of mass transport in material science for systems with reduced dimensionality holds special academic and technological attention since the fine diffusion control of adatoms could initiate exotic nanoscale patterning at epitaxial interfaces. The present study brings out important details of the atomic diffusion mechanisms on vicinal surfaces, accounting for the subtle competition between an external field imposed on the migrating adatoms and the roughening of the steps bordering the atomic terraces. The computational model reveals a temperature gap for breakdown of step permeability in the vicinity of the step roughening transition and sheds light on recently observed experimental results for atomic step dynamics on Si surfaces. The present study also demonstrates the extended capability of atomistic models in computer simulations to unravel simultaneous effects, to distinguish between them, and finally to assess their specific contribution to experimentally observed complex physical phenomena.

  16. Introduction: Childhood implications of parental aging.

    PubMed

    Cedars, Marcelle I

    2015-06-01

    Men and women are increasingly delaying childbearing to the late 30s, the 40s and beyond. The implications of this societal change on childhood health and well-being have only recently been a focus of research. There are known increased perinatal risks associated with increasing maternal age, while paternal age seems to have a potentially greater negative impact on childhood health. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the aging of sperm and eggs, and how these changes impact offspring, is a critical next step as we work to help patients build healthy families. PMID:25936233

  17. Tangible Steps Toward Tomorrow: New Designs for Early Education, Ages 0-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This publication, developed by W.K. Kellogg Foundation in collaboration with IDEO, details a human-centered approach to evolving the system of early education for the needs and possibilities of the 21st century. It provides a set of ideas or "thought-starters" on transforming early education to ensure school readiness and success for the next…

  18. Heart Rate Response to a Modified Harvard Step Test: Males and Females, Age 10-69

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoye, Henry J.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Study supported by the Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Michigan, under Grant HE-6378 (National Heart Institute, U.S. Public Health Service) and Grant CD-00246 (U.S. Public Health Service).

  19. Age Prejudice of 'Act Your Age.'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponzo, Zander

    1978-01-01

    Many life-style decisions are often adversely influenced by prejudicial attitudes, norms, and laws about age. The relationship between ways of thinking about developmental tasks and age prejudice is discussed. (Author)

  20. Development and validation of an automated step ergometer.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Maria do Socorro C; Aniceto, Rodrigo R; Neto, Gabriel R; de Araújo, Ravi C T; de Sousa, Juliana B C; Costa, José A D; Pellegrinotti, Idico L

    2014-09-29

    Laboratory ergometers have high costs, becoming inaccessible for most of the population, hence, it is imperative to develop affordable devices making evaluations like cardiorespiratory fitness feasible and easier. The objective of this study was to develop and validate an Automated Step Ergometer (ASE), adjusted according to the height of the subject, for predicting VO2max through a progressive test. The development process was comprised by three steps, the theoretical part, the prototype assembly and further validation. The ASE consists in an elevating platform that makes the step at a higher or lower level as required for testing. The ASE validation was obtained by comparing the values of predicted VO2max (equation) and direct gas analysis on the prototype and on a, treadmill. For the validation process 167 subjects with average age of 31.24 ± 14.38 years, of both genders and different degrees of cardiorespiratory fitness, were randomized and divided by gender and training condition, into untrained (n=106), active (n=24) and trained (n=37) subjects. Each participant performed a progressive test on which the ASE started at the same height (20 cm) for all. Then, according to the subject's height, it varied to a maximum of 45 cm. Time in each stage and rhythm was chosen in accordance with training condition from lowest to highest (60-180 s; 116-160 bpm, respectively). Data was compared with the student's t test and ANOVA; correlations were tested with Pearson's r. The value of α was set at 0.05. No differences were found between the predicted VO2max and the direct gas analysis VO2max, nor between the ASE and treadmill VO2max (p= 0.365) with high correlation between ergometers (r= 0.974). The values for repeatability, reproducibility, and reliability of male and female groups measures were, respectively, 4.08 and 5.02; 0.50 and 1.11; 4.11 and 5.15. The values of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) among measures were all >0.90. It was verified that the ASE

  1. Development and Validation of an Automated Step Ergometer

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Maria do Socorro C.; Aniceto, Rodrigo R.; Neto, Gabriel R.; de Araújo, Ravi C. T.; de Sousa, Juliana B. C.; Costa, José A. D.; Pellegrinotti, Idico L.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory ergometers have high costs, becoming inaccessible for most of the population, hence, it is imperative to develop affordable devices making evaluations like cardiorespiratory fitness feasible and easier. The objective of this study was to develop and validate an Automated Step Ergometer (ASE), adjusted according to the height of the subject, for predicting VO2max through a progressive test. The development process was comprised by three steps, the theoretical part, the prototype assembly and further validation. The ASE consists in an elevating platform that makes the step at a higher or lower level as required for testing. The ASE validation was obtained by comparing the values of predicted VO2max (equation) and direct gas analysis on the prototype and on a, treadmill. For the validation process 167 subjects with average age of 31.24 ± 14.38 years, of both genders and different degrees of cardiorespiratory fitness, were randomized and divided by gender and training condition, into untrained (n=106), active (n=24) and trained (n=37) subjects. Each participant performed a progressive test on which the ASE started at the same height (20 cm) for all. Then, according to the subject’s height, it varied to a maximum of 45 cm. Time in each stage and rhythm was chosen in accordance with training condition from lowest to highest (60–180 s; 116–160 bpm, respectively). Data was compared with the student’s t test and ANOVA; correlations were tested with Pearson’s r. The value of α was set at 0.05. No differences were found between the predicted VO2max and the direct gas analysis VO2max, nor between the ASE and treadmill VO2max (p= 0.365) with high correlation between ergometers (r= 0.974). The values for repeatability, reproducibility, and reliability of male and female groups measures were, respectively, 4.08 and 5.02; 0.50 and 1.11; 4.11 and 5.15. The values of internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) among measures were all >0.90. It was verified that

  2. [The next step for population policies].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Acevedo, G

    1998-01-01

    In modern and postmodern societies, age has been transformed into a symbol of isolation, sadness, poverty, physical and mental inactivity, and economic and emotional burden for families, societies, and nations. Humanity has struggled to postpone death through medical advances and greater life expectancy. Declines in mortality and fertility lead inexorably to demographic aging. In Mexico, as in many other societies, poverty is concentrated at the beginning and end of life. While it has undeniably been an achievement to add years to life, social and cultural changes in response to demographic aging and greater life expectancy have not occurred. The additional years have not been accompanied by social actions that provide the elderly with a dignified and tranquil life free from want. In 1965, Mexico's population over 65 years of age was 1.7 million, accounting for 4.6% of the population, life expectancy was 57.9 years, and the total fertility rate was 6.9. In 1995, 4.4% of the population was over 65 years of age and the total fertility rate was 2.8. By 2030, a projected 17 million, or 13.1%, will be over 65 years old. The future demographic profile is the result of societal desires for better health, longer life, and fewer children living in better circumstances. The great challenge of the next century will be to create strategies, policies, and programs to attend to population aging. Collective awareness must be created of the material and other needs of the elderly, and the sociopolitical system must adapt in response.

  3. Old age psychiatry in the modern age.

    PubMed

    Warner, James P

    2015-11-01

    Old age psychiatry services globally are under threat. The discipline enjoyed its heyday in the two decades bridging the millennium. More recently there has been a move to integrate old age services with those of working age adults, to create 'ageless' services. Evidence is beginning to accumulate that this is a bad idea.

  4. Avoiding Aging? Social Psychology's Treatment of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Anne E.; Redmond, Rebecca; von Rohr, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Population aging, in conjunction with social and cultural transformations of the life course, has profound implications for social systems--from large-scale structures to micro-level processes. However, much of sociology remains fairly quiet on issues of age and aging, including the subfield of social psychology that could illuminate the impact of…

  5. Stepping stones toward global space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.; McKay, C.

    2011-06-01

    Several nations are currently engaging in or planning for robotic and human space exploration programs that target the Moon, Mars and near-Earth asteroids. These ambitious plans to build new space infrastructures, transport systems and space probes will require international cooperation if they are to be sustainable and affordable. Partnerships must involve not only established space powers, but also emerging space nations and developing countries; the participation of these new space actors will provide a bottom-up support structure that will aid program continuity, generate more active members in the space community, and increase public awareness of space activities in both developed and developing countries. The integration of many stakeholders into a global space exploration program represents a crucial element securing political and programmatic stability. How can the evolving space community learn to cooperate on a truly international level while engaging emerging space nations and developing countries in a meaningful way? We propose a stepping stone approach toward a global space exploration program, featuring three major elements: (1) an international Earth-based field research program preparing for planetary exploration, (2) enhanced exploitation of the International Space Station (ISS) enabling exploration and (3) a worldwide CubeSat program supporting exploration. An international Earth-based field research program can serve as a truly global exploration testbed that allows both established and new space actors to gain valuable experience by working together to prepare for future planetary exploration missions. Securing greater exploitation of the ISS is a logical step during its prolonged lifetime; ISS experiments, partnerships and legal frameworks are valuable foundations for exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Cooperation involving small, low-cost missions could be a major stride toward exciting and meaningful participation from emerging space nations

  6. Step tracking program for concentrator solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, D.; Jaliu, C.

    2016-08-01

    The increasing living standards in developed countries lead to increased energy consumption. The fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas effect that accompany the energy production can be reduced by using renewable energy. For instance, the solar thermal systems can be used in temperate climates to provide heating during the transient period or cooling during the warmer months. Most used solar thermal systems contain flat plate solar collectors. In order to provide the necessary energy for the house cooling system, the cooling machine uses a working fluid with a high temperature, which can be supplied by dish concentrator collectors. These collectors are continuously rotated towards sun by biaxial tracking systems, process that increases the consumed power. An algorithm for a step tracking program to be used in the orientation of parabolic dish concentrator collectors is proposed in the paper to reduce the consumed power due to actuation. The algorithm is exemplified on a case study: a dish concentrator collector to be implemented in Brasov, Romania, a location with the turbidity factor TR equal to 3. The size of the system is imposed by the environment, the diameter of the dish reflector being of 3 meters. By applying the proposed algorithm, 60 sub-programs are obtained for the step orientation of the parabolic dish collector over the year. Based on the results of the numerical simulations for the step orientation, the efficiency of the direct solar radiation capture on the receptor is up to 99%, while the energy consumption is reduced by almost 80% compared to the continuous actuation of the concentrator solar collector.

  7. Test-mass material selection for STEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaser, J. P.

    1996-11-01

    This is a report on the work done of a rather informal working group set up during the Phase A studies to suggest suitable materials for the test masses of the differential accelerometers for the ESA STEP-M3 mission. The most important work was done regarding theory by Thibault Damour (IHES, Paris) and for test-mass design by Nick Lockerbie (Strathclyde University, UK). Valuable ideas contributed by T Quinn, P Fayet, H J Paik, A Bernard and P Touboul are acknowledged.

  8. Lanczos steps to improve variational wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becca, Federico; Hu, Wen-Jun; Iqbal, Yasir; Parola, Alberto; Poilblanc, Didier; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-09-01

    Gutzwiller-projected fermionic states can be efficiently implemented within quantum Monte Carlo calculations to define extremely accurate variational wave functions for Heisenberg models on frustrated two-dimensional lattices, not only for the ground state but also for low-energy excitations. The application of few Lanczos steps on top of these states further improves their accuracy, allowing calculations on large clusters. In addition, by computing both the energy and its variance, it is possible to obtain reliable estimations of exact results. Here, we report the cases of the frustrated Heisenberg models on square and Kagome lattices.

  9. Self-Advancing Step-Tap Drills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Donald R.; Camarda, Charles J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Franklin, Larry D.

    2007-01-01

    Self-advancing tool bits that are hybrids of drills and stepped taps make it possible to form threaded holes wider than about 1/2 in. (about 13 mm) without applying any more axial force than is necessary for forming narrower pilot holes. These self-advancing stepped-tap drills were invented for use by space-suited astronauts performing repairs on reinforced carbon/carbon space-shuttle leading edges during space walks, in which the ability to apply axial drilling forces is severely limited. Self-advancing stepped-tap drills could also be used on Earth for making wide holes without applying large axial forces. A self-advancing stepped-tap drill (see figure) includes several sections having progressively larger diameters, typically in increments between 0.030 and 0.060 in. (between about 0.8 and about 1.5 mm). The tip section, which is the narrowest, is a pilot drill bit that typically has a diameter between 1/8 and 3/16 in. (between about 3.2 and about 4.8 mm). The length of the pilot-drill section is chosen, according to the thickness of the object to be drilled and tapped, so that the pilot hole is completed before engagement of the first tap section. Provided that the cutting-edge geometry of the drill bit is optimized for the material to be drilled, only a relatively small axial force [typically of the order of a few pounds (of the order of 10 newtons)] must be applied during drilling of the pilot hole. Once the first tap section engages the pilot hole, it is no longer necessary for the drill operator to apply axial force: the thread engagement between the tap and the workpiece provides the axial force to advance the tool bit. Like the pilot-drill section, each tap section must be long enough to complete its hole before engagement of the next, slightly wider tap section. The precise values of the increments in diameter, the thread pitch, the rake angle of the tap cutting edge, and other geometric parameters of the tap sections must be chosen, in consideration of

  10. One-step microwave foaming and curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.; Lee, R.; Sorathia, U. A. K.; Wilcoxson, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Process that combines microwave foaming and curing of polyimide precursors in single step produces fire-resistant foam slabs of much larger volume than has previously been possible. By adding selected conductive fillers to powder precursors and by using high-power microwave oven, foam slabs with dimensions in excess of 61 by 61 by 7.6 cm are made. Typical foaming and curing and curing time is 35 minutes in microwave oven with additional 1 to 2 hour postcure in conventional oven.

  11. The Multipole Structure of Earth's STEP Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordtvedt, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    If there is an interaction in physical law which differentially accelerates the test bodies in a STEP satellite, then the di.erent elements that compose the Earth will most likely have source strengths for this interaction which are not proportional to their mass densities. The rotational flattening of Earth and geographical irregularities of our planet's crust then produces a multipole structure for the Equivalence Principle violating force field which differs from the multipole structure of Earth's ordinary gravity field. Measuring these differences yields key information about the new interaction in physical law which is not attainable by solely measuring differences of test body accelerations.

  12. 5 CFR 531.503 - Purpose of quality step increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose of quality step increases. 531... PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Quality Step Increases § 531.503 Purpose of quality step increases. The purpose of quality step increases is to provide appropriate incentives and recognition for excellence...

  13. 36 CFR 1192.99 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds... Commuter Rail Cars and Systems § 1192.99 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step... shall be slip-resistant. (b) All thresholds and step edges shall have a band of color(s) running...

  14. 48 CFR 14.503-2 - Step two.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Step two. 14.503-2 Section... AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Two-Step Sealed Bidding 14.503-2 Step two. (a) Sealed bidding... submitting acceptable technical proposals in step one; (2) Include the provision prescribed in...

  15. 5 CFR 531.503 - Purpose of quality step increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Purpose of quality step increases. 531... PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Quality Step Increases § 531.503 Purpose of quality step increases. The purpose of quality step increases is to provide appropriate incentives and recognition for excellence...

  16. 48 CFR 14.503-1 - Step one.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Step one. 14.503-1 Section... AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Two-Step Sealed Bidding 14.503-1 Step one. (a) Requests for... use the two step method. (3) The requirements of the technical proposal. (4) The evaluation...

  17. 36 CFR 1192.25 - Doors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Doors, steps and thresholds... Buses, Vans and Systems § 1192.25 Doors, steps and thresholds. (a) Slip resistance. All aisles, steps...) Contrast. All step edges, thresholds, and the boarding edge of ramps or lift platforms shall have a band...

  18. 48 CFR 14.503-2 - Step two.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Step two. 14.503-2 Section... AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Two-Step Sealed Bidding 14.503-2 Step two. (a) Sealed bidding... submitting acceptable technical proposals in step one; (2) Include the provision prescribed in...

  19. 48 CFR 14.503-1 - Step one.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Step one. 14.503-1 Section... AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Two-Step Sealed Bidding 14.503-1 Step one. (a) Requests for... use the two step method. (3) The requirements of the technical proposal. (4) The evaluation...

  20. 36 CFR 1192.99 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds... Commuter Rail Cars and Systems § 1192.99 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step... shall be slip-resistant. (b) All thresholds and step edges shall have a band of color(s) running...

  1. 36 CFR 1192.25 - Doors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Doors, steps and thresholds... Buses, Vans and Systems § 1192.25 Doors, steps and thresholds. (a) Slip resistance. All aisles, steps...) Contrast. All step edges, thresholds, and the boarding edge of ramps or lift platforms shall have a band...

  2. 40 CFR 35.909 - Step 2+3 grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.909 Step 2+3 grants. (a) Authority... design (step 2) and construction (step 3) of a waste water treatment works. (b) Limitations. The Regional... disaggregations thereof); (2) The treatment works has an estimated total step 3 construction cost of $2 million...

  3. 40 CFR 35.909 - Step 2+3 grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.909 Step 2+3 grants. (a) Authority... design (step 2) and construction (step 3) of a waste water treatment works. (b) Limitations. The Regional... disaggregations thereof); (2) The treatment works has an estimated total step 3 construction cost of $2 million...

  4. 40 CFR 35.909 - Step 2+3 grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.909 Step 2+3 grants. (a) Authority... design (step 2) and construction (step 3) of a waste water treatment works. (b) Limitations. The Regional... disaggregations thereof); (2) The treatment works has an estimated total step 3 construction cost of $2 million...

  5. A Step or Two Back in Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Peggy

    1979-01-01

    Describes the National Park Service's Environmental Living Program for elementary school children in the San Francisco Bay Area, where teachers, parents, and children stay overnight in a historic fort and schooner, experience living in a past age, use candles and oil stoves, and engage in mock military and shipboard activities. (MF)

  6. Lamin A, farnesylation and aging

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear envelope that is synthesized as a precursor prelamin A molecule and then processed into mature lamin A through sequential steps of posttranslational modifications and proteolytic cleavages. Remarkably, over 400 distinct point mutations have been so far identified throughout the LMNA gene, which result in the development of at least ten distinct human disorders, collectively known as laminopathies, among which is the premature aging disease Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). The majority of HGPS cases are associated with a single point mutation in the LMNA gene that causes the production of a permanently farnesylated mutant lamin A protein termed progerin. The mechanism by which progerin leads to premature aging and the classical HGPS disease phenotype as well as the relationship between this disorder and the onset of analogous symptoms during the lifespan of a normal individual are not well understood. Yet, recent studies have provided critical insights on the cellular processes that are affected by accumulation of progerin and have suggested that cellular alterations in the lamin A processing pathway leading to the accumulation of farnesylated prelamin A intermediates may play a role in the aging process in the general population. In this review we provide a short background on lamin A and its maturation pathway and discuss the current knowledge of how progerin or alterations in the prelamin A processing pathway are thought to influence cell function and contribute to human aging. PMID:21871450

  7. Lamin A, farnesylation and aging

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear envelope that is synthesized as a precursor prelamin A molecule and then processed into mature lamin A through sequential steps of posttranslational modifications and proteolytic cleavages. Remarkably, over 400 distinct point mutations have been so far identified throughout the LMNA gene, which result in the development of at least ten distinct human disorders, collectively known as laminopathies, among which is the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). The majority of HGPS cases are associated with a single point mutation in the LMNA gene that causes the production of a permanently farnesylated mutant lamin A protein termed progerin. The mechanism by which progerin leads to premature aging and the classical HGPS disease phenotype as well as the relationship between this disorder and the onset of analogous symptoms during the lifespan of a normal individual are not well understood. Yet, recent studies have provided critical insights on the cellular processes that are affected by accumulation of progerin and have suggested that cellular alterations in the lamin A processing pathway leading to the accumulation of farnesylated prelamin A intermediates may play a role in the aging process in the general population. In this review we provide a short background on lamin A and its maturation pathway and discuss the current knowledge of how progerin or alterations in the prelamin A processing pathway are thought to influence cell function and contribute to human aging.

  8. [Qualitative analysis: theory, steps and reliability].

    PubMed

    Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza

    2012-03-01

    This essay seeks to conduct in-depth analysis of qualitative research, based on benchmark authors and the author's own experience. The hypothesis is that in order for an analysis to be considered reliable, it needs to be based on structuring terms of qualitative research, namely the verbs 'comprehend' and 'interpret', and the nouns 'experience', 'common sense' and 'social action'. The 10 steps begin with the construction of the scientific object by its inclusion on the national and international agenda; the development of tools that make the theoretical concepts tangible; conducting field work that involves the researcher empathetically with the participants in the use of various techniques and approaches, making it possible to build relationships, observations and a narrative with perspective. Finally, the author deals with the analysis proper, showing how the object, which has already been studied in all the previous steps, should become a second-order construct, in which the logic of the actors in their diversity and not merely their speech predominates. The final report must be a theoretic, contextual, concise and clear narrative.

  9. A step towards an autonomous planetary rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabideau, Gregg; Chien, Steve; Backes, Paul; Chalfant, Gene; Tso, Kam

    1999-01-01

    Recently, significant advances have been made in enabling autonomous rovers and robotic vehicles. Current robotic vehicles employ significant elements of autonomy in their low-level operations and control. A further important step is the integration of high-level intelligent systems with autonomous rover control architectures. In this paper, we describe the integration of two software systems: ASPEN (Automated Scheduling and Planning ENvironment) and WITS (Web Interface for TeleScience). WITS provides a high-level graphical interface to Rocky7, an experimental rover developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Using WITS, a user can naturally specify science activities and locations using actual images of the rover's environment. ASPEN accepts the science goals input using WITS, reasons about the low-level activities and resources required to achieve these goals, and generates the executable sequence to enable achievement of the requested goals. Future steps would include a migration of this software to the rover itself, allowing the rover to schedule its own activities, and thus behave more autonomously.

  10. Next Step Spherical Torus Design Studies

    SciTech Connect

    C. Neumeyer; P. Heitzenroeder; C. Kessel; M. Ono; M. Peng; J. Schmidt; R. Woolley; I. Zatz

    2002-11-08

    Studies are underway to identify and characterize a design point for a Next Step Spherical Torus (NSST) experiment. This would be a ''Proof of Performance'' device which would follow and build upon the successes of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) a ''Proof of Principle'' device which has operated at PPPL since 1999. With the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) nearly completed, the TFTR test cell and facility will soon be available for a device such as NSST. By utilizing the TFTR test cell, NSST can be constructed for a relatively low cost on a short time scale. In addition, while furthering spherical torus (ST) research, this device could achieve modest fusion power gain for short-pulse lengths, a significant step toward future large burning plasma devices now under discussion in the fusion community. The selected design point is Q=2 at HH=1.4, P subscript ''fusion''=60 MW, 5 second pulse, with R subscript ''0''=1.5 m, A=1.6, I subscript ''p''=10vMA, B subscript ''t''=2.6 T, CS flux=16 weber. Most of the research would be conducted in D-D, with a limited D-T campaign during the last years of the program.

  11. Characteristic Age and True Age of Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Long; Zhang, Cheng-Min; Tanni, Ali; Zhao, Hai-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Age of a pulsar is a useful parameter, but it is difficult to get the age from observation. We can only derive the characteristic age from the observed parameters: spin period (P) and period derivative (Ṗ). In this paper, we discussed the relationship between characteristic age and magnetic field of a pulsar. Monte Carlo simulation is also used to support the idea: it is useless to study the magnetic field evolution using characteristic age. From some observation evidences we get that: the characteristic age cannot be used as true age, especially for millisecond pulsar (MSP). The difference between them is also discussed. From the studying of breaking index and MSP's initial spin period (P0), we get the conclusion that: the problem cannot be resolved using different radiation models.

  12. Experiments on the formation carbonate "cyclic steps" as a model of travertine step-pool morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitanishi, Tatsuya; Yokokawa, Miwa; Kim, Wonsuck; Izumi, Norihiro; Parker, Gary

    2014-05-01

    A train of steps similar to those observed on the river bed and the ocean floor are sometimes observed on the limestone surface as well. Those cyclic steps are not formed by the interaction between sediment and flow, but formed by boundary instability between flowing water and a limestone substrate associated with precipitation and solution of limestone due to chemical and biological processes. It is suggested that they correspond to "cyclic steps" or "step-pool" morphology observed at the interface between fluid flow and the transportational and/or erosional substrates, such as sand and gravels and/or bedrock repectively, formed by deposition and erosion at the upper-flow regime in the Froude sense. Although field observations of the limestone step configuration are widely known, there have been very few theoretical and experimental study for the formative condition and mechanism of these carbonate steps with flowing fluid. Here we operated flume experiments on the formation of carbonate steps by the precipitation from the flowing fluid. We used a 1.8 m long, 5 cm deep and 2 cm wide flume made of acrylic boards at Osaka Institute of Technology. To give some roughness at the bottom of the flume we pasted the mixture of the acrylic adhesive and sand, 0.2 mm in diameter. To make the "source water" of the experiments, we immerse limestone pebbles into the distilled water, and add the Carbon dioxide by letting dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) melt in it aiming to dissolve the limestone. In addition, we add the powder of Calcium hydroxide to the source water. The source water was input from the upstream end of the flume and recircurated into the tank of the source water. The values of pH and electric conductivity and the temperature of the source water were monitored, and dry ice, the powder of the calcium hydroxide and the distilled water were added arbitrary to keep the quality of the source water constant. The running time for each day was about 6-7 hours. From about

  13. Skin Care and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Age Spots and Skin Tags Click for more information Age spots, once called "liver spots," are flat, brown ... surface. They are a common occurrence as people age, especially for women. They are ... options, specific conditions, and related issues. ...

  14. Exercise and age

    MedlinePlus

    Age and exercise ... to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry if you have never exercised, ... things you enjoy and stay independent as you age. The right kind of regular exercise can also ...

  15. Whole-Rock 40Ar/39Ar Step-heating Analyses, Problems and Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, M.; Heizler, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.; Warren, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    Whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials are used to constrain the impact history of the inner solar system, the formation age of the Moon, and timing of paleomagnetic fields. Despite the importance of knowing the timing of these important events, the samples we have in hand are usually disturbed through mixing, (multiple?) impact events, and perhaps recoil loss. Extra-terrestrial 40Ar/39Ar data are typically interpreted through the assignment of essentially arbitrary plateau ages rather than through a robust physical model. Although the use of models capable of quantitatively assessing diffusive 40Ar* loss in extra-terrestrial samples has been around for nearly 50 years, this early advance has been widely ignored. Here we present implications of applying a robust, multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model to step-heated 40Ar/39Ar data, with temperature cycling. Our findings show that for even a single heating event, "plateau" ages are unlikely to record meaningful ages. Further, if the sample has experienced multiple heating events or contains inherited clasts, recovering a unique solution may be impossible. Indeed the most readily interpretable portion of the age spectrum is the early heating steps which represents a maximum age estimate of the last re-heating event. Our results challenge the chronologic validity of 40Ar/39Ar "plateau" ages and by extension the hypotheses that are based on this data (e.g., the Late Heavy Bombardment). Future work will require new analytical procedures, interpretative frameworks, and (potentially) the combination of multiple chronometers to derive a robust impact history for the early solar system.

  16. Nutrients, Microglia Aging, and Brain Aging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhou; Yu, Janchun; Zhu, Aiqin; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    As the life expectancy continues to increase, the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) becomes a big major issue in the world. After cellular activation upon systemic inflammation, microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, start to release proinflammatory mediators to trigger neuroinflammation. We have found that chronic systemic inflammatory challenges induce differential age-dependent microglial responses, which are in line with the impairment of learning and memory, even in middle-aged animals. We thus raise the concept of "microglia aging." This concept is based on the fact that microglia are the key contributor to the acceleration of cognitive decline, which is the major sign of brain aging. On the other hand, inflammation induces oxidative stress and DNA damage, which leads to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species by the numerous types of cells, including macrophages and microglia. Oxidative stress-damaged cells successively produce larger amounts of inflammatory mediators to promote microglia aging. Nutrients are necessary for maintaining general health, including the health of brain. The intake of antioxidant nutrients reduces both systemic inflammation and neuroinflammation and thus reduces cognitive decline during aging. We herein review our microglia aging concept and discuss systemic inflammation and microglia aging. We propose that a nutritional approach to controlling microglia aging will open a new window for healthy brain aging. PMID:26941889

  17. Climbing a ladder: a step-by-step approach to understanding the concept of agroecosystem health.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, I; Albizu, I; Amezaga, I; Onaindia, M; Buchner, V; Garbisu, C

    2004-01-01

    Population and individual health is linked to agroecosystem health. To comprehend the concept of agroecosystem health, one should climb a ladder consisting of several successive steps, each rung presenting a certain degree of instability (conceptual difficulty and uncertainty) in an advisable but not inevitable order. Here we suggest a ladder consisting of the following concepts: ecosystem, agroecosystem, biodiversity, sustainability, ecosystem health, and agroecosystem health. Although these concepts are to a certain extent well understood and grasped by scientists, politicians, natural resource managers, and environmentalists, some steps are still highly debatable, unclear, and present a considerable degree of reluctance to be defined and understood. Consequently, much empirical and theoretical effort must be made to construct solid conceptual ladders made up of such steps. In this enterprise, a traditional reductionistic approach confining interpretations to narrow scientific disciplines is unadvisable. Holistic, transdisciplinary approaches are required to reach the desired goal.

  18. "STEPS" Avionics for Exploration Systems the Achieved Results and the Next "STEPS-2"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Andrea; Perino, Maria Antonietta; Gaia, Enrico; Paccagnini, Carlo

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents the STEPS project reached results in the avionics domains like: vision-based GNC for Mars Descent & Landing, Hazard avoidance and complete spacecraft autonomy; Autonomous Rover Navigation, based on perception, 3D map reconstruction and path planning; Mobility & Mechanisms providing an Integrated Ground Mobility System, Rendezvous & Docking equipment, and protection from Environment effects; Human-machine interface features of a predictive Command and Control System;; novel Design & Development Tools, such as a Rover S/W simulator and prototypes of the DEM viewer and of a S/W Rock Creator/visualizator. This paper presents also the STEPS 2 project that started January 2013 and is aimed at improving the development of the most promising technologies, selected from the results of the first STEP phase, and addressing the needs of the exploration missions as defined in the 2012 ministerial conference, with the ultimate goal of an in-flight validation within next five years.

  19. Step-by-step mandibular reconstruction with free fibula flap modelling.

    PubMed

    Pellini, R; Mercante, G; Spriano, G

    2012-12-01

    The functional and aesthetic outcomes after segmental mandibular resection are closely related to the technique used during mandibular reconstruction with bone graft. The fibula free flap approach allows the possibility of using bone with/without skin for restoring the defect. Here, we aimed to establish the preplating technique for oromandibular reconstruction in a step-by-step fashion, based on 41 patients. The surgical technique is expounded in 8-10 steps. Preplating, plate removal, resection, replating, template modelling, contouring and fixation of the fibula represent the key points of the procedure. In this report, we show that the preplating and template modelling method is easy, does not incur extra costs and can be successfully used for mandibular reconstruction with bone graft. Functional and aesthetic results confirm the feasibility and reproducibility of the technique.

  20. Minding Your Metabolism: Can You Avoid Middle-Age Spread?

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Your Plate? Smart Food Choices for Healthy Aging . Exercise and moving are also important. “It doesn’t ... problems that can come with it. NIH’s Go4Life exercise and physical activity campaign is designed especially for ... Steps to Healthy Aging Commit to a healthy diet. Limit snacking. Drink ...

  1. BMI-Referenced Cut Points for Pedometer-Determined Steps per Day in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tudor-Locke, C.; Bassett, D.R.; Rutherford, W.J.; Ainsworth, B.E.; Chan, C.B.; Croteau, K.; Giles-Corti, B.; Le Masurier, G.; Moreau, K.; Mrozek, J.; Oppert, J.-M.; Raustorp, A.; Strath, S.J.; Thompson, D.; Whitt-Glover, M.C.; Wilde, B.; Wojcik, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to establish preliminary criterion-referenced cut points for adult pedometer-determined physical activity (PA) related to weight status defined by body mass index (BMI). Methods Researchers contributed directly measured BMI and pedometer data that had been collected (1) using a Yamax-manufactured pedometer, (2) for a minimum of 3 days, (3) on ostensibly healthy adults. The contrasting groups method was used to identify age- and gender-specific cut points for steps/d related to BMI cut points for normal weight and overweight/obesity (defined as BMI <25 and ≥25 kg/m2, respectively). Results Data included 3127 individuals age 18 to 94 years (976 men, age = 46.8 ± 15.4 years, BMI = 27.3 ± 4.9; 2151 women, age = 47.4 ± 14.9 years, BMI = 27.6 ± 6.4; all gender differences NS). Best estimated cut points for normal versus overweight/obesity ranged from 11,000 to 12,000 steps/d for men and 8000 to 12,000 steps/d for women (consistently higher for younger age groups). Conclusions These steps/d cut points can be used to identify individuals at risk, or the proportion of adults achieving or falling short of set cut points can be reported and compared between populations. Cut points can also be used to set intervention goals, and they can be referred to when evaluating program impact, as well as environmental and policy changes. PMID:18364517

  2. What Is the Need for School-Age Care? Lessons from Two Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, Ami

    In 2001, Arizona's Children's Action Alliance (CCA) developed a resource for community groups interested in exploring the need for care for school-age children. Titled "School-Age Care Tool Kit: A Guide for Measuring Needs in Your Community," the resource provided step-by-step advice to community organizations on how to identify the need for…

  3. On the Existence of Step-To-Step Breakpoint Transitions in Accelerated Sprinting.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Gertjan; McGhie, David; Danielsen, Jørgen; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Haugen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated running is characterised by a continuous change of kinematics from one step to the next. It has been argued that breakpoints in the step-to-step transitions may occur, and that these breakpoints are an essential characteristic of dynamics during accelerated running. We examined this notion by comparing a continuous exponential curve fit (indicating continuity, i.e., smooth transitions) with linear piecewise fitting (indicating breakpoint). We recorded the kinematics of 24 well trained sprinters during a 25 m sprint run with start from competition starting blocks. Kinematic data were collected for 24 anatomical landmarks in 3D, and the location of centre of mass (CoM) was calculated from this data set. The step-to-step development of seven variables (four related to CoM position, and ground contact time, aerial time and step length) were analysed by curve fitting. In most individual sprints (in total, 41 sprints were successfully recorded) no breakpoints were identified for the variables investigated. However, for the mean results (i.e., the mean curve for all athletes) breakpoints were identified for the development of vertical CoM position, angle of acceleration and distance between support surface and CoM. It must be noted that for these variables the exponential fit showed high correlations (r2>0.99). No relationship was found between the occurrences of breakpoints for different variables as investigated using odds ratios (Mantel-Haenszel Chi-square statistic). It is concluded that although breakpoints regularly appear during accelerated running, these are not the rule and thereby unlikely a fundamental characteristic, but more likely an expression of imperfection of performance.

  4. On the Existence of Step-To-Step Breakpoint Transitions in Accelerated Sprinting

    PubMed Central

    McGhie, David; Danielsen, Jørgen; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Haugen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated running is characterised by a continuous change of kinematics from one step to the next. It has been argued that breakpoints in the step-to-step transitions may occur, and that these breakpoints are an essential characteristic of dynamics during accelerated running. We examined this notion by comparing a continuous exponential curve fit (indicating continuity, i.e., smooth transitions) with linear piecewise fitting (indicating breakpoint). We recorded the kinematics of 24 well trained sprinters during a 25 m sprint run with start from competition starting blocks. Kinematic data were collected for 24 anatomical landmarks in 3D, and the location of centre of mass (CoM) was calculated from this data set. The step-to-step development of seven variables (four related to CoM position, and ground contact time, aerial time and step length) were analysed by curve fitting. In most individual sprints (in total, 41 sprints were successfully recorded) no breakpoints were identified for the variables investigated. However, for the mean results (i.e., the mean curve for all athletes) breakpoints were identified for the development of vertical CoM position, angle of acceleration and distance between support surface and CoM. It must be noted that for these variables the exponential fit showed high correlations (r2>0.99). No relationship was found between the occurrences of breakpoints for different variables as investigated using odds ratios (Mantel-Haenszel Chi-square statistic). It is concluded that although breakpoints regularly appear during accelerated running, these are not the rule and thereby unlikely a fundamental characteristic, but more likely an expression of imperfection of performance. PMID:27467387

  5. Stepping back to improve sprint performance: a kinetic analysis of the first step forwards.

    PubMed

    Frost, David M; Cronin, John B

    2011-10-01

    Using a step backward to initiate forward movement can increase force and power at push-off and improve sprint performance over short distances. However, it is not clear whether the benefit provided by this paradoxical step influences the mechanics of the first step forwards. Twenty-seven men of an athletic background performed maximal effort 5-m sprints from a standing start and employed a step forwards (parallel and split stance) or backwards (false) to initiate movement. Each sprint was started with an audio cue that also activated the timing gates. Three trials of each starting style were performed and movement (0 m), 2.5-, and 5-m times were recorded. An in-ground force plate placed at the 0-m mark measured the kinetic and temporal characteristics of the first step. Sprint times to 2.5 and 5 m were slower (p < 0.05) when a parallel start was used. No differences were seen in the normalized peak forces (vertical and horizontal) or the vertical impulse between starts, but the vertical mean force was 11 and 12% higher for the false and split starts, respectively. Surprisingly, the parallel start's impulse was significantly greater than that of the false (24%) and split (22%) styles, a consequence of the additional time spent in contact with the ground. The ground contact time, time to peak force, and time from peak force to toe-off (vertical and horizontal) were significantly longer for the parallel start. These temporal variables were also better correlated with sprint performance than any kinetic measure (0.42 ≤ r ≤ 0.75). The false start appears to be advantageous over short distances by improving push-off and the temporal characteristics of the first step.

  6. Terrace-Width Distributions (TWDs) of Touching Steps: Modification of the Fermion Analogy, with Implications for Measuring Step-Step Interactions on Vicinals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Kim, Kwangmoo

    2010-03-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we computefootnotetextRS, ABH, and TLE, Phys. Rev. B 80 (2009) 153415. the TWDs of surfaces in which steps can touch each other, forming multiple-atomic height steps, but cannot cross (no overhangs), and so inconsistent with the standard mapping to spinless fermions. Our numerical results show that the generalized Wigner distribution, with minor modifications at small step separations, gives a very good fit for TWDs of touching steps. (We also generate analytic results by generalizing results for extended fermions.footnotetextSiew-Ann Cheong and C.L. Henley, arXiv:0907.4228v1.) The interaction strength derived from the fit parameter indicates an effective attraction between steps, weakening the overall repulsion. The strength of this effective attraction decreases for larger mean-step separations and decreasing step-touching energies; describable via finite-size scaling. Hence, accurate extraction of the true repulsion strength requires multiple vicinalities.

  7. Report of 111 Consecutive Patients Enrolled in the International Serial Transverse Enteroplasty (STEP) Data Registry: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brian A; Hull, Melissa A; Potanos, Kristina M; Zurakowski, David; Fitzgibbons, Shimae C; Ching, Y Avery; Duggan, Christopher; Jaksic, Tom; Kim, Heung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background The International Serial Transverse Enteroplasty (STEP) Data Registry is a voluntary online database created in 2004 to collect information on patients undergoing the STEP procedure. The aim of this study was to identify preoperative factors significantly associated with 1) transplantation or death, or 2) attainment of enteral autonomy following STEP. Study Design Data were collected from September 2004 to January 2010. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to determine predictors of transplantation/death or enteral autonomy post-STEP. Time to reach full enteral nutrition was estimated using a Kaplan-Meier curve. Results Fourteen of the 111 patients in the Registry were excluded due to inadequate follow-up. Of the remaining 97 patients, 11 patients died, and 5 progressed to intestinal transplantation. On multivariate analysis, higher direct bilirubin and shorter pre-STEP bowel length were independently predictive of progression to transplantation or death (p = .05 and p < .001, respectively). Of the 78 patients who were ≥7 days of age and required parenteral nutrition (PN) at the time of STEP, 37 (47%) achieved enteral autonomy after the first STEP. Longer pre-STEP bowel length was also independently associated with enteral autonomy (p = .002). The median time to reach enteral autonomy based on Kaplan-Meier analysis was 21 months (95% CI: 12-30). Conclusions Overall mortality post-STEP was 11%. Pre-STEP risk factors for progressing to transplantation or death were higher direct bilirubin and shorter bowel length. Among patients who underwent STEP for short bowel syndrome, 47% attained full enteral nutrition post-STEP. Patients with longer pre-STEP bowel length were significantly more likely to achieve enteral autonomy. PMID:23357726

  8. A Step Towards CO2-Neutral Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brankovic, Andreja; Ryder, Robert C.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Huber, Marcia L.

    2008-01-01

    An approximation method for evaluation of the caloric equations used in combustion chemistry simulations is described. The method is applied to generate the equations of specific heat, static enthalpy, and Gibb's free energy for fuel mixtures of interest to gas turbine engine manufacturers. Liquid-phase fuel properties are also derived. The fuels investigated include JP-8, synthetic fuel, and two blends of JP-8 and synthetic fuel. The complete set of fuel property equations for both phases are implemented into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver database, and multiphase, reacting flow simulations of a well-tested liquid-fueled combustor are performed. The simulations are a first step in understanding combustion system performance and operational issues when using alternate fuels, at practical engine operating conditions.

  9. Step-oriented pipeline data processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Architecture for step-oriented pipeline data processing is disclosed utilizing a plurality of cascaded modules, each module including a programmable general purpose processor and a read/write random access memory. The memory of each module, shared with the next module in cascade serves as an output memory for the processor and the input memory for the next processor. An additional memory is provided to serve as the input memory of the first module, and each module is provided with a memory, which may be a read-out memory, to store a program for the processor. Each module is further provided with a logic network for resolving a potential memory sharing conflict by awarding priority to the processor of the module.

  10. Ion drive - A step toward 'Star Trek'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.; Terwilliger, C.

    1976-01-01

    The design of a solar-powered electric propulsion system is seen as the first step in the ultimate development of an ion drive system which might incorporate many features of a spacecraft propulsion system described in a science fiction novel written by Anderson (1970). The considered ion propulsion systems would make it possible to augment significantly the operational capabilities of space transportation systems utilizing the Shuttle orbiter in combination with a solid-propellant interim upper stage. The use of the ion drive in a number of applications is discussed, giving attention to the resulting enhancement of national space capabilities, the role of the ion drive in the space transportation system, the development and the operation of a manned space station, satellite positioning and service, the elimination of space debris objects, the study of Halley's comet, interplanetary or lunar shuttle services, and space missions involving the outer planets.

  11. Two-step phase-shifting SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shuiqin; Cai, Yi; Pan, Xinjian; Zeng, Xuanke; Li, Jingzhen; Li, Ying; Zhu, Tianlong; Lin, Qinggang; Xu, Shixiang

    2016-09-01

    Comprehensive characterization of ultrafast optical field is critical for ultrashort pulse generation and its application. This paper combines two-step phase-shifting (TSPS) into the spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER) to improve the reconstruction of ultrafast optical-fields. This novel SPIDER can remove experimentally the dc portion occurring in traditional SPIDER method by recording two spectral interferograms with π phase-shifting. As a result, the reconstructed results are much less disturbed by the time delay between the test pulse replicas and the temporal widths of the filter window, thus more reliable. What is more, this SPIDER can work efficiently even the time delay is so small or the measured bandwidth is so narrow that strong overlap happens between the dc and ac portions, which allows it to be able to characterize the test pulses with complicated temporal/spectral structures or narrow bandwidths.

  12. Nutrition recommendations and science: next parallel steps.

    PubMed

    Fogelholm, Mikael

    2016-03-15

    This article examines nutrition recommendations in relation to developments in nutrition science. Combining data on the genome, metabolome and microbiota is likely to open possibilities for personalized nutrition planning, but we are still far from practical applications. However, even these new steps are unlikely to challenge the role and importance of population-based nutrition recommendations as a tool to promote dietary patterns, policies and public health. Developments in science could help in deriving more benefits from nutrition recommendations. For instance, improved accuracy of dietary intake assessment is needed both for surveillance and for understanding the quantitative interplay between diet and health. Applying metabolomics together with food diaries or questionnaires, and also modern technologies such as digital photography, are potentially interesting methods in this respect. Research on consumer behaviour, attitudes and policy interventions, such as taxation of unhealthy foods and nutrition labelling, are needed to gain more insight into how to change eating behaviour for better health at the population level.

  13. The next step for physician executives?

    PubMed

    Kirschman, D

    1998-01-01

    The next step for career growth for many physician executives will be the top leadership role in a health care organization. The availability of such positions for physicians has been limited in the past but could very well open in the future. As physicians, administrators, and boards begin to trust each other more and form meaningful partnerships, the potential for physician CEOs increases. In 1997, the Physician Executive Management Center conducted surveys of physicians serving in CEO roles in hospitals and group practices throughout the country. We compared the results with earlier surveys we had conducted since 1986. This article reports the significant findings of these surveys on areas such as employment contracts, job duties, skills and talents, and remuneration. PMID:10185641

  14. Two-step phase-shifting SPIDER

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shuiqin; Cai, Yi; Pan, Xinjian; Zeng, Xuanke; Li, Jingzhen; Li, Ying; Zhu, Tianlong; Lin, Qinggang; Xu, Shixiang

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive characterization of ultrafast optical field is critical for ultrashort pulse generation and its application. This paper combines two-step phase-shifting (TSPS) into the spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER) to improve the reconstruction of ultrafast optical-fields. This novel SPIDER can remove experimentally the dc portion occurring in traditional SPIDER method by recording two spectral interferograms with π phase-shifting. As a result, the reconstructed results are much less disturbed by the time delay between the test pulse replicas and the temporal widths of the filter window, thus more reliable. What is more, this SPIDER can work efficiently even the time delay is so small or the measured bandwidth is so narrow that strong overlap happens between the dc and ac portions, which allows it to be able to characterize the test pulses with complicated temporal/spectral structures or narrow bandwidths. PMID:27666528

  15. Hamiltonian deformations of Gabor frames: First steps

    PubMed Central

    de Gosson, Maurice A.

    2015-01-01

    Gabor frames can advantageously be redefined using the Heisenberg–Weyl operators familiar from harmonic analysis and quantum mechanics. Not only does this redefinition allow us to recover in a very simple way known results of symplectic covariance, but it immediately leads to the consideration of a general deformation scheme by Hamiltonian isotopies (i.e. arbitrary paths of non-linear symplectic mappings passing through the identity). We will study in some detail an associated weak notion of Hamiltonian deformation of Gabor frames, using ideas from semiclassical physics involving coherent states and Gaussian approximations. We will thereafter discuss possible applications and extensions of our method, which can be viewed – as the title suggests – as the very first steps towards a general deformation theory for Gabor frames. PMID:25892903

  16. MARK-AGE biomarkers of ageing.

    PubMed

    Bürkle, Alexander; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bernhard, Jürgen; Blasco, María; Zondag, Gerben; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Toussaint, Olivier; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix; Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Collino, Sebastiano; Gonos, Efstathios S; Sikora, Ewa; Gradinaru, Daniela; Dollé, Martijn; Salmon, Michel; Kristensen, Peter; Griffiths, Helen R; Libert, Claude; Grune, Tilman; Breusing, Nicolle; Simm, Andreas; Franceschi, Claudio; Capri, Miriam; Talbot, Duncan; Caiafa, Paola; Friguet, Bertrand; Slagboom, P Eline; Hervonen, Antti; Hurme, Mikko; Aspinall, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Many candidate biomarkers of human ageing have been proposed in the scientific literature but in all cases their variability in cross-sectional studies is considerable, and therefore no single measurement has proven to serve a useful marker to determine, on its own, biological age. A plausible reason for this is the intrinsic multi-causal and multi-system nature of the ageing process. The recently completed MARK-AGE study was a large-scale integrated project supported by the European Commission. The major aim of this project was to conduct a population study comprising about 3200 subjects in order to identify a set of biomarkers of ageing which, as a combination of parameters with appropriate weighting, would measure biological age better than any marker in isolation.

  17. The Steps to Health Randomized Trial for Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Sara; McClenaghan, Bruce; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Baruth, Meghan; Hootman, Jennifer M.; Leith, Katherine; Dowda, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the established benefits of exercise for adults with arthritis, participation is low. Safe, evidence-based, self-directed programs, which have the potential for high reach at a low cost, are needed. Purpose To test a 12-week, self-directed, multicomponent exercise program for adults with arthritis. Design Randomized controlled trial. Data were collected from 2010 to 2012. Data were analyzed in 2013 and 2014. Setting/participants Adults with arthritis (N=401, aged 56.3 [10.7] years, 85.8% women, 63.8% white, 35.2% African American, BMI of 33.0 [8.2]) completed measures at a university research center and participated in a self-directed exercise intervention (First Step to Active Health®) or nutrition control program (Steps to Healthy Eating). Intervention Intervention participants received a self-directed multicomponent exercise program and returned self-monitoring logs for 12 weeks. Main outcome measures Self-reported physical activity, functional performance measures, and disease-specific outcomes (arthritis symptoms and self-efficacy) assessed at baseline, 12 weeks, and 9 months. Results Participants in the exercise condition showed greater increases in physical activity than those in the nutrition control group (p=0.01). Significant improvements, irrespective of condition, were seen in lower body strength, functional exercise capacity, lower body flexibility, pain, fatigue, stiffness, and arthritis management self-efficacy (p values <0.0001). More adverse events occurred in the exercise than nutrition control condition, but only one was severe and most were expected with increased physical activity. Conclusions The exercise program improves physical activity, and both programs improve functional and psychosocial outcomes. Potential reasons for improvements in the nutrition control condition are discussed. These interventions have the potential for large-scale dissemination. This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01172327. PMID

  18. Responder Status Criterion for Stepped Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Alison; Scheeringa, Michael S.; Cohen, Judith A.; Storch, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to develop Stepped Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), a definition of early response/non-response is needed to guide decisions about the need for subsequent treatment. Objective The purpose of this article is to (1) establish criterion for defining an early indicator of response/nonresponse to the first step within Stepped Care TF-CBT, and (2) to explore the preliminary clinical utility of the early response/non-response criterion. Method Data from two studies were used: (1) treatment outcome data from a clinical trial in which 17 young children (ages 3 to 6 years) received therapist-directed CBT for children with PTSS were examined to empirically establish the number of posttraumatic stress symptoms to define early treatment response/non-response; and (2) three case examples with young children in Stepped Care TF-CBT were used to explore the utility of the treatment response criterion. Results For defining the responder status criterion, an algorithm of either 3 or fewer PTSS on a clinician-rated measure or being below the clinical cutoff score on a parent-rated measure of childhood PTSS, and being rated as improved, much improved or free of symptoms functioned well for determining whether or not to step up to more intensive treatment. Case examples demonstrated how the criterion were used to guide subsequent treatment, and that responder status criterion after Step One may or may not be aligned with parent preference. Conclusion Although further investigation is needed, the responder status criterion for young children used after Step One of Stepped Care TF-CBT appears promising. PMID:25663796

  19. Creating History Documentaries: A Step-by-Step Guide to Video Projects in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar, Deborah

    This guide offers an easy introduction to social studies teachers wanting to challenge their students with creative media by bringing the past to life. The 14-step guide shows teachers and students the techniques needed for researching, scripting, and editing a historical documentary. Using a video camera and computer software, students can…

  20. Several steps/day indicators predict changes in anthropometric outcomes: HUB city steps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Walking for exercise remains the most frequently reported leisure-time activity, likely because it is simple, inexpensive, and easily incorporated into most people’s lifestyle. Pedometers are simple, convenient, and economical tools that can be used to quantify step-determined physical activity. F...

  1. From Recombinant Expression to Crystals: A Step-by-Step Guide to GPCR Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Arun K; Kumari, Punita; Ghosh, Eshan; Nidhi, Kumari

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the primary targets of drugs prescribed for many human pathophysiological conditions such as hypertension, allergies, schizophrenia, asthma, and various types of cancer. High-resolution structure determination of GPCRs has been a key focus area in GPCR biology to understand the basic mechanism of their activation and signaling and to materialize the long-standing dream of structure-based drug design on these versatile receptors. There has been tremendous effort at this front in the past two decades and it has culminated into crystal structures of 27 different receptors so far. The recent progress in crystallization and structure determination of GPCRs has been driven by innovation and cutting-edge developments at every step involved in the process of crystallization. Here, we present a step-by-step description of various steps involved in GPCR crystallization starting from recombinant expression to obtaining diffracting crystals. We also discuss the next frontiers in GPCR biology that are likely to be a primary focus for crystallography efforts in the next decade or so.

  2. Step-by-step magic state encoding for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hayato

    2014-12-16

    Quantum error correction allows one to make quantum computers fault-tolerant against unavoidable errors due to decoherence and imperfect physical gate operations. However, the fault-tolerant quantum computation requires impractically large computational resources for useful applications. This is a current major obstacle to the realization of a quantum computer. In particular, magic state distillation, which is a standard approach to universality, consumes the most resources in fault-tolerant quantum computation. For the resource problem, here we propose step-by-step magic state encoding for concatenated quantum codes, where magic states are encoded step by step from the physical level to the logical one. To manage errors during the encoding, we carefully use error detection. Since the sizes of intermediate codes are small, it is expected that the resource overheads will become lower than previous approaches based on the distillation at the logical level. Our simulation results suggest that the resource requirements for a logical magic state will become comparable to those for a single logical controlled-NOT gate. Thus, the present method opens a new possibility for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  3. Statistics Translated: A Step-by-Step Guide to Analyzing and Interpreting Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Written in a humorous and encouraging style, this text shows how the most common statistical tools can be used to answer interesting real-world questions, presented as mysteries to be solved. Engaging research examples lead the reader through a series of six steps, from identifying a researchable problem to stating a hypothesis, identifying…

  4. Implementing Service Learning into a Graduate Social Work Course: A Step-by-Step Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Evelyn Marie

    2012-01-01

    Service learning is a powerful pedagogical tool linking community service to academic learning. Several steps are necessary to implement service learning effectively into the curriculum. This study uses a case example as an exploratory study to pilot-test data on how service learning impacts student outcomes. The paper will (1) provide an overview…

  5. Ethnography, Step by Step (2nd Edition), by David M. Fetterman, Thousand Oaks, Ca: Sage, 1998..

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jennifer C.; Buell, James

    2000-01-01

    Reviews this edition, which like the first is primarily an organized presentation of fieldwork vignettes and instructive examples from research and evaluation contexts. The presentation is organized by the steps involved in ethnographic fieldwork. This edition is updated with references to electronic technology. (SLD)

  6. A Step Forward or a Step Back? State Accountability in the Waiver Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Daria

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, No Child Left Behind ushered in sweeping changes in school accountability. Diverging from the federal government's long history of leaving this matter largely to the states, a Congress broadly dissatisfied with the slow pace of educational improvement stepped in with a new framework designed to set schools on a path to getting all…

  7. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  8. Tritium Issues in Next Step Devices

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; G. Federici

    2001-09-05

    Tritium issues will play a central role in the performance and operation of next-step deuterium-tritium (DT) burning plasma tokamaks and the safety aspects associated with tritium will attract intense public scrutiny. The orders-of-magnitude increase in duty cycle and stored energy will be a much larger change than the increase in plasma performance necessary to achieve high fusion gain and ignition. Erosion of plasma-facing components will scale up with the pulse length from being barely measurable on existing machines to centimeter scale. Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) devices with carbon plasma-facing components will accumulate tritium by co-deposition with the eroded carbon and this will strongly constrain plasma operations. We report on a novel laser-based method to remove co-deposited tritium from carbon plasma-facing components in tokamaks. A major fraction of the tritium trapped in a co-deposited layer during the deuterium-tritium (DT) campaign on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was released by heating with a scanning laser beam. This technique offers the potential for tritium removal in a next-step DT device without the use of oxidation and the associated deconditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces and expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide. The operational lifetime of alternative materials such as tungsten has significant uncertainties due to melt layer loss during disruptions. Production of dust and flakes will need careful monitoring and minimization, and control and accountancy of the tritium inventory will be critical issues. Many of the tritium issues in Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) are similar to MFE, but some, for example those associated with the target factory, are unique to IFE. The plasma-edge region in a tokamak has greater complexity than the core due to lack of poloidal symmetry and nonlinear feedback between the plasma and wall. Sparse diagnostic coverage and low dedicated experimental run time has hampered the

  9. In-step inflatable antenna experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeland, R. E.; Bilyeu, G.

    Large deployable space antennas are needed to accommodate a number of applications that include mobile communications, earth observation radiometry, active microwave sensing, space-orbiting very long baseline interferometry, and Department of Defense (DoD) space-based radar. The criteria for evaluating candidate structural concepts for essentially all the applications is the same; high deployment reliability, low cost, low weight, low launch volume, and high aperture precision. A new class of space structures, called inflatable deployable structures, have tremendous potential for completely satisfying the first four criteria and good potential for accommodating the longer wavelength applications. An inflatable deployable antenna under development by L'Garde Inc. of Tustin, California, represents such a concept. Its level of technology is mature enough to support a meaningful orbital technology experiment. The NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology initiated the In-Space Technology Experiments Program (IN-STEP) specifically to sponsor the verification and/or validation of unique and innovative space technologies in the space environment. The potential of the L'Garde concept has been recognized and resulted in its selection for an IN-STEP experiment. The objective of the experiment is to (a) validate the deployment of a 14-meter, inflatable parabolic reflector structure, (b) measure the reflector surface accuracy, and (c) investigate structural damping characteristics under operational conditions. The experiment approach will be to use the NASA Spartan Spacecraft to carry the experiment on orbit. Reflector deployment will be monitored by two high-resolution video cameras. Reflector surface quality will be measured with a digital imaging radiometer. Structural damping will be based on measuring the decay of reflector structure amplitude. The experiment is being managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The experiment definition phase (Phase B) will be

  10. [Determination of dental age].

    PubMed

    Willems, Guy

    2005-01-01

    A review of the most commonly used dental age estimating techniques is generated. The most important issue for the forensic odontologist involved in dental age estimation is to employ as many of these methods as possible by performing repetitive measurements and calculations of different age-related parameters. That is the only way in order to try and establish reliable dental age estimations. In particular, a special chapter is attributed to the complex problem of determining the age of majority. PMID:16370435

  11. [Insomnia in old age].

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Reizo; Furuta, Hisakazu

    2009-08-01

    Alterations of sleep structure with aging are attributed to change of circadian sleep-wake system and decrease of daytime activity with aging. Prevalence of insomnia and use of sleeping pills increases with age. Physical and psychiatric conditions play important roles in poor sleep in old age, and restless legs syndrome and sleep disordered breathing increase with aging as well. Early and appropriate intervention to insomnia will contribute to improvement of health and quality of life in the elderly. PMID:19768939

  12. Aging, anti-aging, and hormesis.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2004-04-01

    As a result of almost 50 years of efforts in collecting descriptive data, biogerontologists are now able to construct general principles of aging and to explore possibilities of gerontomodulation. Most of the data indicate that aging is characterized by a stochastic accumulation of molecular damage and a progressive failure of maintenance and repair, and the genes involved in homeodynamic pathways are the most likely candidate virtual gerontogenes. Several approaches are being tried and tested to modulate aging in a wide variety of organisms, but with the ultimate aim of improving the quality of human life in old age. These approaches include gene therapy, hormonal supplementation, nutritional modulation, and intervention by antioxidants and other molecules. A recent approach is that of applying hormesis in aging research and therapy, which is based on the principle of stimulation of maintenance and repair pathways by repeated exposure to mild stress.

  13. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Past Issues / Fall ... These are the plain facts in "Small Steps. Big Rewards: Prevent Type 2 Diabetes," an education campaign ...

  14. Step and Kink Dynamics in Inorganic and Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.; Rashkovich, L. N.; Vekilov, P. G.; DeYoreo, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    Behavior of low-kink-density steps in solution growth and consequences for general understanding of spiral crystal growth processes will be overviewed. Also, influence of turbulence on step bunching and possibility to diminish this bunching will be presented.

  15. 3 Steps to Building a Personal Medical Record

    MedlinePlus

    ... Building a Personal Medical Record Print to PDF 3 Steps to Building a Personal Medical Record August ... forms or make phone calls for you. Step 3. Organizing and storing your personal medical record There ...

  16. Take 3 Steps Toward Preventing Infections During Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Risk Patient Caregiver Healthcare Provider Discover the 3 Steps Prepare, Prevent, & Protect Fact Sheet & Cut-Out ... Your Risk Patient Caregiver Healthcare Provider Discover the 3 Steps Prepare, Prevent, & Protect Fact Sheet & Cut-Out ...

  17. Stepping analysis in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, O; Taguchi, K; Kikukawa, M; Ogiba, T

    1993-07-01

    POLGON (Polarized light goniometer) was used to evaluate ataxia during stepping movements in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and Parkinson's disease. The measurements included mean angular change of shoulders (M.A.C.S.) and its coefficient of variation (C.V.). In patients with SCD, the values of M.A.C.S. were significantly larger at 1.0 step/s than those at other stepping rhythms. This results suggests that the stepping rhythm of 1.0 step/s is useful for the detection of cerebellar ataxia. The values of C.V. correlated with the degree of advancement of SCD. In patients with Parkinson's disease, the values of M.A.C.S. tended to decrease because of the restricted elevation of the knee, while those of C.V. were increased. The results showed that the stepping test using the POLGON was useful for estimation of the characteristic disequilibrium of SCD and Parkinson's disease.

  18. Detail view in caryatid breezeway to show entrance steps; lion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view in caryatid breezeway to show entrance steps; lion statues once flanked these steps - National Park Seminary, Aloha House, North of Linden Lane near corner of Beech Drive, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  19. Lunar base - A stepping stone to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, M. B.; Mendell, W. W.; Roberts, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    Basic elements of technology and programmatic development are identified that appear relevant to the Case for Mars, starting from a base on the moon. The moon is a logical stepping stone toward human exploration of Mars because a lunar base can provide the first test of human ability to use the resources of another planetary body to provide basic materials for life support. A lunar base can provide the first long-term test of human capability to work and live in a reduced (but not zero) gravity field. A lunar base requires creation of the elements of a space transportation system that will be necessary to deliver large payloads to Mars and the space operations capability and experience necessary to carry out a Mars habitation program efficiently and with high reliability. A lunar base is feasible for the first decade of the 21st Century. Scenarios have been studied that provide advanced capability by 2015 within budget levels that are less than historical U.S. space expenditures (Apollo). Early return on the investment in terms of knowledge, practical experience and lunar products are important in gaining momentum for an expanded human exploration of the solar system and the eventual colonization of Mars.

  20. Neuregulin: First Steps Towards a Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferree, D. S.; Malone, C. C.; Karr, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuregulins are growth factor domain proteins with diverse bioactivities, such as cell proliferation, receptor binding, and differentiation. Neureguh- 1 binds to two members of the ErbB class I tyrosine kinase receptors, ErbB3 and ErbB4. A number of human cancers overexpress the ErbB receptors, and neuregulin can modulate the growth of certain cancer types. Neuregulin-1 has been shown to promote the migration of invasive gliomas of the central nervous system. Neuregulin has also been implicated in schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis and abortive cardiac abnormalities. The full function of neuregulin-1 is not known. In this study we are inserting a cDNA clone obtained from American Type Culture Collection into E.coli expression vectors to express neuregulin- 1 protein. Metal chelate affinity chromatography is used for recombinant protein purification. Crystallization screening will proceed for X-ray diffraction studies following expression, optimization, and protein purification. In spite of medical and scholarly interest in the neuregulins, there are currently no high-resolution structures available for these proteins. Here we present the first steps toward attaining a high-resolution structure of neuregulin- 1, which will help enable us to better understand its function

  1. Deposition Diagnostics for Next-step Devices

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; A.L. Roquemore; the NSTX team; A. Bader; W.R. Wampler

    2004-06-15

    The scale-up of deposition in next-step devices such as ITER will pose new diagnostic challenges. Codeposition of hydrogen with carbon needs to be characterized and understood in the initial hydrogen phase in order to mitigate tritium retention and qualify carbon plasma facing components for DT operations. Plasma facing diagnostic mirrors will experience deposition that is expected to rapidly degrade their reflectivity, posing a new challenge to diagnostic design. Some eroded particles will collect as dust on interior surfaces and the quantity of dust will be strictly regulated for safety reasons - however diagnostics of in-vessel dust are lacking. We report results from two diagnostics that relate to these issues. Measurements of deposition on NSTX with 4 Hz time resolution have been made using a quartz microbalance in a configuration that mimics that of a typical diagnostic mirror. Often deposition was observed immediately following the discharge suggesting that diagnostic shutters should be closed as soon as possible after the time period of interest. Material loss was observed following a few discharges. A novel diagnostic to detect surface particles on remote surfaces was commissioned on NSTX.

  2. Mutual reciprocal inspections: Issues regarding next steps

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.C.

    1996-02-27

    Pressures are mounting for a regime to verify the dismantlement of US and Russian warheads, as well as a system of international control over the weapons` fissile materials to assure irreversibility. There are at least four motivating factors for these measures: (1) as the United States and Russia lower their numbers of nuclear weapons, each side seeks assurance that the warheads are actually being dismantled; (2) by accounting for the fissile materials and placing them under effective controls, the potential for smuggling and theft is reduced; (3) a fissile materials cutoff is being discussed at the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva; verification of a US-Russian cutoff, as well as substantial reductions in fissile materials stockpiles, are seen as integral to the cutoff; (4) calls for total nuclear disarmament have greatly increased; dismantlement verification and international control of fissile materials are widely viewed as requisite steps toward this goal. There are many questions to be answered before the United States can agree to a warhead verification regime and international control over excess fissile materials, let alone total nuclear disarmament. Two of the most important are: What are the prospects for effective verification? and How much fissile material can be declared as excess, and possibly be given over to international control? These topics--compliance weaknesses and excess materials--are the focus of this paper.

  3. Keeping Track Every Step of the Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge Sharing Systems, Inc., a producer of intellectual assets management software systems for the federal government, universities, non-profit laboratories, and private companies, constructed and presently manages the NASA Technology Tracking System, also known as TechTracS. Under contract to Langley Research Center, TechTracS identifies and captures all NASA technologies, manages the patent prosecution process, and then tracks their progress en route to commercialization. The system supports all steps involved in various technology transfer activities, and is considered the premier intellectual asset management system used in the federal government today. NASA TechTracS consists of multiple relational databases and web servers, located at each of the 10 field centers, as well as NASA Headquarters. The system is capable of supporting the following functions: planning commercial technologies; commercialization activities; reporting new technologies and inventions; and processing and tracking intellectual property rights, licensing, partnerships, awards, and success stories. NASA TechTracS is critical to the Agency's ongoing mission to commercialize its revolutionary technologies in a variety of sectors within private industry, both aerospace and non- aerospace.

  4. Nineteen-Step Total Synthesis of (+)-Phorbol

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Shuhei; Chu, Hang; Felding, Jakob; Baran, Phil S.

    2016-01-01

    Phorbol, the flagship member of the tigliane diterpene family, has been known for over 80 years and has attracted attention from scores of chemists and biologists due to its intriguing chemical structure and the medicinal potential of phorbol esters.1 Access to useful quantities of phorbol and related analogs has relied upon isolation from natural sources and semisynthesis. Despite relentless efforts spanning 40 years, chemical synthesis has been unable to compete with these strategies due to its sheer complexity and unusual oxidation pattern. In fact, purely synthetic enantiopure phorbol has remained elusive and efforts on the synthetic biology side have not led to even the simplest members of this terpene family. Recently the chemical syntheses of eudesmanes,2 germacrenes,3 taxanes,4,5 and ingenanes6-8 have all benefited from a strategy inspired by the logic of two-phase terpene biosynthesis where powerful C–C bond constructions and C–H bond oxidations go hand in hand. In this manuscript, we show how a two-phase terpene synthesis strategy can be enlisted to achieve the first enantiospecific total synthesis of (+)-phorbol in only 19 steps from the abundant monoterpene (+)-3-carene. The purpose of this route is not to displace isolation/semisynthesis as a means to generate the natural product per se, but rather to enable access to analogs containing unique oxidation patterns that are otherwise inaccessible. PMID:27007853

  5. First steps in qualitative data analysis: transcribing.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Julia

    2008-04-01

    Qualitative research in primary care deepens understanding of phenomena such as health, illness and health care encounters. Many qualitative studies collect audio or video data (e.g. recordings of interviews, focus groups or talk in consultation), and these are usually transcribed into written form for closer study. Transcribing appears to be a straightforward technical task, but in fact involves judgements about what level of detail to choose (e.g. omitting non-verbal dimensions of interaction), data interpretation (e.g. distinguishing 'I don't, no' from 'I don't know') and data representation (e.g. representing the verbalization 'hwarryuhh' as 'How are you?'). Representation of audible and visual data into written form is an interpretive process which is therefore the first step in analysing data. Different levels of detail and different representations of data will be required for projects with differing aims and methodological approaches. This article is a guide to practical and theoretical considerations for researchers new to qualitative data analysis. Data examples are given to illustrate decisions to be made when transcribing or assigning the task to others.

  6. Time to pause before the next step

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    Many scientists, who have staunchly supported ITER for years, are coming to realize it is time to further rethink fusion energy`s development strategy. Specifically, as was suggested by Grant Logan and Dale Meade, and in keeping with the restructuring of 1996, a theme of better, cheaper, faster fusion would serve the program more effectively than ``demonstrating controlled ignition...and integrated testing of the high-heat-flux and nuclear components required to utilize fusion energy...`` which are the important ingredients of ITER`s objectives. The author has personally shifted his view for a mixture of technical and political reasons. On the technical side, he senses that through advanced tokamak research, spherical tokamak research, and advanced stellarator work, scientists are coming to a new understanding that might make a burning-plasma device significantly smaller and less expensive. Thus waiting for a few years, even ten years, seems prudent. Scientifically, there is fascinating physics to be learned through studies of burning plasma on a tokamak. And clearly if one wishes to study burning plasma physics in a sustained plasma, there is no other configuration with an adequate database on which to proceed. But what is the urgency of moving towards an ITER-like step focused on burning plasma? Some of the arguments put forward and the counter arguments are discussed here.

  7. Space Drive Physics: Introduction and Next Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, M. G.

    Research toward the visionary goal of propellantless ``space drives'' is introduced, covering key physics issues and a listing of roughly 2-dozen approaches. The targeted advantage of a space drive is to circumvent the propellant constraints of rockets and the maneuvering limits of light sails by using the interactions between the spacecraft and its surrounding space for propulsion. At present, the scientific foundations from which to engineer a space drive have not been discovered and, objectively, might be impossible. Although no propulsion breakthroughs appear imminent, the subject has matured to where the relevant questions have been broached and are beginning to be answered. The critical make-break issues include; conservation of momentum, uncertain sources of reaction mass, and the net-external thrusting requirement. Note: space drives are not necessarily faster- than-light devices. Speed limits are a separate, unanswered issue. Relevant unsolved physics includes; the sources and mechanisms of inertial frames, coupling of gravitation and electromagnetism, and the nature of the quantum vacuum. The propulsion approaches span mostly stages 1 through 3 of the scientific method (defining the problem, collecting data, and articulating hypotheses), while some have matured to stage 4 (testing hypotheses). Nonviable approaches include `stiction drives,' `gyroscopic antigravity,' and `lifters.' No attempt is made to gauge the prospects of the remaining approaches. Instead, a list of next-step research questions is derived from the examination of these goals, unknowns, and concepts.

  8. Space Transportation Engine Program (STEP), phase B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Space Transportation Engine Program (STEP) Phase 2 effort includes preliminary design and activities plan preparation that will allow smooth and time transition into a Prototype Phase and then into Phases 3, 4, and 5. A Concurrent Engineering approach using Total Quality Management (TQM) techniques, is being applied to define an oxygen-hydrogen engine. The baseline from Phase 1/1' studies was used as a point of departure for trade studies and analyses. Existing STME system models are being enhanced as more detailed module/component characteristics are determined. Preliminary designs for the open expander, closed expander, and gas generator cycles were prepared, and recommendations for cycle selection made at the Design Concept Review (DCR). As a result of July '90 DCR, and information subsequently supplied to the Technical Review Team, a gas generator cycle was selected. Results of the various Advanced Development Programs (ADP's) for the Advanced Launch Systems (ALS) were contributive to this effort. An active vehicle integration effort is supplying the NASA, Air Force, and vehicle contractors with engine parameters and data, and flowing down appropriate vehicle requirements. Engine design and analysis trade studies are being documented in a data base that was developed and is being used to organize information. To date, seventy four trade studies were input to the data base.

  9. Early steps in steroidogenesis: intracellular cholesterol trafficking.

    PubMed

    Miller, Walter L; Bose, Himangshu S

    2011-12-01

    Steroid hormones are made from cholesterol, primarily derived from lipoproteins that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. In endo-lysosomes, cholesterol is released from cholesterol esters by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL; disordered in Wolman disease) and exported via Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) proteins (disordered in NPC disease). These diseases are characterized by accumulated cholesterol and cholesterol esters in most cell types. Mechanisms for trans-cytoplasmic cholesterol transport, membrane insertion, and retrieval from membranes are less clear. Cholesterol esters and "free" cholesterol are enzymatically interconverted in lipid droplets. Cholesterol transport to the cholesterol-poor outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) appears to involve cholesterol transport proteins. Cytochrome P450scc (CYP11A1) then initiates steroidogenesis by converting cholesterol to pregnenolone on the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Acute steroidogenic responses are regulated by cholesterol delivery from OMM to IMM, triggered by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Chronic steroidogenic capacity is determined by CYP11A1 gene transcription. StAR mutations cause congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, with absent steroidogenesis, potentially lethal salt loss, and 46,XY sex reversal. StAR mutations initially destroy most, but not all steroidogenesis; low levels of StAR-independent steroidogenesis are lost later due to cellular damage, explaining the clinical findings. Rare P450scc mutations cause a similar syndrome. This review addresses these early steps in steroid biosynthesis. PMID:21976778

  10. Collocation and Galerkin Time-Stepping Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, H. T.

    2011-01-01

    We study the numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations by one-step methods where the solution at tn is known and that at t(sub n+1) is to be calculated. The approaches employed are collocation, continuous Galerkin (CG) and discontinuous Galerkin (DG). Relations among these three approaches are established. A quadrature formula using s evaluation points is employed for the Galerkin formulations. We show that with such a quadrature, the CG method is identical to the collocation method using quadrature points as collocation points. Furthermore, if the quadrature formula is the right Radau one (including t(sub n+1)), then the DG and CG methods also become identical, and they reduce to the Radau IIA collocation method. In addition, we present a generalization of DG that yields a method identical to CG and collocation with arbitrary collocation points. Thus, the collocation, CG, and generalized DG methods are equivalent, and the latter two methods can be formulated using the differential instead of integral equation. Finally, all schemes discussed can be cast as s-stage implicit Runge-Kutta methods.

  11. Early steps in steroidogenesis: intracellular cholesterol trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Walter L.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2011-01-01

    Steroid hormones are made from cholesterol, primarily derived from lipoproteins that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. In endo-lysosomes, cholesterol is released from cholesterol esters by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL; disordered in Wolman disease) and exported via Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) proteins (disordered in NPC disease). These diseases are characterized by accumulated cholesterol and cholesterol esters in most cell types. Mechanisms for trans-cytoplasmic cholesterol transport, membrane insertion, and retrieval from membranes are less clear. Cholesterol esters and “free” cholesterol are enzymatically interconverted in lipid droplets. Cholesterol transport to the cholesterol-poor outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) appears to involve cholesterol transport proteins. Cytochrome P450scc (CYP11A1) then initiates steroidogenesis by converting cholesterol to pregnenolone on the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Acute steroidogenic responses are regulated by cholesterol delivery from OMM to IMM, triggered by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Chronic steroidogenic capacity is determined by CYP11A1 gene transcription. StAR mutations cause congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, with absent steroidogenesis, potentially lethal salt loss, and 46,XY sex reversal. StAR mutations initially destroy most, but not all steroidogenesis; low levels of StAR-independent steroidogenesis are lost later due to cellular damage, explaining the clinical findings. Rare P450scc mutations cause a similar syndrome. This review addresses these early steps in steroid biosynthesis. PMID:21976778

  12. Space Transportation Engine Program (STEP), phase B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-10-01

    The Space Transportation Engine Program (STEP) Phase 2 effort includes preliminary design and activities plan preparation that will allow smooth and time transition into a Prototype Phase and then into Phases 3, 4, and 5. A Concurrent Engineering approach using Total Quality Management (TQM) techniques, is being applied to define an oxygen-hydrogen engine. The baseline from Phase 1/1' studies was used as a point of departure for trade studies and analyses. Existing STME system models are being enhanced as more detailed module/component characteristics are determined. Preliminary designs for the open expander, closed expander, and gas generator cycles were prepared, and recommendations for cycle selection made at the Design Concept Review (DCR). As a result of July '90 DCR, and information subsequently supplied to the Technical Review Team, a gas generator cycle was selected. Results of the various Advanced Development Programs (ADP's) for the Advanced Launch Systems (ALS) were contributive to this effort. An active vehicle integration effort is supplying the NASA, Air Force, and vehicle contractors with engine parameters and data, and flowing down appropriate vehicle requirements. Engine design and analysis trade studies are being documented in a data base that was developed and is being used to organize information. To date, seventy four trade studies were input to the data base.

  13. Stance time variability during stair stepping before and after total knee arthroplasty: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica W; Marcus, Robin L; Tracy, Brian L; Foreman, K Bo; Christensen, Jesse C; LaStayo, Paul C

    2016-02-01

    The main objectives of this pilot study were to: (1) investigate stance time variability (STV) during stair stepping in older adults with osteoarthritis (OA) before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and compare to an age- and sex-matched group of healthy controls with native knees and (2) evaluate the relationship between quadriceps strength and STV during stair stepping before and after TKA. A prospective, observational, pilot study was carried out on 13 individuals (15% male, mean age 62.71±6.84years) before and after TKA using an instrumented stairway, patient-reported outcomes, timed stair stepping test, and quadriceps strength measures. At 6-months post-operatively, STV during stair descent was significantly greater in the TKA-GROUP compared to the CONTROL-GROUP, but was not significantly different at 12-months compared to controls. There were no significant differences in STV for stair ascent between the pre- and post-operative visits, or compared to controls. There was a trend toward significance for the relationship between quadriceps strength and STV during stair ascent (P=0.059) and descent (P=0.073). Variability during stair stepping may provide an important, short-term rehabilitation target for individuals following TKA and may represent another parameter to predict declines in functional mobility.

  14. A Protocol for Aging Anurans Using Skeletochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCreary, Brome; Pearl, Christopher A.; Adams, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Age distribution information can be an important part of understanding the biology of any population. Age estimates collected from the annual growth rings found in tooth and bone cross sections, often referred to as Lines of Arrested Growth (LAGs), have been used in the study of various animals. In this manual, we describe in detail all necessary steps required to obtain estimates of age from anuran bone cross sections via skeletochronological assessment. We include comprehensive descriptions of how to fix and decalcify toe specimens (phalanges), process a phalange prior to embedding, embed the phalange in paraffin, section the phalange using a microtome, stain and mount the cross sections of the phalange and read the LAGs to obtain age estimates.

  15. Effect of Two-step Time-restricted Feeding on the Fattening Traits in Geese.

    PubMed

    Lui, Zhen-Jia; Chu, Hung-Hsin; Wu, Yun-Chu; Yang, Shyi-Kuen

    2014-06-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether the two-step time-restricted feeding improves the fattening traits of one-step time-restricted feeding in geese. Thirty-six 8-wk-old geese were allotted into one of three groups. Group R1 (the 1-step restricted feeding group) was allowed access to feed for 2 h in the morning from 8 wk to 14 wk of age. Group R2 (the 2-step restricted feeding group) was treated as Group R1, but was additionally fed for 2 h in the afternoon from 12 wk to 14 wk of age. Group C (the control group) was fed ad libitum from 8 wk to 14 wk of age. Feed intake and body weight (BW) were recorded daily and weekly, respectively. At 14 wk of age, the blood samples were collected to determine the fasting plasma levels of glucose, triacylglycerols and uric acid before sacrifice. The results showed that daily feed intake (DFI) was lower, feed efficiency (FE) was higher in both Groups R1 and R2 than in Group C, and daily gain (DG) in Group R2 was higher than in Group R1 during the whole experimental period (p<0.05). Group R1 exhibited lower abdominal and visceral fat weights in carcass than did Group C (p<0.05), and Group R2 was in intermediate. The fasting plasma glucose levels in Group C were higher, and triacylglycerol levels in Group R1 were higher, compared with the other groups (p<0.05). It is concluded that time-restricted feeding in the fattening period not only increases FE but reduces DFI, and the additional meal during the late fattening period improves the DG without the expense of FE in geese.

  16. Comparison of GT3X accelerometer and Yamax pedometer steps/day in a free-living sample of overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare steps/day detected by the YAMAX SW-200 pedometer versus the Actigraph GT3X accelerometer in free-living adults. Daily YAMAX and GT3X steps were collected from a sample of 23 overweight and obese participants (78% female; age = 52.6 +/- 8.4 yr.; BMI = 31.0 +/-...

  17. Flow and forced-convection heat transfer over forward-facing double steps (effects of step ratio)

    SciTech Connect

    Shakouchi, Toshihiko; Kajino, Itsuki

    1994-07-01

    The flow and heat transfer over a step (a forward- or backward-facing step) result in complicated flow conditions, such as a shear flow field, flow separation, and generation of vortices, and provide some interesting information that improves understanding of the heat transfer on the surface. This is a very frequent flow, and basic to various kinds of chemical equipment, fluid machinery, combustion furnaces, and IC-packages. Recently, there have been many studies on this flow situation by numerical analysis, measurement of mean and fluctuating velocities within the separation bubble using laser Doppler anemometer, and heat transfer analysis. A flow passage having two steps in tiers (forward- or backward-facing double steps) is also frequent, and it is very important to clarify the effects of each step on the flow and the heat-transfer characteristics. This however, has not yet been investigated. This study presents the results of an experimental investigation on the flow and forced convective heat transfer over forward-facing single and double steps. Measurements of velocity and turbulence intensity, flow visualization, pressure distribution, and heat transfer over forward-facing double steps were carried out for various step ratios, L/a (L: step length, a: step height). From these results, the effects of the step ratio on the flow and heat-transfer characteristics were clarified and the following results were confirmed. Heat-transfer enhancement of a double step is considerable compared with that of a single step or a flat plate.

  18. 40 CFR 35.2203 - Step 7 projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Step 7 projects. 35.2203 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2203 Step 7 projects. (a) Prior to initiating action to acquire real property, a Step 7 grantee shall submit for...

  19. 40 CFR 35.2202 - Step 2+3 projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Step 2+3 projects. 35.2202 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2202 Step 2+3 projects. (a) Prior to initiating action to acquire eligible real property, a Step 2+3 grantee shall submit...

  20. Accuracy of Step Recording in Free-Living Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Timothy K.; Dinger, Mary K.; Vesely, Sara K.; Fields, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how accurately free-living adults record their pedometer steps on step logs. Researchers used three different methods to examine the accuracy of participant-recorded steps: tests of equivalence, correlation coefficients, and Bland-Altman plots. Findings indicate that participant-recorded steps…

  1. Problem Structure and Performance on Two-Step Word Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocevar, Dennis; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The effects of problem structure on two-step word problems are analyzed in a sample of 91 fifth through eighth graders. Results showed that sequencing the first and second steps did not cause as much trouble as understanding the first step. (RB)

  2. 40 CFR 35.909 - Step 2+3 grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... design (step 2) and construction (step 3) of a waste water treatment works. (b) Limitations. The Regional... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.909 Step 2+3 grants. (a) Authority... Water and Waste Management finds to have unusually high costs of construction, the...

  3. A Four-Step Model for Teaching Selection Interviewing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiman, Lawrence S.; Benek-Rivera, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The topic of selection interviewing lends itself well to experience-based teaching methods. Instructors often teach this topic by using a two-step process. The first step consists of lecturing students on the basic principles of effective interviewing. During the second step, students apply these principles by role-playing mock interviews with…

  4. 36 CFR 1192.79 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds... Light Rail Vehicles and Systems § 1192.79 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads, places for standees, and areas where wheelchair and mobility aid users are to...

  5. 40 CFR 35.2109 - Step 2+3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Step 2+3. 35.2109 Section 35.2109... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2109 Step 2+3. The Regional Administrator may award a Step 2+3 grant which will provide the Federal share of an allowance under appendix B and...

  6. 40 CFR 35.2203 - Step 7 projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Step 7 projects. 35.2203 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2203 Step 7 projects. (a) Prior to initiating action to acquire real property, a Step 7 grantee shall submit for...

  7. 40 CFR 35.2109 - Step 2+3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Step 2+3. 35.2109 Section 35.2109... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2109 Step 2+3. The Regional Administrator may award a Step 2+3 grant which will provide the Federal share of an allowance under appendix B and...

  8. 40 CFR 280.52 - Release investigation and confirmation steps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... steps. 280.52 Section 280.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... investigation and confirmation steps. Unless corrective action is initiated in accordance with subpart F, owners... implementing agency, using either the following steps or another procedure approved by the implementing...

  9. 49 CFR 38.117 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds. 38.117 Section 38...) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 38.117 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads and areas where wheelchair and mobility...

  10. 49 CFR 38.99 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds. 38.99 Section 38.99... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Commuter Rail Cars and Systems § 38.99 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads, places for standees, and areas where wheelchair...

  11. 14 CFR 152.411 - Affirmative action steps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Affirmative action steps. 152.411 Section...) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Nondiscrimination in Airport Aid Program § 152.411 Affirmative action steps... its aviation workforce as vacancies occur, by taking the affirmative action steps in §...

  12. 49 CFR 38.79 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds. 38.79 Section 38.79... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Light Rail Vehicles and Systems § 38.79 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads, places for standees, and areas where wheelchair...

  13. 36 CFR 1192.79 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds... Light Rail Vehicles and Systems § 1192.79 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads, places for standees, and areas where wheelchair and mobility aid users are to...

  14. 36 CFR 1192.153 - Doors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Doors, steps and thresholds... Over-the-Road Buses and Systems § 1192.153 Doors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads and areas where wheelchair and mobility aid users are to be accommodated shall be...

  15. 14 CFR 152.411 - Affirmative action steps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Affirmative action steps. 152.411 Section...) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Nondiscrimination in Airport Aid Program § 152.411 Affirmative action steps... its aviation workforce as vacancies occur, by taking the affirmative action steps in §...

  16. 49 CFR 38.79 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds. 38.79 Section 38.79... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Light Rail Vehicles and Systems § 38.79 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads, places for standees, and areas where wheelchair...

  17. 49 CFR 38.153 - Doors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Doors, steps and thresholds. 38.153 Section 38.153... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Over-the-Road Buses and Systems § 38.153 Doors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads and areas where wheelchair and mobility aid users are to...

  18. 40 CFR 280.52 - Release investigation and confirmation steps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... steps. 280.52 Section 280.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... investigation and confirmation steps. Unless corrective action is initiated in accordance with subpart F, owners... implementing agency, using either the following steps or another procedure approved by the implementing...

  19. 36 CFR 1192.153 - Doors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Doors, steps and thresholds... Over-the-Road Buses and Systems § 1192.153 Doors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads and areas where wheelchair and mobility aid users are to be accommodated shall be...

  20. 29 CFR 1952.242 - Completed developmental steps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Completed developmental steps. 1952.242 Section 1952.242... Completed developmental steps. (a) In accordance with § 1952.243(d) Alaska completed its interim training... completed on or before October 1, 1976, all developmental steps specified in the plan as approved on July...

  1. 24 CFR Appendix E to Part 3500 - Arithmetic Steps

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arithmetic Steps E Appendix E to...—Arithmetic Steps I. Example Illustrating Aggregate Analysis: ASSUMPTIONS: Disbursements: $360 for school... Payment: July 1 Step 1—Initial Trial Balance Aggregate pmt disb bal Jun 0 0 0 Jul 130 500 −370 Aug 130...

  2. 49 CFR 38.117 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds. 38.117 Section 38...) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 38.117 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads and areas where wheelchair and mobility...

  3. 40 CFR 35.2202 - Step 2+3 projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Step 2+3 projects. 35.2202 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2202 Step 2+3 projects. (a) Prior to initiating action to acquire eligible real property, a Step 2+3 grantee shall submit...

  4. 29 CFR 1952.242 - Completed developmental steps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Completed developmental steps. 1952.242 Section 1952.242... Completed developmental steps. (a) In accordance with § 1952.243(d) Alaska completed its interim training... completed on or before October 1, 1976, all developmental steps specified in the plan as approved on July...

  5. 48 CFR 15.202 - Advisory multi-step process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advisory multi-step... Information 15.202 Advisory multi-step process. (a) The agency may publish a presolicitation notice (see 5.204... participate in the acquisition. This process should not be used for multi-step acquisitions where it...

  6. 49 CFR 38.99 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Floors, steps and thresholds. 38.99 Section 38.99... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Commuter Rail Cars and Systems § 38.99 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles, step treads, places for standees, and areas where wheelchair...

  7. 49 CFR 38.25 - Doors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Doors, steps and thresholds. 38.25 Section 38.25... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Buses, Vans and Systems § 38.25 Doors, steps and thresholds. (a) Slip resistance. All aisles, steps, floor areas where people walk and floors in securement locations shall...

  8. 36 CFR 1192.153 - Doors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Doors, steps and thresholds. 1192.153 Section 1192.153 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS...-resistant. (b) All step edges shall have a band of color(s) running the full width of the step...

  9. 36 CFR 1192.117 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Floors, steps and thresholds. 1192.117 Section 1192.117 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS.... (b) All step edges and thresholds shall have a band of color(s) running the full width of the step...

  10. 40 CFR 35.909 - Step 2+3 grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... design (step 2) and construction (step 3) of a waste water treatment works. (b) Limitations. The Regional... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.909 Step 2+3 grants. (a) Authority... Water and Waste Management finds to have unusually high costs of construction, the...

  11. Steps toward Gaining Knowledge of World Music Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Katie

    2013-01-01

    This article presents steps toward gaining knowledge of world music pedagogy for K-12 general music educators. The majority of the article details steps that invite engagement within everyday contexts with accessible resources within local and online communities. The steps demonstrate ways general music teachers can diversify and self-direct their…

  12. Tea and bone health: steps forward in translational nutrition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Chyu, Ming-Chien; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem in the aging population worldwide. Cross-sectional and retrospective evidence indicates that tea consumption may be a promising approach in mitigating bone loss and in reducing risk of osteoporotic fractures among older adults. Tea polyphenols enhance osteoblastogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Animal studies reveal that intake of tea polyphenols have pronounced positive effects on bone as shown by higher bone mass and trabecular bone volume, number, and thickness and lower trabecular separation via increasing bone formation and inhibition of bone resorption, resulting in greater bone strength. These osteoprotective effects appear to be mediated through antioxidant or antiinflammatory pathways along with their downstream signaling mechanisms. A short-term clinical trial of green tea polyphenols has translated the findings from ovariectomized animals to postmenopausal osteopenic women through evaluation of bioavailability, safety, bone turnover markers, muscle strength, and quality of life. For future studies, preclinical animal studies to optimize the dose of tea polyphenols for maximum osteoprotective efficacy and a follow-up short-term dose-response trial in postmenopausal osteopenic women are necessary to inform the design of randomized controlled studies in at-risk populations. Advanced imaging technology should also contribute to determining the effective dose of tea polyphenols in achieving better bone mass, microarchitecture integrity, and bone strength, which are critical steps for translating the putative benefit of tea consumption in osteoporosis management into clinical practice and dietary guidelines.

  13. Tea and bone health: steps forward in translational nutrition12345

    PubMed Central

    Chyu, Ming-Chien; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem in the aging population worldwide. Cross-sectional and retrospective evidence indicates that tea consumption may be a promising approach in mitigating bone loss and in reducing risk of osteoporotic fractures among older adults. Tea polyphenols enhance osteoblastogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Animal studies reveal that intake of tea polyphenols have pronounced positive effects on bone as shown by higher bone mass and trabecular bone volume, number, and thickness and lower trabecular separation via increasing bone formation and inhibition of bone resorption, resulting in greater bone strength. These osteoprotective effects appear to be mediated through antioxidant or antiinflammatory pathways along with their downstream signaling mechanisms. A short-term clinical trial of green tea polyphenols has translated the findings from ovariectomized animals to postmenopausal osteopenic women through evaluation of bioavailability, safety, bone turnover markers, muscle strength, and quality of life. For future studies, preclinical animal studies to optimize the dose of tea polyphenols for maximum osteoprotective efficacy and a follow-up short-term dose-response trial in postmenopausal osteopenic women are necessary to inform the design of randomized controlled studies in at-risk populations. Advanced imaging technology should also contribute to determining the effective dose of tea polyphenols in achieving better bone mass, microarchitecture integrity, and bone strength, which are critical steps for translating the putative benefit of tea consumption in osteoporosis management into clinical practice and dietary guidelines. PMID:24172296

  14. The Aging Epigenome.

    PubMed

    Booth, Lauren N; Brunet, Anne

    2016-06-01

    During aging, the mechanisms that normally maintain health and stress resistance strikingly decline, resulting in decrepitude, frailty, and ultimately death. Exactly when and how this decline occurs is unknown. Changes in transcriptional networks and chromatin state lie at the heart of age-dependent decline. These epigenomic changes are not only observed during aging but also profoundly affect cellular function and stress resistance, thereby contributing to the progression of aging. We propose that the dysregulation of transcriptional and chromatin networks is a crucial component of aging. Understanding age-dependent epigenomic changes will yield key insights into how aging begins and progresses and should lead to the development of new therapeutics that delay or even reverse aging and age-related diseases. PMID:27259204

  15. Age determination of raccoons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grau, G.A.; Sanderson, G.C.; Rogers, J.P.

    1970-01-01

    Age criteria, based on 61 skulls and eye lenses from 103 known-age captives, are described for separating raccoons (Procyon lotor) into eight age-classes as follows: young-of-the-year, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-7, > 7 years. Criteria studied were eye lens nitrogen, cranial suture closure, tooth wear and incisor cementum layers. Lens nitrogen increased rapidly up to 12 months of age, but at much reduced rate thereafter. Total lens nitrogen was useful only in separating young-of-the-year from adults. The closure sequence for five cranial sutures accurately divided the total known-age sample of males into seven groups, and the adults into five groups. The tooth wear criteria divided the known-age sample into five relative age groups, but aging of individuals by this method was inaccurate. Histological sectioning of known-age teeth was the best method of observing layering in the cementum tissue. The technique of basing estimation of age on cementum ring counts, although subjective, was accurate for aging individuals through their fourth year but tended to underestimate the age of animals over 4 years old. However, suture closure or tooth wear can be used to identify males over 4 years old. In field studies, technical difficulties limit the utility of age estimation by cementum layers. Maximum root thickness of the lower canine was accurate in determining the sex of individuals from 5 months to ,at least 48 months of age.

  16. Epigenetic predictor of age.

    PubMed

    Bocklandt, Sven; Lin, Wen; Sehl, Mary E; Sánchez, Francisco J; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Horvath, Steve; Vilain, Eric

    2011-01-01

    From the moment of conception, we begin to age. A decay of cellular structures, gene regulation, and DNA sequence ages cells and organisms. DNA methylation patterns change with increasing age and contribute to age related disease. Here we identify 88 sites in or near 80 genes for which the degree of cytosine methylation is significantly correlated with age in saliva of 34 male identical twin pairs between 21 and 55 years of age. Furthermore, we validated sites in the promoters of three genes and replicated our results in a general population sample of 31 males and 29 females between 18 and 70 years of age. The methylation of three sites--in the promoters of the EDARADD, TOM1L1, and NPTX2 genes--is linear with age over a range of five decades. Using just two cytosines from these loci, we built a regression model that explained 73% of the variance in age, and is able to predict the age of an individual with an average accuracy of 5.2 years. In forensic science, such a model could estimate the age of a person, based on a biological sample alone. Furthermore, a measurement of relevant sites in the genome could be a tool in routine medical screening to predict the risk of age-related diseases and to tailor interventions based on the epigenetic bio-age instead of the chronological age. PMID:21731603

  17. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy L277 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H.; Farahmand, B.; Cho, A.

    2003-01-01

    Compared with aluminum alloys such as 2219, which is widely used in space vehicle for cryogenic tanks and unpressurized structures, aluminum-lithium alloys possess attractive combinations of lower density and higher modulus along with comparable mechanical properties and improved damage tolerance. These characteristics have resulted in the successful use of the aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 for the Space Shuttle External Tank, and the consideration of newer U.S. aluminum-lithium alloys such as L277 and C458 for future space vehicles. A design of experiments aging study was conducted for plate and a limited study on extrusions. To achieve the T8 temper, Alloy L277 is typically aged at 290 F for 40 hours. In the study for plate, a two-step aging treatment was developed through a design of experiments study and the one step aging used as a control. Based on the earlier NASA studies on 2195, the first step aging temperature was varied between 220 F and 260 F. The second step aging temperatures was varied between 290 F and 310 F, which is in the range of the single-step aging temperature. For extrusions, two, single-step, and one two-step aging condition were evaluated. The results of the design of experiments used for the T8 temper as well as a smaller set of experiments for the T6 temper for plate and the results for extrusions will be presented.

  18. Step-by-step isolated resection of segment 1 of the liver using the hanging maneuver.

    PubMed

    López-Andújar, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Bruna, Marcos; Jiménez-Fuertes, Montiel; Moya, Angel; Pareja, Eugenia; Mir, Jose

    2009-09-01

    The caudate lobe can be the origin of primary liver tumours or the sole site of liver metastases. This lobe is anatomically divided into 3 parts: Spiegel's lobe (Couinaud's segment 1), paracaval portion (Couinaud's segment 9), and the caudate process. In this series of 4 cases, we provide a step-by-step description of a surgical technique variation that can be applied to resections of lesions localized in segment 1. We believe that other than size, lesion removal in this hepatic anatomic area, which is difficult to perform, can be done more easily using this new approach because it requires minimal mobilization without unnecessary parenchyma transection of other liver parts. Therefore, it reduces the risk of lesions in the inferior vena cava and the middle hepatic vein and respects adequate margins without the use of clamping maneuvers and in an acceptable surgical time.

  19. A renal registry for Africa: first steps

    PubMed Central

    Davids, M. Razeen; Eastwood, John B.; Selwood, Neville H.; Arogundade, Fatiu A.; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Jarraya, Faiçal; MacPhee, Iain A.M.; McCulloch, Mignon; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Swanepoel, Charles R.; Adu, Dwomoa

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of data on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Several national renal registries have been established but have not been sustainable because of resource limitations. The African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) and the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA) recognize the importance of good registry data and plan to establish an African Renal Registry. This article reviews the elements needed for a successful renal registry and gives an overview of renal registries in developed and developing countries, with the emphasis on Africa. It then discusses the proposed African Renal Registry and the first steps towards its implementation. A registry requires a clear purpose, and agreement on inclusion and exclusion criteria, the dataset and the data dictionary. Ethical issues, data ownership and access, the dissemination of findings and funding must all be considered. Well-documented processes should guide data collection and ensure data quality. The ERA-EDTA Registry is the world's oldest renal registry. In Africa, registry data have been published mainly by North African countries, starting with Egypt and Tunisia in 1975. However, in recent years no African country has regularly reported national registry data. A shared renal registry would provide participating countries with a reliable technology platform and a common data dictionary to facilitate joint analyses and comparisons. In March 2015, AFRAN organized a registry workshop for African nephrologists and then took the decision to establish, for the first time, an African Renal Registry. In conclusion, African nephrologists have decided to establish a continental renal registry. This initiative could make a substantial impact on the practice of nephrology and the provision of services for adults and children with ESRD in many African countries. PMID:26798479

  20. A renal registry for Africa: first steps.

    PubMed

    Davids, M Razeen; Eastwood, John B; Selwood, Neville H; Arogundade, Fatiu A; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Jarraya, Faiçal; MacPhee, Iain A M; McCulloch, Mignon; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Swanepoel, Charles R; Adu, Dwomoa

    2016-02-01

    There is a dearth of data on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Several national renal registries have been established but have not been sustainable because of resource limitations. The African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) and the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA) recognize the importance of good registry data and plan to establish an African Renal Registry. This article reviews the elements needed for a successful renal registry and gives an overview of renal registries in developed and developing countries, with the emphasis on Africa. It then discusses the proposed African Renal Registry and the first steps towards its implementation. A registry requires a clear purpose, and agreement on inclusion and exclusion criteria, the dataset and the data dictionary. Ethical issues, data ownership and access, the dissemination of findings and funding must all be considered. Well-documented processes should guide data collection and ensure data quality. The ERA-EDTA Registry is the world's oldest renal registry. In Africa, registry data have been published mainly by North African countries, starting with Egypt and Tunisia in 1975. However, in recent years no African country has regularly reported national registry data. A shared renal registry would provide participating countries with a reliable technology platform and a common data dictionary to facilitate joint analyses and comparisons. In March 2015, AFRAN organized a registry workshop for African nephrologists and then took the decision to establish, for the first time, an African Renal Registry. In conclusion, African nephrologists have decided to establish a continental renal registry. This initiative could make a substantial impact on the practice of nephrology and the provision of services for adults and children with ESRD in many African countries.

  1. The magnesium chelation step in chlorophyll biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.

    1990-11-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, the biogenesis of energy transducing membranes requires the coordinate synthesis of prosthetic groups, proteins, and various lipids. Two of the major prosthetic groups, chlorophyll and heme, share a common biosynthetic pathway that diverges at the point of metal insertion into protoporphyrin IX (Proto). Insertion of iron leads to the formation of hemes, while insertion of magnesium is the first step unique to chlorophyll formation. This project is directed toward identifying the enzyme(s) responsible for magnesium chelation and elucidating the mechanism which regulates the flux of precursors through the branch point enzymes in isolated chloroplasts. Using intact chloroplasts from greening cucumber cotyledons, we have confirmed the ATP requirement for Mg-Proto formation. Use of non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs, uncouplers and ionophores has led to the conclusions that ATP hydrolysis is necessary, but that this hydrolysis is not linked to the requirement for membrane intactness by transmembrane ion gradients or electrical potentials. The enzyme(s) are flexible with respect to the porphyrin substrate specificity, accepting porphyrins with -vinyl, -ethyl, or -H substituents at the 2 and 4 positions. The activity increases approximately four-fold during greening. Possible physiological feedback inhibitors such as heme, protochlorophyllide, and chlorophyllide had no specific effect on the activity. The activity has now been assayed in barely, corn and peas, with the system from peas almost ten-fold more active than the cucumber system. Work is continuing in pea chloroplasts with the development of a continuous assay and investigation of the feasibility of characterizing an active, organelle-free preparation. 6 figs.

  2. Clinical implications of aging.

    PubMed

    King, Mitch; Lipsky, Martin S

    2015-11-01

    Figure summarizes the major changes of aging and some key ways these changes affect pages. Though many changes occur with aging, under normal or resting conditions, there is usually very little functionally that is diminished solely on the basis of aging. The net effects are reductions in reserve capacity and placing geriatric patients at higher risk for adverse consequences related to medications and diseases. Interactions between lifestyle factors, such as exercise, diet, and environmental exposures, have a large impact on aging and lead to great individual variability. The interplay between these environmental factors, aging, and development of chronic diseases multiply the amount of variation seen as individual's age.

  3. Aging of gaseous detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.

    1990-03-01

    This paper makes an overview of developments in the wire chamber aging field since the wire chamber aging workshop held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California on January 16--17, 1986. The author discusses new techniques to analyze the gas impurities and the wire aging products, wire nonaging'' in clean systems, wire aging in systems containing various impurities, various examples of problems which can prime'' surfaces prior to the occurrence of the aging, and some recent aging experience with the SSC micro-straw tubes.'' 35 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Association between daily step counts and physical activity level among Korean elementary schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Jonghoon; Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko; Lee, Sangjik; Kim, Eunkyung; Lim, Kiwon; Kim, Hyungryul; Lee, In-Sook; Tanaka, Shigeho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the current study was to investigate steps per day (steps/d) and physical activity level (PAL) in Korean elementary school children having normal weight (normal-weight). We also clarified whether a gender difference exited between steps/d and PAL. [Methods] Children aged 9 to 12 y were recruited from two elementary schools located in different urban districts in Korea. The present study included 33 Korean children, of which 18 were normal-weight boys and 15 were normal-weight girls. During the same 1 week study period under free-living conditions the total energy expenditure (TEE) and step counts were estimated using the doubly labeled water (DLW) method and an accelerometer, respectively. We calculated PAL as the TEE/ resting metabolic rate. [Results] The range of PAL was 1.25 – 1.93 with a mean value of 1.57. None of the variables of energy expenditure was significantly different by sex. However, steps/d were significantly higher in boys than in girls. When adjusting regression analysis by gender, steps/ d were positively associated with PAL among all subjects (r = 0.56, P < 0.01). Furthermore, steps/d were positively associated with PAL in boys (r = 0.68, P < 0.01), but not in girls (r = 0.27, P = 0.34). [Conclusion] Our results suggest that locomotive activity may be the main contributor to the individual PAL differences for elementary school boys, while non-locomotive activity may be the main contributor for elementary school girls. PMID:27757388

  5. Personalised Prescription of Scalable High Intensity Interval Training to Inactive Female Adults of Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Jacqueline L.

    2016-01-01

    Stepping is a convenient form of scalable high-intensity interval training (HIIT) that may lead to health benefits. However, the accurate personalised prescription of stepping is hampered by a lack of evidence on optimal stepping cadences and step heights for various populations. This study examined the acute physiological responses to stepping exercise at various heights and cadences in young (n = 14) and middle-aged (n = 14) females in order to develop an equation that facilitates prescription of stepping at targeted intensities. Participants completed a step test protocol consisting of randomised three-minute bouts at different step cadences (80, 90, 100, 110 steps·min-1) and step heights (17, 25, 30, 34 cm). Aerobic demand and heart rate values were measured throughout. Resting metabolic rate was measured in order to develop female specific metabolic equivalents (METs) for stepping. Results revealed significant differences between age groups for METs and heart rate reserve, and within-group differences for METs, heart rate, and metabolic cost, at different step heights and cadences. At a given step height and cadence, middle-aged females were required to work at an intensity on average 1.9 ± 0.26 METs greater than the younger females. A prescriptive equation was developed to assess energy cost in METs using multilevel regression analysis with factors of step height, step cadence and age. Considering recent evidence supporting accumulated bouts of HIIT exercise for health benefits, this equation, which allows HIIT to be personally prescribed to inactive and sedentary women, has potential impact as a public health exercise prescription tool. PMID:26848956

  6. Personalised Prescription of Scalable High Intensity Interval Training to Inactive Female Adults of Different Ages.

    PubMed

    Mair, Jacqueline L; Nevill, Alan M; De Vito, Giuseppe; Boreham, Colin A

    2016-01-01

    Stepping is a convenient form of scalable high-intensity interval training (HIIT) that may lead to health benefits. However, the accurate personalised prescription of stepping is hampered by a lack of evidence on optimal stepping cadences and step heights for various populations. This study examined the acute physiological responses to stepping exercise at various heights and cadences in young (n = 14) and middle-aged (n = 14) females in order to develop an equation that facilitates prescription of stepping at targeted intensities. Participants completed a step test protocol consisting of randomised three-minute bouts at different step cadences (80, 90, 100, 110 steps·min-1) and step heights (17, 25, 30, 34 cm). Aerobic demand and heart rate values were measured throughout. Resting metabolic rate was measured in order to develop female specific metabolic equivalents (METs) for stepping. Results revealed significant differences between age groups for METs and heart rate reserve, and within-group differences for METs, heart rate, and metabolic cost, at different step heights and cadences. At a given step height and cadence, middle-aged females were required to work at an intensity on average 1.9 ± 0.26 METs greater than the younger females. A prescriptive equation was developed to assess energy cost in METs using multilevel regression analysis with factors of step height, step cadence and age. Considering recent evidence supporting accumulated bouts of HIIT exercise for health benefits, this equation, which allows HIIT to be personally prescribed to inactive and sedentary women, has potential impact as a public health exercise prescription tool. PMID:26848956

  7. Age to survive: DNA damage and aging.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Björn; Garinis, George A; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J

    2008-02-01

    Aging represents the progressive functional decline and increased mortality risk common to nearly all metazoans. Recent findings experimentally link DNA damage and organismal aging: longevity-regulating genetic pathways respond to the accumulation of DNA damage and other stress conditions and conversely influence the rate of damage accumulation and its impact for cancer and aging. This novel insight has emerged from studies on human progeroid diseases and mouse models that have deficient DNA repair pathways. Here we discuss a unified concept of an evolutionarily conserved 'survival' response that shifts the organism's resources from growth to maintenance as an adaptation to stresses, such as starvation and DNA damage. This shift protects the organism from cancer and promotes healthy aging. PMID:18192065

  8. Heterogeneity in Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lowsky, David J.; Olshansky, S. Jay; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2014-01-01

    For a surprisingly large segment of the older population, chronological age is not a relevant marker for understanding, measuring, or experiencing healthy aging. Using the 2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and the 2004 Health and Retirement Study to examine the proportion of Americans exhibiting five markers of health and the variation in health-related quality of life across each of eight age groups, we find that a significant proportion of older Americans is healthy within every age group beginning at age 51, including among those aged 85+. For example, 48% of those aged 51–54 and 28% of those aged 85+ have excellent or very good self-reported health status; similarly, 89% of those aged 51–54 and 56% of those aged 85+ report no health-based limitations in work or housework. Also, health-related quality of life ranges widely within every age group, yet there is only a comparatively small variation in median quality of life across age groups, suggesting that older Americans today may be experiencing substantially different age-health trajectories than their predecessors. Patterns are similar for medical expenditures. Several policy implications are explored. PMID:24249734

  9. Dissipating Step Bunches during Crystallization under Transport Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Hong; Yau, S.-T.; Vekilov, Peter, G.

    2003-01-01

    In studies of crystal formation by the generation and spreading of layers, equidistant step trains are considered unstable---bunches and other spatiotemporal patterns of the growth steps are viewed as ubiquitous. We provide an example to the opposite. We monitor the spatiotemporal dynamics of steps and the resulting step patterns during crystallization of the proteins ferritin and apoferritin using the atomic force microscope. The variations in step velocity and density are not correlated, indicating the lack of a long-range attraction between the steps. We show that (i) because of its coupling to bulk transport, nucleation of new layers is chaotic and occurs at the facet edges, where the interfacial supersaturation is higher; (ii) step bunches self-organize via the competition for supply from the solution; and, (iii) bunches of weakly interacting steps decay as they move along the face. Tests by numerical modeling support the conclusions about the mechanisms underlying our observations. The results from these systems suggest that during crystallization controlled by transport, with weakly or noninteracting growth steps, the stable kinetic state of the surface is an equidistant step train, and step bunches only arise during nucleation of new layers. Since nucleation only occurs at a few sites on the surface, the surface morphology may be controllably patterned or smoothened by locally controlling nucleation.

  10. K/T age for the popigai impact event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deino, A. L.; Garvin, J. B.; Montanari, S.

    1991-01-01

    The multi-ringed POPIGAI structure, with an outer ring diameter of over 100 km, is the largest impact feature currently recognized on Earth with an Phanerozoic age. The target rocks in this relatively unglaciated region consist of upper Proterozoic through Mesozoic platform sediments and igneous rocks overlying Precambrian crystalline basement. The reported absolute age of the Popigai impact event ranges from 30.5 to 39 Ma. With the intent of refining this age estimate, a melt-breccia (suevite) sample from the inner regions of the Popigai structure was prepared for total fusion and step-wise heating Ar-40/Ar-39 analysis. Although the total fusion and step-heating experiments suggest some degree of age heterogeneity, the recurring theme is an age of around 64 to 66 Ma.

  11. Volume Diffusion Growth Kinetics and Step Geometry in Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    1998-01-01

    The role of step geometry in two-dimensional stationary volume diff4sion process used in crystal growth kinetics models is investigated. Three different interface shapes: a) a planar interface, b) an equidistant hemispherical bumps train tAx interface, and c) a train of right angled steps, are used in this comparative study. The ratio of the super-saturation to the diffusive flux at the step position is used as a control parameter. The value of this parameter can vary as much as 50% for different geometries. An approximate analytical formula is derived for the right angled steps geometry. In addition to the kinetic models, this formula can be utilized in macrostep growth models. Finally, numerical modeling of the diffusive and convective transport for equidistant steps is conducted. In particular, the role of fluid flow resulting from the advancement of steps and its contribution to the transport of species to the steps is investigated.

  12. The aging inmate.

    PubMed

    LaMere, S; Smyer, T; Gragert, M

    1996-04-01

    Aging inmates form a distinct cultural subgroup. The antecedents for their unique patterns and needs come from the life cycle of aging within the confines of a total institution. The inmate who ages in place will lack the common social markers experienced by his age cohorts in the outside world. The aging inmate faces challenges to his self-concept related to loss of family, employment, and sexual identity. His sense of autonomy is threatened by loss of self-selective behaviors, personal possessions, and privacy. Needs of the aging prison population will challenge traditional prison resources, including correctional nursing staff and mental health and counseling services. Substantive assistance for the inmate who has aged in prison must be accompanied by an awareness of the cumulative effects of living and aging within the unique sociocultural environment of the total institution. PMID:8778405

  13. Aging According to Biography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiland, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Uses Erik Erikson's work to discuss how biographies treat aging. Explores how developmental theorists observe biographical representations of the life cycle and its applicability to aging. (Author/BHK)

  14. Sleep and Aging: Insomnia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Sleep and Aging Insomnia Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint ... us | contact us | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of ...

  15. Mitochondria and Cardiovascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Old age is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Several lines of evidence in experimental animal models have indicated the central role of mitochondria both in lifespan determination and cardiovascular aging. In this article we review the evidence supporting the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and biogenesis as well as the crosstalk between mitochondria and cellular signaling in cardiac and vascular aging. Intrinsic cardiac aging in the murine model closely recapitulates age-related cardiac changes in humans (left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction), while the phenotype of vascular aging include endothelial dysfunction, reduced vascular elasticity and chronic vascular inflammation. Both cardiac and vascular aging involve neurohormonal signaling (e.g. renin-angiotensin, adrenergic, insulin-IGF1 signaling) and cell-autonomous mechanisms. The potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in aging and cardiovascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants, calorie restriction, calorie restriction mimetics and exercise training. PMID:22499901

  16. Interstellar Probe: The Next Step To Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2016-07-01

    Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) has recently established a new Panel on Interstellar Research (PIR) to consider the next steps toward finally making a dedicated Interstellar Probe mission a reality. Crucial tasks are to build consensus amongst the international scientific community for the appropriate scientific campaigns and measurements to be carried out for such a mission, taking into account the new and continuing results from the outer solar system and beyond by VIM, IBEX, New Horizons, and exoplanet observations and studies.

  17. Insects Use Two Distinct Classes of Steps during Unrestrained Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Theunissen, Leslie M.; Dürr, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Background Adaptive, context-dependent control of locomotion requires modulation of centrally generated rhythmic motor patterns through peripheral control loops and postural reflexes. Thus assuming that the modulation of rhythmic motor patterns accounts for much of the behavioural variability observed in legged locomotion, investigating behavioural variability is a key to the understanding of context-dependent control mechanisms in locomotion. To date, the variability of unrestrained locomotion is poorly understood, and virtually nothing is known about the features that characterise the natural statistics of legged locomotion. In this study, we quantify the natural variability of hexapedal walking and climbing in insects, drawing from a database of several thousand steps recorded over two hours of walking time. Results We show that the range of step length used by unrestrained climbing stick insects is large, showing that step length can be changed substantially for adaptive locomotion. Step length distributions were always bimodal, irrespective of leg type and walking condition, suggesting the presence of two distinct classes of steps: short and long steps. Probability density of step length was well-described by a gamma distribution for short steps, and a logistic distribution for long steps. Major coefficients of these distributions remained largely unaffected by walking conditions. Short and long steps differed concerning their spatial occurrence on the walking substrate, their timing within the step sequence, and their prevalent swing direction. Finally, ablation of structures that serve to improve foothold increased the ratio of short to long steps, indicating a corrective function of short steps. Conclusions Statistical and functional differences suggest that short and long steps are physiologically distinct classes of leg movements that likely reflect distinct control mechanisms at work. PMID:24376877

  18. Aging is not programmed

    PubMed Central

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-01-01

    Aging is not and cannot be programmed. Instead, aging is a continuation of developmental growth, driven by genetic pathways such as mTOR. Ironically, this is often misunderstood as a sort of programmed aging. In contrast, aging is a purposeless quasi-program or, figuratively, a shadow of actual programs. “The brightest flame casts the darkest shadow.” -George Martin PMID:24240128

  19. [Old age workers].

    PubMed

    Izmerov, N F

    2012-01-01

    The author demonstrates that in conditions of demographic aging an important contribution in solving the task set in "Strategy 2020" on more efficient usage of working resources could be involvement of occupational potential of old age workers, e.g. through changeable working schedules, outwork and distance work. With that, employment level at old age should consider performance level, health state and psycho-physiologic potential of the certain age group.

  20. First step for nation building. Elementary education.

    PubMed

    Singh, A

    1998-01-01

    This article focuses on the implementation of the national goal of Universal Elementary Education (UEE) in India. The goal was first recognized at independence in the Constitution. Each state has the responsibility to provide free, compulsory education for children under 14 years of age. National Education Policies reinforce a constitutional mandate. In 1968, the first national policy called for equalization of educational opportunities for girls and children belonging to scheduled castes and tribes. In 1986, policy set a target of the year 2000 for attainment of UEE. States and union territories provide for free, compulsory education, but compulsion is not enforced. Recent efforts focus on universal access, retention, and achievement. During 1950-96, the number of primary schools expanded. After the 1990 World Conference for Education for All in Thailand, multilateral and bilateral aid agencies were more willing to invest in primary education in developing countries. The World Bank and European Union funded a District Primary Education Program which promoted primary education in India through decentralized planning and integrated programming at the district level. The program operated in 149 districts in 14 states in 1997. Two other international programs link the local community with teachers, educational administrators, and students and provide teachers in remote areas. Village Education Committees and Nonformal Education centers were set up in 1986. Nongovernmental groups formed partnerships. It is hoped that a clear vision, a strong commitment, higher investments, and increased community participation will hasten UEE.

  1. Aging and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayor's Office for Senior Citizens, Chicago, IL.

    The process of learning with respect to age is discussed. Learning may be defined as the acquisition of information or skills. Three non-cognitive factors varying with age are loss of speed, health, and motivation. Studies on learning in relation to age have not controlled for non-learning factors. Perceptual and psychomotor studies are not…

  2. English Education and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Candida

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that English teachers are in an excellent position to help students learn about the aged and aging because they know literature that treats the joys and pains of later life and they understand how language shapes and reflects cultural attitudes. Proposes objectives and presents samples of activities to be used in an aging unit. (MM)

  3. Language and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan; Anagnopoulos, Cheryl

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the effects of aging on language usage focusing on three areas of exploration: (1) changes in language in relation to changes in other cognitive abilities, (2) the linguistic consequences of normal aging versus those of dementia and aphasia, and (3) age-group differences in patterns of conversational interaction. (67 references) (GLR)

  4. Age and Terrorist Victimization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trela, James; Hewitt, Christopher

    While research has examined how age-related factors structure the probability of experiencing a particular event or suffering a particular kind of injury, one issue which has not been empirically addressed is the age structure of victimization from terrorist activity and civil strife. To explore the relationship between age and terrorist…

  5. Physiological Aging and Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osness, Wayne

    This paper explores the nature of the aging process by providing an overview of the available evidence relating to the body systems that are most critical to biological function. Each system is treated separately to more clearly describe various aspects of the aging process and then integrated in a discussion of the theories of biological aging.…

  6. Exercise and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    In this presentation on exercise and aging, the following explanations are made: the nature of physical fitness, physical fitness values, the importance of recognizing individual differences, physiological changes occurring with age through the adult years, physical fitness studies pertaining to middle-aged persons, the trainability of older…

  7. Protection of the Space Environment: The First Small Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, M.

    The exploration of the space environment - by robotic and manned missions - is a natural extension of mankind's desire to explore his own planet. Likewise, the development of the space environment - for industry, commerce and tourism - is a natural extension of our current business and domestic environment. Unfortunately, it appears that our ability to pollute, degrade and even destroy aspects of the space environment is also an extension of an ability we have developed and practised here on Earth. This paper reviews the evidence of mankind's pollution of the space environment - which includes the planetary bodies - in the first 45 years of the Space Age, and extrapolates the potential for further degradation into its second half-century. It considers the future development of both scientific exploration and commercial exploitation - in orbit and on the surface of the planetary bodies - and the possible detrimental effects. In presenting the case for protection of the space environment, the paper makes recommendations concerning the first steps towards a solution to the problem. Among other things, it calls for the formation of an international consultative body, to consider the issues relevant to `Protection of the Space Environment' and to raise awareness of the subject among the growing body of space professionals and practitioners. It also recommends consideration of a `set of guidelines' or `code of practice' as a precursor to more formal policies or legislation. In doing so, however, it is careful to recognise the need to strike a balance between unbridled exploration and development, and a stifling regime of rules and regulations. The discussion of this subject requires a good deal more collective knowledge, understanding and maturity than has been evident in similar discussions regarding the Earth's environment. At present, that knowledge resides largely within the professional space community. Thus there is also a need for promulgation, both within and

  8. Heterotopic Renal Autotransplantation in a Porcine Model: A Step-by-Step Protocol.

    PubMed

    Kaths, J Moritz; Echeverri, Juan; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Louis, Kristine S; Yip, Paul; John, Rohan; Mucsi, Istvan; Ghanekar, Anand; Bagli, Darius; Selzner, Markus; Robinson, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients suffering from end-stage renal disease. It offers better life expectancy and higher quality of life when compared to dialysis. Although the last few decades have seen major improvements in patient outcomes following kidney transplantation, the increasing shortage of available organs represents a severe problem worldwide. To expand the donor pool, marginal kidney grafts recovered from extended criteria donors (ECD) or donated after circulatory death (DCD) are now accepted for transplantation. To further improve the postoperative outcome of these marginal grafts, research must focus on new therapeutic approaches such as alternative preservation techniques, immunomodulation, gene transfer, and stem cell administration. Experimental studies in animal models are the final step before newly developed techniques can be translated into clinical practice. Porcine kidney transplantation is an excellent model of human transplantation and allows investigation of novel approaches. The major advantage of the porcine model is its anatomical and physiological similarity to the human body, which facilitates the rapid translation of new findings to clinical trials. This article offers a surgical step-by-step protocol for an autotransplantation model and highlights key factors to ensure experimental success. Adequate pre- and postoperative housing, attentive anesthesia, and consistent surgical techniques result in favorable postoperative outcomes. Resection of the contralateral native kidney provides the opportunity to assess post-transplant graft function. The placement of venous and urinary catheters and the use of metabolic cages allow further detailed evaluation. For long-term follow-up studies and investigation of alternative graft preservation techniques, autotransplantation models are superior to allotransplantation models, as they avoid the confounding bias posed by rejection and immunosuppressive medication. PMID

  9. Heterotopic Renal Autotransplantation in a Porcine Model: A Step-by-Step Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kaths, J. Moritz; Echeverri, Juan; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Louis, Kristine S.; Yip, Paul; John, Rohan; Mucsi, Istvan; Ghanekar, Anand; Bagli, Darius; Selzner, Markus; Robinson, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients suffering from end-stage renal disease. It offers better life expectancy and higher quality of life when compared to dialysis. Although the last few decades have seen major improvements in patient outcomes following kidney transplantation, the increasing shortage of available organs represents a severe problem worldwide. To expand the donor pool, marginal kidney grafts recovered from extended criteria donors (ECD) or donated after circulatory death (DCD) are now accepted for transplantation. To further improve the postoperative outcome of these marginal grafts, research must focus on new therapeutic approaches such as alternative preservation techniques, immunomodulation, gene transfer, and stem cell administration. Experimental studies in animal models are the final step before newly developed techniques can be translated into clinical practice. Porcine kidney transplantation is an excellent model of human transplantation and allows investigation of novel approaches. The major advantage of the porcine model is its anatomical and physiological similarity to the human body, which facilitates the rapid translation of new findings to clinical trials. This article offers a surgical step-by-step protocol for an autotransplantation model and highlights key factors to ensure experimental success. Adequate pre- and postoperative housing, attentive anesthesia, and consistent surgical techniques result in favorable postoperative outcomes. Resection of the contralateral native kidney provides the opportunity to assess post-transplant graft function. The placement of venous and urinary catheters and the use of metabolic cages allow further detailed evaluation. For long-term follow-up studies and investigation of alternative graft preservation techniques, autotransplantation models are superior to allotransplantation models, as they avoid the confounding bias posed by rejection and immunosuppressive medication. PMID

  10. Aging on a different scale--chronological versus pathology-related aging.

    PubMed

    Melis, Joost P M; Jonker, Martijs J; Vijg, Jan; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Breit, Timo M; van Steeg, Harry

    2013-10-01

    In the next decades the elderly population will increase dramatically, demanding appropriate solutions in health care and aging research focusing on healthy aging to prevent high burdens and costs in health care. For this, research targeting tissue-specific and individual aging is paramount to make the necessary progression in aging research. In a recently published study we have attempted to make a step interpreting aging data on chronological as well as pathological scale. For this, we sampled five major tissues at regular time intervals during the entire C57BL/6J murine lifespan from a controlled in vivo aging study, measured the whole transcriptome and incorporated temporal as well as physical health aspects into the analyses. In total, we used 18 different age-related pathological parameters and transcriptomic profiles of liver, kidney, spleen, lung and brain and created a database that can now be used for a broad systems biology approach. In our study, we focused on the dynamics of biological processes during chronological aging and the comparison between chronological and pathology-related aging.

  11. Aging on a different scale – chronological versus pathology-related aging

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Jonker, Martijs J.; Vijg, Jan; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Breit, Timo M.; van Steeg, Harry

    2013-01-01

    In the next decades the elderly population will increase dramatically, demanding appropriate solutions in health care and aging research focusing on healthy aging to prevent high burdens and costs in health care. For this, research targeting tissue-specific and individual aging is paramount to make the necessary progression in aging research. In a recently published study we have attempted to make a step interpreting aging data on chronological as well as pathological scale. For this, we sampled five major tissues at regular time intervals during the entire C57BL/6J murine lifespan from a controlled in vivo aging study, measured the whole transcriptome and incorporated temporal as well as physical health aspects into the analyses. In total, we used 18 different age-related pathological parameters and transcriptomic profiles of liver, kidney, spleen, lung and brain and created a database that can now be used for a broad systems biology approach. In our study, we focused on the dynamics of biological processes during chronological aging and the comparison between chronological and pathology-related aging. PMID:24131799

  12. Social and Emotional Aging

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Susan; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The past several decades have witnessed unidimensional decline models of aging give way to life-span developmental models that consider how specific processes and strategies facilitate adaptive aging. In part, this shift was provoked by the stark contrast between findings that clearly demonstrate decreased biological, physiological, and cognitive capacity with those suggesting that people are generally satisfied in old age and experience relatively high levels of emotional well-being. In recent years, this supposed “paradox” of aging has been reconciled through careful theoretical analysis and empirical investigation. Viewing aging as adaptation sheds light on resilience, wellbeing, and emotional distress across adulthood. PMID:19575618

  13. Computational biology for ageing.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Daniela; Papatheodorou, Irene; Ziehm, Matthias; Thornton, Janet M

    2011-01-12

    High-throughput genomic and proteomic technologies have generated a wealth of publicly available data on ageing. Easy access to these data, and their computational analysis, is of great importance in order to pinpoint the causes and effects of ageing. Here, we provide a description of the existing databases and computational tools on ageing that are available for researchers. We also describe the computational approaches to data interpretation in the field of ageing including gene expression, comparative and pathway analyses, and highlight the challenges for future developments. We review recent biological insights gained from applying bioinformatics methods to analyse and interpret ageing data in different organisms, tissues and conditions.

  14. UV, stress and aging.

    PubMed

    Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Leduc, Cedric; Verbeke, Alix; Toussaint, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Skin is a model of choice in studies on aging. Indeed, skin aging can be modulated by internal and external factors, reflecting its complexity. Two types of skin aging have been identified: intrinsic, mainly genetically determined and extrinsic-also called "photo-aging"-resulting on the impact of environmental stress and more precisely of UV rays. Simplified in vitro models, based on cellular senescence, have been developed to study the relationship between UV and aging. These models vary on the cell type (fibroblasts or keratinocytes, normal or immortalized) and the type of UV used (UVA or UVB). PMID:23467762

  15. UV, stress and aging.

    PubMed

    Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Leduc, Cedric; Verbeke, Alix; Toussaint, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Skin is a model of choice in studies on aging. Indeed, skin aging can be modulated by internal and external factors, reflecting its complexity. Two types of skin aging have been identified: intrinsic, mainly genetically determined and extrinsic-also called "photo-aging"-resulting on the impact of environmental stress and more precisely of UV rays. Simplified in vitro models, based on cellular senescence, have been developed to study the relationship between UV and aging. These models vary on the cell type (fibroblasts or keratinocytes, normal or immortalized) and the type of UV used (UVA or UVB).

  16. Computational biology for ageing

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Daniela; Papatheodorou, Irene; Ziehm, Matthias; Thornton, Janet M.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput genomic and proteomic technologies have generated a wealth of publicly available data on ageing. Easy access to these data, and their computational analysis, is of great importance in order to pinpoint the causes and effects of ageing. Here, we provide a description of the existing databases and computational tools on ageing that are available for researchers. We also describe the computational approaches to data interpretation in the field of ageing including gene expression, comparative and pathway analyses, and highlight the challenges for future developments. We review recent biological insights gained from applying bioinformatics methods to analyse and interpret ageing data in different organisms, tissues and conditions. PMID:21115530

  17. Studying aging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-06-15

    Drosophila melanogaster represents one of the most important genetically accessible model organisms for aging research. Studies in flies have identified single gene mutations that influence lifespan and have characterized endocrine signaling interactions that control homeostasis systemically. Recent studies have focused on the effects of aging on specific tissues and physiological processes, providing a comprehensive picture of age-related tissue dysfunction and the loss of systemic homeostasis. Here we review methodological aspects of this work and highlight technical considerations when using Drosophila to study aging and age-related diseases.

  18. A step-by-step guide to chemical cleaning of boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    1996-09-01

    Steam generation is an essential part of virtually all chemical process industries (CPI) plants, but the steam plant is frequently the poor and somewhat forgotten unit at a chemical manufacturing facility. Yet, proper steam plant operation and boiler maintenance can save a facility many thousands of dollars per year in repair costs and lost production due to boiler outages. An integral part of a good boiler maintenance program is periodic chemical cleaning of the boiler. This article outlines twelve important steps that plant engineers and managers can take to ensure a successful clean.

  19. Steps toward fault-tolerant quantum chemistry.

    SciTech Connect

    Taube, Andrew Garvin

    2010-05-01

    MPI alone is insufficient to achieve parallel scaling; QC developers have been forced to use alternative approaches to achieve scalability and would be receptive to radical shifts in the programming paradigm. Initial work in adapting the simplest QC method, Hartree-Fock, to this the new programming model indicates that the approach is beneficial for QC applications. However, the advantages to being able to scale to exascale computers are greatest for the computationally most expensive algorithms; within QC these are the high-accuracy coupled-cluster (CC) methods. Parallel coupledcluster programs are available, however they are based on the conventional MPI paradigm. Much of the effort is spent handling the complicated data dependencies between the various processors, especially as the size of the problem becomes large. The current paradigm will not survive the move to exascale computers. Here we discuss the initial steps toward designing and implementing a CC method within this model. First, we introduce the general concepts behind a CC method, focusing on the aspects that make these methods difficult to parallelize with conventional techniques. Then we outline what is the computational core of the CC method - a matrix multiply - within the task-based approach that the FAST-OS project is designed to take advantage of. Finally we outline the general setup to implement the simplest CC method in this model, linearized CC doubles (LinCC).

  20. Aging, longevity and health.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Sander, Miriam; Wewer, Ulla M; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2011-10-01

    The IARU Congress on Aging, Longevity and Health, held on 5-7 October 2010 in Copenhagen, Denmark, was hosted by Rector Ralf Hemmingsen, University of Copenhagen and Dean Ulla Wewer, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen and was organized by Center for Healthy Aging (CEHA) under the leadership of CEHA Managing Director Lene Juel Rasmussen and Prof. Vilhelm Bohr, National Institute on Aging, NIH, Baltimore, USA (associated to CEHA). The Congress was attended by approximately 125 researchers interested in and/or conducting research on aging and aging-related topics. The opening Congress Session included speeches by Ralf Hemmingsen, Ulla Wewer, and Lene Juel Rasmussen and Keynote Addresses by four world renowned aging researchers: Povl Riis (The Age Forum), Bernard Jeune (University of Southern Denmark), George Martin (University of Washington, USA) and Jan Vijg (Albert Einstein School of Medicine, USA) as well as a lecture discussing the art-science interface by Thomas Söderqvist (Director, Medical Museion, University of Copenhagen). The topics of the first six Sessions of the Congress were: Neuroscience and DNA damage, Aging and Stress, Life Course, Environmental Factors and Neuroscience, Muscle and Life Span and Life Span and Mechanisms. Two additional Sessions highlighted ongoing research in the recently established Center for Healthy Aging at the University of Copenhagen. This report highlights outcomes of recent research on aging-related topics, as described at the IARU Congress on Aging, Longevity and Health.