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Sample records for aging time increased

  1. Increase in the age of Olympic swimmers in modern times.

    PubMed

    Mazzilli, Facundo

    2016-11-25

    Mazzilli, F. Increase in the age of Olympic swimmers in modern times. Anecdotal data suggest an increase in the age of Olympic swimmers, but scientific studies in this regard are scarce, despite the importance for coaches of the confirmation of this increase in different styles. To ascertain the reality of this increase, the present study focused on the analysis of the data contained in the reports of the Internal Olympic Games Association, covering different events and styles throughout the history of the Games. Starting with the 1908 Games, a total of 806 swimmers (436 men and 370 women) were included in the study. Of them 137 men and 135 women had won two or more medals. Plots of the age of the swimmer at the time a gold, silver or bronze medal was granted versus year of competition elicited statistical significant increases in 3 events in men and 9 events in women. Interestingly, significant increases were regularly observed in the styles introduced in the sixties and a kind of V-shaped distribution was observed in some of the long established competitions, namely in the 100, 400 and 1500 m freestyle in men, where the point of inflexion seems to occur around 1960. Overall there is a continuing increase in the age of swimmers of ages over 24 years old mirrored by a decrease of those below 20 years and this is accompanied by the increased presence of swimmers that have won medals in 2 or 3 different Games.

  2. Age-related increases in right frontal activation during task switching are mediated by reaction time and white matter microstructure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Z; Hakun, J G; Johnson, N F; Gold, B T

    2014-10-10

    Age-related increases in right frontal cortex activation are a common finding in the neuroimaging literature. However, neurocognitive factors contributing to right frontal over-recruitment remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the influence of age-related reaction time (RT) slowing and white matter (WM) microstructure reductions as potential explanatory factors for age-related increases in right frontal activation during task switching. Groups of younger (N=32) and older (N=33) participants completed a task switching paradigm while functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed, and rested while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed. Two right frontal regions of interest (ROIs), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and insula, were selected for further analyses from a common network of regions recruited by both age groups during task switching. Results demonstrated age-related activation increases in both ROIs. In addition, the older adult group showed longer RT and decreased fractional anisotropy in regions of the corpus callosum with direct connections to the fMRI ROIs. Subsequent mediation analyses indicated that age-related increases in right insula activation were mediated by RT slowing and age-related increases in right DLPFC activation were mediated by WM microstructure. Our results suggest that age-related RT slowing and WM microstructure declines contribute to age-related increases in right frontal activation during cognitive task performance.

  3. The effect of obesity and increasing age on operative time and length of stay in primary hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Ben M; Griffiths, Shelly N; Stewart, Kyle J; Higgins, Gordon A; Hockings, Michael; Isaac, David L

    2014-10-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 589 patients undergoing lower-limb arthroplasty, recording age, body mass index (BMI) and co-morbidities. The effect of these on operative duration and length of stay (LOS) was analysed. For a 1 point increase in BMI we expect LOS to increase by a factor of 2.9% and mean theatre time to increase by 1.46minutes. For a 1-year increase in age, we expect LOS to increase by a factor of 1.2%. We have calculated the extra financial costs associated. The current reimbursement system underestimates the financial impact of BMI and age. The results have been used to produce a chart that allows prediction of LOS following lower limb arthroplasty based on BMI and age. These data are of use in planning operating lists.

  4. Time is no healer: increasing restoration age does not lead to improved benthic invertebrate communities in restored river reaches.

    PubMed

    Leps, Moritz; Sundermann, Andrea; Tonkin, Jonathan D; Lorenz, Armin W; Haase, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Evidence for successful restoration of riverine communities is scarce, particularly for benthic invertebrates. Among the multitude of reasons discussed so far for the lack of observed effects is too short of a time span between implementation and monitoring. Yet, studies that explicitly focus on the importance of restoration age are rare. We present a comprehensive study based on 44 river restoration projects in Germany, focusing on standardized benthic invertebrate sampling. A broad gradient ranging from 1 to 25years in restoration age was available. In contrast to clear improvements in habitat heterogeneity, benthic community responses to restoration were inconsistent when compared to control sections. Taxon richness increased in response to restoration, but abundance, diversity and various assessment metrics did not respond clearly. Restoration age was a poor predictor of community composition and community change, as no significant linear responses could be detected using 34 metrics. Moreover, only 5 out of 34 tested metrics showed non-linear shifts at restoration ages of 2 to 3years. This might be interpreted as an indication of a post-restoration disturbance followed by a re-establishment of pre-restoration conditions. BIO-ENV analysis and fourth-corner modeling underlined the low importance of restoration age, but revealed high importance of catchment-scale characteristics (e.g., ecoregion, catchment size and land use) in controlling community composition and community change. Overall, a lack of time for community development did not appear to be the ultimate reason for impaired benthic invertebrate communities. Instead, catchment-scale characteristics override the effectiveness of restoration. To enhance the ecological success of future river restoration projects, we recommend improving water quality conditions and catchment-scale processes (e.g., connectivity and hydrodynamics) in addition to restoring local habitat structure.

  5. Increased risk for age-related impairment in visual attention associated with mild traumatic brain injury: Evidence from saccadic response times

    PubMed Central

    Barry, David M.; Ettenhofer, Mark L.

    2017-01-01

    It was hypothesized that risk for age-related impairment in attention would be greater among those with remote history of mild TBI than individuals without history of head injury. Twenty-seven adults with remote history of mild TBI and a well-matched comparison group of 54 uninjured controls completed a computerized test of visual attention while saccadic and manual response times were recorded. Within the mild TBI group only, older age was associated with slower saccadic responses and poorer saccadic inhibition. Saccadic slowing was mitigated in situations where the timing and location of attention targets was fully predictable. Mild TBI was not associated with age-related increases in risk for neuropsychological impairment or neurobehavioral symptoms. These results provide preliminary evidence that risk for age-related impairment in visual attention may be higher among those with a history of mild TBI. Saccadic measures may provide enhanced sensitivity to this subtle form of cognitive impairment. PMID:28166259

  6. Age-related effects of increased ambient pressure on discrimination reaction time: A study in 105 professional divers at 6.0 atm abs.

    PubMed

    Tikkinen, Janne; Siimes, Martti A

    2015-01-01

    We investigated 105 professional divers using a computerized visual discrimination trial (Cognitrone) to measure the effects of ambient pressure on reaction times. The possible improvement in performance due to practice was anticipated, and the trials were carried out four times prior to pressurization in a hyperbaric chamber. The effect of increased ambient pressure was measured at 6.0 and 1.9 atm abs, and the potential for residual effects was tested after decompression. The results of our study indicate that repeated testing had a systematic influence on the measured time values. The effects of learning, which were independent of diver age, may have independently influenced response times. Exposure to 6.0 atm abs modified the systematic pattern of learning and was associated with increased reaction times. There were also age-related differences in response times associated with exposure to increased ambient pressures. Younger divers were more susceptible to elevated ambient pressure, evidenced by increased response times at 6 atm abs relative to their older colleagues. One out of every four of the younger divers could be considered susceptible to inert gas narcosis (ION) when an increase of one standard deviation/1SD (> 19%) or more in discrimination reaction time is used as an indicator. ION susceptibility appears independent of body composition and physical fitness. The slowed response speed experienced at 6.0 atm abs was of short duration and returned to baseline immediately with decompression. Our results suggest that IGN is demonstrated by an impaired learning process and decreased response speed and that some younger divers appear more susceptible.

  7. The effect of age and increasing head-up tilt on pre-oxygenation times in children: a randomised exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Oshan, V; Plant, N; Gopal, P; Rajai, A; Roberts, S A; Walker, R W M

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a randomised exploratory trial in children aged between one and sixteen years old to establish the time to achieve an end-tidal oxygen fraction ≥ 0.9 in three different positions: supine, and 30 and 45° head up. We recruited 120 children analysed in two age groups: 1-8 years and 9-16 years. The median (IQR [range]) time to reach the end point was 80 (59-114 [41-295]) s in the younger group and 150 (107-211 [44-405]) s in the older group, regardless of position (p = 0.0001). The end point was reached in 90% of children in approximately 160 s in the younger, and 271 s in the older, groups, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the three positions within each age group in the time to reach the endpoint (p = 0.59). Only two patients in the older age group could not reach the end point, due to poorly fitting facemasks. We conclude that pre-oxygenation can therefore be achieved effectively in most children, and that tilting children head up by 30 or 45° does not significantly reduce the time taken to achieve an end-tidal oxygen fraction of ≥ 0.9. The recommended period for pre-oxygenation in both groups should remain at 3 min but it should be noted that this may be insufficient for many older patients.

  8. Increased sensitivity to nitrazepam in old age.

    PubMed

    Castleden, C M; George, C F; Marcer, D; Hallett, C

    1977-01-01

    The effects of a single 10 mg oral dose of nitrazepam were compared with those of a placebo in healthy young and old people. Both the young and the elderly slept better on three successive nights after nitrazepam but they felt less awake at 12 and 36 hours (P less than 0-01). Elderly people made significantly more mistakes in a psychomotor test than did the young, despite similar plasma concentrations of nitrazepam and half lives in the two groups. This difference in response to psychomotor testing is probably explained by an increased sensitivity of the ageing brain to the action of nitrazepam.

  9. Increasing instruction time in school does increase learning

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Simon Calmar; Nandrup, Anne Brink

    2016-01-01

    Increasing instruction time in school is a central element in the attempts of many governments to improve student learning, but prior research—mainly based on observational data—disputes the effect of this approach and points out the potential negative effects on student behavior. Based on a large-scale, cluster-randomized trial, we find that increasing instruction time increases student learning and that a general increase in instruction time is at least as efficient as an expert-developed, detailed teaching program that increases instruction with the same amount of time. These findings support the value of increased instruction time. PMID:27325778

  10. Increasing Student Involvement in Cognitive Aging Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Linda A.

    2006-01-01

    The involvement of undergraduates in research on aging has benefits for the students and for the faculty mentors, as well as for their departments, their universities, and the field of gerontology at large. This article reports on the application of a 3-year Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) by the National Institute on Aging awarded to…

  11. Aging increases CCN1 expression leading to muscle senescence.

    PubMed

    Du, Jie; Klein, Janet D; Hassounah, Faten; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Xiaonan H

    2014-01-01

    Using microarray analysis, we found that aging sarcopenia is associated with a sharp increase in the mRNA of the matricellular protein CCN1 (Cyr61/CTGF/Nov). CCN1 mRNA was upregulated 113-fold in muscle of aged vs. young rats. CCN1 protein was increased in aging muscle in both rats (2.8-fold) and mice (3.8-fold). When muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) were treated with recombinant CCN1, cell proliferation was decreased but there was no change in the myogenic marker myoD. However, the CCN1-treated MPCs did express a senescence marker (SA-βgal). Interestingly, we found CCN1 increased p53, p16(Ink4A), and pRP (hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma protein) protein levels, all of which can arrest cell growth in MPCs. When MPCs were treated with aged rodent serum CCN1 mRNA increased by sevenfold and protein increased by threefold suggesting the presence of a circulating regulator. Therefore, we looked for a circulating regulator. Wnt-3a, a stimulator of CCN1 expression, was increased in serum from elderly humans (2.6-fold) and aged rodents (2.0-fold) compared with young controls. We transduced C2C12 myoblasts with wnt-3a and found that CCN1 protein was increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We conclude that in aging muscle, the circulating factor wnt-3a acts to increase CCN1 expression, prompting muscle senescence by activating cell arrest proteins.

  12. A systemic increase in the recombination frequency upon local infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with oilseed rape mosaic virus depends on plant age, the initial inoculum concentration and the time for virus replication.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Kathiria, Palak; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2013-01-01

    In the past, we showed that local infection of tobacco leaves with either tobacco mosaic virus or oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV) resulted in a systemic increase in the homologous recombination frequency (HRF). Later on, we showed that a similar phenomenon occurs in Arabidopsis thaliana plants infected with ORMV. Here, we tested whether the time of removing the infected leaves as well as viral titer have any effect on the degree of changes in HRF in systemic tissues. An increase in HRF in systemic non-infected tissues was more pronounced when the infected leaves were detached from the infected plants at 60-96 h post-infection, rather than at earlier time. Next, we found that exposure to higher concentrations of inoculum was much more efficient in triggering an increase in HRF than exposure to lower concentrations. Finally, we showed that older plants exhibited a higher increase in HRF than younger plants. We found that an increase in genome instability in systemic tissues of locally infected plants depends on plant age, the concentration of initial inoculums and the time of viral replication.

  13. Subjective Age in Early Adolescence: Relationships with Chronological Age, Pubertal Timing, Desired Age, and Problem Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubley, Anita M.; Arim, Rubab G.

    2012-01-01

    Subjective age generally refers to the age that one feels. In a cross-sectional questionnaire study of 245 adolescents ages 10-14 years, we examined (a) whether, and when, a cross-over in subjective age occurs, (b) differences in subjective age among pubertal timing groups, (c) correlations between subjective age and each of desired age and five…

  14. Time Perspective and Age: A Review of Age Associated Differences

    PubMed Central

    Laureiro-Martinez, Daniella; Trujillo, Carlos A.; Unda, Juliana

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between age and the five dimensions of time perspective measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) (past negative, past positive, present hedonistic, present fatalistic, and future). Time perspective is related to well-being, decision-making, level of development, and many other psychological issues. Hence, the existence of a systematic relationship between time perspective and age should be considered in all studies for which time is a relevant variable. However, no specific research about this has been conducted. We collected 407 papers that referenced the ZTPI between 2001 and 2015. From those, 72 studies met our inclusion criteria. They included 29,815 participants from 19 countries whose age spans most phases of adulthood (from 13.5 to 75.5 years, mean 28.7). We analyzed these studies adapting meta-analytical techniques. We found that present hedonistic and past negative dimensions are negatively related to aging with partial eta squared effect sizes of roughly 0.15. Our results have implications for the design of studies related to time as our findings highlight the importance of taking into account the differences associated with age. PMID:28261119

  15. Time Perspective and Age: A Review of Age Associated Differences.

    PubMed

    Laureiro-Martinez, Daniella; Trujillo, Carlos A; Unda, Juliana

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between age and the five dimensions of time perspective measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) (past negative, past positive, present hedonistic, present fatalistic, and future). Time perspective is related to well-being, decision-making, level of development, and many other psychological issues. Hence, the existence of a systematic relationship between time perspective and age should be considered in all studies for which time is a relevant variable. However, no specific research about this has been conducted. We collected 407 papers that referenced the ZTPI between 2001 and 2015. From those, 72 studies met our inclusion criteria. They included 29,815 participants from 19 countries whose age spans most phases of adulthood (from 13.5 to 75.5 years, mean 28.7). We analyzed these studies adapting meta-analytical techniques. We found that present hedonistic and past negative dimensions are negatively related to aging with partial eta squared effect sizes of roughly 0.15. Our results have implications for the design of studies related to time as our findings highlight the importance of taking into account the differences associated with age.

  16. CKD increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Yin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Wang, Jie Jin

    2008-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the United States and often coexists with chronic kidney disease. Both conditions share common genetic and environmental risk factors. A total of 1183 participants aged 54+ were examined in the population-based, prospective cohort Blue Mountains Eye Study (Australia) to determine if chronic kidney disease increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) based on the Cockcroft-Gault equation) was present in 24% of the population (286 of 1183). The 5-yr incidence of early age-related macular degeneration was 3.9% in participants with no/mild chronic kidney disease (35 of 897) and 17.5% in those with moderate chronic kidney disease (50 of 286). After adjusting for age, sex, cigarette smoking, hypertension, complement factor H polymorphism, and other risk factors, persons with moderate chronic kidney disease were 3 times more likely to develop early age-related macular degeneration than persons with no/mild chronic kidney disease (odds ratio = 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8 to 5.7, P < 0.0001). Each SD (14.8 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) decrease in Cockcroft-Gault estimated glomerular filtration rate was associated with a doubling of the adjusted risk for early age-related macular degeneration (odds ratio = 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 2.8, P < 0.0001). In conclusion, persons with chronic kidney disease have a higher risk of early age-related macular degeneration, suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms between the two conditions.

  17. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  18. Randomness in Sequence Evolution Increases over Time

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Sun, Shixiang; Zhang, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy, as a measure of randomness in a system, increases over time. Although studies have investigated biological sequence randomness from different aspects, it remains unknown whether sequence randomness changes over time and whether this change consists with the second law of thermodynamics. To capture the dynamics of randomness in molecular sequence evolution, here we detect sequence randomness based on a collection of eight statistical random tests and investigate the randomness variation of coding sequences with an application to Escherichia coli. Given that core/essential genes are more ancient than specific/non-essential genes, our results clearly show that core/essential genes are more random than specific/non-essential genes and accordingly indicate that sequence randomness indeed increases over time, consistent well with the second law of thermodynamics. We further find that an increase in sequence randomness leads to increasing randomness of GC content and longer sequence length. Taken together, our study presents an important finding, for the first time, that sequence randomness increases over time, which may provide profound insights for unveiling the underlying mechanisms of molecular sequence evolution. PMID:27224236

  19. Timing of increased autistic disorder cumulative incidence.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael E; Paul, John F

    2010-03-15

    Autistic disorder (AD) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder typically identified in early childhood. Both genetic and environmental factors are implicated in its etiology. The number of individuals identified as having autism has increased dramatically in recent years, but whether some proportion of this increase is real is unknown. If real, susceptible populations may have exposure to controllable exogenous stressors. Using literature AD data from long-term (approximately 10-year) studies, we determined cumulative incidence of AD for each cohort within each study. These data for each study were examined for a changepoint year in which the AD cumulative incidence first increased. We used data sets from Denmark, California, Japan, and a worldwide composite of studies. In the Danish, California, and worldwide data sets, we found that an increase in AD cumulative incidence began about 1988-1989. The Japanese study (1988-1996) had AD cumulative incidence increasing continuously, and no changepoint year could be calculated. Although the debate about the nature of increasing autism continues, the potential for this increase to be real and involve exogenous environmental stressors exists. The timing of an increase in autism incidence may help in screening for potential candidate environmental stressors.

  20. Faster Increases in Human Life Expectancy Could Lead to Slower Population Aging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Counterintuitively, faster increases in human life expectancy could lead to slower population aging. The conventional view that faster increases in human life expectancy would lead to faster population aging is based on the assumption that people become old at a fixed chronological age. A preferable alternative is to base measures of aging on people’s time left to death, because this is more closely related to the characteristics that are associated with old age. Using this alternative interpretation, we show that faster increases in life expectancy would lead to slower population aging. Among other things, this finding affects the assessment of the speed at which countries will age. PMID:25876033

  1. Faster increases in human life expectancy could lead to slower population aging.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Warren C; Scherbov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Counterintuitively, faster increases in human life expectancy could lead to slower population aging. The conventional view that faster increases in human life expectancy would lead to faster population aging is based on the assumption that people become old at a fixed chronological age. A preferable alternative is to base measures of aging on people's time left to death, because this is more closely related to the characteristics that are associated with old age. Using this alternative interpretation, we show that faster increases in life expectancy would lead to slower population aging. Among other things, this finding affects the assessment of the speed at which countries will age.

  2. Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Jonathan; Caan, Matthan W.A.; De Francesco, Davide; van Zoest, Rosan A.; Leech, Robert; Wit, Ferdinand W.N.M.; Portegies, Peter; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Schmand, Ben A.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Franceschi, Claudio; Sabin, Caroline A.; Majoie, Charles B.L.M.; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Sharp, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. Methods: A large sample of virologically suppressed HIV-positive adults (n = 162, age 45–82 years) and highly comparable HIV-negative controls (n = 105) were recruited as part of the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) collaboration. Using T1-weighted MRI scans, a machine-learning model of healthy brain aging was defined in an independent cohort (n = 2,001, aged 18–90 years). Neuroimaging data from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals were then used to estimate brain-predicted age; then brain-predicted age difference (brain-PAD = brain-predicted brain age − chronological age) scores were calculated. Neuropsychological and clinical assessments were also carried out. Results: HIV-positive individuals had greater brain-PAD score (mean ± SD 2.15 ± 7.79 years) compared to HIV-negative individuals (−0.87 ± 8.40 years; b = 3.48, p < 0.01). Increased brain-PAD score was associated with decreased performance in multiple cognitive domains (information processing speed, executive function, memory) and general cognitive performance across all participants. Brain-PAD score was not associated with age, duration of HIV infection, or other HIV-related measures. Conclusion: Increased apparent brain aging, predicted using neuroimaging, was observed in HIV-positive adults, despite effective viral suppression. Furthermore, the magnitude of increased apparent brain aging related to cognitive deficits. However, predicted brain age difference did not correlate with chronological age or duration of HIV infection, suggesting that HIV disease may accentuate rather than accelerate brain aging. PMID:28258081

  3. Geroscience approaches to increase healthspan and slow aging

    PubMed Central

    Melov, Simon

    2016-01-01

    For decades, researchers in the biology of aging have focused on defining mechanisms that modulate aging by primarily studying a single metric, sometimes described as the “gold standard” lifespan. Increasingly, geroscience research is turning towards defining functional domains of aging such as the cardiovascular system, skeletal integrity, and metabolic health as being a more direct route to understand why tissues decline in function with age. Each model used in aging research has strengths and weaknesses, yet we know surprisingly little about how critical tissues decline in health with increasing age. Here I discuss popular model systems used in geroscience research and their utility as possible tools in preclinical studies in aging. PMID:27158475

  4. Age, Innovations and Time Operator of Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gialampoukidis, Ilias; Antoniou, Ioannis

    2015-08-01

    We extend the Time Operator and Age to Network Evolution models. Internal Age formulas and the distribution of innovations are computed for Erdős-Rényi Random Networks, for Markov Networks and Barabási-Albert preferential Attachment Networks. The innovation probabilities are found to be proportional to the quadratic entropy (which coincides with the Tsallis entropy for entropic index q = 2) in all Markov networks, as well as in the linear growth mechanism. The distribution of innovations in the Barabási-Albert model is a new probability distribution of the logarithmic type.

  5. Aging, Spirituality, and Time: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Black, Helen K.; Hannum, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the concepts of aging, time, spirituality, and future care needs in four randomly selected informants from a group of 54 never-married childless older women. Using data from the Generativity and Lifestyles of Older Women (GLOW) study, we questioned how women’s perceptions of these concepts came together in current older age. We employed cultural theory, (our theoretical framework), ethnography, (our methodological framework), and phenomenology, (our philosophical foundation) to produce a portrait of each woman interviewed. Through a three-session interview process, we elicited the women’s life stories, reasons for childlessness, and topics that emerged as significant to the women, including aging, a sense of time remaining, and spirituality. A key finding was that the context of each woman’s life, both biographical and historical, transpired as a foundation for these concepts. That is, a woman’s “place in time” shaped their experiences of aging, as well as her reasons for childlessness and perceptions of finitude. PMID:26539067

  6. Prosocial Behavior Increases with Age across Five Economic Games.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshie; Yamagishi, Toshio; Li, Yang; Kiyonari, Toko

    2016-01-01

    Ontogenic studies of human prosociality generally agree on that human prosociality increases from early childhood through early adulthood; however, it has not been established if prosociality increases beyond early adulthood. We examined a sample of 408 non-student residents from Tokyo, Japan, who were evenly distributed across age (20-59) and sex. Participants played five economic games each separated by a few months. We demonstrated that prosocial behavior increased with age beyond early adulthood and this effect was shown across all five economic games. A similar, but weaker, age-related trend was found in one of three social value orientation measures of prosocial preferences. We measured participants' belief that manipulating others is a wise strategy for social success, and found that this belief declined with age. Participants' satisfaction with the unilateral exploitation outcome of the prisoner's dilemma games also declined with age. These two factors-satisfaction with the DC outcome in the prisoner's dilemma games and belief in manipulation-mediated the age effect on both attitudinal and behavioral prosociality. Participants' age-related socio-demographic traits such as marriage, having children, and owning a house weakly mediated the age effect on prosociality through their relationships with satisfaction with the DC outcome and belief in manipulation.

  7. Marginal effect of increasing ageing drivers on injury crashes.

    PubMed

    Tay, Richard

    2008-11-01

    The safety effects of the ageing driving population have been a topic of research interests in health and transportation economics in recent years due to the ageing of the baby boomers. This study adds to the current knowledge by examining the marginal effects of changing the driver mix on injury crashes using data from the Canadian Province of Alberta between 1990 and 2004. Results from a Poisson regression model reveal that increasing the number of young and ageing drivers will result in an increase in the number of injury crashes whereas increasing the number of middle-aged drivers will result in a reduction. These results are in contrast to those obtained in a previous study on the marginal effects of changing the driver mix on fatal crashes in the Australian State of Queensland and some possible explanations for the differing results are provided.

  8. Geologic time: The age of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, William L.

    1977-01-01

    The Earth is very old 4 1/2 billion years or more according to recent estimates. This vast span of time, called geologic time by earth scientists and believed by some to reach back to the birth of the Solar System, is difficult if not impossible to comprehend in the familiar time units of months and years, or even centuries. How then do scientists reckon geologic time, and why do they believe the Earth is so old? A great part of the secret of the Earth's age is locked up in its rocks, and man's centuries-old search for the key led to the beginning and nourished the growth of geologic science.

  9. Effects of dry aging of bone-in and boneless strip loins using two aging processes for two aging times.

    PubMed

    Degeer, S L; Hunt, M C; Bratcher, C L; Crozier-Dodson, B A; Johnson, D E; Stika, J F

    2009-12-01

    This experiment investigated the combined effects of two dry-aging methods (unpackaged and in a bag), two loin-cut styles (bone-in shell loins and boneless strip loins), and two aging times (21 and 28days) on the physical, chemical, sensory, and microbial properties of dry-aged beef. Sections from shell and strip loin were assigned randomly to be aged unpackaged or aged packaged in a bag with high moisture permeability. Weight losses increased with aging time. Shell loins lost more (P<0.05) weight during aging compared with strip loins; dry aging in a bag had less (P<0.05) weight loss than unpackaged aging. There were no differences (P>0.05) in any of the sensory traits between shell and strip loins or dry aging using a traditional method or in a bag. Dry aging in a bag creates positive effects on yields, no negative effects on product quality, and adds flexibility and control of the aging environment.

  10. Methamphetamine increases basal ganglia iron to levels observed in aging.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Laćan, Goran; Harvey, Dennis C; Way, Baldwin M

    2007-10-29

    Increases in basal ganglia iron are well documented for neurodegenerative diseases but have not been associated with methamphetamine (METH). In this study, vervet monkeys that received two doses of METH (2 mg/kg, intramuscularly, 6 h apart) showed at 1 month, iron increases in substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus, with concurrent increases of ferritin-immunoreactivity and decreases of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity in substantia nigra. At 1.5 years, substantia nigra tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity had recovered while iron and ferritin-immunoreactivity increases persisted. Globus pallidus and substantia nigra iron levels of the adult METH-exposed animals (age 5-9 years) were now comparable with those of drug-naive, aged animals (19-22 years), suggesting an aging-related condition that might render those regions more vulnerable to oxidative stress.

  11. Increases in Cognitive and Linguistic Processing Primarily Account for Increases in Speaking Rate with Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nip, Ignatius S. B.; Green, Jordan R.

    2013-01-01

    Age-related increases of speaking rate are not fully understood, but have been attributed to gains in biologic factors and learned skills that support speech production. This study investigated developmental changes in speaking rate and articulatory kinematics of participants aged 4 ("N" = 7), 7 ("N" = 10), 10…

  12. Vestibular Perceptual Thresholds Increase above the Age of 40

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez Rey, María Carolina; Clark, Torin K.; Wang, Wei; Leeder, Tania; Bian, Yong; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in 105 healthy humans (54F/51M) ranging from 18 to 80 years of age. Direction-recognition thresholds were measured using standard methods. The motion consisted of single cycles of sinusoidal acceleration at 0.2 Hz for roll tilt and 1.0 Hz for yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis, inter-aural earth-horizontal translation (y-translation), inferior–superior earth-vertical translation (z-translation), and roll tilt. A large subset of this population (99 of 105) also performed a modified Romberg test of standing balance. Despite the relatively large population (54F/51M), we found no difference between thresholds of male and female subjects. After pooling across sex, we found that thresholds increased above the age of 40 for all five motion directions investigated. The data were best modeled by a two-segment age model that yielded a constant baseline below an age cutoff of about 40 and a threshold increase above the age cutoff. For all subjects who passed all conditions of the balance test, the baseline thresholds were 0.97°/s for yaw rotation, 0.66°/s for 1-Hz roll tilt, 0.35°/s for 0.2-Hz roll tilt, 0.58 cm/s for y-translation, and 1.24 cm/s for z-translation. As a percentage of the baseline, the fitted slopes (indicating the threshold increase each decade above the age cutoff) were 83% for z-translation, 56% for 1-Hz roll tilt, 46% for y-translation, 32% for 0.2-Hz roll tilt, and 15% for yaw rotation. Even taking age and other factors into consideration, we found a significant correlation of balance test failures with increasing roll-tilt thresholds. PMID:27752252

  13. Vestibular Perceptual Thresholds Increase above the Age of 40.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez Rey, María Carolina; Clark, Torin K; Wang, Wei; Leeder, Tania; Bian, Yong; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    We measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in 105 healthy humans (54F/51M) ranging from 18 to 80 years of age. Direction-recognition thresholds were measured using standard methods. The motion consisted of single cycles of sinusoidal acceleration at 0.2 Hz for roll tilt and 1.0 Hz for yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis, inter-aural earth-horizontal translation (y-translation), inferior-superior earth-vertical translation (z-translation), and roll tilt. A large subset of this population (99 of 105) also performed a modified Romberg test of standing balance. Despite the relatively large population (54F/51M), we found no difference between thresholds of male and female subjects. After pooling across sex, we found that thresholds increased above the age of 40 for all five motion directions investigated. The data were best modeled by a two-segment age model that yielded a constant baseline below an age cutoff of about 40 and a threshold increase above the age cutoff. For all subjects who passed all conditions of the balance test, the baseline thresholds were 0.97°/s for yaw rotation, 0.66°/s for 1-Hz roll tilt, 0.35°/s for 0.2-Hz roll tilt, 0.58 cm/s for y-translation, and 1.24 cm/s for z-translation. As a percentage of the baseline, the fitted slopes (indicating the threshold increase each decade above the age cutoff) were 83% for z-translation, 56% for 1-Hz roll tilt, 46% for y-translation, 32% for 0.2-Hz roll tilt, and 15% for yaw rotation. Even taking age and other factors into consideration, we found a significant correlation of balance test failures with increasing roll-tilt thresholds.

  14. Increased mobilization of aged carbon to rivers by human disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butman, David E.; Wilson, Henry F.; Barnes, Rebecca T.; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A.; Raymond, Peter A.

    2015-02-01

    Approximately 8% of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are estimated to come from land-use change, but this estimate excludes fluxes of terrestrial carbon to aquatic ecosystems from human disturbance. Carbon fluxes from land to rivers have probably increased by 0.1 to 0.2 petagrams of carbon per year as a result of disturbances such as deforestation, agricultural intensification and the injection of human wastewater. Most dissolved organic carbon in rivers originates from young organic carbon from soils and vegetation, but aged carbon removed from the modern carbon cycle is also exported in many systems. Here we analyse a global data set of radiocarbon ages of riverine dissolved organic carbon and spatial data on land cover, population and environmental variables. We find that the age of dissolved organic carbon in rivers increases with population density and the proportion of human-dominated landscapes within a watershed, and decreases with annual precipitation. We reason that disturbance reintroduces aged soil organic matter into the modern carbon cycle, although fossil carbon in fertilizer or petroleum products may also be a source of aged carbon in disturbed watersheds. The total export from the terrestrial environment to freshwater systems remains unknown; nevertheless, our results suggest that 3-9% of dissolved organic carbon in rivers is aged carbon mobilized by human disturbance.

  15. Increases in cognitive and linguistic processing primarily account for increases in speaking rate with age.

    PubMed

    Nip, Ignatius S B; Green, Jordan R

    2013-01-01

    Age-related increases of speaking rate are not fully understood, but have been attributed to gains in biologic factors and learned skills that support speech production. This study investigated developmental changes in speaking rate and articulatory kinematics of participants aged 4 (N = 7), 7 (N = 10), 10 (N = 9), 13 (N = 7), 16 (N = 9) years, and young adults (N = 11) in speaking tasks varying in task demands. Speaking rate increased with age, with decreases in pauses and articulator displacements but not increases in articulator movement speed. Movement speed did not appear to constrain the speaking. Rather, age-related increases in speaking rate are due to gains in cognitive and linguistic processing and speech motor control.

  16. Lack of increase in DNA crosslinking in Drosophila melanogaster with age.

    PubMed

    Massie, H R; Baird, M B; Williams, T R

    1975-01-01

    Adult Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies ranging in age from 2 to 7.5 weeks with a median colony survival time of 6.4 weeks at 25 degrees C showed no increase in DNA crosslinking with age. The purified denatured DNA used for crosslink determinations varied in molecular weight from 2.02 to 3.84 times 10(5) daltons and was crosslinked to the extent of 6.2-8.8% with no age-related trend.

  17. Delirium in the elderly: Current problems with increasing geriatric age.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Deepti; Günther, Ulf; Popp, Julius

    2015-12-01

    Delirium is an acute disorder of attention and cognition seen relatively commonly in people aged 65 yr or older. The prevalence is estimated to be between 11 and 42 per cent for elderly patients on medical wards. The prevalence is also high in nursing homes and long term care (LTC) facilities. The consequences of delirium could be significant such as an increase in mortality in the hospital, long-term cognitive decline, loss of autonomy and increased risk to be institutionalized. Despite being a common condition, it remains under-recognised, poorly understood and not adequately managed. Advanced age and dementia are the most important risk factors. Pain, dehydration, infections, stroke and metabolic disturbances, and surgery are the most common triggering factors. Delirium is preventable in a large proportion of cases and therefore, it is also important from a public health perspective for interventions to reduce further complications and the substantial costs associated with these. Since the aetiology is, in most cases, multifactorial, it is important to consider a multi-component approach to management, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Detection and treatment of triggering causes must have high priority in case of delirium. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of delirium in the elderly population, given the increasing numbers of ageing people as well as increasing geriatric age.

  18. Increased NGF proforms in aged sympathetic neurons and their targets.

    PubMed

    Bierl, Michael A; Isaacson, Lori G

    2007-01-01

    Target-derived neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) regulate sympathetic neuron survival. Here, NGF and NT-3 protein and transcript were examined in sympathetic neurons and targets in order to determine their role in age-related neuronal atrophy. One obvious alteration was a dramatic increase (up to 50-fold) in NGF protein forms, corresponding to proNGF-B, in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) and targets where sympathetic innervation shows atrophy. In the iris, where sympathetic innervation is protected into old age, proNGF-B was decreased. Alterations in NGF transcript paralleled changes in NGF protein, albeit to a lesser degree. Though significantly increased in aged SCG, NT-3 protein, found primarily as the 'mature' form, showed only minor changes in most tissues, though NT-3 mRNA generally was decreased. In contrast, both NT-3 transcript and NT-3 precursors were increased in iris. The dramatic increases in proNGF, together with minimal changes in NT-3, suggest that alterations in NGF regulation may contribute to the loss of sympathetic innervation observed in many aged peripheral targets.

  19. Salmon lice increase the age of returning Atlantic salmon

    PubMed Central

    Vollset, Knut Wiik; Barlaup, Bjørn Torgeir; Skoglund, Helge; Normann, Eirik Straume; Skilbrei, Ove Tommy

    2014-01-01

    The global increase in the production of domestic farmed fish in open net pens has created concerns about the resilience of wild populations owing to shifts in host–parasite systems in coastal ecosystems. However, little is known about the effects of increased parasite abundance on life-history traits in wild fish populations. Here, we report the results of two separate studies in which 379 779 hatchery-reared Atlantic salmon smolts were treated (or not) against salmon lice, marked and released. Adults were later recaptured, and we specifically tested whether the age distribution of the returning spawners was affected by the treatment. The estimates of parasite-induced mortality were 31.9% and 0.6% in the River Vosso and River Dale stock experiments, respectively. Age of returning salmon was on average higher in treated versus untreated fish. The percentages of fish returning after one winter at sea were 37.5% and 29.9% for the treated and untreated groups, respectively. We conclude that salmon lice increase the age of returning salmon, either by affecting their age at maturity or by disproportionately increasing mortality in fish that mature early. PMID:24478199

  20. Age-Associated Increase in BMP Signaling Inhibits Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Hanadie; Morgenthaler, Adam; Schlesinger, Christina; Bugaj, Lukasz; Conboy, Irina M; Schaffer, David V

    2015-05-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis, the product of resident neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation, persists into adulthood but decreases with organismal aging, which may contribute to the age-related decline in cognitive function. The mechanisms that underlie this decrease in neurogenesis are not well understood, although evidence in general indicates that extrinsic changes in an aged stem cell niche can contribute to functional decline in old stem cells. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family members are intercellular signaling proteins that regulate stem and progenitor cell quiescence, proliferation, and differentiation in various tissues and are likewise critical regulators of neurogenesis in young adults. Here, we establish that BMP signaling increases significantly in old murine hippocampi and inhibits neural progenitor cell proliferation. Furthermore, direct in vivo attenuation of BMP signaling via genetic and transgenic perturbations in aged mice led to elevated neural stem cell proliferation, and subsequent neurogenesis, in old hippocampi. Such advances in our understanding of mechanisms underlying decreased hippocampal neurogenesis with age may offer targets for the treatment of age-related cognitive decline.

  1. Practical Tips for Increasing Listening Practice Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughey, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Learning a language--like learning to dance ballet, weaving carpets, or playing the saxophone--takes time and practice. In general, it is safe to say that the more practice one gets, the better one will become. This article will help teachers of English reconsider how to think about listening tasks. It will provide guidance for increasing…

  2. Normal aging increases cognitive heterogeneity: analysis of dispersion in WAIS-III scores across age.

    PubMed

    Ardila, Alfredo

    2007-11-01

    Individual differences in cognitive decline during normal aging need further delineation. The purpose of this study was to find the score dispersions in the WAIS-III subtests at different ages. Norms presented in the Administration and Scoring Manual [Wechsler, D. (1997). WAIS-III: Administration and scoring manual. San Antonio: The Psychological Corporation] were used. The WAIS-III was standardized and normalized using 2450 American adults divided into 13 age ranges and 4 education groups. Means and standard deviations for the different WAIS-III subtests were deduced and the ratio Percentage of the mean="(standard deviation/mean)x100" was calculated. It was hypothesized that during normal aging, whereas mean scores decrease, score dispersions increase, pointing to an increased heterogeneity in intellectual abilities in older individuals. In all subtests, except Digit Span, it was found that score dispersions indeed increased during aging. However, in some subtests, increase in dispersion was less than 20% (Block Design, Object Assembly, and Information), whereas in others, increase in dispersion was over 200% (Matrix Reasoning, L-N Sequencing, Digit-Symbol, Picture Completion, and Picture Arrangement). It was proposed that cognitive heterogeneity during normal aging is related to those abilities measured with these latter subtests, basically, executive functions, attention, and selected non-verbal abilities. In other abilities (e.g., visuoconstructive abilities and fund of general information), normal aging is associated with a more homogenous pattern of decline.

  3. A ketogenic diet increases succinic dehydrogenase activity in aging cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Marta; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Giorgetti, Belinda; Casoli, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Solazzi, Moreno; Platano, Daniela; Aicardi, Giorgio; Bertoni-Freddari, Carlo

    2009-08-01

    Impairment of energy metabolism and an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production seem to play a major role in age-related apoptotic loss of cardiomyocytes. Succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) is an important marker of the mitochondrial capability to provide an adequate amount of ATP. Moreover, because of its unique redox properties, SDH activity contributes to maintain the reduced state of the ubiquinone pool. Recent reports have shown that ketone body intake improves cardiac metabolic efficiency and exerts a cardioprotective antioxidant action, we therefore performed a cytochemical investigation of SDH activity in cardiomyocytes of late-adult (19-month-old) rats fed for 8 weeks with a medium-chain triglycerides ketogenic diet (MCT-KD). Young, age-matched and old animals fed with a standard chow were used as controls. The overall area of the precipitates (PA) from SDH activity and the area of the SDH-positive mitochondria (MA) were measured. The percent ratios PA/MA and MA/total myocardial tissue area (MA/TA) were the parameters taken into account. We found that PA/MA was significantly higher in young control rats and in MCT-KD-fed rats versus late-adult and old control rats and in young control versus MCT-KD-fed rats. MA/TA of MCT-KD-fed rats was significantly higher versus age-matched and old control rats and tended to be higher versus young control rats; this parameter was significantly higher in young versus old control rats. Thus, MCT-KD intake partially recovers age-related decrease of SDH activity and increases the myocardial area occupied by metabolically active mitochondria. These effects might counteract metabolic alterations leading to apoptosis-induced myocardial atrophy and failure during aging.

  4. Aliens and time in the machine age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brake, Mark; Hook, Neil

    2006-12-01

    The 19th century saw sweeping changes for the development of astrobiology, both in the constituency of empirical science encroaching upon all aspects of life and in the evolution of ideas, with Lyell's Principles of Geology radically raising expectation of the true age of the Earth and the drama of Darwinism questioning biblically literalist accounts of natural history. This paper considers the popular culture spun on the crackling loom of the emergent aspects of astrobiology of the day: Edward Bulwer-Lytton's The Coming Race (1871), which foretold the race of the future, and satirist Samuel Butler's anticipation of machine intelligence, `Darwin Among the Machines', in his Erewhon (1872). Finally, we look at the way Darwin, Huxley and natural selection travelled into space with French astronomer Camille Flammarion's immensely popular Récits de l'infini (Stories of Infinity, 1872), and the social Darwinism of H.G. Wells' The Time Machine (1895) and The War of the Worlds (1898). These works of popular culture presented an effective and inspiring communication of science; their crucial discourse was the reducible gap between the new worlds uncovered by science and exploration and the fantastic strange worlds of the imagination. As such they exemplify a way in which the culture and science of popular astrobiology can be fused.

  5. Remaining time and opportunities at work: Relationships between age, work characteristics, and occupational future time perspective.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Hannes; Frese, Michael

    2009-06-01

    The authors adapted the concept of future time perspective (FTP) to the work context and examined its relationships with age and work characteristics (job complexity and control). Structural equation modeling of data from 176 employees of various occupations showed that age is negatively related to 2 distinct dimensions of occupational FTP: remaining time and remaining opportunities. Work characteristics (job complexity and control) were positively related to remaining opportunities and moderated the relationship between age and remaining opportunities, such that the relationship became weaker with increasing levels of job complexity and control.

  6. Aging increases the susceptibility of hepatic inflammation, liver fibrosis and aging in response to high-fat diet in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Hee; Xu, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Koyama, Yukinori; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Diggle, Karin; You, Young-Hyun; Schilling, Jan M; Jeste, Dilip; Sharma, Kumar; Brenner, David A; Kisseleva, Tatiana

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to investigate whether aging increases the susceptibility of hepatic and renal inflammation or fibrosis in response to high-fat diet (HFD) and explore the underlying genetic alterations. Middle (10 months old) and old (20 months old) aged, male C57BL/6N mice were fed either a low-fat diet (4 % fat) or HFD (60 % fat) for 4 months. Young (3 months old) aged mice were included as control group. HFD-induced liver and kidney injuries were analyzed by serum and urine assay, histologic staining, immunohistochemistry, and reverse-transcription real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Total RNA sequencing with next-generation technology was done with RNA extracted from liver tissues. With HFD feeding, aged was associated with higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels, marked infiltration of hepatic macrophages, and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines (MCP1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17A). Importantly, aged mice showed more advanced hepatic fibrosis and increased expression of fibrogenic markers (Col-I-α1, αSMA, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGFβRII, PDGF, PDGFRβII, TIMP1) in response to HFD. Aged mice fed on HFD also showed increased oxidative stress and TLR4 expression. In the total RNA seq and gene ontology analysis of liver, old-aged HFD group showed significant up-regulation of genes linked to innate immune response, immune response, defense response, inflammatory response compared to middle-aged HFD group. Meanwhile, aging and HFD feeding showed significant increase in glomerular size and mesangial area, higher urine albumin/creatinine ratio, and advanced renal inflammation or fibrosis. However, the difference of HFD-induced renal injury between old-aged group and middle-aged group was not significant. The susceptibility of hepatic fibrosis as well as hepatic inflammation in response to HFD was significantly increased with aging. In addition, aging was associated with glomerular alterations and increased renal inflammation or

  7. Hypermaintenance and hypofunction of aged spermatogonia: insight from age-related increase of Plzf expression.

    PubMed

    Ferder, Ianina C; Wang, Ning

    2015-06-30

    Like stem cells in other tissues, spermatogonia, including spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) at the foundation of differentiation hierarchy, undergo age-related decline in function. The promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (Plzf) protein plays an essential role in spermatogonia maintenance by preventing their differentiation. To evaluate whether there is an age-related change in Plzf expression, we found that aged mouse testes exhibited a robust "Plzf overexpression" phenotype, in that they showed not only a higher frequency of Plzf-expressing cells but also an increased level of Plzf expression in these cells. Moreover, some Plzf-expressing cells in aged testes even aberrantly appeared in the differentiating spermatogonia compartment, which is usually low or negative for Plzf expression. Importantly, ectopic Plzf expression in F9 cells suppressed retinoic acid (RA)-induced Stra8 activation, a gene required for meiosis initiation. These data, together with our observation of a lack of meiosis-initiating spermatocytes associated with high Plzf-expressing spermatogonia in the aged testes, particularly in the degenerative seminiferous tubules, suggest that age-related increase in Plzf expression represents a novel molecular signature of spermatogonia aging by functionally arresting their differentiation.

  8. Effect of aging time and temperature on the aging behavior in Sn containing AZ91 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Kyun; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kim, Kang Cheol; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang

    2017-03-01

    Effects of aging temperature and time on the aging behavior in AZ91 alloy and Sn containing AZ91 alloy (AZT915) have been investigated in the present study. The mode of precipitation, i.e. discontinuous and continuous precipitation in both alloys is strongly affected by the aging temperature. At low aging temperature of 403 K, only discontinuous precipitation occurs at the grain boundaries, whereas at high aging temperatures of 573 and 623 K only continuous precipitation occurs inside the grains. At intermediate temperature range (443 or 498 K) both discontinuous and continuous precipitation reactions occur. In AZT915, the Mg2Sn particles at the grain boundary effectively reduce the available nucleation sites for discontinuous β precipitates, and slow down the movement of the grain boundary, resulting in suppression of discontinuous precipitation. In addition, increased local lattice strain by the presence of Sn in the α-Mg solid solution matrix accelerates the nucleation of the continuous precipitates at the early stage of aging treatment. Therefore, significantly higher peak hardness can be obtained within a shorter aging time in AZT915.

  9. Effect of aging time and temperature on the aging behavior in Sn containing AZ91 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Kyun; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kim, Kang Cheol; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang

    2017-02-01

    Effects of aging temperature and time on the aging behavior in AZ91 alloy and Sn containing AZ91 alloy (AZT915) have been investigated in the present study. The mode of precipitation, i.e. discontinuous and continuous precipitation in both alloys is strongly affected by the aging temperature. At low aging temperature of 403 K, only discontinuous precipitation occurs at the grain boundaries, whereas at high aging temperatures of 573 and 623 K only continuous precipitation occurs inside the grains. At intermediate temperature range (443 or 498 K) both discontinuous and continuous precipitation reactions occur. In AZT915, the Mg2Sn particles at the grain boundary effectively reduce the available nucleation sites for discontinuous β precipitates, and slow down the movement of the grain boundary, resulting in suppression of discontinuous precipitation. In addition, increased local lattice strain by the presence of Sn in the α-Mg solid solution matrix accelerates the nucleation of the continuous precipitates at the early stage of aging treatment. Therefore, significantly higher peak hardness can be obtained within a shorter aging time in AZT915.

  10. Similarity estimators for irregular and age-uncertain time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehfeld, K.; Kurths, J.

    2014-01-01

    Paleoclimate time series are often irregularly sampled and age uncertain, which is an important technical challenge to overcome for successful reconstruction of past climate variability and dynamics. Visual comparison and interpolation-based linear correlation approaches have been used to infer dependencies from such proxy time series. While the first is subjective, not measurable and not suitable for the comparison of many data sets at a time, the latter introduces interpolation bias, and both face difficulties if the underlying dependencies are nonlinear. In this paper we investigate similarity estimators that could be suitable for the quantitative investigation of dependencies in irregular and age-uncertain time series. We compare the Gaussian-kernel-based cross-correlation (gXCF, Rehfeld et al., 2011) and mutual information (gMI, Rehfeld et al., 2013) against their interpolation-based counterparts and the new event synchronization function (ESF). We test the efficiency of the methods in estimating coupling strength and coupling lag numerically, using ensembles of synthetic stalagmites with short, autocorrelated, linear and nonlinearly coupled proxy time series, and in the application to real stalagmite time series. In the linear test case, coupling strength increases are identified consistently for all estimators, while in the nonlinear test case the correlation-based approaches fail. The lag at which the time series are coupled is identified correctly as the maximum of the similarity functions in around 60-55% (in the linear case) to 53-42% (for the nonlinear processes) of the cases when the dating of the synthetic stalagmite is perfectly precise. If the age uncertainty increases beyond 5% of the time series length, however, the true coupling lag is not identified more often than the others for which the similarity function was estimated. Age uncertainty contributes up to half of the uncertainty in the similarity estimation process. Time series irregularity

  11. Similarity estimators for irregular and age uncertain time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehfeld, K.; Kurths, J.

    2013-09-01

    Paleoclimate time series are often irregularly sampled and age uncertain, which is an important technical challenge to overcome for successful reconstruction of past climate variability and dynamics. Visual comparison and interpolation-based linear correlation approaches have been used to infer dependencies from such proxy time series. While the first is subjective, not measurable and not suitable for the comparison of many datasets at a time, the latter introduces interpolation bias, and both face difficulties if the underlying dependencies are nonlinear. In this paper we investigate similarity estimators that could be suitable for the quantitative investigation of dependencies in irregular and age uncertain time series. We compare the Gaussian-kernel based cross correlation (gXCF, Rehfeld et al., 2011) and mutual information (gMI, Rehfeld et al., 2013) against their interpolation-based counterparts and the new event synchronization function (ESF). We test the efficiency of the methods in estimating coupling strength and coupling lag numerically, using ensembles of synthetic stalagmites with short, autocorrelated, linear and nonlinearly coupled proxy time series, and in the application to real stalagmite time series. In the linear test case coupling strength increases are identified consistently for all estimators, while in the nonlinear test case the correlation-based approaches fail. The lag at which the time series are coupled is identified correctly as the maximum of the similarity functions in around 60-55% (in the linear case) to 53-42% (for the nonlinear processes) of the cases when the dating of the synthetic stalagmite is perfectly precise. If the age uncertainty increases beyond 5% of the time series length, however, the true coupling lag is not identified more often than the others for which the similarity function was estimated. Age uncertainty contributes up to half of the uncertainty in the similarity estimation process. Time series irregularity

  12. Cold hardiness increases with age in juvenile Rhododendron populations

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chon-Chong; Krebs, Stephen L.; Arora, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Winter survival in woody plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors that affect the plant’s ability to cold acclimate. Because woody perennials are long-lived and often have a prolonged juvenile (pre-flowering) phase, it is conceivable that both chronological and physiological age factors influence adaptive traits such as stress tolerance. This study investigated annual cold hardiness (CH) changes in several hybrid Rhododendron populations based on Tmax, an estimate of the maximum rate of freezing injury (ion leakage) in cold-acclimated leaves from juvenile progeny. Data from F2 and backcross populations derived from R. catawbiense and R. fortunei parents indicated significant annual increases in Tmax ranging from 3.7 to 6.4°C as the seedlings aged from 3 to 5 years old. A similar yearly increase (6.7°C) was observed in comparisons of 1- and 2-year-old F1 progenies from a R. catawbiense × R. dichroanthum cross. In contrast, CH of the mature parent plants (>10 years old) did not change significantly over the same evaluation period. In leaf samples from a natural population of R. maximum, CH evaluations over 2 years resulted in an average Tmax value for juvenile 2- to 3-year-old plants that was 9.2°C lower than the average for mature (~30 years old) plants. A reduction in CH was also observed in three hybrid rhododendron cultivars clonally propagated by rooted cuttings (ramets)—Tmax of 4-year-old ramets was significantly lower than the Tmax estimates for the 30- to 40-year-old source plants (ortets). In both the wild R. maximum population and the hybrid cultivar group, higher accumulation of a cold-acclimation responsive 25 kDa leaf dehydrin was associated with older plants and higher CH. The feasibility of identifying hardy phenotypes at juvenile period and research implications of age-dependent changes in CH are discussed. PMID:25360138

  13. Does Cognitive Function Increase over Time in the Healthy Elderly?

    PubMed Central

    de Rotrou, Jocelyne; Wu, Ya-Huei; Mabire, Jean-Bernard; Moulin, Florence; de Jong, Laura W.; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie; Hanon, Olivier; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Background In dementia screening, most studies have focused on early cognitive impairment by comparing patients suffering from mild dementia or mild cognitive impairment with normal subjects. Few studies have focused on modifications over time of the cognitive function in the healthy elderly. The objective of the present study was to analyze the cognitive function changes of two different samples, born > 15 years apart. Method A first sample of 204 cognitively normal participants was recruited in the memory clinic of Broca hospital between 1991 and 1997. A second sample of 177 cognitively normal participants was recruited in 2008–2009 in the same institution. Both samples were from the same districts of Paris and were assessed with the same neuropsychological test battery. Mean cognitive test scores were compared between 1991 and 2008 samples, between < 80 years old and ≥ 80 years old in 1991 and 2008 samples, and finally between subjects < 80 year old of 1991 sample and subjects ≥ 80 years old of the 2008 sample. Means were compared with T-tests stratified on gender, age-groups and educational level. Results Cognitive scores were significantly higher in the 2008 sample. Participants < 80 years old outperformed those ≥ 80 in both samples. However, participants < 80 years old in 1991 sample and subjects ≥ 80 in the 2008 sample, born on average in 1923, performed mostly identically. Conclusion This study showed a significant increase of cognitive scores over time. Further, contemporary octogenarians in the later sample performed like septuagenarians in the former sample. These findings might be consistent with the increase in life expectancy and life span in good health. The study highlights the necessity to take into account factors which may contaminate and artificially inflate the age-related differences in favor of younger to the older adults. PMID:24244332

  14. [Temporal ambivalences of aging: Individual patterns of time use in conflict between time wealth and time poverty].

    PubMed

    Münch, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Throughout their lives people are confronted with different time resources and demands that change continuously up into old age. With the help of a qualitative interview study the narrative constructions of subjective time experiences as well as individual ways of dealing with time in retirement were investigated. In particular the influences of older persons' experience of time within the dimensions of everyday time and life time were analyzed. In addition, the study focused on potential time conflicts between these two dimensions and the question of how older people deal with the ambivalence between everyday time wealth and biographical time poverty in older age. The results of the interviews with 50 retired men and women (aged 56-91 years) in Germany, which were analyzed with "grounded theory" techniques, indicated that time in retirement does not indeed always run smoothly. In particular, the individual perception of increasing biographical time poverty exerts pressure on the arrangement of activities and daily routine in retirement. The resulting time conflicts are reflected in differential patterns of time use through which older persons try to cope with their ambivalent time experiences.

  15. Increased commuting to school time reduces sleep duration in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erico Felden; Moreno, Claudia; Louzada, Fernando Mazzilli

    2014-02-01

    Active travel to school has been referred to as one way of increasing the level of daily physical exercise, but the actual impacts on student's general health are not clear. Recently, a possible association between active travel to school and the duration of sleep was suggested. Thus, the aim was of this study to investigate the associations between the type of transportation and travel time to school, the time in bed and sleepiness in the classroom of high school students. Information on sleeping habits and travel to school of 1126 high school students were analyzed, where 55.1% were girls with an average age of 16.24 (1.39) years old, in Santa Maria Municipality, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Multiple linear regression and adjusted prevalence rates analyses were carried out. The frequency of active travel found was 61.8%. Associations between time in bed, sleepiness in the classroom and the type of transportation (active or passive) were not identified. Nevertheless, the time in bed was inversely associated with the travel time (p = 0.036) and with a phase delay. In the adjusted analysis, active travel was more incident for the students of schools in the suburbs (PR: 1.68; CI: 1.40-2.01) in comparison with the students of schools in the center. Therefore, longer trips were associated with a reduction of sleep duration of morning and night groups. Interventions concerning active travel to school must be carried out cautiously in order not to cause a reduction of the sleeping time.

  16. Elevated Mutagenesis Does Not Explain the Increased Frequency of Antibiotic Resistant Mutants in Starved Aging Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Sophia; Hershberg, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of mutants resistant to the antibiotic rifampicin has been shown to increase in aging (starved), compared to young colonies of Eschierchia coli. These increases in resistance frequency occur in the absence of any antibiotic exposure, and similar increases have also been observed in response to additional growth limiting conditions. Understanding the causes of such increases in the frequency of resistance is important for understanding the dynamics of antibiotic resistance emergence and spread. Increased frequency of rifampicin resistant mutants in aging colonies is cited widely as evidence of stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM), a mechanism thought to allow bacteria to increase mutation rates upon exposure to growth-limiting stresses. At the same time it has been demonstrated that some rifampicin resistant mutants are relatively fitter in aging compared to young colonies, indicating that natural selection may also contribute to increased frequency of rifampicin resistance in aging colonies. Here, we demonstrate that the frequency of mutants resistant to both rifampicin and an additional antibiotic (nalidixic-acid) significantly increases in aging compared to young colonies of a lab strain of Escherichia coli. We then use whole genome sequencing to demonstrate conclusively that SIM cannot explain the observed magnitude of increased frequency of resistance to these two antibiotics. We further demonstrate that, as was previously shown for rifampicin resistance mutations, mutations conferring nalidixic acid resistance can also increase fitness in aging compared to young colonies. Our results show that increases in the frequency of antibiotic resistant mutants in aging colonies cannot be seen as evidence of SIM. Furthermore, they demonstrate that natural selection likely contributes to increases in the frequency of certain antibiotic resistance mutations, even when no selection is exerted due to the presence of antibiotics. PMID:24244205

  17. Age-related hearing loss increases cross-modal distractibility.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Sandmann, Pascale; Bendixen, Alexandra; Thiel, Christiane M

    2014-10-01

    Recent electrophysiological studies have provided evidence that changes in multisensory processing in auditory cortex cannot only be observed following extensive hearing loss, but also in moderately hearing-impaired subjects. How the reduced auditory input affects audio-visual interactions is however largely unknown. Here we used a cross-modal distraction paradigm to investigate multisensory processing in elderly participants with an age-related high-frequency hearing loss as compared to young and elderly subjects with normal hearing. During the experiment, participants were simultaneously presented with independent streams of auditory and visual input and were asked to categorize either the auditory or visual information while ignoring the other modality. Unisensory sequences without any cross-modal input served as control conditions to assure that all participants were able to perform the task. While all groups performed similarly in these unisensory conditions, hearing-impaired participants showed significantly increased error rates when confronted with distracting cross-modal stimulation. This effect could be observed in both the auditory and the visual task. Supporting these findings, an additional regression analysis indicted that the degree of high-frequency hearing loss significantly modulates cross-modal visual distractibility in the auditory task. These findings provide new evidence that already a moderate sub-clinical hearing loss, a common phenomenon in the elderly population, affects the processing of audio-visual information.

  18. Time Perspective and Emotion Regulation as Predictors of Age-Related Subjective Passage of Time

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Marc; Rudolph, Tina; Linares Gutierrez, Damisela; Winkler, Isabell

    2015-01-01

    Hardly any empirical work exists concerning the relationship between the intra-individually stable time perspective relating to the past, present, and future and the subjective speed of time passing in everyday life. Moreover, studies consistently show that the subjective passage of time over the period of the last ten years speeds up as we get older. Modulating variables influencing this phenomenon are still unknown. To investigate these two unresolved issues, we conducted an online survey with n = 423 participants ranging in age between 17 and 81 assessing trait time perspective of the past, present, and future, and relating these subscales with a battery of measures pertaining to the subjective passage of time. Moreover, the subjective passage of time as an age-dependent variable was probed in relationship to emotion awareness, appraisal and regulation. Results show how present hedonism is linked with having fewer routines in life and a faster passage of the last week; the past negative perspective is related to time pressure, time expansion and more routine; a pronounced future perspective is related to a general faster passage of time. Importantly, increased emotion regulation and a balanced time perspective are related to a slower passage of the last ten years. These novel findings are discussed within models of time perception and the time perspective. PMID:26694439

  19. Time Perspective and Emotion Regulation as Predictors of Age-Related Subjective Passage of Time.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Marc; Rudolph, Tina; Linares Gutierrez, Damisela; Winkler, Isabell

    2015-12-17

    Hardly any empirical work exists concerning the relationship between the intra-individually stable time perspective relating to the past, present, and future and the subjective speed of time passing in everyday life. Moreover, studies consistently show that the subjective passage of time over the period of the last ten years speeds up as we get older. Modulating variables influencing this phenomenon are still unknown. To investigate these two unresolved issues, we conducted an online survey with n = 423 participants ranging in age between 17 and 81 assessing trait time perspective of the past, present, and future, and relating these subscales with a battery of measures pertaining to the subjective passage of time. Moreover, the subjective passage of time as an age-dependent variable was probed in relationship to emotion awareness, appraisal and regulation. Results show how present hedonism is linked with having fewer routines in life and a faster passage of the last week; the past negative perspective is related to time pressure, time expansion and more routine; a pronounced future perspective is related to a general faster passage of time. Importantly, increased emotion regulation and a balanced time perspective are related to a slower passage of the last ten years. These novel findings are discussed within models of time perception and the time perspective.

  20. Circadian rhythms, time-restricted feeding, and healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Manoogian, Emily N C; Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-12-23

    Circadian rhythms optimize physiology and health by temporally coordinating cellular function, tissue function, and behavior. These endogenous rhythms dampen with age and thus compromise temporal coordination. Feeding-fasting patterns are an external cue that profoundly influence the robustness of daily biological rhythms. Erratic eating patterns can disrupt the temporal coordination of metabolism and physiology leading to chronic diseases that are also characteristic of aging. However, sustaining a robust feeding-fasting cycle, even without altering nutrition quality or quantity, can prevent or reverse these chronic diseases in experimental models. In humans, epidemiological studies have shown erratic eating patterns increase the risk of disease, whereas sustained feeding-fasting cycles, or prolonged overnight fasting, is correlated with protection from breast cancer. Therefore, optimizing the timing of external cues with defined eating patterns can sustain a robust circadian clock, which may prevent disease and improve prognosis.

  1. Effects of post-mortem aging time and type of aging on palatability of low marbled beef loins.

    PubMed

    Lepper-Blilie, A N; Berg, E P; Buchanan, D S; Berg, P T

    2016-02-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the effect of post-mortem aging period (14 to 49days), dry vs. wet (D vs W) type of aging on the palatability of bone-in (BI) beef short loins (n=96) and boneless (BL) strip loins (n=96) possessing United States Department of Agriculture marbling scores between Slight and Small. Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) scores decreased linearly over time (P=0.0001). WBSF was not influenced by aging method or loin type. Aged flavor was higher for DBL than for DBI with WBL and WBI intermediate. Dry aging strip loins increase aged flavor yet did not improve beefy flavor compared to wet aging. Based on objective data and panelist's scores for tenderness, juiciness and aged flavor, a boneless, 28days wet aged strip steak, cooked to 71°C would provide the best combination of eating satisfaction and value.

  2. Are age-based strategies effective in increasing influenza vaccination coverage?: the Spanish experience.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Herńndez-Barrera, Valentín; Rodríguez-Rieiro, Cristina; de Andrés, Ana López; Miguel-Diez, Javier de; Trujillo, Isabel Jimenez; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of applying age-based strategies to improve influenza vaccination coverage in Spain. We described and compared influenza vaccination coverage from 2003 to 2010 between those Spanish autonomous regions (AR) that lowered the age limit to 60 y and those regions that maintained the limit at 65 y. We used data collected from two surveys covering a representative sample of the Spanish population aged ≥ 16 y [Spanish National Health Survey (SNHS) 2003/2004 and the European Health Survey for Spain (EHSS) 2009/2010]. The study population (persons aged ≥ 60 y) comprised 7,496 persons in the SNHS and 7,686 in the EHSS. In 2010, those AR which had reduced the age limit had higher coverage for all age groups analyzed-regardless of the presence of associated chronic conditions-than AR which continued vaccination for those ≥ 65 y. The greatest differences appeared in individuals aged 60 to 64 y (36.9% vs. 24.4% for individuals without chronic conditions, 59.1% vs. 52.9% for those with chronic conditions, and 43.3% vs. 32.3% for the entire age group). Multivariate analysis showed that those AR which lowered the age limit increased total coverage for all age groups, specifically among individuals with chronic conditions aged 60 to 64 y (IRR 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01-1.54) and ≥ 65 y (IRR 1.07; 95% CI, 1.00-1.14). No significant changes were observed over time for the AR that continued vaccinating people aged ≥ 65 y. Our results suggest that age-based strategies are effective for improving influenza vaccination coverage in Spain.

  3. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) increase human mesangial foam cell formation by increasing Golgi SCAP glycosylation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Zhao, Lei; Chen, Yaxi; Moorhead, John F; Varghese, Zac; Powis, Stephen H; Minogue, Shane; Sun, Zilin; Ruan, Xiong Z

    2011-07-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is one of the causative factors of diabetic nephropathy, which is associated with lipid accumulation in glomeruli. This study was designed to investigate whether N(ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML; a member of the AGEs family) increases lipid accumulation by impairing the function of sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) in human mesangial cells (HMCs). Intracellular cholesterol content was assessed by Oil Red O staining and quantitative assay. The expression of molecules controlling cholesterol homeostasis was examined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The activity of Golgi-processing enzymes was determined using enzyme-based methods, and the translocation of SCAP from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi was detected by confocal microscopy. CML increased cholesterol accumulation in HMCs. Exposure to CML increased expression and abnormal translocation of SCAP from the ER to the Golgi even in the presence of a high concentration of LDL. The increased SCAP translocation carried more SREBP-2 to the Golgi for activation by proteolytic cleavages, enhancing transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylclutaryl-CoA reductase and the LDL receptor. CML increased Golgi mannosidase activity, which may enhance glycosylation of SCAP. This prolonged the half-life and enhanced recycling of SCAP between the ER and the Golgi. The effects of CML were blocked by inhibitors of Golgi mannosidases. AGEs (CML) increased lipid synthesis and uptake, thereby causing foam cell formation via increasing transcription and protein glycosylation of SCAP in HMCs. These data imply that inhibitors of Golgi-processing enzymes might have a potential renoprotective role in prevention of mesangial foam cell formation.

  4. A comment on the use of flushing time, residence time, and age as transport time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsen, N.E.; Cloern, J.E.; Lucas, L.V.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    Applications of transport time scales are pervasive in biological, hydrologic, and geochemical studies yet these times scales are not consistently defined and applied with rigor in the literature. We compare three transport time scales (flushing time, age, and residence time) commonly used to measure the retention of water or scalar quantities transported with water. We identify the underlying assumptions associated with each time scale, describe procedures for computing these time scales in idealized cases, and identify pitfalls when real-world systems deviate from these idealizations. We then apply the time scale definitions to a shallow 378 ha tidal lake to illustrate how deviations between real water bodies and the idealized examples can result from: (1) non-steady flow; (2) spatial variability in bathymetry, circulation, and transport time scales; and (3) tides that introduce complexities not accounted for in the idealized cases. These examples illustrate that no single transport time scale is valid for all time periods, locations, and constituents, and no one time scale describes all transport processes. We encourage aquatic scientists to rigorously define the transport time scale when it is applied, identify the underlying assumptions in the application of that concept, and ask if those assumptions are valid in the application of that approach for computing transport time scales in real systems.

  5. A 1000-year increase in deep Pacific ventilation age during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, D. C.; Mix, A. C.; Southon, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    The rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide during the last deglaciation may have been driven by release of carbon sequestered in the abyssal ocean. This mechanism requires a poorly ventilated deep Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and enhanced ventilation during the deglaciation. Here we present planktonic and benthic foraminiferal radiocarbon data from a high-sedimentation rate core collected at 2.7 km water depth in the Northeast Pacific, a site that monitors the oldest watermass in the modern ocean. We estimate ventilation age (i.e. the time elapsed since water was last at the surface) using the projection age (Adkins and Boyle, 1997) and TTD-ETD methods (DeVries and Primeau, 2010). We show that both methods yield LGM ventilation ages similar to today, suggesting this depth horizon in the NE Pacific was not an important carbon reservoir at the LGM. During the deglaciation, both projection and TTD-ETD ages increased by ~1 kyr, indicating that either the 1) ventilation rate decreased, 2) the surface water reservoir age in the Southern Ocean increased, or 3) there was an influx of 14C-depleted carbon from another source into the deep Pacific. The available paleoceanographic evidence is inconsistent with the first two options, implying that another source of old carbon may have been responsible for the apparent increase in ventilation age during the last deglaciation.

  6. Climate control of decadal-scale increases in apparent ages of eogenetic karst spring water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jonathan B.; Kurz, Marie J.; Khadka, Mitra B.

    2016-09-01

    Water quantity and quality in karst aquifers may depend on decadal-scale variations in recharge or withdrawal, which we hypothesize could be assessed through time-series measurements of apparent ages of spring water. We tested this hypothesis with analyses of various age tracers (3H/3He, SF6, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) and selected solute concentrations [dissolved oxygen (DO), NO3, Mg, and SO4] from 6 springs in a single spring complex (Ichetucknee springs) in northern Florida over a 16-yr period. These springs fall into two groups that reflect shallow short (Group 1) and deep long (Group 2) flow paths. Some tracer concentrations are altered, with CFC-12 and CFC-113 concentrations yielding the most robust apparent ages. These tracers show a 10-20-yr monotonic increase in apparent age from 1997 to 2013, including the flood recession that followed Tropical Storm Debby in mid-2012. This increase in age indicates most water discharged during the study period recharged the aquifer within a few years of 1973 for Group 2 springs and 1980 for Group 1 springs. Inverse correlations between apparent age and DO and NO3 concentrations reflect reduced redox state in older water. Positive correlations between apparent age and Mg and SO4 concentrations reflect increased water-rock reactions. Concentrated recharge in the decade around 1975 resulted from nearly 2 m of rain in excess of the monthly average that fell between 1960 and 2014, followed by a nearly 4 m deficit to 2014. This excess rain coincided with two major El Niño events during the maximum cool phase in the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Although regional water withdrawal increased nearly 5-fold between 1980 and 2005, withdrawals represent only 2-5% of Ichetucknee River flow and are less important than decadal-long variations in precipitation. These results suggest that groundwater management should consider climate cycles as predictive tools for future water resources.

  7. Population aging and emergency departments: visits will not increase, lengths-of-stay and hospitalizations will.

    PubMed

    Pallin, Daniel J; Allen, Matthew B; Espinola, Janice A; Camargo, Carlos A; Bohan, J Stephen

    2013-07-01

    With US emergency care characterized as "at the breaking point," we studied how the aging of the US population would affect demand for emergency department (ED) services and hospitalizations in the coming decades. We applied current age-specific ED visit rates to the population structure anticipated by the Census Bureau to exist through 2050. Our results indicate that the aging of the population will not cause the number of ED visits to increase any more than would be expected from population growth. However, the data do predict increases in visit lengths and the likelihood of hospitalization. As a result, the aggregate amount of time patients spend in EDs nationwide will increase 10 percent faster than population growth. This means that ED capacity will have to increase by 10 percent, even without an increase in the number of visits. Hospital admissions from the ED will increase 23 percent faster than population growth, which will require hospitals to expand capacity faster than required by raw population growth alone.

  8. Mitochondrial proteomic profiling reveals increased carbonic anhydrase II in aging and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Amelia; Shephard, Freya; Freed, James; Liddell, Susan; Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are used to treat glaucoma and cancers. Carbonic anhydrases perform a crucial role in the conversion of carbon dioxide and water into bicarbonate and protons. However, there is little information about carbonic anhydrase isoforms during the process of ageing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicit in ageing brain and muscle. We have interrogated isolated mitochondrial fractions from young adult and middle aged mouse brain and skeletal muscle. We find an increase of tissue specific carbonic anhydrases in mitochondria from middle-aged brain and skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase II was measured in the Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd5J) mouse model. In pcd5J we find mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase II is also elevated in brain from young adults undergoing a process of neurodegeneration. We show C.elegans exposed to carbonic anhydrase II have a dose related shorter lifespan suggesting that high CAII levels are in themselves life limiting. We show for the first time that the mitochondrial content of brain and skeletal tissue are exposed to significantly higher levels of active carbonic anhydrases as early as in middle-age. Carbonic anhydrases associated with mitochondria could be targeted to specifically modulate age related impairments and disease. PMID:27743511

  9. Increasing the Value of Age: Guidance in Employers' Age Management Strategies. Research Paper No 44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The European active population is ageing. In the face of growing skills shortages, both national States and employers need to prolong the working lives of their most experienced workers. While enterprises strive to respond to this challenge, most still have not fully explored the potential of guidance activities in addressing age-related issues in…

  10. Age-related decline in cardiac autonomic function is not attenuated with increased physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Njemanze, Hugo; Warren, Charlotte; Eggett, Christopher; MacGowan, Guy A.; Bates, Matthew G D; Siervo, Mario; Ivkovic, Srdjan; Trenell, Michael I.; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.

    2016-01-01

    Age and physical inactivity are important risk factors for cardiovascular mortality. Heart rate response to exercise (HRRE) and heart rate recovery (HRR), measures of cardiac autonomic function, are strong predictors of mortality. The present study defined the effect of age and physical activity on HRRE and HRR. Healthy women (N=72) grouped according to age (young, 20-30 years; middle, 40-50 years; and older, 65-81 years) and daily physical activity (low active <7500, high active >12,500 steps/day) performed a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. The HRRE was defined as an increase in heart rate from rest to 1, 3 and 5 minutes of exercise and at 1/3 of total exercise time, and HRR as the difference in heart rate between peak exercise and 1, 2, and 3 minutes later. Age was associated with a significant decline in HRRE at 1 min and 1/3 of exercise time (r= − 0.27, p=0.04, and r=−0.39, p=0.02) and HRR at 2 min and 3 min (r=−0.35, p=0.01, and r=−0.31, p=0.02). There was no significant difference in HRRE and HRR between high and low-active middle-age and older women (p>0.05). Increased level of habitual physical activity level appears to have a limited effect on age-related decline in cardiac autonomic function in women. PMID:27705949

  11. Influence of evisceration time and carcass ageing conditions on wild venison quality. Preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Soriano, A; Montoro, V; Vicente, J; Sánchez-Migallón, B F; Benítez, S; Utrilla, M C; García Ruiz, A

    2016-04-01

    The influence of common carcass preparation practices of wild red deer on the physicochemical, microbiological and sensory quality of venison was assessed by varying evisceration time and ageing method. Deer were head shot; half were eviscerated 30 min and the other half 4 h post mortem. In both groups (n=18), 6 carcasses were skinned immediately after evisceration and aged for 24 h; 6 were aged unskinned for 24 h and 6 were aged unskinned for 72 h at 10°C. Ageing method had a significant effect on the sensory quality of venison loin; unskinned ageing was associated with an increase of odour and taste intensity, and higher scores for gamey and sweet/caramel flavours. Carcasses aged for 72 h displayed darker and tender meat, but increased aerobic bacterial counts. Evisceration time had less influence on loin quality, although off-flavours were more often detected in deer eviscerated 4h post mortem.

  12. Loss of Catecholaminergic Neuromodulation of Persistent Forms of Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity with Increasing Age

    PubMed Central

    Twarkowski, Hannah; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulation by means of the catecholaminergic system is a key component of motivation-driven learning and behaviorally modulated hippocampal synaptic plasticity. In particular, dopamine acting on D1/D5 receptors and noradrenaline acting on beta-adrenergic receptors exert a very potent regulation of forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity that last for very long-periods of time (>24 h), and occur in conjunction with novel spatial learning. Antagonism of these receptors not only prevents long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), but prevents the memory of the spatial event that, under normal circumstances, leads to the perpetuation of these plasticity forms. Spatial learning behavior that normally comes easily to rats, such as object-place learning and spatial reference learning, becomes increasingly impaired with aging. Middle-aged animals display aging-related deficits of specific, but not all, components of spatial learning, and one possibility is that this initial manifestation of decrements in learning ability that become apparent in middle-age relate to changes in motivation, attention and/or the regulation by neuromodulatory systems of these behavioral states. Here, we compared the regulation by dopaminergic D1/D5 and beta-adrenergic receptors of persistent LTP in young (2–4 month old) and middle-aged (8–14 month old) rats. We observed in young rats, that weak potentiation that typically lasts for ca. 2 h could be strengthened into persistent (>24 h) LTP by pharmacological activation of either D1/D5 or beta-adrenergic receptors. By contrast, no such facilitation occurred in middle-aged rats. This difference was not related to an ostensible learning deficit: a facilitation of weak potentiation into LTP by spatial learning was possible both in young and middle-aged rats. It was also not directly linked to deficits in LTP: strong afferent stimulation resulted in equivalent LTP in both age groups. We postulate that this change in

  13. Spontaneous calcium waves in Bergman glia increase with age and hypoxia and may reduce tissue oxygen.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Claus; Brazhe, Alexey; Thomsen, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Glial calcium (Ca(2+)) waves constitute a means to spread signals between glial cells and to neighboring neurons and blood vessels. These waves occur spontaneously in Bergmann glia (BG) of the mouse cerebellar cortex in vivo. Here, we tested three hypotheses: (1) aging and reduced blood oxygen saturation alters wave activity; (2) glial Ca(2+) waves change cerebral oxygen metabolism; and (3) neuronal and glial wave activity is correlated. We used two-photon microscopy in the cerebellar cortexes of adult (8- to 15-week-old) and aging (48- to 80-week-old) ketamine-anesthetized mice after bolus loading with OGB-1/AM and SR101. We report that the occurrence of spontaneous waves is 20 times more frequent in the cerebellar cortex of aging as compared with adult mice, which correlated with a reduction in resting brain oxygen tension. In adult mice, spontaneous glial wave activity increased on reducing resting brain oxygen tension, and ATP-evoked glial waves reduced the tissue O(2) tension. Finally, although spontaneous Purkinje cell (PC) activity was not associated with increased glia wave activity, spontaneous glial waves did affect intracellular Ca(2+) activity in PCs. The increased wave activity during aging, as well as low resting brain oxygen tension, suggests a relationship between glial waves, brain energy homeostasis, and pathology.

  14. Mindfulness meditation and relaxation training increases time sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Droit-Volet, S; Fanget, M; Dambrun, M

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effect of mindfulness meditation and relaxation on time perception using a temporal bisection task. In Experiment 1, the participants performed a temporal task before and after exercises of mindfulness meditation or relaxation. In Experiment 2, the procedure was similar than that used in Experiment 1, except that the participants were trained to mediate or relax every day over a period of several weeks. The results showed that mindfulness meditation exercises increased sensitivity to time and lengthened perceived time. However, this temporal improvement with meditation exercises was primarily observed in the experienced meditators. Our results also showed the experienced meditators were less anxious than the novice participants, and that the sensitivity to time increased when the level of anxiety decreased. Our results were explained by the practice of mindfulness technique that had developed individuals' abilities in devoting more attention resources to temporal information processing.

  15. Onset of mortality increase with age and age trajectories of mortality from all diseases in the four Nordic countries

    PubMed Central

    Dolejs, Josef; Marešová, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Background The answer to the question “At what age does aging begin?” is tightly related to the question “Where is the onset of mortality increase with age?” Age affects mortality rates from all diseases differently than it affects mortality rates from nonbiological causes. Mortality increase with age in adult populations has been modeled by many authors, and little attention has been given to mortality decrease with age after birth. Materials and methods Nonbiological causes are excluded, and the category “all diseases” is studied. It is analyzed in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden during the period 1994–2011, and all possible models are screened. Age trajectories of mortality are analyzed separately: before the age category where mortality reaches its minimal value and after the age category. Results Resulting age trajectories from all diseases showed a strong minimum, which was hidden in total mortality. The inverse proportion between mortality and age fitted in 54 of 58 cases before mortality minimum. The Gompertz model with two parameters fitted as mortality increased with age in 17 of 58 cases after mortality minimum, and the Gompertz model with a small positive quadratic term fitted data in the remaining 41 cases. The mean age where mortality reached minimal value was 8 (95% confidence interval 7.05–8.95) years. The figures depict an age where the human population has a minimal risk of death from biological causes. Conclusion Inverse proportion and the Gompertz model fitted data on both sides of the mortality minimum, and three parameters determined the shape of the age–mortality trajectory. Life expectancy should be determined by the two standard Gompertz parameters and also by the single parameter in the model c/x. All-disease mortality represents an alternative tool to study the impact of age. All results are based on published data. PMID:28176929

  16. Narayanaswamy’s 1971 aging theory and material time

    SciTech Connect

    Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2015-09-21

    The Bochkov-Kuzovlev nonlinear fluctuation-dissipation theorem is used to derive Narayanaswamy’s phenomenological theory of physical aging, in which this highly nonlinear phenomenon is described by a linear material-time convolution integral. A characteristic property of the Narayanaswamy aging description is material-time translational invariance, which is here taken as the basic assumption of the derivation. It is shown that only one possible definition of the material time obeys this invariance, namely, the square of the distance travelled from a configuration of the system far back in time. The paper concludes with suggestions for computer simulations that test for consequences of material-time translational invariance. One of these is the “unique-triangles property” according to which any three points on the system’s path form a triangle such that two side lengths determine the third; this is equivalent to the well-known triangular relation for time-autocorrelation functions of aging spin glasses [L. F. Cugliandolo and J. Kurchan, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 27, 5749 (1994)]. The unique-triangles property implies a simple geometric interpretation of out-of-equilibrium time-autocorrelation functions, which extends to aging a previously proposed framework for such functions in equilibrium [J. C. Dyre, e-print arXiv:cond-mat/9712222 (1997)].

  17. [Aging explosive detection using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Meng, Kun; Li, Ze-ren; Liu, Qiao

    2011-05-01

    Detecting the aging situation of stock explosive is essentially meaningful to the research on the capability, security and stability of explosive. Existing aging explosive detection techniques, such as scan microscope technique, Fourier transfer infrared spectrum technique, gas chromatogram mass spectrum technique and so on, are either not able to differentiate whether the explosive is aging or not, or not able to image the structure change of the molecule. In the present paper, using the density functional theory (DFT), the absorb spectrum changes after the explosive aging were calculated, from which we can clearly find the difference of spectrum between explosive molecule and aging ones in the terahertz band. The terahertz time-domain spectrum (THz-TDS) system as well as its frequency spectrum resolution and measured range are analyzed. Combined with the existing experimental results and the essential characters of the terahertz wave, the application of THz-TDS technique to the detection of aging explosive was demonstrated from the aspects of feasibility, veracity and practicability. On the base of that, the authors advance the new method of aging explosive detection using the terahertz time-domain spectrum technique.

  18. Increased Waist-to-height Ratio May Contribute to Age-related Increase in Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Masoumeh; Kamali, Majid; Dastsouz, Farideh; Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Amanat, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) increases with age. The objective was to determine whether lifestyle and dietary behaviors and anthropometric measures, which are affected by these behaviors, contribute to the increase of CVD risk factors across age categories of 20–50-year-old. Methods: In a cross-sectional design, 437 adults aged 20–50-year-old were selected from households living in Shiraz. Risk factors of CVD, including body mass index (BMI), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), blood pressure, fasting blood glucose (FBG), serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C, respectively) as well as lifestyle behaviors (physical activity and smoking), dietary habits, and food intakes were assessed across the age categories of 20–29, 30–39, and 40–50 years. Linear regression was used to examine the contribution of different variables to the age-related increase of CVD risk factors. Results: All CVD risk factors, except for HDL-C, significantly increased across age categories. Older subjects had healthier dietary habits and food intakes, but they possessed nonsignificantly lower physical activity and higher smoking rate compared to younger adults. Adjusting for physical activity, smoking, and BMI did not change the significant positive association between age and CVD risk factors but adjusting for WHtR disappeared associations for blood pressure, triglycerides, and metabolic syndrome although significant associations remained for FBG and total and LDL-C. Conclusions: Age-related increase of CVD risk factors occurred independent of lifestyle habits. WHtR, but not BMI, may partially contribute to the age-related increase in CVD risk factors. PMID:27195100

  19. Method for Predicting Which Customers' Time Deposit Balances Will Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Toshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Morita, Masahiro; Komoda, Norihisa

    This paper proposes a method of predicting which customers' account balances will increase by using data mining to effectively and efficiently promote sales. Prediction by mining all the data in a business is difficult because of much time required to collect, process, and calculate it. The selection of which features are used for prediction is a critical issue. We propose a method of selecting features to improve the accuracy of prediction within practical time limits. It consists of three parts: (1) converting collected features into financial behavior features that reflect customer actions, (2) extracting features affecting increases in account balances from these collected and financial behavior features, and (3) predicting customers whose account balances will increase based on the extracted features. We found the accuracy of prediction in an experiment with our method to be higher than with other conventional methods.

  20. Time pressure increases cooperation in competitively framed social dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Cone, Jeremy; Rand, David G

    2014-01-01

    What makes people willing to pay costs to benefit others? Does such cooperation require effortful self-control, or do automatic, intuitive processes favor cooperation? Time pressure has been shown to increase cooperative behavior in Public Goods Games, implying a predisposition towards cooperation. Consistent with the hypothesis that this predisposition results from the fact that cooperation is typically advantageous outside the lab, it has further been shown that the time pressure effect is undermined by prior experience playing lab games (where selfishness is the more advantageous strategy). Furthermore, a recent study found that time pressure increases cooperation even in a game framed as a competition, suggesting that the time pressure effect is not the result of social norm compliance. Here, we successfully replicate these findings, again observing a positive effect of time pressure on cooperation in a competitively framed game, but not when using the standard cooperative framing. These results suggest that participants' intuitions favor cooperation rather than norm compliance, and also that simply changing the framing of the Public Goods Game is enough to make it appear novel to participants and thus to restore the time pressure effect.

  1. Effect of blade tenderization, aging time, and aging temperature on tenderness of beef longissimus lumborum and gluteus medius.

    PubMed

    King, D A; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Pfeiffer, K D; Nickelson, R; Koohmaraie, M

    2009-09-01

    Purveyors are concerned about the potential food safety risk of nonintact meat products and are seeking strategies to ensure adequate meat tenderness without blade tenderization. This study was conducted to determine the effects of blade tenderization and time and temperature of aging on beef longissimus lumborum (LL) and gluteus medius (GM) tenderness. Beef strip loins (n = 300) and top sirloin butts (n = 300) were assigned to storage at -0.5 or 3.3 degrees C for 12, 26, or 40 d. Cuts were blade tenderized (BT) or not blade tenderized (NBT) before steak cutting. One 2.54-cm steak from each subprimal was used for slice shear force determination and Western blotting of desmin. Desmin degradation was less (P < 0.05) in LL stored at -0.5 degrees C than LL stored at 3.3 degrees C (57 and 65%, respectively). Aging from 12 to 26 d increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis (50 to 65%) in LL. Regardless of aging time, BT reduced (P < 0.05) LL slice shear force values. Aging time did not affect (P > 0.05) slice shear force values of BT LL steaks (10.4, 9.9, and 9.4 kg for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively), but reduced (P < 0.05) NBT steak slice shear force values (15.1, 13.8, and 12.3 kg for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively). Greater temperature did not affect (P > 0.05) slice shear force values of BT LL steaks (10.2 and 9.6 kg for steaks aged at -0.5 and 3.3 degrees C, respectively), but improved (P < 0.05) slice shear force of NBT LL steaks (15.1 and 12.4, respectively). Aging at 3.3 degrees C increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis in GM steaks (43 and 54% for -0.5 and 3.3 degrees C, respectively). Longer aging times increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis (40, 46, and 60% for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively) in GM steaks. Blade-tenderized GM steaks had dramatically less (P < 0.05) slice shear force values than NBT steaks (13.7 and 19.9 kg, respectively). Raising aging temperature from -0.5 to 3.3 degrees C reduced (17.6 vs. 16.0 kg; P < 0.05) and increasing aging time from 12 d

  2. Effects of increased paternal age on sperm quality, reproductive outcome and associated epigenetic risks to offspring.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh; Agarwal, Ashok; Rohra, Vikram K; Assidi, Mourad; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Turki, Rola F

    2015-04-19

    Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in average paternal age when the first child is conceived, either due to increased life expectancy, widespread use of contraception, late marriages and other factors. While the effect of maternal ageing on fertilization and reproduction is well known and several studies have shown that women over 35 years have a higher risk of infertility, pregnancy complications, spontaneous abortion, congenital anomalies, and perinatal complications. The effect of paternal age on semen quality and reproductive function is controversial for several reasons. First, there is no universal definition for advanced paternal ageing. Secondly, the literature is full of studies with conflicting results, especially for the most common parameters tested. Advancing paternal age also has been associated with increased risk of genetic disease. Our exhaustive literature review has demonstrated negative effects on sperm quality and testicular functions with increasing paternal age. Epigenetics changes, DNA mutations along with chromosomal aneuploidies have been associated with increasing paternal age. In addition to increased risk of male infertility, paternal age has also been demonstrated to impact reproductive and fertility outcomes including a decrease in IVF/ICSI success rate and increasing rate of preterm birth. Increasing paternal age has shown to increase the incidence of different types of disorders like autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, and childhood leukemia in the progeny. It is thereby essential to educate the infertile couples on the disturbing links between increased paternal age and rising disorders in their offspring, to better counsel them during their reproductive years.

  3. Mean Velocity of Local Populations: Axiality, Age and Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael; Alcobé, Santiago

    2007-05-01

    The mean velocity of local stellar populations is analyzed by building a set of hierarchically selected samples from Hipparcos catalog, with the full space motions. The technique for scanning populations, MEMPHIS (Maximum Entropy of the Mixture Probability from HIerarchical Segregation), is a combination of two separate procedures: A sample selecting filter (Alcobé & Cubarsi 2005, A&A 442, 292) and a segregation method (Cubarsi & Alcobé 2004, A&A 427, 131). By continuously increasing the sampling parameter, in our case the absolute value of the stellar velocity, we build a set of nested subsamples containing an increasing number of populations. A bimodal pattern is then applied in order to identify differentiated kinematic populations. The resulting populations can be identified as early-type stars, young disk stars, old disk stars, and thick disk stars. Discontinuities of the velocity dispersion are found for early-type and thick disk stars, while young and old disk stars show a continuous trend that is asymptotically represented by the thin disk galactic component. Similarly, the mean velocity of early-type stars shows a particular behavior, while the remaining populations share a similar average motion. The later populations are studied on the basis of a time-dependent and non-axial Chandrasekhar model, allowing to estimate the degree of deviation from axial symmetry and steady-state hypotheses, as well as the average age of each population. According to this model, the no net radial movement point can be evaluated, having heliocentric velocities U=-18 ± 1 km/s in the radial direction, which is very close to the radial mean velocity of early-type stars, and V=-76 ± 2 km/s in rotation. The remaining populations share a common differential galactic movement, suggesting a common dynamical origin for the rupture of the axial symmetry.

  4. Does male reproductive effort increase with age? Courtship in fiddler crabs

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Catherine L.; Booksmythe, Isobel; Jennions, Michael D.; Backwell, Patricia R. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Theory suggests that reproductive effort generally increases with age, but life-history models indicate that other outcomes are possible. Empirical data are needed to quantify variation in actual age-dependence. Data are readily attainable for females (e.g. clutch per egg size), but not for males (e.g. courtship effort). To quantify male effort one must: (i) experimentally control for potential age-dependent changes in female presence; and, crucially, (ii) distinguish between the likelihood of courtship being initiated, the display rate, and the total time invested in courting before stopping (‘courtship persistence’). We provide a simple experimental protocol, suitable for many taxa, to illustrate how to obtain this information. We studied courtship waving by male fiddler crabs, Uca annulipes. Given indeterminate growth, body size is correlated with age. Larger males were more likely to wave at females and waved more persistently. They did not, however, have a higher courtship rate (waves per second). A known female preference for males with higher display rates explains why, once waving is initiated, all males display at the same rate. PMID:23325736

  5. Does male reproductive effort increase with age? Courtship in fiddler crabs.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Catherine L; Booksmythe, Isobel; Jennions, Michael D; Backwell, Patricia R Y

    2013-04-23

    Theory suggests that reproductive effort generally increases with age, but life-history models indicate that other outcomes are possible. Empirical data are needed to quantify variation in actual age-dependence. Data are readily attainable for females (e.g. clutch per egg size), but not for males (e.g. courtship effort). To quantify male effort one must: (i) experimentally control for potential age-dependent changes in female presence; and, crucially, (ii) distinguish between the likelihood of courtship being initiated, the display rate, and the total time invested in courting before stopping ('courtship persistence'). We provide a simple experimental protocol, suitable for many taxa, to illustrate how to obtain this information. We studied courtship waving by male fiddler crabs, Uca annulipes. Given indeterminate growth, body size is correlated with age. Larger males were more likely to wave at females and waved more persistently. They did not, however, have a higher courtship rate (waves per second). A known female preference for males with higher display rates explains why, once waving is initiated, all males display at the same rate.

  6. A developmental increase in allostatic load from ages 3 to 11 years is associated with increased schizotypal personality at age 23 years.

    PubMed

    Peskin, Melissa; Raine, Adrian; Gao, Yu; Venables, Peter H; Mednick, Sarnoff A

    2011-11-01

    Although allostatic load has been investigated in mood and anxiety disorders, no prior study has investigated developmental change in allostatic load as a precursor to schizotypal personality. This study employed a multilevel developmental framework to examine whether the development of increased allostatic load, as indicated by impaired sympathetic nervous system habituation from ages 3 to 11 years, predisposes to schizotypal personality at age 23 years. Electrodermal activity to six aversive tones was recorded in 995 subjects at age 3 years and again at 11 years. Habituation slopes at both ages were used to create groups who showed a developmental increase in habituation (decreased allostatic load), and those who showed a developmental decrease in habituation (increased allostatic load). Children who showed a developmental increase in allostatic load from ages 3 to 11 years had higher levels of schizotypal personality at 23 years. A breakdown of total schizotypy scores demonstrated specificity of findings to cognitive-perceptual features of schizotypy. Findings are the first to document a developmental abnormality in allostasis in relation to adult schizotypal personality. The relative failure to develop normal habituation to repeated stressors throughout childhood is hypothesized to result in an accumulation of allostatic load and consequently increased positive symptom schizotypy in adulthood.

  7. Scaling in a Continuous Time Model for Biological Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, R. M. C.; Thomas, G. L.

    In this paper, we consider a generalization to the asexual version of Penna model for biological aging, where we take a continuous time limit. The genotype associated to each individual is an interval of real numbers over which Dirac δ-functions are defined, representing genetically programmed diseases to be switched on at defined ages of the individual life. We discuss two different continuous limits for the evolution equation and two different mutation protocols, to be implemented during reproduction. Exact stationary solutions are obtained and scaling properties are discussed.

  8. The use of a random regression model to account for change in racing speed of German trotters with increasing age.

    PubMed

    Bugislaus, A-E; Roehe, R; Willms, F; Kalm, E

    2006-08-01

    In a genetic analysis of German trotters, the performance trait racing time per km was analysed by using a random regression model on six different age classes (2-, 3-, 4-, 5- and 6-year-old and older trotters; the age class of 3-year-old trotters was additionally divided by birth months of horses into two seasons). The best-fitting random regression model for the trait racing time per km on six age classes included as fixed effects sex, race track, condition of race track (fitted as second-order polynomial on age), distance of race and each driver (fitted as first-order polynomial on age) as well as the year-season (fitted independent of age). The random additive genetic and permanent environmental effects were fitted as second-order polynomials on age. Data consisted of 138,620 performance observations from 2,373 trotters and the pedigree data contained 9,952 horses from a four-generation pedigree. Heritabilities for racing time per km increased from 0.01 to 0.18 at age classes from 2- to 4-year-old trotters, then slightly decreased for 5 year and substantially decreased for 6-year-old horses. Genetic correlations of racing time per km among the six age classes were very high (rg = 0.82-0.99). Heritability was h2 = 0.13 when using a repeatability animal model for racing time per km considering the six age classes as fixed effect. Breeding values using repeatability analysis over all and within age classes resulted in slightly different ranking of trotters than those using random regression analysis. When using random regression analysis almost no reranking of trotters over time took place. Generally, the analyses showed that using a random regression model improved the accuracy of selection of trotters over age classes.

  9. Air pollutants degrade floral scents and increase insect foraging times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Jose D.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Roulston, T.'ai; Chen, Bicheng; Pratt, Kenneth R.

    2016-09-01

    Flowers emit mixtures of scents that mediate plant-insect interactions such as attracting insect pollinators. Because of their volatile nature, however, floral scents readily react with ozone, nitrate radical, and hydroxyl radical. The result of such reactions is the degradation and the chemical modification of scent plumes downwind of floral sources. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are developed to investigate dispersion and chemical degradation and modification of floral scents due to reactions with ozone, hydroxyl radical, and nitrate radical within the atmospheric surface layer. Impacts on foraging insects are investigated by utilizing a random walk model to simulate insect search behavior. Results indicate that even moderate air pollutant levels (e.g., ozone mixing ratios greater than 60 parts per billion on a per volume basis, ppbv) substantially degrade floral volatiles and alter the chemical composition of released floral scents. As a result, insect success rates of locating plumes of floral scents were reduced and foraging times increased in polluted air masses due to considerable degradation and changes in the composition of floral scents. Results also indicate that plant-pollinator interactions could be sensitive to changes in floral scent composition, especially if insects are unable to adapt to the modified scentscape. The increase in foraging time could have severe cascading and pernicious impacts on the fitness of foraging insects by reducing the time devoted to other necessary tasks.

  10. Selective increase in posterior corpus callosum thickness between the age of 4 and 11years.

    PubMed

    Westerhausen, René; Fjell, Anders M; Krogsrud, Stine K; Rohani, Darius A; Skranes, Jon S; Håberg, Asta K; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2016-06-07

    Establishing an efficient functional and structural connectivity between the two cerebral hemispheres is an important developmental task during childhood, and alterations in this development have accordingly been linked to a series of neurodevelopmental and pediatric disorders. The corpus callosum, the major white-matter structure connecting the hemispheres, has been shown to increase in size throughout the three first decades of life. However, behavioral studies indicate that adult-like performance levels of functional hemispheric interaction are already reached during middle and late childhood. Thus, here we specifically examine the structural development of the corpus callosum during the functionally relevant time period by for the first time (a) selectively addressing prospective childhood development and (b) analyzing a sample in which also younger children are well represented. Corpus callosum anatomy was assessed from 732 T1-weighted MRI datasets acquired from 428 children (213 boys, 215 girls) aged of 4.1 and 10.9years, of which 304 were scanned at two time points. Regional callosal thickness was determined from an outline-based segmentation of the mid-sagittal cross-sectional surface area. Linear-mixed model analyses revealed a significant increase in thickness with age (effect size: up to 15% explained variance) equivalent to a growth in callosal thickness of up to 0.19mm per year in the posterior corpus callosum. The age effect was found to be stronger in posterior segments (i.e., splenium) than in other callosal subregions. Also, the age effect was found to be comparable between boys and girls, and was detected irrespective of whether developmental or individual differences in overall brain size where accounted for or not. Our results demonstrate a selective increase in posterior corpus-callosum thickness during middle and late childhood. Since axons crossing the midline in the splenium mainly connect occipital and parietal cortices, the accentuated

  11. Polyphenols decreased liver NADPH oxidase activity, increased muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and decreased gastrocnemius age-dependent autophagy in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Caroline; Chabi, Beatrice; Fouret, Gilles; Py, Guillaume; Sairafi, Badie; Elong, Cecile; Gaillet, Sylvie; Cristol, Jean Paul; Coudray, Charles; Feillet-Coudray, Christine

    2012-09-01

    This study explored major systems of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and their consequences on oxidative stress, mitochondriogenesis and muscle metabolism in aged rats, and evaluated the efficiency of 30-day oral supplementation with a moderate dose of a red grape polyphenol extract (RGPE) on these parameters. In the liver of aged rats, NADPH oxidase activity was increased and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities were altered, while xanthine oxidase activity remained unchanged. In muscles, only mitochondrial activity was modified with aging. The oral intake of RGPE decreased liver NADPH oxidase activity in the aged rats without affecting global oxidative stress, suggesting that NADPH oxidase was probably not the dominant detrimental source of production of O(2)·(-) in the liver. Interestingly, RGPE supplementation increased mitochondrial biogenesis and improved antioxidant status in the gastrocnemius of aged rats, while it had no significant effect in soleus. RGPE supplementation also decreased age-dependent autophagy in gastrocnemius of aged rats. These results extended existing findings on the beneficial effects of RGPE on mitochondriogenesis and muscle metabolism in aged rats.

  12. Spatial structure increases the waiting time for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Erik A.; Kostadinov, Rumen; Maley, Carlo C.; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2012-01-01

    Cancer results from a sequence of genetic and epigenetic changes which lead to a variety of abnormal phenotypes including increased proliferation and survival of somatic cells, and thus, to a selective advantage of pre-cancerous cells. The notion of cancer progression as an evolutionary process has been experiencing increasing interest in recent years. Many efforts have been made to better understand and predict the progression to cancer using mathematical models; these mostly consider the evolution of a well-mixed cell population, even though pre-cancerous cells often evolve in highly structured epithelial tissues. In this study, we propose a novel model of cancer progression that considers a spatially structured cell population where clones expand via adaptive waves. This model is used to assess two different paradigms of asexual evolution that have been suggested to delineate the process of cancer progression. The standard scenario of periodic selection assumes that driver mutations are accumulated strictly sequentially over time. However, when the mutation supply is sufficiently high, clones may arise simultaneously on distinct genetic backgrounds, and clonal adaptation waves interfere with each other. We find that in the presence of clonal interference, spatial structure increases the waiting time for cancer, leads to a patchwork structure of non-uniformly sized clones, decreases the survival probability of virtually neutral (passenger) mutations, and that genetic distance begins to increase over a characteristic length scale Lc. These characteristic features of clonal interference may help to predict the onset of cancers with pronounced spatial structure and to interpret spatially-sampled genetic data obtained from biopsies. Our estimates suggest that clonal interference likely occurs in the progression of colon cancer, and possibly other cancers where spatial structure matters. PMID:22707911

  13. Increases in norepinephrine release and ovarian cyst formation during ageing in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Eric; Fornes, Romina; Fernandois, Daniela; Garrido, Maritza P; Greiner, Monika; Lara, Hernan E; Paredes, Alfonso H

    2009-01-01

    Background Depletion of ovarian follicles is associated with the end of reproductive function in ageing females. Recently, it has been described that this process parallels increases in the concentration of norepinephrine (NE) in the rat ovary. In sexually mature rats, experimentally-induced increases in the sympathetic tone of the ovary is causally related to ovarian cyst formation and deranged follicular development. Thus, there is a possibility that increased ovarian NE concentrations represent changes in the activity of sympathetic nerves, which consequently participate in the process of ovarian cyst formation observed during ageing in the human and experimental animal models. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats between 6 and 14 months old were used to analyse the capacity of the ovary to release 3H-NE recently incorporated under transmural depolarisation in relation to changes in the ovarian follicular population. Morphometric analysis of ovarian follicles and real time PCR for Bcl2 and Bax mRNA were used to assess follicular atresia. Results From 8 months old, the induced release of recently incorporated 3H-norepinephrine (3H-NE) from the ovary and ovarian NE concentrations increased, reaching their peak values at 12 months old and remained elevated up to 14 months old. Increases in sympathetic nerve activity paralleled changes in the follicular population, as well as disappearance of the corpus luteum. In contrast, luteinised follicles, precystic follicles, and cystic follicles increased. During this period, the relationship between Bax and Bcl2 mRNAs (the proapoptotic/antiapoptotic signals) increased, suggesting atresia as the principal mechanism contributing to the decreased follicular population. When NE tone was increased, the mRNA ratio favoured Bcl2 to Bax and antiapoptotic signals dominated this period of development. Thus, these changing ratios could be responsible for the increase in luteinised follicles, as well as precystic and cystic follicles

  14. Age-related slowing of response selection and production in a visual choice reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with delayed processing in choice reaction time (CRT) tasks, but the processing stages most impacted by aging have not been clearly identified. Here, we analyzed CRT latencies in a computerized serial visual feature-conjunction task. Participants responded to a target letter (probability 40%) by pressing one mouse button, and responded to distractor letters differing either in color, shape, or both features from the target (probabilities 20% each) by pressing the other mouse button. Stimuli were presented randomly to the left and right visual fields and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were adaptively reduced following correct responses using a staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, we tested 1466 participants who ranged in age from 18 to 65 years. CRT latencies increased significantly with age (r = 0.47, 2.80 ms/year). Central processing time (CPT), isolated by subtracting simple reaction times (SRT) (obtained in a companion experiment performed on the same day) from CRT latencies, accounted for more than 80% of age-related CRT slowing, with most of the remaining increase in latency due to slowed motor responses. Participants were faster and more accurate when the stimulus location was spatially compatible with the mouse button used for responding, and this effect increased slightly with age. Participants took longer to respond to distractors with target color or shape than to distractors with no target features. However, the additional time needed to discriminate the more target-like distractors did not increase with age. In Experiment 2, we replicated the findings of Experiment 1 in a second population of 178 participants (ages 18–82 years). CRT latencies did not differ significantly in the two experiments, and similar effects of age, distractor similarity, and stimulus-response spatial compatibility were found. The results suggest that the age-related slowing in visual CRT latencies is largely due to delays in response selection and

  15. The impact of age at death on the lag time of radiocarbon values in human bone.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, Douglas H; Thomas, Christian; Olson, Jacqueline E

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of modern bomb-pulse radiocarbon in human bone offers data needed to interpret the post-mortem interval in skeletonized human remains recovered from forensic contexts. Radiocarbon analysis of different tissues with distinct rates of remodeling allows proper placement of the values on the modern bomb-curve. However, the lag time between the date of intercept on the curve and the actual death date is largely affected by the age at death. Published data on radiocarbon analysis of individuals of known age at death and death dates indicate that this lag time increases with age until about 60 years. The lag time documented for each decade of life can be used to compensate for this age-related factor and increase the accuracy of interpretation of the death date. While this method could be greatly improved by original research with a larger sample size, this study provides an adequate point from which to launch further investigations into the subject.

  16. Time Outdoors at Specific Ages During Early Childhood and the Risk of Incident Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rupal L.; Huang, Yu; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Williams, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Time outdoors during childhood is negatively associated with incident myopia. Consequently, additional time outdoors has been suggested as a public health intervention to reduce the prevalence of myopia. We investigated whether there were specific ages during early childhood when the time outdoors versus incident myopia association was strongest. Methods Children participating in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) were studied from age 2 to 15 years. Parentally reported time outdoors and time spent reading were assessed longitudinally in early childhood (ages 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 9 years). Noncycloplegic autorefraction was carried out longitudinally in later childhood (ages 10, 11, 12, and 15 years). Information was available for 2833 participants. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to test for association between time outdoors and incident myopia. Results From 3 years of age onward, greater time outdoors was associated with a reduced risk of incident myopia. The hazard ratio for myopia changed progressively from 0.90 (95% CI 0.83–0.98, P = 0.012) at age 3 years, to 0.86 (95% CI 0.78–0.93, P = 0.001) at age 9 years, for each additional SD of time spent outdoors per day. These associations were independent of two major risk factors for myopia: time reading and number of myopic parents. Conclusions Additional time spent outdoors across the 3 to 9 years age range was associated with a reduced incidence of myopia between ages 10 and 15 years. There was a trend for the association to increase toward the older end of the 3 to 9 years range. PMID:28245296

  17. Age, Time, and Decision Making: From Processing Speed to Global Time Horizons

    PubMed Central

    Löckenhoff, Corinna E.

    2013-01-01

    Time and time perceptions are integral to decision making because any meaningful choice is embedded in a temporal context and requires the evaluation of future preferences and outcomes. The present review examines the influence of chronological age on time perceptions and horizons and discusses implications for decision making across the life span. Time influences and interacts with decision making in multiple ways. Specifically, this review examines the following topic areas: (1) processing speed and decision time, (2) internal clocks and time estimation, (3) mental representations of future time and intertemporal choice, and (4) global time horizons. For each aspect, patterns of age differences and implications for decision strategies and quality are discussed. The conclusion proposes frameworks to integrate different lines of research and identifies promising avenues for future inquiry. PMID:22023567

  18. Reducing video frame rate increases remote optimal focus time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1993-01-01

    Twelve observers made best optical focus adjustments to a microscope whose high-resolution pattern was video monitored and displayed first on a National Television System Committee (NTSC) analog color monitor and second on a digitally compressed computer monitor screen at frame rates ranging (in six steps) from 1.5 to 30 frames per second (fps). This was done to determine whether reducing the frame rate affects the image focus. Reducing frame rate has been shown to be an effective and acceptable means of reducing transmission bandwidth of dynamic video imagery sent from Space Station Freedom (SSF) to ground scientists. Three responses were recorded per trial: time to complete the focus adjustment, number of changes of focus direction, and subjective rating of final image quality. It was found that: the average time to complete the focus setting increases from 4.5 sec at 30 fps to 7.9 sec at 1.5 fps (statistical probability = 1.2 x 10(exp -7)); there is no significant difference in the number of changes in the direction of focus adjustment across these frame rates; and there is no significant change in subjectively determined final image quality across these frame rates. These data can be used to help pre-plan future remote optical-focus operations on SSF.

  19. Near-infrared light increases ATP, extends lifespan and improves mobility in aged Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rana; Calaza, Karin; Kam, Jaimie Hoh; Salt, Thomas E.; Hogg, Chris; Jeffery, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is an irreversible cellular decline partly driven by failing mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria accumulate DNA mutations and reduce ATP production necessary for cellular metabolism. This is associated with inflammation. Near-infrared exposure increases retinal ATP in old mice via cytochrome c oxidase absorption and reduces inflammation. Here, we expose fruitflies daily to 670 nm radiation, revealing elevated ATP and reduced inflammation with age. Critically, there was a significant increase in average lifespan: 100–175% more flies survived into old age following 670 nm exposure and these had significantly improved mobility. This may be a simple route to extending lifespan and improving function in old age. PMID:25788488

  20. Near-infrared light increases ATP, extends lifespan and improves mobility in aged Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Begum, Rana; Calaza, Karin; Kam, Jaimie Hoh; Salt, Thomas E; Hogg, Chris; Jeffery, Glen

    2015-03-01

    Ageing is an irreversible cellular decline partly driven by failing mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria accumulate DNA mutations and reduce ATP production necessary for cellular metabolism. This is associated with inflammation. Near-infrared exposure increases retinal ATP in old mice via cytochrome c oxidase absorption and reduces inflammation. Here, we expose fruitflies daily to 670 nm radiation, revealing elevated ATP and reduced inflammation with age. Critically, there was a significant increase in average lifespan: 100-175% more flies survived into old age following 670 nm exposure and these had significantly improved mobility. This may be a simple route to extending lifespan and improving function in old age.

  1. Increased human AP endonuclease 1 level confers protection against the paternal age effect in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Jamila R.; Reddick, Traci L.; Perez, Marissa; Centonze, Victoria E.; Mitra, Sankar; Izumi, Tadahide; McMahan, C. Alex; Walter, Christi A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased paternal age is associated with a greater risk of producing children with genetic disorders originating from de novo germline mutations. Mice mimic the human condition by displaying an age-associated increase in spontaneous mutant frequency in spermatogenic cells. The observed increase in mutant frequency appears to be associated with a decrease in the DNA repair protein, AP endonuclease1 (APEX1) and Apex1 heterozygous mice display an accelerated paternal age effect as young adults. In this study, we directly tested if APEX1 over-expression in cell lines and transgenic mice could prevent increases in mutagenesis. Cell lines with ectopic expression of APEX1 had increased APEX1 activity and lower spontaneous and induced mutations in the lacI reporter gene relative to the control. Spermatogenic cells obtained from mice transgenic for human APEX1 displayed increased APEX1 activity, were protected from the age-dependent increase in spontaneous germline mutagenesis, and exhibited increased apoptosis in the spermatogonial cell population. These results directly indicate that increases in APEX1 level confer protection against the murine paternal age effect, thus highlighting the role of APEX1 in preserving reproductive health with increasing age and in protection against genotoxin-induced mutagenesis in somatic cells. PMID:26201249

  2. Increase in participation but decrease in performance in age group mountain marathoners in the 'Jungfrau Marathon': a Swiss phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Rosemann, Thomas; Zingg, Matthias A; Rüst, Christoph A

    2015-01-01

    Participation and performance trends for age group marathoners have been investigated for large city marathons such as the 'New York City Marathon' but not for mountain marathons. This study investigated participation and trends in performance and sex difference in the mountain marathon 'Jungfrau Marathon' held in Switzerland from 2000 to 2014 using single and mixed effects regression analyses. Results were compared to a city marathon (Lausanne Marathon) also held in Switzerland during the same period. Sex difference was calculated using the equation ([race time in women] - [race time in men]/[race time in men] × 100). Changes in sex differences across calendar years and were investigated using linear regression models. In 'Jungfrau Marathon', participation in all female and male age groups increased with exception of women in age groups 18-24 and men in age groups 30-34, 40-44 and 60-64 years where participation remained unchanged. In 'Lausanne Marathon', participation increased in women in age groups 30-34 to 40-44 years. In men, participation increased in age groups 25-29 to 44-44 years and 50-54 years. In 'Jungfrau Marathon' runners became slower across years in age groups 18-24 to 70-74 years. In 'Lausanne Marathon', runners became slower across years in age groups 18-24 and 30-34 to 65-69 years, but not for 25-29, 70-74 and 75-79 years. In 'Jungfrau Marathon', sex difference increased in age groups 25-29 (from 4 to 10 %) and 60-64 years (from 3 to 8 %) but decreased in age group 40-44 years (from 12 to 6 %). In 'Lausanne Marathon', the sex difference showed no changes. In summary, participation increased in most female and male age groups but performance decreased in most age groups for both the mountain marathon 'Jungfrau Marathon' and the city marathon 'Lausanne Marathon'. The sex differences were lower in the 'Jungfrau Marathon' (~6-7 %) compared to the 'Lausanne Marathon' where the sex difference was ~10-12 % from age groups 18-24 to 55

  3. Paternal aging and increased risk of congenital disease, psychiatric disorders, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Simon L; Eisenberg, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    As couples are increasingly delaying parenthood, the effect of the aging men and women on reproductive outcomes has been an area of increased interest. Advanced paternal age has been shown to independently affect the entire spectrum of male fertility as assessed by reductions in sperm quality and fertilization (both assisted and unassisted). Moreover, epidemiological data suggest that paternal age can lead to higher rates of adverse birth outcomes and congenital anomalies. Mounting evidence also suggests increased risk of specific pediatric and adult disease states ranging from cancer to behavioral traits. While disease states associated with advancing paternal age have been well described, consensus recommendations for neonatal screening have not been as widely implemented as have been with advanced maternal age. PMID:26975491

  4. Advancing age increases sperm chromatin damage and impairs fertility in peroxiredoxin 6 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozkosem, Burak; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Fisher, Aron B.; O’Flaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Due to socioeconomic factors, more couples are choosing to delay conception than ever. Increasing average maternal and paternal age in developed countries over the past 40 years has raised the question of how aging affects reproductive success of males and females. Since oxidative stress in the male reproductive tract increases with age, we investigated the impact of advanced paternal age on the integrity of sperm nucleus and reproductive success of males by using a Prdx6−/− mouse model. We compared sperm motility, cytoplasmic droplet retention sperm chromatin quality and reproductive outcomes of young (2-month-old), adult (8-month-old), and old (20-month-old) Prdx6−/− males with their age-matched wild type (WT) controls. Absence of PRDX6 caused age-dependent impairment of sperm motility and sperm maturation and increased sperm DNA fragmentation and oxidation as well as decreased sperm DNA compaction and protamination. Litter size, total number of litters and total number of pups per male were significantly lower in Prdx6−/− males compared to WT controls. These abnormal reproductive outcomes were severely affected by age in Prdx6−/− males. In conclusion, the advanced paternal age affects sperm chromatin integrity and fertility more severely in the absence of PRDX6, suggesting a protective role of PRDX6 in age-associated decline in the sperm quality and fertility in mice. PMID:25796034

  5. Age-dependent increase in miRNA-34a expression in the posterior pole of the mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Forward, Krisztina I.; Nguyen, Anthony T.; Bordbari, Matthew H.; Oltjen, Sharon L.; Hjelmeland, Leonard M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) has been implicated in neurodegeneration. MiR-34a belongs to a signaling network involving p53 and Sirt-1. This network responds to DNA damage with further downstream signals that induce senescence or apoptosis. Our goal was to measure the expression level of miR-34a in the mouse retina and RPE as a function of age. Methods The age-dependent change in miR-34a expression was quantified using a real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay on microRNA isolates from eye tissue: the retina and RPE/choroid (4, 18, 24, and 32 months of age). Tissue localization of miR-34a was determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) for a series of time points. Expression of the miR-34a target gene Sirt1 was analyzed using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results MiR-34a examined with real-time PCR showed a linear increase in expression with age when compared to that of 4-month-old mice. However, the level of expression between the 24 and 32-month-old animals showed mild downregulation. An age-related increase in miR-34a expression was confirmed in the mouse eye using in situ hybridization. An inverse relationship between the levels of expression of miR-34a and its target Sirt1 mRNA was found at 18 and 24 months of age. Conclusions Our data showed that miR-34a expression increased in the retina and RPE with age. The level of DNA damage in mitochondria in the retina and RPE followed a similar time course. This suggests that miR-34a may play a role in the senescence and apoptosis of the retina and RPE cells in the aging eye. PMID:25489229

  6. Cow comfort in tie-stalls: increased depth of shavings or straw bedding increases lying time.

    PubMed

    Tucker, C B; Weary, D M; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Beauchemin, K A

    2009-06-01

    Over half of US dairy operations use tie-stalls, but these farming systems have received relatively little research attention in terms of stall design and management. The current study tested the effects of the amount of 2 bedding materials, straw and shavings, on dairy cattle lying behavior. The effects of 4 levels of shavings, 3, 9, 15, and 24 kg/stall (experiment 1, n = 12), and high and low levels of straw in 2 separate experiments: 1, 3, 5, and 7 kg/stall (experiment 2, n = 12) and 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kg/stall (experiment 3, n = 12) were assessed. Treatments were compared using a crossover design with lactating cows housed in tie-stalls fitted with mattresses. Treatments were applied for 1 wk. Total lying time, number of lying bouts, and the length of each lying bout was recorded with data loggers. In experiment 1, cows spent 3 min more lying down for each additional kilogram of shavings (11.0, 11.7, 11.6, and 12.1 +/- 0.24 h/d for 3, 9, 15, and 24 kg/stall shavings, respectively). In experiment 2, cows increased lying time by 12 min for every additional kilogram of straw (11.2, 12.0, 11.8, and 12.4 +/- 0.24 h/d for 1, 3, 5, and 7 kg/stall of straw, respectively). There were no differences in lying behavior among the lower levels of straw tested in experiment 3 (11.7 +/- 0.32 h/d). These results indicated that additional bedding above a scant amount improves cow comfort, as measured by lying time, likely because a well-bedded surface is more compressible.

  7. Increased centrosome amplification in aged stem cells of the Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joung-Sun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Na, Hyun-Jin; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Kim, Young-Shin; Arking, Robert; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of aged Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of oxidative stressed Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be responsible for abnormal ISC polyploid cells. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be a useful marker for aging stem cells. - Abstract: Age-related changes in long-lived tissue-resident stem cells may be tightly linked to aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. Centrosomes play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. Supernumerary centrosomes are known to be an early event in tumorigenesis and senescence. However, the age-related changes of centrosome duplication in tissue-resident stem cells in vivo remain unknown. Here, using anti-γ-tubulin and anti-PH3, we analyzed mitotic intestinal stem cells with supernumerary centrosomes in the adult Drosophila midgut, which may be a versatile model system for stem cell biology. The results showed increased centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells of aged and oxidatively stressed Drosophila midguts. Increased centrosome amplification was detected by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT in intestinal stem cells/enteroblasts, known to mimic age-related changes including hyperproliferation of intestinal stem cells and hyperplasia in the midgut. Our data show the first direct evidence for the age-related increase of centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells and suggest that the Drosophila midgut is an excellent model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying centrosome amplification in aging adult stem cells in vivo.

  8. On the Increasing Fragility of Human Teeth with Age: ADeep-Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, J.W.; Nalla, R.K.; Balooch, G.; Kim, G.; Pugach, M.; Habelitz, S.; Marshall, G.W.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-07-14

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) using 244nm excitation was used to investigate the impact of aging on humandentin. The intensity of a spectroscopic feature from the peptide bondsin the collagen increases with tissue age, similar to a finding reportedpreviously for human cortical bone.

  9. Time is up: increasing shadow price of time in primary-care office visits.

    PubMed

    Tai-Seale, Ming; McGuire, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    A physician's own time is a scarce resource in primary care, and the physician must constantly evaluate the gain from spending more time with the current patient against moving to address the health-care needs of the next. We formulate and test two alternative hypotheses. The first hypothesis is based on the premise that with time so scarce, physicians equalize the marginal value of time across patients. The second, alternative hypothesis states that physicians allocate the same time to each patient, regardless of how much the patient benefits from the time at the margin. For our empirical work, we examine the presence of a sharply increasing subjective shadow price of time around the 'target' time using video recordings of 385 visits by elderly patients to their primary care physician. We structure the data at the 'topic' level and find evidence consistent with the alternative hypothesis. Specifically, time elapsed within a visit is a very strong determinant of the current topic being the 'last topic'. This finding implies the physician's shadow price of time is rising during the course of a visit. We consider whether dislodging a target-time mentality from physicians (and patients) might contribute to more productive primary care practice.

  10. Generalized master equation via aging continuous-time random walks.

    PubMed

    Allegrini, Paolo; Aquino, Gerardo; Grigolini, Paolo; Palatella, Luigi; Rosa, Angelo

    2003-11-01

    We discuss the problem of the equivalence between continuous-time random walk (CTRW) and generalized master equation (GME). The walker, making instantaneous jumps from one site of the lattice to another, resides in each site for extended times. The sojourn times have a distribution density psi(t) that is assumed to be an inverse power law with the power index micro. We assume that the Onsager principle is fulfilled, and we use this assumption to establish a complete equivalence between GME and the Montroll-Weiss CTRW. We prove that this equivalence is confined to the case where psi(t) is an exponential. We argue that is so because the Montroll-Weiss CTRW, as recently proved by Barkai [E. Barkai, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 104101 (2003)], is nonstationary, thereby implying aging, while the Onsager principle is valid only in the case of fully aged systems. The case of a Poisson distribution of sojourn times is the only one with no aging associated to it, and consequently with no need to establish special initial conditions to fulfill the Onsager principle. We consider the case of a dichotomous fluctuation, and we prove that the Onsager principle is fulfilled for any form of regression to equilibrium provided that the stationary condition holds true. We set the stationary condition on both the CTRW and the GME, thereby creating a condition of total equivalence, regardless of the nature of the waiting-time distribution. As a consequence of this procedure we create a GME that is a bona fide master equation, in spite of being non-Markov. We note that the memory kernel of the GME affords information on the interaction between system of interest and its bath. The Poisson case yields a bath with infinitely fast fluctuations. We argue that departing from the Poisson form has the effect of creating a condition of infinite memory and that these results might be useful to shed light on the problem of how to unravel non-Markov quantum master equations.

  11. Increased susceptibility of aging gastric mucosa to injury: the mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Andrzej S; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Jones, Michael K

    2014-04-28

    This review updates the current views on aging gastric mucosa and the mechanisms of its increased susceptibility to injury. Experimental and clinical studies indicate that gastric mucosa of aging individuals-"aging gastropathy"-has prominent structural and functional abnormalities vs young gastric mucosa. Some of these abnormalities include a partial atrophy of gastric glands, impaired mucosal defense (reduced bicarbonate and prostaglandin generation, decreased sensory innervation), increased susceptibility to injury by a variety of damaging agents such as ethanol, aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), impaired healing of injury and reduced therapeutic efficacy of ulcer-healing drugs. Detailed analysis of the above changes indicates that the following events occur in aging gastric mucosa: reduced mucosal blood flow and impaired oxygen delivery cause hypoxia, which leads to activation of the early growth response-1 (egr-1) transcription factor. Activation of egr-1, in turn, upregulates the dual specificity phosphatase, phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) resulting in activation of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 and caspase-9 and reduced expression of the anti-apoptosis protein, survivin. The imbalance between pro- and anti-apoptosis mediators results in increased apoptosis and increased susceptibility to injury. This paradigm has human relevance since increased expression of PTEN and reduced expression of survivin were demonstrated in gastric mucosa of aging individuals. Other potential mechanisms operating in aging gastric mucosa include reduced telomerase activity, increase in replicative cellular senescence, and reduced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and importin-α-a nuclear transport protein essential for transport of transcription factors to nucleus. Aging gastropathy is an important and clinically relevant issue because of: (1) an aging world population due to prolonged life span; (2) older

  12. Transient Elastography-Based Liver Stiffness Age-Dependently Increases in Children

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhara, Daisuke; Cho, Yuki; Shintaku, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Pediatric use of liver transient elastography (TE) is attractive for its non-invasiveness, but reference values have not been established. We aimed to determine reference values for TE in children. Methods In pediatric patients (1 to 18 years), TE (FibroScan®) with an M probe was used for both liver stiffness measurement (LSM) and measurement of hepatic fat deposition by using a controlled attenuation parameter (CAP). The patients were divided into three relevant age groups: preschoolers (1 to 5 years), elementary school children (6 to 11 years), and adolescents (12 to 18 years). Overweight or obese patients or those with known liver disease, elevated serum liver enzymes, or hepatic echogenic abnormality were excluded from the study. Results Among 139 children, 123 (88.5%; 62 male; median age, 11.7 years; age range, 1.3 to 17.2 years) were successfully subjected to M-probe TE without anesthesia. Median LSM increased with age: it was 3.4 kPa (2.3 to 4.6 kPa, 5th to 95th percentiles) at ages 1 to 5 years; 3.8 (2.5 to 6.1) kPa at ages 6 to 11; and 4.1 (3.3 to 7.9) kPa at ages 12 to 18 (P = 0.001). Median CAP was not age dependent: it was 183 (112 to 242) for ages 1 to 18 years. Conclusions M-probe TE is suitable in a wide age range of children from age 1 year up. In children without evidence of liver disease, LSM has an age-dependent increase, whereas CAP does not differ between ages 1 and 18. PMID:27861607

  13. New York: Expanding Time, Increasing Opportunities for Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tiffany D.

    2014-01-01

    New York is poised to take an important step to improve student achievement by expanding learning time for students attending high-poverty, low-performing schools. Recent district- and state-level investments in expanded learning time--a promising strategy to close achievement and opportunity gaps--will give students more time to learn core…

  14. Evaluation of a Changing Criterion Intervention to Increase Fluent Responding with an Elementary Age Student with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fienup, Daniel M.; Doepke, Karla

    2008-01-01

    Fluency training focuses on increasing the speed of accurate responding (Martens & Witt, 2004). This research was conducted with an elementary aged boy diagnosed with autism who responded accurately, but slowly to calendar and time related questions. Set in a public school, the student's personal aide was trained to make rewards contingent on…

  15. Surface L-type Ca2+ channel expression levels are increased in aged hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Santana, Félix Luis; Oh, Myongsoo Matthew; Antion, Marcia Diana; Lee, Amy; Hell, Johannes Wilhelm; Disterhoft, John Francis

    2014-01-01

    Age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel (LTCC) expression in hippocampal pyramidal neurons has been hypothesized to underlie the increased Ca2+ influx and subsequent reduced intrinsic neuronal excitability of these neurons that lead to age-related cognitive deficits. Here, using specific antibodies against Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits of LTCCs, we systematically re-examined the expression of these proteins in the hippocampus from young (3 to 4 month old) and aged (30 to 32 month old) F344xBN rats. Western blot analysis of the total expression levels revealed significant reductions in both Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits from all three major hippocampal regions of aged rats. Despite the decreases in total expression levels, surface biotinylation experiments revealed significantly higher proportion of expression on the plasma membrane of Cav1.2 in the CA1 and CA3 regions and of Cav1.3 in the CA3 region from aged rats. Furthermore, the surface biotinylation results were supported by immunohistochemical analysis that revealed significant increases in Cav1.2 immunoreactivity in the CA1 and CA3 regions of aged hippocampal pyramidal neurons. In addition, we found a significant increase in the level of phosphorylated Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane in the dentate gyrus of aged rats. Taken together, our present findings strongly suggest that age-related cognitive deficits cannot be attributed to a global change in L-type channel expression nor to the level of phosphorylation of Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane of hippocampal neurons. Rather, increased expression and density of LTCCs on the plasma membrane may underlie the age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:24033980

  16. In vitro 3-D model based on extending time of culture for studying chronological epidermis aging.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Morgan; Metral, Elodie; Boher, Aurélie; Rousselle, Patricia; Thepot, Amélie; Damour, Odile

    2015-09-01

    Skin aging is a complex phenomenon in which several mechanisms operate simultaneously. Among them, intrinsic aging is a time-dependent process, which leads to gradual skin changes affecting its structure and function such as thinning down of both epidermal and dermal compartments and a flattening and fragility of the dermo-epidermal junction. Today, several approaches have been proposed for the generation of aged skin in vitro, including skin explants from aged donors and three-dimensional skin equivalent treated by aging-inducing chemical compounds or engineered with human cells isolated from aged donors. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new in vitro model of aging based on skin equivalent demonstrating the same phenotypic changes that were observed in chronological aging. By using prolonged culture as a proxy for cellular aging, we extended to 120 days the culture time of a skin equivalent model based on collagen-glycosaminoglycan-chitosan porous polymer and engineered with human skin cells from photo-protected sites of young donors. Morphological, immunohistological and ultrastructural analysis at different time points of the culture allowed characterizing the phenotypic changes observed in our model in comparison to samples of non photo-exposed normal human skin from different ages. We firstly confirmed that long-term cultured skin equivalents are still morphologically consistent and functionally active even after 120 days of culture. However, similar to in vivo chronological skin aging a significant decrease of the epidermis thickness as well as the number of keratinocyte expressing proliferation marker Ki67 are observed in extended culture time skin equivalent. Epidermal differentiation markers loricrin, filaggrin, involucrin and transglutaminase, also strongly decreased. Ultrastructural analysis of basement membrane showed typical features of aged skin such as duplication of lamina densa and alterations of hemidesmosomes. Moreover, the

  17. In vivo levels of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide increase with age in mtDNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Logan, Angela; Shabalina, Irina G; Prime, Tracy A; Rogatti, Sebastian; Kalinovich, Anastasia V; Hartley, Richard C; Budd, Ralph C; Cannon, Barbara; Murphy, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    In mtDNA mutator mice, mtDNA mutations accumulate leading to a rapidly aging phenotype. However, there is little evidence of oxidative damage to tissues, and when analyzed ex vivo, no change in production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by mitochondria has been reported, undermining the mitochondrial oxidative damage theory of aging. Paradoxically, interventions that decrease mitochondrial ROS levels in vivo delay onset of aging. To reconcile these findings, we used the mitochondria-targeted mass spectrometry probe MitoB to measure hydrogen peroxide within mitochondria of living mice. Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide was the same in young mutator and control mice, but as the mutator mice aged, hydrogen peroxide increased. This suggests that the prolonged presence of mtDNA mutations in vivo increases hydrogen peroxide that contributes to an accelerated aging phenotype, perhaps through the activation of pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory redox signaling pathways.

  18. Increased CaVbeta1A expression with aging contributes to skeletal muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jackson R; Zheng, Zhenlin; Wang, Zhong-Min; Payne, Anthony M; Messi, María L; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2009-09-01

    Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into the cytosol is a crucial part of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. Excitation-contraction uncoupling, a deficit in Ca2+ release from the SR, is thought to be responsible for at least some of the loss in specific force observed in aging skeletal muscle. Excitation-contraction uncoupling may be caused by alterations in expression of the voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha1s (CaV1.1) and beta1a (CaVbeta1a) subunits, both of which are necessary for E-C coupling to occur. While previous studies have found CaV1.1 expression declines in old rodents, CaVbeta1a expression has not been previously examined in aging models. Western blot analysis shows a substantial increase of CaVbeta1a expression over the full lifespan of Friend Virus B (FVB) mice. To examine the specific effects of CaVbeta1a overexpression, a CaVbeta1a-YFP plasmid was electroporated in vivo into young animals. The resulting increase in expression of CaVbeta1a corresponded to decline of CaV1.1 over the same time period. YFP fluorescence, used as a measure of CaVbeta1a-YFP expression in individual fibers, also showed an inverse relationship with charge movement, measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Specific force was significantly reduced in young CaVbeta1a-YFP electroporated muscle fibers compared with sham-electroporated, age-matched controls. siRNA interference of CaVbeta1a in young muscles reduced charge movement, while charge movement in old was restored to young control levels. These studies imply CaVbeta1a serves as both a positive and negative regulator CaV1.1 expression, and that endogenous overexpression of CaVbeta1a during old age may play a role in the loss of specific force.

  19. Increasing subtropical North Pacific Ocean nitrogen fixation since the Little Ice Age.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Owen A; Guilderson, Thomas P; Batista, Fabian C; Schiff, John T; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2014-01-02

    The North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) plays a major part in the export of carbon and other nutrients to the deep ocean. Primary production in the NPSG has increased in recent decades despite a reduction in nutrient supply to surface waters. It is thought that this apparent paradox can be explained by a shift in plankton community structure from mostly eukaryotes to mostly nitrogen-fixing prokaryotes. It remains uncertain, however, whether the plankton community domain shift can be linked to cyclical climate variability or a long-term global warming trend. Here we analyse records of bulk and amino-acid-specific (15)N/(14)N isotopic ratios (δ(15)N) preserved in the skeletons of long-lived deep-sea proteinaceous corals collected from the Hawaiian archipelago; these isotopic records serve as a proxy for the source of nitrogen-supported export production through time. We find that the recent increase in nitrogen fixation is the continuation of a much larger, centennial-scale trend. After a millennium of relatively minor fluctuation, δ(15)N decreases between 1850 and the present. The total shift in δ(15)N of -2 per mil over this period is comparable to the total change in global mean sedimentary δ(15)N across the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, but it is happening an order of magnitude faster. We use a steady-state model and find that the isotopic mass balance between nitrate and nitrogen fixation implies a 17 to 27 per cent increase in nitrogen fixation over this time period. A comparison with independent records suggests that the increase in nitrogen fixation might be linked to Northern Hemisphere climate change since the end of the Little Ice Age.

  20. Increasing subtropical North Pacific Ocean nitrogen fixation since the Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Owen A.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Batista, Fabian C.; Schiff, John T.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    The North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) plays a major part in the export of carbon and other nutrients to the deep ocean. Primary production in the NPSG has increased in recent decades despite a reduction in nutrient supply to surface waters. It is thought that this apparent paradox can be explained by a shift in plankton community structure from mostly eukaryotes to mostly nitrogen-fixing prokaryotes. It remains uncertain, however, whether the plankton community domain shift can be linked to cyclical climate variability or a long-term global warming trend. Here we analyse records of bulk and amino-acid-specific 15N/14N isotopic ratios (δ15N) preserved in the skeletons of long-lived deep-sea proteinaceous corals collected from the Hawaiian archipelago; these isotopic records serve as a proxy for the source of nitrogen-supported export production through time. We find that the recent increase in nitrogen fixation is the continuation of a much larger, centennial-scale trend. After a millennium of relatively minor fluctuation, δ15N decreases between 1850 and the present. The total shift in δ15N of -2 per mil over this period is comparable to the total change in global mean sedimentary δ15N across the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, but it is happening an order of magnitude faster. We use a steady-state model and find that the isotopic mass balance between nitrate and nitrogen fixation implies a 17 to 27 per cent increase in nitrogen fixation over this time period. A comparison with independent records suggests that the increase in nitrogen fixation might be linked to Northern Hemisphere climate change since the end of the Little Ice Age.

  1. Preferential retrotransposition in aging yeast mother cells is correlated with increased genome instability.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Melissa N; Scannapieco, Alison E; Au, Pak Ho; Dorsey, Savanna; Royer, Catherine A; Maxwell, Patrick H

    2015-10-01

    Retrotransposon expression or mobility is increased with age in multiple species and could promote genome instability or altered gene expression during aging. However, it is unclear whether activation of retrotransposons during aging is an indirect result of global changes in chromatin and gene regulation or a result of retrotransposon-specific mechanisms. Retromobility of a marked chromosomal Ty1 retrotransposon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was elevated in mother cells relative to their daughter cells, as determined by magnetic cell sorting of mothers and daughters. Retromobility frequencies in aging mother cells were significantly higher than those predicted by cell age and the rate of mobility in young populations, beginning when mother cells were only several generations old. New Ty1 insertions in aging mothers were more strongly correlated with gross chromosome rearrangements than in young cells and were more often at non-preferred target sites. Mother cells were more likely to have high concentrations and bright foci of Ty1 Gag-GFP than their daughter cells. Levels of extrachromosomal Ty1 cDNA were also significantly higher in aged mother cell populations than their daughter cell populations. These observations are consistent with a retrotransposon-specific mechanism that causes retrotransposition to occur preferentially in yeast mother cells as they begin to age, as opposed to activation by phenotypic changes associated with very old age. These findings will likely be relevant for understanding retrotransposons and aging in many organisms, based on similarities in regulation and consequences of retrotransposition in diverse species.

  2. Effect of age increase on metabolism and toxicity of ethanol in female rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young C; Kim, Sung Y; Sohn, Young R

    2003-12-12

    Age-dependent change in the effects of acute ethanol administration on female rat liver was investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats, each aged 4, 12, or 50 weeks, received ethanol (2 g/kg) via a catheter inserted into a jugular vein. Ethanol elimination rate (EER), most rapid in the 4 weeks old rats, was decreased as the age advanced. Hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity was not altered by age, but microsomal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activity was significantly greater in the 4 weeks old rats. Relative liver weight decreased with age increase in proportion to reduction of EER. Hepatic triglyceride and malondialdehyde concentrations increased spontaneously in the 50 weeks old nai;ve rats. Ethanol administration (3 g/kg, ip) elevated malondialdehyde and triglyceride contents only in the 4 and the 12 weeks old rats. Hepatic glutathione concentration was increasingly reduced by ethanol with age increase. Ethanol decreased cysteine concentration in the 4 weeks old rats, but elevated it significantly in the older rats. Inhibition of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity by ethanol was greater with age increase, which appeared to be responsible for the increase in hepatic cysteine. The results indicate that age does not affect the ethanol metabolizing capacity of female rat liver, but the overall ethanol metabolism is decreased in accordance with the reduction of relative liver size. Accordingly induction of acute alcoholic fatty liver is less significant in the old rats. However, progressively greater depletion of glutathione by ethanol in older rats suggests that susceptibility of liver to oxidative damage would be increased as animals grow old.

  3. Increasing incidence of thyroid cancer in Great Britain, 1976-2005: age-period-cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J Q; Blakey, Karen; James, Peter W; Gomez Pozo, Basilio; Basta, Nermine O; Hale, Juliet

    2012-08-01

    Increases in the incidence of thyroid cancer have been previously reported. The purpose of the present study was to examine temporal trends in the incidence of primary thyroid cancer diagnosed in 0-49 year olds in parts of Great Britain during 1976-2005. Data on 4,337 cases of thyroid cancer were obtained from regional cancer registries. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) were calculated. Negative binomial regression was used to examine effects of age, sex, drift (linear trend), non-linear period and non-linear cohort. The best fitting negative binomial regression model included age (P < 0.001), sex (P < 0.001) and drift (P < 0.001). Non-linear period (P = 0.648) and non-linear cohort (P = 0.788) were not statistically significant. For males aged 0-14, the ASR increased from 0.2 per million persons per year in 1976-1986 to 0.6 in 1997-2005. For males aged 15-29 and 30-49 the ASRs increased from 1.9 to 3.3 and from 7.4 to 12.7, respectively. For females aged 0-14, the corresponding ASR increased from 0.3 to 0.5. For females aged 15-29 and 30-49 the ASRs increased from 6.9 to 12.4 and from 21.2 to 42.3, respectively. For all age groups, there has been a linear increase in incidence of thyroid cancer, which has led to a doubling of the number of cases diagnosed over a twenty year span. The reasons for this increase are not well understood, but it is consistent with findings from other countries.

  4. Measuring Space-Time Geometry over the Ages

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbins, Albert; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Theorists are often told to express things in the 'observational plane'. One can do this for space-time geometry, considering 'visual' observations of matter in our universe by a single observer over time, with no assumptions about isometries, initial conditions, nor any particular relation between matter and geometry, such as Einstein's equations. Using observables as coordinates naturally leads to a parametrization of space-time geometry in terms of other observables, which in turn prescribes an observational program to measure the geometry. Under the assumption of vorticity-free matter flow we describe this observational program, which includes measurements of gravitational lensing, proper motion, and redshift drift. Only 15% of the curvature information can be extracted without long time baseline observations, and this increases to 35% with observations that will take decades. The rest would likely require centuries of observations. The formalism developed is exact, non-perturbative, and more general than the usual cosmological analysis.

  5. The increase of the functional entropy of the human brain with age.

    PubMed

    Yao, Y; Lu, W L; Xu, B; Li, C B; Lin, C P; Waxman, D; Feng, J F

    2013-10-09

    We use entropy to characterize intrinsic ageing properties of the human brain. Analysis of fMRI data from a large dataset of individuals, using resting state BOLD signals, demonstrated that a functional entropy associated with brain activity increases with age. During an average lifespan, the entropy, which was calculated from a population of individuals, increased by approximately 0.1 bits, due to correlations in BOLD activity becoming more widely distributed. We attribute this to the number of excitatory neurons and the excitatory conductance decreasing with age. Incorporating these properties into a computational model leads to quantitatively similar results to the fMRI data. Our dataset involved males and females and we found significant differences between them. The entropy of males at birth was lower than that of females. However, the entropies of the two sexes increase at different rates, and intersect at approximately 50 years; after this age, males have a larger entropy.

  6. Aging of nickel added to soils as predicted by soil pH and time.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibing; Lombi, Enzo; McLaughlin, Mike J; Oliver, Ian W; Nolan, Annette L; Oorts, Koen; Smolders, Erik

    2013-08-01

    Although aging processes are important in risk assessment for metals in soils, the aging of Ni added to soils has not been studied in detail. In this study, after addition of water soluble Ni to soils, the changes over time in isotopic exchangeability, total concentrations and free Ni(2+) activity in soil pore water, were investigated in 16 European soils incubated outdoors for 18 months. The results showed that after Ni addition, concentrations of Ni in soil pore water and isotopic exchangeability of Ni in soils initially decreased rapidly. This phase was followed by further decreases in the parameters measured but these occurred at slower rates. Increasing soil pH increased the rate and extent of aging reactions. Semi-mechanistic models, based on Ni precipitation/nucleation on soil surfaces and micropore diffusion, were developed and calibrated. The initial fast processes, which were attributed to precipitation/nucleation, occurred over a short time (e.g. 1h), afterwards the slow processes were most likely controlled by micropore diffusion processes. The models were validated by comparing predicted and measured Ni aging in three additional, widely differing soils aged outdoors for periods up to 15 months in different conditions. These models could be used to scale ecotoxicological data generated in short-term studies to longer aging times.

  7. Age at migration, family instability, and timing of sexual onset.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Rachel E; Tienda, Marta; Adserà, Alícia

    2017-03-01

    This study builds on and extends previous research on nativity variations in adolescent health and risk behavior by addressing three questions: (1) whether and how generational status and age at migration are associated with timing of sexual onset among U.S. adolescents; (2) whether and how family instability mediates associations between nativity and sexual debut; and (3) whether and how these associations vary by gender. We find that first- and second-generation immigrant youth initiate sexual activity later than native youth. Foreign-born youth who migrate after the start of adolescence exhibit the latest sexual onset; boys' sexual behavior is particularly sensitive to age at migration. Parental union stability is protective for first- and second-generation youth, especially boys; however, instability in co-residence with parents accelerates sexual debut for foreign-born girls, and dilutes protections from parental marital stability. Use of a non-English language at home delays sexual onset for immigrant girls, but not boys.

  8. Increased Screen Time: Implications for Early Childhood Development and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Radesky, Jenny S; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2016-10-01

    The authors review trends in adoption of new digital technologies (eg, mobile and interactive media) by families with young children (ages 0-8 years), continued use of television and video games, and the evidence for learning from digital versus hands-on play. The authors also discuss continued concerns about health and developmental/behavioral risks of excessive media use for child cognitive, language, literacy, and social-emotional development. This evidence is then applied to clinical care in terms of the screening questions providers can use, tools available to providers and parents, and changes in anticipatory guidance.

  9. Age-induced protein modifications and increased proteolysis in potato seed-tubers

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, G.N.M.; Knowles, N.R.; Houtz, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term aging of potato (Solanum tuberosum) seed-tubers resulted in a loss of patatin and a cysteine-proteinase inhibitor, potato multicystatin (PMC), as well as in increase in the activities of 84-, 95-, and 125-kD proteinases. Highly active, additional proteinases appeared in the oldest tubers. Over 90% of the total proteolytic activity in aged tubers was sensitive to trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido (4-guanidino) butane or leupeptin, whereas pepstatin was the most effective inhibitor of proteinases in young tubers. Proteinases in aged tubers were also inhibited by crude extracts or purified PMC from young tubers, suggesting that the loss of PMC was responsible for the age-induced increase in proteinase activity. Nonenzymatic oxidation, glycation, and deamidation of proteins were enhanced by aging. Aged tubers developed daughter tubers that contained 3-fold more protein than mother tubers, with a polypeptide profile consistent with that of young tubers. Although PMC and patatin were absent from the older mother tubers, both proteins were expressed in the daughter tubers, indicating that aging did not compromise the efficacy of genes encoding PMC and patatin. Unlike the mother tubers, proteinase activity in daughter tubers was undetectable. Their results indicate that tuber aging nonenzymatically modifies proteins, which enhances their susceptibility to breakdown; the authors also identify a role for PMC in regulating protein turnover in potato tubers.

  10. Increased epigenetic age and granulocyte counts in the blood of Parkinson's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Steve; Ritz, Beate R.

    2015-01-01

    It has been a long standing hypothesis that blood tissue of PD Parkinson's disease (PD) patients may exhibit signs of accelerated aging. Here we use DNA methylation based biomarkers of aging (“epigenetic clock”) to assess the aging rate of blood in two ethnically distinct case-control data sets. Using n=508 Caucasian and n=84 Hispanic blood samples, we assess a) the intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration of blood (IEAA), which is independent of blood cell counts, and b) the extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration rate of blood (EEAA) which is associated with age dependent changes in blood cell counts. Blood of PD subjects exhibits increased age acceleration according to both IEAA (p=0.019) and EEAA (p=6.1×10−3). We find striking differences in imputed blood cell counts between PD cases and controls. Compared to control subjects, PD subjects contains more granulocytes (p=1.0×10−9 in Caucasians, p=0.00066 in Hispanics) but fewer T helper cells (p=1.4×10−6 in Caucasians, p=0.0024 in Hispanics) and fewer B cells (p=1.6×10−5 in Caucasians, p=4.5×10−5 in Hispanics). Overall, this study shows that the epigenetic age of the immune system is significantly increased in PD patients and that granulocytes play a significant role. PMID:26655927

  11. Time-Dependent Increase of Chitinase1 in APP/PS1 Double Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qian; Shi, Rui; Yang, Wenxiu; Zou, Yan; Du, Yinshi; Zhang, Man; Yu, Weihua; Lü, Yang

    2016-07-01

    It is reported that chitinase1 increases in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the alteration of chitinase1 in the progress of AD is still unclear. Thus, we designed the present study to detect chitinase1 level in different stages of APP/PS1 double transgenic mice. Experimental models were APP/PS1 double transgenic mice with 4, 12 and 22 months. Cognitive function was detected by Morris water maze test in APP/PS1 mice as well as controls. ELISA and the quantitative RT-PCR were used to detect chitinase1 level in different groups. The study displayed that expression of chitinase1 gradually increased in a time-dependent manner in APP/PS1 mice, while there were no statistical differences among the wild-type mice in varies ages. Moreover, chitnase1 increased significantly in APP/PS1 mice aged 12 and 22 months compared with the age matched wild-type group, respectively. However, no difference of chitnase1 was found between 4 months-old APP/PS1 mice and wild-type mice. Comparing with the age matched wild type group, the consequences of mRNA on the increase in chitnase1 is in accordance with protein in APP/PS1 mice. Furthermore, Morris water maze showed that 4 months-old APP/PS1 mice have normal spatial learning and impaired spatial memory; both spatial learning and spatial memory in 12 and 22 months-old APP/PS1 mice were declined. Time-dependent increase of chitnase1 in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice indicates that the level of chitinase1 is associated with decline of cognition. Therefore, chitinase1 might be a biomarker of disease progression in AD.

  12. Ageing increases reliance on sensorimotor prediction through structural and functional differences in frontostriatal circuits.

    PubMed

    Wolpe, Noham; Ingram, James N; Tsvetanov, Kamen A; Geerligs, Linda; Kievit, Rogier A; Henson, Richard N; Wolpert, Daniel M; Rowe, James B

    2016-10-03

    The control of voluntary movement changes markedly with age. A critical component of motor control is the integration of sensory information with predictions of the consequences of action, arising from internal models of movement. This leads to sensorimotor attenuation-a reduction in the perceived intensity of sensations from self-generated compared with external actions. Here we show that sensorimotor attenuation occurs in 98% of adults in a population-based cohort (n=325; 18-88 years; the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience). Importantly, attenuation increases with age, in proportion to reduced sensory sensitivity. This effect is associated with differences in the structure and functional connectivity of the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. The results suggest that ageing alters the balance between the sensorium and predictive models, mediated by the pre-SMA and its connectivity in frontostriatal circuits. This shift may contribute to the motor and cognitive changes observed with age.

  13. Empirical evidence for various evolutionary hypotheses on species demonstrating increasing mortality with increasing chronological age in the wild.

    PubMed

    Libertini, Giacinto

    2008-02-19

    Many species show a significant increase in mortality with increasing chronological age in the wild. For this phenomenon, three possible general hypotheses are proposed, namely that: (1) it has no adaptive meaning; (2) it has an adaptive meaning; (3) the ancestry is the pivotal determinant. These hypotheses are evaluated according to their consistency with the empirical evidence. In particular, (1) the existence of many species with a constant, or almost constant, mortality rate, especially the so-called "animals with negligible senescence"; (2) the inverse correlation, observed in mammals and birds in the wild, between extrinsic mortality and the proportion of deaths due to intrinsic mortality; (3) the existence of highly sophisticated, genetically determined, and regulated mechanisms that limit and modulate cell duplication capacities and overall cell functionality. On the whole, the hypothesis of an adaptive meaning appears to be consistent with the empirical evidence, while the other two hypotheses hardly appear compatible.

  14. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-4 - Maximum age conditions and time of participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maximum age conditions and time of participation... Maximum age conditions and time of participation. (a) Maximum age conditions—(1) General rule. A plan is... excludes from participation (on the basis of age) an employee who has attained an age specified by the...

  15. Inhibition of autophagy increased AGE/ROS-mediated apoptosis in mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Fan, Qiuling; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Xue; Wang, Lining

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the role of autophagy, a homeostatic process involved in the lysosomal degradation of damaged cell organelles and proteins, in regulating the survival of mesangial cells treated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In the present study, AGEs induced mitochondrial depolarization and led to mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in mesangial cells, as shown by the loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential; increased Bax processing; increased Caspase-9, Caspase-3 and PARP cleavage; and decreased Bcl-2 expression. Meanwhile, AGEs also triggered autophagy flux in mesangial cells, as confirmed by the presence of autophagic vesicles, the conversion of LC3II/LC3I and the increase/decrease in Beclin-1/p62 expression. Interestingly, this study reported apparent apoptosis and autophagy that were dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Scavenging ROS with N-acetyl-l-cysteine could prevent the appearance of the autophagic features and reverse AGE-induced apoptosis. Moreover, AGE-triggered mitophagy, which was confirmed by the colocalization of autophagosomes and mitochondria and Parkin translocation to mitochondria, played a potential role in reducing ROS production in mesangial cells. Additionally, inhibition of autophagy significantly enhanced AGE-induced cell apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest that ROS were the mediators of AGE-induced mesangial cell apoptosis and that autophagy was likely to be the mechanism that was triggered to repair the ROS-induced damage in the AGE-treated cells and thereby promote cell survival. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanism of autophagy involved in AGE-induced apoptosis in mesangial cells. PMID:27809300

  16. Increased bone morphogenetic protein signaling contributes to age-related declines in neurogenesis and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Emily A.; Gobeske, Kevin T.; Bond, Allison M.; Jarrett, Jennifer C.; Peng, Chian-Yu; Kessler, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus and diminished hippocampus-dependent cognitive functions. Expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) increases with age by more than 10-fold in the mouse dentate gyrus while levels of the BMP inhibitor, noggin, decrease. This results in a profound 30-fold increase in phosphorylated-SMAD1/5/8, the effector of canonical BMP signaling. Just as observed in mice, a profound increase in expression of BMP4 is observed in the dentate gyrus of humans with no known cognitive abnormalities. Inhibition of BMP signaling either by overexpression of noggin or transgenic manipulation not only increases neurogenesis in aging mice, but remarkably, is associated with a rescue of cognitive deficits to levels comparable to young mice. Additive benefits are observed when combining inhibition of BMP signaling and environmental enrichment. These findings indicate that increased BMP signaling contributes significantly to impairments in neurogenesis and to cognitive decline associated with aging, and identify this pathway as a potential druggable target for reversing age-related changes in cognition. PMID:26827654

  17. Age of the mother as a risk factor and timing of hypospadias repair according to severity

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Brayfield, Marcos Raymond; Torres, Camille M.; Piñeyro-Ruiz, Coriness; Torres, Naillil

    2016-01-01

    according to severity (p ≤ 0.0018, z-ratio = 2.91) and age difference for the timing of last repair (p ≤ 0.045, z-ratio = 1.69) were statistically different, but not the age difference for the first repair. Conclusions Increased maternal age is associated with the most severe forms of hypospadias. There is room for improvement for the timing of hypospadias repair according to severity. PMID:27331196

  18. Age-related increase of thromboxane B2 and risk of cardiovascular disease in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Farcomeni, Alessio; Nocella, Cristina; Bartimoccia, Simona; Carnevale, Roberto; Violi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Aging is strictly associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular events (CVEs) in the general population. Mechanisms underlying the risk of CVEs are still unclear. Platelet activation contributes to the onset of cardiovascular complications. The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) increases with age, and the natural history of AF is often complicated by CVEs. We prospectively investigated the relationship between age, urinary thromboxane (Tx) B2, which reflects platelet activation, and CVEs in 833 AF patients. Median TxB2 level was 120 [66-200] ng/mg of urinary creatinine. At multivariable linear regression analysis, age (B: 0.097, p=0.005) and previous MI/CHD (B: 0.069, p=0.047) were associated with log-TxB2 levels. When we divided our population into age classes (i.e. < 60, 60-69, 70-79, ≥ 80 years), we found a significant difference in TxB2 levels across classes (p=0.005), with a significant elevation at 74.6 years. During a mean follow-up of 40.9 months, 128 CVEs occurred; the rate of CVEs significantly increased with age classes (Log-rank test, p < 0.001). TxB2 levels were higher in patients with, compared to those without, CVEs in patients aged 70-79 (p < 0.001) and ≥ 80 (p = 0.020) years. In conclusion, TxB2 levels enhance by increasing age, suggesting that platelet activation contributes to CVEs in elderly patients with AF. PMID:27270651

  19. Human actuarial aging increases faster when background death rates are lower: a consequence of differential heterogeneity?

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Kristen; Smith, Ken R; Blevins, James K

    2012-01-01

    Many analyses of human populations have found that age-specific mortality rates increase faster across most of adulthood when overall mortality levels decline. This contradicts the relationship often expected from Williams' classic hypothesis about the effects of natural selection on the evolution of senescence. More likely, much of the within-species difference in actuarial aging is not due to variation in senescence, but to the strength of filters on the heterogeneity of frailty in older survivors. A challenge to this differential frailty hypothesis was recently posed by an analysis of life tables from historical European populations and traditional societies that reported variation in actuarial aging consistent with Williams' hypothesis after all. To investigate the challenge, we reconsidered those cases and aging measures. Here we show that the discrepancy depends on Ricklefs' aging rate measure, ω, which decreases as mortality levels drop because it is an index of mortality level itself, not the rate of increase in mortality with age. We also show unappreciated correspondence among the parameters of Gompertz-Makeham and Weibull survival models. Finally, we compare the relationships among mortality parameters of the traditional societies and the historical series, providing further suggestive evidence that differential heterogeneity has strong effects on actuarial aging.

  20. Cognitive Aging and Time Perception: Roles of Bayesian Optimization and Degeneracy

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Martine; Lustig, Cindy; Meck, Warren H.

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines the basic psychological and neurobiological processes associated with age-related distortions in timing and time perception in the hundredths of milliseconds-to-minutes range. The difficulty in separating indirect effects of impairments in attention and memory from direct effects on timing mechanisms is addressed. The main premise is that normal aging is commonly associated with increased noise and temporal uncertainty as a result of impairments in attention and memory as well as the possible reduction in the accuracy and precision of a central timing mechanism supported by dopamine-glutamate interactions in cortico-striatal circuits. Pertinent to these findings, potential interventions that may reduce the likelihood of observing age-related declines in timing are discussed. Bayesian optimization models are able to account for the adaptive changes observed in time perception by assuming that older adults are more likely to base their temporal judgments on statistical inferences derived from multiple trials than on a single trial’s clock reading, which is more susceptible to distortion. We propose that the timing functions assigned to the age-sensitive fronto-striatal network can be subserved by other neural networks typically associated with finely-tuned perceptuo-motor adjustments, through degeneracy principles (different structures serving a common function). PMID:27242513

  1. Memorizing while walking: increase in dual-task costs from young adulthood to old age.

    PubMed

    Lindenberger, U; Marsiske, M; Baltes, P B

    2000-09-01

    The dual task of memorizing word lists while walking was predicted to become more difficult with age because balance and gait are in greater need of "attentional resources." Forty-seven young (ages 20-30 years), 45 middle-aged (40-50), and 48 old (60-70) adults were trained to criterion in a mnemonic technique and instructed to walk quickly and accurately on 2 narrow tracks of different path complexity. Then. participants encoded the word lists while sitting, standing, or walking on either track; likewise, speed and accuracy of walking performance were assessed with and without concurrent memory encoding. Dual-task costs increased with age in both domains; relative to young adults, the effect size of the overall increase was 0.98 standard deviation units for middle-aged and 1.47 standard deviation units for old adults. It is argued that sensory and motor aspects of behavior are increasingly in need of cognitive control with advancing age.

  2. Risk of inhibitor development in mild haemophilia A increases with age.

    PubMed

    Mauser-Bunschoten, E P; Den Uijl, I E M; Schutgens, R E G; Roosendaal, G; Fischer, K

    2012-03-01

    Mild haemophilia A is a rare disease with a relatively mild phenotype. Treatment with factor VIII (FVIII) is indicated after trauma or for surgery only. FVIII infusion may result in the development of inhibiting antibodies against FVIII. This study describes the relation between age and other risk factors for inhibitor development in mild haemophilia. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among all patients with mild haemophilia (FVIII 0.05-0.40 IU mL(-1)) registered at the van Creveldkliniek, University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands. Data on peak treatment with FVIII, gene mutation and history of inhibitor development were obtained from patient files from the period between 1st January 1970 and 31st December 2009. A total of 231 out of 297 (78%) patients had at least one exposure to FVIII, of whom 14 (6.1%) developed an inhibitor to FVIII at a median age of 66 years after a median of 50 exposure days (ED). Age at first exposure, age at peak treatment, number of peak treatments and Arg593Cys mutation were significantly associated with the development of an inhibitor, while continuous infusion with FVIII was not. Although the incidence of inhibitors in mild haemophilia is low, it increases with age and peak treatments. With increasing age patients with mild haemophilia will suffer from co-morbidity more frequently, requiring surgical interventions and exposing them to an increased risk of inhibitor development. Especially patients with a change of arginine in cysteine at 593 are at risk for inhibitor development.

  3. School Tax Increase During Hard Times: The Birmingham Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cody, Wilmer S.

    The Birmingham (Alabama) school district regressed from a model system in 1926 to a poorly equipped, underfunded one in 1975. In that year, however, in spite of recession and joblessness, the citizens voted a $3 million tax increase for schools. The success of the election may be traced to several factors. Citizens were concerned about the…

  4. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Pérez, José Jaime; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT) expression associated with low testosterone (T) levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1) if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2) if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months) and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population. PMID:26317087

  5. Energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is increasing with time

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2008-01-01

    It is shown, using the Zeldovich integral relations, that the energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is strongly growing with time, approximately as t1/3. This growth can be attributed to the exothermic reactions going inside the remnant. The use of the assumption of the adiabaticity of the motion inside of the shock front, and no losses or gain of energy at the front, seems therefore unjustified. PMID:18202174

  6. The sine wave protocol: decrease movement time without increasing errors.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Jason B; Kennedy, Deanna M; Wang, Chaoyi; Shea, Charles H

    2014-01-01

    Practice tracking a sine wave template has been shown (J. B. Boyle, D. Kennedy, & C. H. Shea, 2012) to greatly enhance performance on a difficult Fitts task of the same amplitude. The purpose of the experiment was to replicate this finding and determine whether enhancements related to the sine wave practice are specific to the amplitude experienced during the sine wave practice. Following sine wave or Fitts task practice with amplitudes of 16° or 24°, participants were tested under the conditions they had practiced under (Test 1) and then all groups were tested under Fitts task conditions (Test 2; ID = 6, amplitude = 16°). Participants who practiced with the sine wave templates were able to move faster on Test 2 where a 16° amplitude Fitts task was used than participants that had practiced either the 16° or 24° amplitude Fitts tasks. The movements produced by the sine groups on Test 2 were not only faster than the movements of the Fitts groups on Test 2, but dwell time was lower with percent time to peak velocity and harmonicity higher for the Sine groups than for the Fitts groups. The decreased movement times for the sine groups on Test 2 were accomplished with hits or endpoint variability similar to that of the Fitts group.

  7. Aging of whiskey increases the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor response.

    PubMed

    Koda, Hirofumi; Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Aoshima, Hitoshi

    2003-08-27

    It is known that the target of most mood-defining compounds such as ethanol is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activities in the human brain. Because both extracts of whiskey by pentane and fragrant components in whiskey potentiate the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting cRNAs prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors in order to study the effects of whiskey itself on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. Whiskey itself also potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors generally more than ethanol at the same concentration as that of the whiskey. The potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response increased with the aging period of the whiskey. Inhalation of whiskey to mice increased the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital more than that of the same concentration of ethanol as the whiskey. These results suggest that not only ethanol but also minor components in whiskey play an important role in the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor-mediated response and possibly the sedative effect of whiskey. Although the minor components are present in extremely small quantities compared with ethanol in alcoholic beverages, they may modulate the mood or consciousness of humans through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic compounds are easily absorbed into the brain across the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response.

  8. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto; Pepke Pedersen, Jens Olaf

    2016-06-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) carbon release and global warming event 55.8 Ma ago, a possible future warming analogue. We obtain constrained estimates of CO2 and climate sensitivity before and during the PETM and of the PETM carbon input amount and nature. Sensitivity increased from 3.3-5.6 to 3.7-6.5 K (Kelvin) into the PETM. When taken together with Last Glacial Maximum and modern estimates, this result indicates climate sensitivity increase with global warming.

  9. Study of Increasing Lead Times in Major Weapon Systems Acquisition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-31

    Increasing Lead Tim ........ . 3-36 3.3.5.1.1 Market Factors . . . . . . . . .... ................... 3-36 3.3.5.1.2 Industrial Factors...factors, industry factors, or market factors. (For listings of specific causes identified, see Tables 3-2, 3-5, 3-8, 3-11, 3-13, and 3-16.) Some of...technicians, and other skilled craftsmen. * Market - The significant competition of comercial demands in certain business sectors such as aerospace and

  10. Age-Based Methods to Explore Time-Related Variables in Occupational Epidemiology Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Janice P. Watkins, Edward L. Frome, Donna L. Cragle

    2005-08-31

    Although age is recognized as the strongest predictor of mortality in chronic disease epidemiology, a calendar-based approach is often employed when evaluating time-related variables. An age-based analysis file, created by determining the value of each time-dependent variable for each age that a cohort member is followed, provides a clear definition of age at exposure and allows development of diverse analytic models. To demonstrate methods, the relationship between cancer mortality and external radiation was analyzed with Poisson regression for 14,095 Oak Ridge National Laboratory workers. Based on previous analysis of this cohort, a model with ten-year lagged cumulative radiation doses partitioned by receipt before (dose-young) or after (dose-old) age 45 was examined. Dose-response estimates were similar to calendar-year-based results with elevated risk for dose-old, but not when film badge readings were weekly before 1957. Complementary results showed increasing risk with older hire ages and earlier birth cohorts, since workers hired after age 45 were born before 1915, and dose-young and dose-old were distributed differently by birth cohorts. Risks were generally higher for smokingrelated than non-smoking-related cancers. It was difficult to single out specific variables associated with elevated cancer mortality because of: (1) birth cohort differences in hire age and mortality experience completeness, and (2) time-period differences in working conditions, dose potential, and exposure assessment. This research demonstrated the utility and versatility of the age-based approach.

  11. Aging As An Evolvability-Increasing Program Which Can Be Switched Off By Organism To Mobilize Additional Resources For Survival.

    PubMed

    Skulachev, Maxim V; Severin, Fedor F; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2015-04-22

    .g., geroprotective psychological factors). Similarly, dangerous individuals can be eliminated by programmed death due to operation of progeric psychological factors. The interplay of all these signals results in the final decision of the organism concerning its aging - to accelerate or to decelerate this process. Thus, paradoxically, such an originally counterproductive program as aging appears to be useful for the individual since this program can be switched off by the individual for a certain period of time, an action that thereby increases its resources in crucial periods of life.

  12. Younger age increases the risk of early prosthesis failure following primary total knee replacement for osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee replacements (TKRs) are being increasingly performed in patients aged ≤ 65 years who often have high physical demands. We investigated the relation between age of the patient and prosthesis survival following primary TKR using nationwide data collected from the Finnish Arthroplasty Register. Materials From Jan 1, 1997 through Dec 31, 2003, 32,019 TKRs for primary or secondary osteoarthritis were reported to the Finnish Arthroplasty Register. The TKRs were followed until the end of 2004. During the follow-up, 909 TKRs were revised, 205 (23%) due to infection and 704 for other reasons. Results Crude overall implant survival improved with increasing age between the ages of 40 and 80. The 5-year survival rates were 92% and 95% in patients aged ≤ 55 and 56–65 years, respectively, compared to 97% in patients who were > 65 years of age (p < 0.001). The difference was mainly attributable to reasons other than infections. Sex, diagnosis, type of TKR (condylar, constrained, or hinge), use of patellar component, and fixation method were also associated with higher revision rates. However, the differences in prosthesis survival between the age groups ≤ 55, 56–65, and > 65 years remained after adjustment for these factors (p < 0.001). Interpretation Young age impairs the prognosis of TKR and is associated with increased revision rates for non-infectious reasons. Diagnosis, sex, type of TKR, use of patellar component, and fixation method partly explain the differences, but the effects of physical activity, patient demands, and obesity on implant survival in younger patients warrant further research. PMID:20809740

  13. Increasing time-scheduling efficiency in the building process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamulová, B.

    2011-06-01

    The submitted paper deals with time scheduling. It concentrates on scheduling the building process and extends it by providing a way to set priorities. The priorities are evaluated from two points of view: the point of view of the building owner or investor and the point of view of the building contractor. These priorities are next used in the initiation of the relations among the scheduled activities. The utilization of priorities can contribute to preventing mistakes in creating the schedule. It could also facilitate schedule updates with changes. The contribution only contains the most important ideas for the exploitation of prioritization in the scheduling. A detailed description is included.

  14. Lens opacity based modelling of the age-related straylight increase.

    PubMed

    Rozema, Jos J; Sanchez, Victoria; Artal, Natalia; Gramajo, Ana L; Torres, Eduardo; Luna, Jose D; Iribarren, Rafael; Tassignon, Marie-José; Juarez, Claudio P

    2015-12-01

    This work studies ethnic and geographical differences in the age-related straylight increase by means of a stochastic model and unpublished lens opacity data of 559 residents of Villa Maria (Argentina), as well as data of 912 Indonesian subjects published previously by Husain et al. For both cohorts the prevalence of each type and grade of lens opacity was determined as a function of age, from which a stochastic model was derived capable of simulating the lens opacity prevalence for both populations. These simulated lens opacity data were then converted to estimated straylight by means of an equation derived from previously recorded data of 107 eyes with varying degrees of cataract. Based on these opacity templates 2500 random sets of subject age and lens opacity data were generated by the stochastic model for each dataset, from which estimated straylight could be calculated. For the Argentinian data the estimated straylight was found to closely resemble the published models for age-related straylight increase. For younger eyes the straylight variation of the model was the same as what was previously published (in both cases ±0.200logunits), which doubled in size for older eyes. For the Indonesian data, however, this age-related straylight increase was found to be fundamentally different from the published age model. This suggests that current normative curves for age-related straylight increase may not always be appropriate for non-European populations, and that the inter-individual straylight variations in young, healthy eyes may possibly be due to variations in lens opacities.

  15. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors increase growth rate with time.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Alexander T; Finkel, Kelsey A; Warner, Kristy A; Nör, Felipe; Tice, David; Martins, Manoela D; Jackson, Trachette L; Nör, Jacques E

    2016-02-16

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are frequently used for translational cancer research, and are assumed to behave consistently as the tumor ages. However, growth rate constancy as a function of time is unclear. Notably, variable PDX growth rates over time might have implications for the interpretation of translational studies. We characterized four PDX models through several in vivo passages from primary human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma. We developed a mathematical approach to merge growth data from different passages into a single measure of relative tumor volume normalized to study initiation size. We analyzed log-relative tumor volume increase with linear mixed effect models. Two oral pathologists analyzed the PDX tissues to determine if histopathological feature changes occurred over in vivo passages. Tumor growth rate increased over time. This was determined by repeated measures linear regression statistical analysis in four different PDX models. A quadratic statistical model for the temporal effect predicted the log-relative tumor volume significantly better than a linear time effect model. We found a significant correlation between passage number and histopathological features of higher tumor grade. Our mathematical treatment of PDX data allows statistical analysis of tumor growth data over long periods of time, including over multiple passages. Non-linear tumor growth in our regression models revealed the exponential growth rate increased over time. The dynamic tumor growth rates correlated with quantifiable histopathological changes that related to passage number in multiple types of cancer.

  16. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors increase growth rate with time

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Alexander T.; Finkel, Kelsey A.; Warner, Kristy A.; Nör, Felipe; Tice, David; Martins, Manoela D.; Jackson, Trachette L.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are frequently used for translational cancer research, and are assumed to behave consistently as the tumor ages. However, growth rate constancy as a function of time is unclear. Notably, variable PDX growth rates over time might have implications for the interpretation of translational studies. We characterized four PDX models through several in vivo passages from primary human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma. We developed a mathematical approach to merge growth data from different passages into a single measure of relative tumor volume normalized to study initiation size. We analyzed log-relative tumor volume increase with linear mixed effect models. Two oral pathologists analyzed the PDX tissues to determine if histopathological feature changes occurred over in vivo passages. Tumor growth rate increased over time. This was determined by repeated measures linear regression statistical analysis in four different PDX models. A quadratic statistical model for the temporal effect predicted the log-relative tumor volume significantly better than a linear time effect model. We found a significant correlation between passage number and histopathological features of higher tumor grade. Our mathematical treatment of PDX data allows statistical analysis of tumor growth data over long periods of time, including over multiple passages. Non-linear tumor growth in our regression models revealed the exponential growth rate increased over time. The dynamic tumor growth rates correlated with quantifiable histopathological changes that related to passage number in multiple types of cancer. PMID:26783960

  17. Inspection Time and Cognitive Abilities in Twins Aged 7 to 17 Years: Age-Related Changes, Heritability and Genetic Covariance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Caroline J.; Isaacs, Elizabeth B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Rogers, Mary; Lanigan, Julie; Singhal, Atul; Lucas, Alan; Gringras, Paul; Denton, Jane; Deary, Ian J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the age-related differences in inspection time and multiple cognitive domains in a group of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins aged 7 to 17 years. Data from 111 twin pairs and 19 singleton siblings were included. We found clear age-related trends towards more efficient visual information processing in older participants. There…

  18. Unexpected Retirement from Full Time Work after Age 62: Consequences for Life Satisfaction in older Americans

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Philippa; Marshall, Victor W.; Weir, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent policy shifts in the United States have resulted in an increase in the number of older workers remaining in the labor force. Increases in the retirement age for receiving full Social Security benefits coupled with declining pension funds and the erosion of employer retiree health benefits, mean that current cohorts of older workers may fully expect to work longer than previous generations. Yet, working longer may not always be possible due to health problems, outdated skills, economic insecurity, and competing obligations. We examine the consequences of unmet expectations for full time work after age 62 for life satisfaction in a nationally representative sample of older Americans. With longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study (1998–2008), this paper uses repeated measures of expectations for later life work among a cohort of Americans (N=1684) gathered prospectively over an eight year period, and examines the effects of unfulfilled expectations on subsequent life satisfaction. Using generalized growth mixture modeling three latent classes of individuals were identified with distinct trajectories of later life work expectations (low expectations, high expectations, and neutral expectations for full time work after age 62). A majority of men had generally high expectations to work full time past age 62, whereas the majority of women reported a low probability of working full time after age 62. When comparing expectations to actual full time work past age 62, we found no effects of unmet expectations for women. But men with less job stability (reflected by shorter job tenure and lower incomes) generally had high expectations to work longer, and their life satisfaction scores were significantly lower when these expectations were not realized. The hazards of missed expectations for later life work have consequences for subjective well-being in older adults. PMID:24159276

  19. Caloric restriction increases ketone bodies metabolism and preserves blood flow in aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Xiaoli; Watts, Lora

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase the life span and health span of a broad range of species. However, CR effects on in vivo brain functions are far from explored. In this study, we used multimetric neuroimaging methods to characterize the CR-induced changes of brain metabolic and vascular functions in aging rats. We found that old rats (24 months of age) with CR diet had reduced glucose uptake and lactate concentration, but increased ketone bodies level, compared with the age-matched and young (5 months of age) controls. The shifted metabolism was associated with preserved vascular function: old CR rats also had maintained cerebral blood flow relative to the age-matched controls. When investigating the metabolites in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle, we found that citrate and α-ketoglutarate were preserved in the old CR rats. We suggest that CR is neuroprotective; ketone bodies, cerebral blood flow, and α-ketoglutarate may play important roles in preserving brain physiology in aging. PMID:25896951

  20. Influence of age and hypertension treatment-time on ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Crespo, Juan J; Mojón, Artemio; Chayán, Luisa; Fontao, María J; Fernández, José R

    2013-03-01

    the age groups was in the prevalence of a riser BP pattern, i.e., asleep SBP mean greater than awake SBP mean (19.9% vs. 4.9% in older vs. younger patients, respectively; p < .001). The sleep-time relative SBP decline was mainly unchanged until ~40 yrs of age, and then significantly and progressively decreasing with increasing age at a rate of .28%/yr (p < .001), reaching a minimum value of 4.38% ± .47% for patients ≥75 yrs of age. Treated compared with untreated patients showed lower awake and asleep SBP means, although the predictable changes of SBP and DBP with age were equivalent in both groups. As a consequence, there were no significant differences between untreated and treated patients in the changes of the sleep-time relative SBP and DBP declines with age. Additionally, the asleep SBP and DBP means were significantly lower and the sleep-time relative SBP and DBP declines significantly higher at all ages in patients ingesting ≥1 BP-lowering medications at bedtime as compared with those ingesting all medications upon awakening. Our findings document a significantly elevated prevalence of a blunted nighttime BP decline with increasing age ≥40 yrs. The prevalence of a riser BP pattern, associated with highest cardiovascular risk among all possible BP patterns, was 4 times more prevalent in patients ≥60 yrs of age than those <60 yr of age. Most important, there was an attenuated prevalence of a blunted nighttime BP decline at all ages when ≥1 hypertension medications were ingested at bedtime as compared with when all of them were ingested upon awakening. These findings indicate that older age should be included among the conditions for which ABPM is recommended for proper cardiovascular risk assessment.

  1. Increased coherence time in narrowed bath states in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravert, Lars B.; Lorenz, Peter; Nase, Carsten; Stolze, Joachim; Uhrig, Götz S.

    2016-09-01

    We study the influence of narrowed distributions of the nuclear Overhauser field on the decoherence of a central electron spin in quantum dots. We describe the spin dynamics in quantum dots by the central spin model. We use analytic solutions for uniform couplings and the time dependent density-matrix renormalization group (tDMRG) for nonuniform couplings. With these tools we calculate the dynamics of the central spin for large baths of nuclear spins with or without external magnetic field applied to the central spin. The focus of our study is the influence of initial mixtures with narrowed distributions of the Overhauser field and of applied magnetic fields on the decoherence of the central spin.

  2. Obesity-induced oxidative stress, accelerated functional decline with age and increased mortality in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Fischer, Kathleen E.; Soto, Vanessa; Liu, Yuhong; Sosnowska, Danuta; Richardson, Arlan; Salmon, Adam B.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a serious chronic disease that increases the risk of numerous co-morbidities including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and cancer as well as increases risk of mortality leading some to suggest this represents accelerated aging. Obesity is associated with significant increases in oxidative stress in vivo and, despite the well-explored relationship between oxidative stress and aging, the role this plays in the increased mortality of obese subjects remains an unanswered question. Here, we addressed this by undertaking a comprehensive, longitudinal study of a group of high fat-fed obese mice and assessed both their changes in oxidative stress and in their performance in physiological assays known to decline with aging. In female C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet starting in adulthood, mortality was significantly increased in high fat-fed mice as was oxidative damage in vivo. High fat-feeding significantly accelerated the decline in performance in several assays, including activity, gait, and rotarod. However, we also found that obesity had little effect on other markers and actually improved performance in grip strength, a marker of muscular function. Together, this first comprehensive assessment of longitudinal functional changes in high fat-fed mice suggests that obesity may induce segmental acceleration of some of the aging process. PMID:25558793

  3. Evidence for a major gene influencing 7-year increases in diastolic blood pressure with age

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shu-Chuan Cheng; Carmelli, D.; Hunt, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to blood pressure levels is well established. The contribution of genes to the longitudinal change in blood pressure has been less well studied, because of the lack of longitudinal family data. The present study investigated a possible major-gene effect on the observed increase with age in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels. Subjects included 965 unmedicated adults (age {ge}18 years) in 73 pedigrees collected in Utah as part of a longitudinal cardiovascular family study. Segregation analysis of DBP change over 7.2 years of follow-up identified a recessive major-gene effect with a gene frequency of p = .23. There was also a significant age effect on the genotypic means, which decreased expression of the major gene at older ages. For those inferred to have the genotype responsible for large DBP increases, DBP increased 32.3%, compared with a 1.5% increase in the nonsusceptible group (P < .0001). The relative risk of developing hypertension between the susceptible and nonsusceptible groups after 7.2 years was 2.4 (P = .006). Baseline DBP reactivities to mental arithmetic (P < .0001) and isometric hand-grip (P < .0001) stress tests were greatest in those assigned to the susceptible genotype. We conclude that age-related changes in DBP are influenced by a major gene. Characteristics of this major-gene effect for greater age-related blood pressure increases include greater reactivity to mental and physical stressors. The present study thus provides evidence for genetic control of changes in blood pressure, in addition to the previously suggested genetic control of absolute blood pressure level. 28 refs., 6 tabs.

  4. Learning Science by Constructing Models: Can Dragoon Increase Learning without Increasing the Time Required?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt; Chung, Greg; Grover, Sachin; Madni, Ayesha; Wetzel, Jon

    2016-01-01

    A common hypothesis is that students will more deeply understand dynamic systems and other complex phenomena if they construct computational models of them. Attempts to demonstrate the advantages of model construction have been stymied by the long time required for students to acquire skill in model construction. In order to make model…

  5. Mechanical properties of bulk polydimethylsiloxane for microfluidics over a large range of frequencies and aging times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placet, V.; Delobelle, P.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamic mechanical characterization of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) over a large range of frequencies (10-2 < f < 105 Hz) and long aging times at room temperature (4 h < tv < ~60 000 h) has been presented. Three samples with different curing conditions have been studied and three different techniques, dynamic mechanical analysis at different temperatures, nano-indentation and scanning micro-deformation microscopy, have been used. Although the three techniques work at different scales and at different frequencies all the results match the same master curve. As expected, the storage and the loss moduli greatly increase with the frequency. Moreover, these moduli moderately increase with the aging time tv depending on the curing temperature. A simple model which takes the frequency and the aging time into account, and which is based on the Havriliak-Negami model, has been presented and identified. Hence, values of the relaxed and instantaneous moduli at tv = 0 and tv = ∞ are proposed. Only the relaxed moduli depend on the curing conditions and moreover it has been shown that the tangent of the phase lag is independent of the aging time and thus of the curing process.

  6. Aging as an evolvability-increasing program which can be switched off by organism to mobilize additional resources for survival.

    PubMed

    Skulachev, Maxim V; Severin, Fedor F; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    .g., geroprotective psychological factors). Similarly, dangerous individuals can be eliminated by programmed death due to operation of progeric psychological factors. The interplay of all these signals results in the final decision of the organism concerning its aging - to accelerate or to decelerate this process. Thus, paradoxically, such an originally counterproductive program as aging appears to be useful for the individual since this program can be switched off by the individual for a certain period of time, an action that thereby increases its resources in crucial periods of life.

  7. Synaptic Correlates Of Increased Cognitive Vulnerability With Aging: Peripheral Immune Challenge and Aging Interact to Disrupt Theta-Burst L-LTP in Hippocampal Area CA1

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Timothy R.; Barrientos, Ruth M.; Ahrendsen, Jared T.; Maier, Steven F.; Patterson, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Variability in cognitive functioning increases markedly with age, as does cognitive vulnerability to physiological and psychological challenges. Exploring the basis of this vulnerability may provide important insights into the mechanisms underlying aging-associated cognitive decline. As we have previously reported, the cognitive abilities of aging (24-month-old) F344xBN rats are generally good, but are more vulnerable to the consequences of a peripheral immune challenge (an i.p. injection of live E. coli) than those of their younger (3-month-old) counterparts. Four days after the injection, the aging, but not the young rats show profound memory deficits, specific to the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory processes. Here, we have extended these observations, using hippocampal slices to examine for the first time the combined effects of aging and a recent infection on several forms of synaptic plasticity. We have found that the specific deficit in long-lasting memory observed in the aged animals following infection is mirrored by a specific deficit in a form of long-lasting synaptic plasticity. The late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) induced in area CA1 using theta burst stimulation is particularly compromised by the combined effects of aging and infection – a deficit that can be ameliorated by intra-cisterna magna administration of the naturally occurring anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra). These data support the idea that the combination of aging and a negative life event such as an infection might produce selective, early-stage failures of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, with corresponding selective deficits in memory. PMID:20519534

  8. Chronic stroke and aging: the impact of acoustic stimulus intensity on fractionated reaction time.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Stephen A; Janelle, Christopher M; Cauraugh, James H

    2009-03-13

    In control samples, intense acoustic "go" stimuli accelerate the central and peripheral motor processes that compose simple reaction time movements. The goal of the current study was to determine whether movements that are initiated to intense acoustic cues facilitate simple reaction times in (1) adults with chronic stroke as compared to age matched controls and (2) in older as compared to younger adults. EMG and force data were collected from three groups (stroke, older adults, and younger adults) during a ballistic wrist and finger extension task. Movements were made to the onset of 80 dB and 107 dB acoustic cues and simple reaction times were fractionated into premotor and motor components. The present findings offer two important contributions to the literature. First, increases in stimulus intensity led to faster motor times in the impaired limb of stroke subjects. Second, increased stimulus intensity led to faster premotor reaction times across all groups, although an age rather than a stroke-specific motor deficit was evidenced, with the younger control group displaying significantly faster premotor times. Findings are integrated with previous evidence concerning post stroke corticospinal tract integrity and are interpreted via mechanisms which address stroke and age-related changes in motoneurons and activity in motor units.

  9. Role of Aging and Hippocampus in Time-Place Learning: Link to Episodic-Like Memory?

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, C. K.; Gerkema, M. P.; Van der Zee, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: With time-place learning (TPL), animals link an event with the spatial location and the time of day (TOD). The what–where–when TPL components make the task putatively episodic-like in nature. Animals use an internal sense of time to master TPL, which is circadian system based. Finding indications for a role of the hippocampus and (early) aging-sensitivity in TPL would strengthen the episodic-like memory nature of the paradigm. Methods: Previously, we used C57Bl/6 mice for our TPL research. Here, we used CD1 mice which are less hippocampal-driven and age faster compared to C57Bl/6 mice. To demonstrate the low degree of hippocampal-driven performance in CD1 mice, a cross maze was used. The spontaneous alternation test was used to score spatial working memory in CD1 mice at four different age categories (young (3–6 months), middle-aged (7–11 months), aged (12–18 months) and old (>19 months). TPL performance of middle-aged and aged CD1 mice was tested in a setup with either two or three time points per day (2-arm or 3-arm TPL task). Immunostainings were applied on brains of young and middle-aged C57Bl/6 mice that had successfully mastered the 3-arm TPL task. Results: In contrast to C57Bl/6 mice, middle-aged and aged CD1 mice were less hippocampus-driven and failed to master the 3-arm TPL task. They could, however, master the 2-arm TPL task primarily via an ordinal (non-circadian) timing system. c-Fos, CRY2, vasopressin (AVP), and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) were investigated. We found no differences at the level of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; circadian master clock), whereas CRY2 expression was increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). The most pronounced difference between TPL trained and control mice was found in c-Fos expression in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, a circadian system relay station. Conclusions: These results further indicate a key role of CRY proteins in TPL and confirm the

  10. Methylglyoxal alters glucose metabolism and increases AGEs content in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Silveira, Simone da Luz; Hoefel, Ana Lúcia; Fontoura, Júlia Bijoldo; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Leite, Marina Concli; Perry, Marcos Luiz Santos; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Methylglyoxal is a dicarbonyl compound that is physiologically produced by enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions. It can lead to cytotoxicity, which is mainly related to Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) formation. Methylglyoxal and AGEs are involved in the pathogenesis of Neurodegenerative Diseases (ND) and, in these situations, can cause the impairment of energetic metabolism. Astroglial cells play critical roles in brain metabolism and the appropriate functioning of astrocytes is essential for the survival and function of neurons. However, there are only a few studies evaluating the effect of methylglyoxal on astroglial cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of methylglyoxal exposure, over short (1 and 3 h) and long term (24 h) periods, on glucose, glycine and lactate metabolism in C6 glioma cells, as well as investigate the glyoxalase system and AGEs formation. Glucose uptake and glucose oxidation to CO(2) increased in 1 h and the conversion of glucose to lipids increased at 3 h. In addition, glycine oxidation to CO(2) and conversion of glycine to lipids increased at 1 h, whereas the incorporation of glycine in proteins decreased at 1 and 3 h. Methylglyoxal decreased glyoxalase I and II activities and increased AGEs content within 24 h. Lactate oxidation and lactate levels were not modified by methylglyoxal exposure. These data provide evidence that methylglyoxal may impair glucose metabolism and can affect glyoxalase activity. In periods of increased methylglyoxal exposure, such alterations could be exacerbated, leading to further increases in intracellular methylglyoxal and AGEs, and therefore triggering and/or worsening ND.

  11. Myosteatosis increases with aging and is associated with incident diabetes in African ancestry men

    PubMed Central

    Miljkovic, I; Kuipers, AL; Cvejkus, R; Bunker, CH; Patrick, AL; Gordon, CL; Zmuda, JM

    2015-01-01

    Objective Skeletal muscle fat infiltration (known as myosteatosis) is greater in African compared with European ancestry men and may play an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, prospective studies examining the magnitude of changes in myosteatosis with aging and their metabolic consequences are sparse. Methods We examined longitudinal changes in peripheral quantitative computed tomography measured calf myosteatosis [inter-muscular fat (mm2) and skeletal muscle density as a measure of intra-muscular fat (mg/cm3)] in 1,515 Afro-Caribbean men aged 40+ years recruited without regard to their health status. Results During an average of 6.2 years of follow-up, we observed an age-related increase in inter-muscular fat and a decrease in skeletal muscle density (all P<0.0001), which remained significant in those who lost weight, gained weight, or remained weight-stable (all P<0.0001). In addition, muscle density loss accelerated with increasing age (P<0.0001). Increased inter-muscular fat during follow-up was associated with an increased incident risk of T2D independent of factors known to be associated with T2D (Odds ratios per 1-SD increase in inter-muscular fat=1.29; 95% CI=1.08-1.53). Conclusions Our findings suggest that both inter- and intra- muscular fat increase with advancing age and that inter-muscular fat contributes to development of T2D among African ancestry men. PMID:26694517

  12. Age-Associated Increases in Pulmonary Artery Systolic Pressure in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Carolyn S. P.; Borlaug, Barry A.; Kane, Garvan C.; Enders, Felicity T.; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Redfield, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    Background In contrast to the wealth of data on isolated systolic hypertension involving the systemic circulation in the elderly, much less is known about age-related change in pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and its prognostic impact in the general population. We sought to define the relationship between PASP and age, evaluate which factors influence PASP and determine if PASP is independently predictive of mortality in the community. Methods and Results A random sample of Olmsted County, MN general population (N=2042) underwent echocardiography and spirometry and was followed for a median of 9 years. PASP was measured from the tricuspid regurgitation velocity. Left ventricular diastolic pressure was estimated using Doppler echocardiography (E/e' ratio) and arterial stiffening was assessed using the brachial artery pulse pressure. Among 1413 (69%) subjects with measurable PASP (63±11y; 43% male), PASP (median, 25th-75th percentile) was 26 (24-30) mmHg and increased with age (r=0.31; p<0.001). Independent predictors of PASP were age, pulse pressure and mitral E/e' (all p≤0.003). Increasing PASP was associated with higher mortality (hazard ratio 2.73 per 10 mmHg; p<0.001). In subjects without cardiopulmonary disease (any heart failure, coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus or chronic obstructive lung disease), the age-adjusted hazard ratio was 2.74 per 10 mmHg (p=0.016). Conclusions We provide the first population-based evidence of age-related increase in pulmonary artery pressure, its association with increasing left heart diastolic pressures and systemic vascular stiffening, as well as its negative impact on survival. Pulmonary artery pressure may serve as a novel cardiovascular risk factor and potential therapeutic target. PMID:19433755

  13. Rubber dam may increase the survival time of dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Keys, William; Carson, Susan J

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health's Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, LILACS, SciELO, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, VIP, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, OpenGrey and Sciencepaper Online databases. Handsearches in a number of journals.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials, including split-mouth studies assessing the effects of rubber dam isolation for restorative treatments in dental patients.Data extraction and synthesisTwo review authors independently screened the results of the electronic searches, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies.ResultsFour studies involving a total of 1,270 patients were included. The studies were at high risk of bias. One trial was excluded from the analysis due to inconsistencies in the presented data. Restorations had a significantly higher survival rate in the rubber dam isolation group compared to the cotton roll isolation group at six months in participants receiving composite restorative treatment of non-carious cervical lesions (risk ratio (RR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 1.37, very low-quality evidence). The rubber dam group had a lower risk of failure at two years in children undergoing proximal atraumatic restorative treatment in primary molars (hazard ratio (HR) 0.80, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.97, very low-quality evidence). One trial reported limited data showing that rubber dam usage during fissure sealing might shorten the treatment time. None of the included studies mentioned adverse effects or reported the direct cost of the treatment, or the level of patient acceptance/satisfaction. There was also no evidence evaluating the effects of rubber dam usage on the quality of the restorations.ConclusionsWe found some very low-quality evidence, from single studies, suggesting that rubber dam usage in dental direct

  14. Mechanical properties improvement of silica aerogel through aging: Role of solvent type, time and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omranpour, H.; Dourbash, A.; Motahari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Effective parameters that enhance mechanical properties during aging were investigated in the present study. Silica aerogels were made from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), water, methanol and NH4F in molar ratio 1:4:8:2×10-3 using a one-step method. Different time, temperature and aging solvents in aging stage were studied. Subsequently, solvent exchange with n-hexane, modification under TMCS solution and ambient pressure drying (APD) were performed for all samples. The aerogels had densities within the range of 0.1 and 0.6 g/cm3. The FTIR, mechanical properties, density and BET results, porosity, pore volume, pore diameter and surface area of the samples, were discussed. The compression properties of the gel increased with the increase in the time and temperature of aging. It was observed that solvents with more polarity improved polymerization, which enhanced the mechanical properties of the related samples. However, the stresses and capillary forces of water during drying were so large that inhibited "spring-back effect" during APD, and consequently a collapsed silica network with higher density was fabricated. In other words, the specific compression strength and modulus declined drastically. For methanol, alcohols inhibit the reactions inconveniently causing more shrinkage. In aging by n-hexane, capillary pressure declined significantly and thereby shrinkage was eliminated and silica aerogels with low bulk densities (0.095 g/cm3), high specific surface areas (600 m2/g), and large pore volumes (2.6 cm3/g) were synthesized.

  15. Age is associated with time in therapeutic range for warfarin therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Darrieux, Francisco Carlos; Hachul, Denise Tessariol; Scanavacca, Maurício Ibrahim; Krieger, Jose Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Lima Santos, Paulo Caleb Junior

    2016-01-01

    Background Warfarin is the most prescribed oral anticoagulant used for preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Time in the therapeutic range (TTR) has been accepted as the best method to evaluate the quality of warfarin therapy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of variables on the time in the therapeutic range for warfarin therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation from a referral cardiovascular hospital. Methods This retrospective study included 443 patients were included (190 patients with age < 65 years and 253 patients with age ≥65 years) from 2011 to 2014 and TTR was computed according to Rosendaal's method. Results Patients with age ≥65 years had higher TTR value (67±22%) compared with patients with < 65 years (60±24%) (p = 0.004). In a linear regression model, only age ≥65 years emerged as a significant predictor of greater TTR values. In multivariate logistic regression model, the variable age ≥65 years was associated with higher OR for having a TTR higher than the median value (OR = 2.17, p < 0.001). Conclusion We suggest that the age influenced TTR through greater drug adherence. Strategies for increasing drug adherence might improve quality of warfarin anticoagulation. PMID:27486984

  16. Stability of the age distribution of measles cases over time during outbreaks in Bangladesh, 2004-2006.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Eric; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Goodson, James L; Anand, Abhijeet; Mach, Ondrej; Thapa, Arun; O'Connor, Patrick; Linayage, Jayantha; Diorditsa, Serguei; Hasan, A S M Mainul; Uzzaman, Sharif; Jalil Mondal, M D Abdul

    2011-07-01

    Despite recommendations from WHO to conduct measles outbreak response vaccination campaigns based on the age distribution of cases at the beginning of an outbreak, few data exist to specifically examine whether the age distribution of cases remains constant over time in a measles outbreak. This analysis explores this question with use of measles outbreak surveillance data from Bangladesh from the period 2004-2006. Pearson χ(2) tests were conducted of age distributions over 2 periods during 41 large laboratory-confirmed measles outbreaks. Statistically significant changes in age distribution over time were observed in 24% of the outbreaks. No single pattern was detected in the shifts in age distribution; however, an increase in the proportion of cases occurring among infants <9 months of age was evident in 6 outbreaks. These findings suggest a need to consider the possibility of a shift in the age distribution over time when planning an outbreak response vaccination campaign.

  17. Long driving time is associated with haematological markers of increased cardiovascular risk in taxi drivers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J; Chen, Y; Chang, W; Christiani, D

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To examine the association between driving time and changes in haematological markers of increased risks for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Methods: The authors conducted a cross sectional analysis of baseline data from the Taxi Drivers' Health Study cohort in Taipei, Taiwan. They retrieved information on comorbidity, laboratory tests, age, and anthropometric measures from medical records of 1157 subjects (mean age 44.6 (SD 8.6) years). Whole blood cell (WBC) count was used as the primary haematological marker for increased CVD risk, and platelet count and haematocrit as the secondary markers. Standardised questionnaires were implemented to collect information on demographics, lifestyle, work related physical and psychosocial factors, and driving time profiles. Multiple regression was used to estimate the adjusted effects of driving time on three haematological markers. Results: The mean measured hematological marker was 6656 (SD 1656) cells x106/l for WBC, 47.2 (SD 3.5) % for hematocrit, and 243 (SD 52) cells x109/l for platelets. The driving time was 264 (SD 76) hours/month. Compared with drivers who drove ⩽208 hours/month (1st quartile cut off), drivers who drove >208 hours/month had a higher WBC count (by 317 x106/l; 95% CI 99 to 535), haematocrit (by 0.8%; 95% CI 0.3 to 1.2), and platelets (7.9 x109/l; 95% CI 1.0 to 14.8). After adjusting for conventional CVD risk factors (age, sex, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolaemia), obesity, alcohol drinking, regular exercise, and sociodemographics (education, marital status, income, and so on), long driving time was still associated with significant increases in WBC and platelets, whereas the effect on haematocrit was diminished and became statistically non-significant. Additional controls for physical workload, self-perceived job stress, and job dissatisfaction did not alter the associations with increased WBC and platelets. Conclusions: Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the

  18. Aging of whiskey increases 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Hitoshi; Tsunoue, Hideaki; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2004-08-11

    1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of Japanese whiskey after various aging periods in oak barrels was measured to evaluate the antioxidative effects of whiskey. The activity of the whiskey increased with the aging period with high correlation. The activity of various types of whiskey was measured and shown to be correlated to the potentiation of the GABAA receptor response measured in a previous paper. However, the fragrant compounds in the whiskey which potentiated the GABAA receptor response had low DPPH radical scavenging activity, while phenol derivatives had high radical scavenging activity. The whiskey was extracted by pentane. The aqueous part showed the scavenging activity, whereas the pentane part did not. Thus, both the DPPH radical scavenging activity and the potentiation of the GABAA receptor response increased during whiskey aging in oak barrels, but were due to different components. The whiskey protected the H2O2-induced death of E. coli more than ethanol at the same concentration as that of the whiskey. The changes that occurred in the whiskey during aging may be the reason aged whiskies are so highly valued.

  19. Intake of melatonin increases tryptophan hydroxylase type 1 activity in aged rats: Preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Moranta, D; Barceló, P; Aparicio, S; Garau, C; Sarubbo, F; Ramis, M; Nicolau, C; Esteban, S

    2014-01-01

    Pineal melatonin is important not only for synchronization of biological rhythms, but also in the ageing process as a potential drug to relieve oxidative damage. During ageing, the nocturnal melatonin production decreases resulting in an increased incidence of disorders. Present in vivo experiments were performed to study the effects of exogenous melatonin chronically administered to old rats on the pineal biosynthesis of melatonin and the precursor serotonin (5-HT) mediated by tryptophan hydroxylase type 1 (TPH-1). Accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) after decarboxylase inhibition was used as a measure of the TPH-1 activity. 5-HT and its metabolite 5-HIAA were also quantified by HPLC-ED. As expected, ageing resulted in worsening of different neurochemical parameters. However, chronic intake of melatonin (1mg/kg/day, diluted in drinking water, 4 weeks) increased TPH-1 activity and significantly improved the age-induced deficits in nocturnal melatonin content in the pineal gland. Results suggest that melatonin intake (or melatonin rich foods) may contribute to recover the pineal function preventing the nocturnal descent of 5-HT and melatonin biosynthesis that normally occur in pineal gland as a consequence of ageing.

  20. Malaria in school-age children in Africa: an increasingly important challenge

    PubMed Central

    Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Brooker, Simon J; Clarke, Sian E; Fernando, Deepika; Gitonga, Caroline W; Schellenberg, David; Greenwood, Brian

    2014-01-01

    School-age children have attracted relatively little attention as a group in need of special measures to protect them against malaria. However, increasing success in lowering the level of malaria transmission in many previously highly endemic areas will result in children acquiring immunity to malaria later in life than has been the case in the past. Thus, it can be anticipated that in the coming years there will be an increase in the incidence of both uncomplicated and severe malaria in school-age children in many previously highly endemic areas. In this review, which focuses primarily on Africa, recent data on the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and on the incidence of clinical malaria in African school-age children are presented and evidence that malaria adversely effects school performance is reviewed. Long-lasting insecticide treated bednets (LLIN) are an effective method of malaria control but several studies have shown that school-age children use LLINs less frequently than other population groups. Antimalarial drugs are being used in different ways to control malaria in school-age children including screening and treatment and intermittent preventive treatment. Some studies of chemoprevention in school-age children have shown reductions in anaemia and improved school performance but this has not been the case in all trials and more research is needed to identify the situations in which chemoprevention is likely to be most effective and, in these situations, which type of intervention should be used. In the longer term, malaria vaccines may have an important role in protecting this important section of the community from malaria. Regardless of the control approach selected, it is important this is incorporated into the overall programme of measures being undertaken to enhance the health of African school-age children. PMID:25145389

  1. Malaria in school-age children in Africa: an increasingly important challenge.

    PubMed

    Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Brooker, Simon J; Clarke, Sian E; Fernando, Deepika; Gitonga, Caroline W; Schellenberg, David; Greenwood, Brian

    2014-11-01

    School-age children have attracted relatively little attention as a group in need of special measures to protect them against malaria. However, increasing success in lowering the level of malaria transmission in many previously highly endemic areas will result in children acquiring immunity to malaria later in life than has been the case in the past. Thus, it can be anticipated that in the coming years there will be an increase in the incidence of both uncomplicated and severe malaria in school-age children in many previously highly endemic areas. In this review, which focuses primarily on Africa, recent data on the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and on the incidence of clinical malaria in African school-age children are presented and evidence that malaria adversely effects school performance is reviewed. Long-lasting insecticide treated bednets (LLIN) are an effective method of malaria control but several studies have shown that school-age children use LLINs less frequently than other population groups. Antimalarial drugs are being used in different ways to control malaria in school-age children including screening and treatment and intermittent preventive treatment. Some studies of chemoprevention in school-age children have shown reductions in anaemia and improved school performance but this has not been the case in all trials and more research is needed to identify the situations in which chemoprevention is likely to be most effective and, in these situations, which type of intervention should be used. In the longer term, malaria vaccines may have an important role in protecting this important section of the community from malaria. Regardless of the control approach selected, it is important this is incorporated into the overall programme of measures being undertaken to enhance the health of African school-age children.

  2. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-4 - Maximum age conditions and time of participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Maximum age conditions and time of participation.... § 1.410(a)-4 Maximum age conditions and time of participation. (a) Maximum age conditions—(1) General...) if the plan excludes from participation (on the basis of age) an employee who has attained an...

  3. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-4 - Maximum age conditions and time of participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Maximum age conditions and time of participation.... § 1.410(a)-4 Maximum age conditions and time of participation. (a) Maximum age conditions—(1) General...) if the plan excludes from participation (on the basis of age) an employee who has attained an...

  4. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-4 - Maximum age conditions and time of participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maximum age conditions and time of participation.... § 1.410(a)-4 Maximum age conditions and time of participation. (a) Maximum age conditions—(1) General...) if the plan excludes from participation (on the basis of age) an employee who has attained an...

  5. Increased ghrelin signaling prolongs survival in mouse models of human aging through activation of sirtuin1

    PubMed Central

    Fujitsuka, N; Asakawa, A; Morinaga, A; Amitani, M S; Amitani, H; Katsuura, G; Sawada, Y; Sudo, Y; Uezono, Y; Mochiki, E; Sakata, I; Sakai, T; Hanazaki, K; Yada, T; Yakabi, K; Sakuma, E; Ueki, T; Niijima, A; Nakagawa, K; Okubo, N; Takeda, H; Asaka, M; Inui, A

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is known to retard aging and delay functional decline as well as the onset of diseases in most organisms. Ghrelin is secreted from the stomach in response to CR and regulates energy metabolism. We hypothesized that in CR ghrelin has a role in protecting aging-related diseases. We examined the physiological mechanisms underlying the ghrelin system during the aging process in three mouse strains with different genetic and biochemical backgrounds as animal models of accelerated or normal human aging. The elevated plasma ghrelin concentration was observed in both klotho-deficient and senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8 (SAMP8) mice. Ghrelin treatment failed to stimulate appetite and prolong survival in klotho-deficient mice, suggesting the existence of ghrelin resistance in the process of aging. However, ghrelin antagonist hastened death and ghrelin signaling potentiators rikkunshito and atractylodin ameliorated several age-related diseases with decreased microglial activation in the brain and prolonged survival in klotho-deficient, SAMP8 and aged ICR mice. In vitro experiments, the elevated sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity and protein expression through the cAMP–CREB pathway was observed after ghrelin and ghrelin potentiator treatment in ghrelin receptor 1a-expressing cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, rikkunshito increased hypothalamic SIRT1 activity and SIRT1 protein expression of the heart in the all three mouse models of aging. Pericarditis, myocardial calcification and atrophy of myocardial and muscle fiber were improved by treatment with rikkunshito. Ghrelin signaling may represent one of the mechanisms activated by CR, and potentiating ghrelin signaling may be useful to extend health and lifespan. PMID:26830139

  6. Aging of TiO2 Nanoparticles Transiently Increases Their Toxicity to the Pelagic Microcrustacean Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Frank; Lüderwald, Simon; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R.; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2015-01-01

    During their aquatic life cycle, nanoparticles are subject to environmentally driven surface modifications (e.g. agglomeration or coating) associated with aging. Although the ecotoxicological potential of nanoparticles might be affected by these processes, only limited information about the potential impact of aging is available. In this context, the present study investigated acute (96 h) and chronic (21 d) implications of systematically aged titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2; ~90 nm) on the standard test species Daphnia magna by following the respective test guidelines. The nTiO2 were aged for 0, 1, 3 and 6 d in media with varying ionic strengths (Milli-Q water: approx. 0.00 mmol/L and ASTM: 9.25 mmol/L) in the presence or absence of natural organic matter (NOM). Irrespective of the other parameters, aging in Milli-Q did not change the acute toxicity relative to an unaged control. In contrast, 6 d aged nTiO2 in ASTM without NOM caused a fourfold decreased acute toxicity. Relative to the 0 d aged particles, nTiO2 aged for 1 and 3 d in ASTM with NOM, which is the most environmentally-relevant setup used here, significantly increased acute toxicity (by approximately 30%), while a toxicity reduction (60%) was observed for 6 d aged nTiO2. Comparable patterns were observed during the chronic experiments. A likely explanation for this phenomenon is that the aging of nTiO2 increases the particle size at the start of the experiment or the time of the water exchange from <100 nm to approximately 500 nm, which is the optimal size range to be taken up by filter feeding D. magna. If subjected to further agglomeration, larger nTiO2 particles, however, cannot be retained by the daphnids’ filter apparatus ultimately reducing their ecotoxicological potential. This non-linear pattern of increasing and decreasing nTiO2 related toxicity over the aging duration, highlights the knowledge gap regarding the underlying mechanisms and processes. This understanding seems, however

  7. Muddy conditions reduce hygiene and lying time in dairy cattle and increase time spent on concrete.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jennifer M; Stull, Carolyn L; Ledgerwood, David N; Tucker, Cassandra B

    2017-03-01

    Dairy cattle spend less time lying and show signs of increased stress when housed in rainy and windy conditions, but no work has separated the effects of exposure to inclement weather from muddy conditions underfoot. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of muddy conditions alone on lying behavior, hygiene, and physiological responses. We housed pairs of pregnant, nonlactating dairy cattle (n = 12; 6 primigravid heifers, 6 multiparous cows) in enclosed pens with dirt floors and a concrete feed apron. Cattle were exposed to 3 levels of soil moisture: 90 (dry), 74 (muddy), or 67% (very muddy) dry matter for 5 d each in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design. Lying time was measured on all days with data loggers, and lying locations and postures were recorded on the final day of each treatment. Before and after each treatment, blood samples were collected, and the percentage of dirty surface area was measured on the udder, hind leg, and side of each animal. Cattle spent less time lying down in muddier conditions, especially in the first 24 h of exposure, when cows and heifers spent only 3.2 and 5.8 h, respectively, lying down in the muddiest treatment compared with 12.5 and 12.7 h on dry soil. When the soil was dry, cattle never chose to lie down on concrete, but in muddier conditions they spent a greater proportion of their lying time on concrete (mean ± SE: 56 ± 14 and 10 ± 8% in the very muddy and muddy treatments, respectively). The shift in lying location was more marked for heifers, and all 6 spent ≥87% of their lying time on concrete in the muddiest treatment. When cattle chose to lie down on wetter soil, they limited the surface area exposed to their surroundings by tucking their legs beneath their bodies (mean ± SE: 30 ± 11, 15 ± 4, and 5 ± 2% of lying observations in the very muddy, muddy, and dry treatments, respectively). Despite cattle spending less time on wetter soil, all 3 measured body parts became dirtier in muddier conditions (1.4-, 1

  8. Transient rapamycin treatment can increase lifespan and healthspan in middle-aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Alessandro; Ito, Takashi K; Pineda, Victor V; LeTexier, Nicolas J; Huang, Heather Z; Sutlief, Elissa; Tung, Herman; Vizzini, Nicholas; Chen, Belle; Smith, Kaleb; Meza, Daniel; Yajima, Masanao; Beyer, Richard P; Kerr, Kathleen F; Davis, Daniel J; Gillespie, Catherine H; Snyder, Jessica M; Treuting, Piper M; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The FDA approved drug rapamycin increases lifespan in rodents and delays age-related dysfunction in rodents and humans. Nevertheless, important questions remain regarding the optimal dose, duration, and mechanisms of action in the context of healthy aging. Here we show that 3 months of rapamycin treatment is sufficient to increase life expectancy by up to 60% and improve measures of healthspan in middle-aged mice. This transient treatment is also associated with a remodeling of the microbiome, including dramatically increased prevalence of segmented filamentous bacteria in the small intestine. We also define a dose in female mice that does not extend lifespan, but is associated with a striking shift in cancer prevalence toward aggressive hematopoietic cancers and away from non-hematopoietic malignancies. These data suggest that a short-term rapamycin treatment late in life has persistent effects that can robustly delay aging, influence cancer prevalence, and modulate the microbiome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16351.001 PMID:27549339

  9. Stochastic epigenetic mutations (DNA methylation) increase exponentially in human aging and correlate with X chromosome inactivation skewing in females.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Pisoni, Serena; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Calzari, Luciano; Mari, Daniela; Vitale, Giovanni; Franceschi, Claudio; Di Blasio, Anna Maria

    2015-08-01

    In this study we applied a new analytical strategy to investigate the relations between stochastic epigenetic mutations (SEMs) and aging. We analysed methylation levels through the Infinium HumanMethylation27 and HumanMethylation450 BeadChips in a population of 178 subjects ranging from 3 to 106 years. For each CpG probe, epimutated subjects were identified as the extreme outliers with methylation level exceeding three times interquartile ranges the first quartile (Q1-(3 x IQR)) or the third quartile (Q3+(3 x IQR)). We demonstrated that the number of SEMs was low in childhood and increased exponentially during aging. Using the HUMARA method, skewing of X chromosome inactivation (XCI) was evaluated in heterozygotes women. Multivariate analysis indicated a significant correlation between log(SEMs) and degree of XCI skewing after adjustment for age (β = 0.41; confidence interval: 0.14, 0.68; p-value = 0.0053). The PATH analysis tested the complete model containing the variables: skewing of XCI, age, log(SEMs) and overall CpG methylation. After adjusting for the number of epimutations we failed to confirm the well reported correlation between skewing of XCI and aging. This evidence might suggest that the known correlation between XCI skewing and aging could not be a direct association but mediated by the number of SEMs.

  10. Aging services or services to the aging?focus of a university-community curriculum development partnership to increase awareness of aging issues in social work practice.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Sadhna; Wertheimer, Mindy R

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a partnership between social work faculty and community practitioners to develop gerontological curricula to increase awareness of aging issues among social work students. We describe steps taken to identify learning needs of students by examining gaps in the core curriculum and surveying community-based agencies that serve older persons who face a variety of problems. We also describe a unique field education assignment designed to increase awareness of how well community service agencies meet the needs of older clients and provide quantitative and qualitative data on students' overall learning experiences. The project highlights the role of community partners in developing relevant curricula for future social work practitioners.

  11. Incidence of Ichthyophonus hoferi in Puget Sound fishes and its increase with age of Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Stick, K.; Bui, B.; Carroll, C.; Fall, B.; Mork, C.; Perry, J.A.; Sweeney, E.; Wittouck, J.; Winton, J.; Kocan, R.

    2002-01-01

    A recent decrease in the mean age of adult Pacific herring Clupea pallasi in Puget Sound was associated with a high prevalence of Ichthyophonus hoferi, a protistan parasite that can be highly pathogenic to Pacific herring. In Puget Sound, high intensities of I. hoferiinfection may be maintained in older cohorts of Pacific herring because the prevalence ofI. hoferi increased with age from 12% among juveniles to 58% among the oldest, age-6 and older cohorts. Low intensities of I. hoferi infection in the region may be maintained in alternative fish hosts, such as surf smelt Hypomesus pretiosus, Puget Sound rockfishSebastes emphaeus, Pacific tomcod Microgadus proximus, and speckled sanddabCithanichthys stigmaeus.

  12. Effects of subprimal type, quality grade, and aging time on display color of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Garner, C M; Unruh, J A; Hunt, M C; Boyle, E A E; Houser, T A

    2014-10-01

    A factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of two subprimal types (chuck roll and knuckle), two quality grades (Premium Choice and Select), and three vacuum-storage aging times before processing (7, 21, and 42d) ground beef patty display color attributes. Patties from chuck roll and Premium Choice subprimals had brighter red visual color scores, less discoloration, and higher L*, a*, b*, and chroma values than those from knuckle and Select subprimals, respectively. With an increased display time, patties became darker red, more discolored, and had decreased L*, a*, b*, and chroma values. Therefore, aging Premium Choice chuck rolls for less time (fewer than 21d) could maximize display color life.

  13. Increase in bioavailability of aged phenanthrene in soils by competitive displacement with pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C.; Hunter, M.; Pignatello, J.J.; Alexander, M.

    1999-08-01

    Competitive sorption to natural solids among mixtures of organic compounds has been documented in the literature. This study was conducted to determine co-solute competitive effects on the biological and physical availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils after long contact periods (aging). Sterile suspensions of Mount Pleasant silt loam (Mt. Pleasant, NY, USA) and Pahokee peat soils were spiked with phenanthrene and allowed to age for 3 or 123 d before inoculation with a phenanthrene-degrading bacterium in the presence or absence of the nonbiodegradable co-solute pyrene. As expected, mineralization decreased with aging in the samples not amended with pyrene. However, addition of pyrene just prior to inoculation at 123 d significantly mitigated this decrease; that is, the extent of mineralization was greater in the 123-d pyrene-amended samples than in the 123-d nonamended samples. Parallel experiments on sterile soils showed that pyrene increased the physical availability of phenanthrene by competitive displacement of phenanthrene from sorption sites. First, the addition of pyrene increased recovery of 123-d-aged phenanthrene by mild solvent extraction. Second, addition of pyrene (at three concentrations) dramatically reduced the apparent distribution coefficient (K{sub d}{sup app}) of several concentrations of 60-, 95-, and 111-d-aged phenanthrene. At the lowest phenanthrene and highest pyrene concentrations, reductions in the K{sub d}{sup app} of phenanthrene in the peat soil reached 83%. The competitive displacement effect observed in this study adds further support to the dual mode model of sorption to soil organic matter. The displacement of an aged contaminant by a nonaged co-solute might also prove useful in the development of novel remediation strategies.

  14. BDNF increases with behavioral enrichment and an antioxidant diet in the aged dog.

    PubMed

    Fahnestock, Margaret; Marchese, Monica; Head, Elizabeth; Pop, Viorela; Michalski, Bernadeta; Milgram, William N; Cotman, Carl W

    2012-03-01

    The aged canine (dog) is an excellent model for investigating the neurobiological changes that underlie cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration in humans, as canines and humans undergo similar pathological and behavioral changes with aging. Recent evidence indicates that a combination of environmental enrichment and antioxidant-fortified diet can be used to reduce the rate of age-dependent neuropathology and cognitive decline in aged dogs, although the mechanisms underlying these changes have not been established. We examined the hypothesis that an increase in levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the factors underlying improvements in learning and memory. Old, cognitively impaired animals that did not receive any treatment showed a significant decrease in BDNF mRNA in the temporal cortex when compared with the young group. Animals receiving either an antioxidant diet or environmental enrichment displayed intermediate levels of BDNF mRNA. However, dogs receiving both an antioxidant diet and environmental enrichment showed increased levels of BDNF mRNA when compared with untreated aged dogs, approaching levels measured in young animals. BDNF receptor TrkB mRNA levels did not differ between groups. BDNF mRNA levels were positively correlated with improved cognitive performance and inversely correlated with cortical Aβ((1-42)) and Aβ((1-40)) levels. These findings suggest that environmental enrichment and antioxidant diet interact to maintain brain levels of BDNF, which may lead to improved cognitive performance. This is the first demonstration in a higher animal that nonpharmacological changes in lifestyle in advanced age can upregulate BDNF to levels approaching those in the young brain.

  15. Does Time Matter? Comparing Trajectory Concordance and Covariate Association Using Time-Based and Age-Based Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquero, Alex R.; Monahan, Kathryn C.; Glasheen, Cristie; Schubert, Carol A.; Mulvey, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    Much criminological research has used longitudinal data to assess change in offending over time. An important feature of some data sources is that they contain cross-sections of different aged individuals followed over successive time periods, thereby potentially conflating age and time. This article compares the substantive conclusions about the…

  16. Effects of simulated increased gravity on the rate of aging of rats - Implications for the rate of living theory of aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economos, A. C.; Ballard, R. C.; Blunden, M.; Miquel, J.; Lindseth, K. A.; Fleming, J.; Philpott, D. E.; Oyama, J.

    1982-01-01

    It was found that the rate of aging of 17 month old rats which had been exposed to 3.14 times normal gravity in an animal centrifuge for 8 months was larger than that of the controls as determined by the apparently elevated lipofuscin content in heart and kidney, reduced numbers and increased size of mitochondria of heart tissue, and inferior liver mitochondria respiration. Steady-state food intake per day per kg body weight, which is presumably proportional to rate of living or specific basal metabolic expenditure, was found to be about 18 percent higher than in the controls after an initial 2 month adaptation period. Although half of the centrifuged animals lived only a little shorter than the controls (average about 343 vs. 364 days on the average, statistically nonsignificant), the remaining half (longest survivors) lived on the centrifuge an average of 520 days (range 483-572) compared to an average of 574 days (range 502-615) for the controls, computed from the onset of centrifugation, or 11 percent shorter. These findings indicate that a moderate increase of the level of basal metabolism of young adult rats adapted to hypergravity compared to controls in normal gravity is accompanied by a roughly similar increase in the rate of organ aging and reduction of survival, in agreement with Pearl's (1928) rate of living theory of aging, previously experimentally demonstrated only in poikilotherms.

  17. Modelling the Effects of Ageing Time of Starch on the Enzymatic Activity of Three Amylolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Nelson P.; Pastrana Castro, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The effect of increasing ageing time (t) of starch on the activity of three amylolytic enzymes (Termamyl, San Super, and BAN) was investigated. Although all the enzymatic reactions follow michaelian kinetics, vmax decreased significantly (P < 0.05) and KM increased (although not always significantly) with the increase in t. The conformational changes produced in the starch chains as a consequence of the ageing seemed to affect negatively the diffusivity of the starch to the active site of the enzymes and the release of the reaction products to the medium. A similar effect was observed when the enzymatic reactions were carried out with unaged starches supplemented with different concentrations of gelatine [G]. The inhibition in the amylolytic activities was best mathematically described by using three modified forms of the Michaelis-Menten model, which included a term to consider, respectively, the linear, exponential, and hyperbolic inhibitory effects of t and [G]. PMID:22666116

  18. Overexpression of MMP-7 increases collagen 1A2 in the aging kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarz, Anna; Nichols, LaNita A; Grunz-Borgmann, Elizabeth A; Chen, Gang; Akintola, Adebayo D; Catania, Jeffery M; Burghardt, Robert C; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P; Parrish, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The percentage of the U.S. population over 65 is rapidly increasing, as is the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The kidney is susceptible to age-dependent alterations in structure, specifically tubulointerstitial fibrosis that leads to CKD. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were initially characterized as extracellular matrix (ECM) proteinases; however, it is clear that their biological role is much larger. We have observed increased gene expression of several MMPs in the aging kidney, including MMP-7. MMP-7 overexpression was observed starting at 16 months, with over a 500-fold upregulation in 2-year-old animals. Overexpression of MMP-7 is not observed in age-matched, calorically restricted controls that do not develop fibrosis and renal dysfunction, suggesting a role in the pathogenesis. In order to delineate the contributions of MMP-7 to renal dysfunction, we overexpressed MMP-7 in NRK-52E cells. High-throughput sequencing of the cells revealed that two collagen genes, Col1a2 and Col3a1, were elevated in the MMP-7 overexpressing cells. These two collagen genes were also elevated in aging rat kidneys and temporally correlated with increased MMP-7 expression. Addition of exogenous MMP-7, or conditioned media from MMP-7 overexpressing cells also increased Col1A2 expression. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA), src, and MAPK signaling at p38 and ERK was able to attenuate the MMP-7 upregulation of Col1a2. Consistent with this finding, increased phosphorylation of PKA, src, and ERK was seen in MMP-7 overexpressing cells and upon exogenous MMP-7 treatment of NRK-52E cells. These data suggest a novel mechanism by which MMP-7 contributes to the development of fibrosis leading to CKD. PMID:24273653

  19. Ageing increases reliance on sensorimotor prediction through structural and functional differences in frontostriatal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Wolpe, Noham; Ingram, James N.; Tsvetanov, Kamen A.; Geerligs, Linda; Kievit, Rogier A.; Henson, Richard N.; Wolpert, Daniel M.; Tyler, Lorraine K.; Brayne, Carol; Bullmore, Edward; Calder, Andrew; Cusack, Rhodri; Dalgleish, Tim; Duncan, John; Matthews, Fiona E.; Marslen-Wilson, William; Shafto, Meredith A.; Campbell, Karen; Cheung, Teresa; Davis, Simon; McCarrey, Anna; Mustafa, Abdur; Price, Darren; Samu, David; Taylor, Jason R.; Treder, Matthias; van Belle, Janna; Williams, Nitin; Bates, Lauren; Emery, Tina; Erzinçlioglu, Sharon; Gadie, Andrew; Gerbase, Sofia; Georgieva, Stanimira; Hanley, Claire; Parkin, Beth; Troy, David; Auer, Tibor; Correia, Marta; Gao, Lu; Green, Emma; Henriques, Rafael; Allen, Jodie; Amery, Gillian; Amunts, Liana; Barcroft, Anne; Castle, Amanda; Dias, Cheryl; Dowrick, Jonathan; Fair, Melissa; Fisher, Hayley; Goulding, Anna; Grewal, Adarsh; Hale, Geoff; Hilton, Andrew; Johnson, Frances; Johnston, Patricia; Kavanagh-Williamson, Thea; Kwasniewska, Magdalena; McMinn, Alison; Norman, Kim; Penrose, Jessica; Roby, Fiona; Rowland, Diane; Sargeant, John; Squire, Maggie; Stevens, Beth; Stoddart, Aldabra; Stone, Cheryl; Thompson, Tracy; Yazlik, Ozlem; Barnes, Dan; Dixon, Marie; Hillman, Jaya; Mitchell, Joanne; Villis, Laura; Rowe, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The control of voluntary movement changes markedly with age. A critical component of motor control is the integration of sensory information with predictions of the consequences of action, arising from internal models of movement. This leads to sensorimotor attenuation—a reduction in the perceived intensity of sensations from self-generated compared with external actions. Here we show that sensorimotor attenuation occurs in 98% of adults in a population-based cohort (n=325; 18–88 years; the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience). Importantly, attenuation increases with age, in proportion to reduced sensory sensitivity. This effect is associated with differences in the structure and functional connectivity of the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. The results suggest that ageing alters the balance between the sensorium and predictive models, mediated by the pre-SMA and its connectivity in frontostriatal circuits. This shift may contribute to the motor and cognitive changes observed with age. PMID:27694879

  20. The Maillard hypothesis on aging: time to focus on DNA.

    PubMed

    Baynes, John W

    2002-04-01

    Aging is the outcome of the contest between chemistry and biology in living systems. Chronic, cumulative chemical modifications compromise the structure and function of biomolecules throughout the body. Proteins with long life spans serve as cumulators of exposure to chemical damage, which is detectable in the form of advanced glycation and lipoxidation end products (AGEs, ALEs); amino acids modified by reactive oxygen, chlorine, and nitrogen species; and deamidated and racemized amino acids. Not all of these modifications are oxidative in nature, although oxidative reactions are an important source of age-related damage. Measurements of AGEs and ALEs in proteins are useful for assessing the rate and extent of Maillard reaction damage, but it is the damage to the genome that undoubtedly has the greatest effect on the viability of the organism. The extent of genomic damage represents a balance between the rate of modification and the rate and fidelity of repair. Damage to DNA accumulates not in the form of modified nucleic acids, but as chemically "silent" errors in repair-insertions, deletions, substitutions, transpositions, and inversions in DNA sequences-that affect the expression and structure of proteins. These mutations are random, vary from cell to cell, and are passed forward from one cell generation to another. Although they are not detectable in DNA by conventional analytical techniques, purines and pyrimidines modified by Maillard reaction intermediates may be detectable in urine, and studies on these compounds should provide insight into the role of Maillard reactions of DNA in aging and disease.

  1. Alfacalcidol increases cancellous bone in low turnover, fatty marrow sites in aged, orchidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, X Y; Chen, H Y; Setterberg, R B; Li, M; Jee, W S S

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the responses of cancellous bone in the distal tibial metaphysis (DTM), a low turnover, fatty (yellow) marrow site, to sham-aged, orchidectomy (ORX) and alfacalcidol treatment in sham-aged and ORX rats. Eighteen-month-old male sham and ORX rats were treated with 0.1 and 0.2 microg/kg alfacalcidol 5 days/wk p.o. for 12 weeks, double fluorescent labeled, and the DTM were processed for bone histomorphometry analyses. The current study found the DTM in sham-aged male rats were resistant to age-related and ORX-induced cancellous bone loss and alfacalcidol-induced bone gain, findings that differ from that in the proximal tibial metaphysis (PTM) and lumbar vertebral body (LVB), two high turnover, red marrow bone sites. However, alfacalcidol treatment increased DTM bone mass in ORX rats where bone turnover was elevated by androgen deficiency. These results in concert with the previously positive findings in red marrow bone sites following alfacalcidol treatment suggest that alfacalcidol is more effective in increasing cancellous bone mass in the skeletal sites with higher bone turnover.

  2. Better stay together: pair bond duration increases individual fitness independent of age-related variation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Macouzet, Oscar; Rodríguez, Cristina; Drummond, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged pair bonds have the potential to improve reproductive performance of socially monogamous animals by increasing pair familiarity and enhancing coordination and cooperation between pair members. However, this has proved very difficult to test robustly because of important confounds such as age and reproductive experience. Here, we address limitations of previous studies and provide a rigorous test of the mate familiarity effect in the socially monogamous blue-footed booby, Sula nebouxii, a long-lived marine bird with a high divorce rate. Taking advantage of a natural disassociation between age and pair bond duration in this species, and applying a novel analytical approach to a 24 year database, we found that those pairs which have been together for longer establish their clutches five weeks earlier in the season, hatch more of their eggs and produce 35% more fledglings, regardless of age and reproductive experience. Our results demonstrate that pair bond duration increases individual fitness and further suggest that synergistic effects between a male and female's behaviour are likely to be involved in generating a mate familiarity effect. These findings help to explain the age- and experience-independent benefits of remating and their role in life-history evolution. PMID:24827435

  3. Excess body weight increases the burden of age-associated chronic diseases and their associated health care expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Atella, Vincenzo; Kopinska, Joanna; Medea, Gerardo; Belotti, Federico; Tosti, Valeria; Mortari, Andrea Piano; Cricelli, Claudio; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Aging and excessive adiposity are both associated with an increased risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, which drive ever increasing health costs. The main aim of this study was to determine the net (non‐estimated) health costs of excessive adiposity and associated age‐related chronic diseases. We used a prevalence‐based approach that combines accurate data from the Health Search CSD‐LPD, an observational dataset with patient records collected by Italian general practitioners and up‐to‐date health care expenditures data from the SiSSI Project. In this very large study, 557,145 men and women older than 18 years were observed at different points in time between 2004 and 2010. The proportion of younger and older adults reporting no chronic disease decreased with increasing BMI. After adjustment for age, sex, geographic residence, and GPs heterogeneity, a strong J‐shaped association was found between BMI and total health care costs, more pronounced in middle‐aged and older adults. Relative to normal weight, in the 45‐64 age group, the per‐capita total cost was 10% higher in overweight individuals, and 27 to 68% greater in patients with obesity and very severe obesity, respectively. The association between BMI and diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease largely explained these elevated costs. PMID:26540605

  4. The implications of increased survivorship for mortality variation in aging populations.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Michal; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Agree, Emily M

    2010-01-01

    The remarkable growth in life expectancy during the twentieth century inspired predictions of a future in which all people, not just a fortunate few, will live long lives ending at or near the maximum human life span. We show that increased longevity has been accompanied by less variation in ages at death, but survivors to the oldest ages have grown increasingly heterogeneous in their mortality risks. These trends are consistent across countries, and apply even to populations with record-low variability in the length of life. We argue that as a result of continuing improvements in survival, delayed mortality selection has shifted health disparities from early to later life, where they manifest in the growing inequalities in late-life mortality.

  5. Diversity of gut microbiota increases with aging and starvation in the desert locust.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Rod J; Webster, Gordon; Weightman, Andrew J; Keith Charnley, A

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the effects of starvation and insect age on the diversity of gut microbiota of adult desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoretic (DGGE) analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Sequencing of excised DGGE bands revealed the presence of only one potentially novel uncultured member of the Gammaproteobacteria in the guts of fed, starved, young or old locusts. Most of the 16S rRNA gene sequences were closely related to known cultured bacterial species. DGGE profiles suggested that bacterial diversity increased with insect age and did not provide evidence for a characteristic locust gut bacterial community. Starved insects are often more prone to disease, probably because they compromise on immune defence. However, the increased diversity of Gammaproteobacteria in starved locusts shown here may improve defence against enteric threats because of the role of gut bacteria in colonization resistance.

  6. Aging in precarious times: Exploring the role of gender in shaping views on aging.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Catrinel; Flick, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores views on aging and how these differ according to gender and precariousness status. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 men and 10 women with secure and insecure pensions. Themes like fear of illness and health decline were more present in men, while fear of losing their attractiveness in old age more present among women. For all participants, loss of autonomy and social roles represented a negative view of old age, while activity in the form of work, volunteering, or leisure represented positive views. Differences in views on aging were related to pension security and less to gender. Women with insecure pension plans displayed the most negative views of aging. Implications for practice and policy to prevent health and gender inequalities are discussed.

  7. Sexuality and Aging: A Timely Addition to the Gerontology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Tanya R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development and content of a course on sexuality in aging for a gerontology master's program. Topics include physical health, AIDS, gay/lesbian issues, widows/widowers, marriage, ethnic issues, menopause, and impotence. Provides a 33-item bibliography. (SK)

  8. Increased gene dosage of Ink4a/Arf results in cancer resistance and normal aging

    PubMed Central

    Matheu, Ander; Pantoja, Cristina; Efeyan, Alejo; Criado, Luis M.; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana M.; Klatt, Peter; Serrano, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian genes frequently present allelic variants that differ in their expression levels and that, in the case of tumor suppressor genes, can be of relevance for cancer susceptibility and aging. We report here the characterization of a novel mouse model with increased activity for the Ink4a and Arf tumor suppressors. We have generated a “super Ink4a/Arf” mouse strain carrying a transgenic copy of the entire Ink4a/Arf locus. Cells derived from super Ink4a/Arf mice have increased resistance to in vitro immortalization and oncogenic transformation. Importantly, super Ink4a/Arf mice manifest higher resistance to cancer compared to normal, nontransgenic, mice. Finally, super Ink4a/Arf mice have normal aging and lifespan. Together, these results indicate that modest increases in the activity of the Ink4a/Arf tumor suppressor result in a beneficial cancer-resistant phenotype without affecting normal viability or aging. PMID:15520276

  9. beta. -adrenergic receptor-mediated hepatic glycogenolysis is increased in aged male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, P.A.; Graham, S.M.; Arinze, I.J.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of age on catecholamine-stimulated glycogenolysis was studied in isolated hepatocytes prepared from 3, 12, and 24 month-old rats. Glucose release was stimulated by epinephrine and norepinephrine, this was inhibited by phentolamine and prazosin. Isoproterenol (ISO) stimulated glycogenolysis only in cells from 24 month-old rats, this was blocked by propranolol. In liver plasma membranes, binding of (/sup 3/H)yohimbine (100-130 fmol/mg protein) did not change with age, whereas (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding decreased from 870 fmol/mg at 3 months to 435 fmol/mg at 12 months, but subsequently rose to 656 fmol/mg at 24 months. (/sup 125/I)Cyanopindolol binding increased from 8 fmol/mg at 3 months to 19 fmol/mg at 24 months. The proportion of ..beta..-receptors in the high affinity state increased from 28% at 3 months to 42% at 24 months. ISO stimulated adenylate cyclase at 24 months but not at 3 months. Basal, fluoride-, GTP-, and Gpp(NH)p-stimulated activities were 1.4- to 2.4-fold greater at 24 months than at 3 months. These results suggest an age-related increase in the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase to ..beta..-receptor stimulation.

  10. Intrinsic stiffness of extracellular matrix increases with age in skeletal muscles of mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lauren K; Kayupov, Erdan; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Mendias, Christopher L; Claflin, Dennis R; Brooks, Susan V

    2014-08-15

    Advanced age is associated with increases in muscle passive stiffness, but the contributors to the changes remain unclear. Our purpose was to determine the relative contributions of muscle fibers and extracellular matrix (ECM) to muscle passive stiffness in both adult and old animals. Passive mechanical properties were determined for isolated individual muscle fibers and bundles of muscle fibers that included their associated ECM, obtained from tibialis anterior muscles of adult (8-12 mo old) and old (28-30 mo old) mice. Maximum tangent moduli of individual muscle fibers from adult and old muscles were not different at any sarcomere length tested. In contrast, the moduli of bundles of fibers from old mice was more than twofold greater than that of fiber bundles from adult muscles at sarcomere lengths >2.5 μm. Because ECM mechanical behavior is determined by the composition and arrangement of its molecular constituents, we also examined the effect of aging on ECM collagen characteristics. With aging, muscle ECM hydroxyproline content increased twofold and advanced glycation end-product protein adducts increased threefold, whereas collagen fibril orientation and total ECM area were not different between muscles from adult and old mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that the ECM of tibialis anterior muscles from old mice has a higher modulus than the ECM of adult muscles, likely driven by an accumulation of densely packed extensively crosslinked collagen.

  11. Elastic moduli of δ-Pu 239 reveal aging in real time

    DOE PAGES

    Maiorov, Boris; Betts, Jonathan B.; Söderlind, Per; ...

    2017-03-28

    We study the time evolution (aging) of the elastic moduli of an eight-year-old polycrystalline δ- Pu 2.0 at % Ga alloy (δ-Pu:Ga ) from 295K to nearly 500K in real time using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). After 8 years of aging at 295K, the bulk and shear moduli increase at a normalized rate of 0.2%/year and 0.6%/year respectively. As the temperature is raised, two time dependences are observed, an exponential one of about a week, followed by a linear one (constant rate). The linear rate is thermally activated with an activation energy of 0.33+0.06 eV. Above 420K a qualitative changemore » in the time evolution is observed; the bulk modulus decreases with time while the shear modulus continues to stiffen. No change is observed as the α-β transition temperature is crossed as would be expected if a decomposition of δ-Pu:Ga to α-Pu and Pu3Ga occurred over the temperature range studied. Our results indicate that the main mechanism of aging is creation of defects that are partially annealed starting at T = 420 K.« less

  12. Nickel hydroxide ageing time influence on its solubility in water acidified with sulphuric acid.

    PubMed

    Osińska, Małgorzata; Stefanowicz, Tadeusz; Paukszta, Dominik

    2004-08-30

    Nickel hydroxide samples freshly settled as well as stored over 1 month, 2 months and 6.5 years were examined for their solubility rate in diluted H2SO4 solutions of pH 1.9 and 2.8 as a function of time. Samples with a longer ageing history dissolved less readily than freshly settled ones. It was determined that the resistance to dissolving rose with sample ageing time and the solubility of the 6.5 years stored sample was particularly low. X-ray examination evidenced that during storage the crystallinity of Ni(OH)2 subsequently rose. The parallelity of both time-dependent phenomena allows the conclusion that with nickel hydroxide ageing the transformation of disordered nickel hydroxide species into crystalline Ni(OH)2 (without phase changes) is responsible for increasing nickel hydroxide resistance to dissolving in acidic solutions. Such decrease of nickel hydroxide solubility with ageing in case of waste nickel hydroxide, is worth to notice in a view of environment protection against pollution with electroplating waste.

  13. Age differences in multiple outcome measures of time-based prospective memory.

    PubMed

    Mäntylä, Timo; Missier, Fabio Del; Nilsson, Lars-Göran

    2009-11-01

    This study examined time-based prospective memory performance in relation to age, monitoring strategy, response accuracy, and dual-task demands. Young, middle-aged and older adults (N = 115) completed a prospective memory task, in which they indicated the passing of time every 5 min while listening to a short story (low task demands) or completing a series of cognitive tasks (high task demands). Young and older adults showed similar patterns of monitoring behavior, with low rates of clock checking during the early phase of each 5-min interval, followed by linearly accelerating monitoring functions. However, to obtain the same level of prospective memory performance older adults needed more frequent clock checks than young adults. Furthermore, older adults' compensatory monitoring strategy was associated with an additional cost in primary task performance. Finally, increased primary task demands shifted age differences in prospective memory from monitoring frequency to response accuracy. These findings suggest that goal-directed behavior requires efficient task coordination and resource allocation, and that age-related differences in time-based prospective memory should be evaluated by using multiple outcome measures.

  14. Food restriction increases long-term memory persistence in adult or aged mice.

    PubMed

    Talhati, F; Patti, C L; Zanin, K A; Lopes-Silva, L B; Ceccon, L M B; Hollais, A W; Bizerra, C S; Santos, R; Tufik, S; Frussa-Filho, R

    2014-04-03

    Food restriction (FR) seems to be the unique experimental manipulation that leads to a remarkable increase in lifespan in rodents. Evidences have suggested that FR can enhance memory in distinct animal models mainly during aging. However, only few studies systemically evaluated the effects FR on memory formation in both adult (3-month-old) and aged (18-24-month-old) mice. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute (12h) or repeated (12h/day for 2days) FR protocols on learning and memory of adult and aged mice evaluated in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PM-DAT), an animal model that concurrently (but independently) evaluates learning and memory, anxiety and locomotion. We also investigated the possible role of FR-induced stress by the corticosterone concentration in adult mice. Male mice were kept at home cage with food ad libitum (CTRL-control condition) or subjected to FR during the dark phase of the cycle for 12h/day or 12h/2days. The FR protocols were applied before training, immediately after it or before testing. Our results demonstrated that only FR for 2days enhanced memory persistence when applied before training in adults and before testing in aged mice. Conversely, FR for 2days impaired consolidation and exerted no effects on retrieval irrespective of age. These effects do not seem to be related to corticosterone concentration. Collectively, these results indicate that FR for 2days can promote promnestic effects not only in aged mice but also in adults.

  15. Arterial Stiffness is Associated with Increase in Blood Pressure Over Time in Treated Hypertensives

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, T; Bailey, KR; Turner, ST; Kullo, IJ

    2014-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is associated with incident hypertension. We hypothesized that arterial stiffness would predict increases in systolic (SBP), mean (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP) over time in treated hypertensives. Methods Blood pressure (BP) was measured a mean of 8.5±0.9 years apart in 414 non-Hispanic white hypertensives (mean age 60±8 years, 55% women). The average of 3 supine right brachial BPs was recorded. Measures of arterial stiffness including carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), aortic augmentation index (AIx) and central pulse pressure (CPP) were obtained at baseline by applanation tonometry. We performed stepwise multivariable linear regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders to assess the associations of arterial stiffness parameters with BP changes over time. Results Systolic, mean and pulse pressure increased in 80% of participants. After adjustment for the covariates listed above, cfPWV was significantly associated with increases in SBP (β±SE: 0.71±0.31) and PP (β±SE: 1.09±0.27); AIx was associated with increases in SBP (β±SE: 0.23±0.10) and MAP (β±SE: 0.27±0.07); and CPP was associated with increases in SBP (β±SE: 0.44±0.07), MAP (β±SE: 0.24±0.05) and PP (β±SE: 0.42±0.06) over time (P≤0.02 for all). Conclusions Baseline arterial stiffness measures were associated with longitudinal increases in SBP, MAP and PP in treated hypertensives. PMID:24952654

  16. Effect of Blade Tenderization, Aging Time and Aging Temperature on Tenderness of Beef Longissimus Lumborum and Gluteus Medius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of blade tenderization, aging time, and aging temperature on the tenderness of longissimus lumborum (LL) and gluteus medius (GM) steaks. Beef strip loins (n = 300) and top sirloin butts (n = 300) were selected from a large beef processor and transported...

  17. Increased choroidal mast cells and their degranulation in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bhutto, Imran A; McLeod, D Scott; Jing, Tian; Sunness, Janet S.; Seddon, Johanna M.; Lutty, Gerard A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Inflammation has been implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study investigates the association of mast cells (MCs), a resident choroidal inflammatory cell, with pathological changes in AMD. Methods Human donor eyes included aged controls (n=10), clinically diagnosed with early AMD (n=8), geographic atrophy (GA, n=4), and exudative AMD (n=11). The choroids were excised and incubated alkaline phosphatase (APase; blood vessels) and nonspecific esterase activities (MCs). Degranulated (DG) and nondegranulated (NDG) MCs in four areas of posterior choroid (nasal, nonmacular, paramacular, and submacular) were counted in flat mounts (4∼6 fields/area). Choroids were subsequently embedded in JB-4 and sectioned for histological analyses. Results The number of MCs was significantly increased in all choroidal areas in early AMD (p=0.0006) and in paramacular area in exudative AMD (139.44±55.3 cells/mm2; p=0.0091) and GA (199.08±82.0 cells/mm2; p=0.0019) compared to the aged controls. DG MCs was also increased in paramacular (p=0.001) and submacula choroid (p=0.02) in all forms of AMD. Areas with the greatest numbers of DG MC had loss of choriocapillaris (CC). Sections revealed that the MCs were widely distributed in Sattler's and Haller's layer in the choroidal stroma in aged controls, whereas MCs were frequently found in close proximity to CC in GA and exudative AMD and in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Conclusion Increased MC numbers and degranulation were observed in all AMD choroids. These results suggest that MC degranulation may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD: death of CC and RPE and CNV formation. The proteolytic enzymes released from MC granules may result in thinning of AMD choroid. PMID:26931413

  18. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  19. Increase of oxidation and inflammation in nervous and immune systems with aging and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Vida, Carmen; González, Eva M; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    According to the oxidation-inflammation theory of aging, chronic oxidative stress and inflammatory stress situations (with higher levels of oxidant and inflammatory compounds and lower antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses) are the basis of the agerelated impairment of organism functions, including those of the nervous and immune systems, as well as of the neuroimmune communication, which explains the altered homeostasis and the resulting increase of morbidity and mortality. Overproduction of oxidant compounds can induce an inflammatory response, since oxidants are inflammation effectors. Thus, oxidation and inflammation are interlinked processes and have many feedback loops. However, the nature of their potential interactions, mainly in the brain and immune cells, and their key involvement in aging remain unclear. Moreover, in the context of the neuroimmune communication, it has been described that an oxidative-inflammatory situation occurs in subjects with anxiety, and this situation contributes to an immunosenescence, alteration of survival responses and shorter life span. As an example of this, a model of premature aging in mice, in which animals show a poor response to stress and high levels of anxiety, an oxidative stress in their immune cells and tissues, as well as a premature immunosenescence and a shorter life expectancy, will be commented in the present review. This model supports the hypothesis that anxiety can be a situation of chronic oxidative stress and inflammation, especially in brain and immune cells, and this accelerates the rate of aging.

  20. 2-Nonenal newly found in human body odor tends to increase with aging.

    PubMed

    Haze, S; Gozu, Y; Nakamura, S; Kohno, Y; Sawano, K; Ohta, H; Yamazaki, K

    2001-04-01

    Human body odor consists of various kinds of odor components. Here, we have investigated the changes in body odor associated with aging. The body odor of subjects between the ages of 26 and 75 was analyzed by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. 2-Nonenal, an unsaturated aldehyde with an unpleasant greasy and grassy odor, was detected only in older subjects (40 y or older). Furthermore, analysis of skin surface lipids revealed that omega7 unsaturated fatty acids and lipid peroxides also increased with aging and that there were positive correlations between the amount of 2-nonenal in body odor and the amount of omega7 unsaturated fatty acids or lipid peroxides in skin surface lipids. 2-Nonenal was generated only when omega7 unsaturated fatty acids were degraded by degradation tests in which some main components of skin surface lipids were oxidatively decomposed using lipid peroxides as initiator of an oxidative chain reaction. The results indicate that 2-nonenal is generated by the oxidative degradation of omega7 unsaturated fatty acids, and suggest that 2-nonenal may be involved in the age-related change of body odor.

  1. Exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat as a mechanism linking anxiety with increased risk for diseases of aging.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Aoife; Slavich, George M; Epel, Elissa S; Neylan, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders increase risk for the early development of several diseases of aging. Elevated inflammation, a common risk factor across diseases of aging, may play a key role in the relationship between anxiety and physical disease. However, the neurobiological mechanisms linking anxiety with elevated inflammation remain unclear. In this review, we present a neurobiological model of the mechanisms by which anxiety promotes inflammation. Specifically we propose that exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat in anxious individuals may lead to sustained threat perception, which is accompanied by prolonged activation of threat-related neural circuitry and threat-responsive biological systems including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, autonomic nervous system (ANS), and inflammatory response. Over time, this pattern of responding can promote chronic inflammation through structural and functional brain changes, altered sensitivity of immune cell receptors, dysregulation of the HPA axis and ANS, and accelerated cellular aging. Chronic inflammation, in turn, increases risk for diseases of aging. Exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat may thus be a treatment target for reducing disease risk in anxious individuals.

  2. Prevalence of insomnia-related symptoms continues to increase in the Finnish working-age population.

    PubMed

    Kronholm, Erkki; Partonen, Timo; Härmä, Mikko; Hublin, Christer; Lallukka, Tea; Peltonen, Markku; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2016-08-01

    In 2008, we published epidemiological data from 1972 to 2005 that suggested an increase in insomnia-related symptoms among the working-age population. The results were based on the National FINRISK (FR) Study samples of the Finnish adult population aged 25-64, and on the Finnish Quality of Work Life Surveys (FQWLS), carried out among Finnish salary earners. Both of these ongoing studies have since provided two new estimates of insomnia-related symptoms. Chronic insomnia-related symptoms were 9.0% (95% CI 8.3-9.7), 9.6% (95% CI 8.8-10.4) in FR 2007 and 2012, respectively; and 9.1% (95% CI 8.3-10.0), 9.2% (95% CI 8.4-10.1) in FQWLS 2008 and 2013, respectively. Occasional insomnia-related symptoms were 45.3% (95% CI 44.1-46.6), 42.5% (95% CI 41.1-43.9) in FR 2007 and 2012, respectively; and 40.3% (95% CI 38.8-41.7), 44.8% (95% CI 41.1-43.9) in FQWLS 2008 and 2013, respectively. The new estimates further strengthen the interpretation of the ongoing increase in occasional insomnia-related symptoms among the Finnish general adult population. The increase in occasional symptoms was most prominent among employees. However, chronic insomnia symptoms showed no further increase.

  3. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness as a Mechanism for Increased Aortic Stiffness with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongyu; Zhu, Yi; Sun, Zhe; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P.; Gansner, Meredith; Depre, Christophe; Resuello, Ranillo R.G.; Natividad, Filipinas F.; Hunter, William C.; Genin, Guy M.; Elson, Elliot L.; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Increased aortic stiffness, an important feature of many vascular diseases, e.g., aging, hypertension, atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms, is assumed due to changes in extracellular matrix (ECM). Objective We tested the hypothesis that the mechanisms also involve intrinsic stiffening of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods and Results Stiffness was measured in vitro both by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in a reconstituted tissue model, using VSMCs from aorta of young versus old male monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, n=7/group), where aortic stiffness increases by 200 % in vivo. The apparent elastic modulus was increased (P<0.05) in old VSMCs (41.7±0.5 kPa) versus young (12.8±0.3 kPa), but not after disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D. Stiffness of the VSMCs in the reconstituted tissue model was also higher (P<0.05) in old (23.3±3.0 kPa) than in young (13.7±2.4 kPa). Conclusions These data support the novel concept, not appreciated previously, that increased vascular stiffness with aging is due not only to changes in ECM, but also to intrinsic changes in VSMCs. PMID:20634486

  4. Risk of Developmental Delay Increases Exponentially as Gestational Age of Preterm Infants Decreases: A Cohort Study at Age 4 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerstjens, Jorien M.; de Winter, Andrea F.; Bocca-TJeertes, Inger F.; Bos, Arend F.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the influence of decreasing gestational age on the risk of developmental delay in various domains at age 4 years among children born at a wide range of gestational ages. Method: In a community-based cohort, the parents of 1439 preterm-born children (24 0/7 to 35 6/7wks) and 544 term-born children (38 0/7 to…

  5. Estimating Allele Age and Selection Coefficient from Time-Serial Data

    PubMed Central

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Malaspinas, Orestis; Evans, Steven N.; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have made available an ever-increasing amount of ancient genomic data. In particular, it is now possible to target specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in several samples at different time points. Such time-series data are also available in the context of experimental or viral evolution. Time-series data should allow for a more precise inference of population genetic parameters and to test hypotheses about the recent action of natural selection. In this manuscript, we develop a likelihood method to jointly estimate the selection coefficient and the age of an allele from time-serial data. Our method can be used for allele frequencies sampled from a single diallelic locus. The transition probabilities are calculated by approximating the standard diffusion equation of the Wright–Fisher model with a one-step process. We show that our method produces unbiased estimates. The accuracy of the method is tested via simulations. Finally, the utility of the method is illustrated with an application to several loci encoding coat color in horses, a pattern that has previously been linked with domestication. Importantly, given our ability to estimate the age of the allele, it is possible to gain traction on the important problem of distinguishing selection on new mutations from selection on standing variation. In this coat color example for instance, we estimate the age of this allele, which is found to predate domestication. PMID:22851647

  6. Estimating allele age and selection coefficient from time-serial data.

    PubMed

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Malaspinas, Orestis; Evans, Steven N; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have made available an ever-increasing amount of ancient genomic data. In particular, it is now possible to target specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in several samples at different time points. Such time-series data are also available in the context of experimental or viral evolution. Time-series data should allow for a more precise inference of population genetic parameters and to test hypotheses about the recent action of natural selection. In this manuscript, we develop a likelihood method to jointly estimate the selection coefficient and the age of an allele from time-serial data. Our method can be used for allele frequencies sampled from a single diallelic locus. The transition probabilities are calculated by approximating the standard diffusion equation of the Wright-Fisher model with a one-step process. We show that our method produces unbiased estimates. The accuracy of the method is tested via simulations. Finally, the utility of the method is illustrated with an application to several loci encoding coat color in horses, a pattern that has previously been linked with domestication. Importantly, given our ability to estimate the age of the allele, it is possible to gain traction on the important problem of distinguishing selection on new mutations from selection on standing variation. In this coat color example for instance, we estimate the age of this allele, which is found to predate domestication.

  7. Modeling the Phenotypic Architecture of Autism Symptoms from Time of Diagnosis to Age 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiades, Stelios; Boyle, Michael; Szatmari, Peter; Hanna, Steven; Duku, Eric; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bryson, Susan; Fombonne, Eric; Volden, Joanne; Mirenda, Pat; Smith, Isabel; Roberts, Wendy; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Waddell, Charlotte; Bennett, Teresa; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Thompson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The latent class structure of autism symptoms from the time of diagnosis to age 6 years was examined in a sample of 280 children with autism spectrum disorder. Factor mixture modeling was performed on 26 algorithm items from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised at diagnosis (Time 1) and again at age 6 (Time 2). At Time 1, a…

  8. The Effects of Aging on Time Reproduction in Delayed Free-Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakitin, B.C.; Stern, Y.; Malapani, C.

    2005-01-01

    The experiments presented here demonstrate that normal aging amplifies differences in time production occurring in delayed free-recall testing. Experiment 1 compared the time production ability of two healthy aged groups as well as college-aged participants. During the test session, which followed a 24-h delay and omitted all feedback and examples…

  9. Time as a Tool for Policy Analysis in Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastorello, Thomas

    National policy makers have put forth different life cycle planning proposals for the more satisfying integration of education, work and leisure over the life course. This speech describes a decision making scheme, the Time Paradigm, for researched-based choice among various proposals. The scheme is defined in terms of a typology of time-related…

  10. Experimental increase in availability of a PAH complex organic contamination from an aged contaminated soil: consequences on biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Cébron, Aurélie; Faure, Pierre; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Leyval, Corinne

    2013-06-01

    Although high PAH content and detection of PAH-degraders, the PAH biodegradation is limited in aged-contaminated soils due to low PAH availability (i.e., 1%). Here, we tried to experimentally increase the soil PAH availability by keeping both soil properties and contamination composition. Organic extract was first removed and then re-incorporated in the raw soil as fresh contaminants. Though drastic, this procedure only allowed a 6-time increase in the PAH availability suggesting that the organic constituents more than ageing were responsible for low availability. In the re-contaminated soil, the mineralization rate was twice more important, the proportion of 5-6 cycles PAH was higher indicating a preferential degradation of lower molecular weight PAH. The extraction treatment induced bacterial and fungal community structures modifications, Pseudomonas and Fusarium solani species were favoured, and the relative quantity of fungi increased. In re-contaminated soil the percentage of PAH-dioxygenase gene increased, with 10 times more Gram negative representatives.

  11. The incidence of cervical spondylosis decreases with aging in the elderly, and increases with aging in the young and adult population: a hospital-based clinical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuanling; Tian, Fuming; Zhou, Yingjun; He, Wenbo; Cai, Zhiyou

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Cervical spondylosis is well accepted as a common degenerative change in the cervical spine. Compelling evidence has shown that the incidence of cervical spondylosis increases with age. However, the relationship between age and the incidence of cervical spondylosis remains obscure. It is essential to note the relationship between age and the incidence of cervical spondylosis through more and more clinical data. Methods In the case-controlled study reported here, retrospective clinical analysis of 1,276 cases of cervical spondylosis has been conducted. We analyzed the general clinical data, the relationship between age and the incidence of cervical spondylosis, and the relationship between age-related risk factors and the incidence of cervical spondylosis. A chi-square test was used to analyze the associations between different variables. Statistical significance was defined as a P-value of less than 0.05. Results The imaging examination demonstrated the most prominent characteristic features of cervical spondylosis: bulge or herniation at C3-C4, C4-C5, and C5-C6. The incidence of cervical spondylosis increased with aging before age 50 years and decreased with aging after age 50 years, especially in the elderly after 60 years old. The occurrence rate of bulge or herniation at C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 increased with aging before age 50 years and decreased with aging after age 50 years, especially after 60 years. Moreover, the incidence of hyperosteogeny and spinal stenosis increased with aging before age 60 years and decreased with aging after age 60 years, although there was no obvious change in calcification. The age-related risk factors, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, cerebral infarct, cardiovascular diseases, smoking, and drinking, have no relationship with the incidence of cervical spondylosis. Conclusion A decreasing proportion of cervical spondylosis with aging occurs in the elderly, while the proportion of

  12. Soil carbon stock increases in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, M.; Heikkinen, J.; Mäkipää, R.

    2011-02-01

    Changes in the soil carbon stock can potentially have a large influence on global carbon balance between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere. Since carbon sequestration of forest soils is influenced by human activities, reporting of the soil carbon pool is a compulsory part of the national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. Various soil carbon models are applied in GHG inventories, however, the verification of model-based estimates is lacking. In general, the soil carbon models predict accumulation of soil carbon in the middle-aged stands, which is in good agreement with chronosequence studies and flux measurements of eddy sites, but they have not been widely tested with repeated measurements of permanent plots. The objective of this study was to evaluate soil carbon changes in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged forest stands. Soil carbon changes on re-measured sites were analyzed by using soil survey data that was based on composite samples as a first measurement and by taking into account spatial variation on the basis of the second measurement. By utilizing earlier soil surveys, a long sampling interval, which helps detection of slow changes, could be readily available. The range of measured change in the soil organic layer varied from -260 to 1260 g m-2 over the study period of 16-19 years and 23 ± 2 g m-2 per year, on average. The increase was significant in 6 out of the 38 plots from which data were available. Although the soil carbon change was difficult to detect at the plot scale, the overall increase measured across the middle-aged stands agrees with predictions of the commonly applied soil models. Further verification of the soil models is needed with larger datasets that cover wider geographical area and represent all age classes, especially young stands with potentially large soil carbon source.

  13. Soil carbon stock increases in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, M.; Heikkinen, J.; Mäkipää, R.

    2011-05-01

    Changes in the soil carbon stock can potentially have a large influence on global carbon balance between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere. Since carbon sequestration of forest soils is influenced by human activities, reporting of the soil carbon pool is a compulsory part of the national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. Various soil carbon models are applied in GHG inventories, however, the verification of model-based estimates is lacking. In general, the soil carbon models predict accumulation of soil carbon in the middle-aged stands, which is in good agreement with chronosequence studies and flux measurements of eddy sites, but they have not been widely tested with repeated measurements of permanent plots. The objective of this study was to evaluate soil carbon changes in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged forest stands. Soil carbon changes on re-measured sites were analyzed by using soil survey data that was based on composite samples as a first measurement and by taking into account spatial variation on the basis of the second measurement. By utilizing earlier soil surveys, a long sampling interval, which helps detection of slow changes, could be readily available. The range of measured change in the soil organic layer varied from -260 to 1260 g m-2 over the study period of 16-19 years and 23 ± 2 g m-2 per year, on average. The increase was significant in 6 out of the 38 plots from which data were available. Although the soil carbon change was difficult to detect at the plot scale, the overall increase measured across the middle-aged stands agrees with predictions of the commonly applied soil models. Further verification of the soil models is needed with larger datasets that cover wider geographical area and represent all age classes, especially young stands with potentially large soil carbon source.

  14. Increases of M2a macrophages and fibrosis in aging muscle are influenced by bone marrow aging and negatively regulated by muscle-derived nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle; Samengo, Giuseppina; Tidball, James G

    2015-08-01

    Muscle aging is associated with changes in myeloid cell phenotype that may influence age-related changes in muscle structure. We tested whether preventing age-related reductions in muscle neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) would obviate age-related changes in myeloid cells in muscle. Our findings show that muscle aging is associated with elevations of anti-inflammatory M2a macrophages that can increase muscle fibrosis. Expression of a muscle-specific nNOS transgene in mice prevented age-related increases in M2a macrophages. Transgene expression also reduced expression of collagens and decreased muscle fibrosis. The nNOS transgene prevented age-related increases in arginase-1 but did not influence TGFβ expression, indicating that the transgene may prevent age-related muscle fibrosis by inhibiting the arginase-dependent profibrotic pathway. Although aged satellite cells or fibro-adipogenic precursor (FAPs) cells also promote fibrosis, transgene expression had no effect on the expression of key signaling molecules that regulate fibrogenic activity of those cells. Finally, we tested whether increases in M2a macrophages and the associated increase in fibrosis were attributable to aging of myeloid lineage cells. Young bone marrow cells (BMCs) were transplanted into young or old mice, and muscles were collected 8 months later. Muscles of young mice receiving young BMCs showed no effect on M2a macrophage number or collagen accumulation compared to age-matched, nontransplanted controls. However, muscles of old mice receiving young BMCs showed fewer M2a macrophages and less accumulation of collagen. Thus, the age-related increase in M2a macrophages in aging muscle and the associated muscle fibrosis are determined in part by the age of bone marrow cells.

  15. Strawberry or blueberry supplementation may protect against increased oxidative stress vulnerability from both irradiation and aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Carey, A.; Rabin, B. M.

    In several studies we have now shown that there are some interesting parallels between aging and the effects of heavy particle irradiation (56Fe) in a rat model. Interestingly this research also has shown that, much as has been seen in aged animals, dietary supplementation with high antioxidant-strawberry (SB) or blueberry (BB) extracts (2% of the diet) reversed many of the age-related changes. Similarly, supplementing the diets of young rats with SBs or BBs (2% of diet as in the aged animals) for 8 weeks prior to being exposed to 56Fe (1 GeV/n), using the AGS or NSRL at Brookhaven National Laboratory, prevented the deleterious effects of the radiation exposure on the motor, cognitive and neuronal parameters described above. In the present experiment we examined whether striatal tissue obtained from BB- or SB-supplemented or control-fed, irradiated or non-radiated, young rats would show differential sensitivity (as assessed via decrements in mAChR stimulation of dopamine release) to hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating agent. The results indicated that, just as we had seen previously with respect to radiation protection in the parameters described above, the tissue from the SB or BB-supplemented irradiated or non-radiated animals showed increased mAChR-stimulated DA release from the striatal tissue following hydrogen peroxide exposure compared to that seen in non-supplemented irradiated or non-radiated animals (e.g., DA rels. p moles/mg protein, rad + H202 non-supplemented = 90, SB = 260, BB = 360). These results show that aging and irradiation may produce similar decrements in dopamine release and that, much as we have seen previously with age, radiation enhances the vulnerability to oxidative stressors, but these are reduced with SB or BB supplementation. They are discussed in-terms of protection against the effects of exposure to heavy particles and aging via nutritional supplementation with foods that are high in antioxidant activity

  16. Accelerated failure time models provide a useful statistical framework for aging research.

    PubMed

    Swindell, William R

    2009-03-01

    Survivorship experiments play a central role in aging research and are performed to evaluate whether interventions alter the rate of aging and increase lifespan. The accelerated failure time (AFT) model is seldom used to analyze survivorship data, but offers a potentially useful statistical approach that is based upon the survival curve rather than the hazard function. In this study, AFT models were used to analyze data from 16 survivorship experiments that evaluated the effects of one or more genetic manipulations on mouse lifespan. Most genetic manipulations were found to have a multiplicative effect on survivorship that is independent of age and well-characterized by the AFT model "deceleration factor". AFT model deceleration factors also provided a more intuitive measure of treatment effect than the hazard ratio, and were robust to departures from modeling assumptions. Age-dependent treatment effects, when present, were investigated using quantile regression modeling. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survivorship data associated with currently known long-lived mouse models. In addition, from the standpoint of aging research, these statistical approaches have appealing properties and provide valuable tools for the analysis of survivorship data.

  17. Breed, slaughter weight and ageing time effects on physico-chemical characteristics of lamb meat.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cerezo, S; Sañudo, C; Panea, B; Medel, I; Delfa, R; Sierra, I; Beltrán, J A; Cepero, R; Olleta, J L

    2005-02-01

    The effects of breed, slaughter weight and ageing time on the meat quality of the three most important Spanish breeds were considered. Two hundred and twenty-five lambs of Rasa Aragonesa-local meat breed-, Churra-local dairy breed- and Spanish Merino were used. Animals (75 of each breed) were slaughtered at three different live weights (10-12, 20-22 or 30-32 kg), and the meat was aged for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 days. The meat pH, colour, amount of haem pigments, intramuscular fat, moisture, hydroxyproline content and sarcomere length were measured at 24 h post-mortem. Meat texture was measured by compression after each ageing time. The pH of the samples ranged from 5.50 to 5.58. Meat colour varied with breed and slaughter weight (P⩽0.01), the M. longissimus thoracis was lighter in the youngest animals and in the Churra breed and redder in Merinos. Intramuscular fat increased and moisture decreased for heavier lambs. Differences in collagen were associated with breed (P⩽0.01); total and insoluble collagen contents were higher in the Churra breed. Sarcomere length was only slightly affected by slaughter weight. Meat from the Churra breed had the highest values at high levels of compression. Suckling lambs (10-12 kg) had greater myofibrillar toughness than heavier lambs and ageing strongly influenced myofibrillar tenderness.

  18. The timing of the age at which natural menopause occurs.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ellen B

    2011-09-01

    The timing of natural menopause is a clinically important indicator of longevity and risk of morbidity and mortality. Demographic, menstrual, reproductive, familial, genetic, and lifestyle factors seem to be important in this timing. Smoking, lower parity and poor socioeconomic status are associated with earlier menopause. However, a number of relationships have been inconsistent; others remain largely unexplored. Much remains to be learned about factors that affect follicular atresia and the onset and duration of perimenopause and the timing of the natural menopause. Knowledge about these relationships offers women and their health care providers enhanced understanding and choices to deal with menopause.

  19. Age effects on discrimination of timing in auditory sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbons, Peter J.; Gordon-Salant, Sandra

    2004-08-01

    The experiments examined age-related changes in temporal sensitivity to increments in the interonset intervals (IOI) of components in tonal sequences. Discrimination was examined using reference sequences consisting of five 50-ms tones separated by silent intervals; tone frequencies were either fixed at 4 kHz or varied within a 2-4-kHz range to produce spectrally complex patterns. The tonal IOIs within the reference sequences were either equal (200 or 600 ms) or varied individually with an average value of 200 or 600 ms to produce temporally complex patterns. The difference limen (DL) for increments of IOI was measured. Comparison sequences featured either equal increments in all tonal IOIs or increments in a single target IOI, with the sequential location of the target changing randomly across trials. Four groups of younger and older adults with and without sensorineural hearing loss participated. Results indicated that DLs for uniform changes of sequence rate were smaller than DLs for single target intervals, with the largest DLs observed for single targets embedded within temporally complex sequences. Older listeners performed more poorly than younger listeners in all conditions, but the largest age-related differences were observed for temporally complex stimulus conditions. No systematic effects of hearing loss were observed.

  20. Breed, slaughter weight and ageing time effects on sensory characteristics of lamb.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cerezo, S; Sañudo, C; Medel, I; Olleta, J L

    2005-03-01

    The longissimus lumborum (right and left) from 180 entire male lambs were tasted by a nine-member trained taste panel. The samples were from lambs from three Spanish breeds; Rasa Aragonesa (local meat breed), Churra (local dairy breed) and Spanish Merino. Within breed, three slaughter live weights were considered (10-12, 20-22 or 30-32 kg) and meat was aged in a vacuum package for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 days. Panellists assessed a total of eight descriptors. Lamb odour and lamb flavour intensities increased with slaughter weight. However, fat flavour intensity was significantly influenced by breed, with the highest score for Rasa Aragonesa. Off-flavour intensity was influenced by breed and ageing, with higher scores for Rasa Aragonesa and longer ageing times. Tenderness and juiciness were influenced by all three effects (P⩽0.001, each) and there was a significant interaction between breed and slaughter live weight. Meat was juicier and more tender in the lightest Churra lambs, and in the Spanish Merino lambs for the heavier weight animals. Tenderness and juiciness increased with ageing. The best quality flavour was for the Spanish Merino and the intermediate and heavier lambs.

  1. Age at Time of Initial Sexual Intercourse and Health of Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Lara, Lúcia A S; Abdo, Carmita H N

    2016-10-01

    Adolescence is characterized by marked changes in the body, psychology, and sexual behavior due to increasing production of hormones. In this review we aimed to assess the effect of age at the time of first sexual intercourse (sexarche) on the health of adolescent girls, and identify factors that might protect against early initiation of sexual relations in girls. The PubMed, Lilacs, and Google Scholar databases were searched for clinical trials, comparative studies, case-control studies, cross-sectional studies, cohort studies, multicenter studies, observational studies, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews published up to December 2014 on this theme. The search terms were: "sexual debut," "coitarche," "sexarche," and "young people," "adolescent," "unplanned pregnancy," "adolescent contraception," and "STDs." Data were extracted from 28 studies and 41 references were used to introduce the theme and to support the discussion. Sexarche has been occurring in increasingly younger girls. A young age at sexarche can lead to subsequent risky sexual behavior. Girls who have sexarche when they are 14 years old or younger are less likely to use contraception on this occasion, take more time before they start using contraception in subsequent sexual relations, are more likely to have several sex partners, have a higher risk for depression, have lower self-esteem and more episodes of repentance, and have a higher risk for a sexually transmitted disease and cervical cancer. Girls with low educational, socioeconomic, and cultural status, little parental monitoring, parental separation, and absence of religiosity tend to experience sexarche at a younger age. Adolescent girls who postpone sexarche until they are 16 years old are physically and psychologically healthier than those who have sexarche at a younger age. This suggests that providing adolescent girls with appropriate education about sexual relations might reduce the negative effect of sexual relations at a young age.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency induces early signs of aging in human bone, increasing the risk of fracture.

    PubMed

    Busse, Björn; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Panganiban, Brian; Barth, Holly D; Carriero, Alessandra; Vettorazzi, Eik; Zustin, Josef; Hahn, Michael; Ager, Joel W; Püschel, Klaus; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O

    2013-07-10

    Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Fracture susceptibility in the context of low vitamin D has been primarily associated with defective mineralization of collagenous matrix (osteoid). However, bone's fracture resistance is due to toughening mechanisms at various hierarchical levels ranging from the nano- to the microstructure. Thus, we hypothesize that the increase in fracture risk with vitamin D deficiency may be triggered by numerous pathological changes and may not solely derive from the absence of mineralized bone. We found that the characteristic increase in osteoid-covered surfaces in vitamin D-deficient bone hampers remodeling of the remaining mineralized bone tissue. Using spatially resolved synchrotron bone mineral density distribution analyses and spectroscopic techniques, we observed that the bone tissue within the osteoid frame has a higher mineral content with mature collagen and mineral constituents, which are characteristic of aged tissue. In situ fracture mechanics measurements and synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography of the crack path indicated that vitamin D deficiency increases both the initiation and propagation of cracks by 22 to 31%. Thus, vitamin D deficiency is not simply associated with diminished bone mass. Our analyses reveal the aged nature of the remaining mineralized bone and its greatly decreased fracture resistance. Through a combination of characterization techniques spanning multiple size scales, our study expands the current clinical understanding of the pathophysiology of vitamin D deficiency and helps explain why well-balanced vitamin D levels are essential to maintain bone's structural integrity.

  3. Frontotemporal Network Connectivity during Memory Encoding Is Increased with Aging and Disrupted by Beta-Amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of cognitively normal older adults harbor brain β-amyloid (Aβ), a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease associated with neural alterations and episodic memory decline. We examined how aging and Aβ deposition affect neural function during memory encoding of visual scenes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans. Thirty-six cognitively normal older people underwent fMRI scanning, and positron emission tomography with [11C] Pittsburgh compound B to measure fibrillar brain Aβ; 15 young subjects were studied with fMRI. Older adults without Aβ deposition showed reduced regional brain activation (compared with young subjects) with decreased task-independent functional connectivity between parahippocampal gyrus and prefrontal cortex. In this network, task-related connectivity was increased compared with young subjects, and the degree of connectivity was related to memory performance. In contrast, older individuals with Aβ deposition showed no such increased task-related network connectivity, but did display increased regional activity unassociated with performance. These findings suggest that network connectivity plays a significant role in compensating for reduced regional activity during successful memory encoding in aging without Aβ deposition, while in those with Aβ this network compensation fails and is accompanied by inefficient regional hyperactivation. PMID:24259567

  4. Multistrategy health education program to increase mammography use among women ages 65 and older.

    PubMed Central

    Rimer, B K; Resch, N; King, E; Ross, E; Lerman, C; Boyce, A; Kessler, H; Engstrom, P F

    1992-01-01

    Mammography use decreases with age although the risk of breast cancer increases with age. Medicare now provides biennial coverage for screening mammography. This study was designed to simulate the Medicare condition by subsidizing mammography among women in eight retirement communities in the metropolitan Philadelphia area. The study also measured the impact of health education interventions and the presence of a mobile mammography van on increased use of mammography. Retirement communities were assigned randomly to the control (cost subsidy alone) or experimental group (cost subsidy, mammography van, and tailored health education interventions). A total of 412 women ages 65 and older who had not had mammograms in the previous year were surveyed at baseline and 3 months later. Analytic techniques reflected the cluster nature of the randomization. Women in the experimental group were significantly more likely than the control group women to have obtained mammograms. Forty-five percent of the experimental group women compared with 12 percent of the control group women subsequently had mammograms in the 3 months after the baseline interview (P less than .001). Logistic regression analysis for mammography use indicated an odds ratio of 6.1 associated with being in the experimental group. For women in the experimental group, a separate logistic regression for mammography use showed an odds ratio of 7.8 associated with attendance at the educational presentation. The results suggest that Medicare coverage alone will not increase mammography use sufficiently to achieve year 2000 objectives. However, the addition of access enhancing and health education interventions boosts utilization dramatically. PMID:1641432

  5. Altered conformation and increased strand breaks in neuronal and astroglial DNA of aging rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, M S; Rao, K S

    1994-05-01

    Melting temperatures (Tm) of the DNA isolated from young, adult, and old rat brain neurons and astrocytes were recorded under different conditions. There was a rise in Tm and decrease in hyperchromicity in the old when compared to the young and adult. Single and double strand breaks were assessed by using nick translation type incubation of DNA with E. coli Pol I and addition of nucleotides at the terminal 3'-OH by calf thymus terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Results show that DNA from old brain cells is more compact in conformation. However, there is also an increase in the number of single and double strand breaks with age in both neuronal and astroglial DNA.

  6. No evidence of age-related increases in unconscious plagiarism during free recall.

    PubMed

    Perfect, Timothy John; Defeldre, Anne-Catherine; Elliman, Rachel; Dehon, Hedwige

    2011-07-01

    In three experiments younger and older participants took part in a group generation task prior to a delayed recall task. In each, participants were required to recall the items that they had generated, avoiding plagiarism errors. All studies showed the same pattern: older adults did not plagiarise their partners any more than younger adults did. However, older adults were more likely than younger adults to intrude with entirely novel items not previously generated by anyone. These findings stand in opposition to the single previous demonstration of age-related increases in plagiarism during recall.

  7. Slow Desorption of Phenanthrene from Silica Particles: Influence of Pore Size, Pore Water, and Aging Time

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Fortman, Timothy J.; Riley, Robert G.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Wang, Zheming; Truex, Michael J.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2006-01-16

    When micro-porous and meso-porous silica particles were exposed to aqueous phenanthrene solutions for various durations it was observed that sorbed-phase phenanthrene concentrations increased with aging time only for meso-porous but not micro-porous silicas. Desorption equilibrium was reached almost instantaneously for the micro-porous particles while both the rate and extent of desorption decreased with increasing aging time for the meso-porous silicas. These findings indicate that phenanthrene can be sequestered within the internal pore-space of meso-porous silicas while the internal surfaces of micro-porous silicas are not accessible to phenanthrene sorption, possibly due to the presence of physi- or chemi-sorbed water that may sterically hinder the diffusion of phenanthrene inside water-filled micro-pores. By contrast, the internal surfaces of these micro-porous silicas are accessible to phenanthrene when aging methods are employed which assure that pores are devoid of physi-sorbed water. Consequently, when phenanthrene was incorporated into these particles using either supercritical CO2 or via solvent soaking, the aqueous desorption kinetics were extremely slow indicating effective sequestration of phenanthrene inside micro-porous particles. Finally, a two-compartment conceptual model is used to interpret the experimental findings.

  8. Accelerated tissue aging and increased oxidative stress in broiler chickens fed allopurinol.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Rathore, D S; Iqbal, M; Shi, X; Van Dyke, K

    2001-06-01

    Uric acid has been hypothesized as being one of the more important antioxidants in limiting the accumulation of glycosylated endproducts in birds. Study 1 was designed to quantitatively manipulate the plasma concentrations of uric acid using hemin and allopurinol while study 2 determined their effects on skin pentosidine, the shear force value of Pectoralis major muscle, plasma glucose, body weight and chemiluminescence monitored oxidative stress in broiler chickens. Hemin was hypothesized to raise uric acid concentrations thereby lowering oxidative stress whereas allopurinol was hypothesized to lower uric acid concentrations and raise measures of oxidative stress. In study 1 feeding allopurinol (10 mg/kg body weight) to 8-week-old broiler chicks (n=50) for 10 days decreased plasma uric acid by 57%. However, hemin (10 mg/kg body weight) increased uric acid concentrations 20%. In study 2, 12-week-old broiler chicks (n=90) were randomly assigned to either an ad libitum (AL) diet or a diet restricted (DR) group. Each group was further divided into three treatments (control, allopurinol or hemin fed). Unexpectedly, hemin did not significantly effect uric acid concentrations but increased (P<0.05) measures of chemiluminescence dependent oxidative stress in both the DR and AL birds probably due to the ability of iron to generate oxygen radicals. Allopurinol lowered concentrations of uric acid and increased (P<0.05) the oxidative stress in the AL birds at week 22, reduced (P<0.05) body weight in both the AL and DR fed birds at 16 and 22 weeks of age, and markedly increased (P<0.001) shear force values of the pectoralis major muscle. Skin pentosidine levels increased (P<0.05) in AL birds fed allopurinol or hemin fed birds, but not in the diet restricted birds at 22 weeks. The significance of these studies is that concentrations of plasma uric acid can be related to measures of oxidative stress, which can be linked to tissue aging.

  9. Effects of a native parasitic plant on an exotic invader decrease with increasing host age

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junmin; Yang, Beifen; Yan, Qiaodi; Zhang, Jing; Yan, Min; Li, Maihe

    2015-01-01

    Understanding changes in the interactions between parasitic plants and their hosts in relation to ontogenetic changes in the hosts is crucial for successful use of parasitic plants as biological controls. We investigated growth, photosynthesis and chemical defences in different-aged Bidens pilosa plants in response to infection by Cuscuta australis. We were particularly interested in whether plant responses to parasite infection change with changes in the host plant age. Compared with the non-infected B. pilosa, parasite infection reduced total host biomass and net photosynthetic rates, but these deleterious effects decreased with increasing host age. Parasite infection reduced the concentrations of total phenolics, total flavonoids and saponins in the younger B. pilosa but not in the older B. pilosa. Compared with the relatively older and larger plants, younger and smaller plants suffered from more severe damage and are likely less to recover from the infection, suggesting that C. australis is only a viable biocontrol agent for younger B. pilosa plants. PMID:25838325

  10. Being overweight in early adulthood is associated with increased mortality in middle age

    PubMed Central

    Carslake, David; Jeffreys, Mona; Davey Smith, George

    2016-01-01

    Observational analyses of the association between body mass index (BMI) and all-cause mortality often suggest that overweight is neutral or beneficial, but such analyses are potentially confounded by smoking or by reverse causation. The use of BMI measured in early adulthood offers one means of reducing the latter problem. We used a cohort who were first measured while 16–24 year old students at Glasgow University in 1948–1968 and subsequently re-measured in 2000–2003, offering a rare opportunity to compare BMI measured at different ages as a predictor of mortality. Analysis of the later BMI measurements suggested that overweight was beneficial to survival, while analysis of BMI measured in early adulthood suggested that overweight was harmful and that the optimum BMI lay towards the lower end of the recommended range of 18.5–25 kg m−2. We interpret the association with later BMI as being probably distorted by reverse causality, although it remains possible instead that the optimum BMI increases with age. Differences when analyses were restricted to healthy non-smokers also suggested some residual confounding by smoking. These results suggest that analyses of BMI recorded in middle or old age probably over-estimate the optimum BMI for survival and should be treated with caution. PMID:27782178

  11. Increase of α-Secretase ADAM10 in Platelets Along Cognitively Healthy Aging.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Florian; Wolf, Dominik; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Endres, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 is one of the key players in ectodomain-shedding of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP). Previous research with postmortem tissue has shown reduced expression and activity of ADAM10 within the central nervous system (CNS) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Determination of cerebral ADAM10 in living humans is hampered by its transmembrane property; only the physiological AβPP cleavage product generated by ADAM10, sAβPPα, can be assessed in cerebrospinal fluid. Establishment of surrogate markers in easily accessible material therefore is crucial. It has been demonstrated that ADAM10 is expressed in platelets and that platelet amount is decreased in AD patients. Just recently it has been shown that platelet ADAM10 and cognitive performance of AD patients positively correlate. In contrast to AD patients, to our knowledge almost no information has been published regarding ADAM10 expression during normal aging. We investigated ADAM10 amount and activity in platelets of cognitively healthy individuals from three different age groups ranging from 22-85 years. Interestingly, we observed an age-dependent increase in ADAM10 levels and activity in platelets.

  12. Carcinogenically relevant split dose repair increased with age in rat skin model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Fredric; Tang, Moon-Shong Eric; Wu, Feng; Uddin, Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    These experiments utilize cancer induction to evaluate cancer-relevant repair during the interval between dose fractions. Low LET electron radiation(LET ~ 0.34 keV/u) were utilized in experiments that involved exposing rat dorsal skin to 2 equal 8 Gy dose fractions separated at various intervals from 0.25 h to 24 h. Cancer onset was established for 80 weeks after the exposures and only histologically verified cancers were included in the analysis. This experiment involved a total of 540 rats and 880 induced cancers. In the youngest rats (irradiated at 28 days of age) the cancer yield declined with a halftime of approximately 3.5 hrs. In 113 day old rats the cancer yield halftime was shortened to 1.3 hrs. In the oldest rats (182 days of age), the halftime could not be established quantitatively, because it was less than the shortest interval (15 min) utilized in the protocol (best estimate ~5 min). In the oldest rats the cancer yields for all fractionated exposures dropped essentially to the expected level of 2 single fractions, below which theoretically no further reduction is possible. The follow-up times for obtaining cancer yields were the same for all exposure groups in spite of the differing ages at exposure. These results indicate that repair of carcinogenically-relevant damage accelerates with age of the rat. No information is available on the possible mechanistic basis for this finding, although the model might be useful for delineating which of the many postulated split dose repair pathways is the correct one. The finding indicates that older rats should be less susceptible to the carcinogenic action of single doses of low LET radiation in comparison to younger rats, which has been verified in separate studies.

  13. Testing a basic assumption of shrubland fire management: Does the hazard of burning increase with the age of fuels?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moritz, Max A.; Keeley, Jon E.; Johnson, Edward A.; Schaffner, Andrew A.

    2004-01-01

    This year's catastrophic wildfires in southern California highlight the need for effective planning and management for fire-prone landscapes. Fire frequency analysis of several hundred wildfires over a broad expanse of California shrublands reveals that there is generally not, as is commonly assumed, a strong relationship between fuel age and fire probabilities. Instead, the hazard of burning in most locations increases only moderately with time since the last fire, and a marked age effect of fuels is observed only in limited areas. Results indicate a serious need for a re-evaluation of current fire management and policy, which is based largely on eliminating older stands of shrubland vegetation. In many shrubland ecosystems exposed to extreme fire weather, large and intense wildfires may need to be factored in as inevitable events.

  14. Possible effects of anthropogenically-increased CO2 on the dynamics of climate - Implications for ice age cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Barry; Maasch, Kirk A.; Verbitsky, Mikhail YA.

    1993-01-01

    A dynamical model, developed to account for the observed major variations of global ice mass and atmospheric CO2 during the late Cenozoic, is used to provide a quantitative demonstration of the possibility that the anthropogenically-forced increase of atmospheric CO2, if maintained over a long period of time (perhaps by tectonic forcing), could displace the climatic system from an unstable regime of oscillating ice ages into a more stable regime representative of the pre-Pleistocene. This stable regime is characterized by orbitally-forced oscillations that are of much weaker amplitude than prevailed during the Pleistocene.

  15. Silver: an age-old treatment modality in modern times.

    PubMed

    Spear, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    The use of silver as an antimicrobial for infection spans hundreds of years. The ancient Greeks and Romans used silver to disinfect their water and food supplies. Silver was also used in ancient times to treat burns and wounds as a wound dressing. Silver solutions were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in the 1920s. Since that time, silver has established itself as an effective and well-known treatment modality for and in the prevention of high-risk infection in clinical wound care (http://int.hansaplast.com/med-info/wound-care-beautiful-healing/silver-tech.html).

  16. Adaptive responses of cardiac function to fetal postural change as gestational age increases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jin; Choi, Hye Jin; Yang, Sun Young; Koo, Boo Hae; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Hong, Soon Cheol; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The cardiovascular system maintains homeostasis through a series of adaptive responses to physiological requirements. However, little is known about the adaptation of fetal cardiac function to gravity, according to gestational age. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the adaptive responses of cardiac function to postural changes, using Tei index measurements. Methods Fetal echocardiography and Doppler examination were performed on 114 women with vertex singleton pregnancies at 19 to 40 weeks' gestation. Participants were placed in an upright seated position, and the Tei index for fetal left ventricular cardiac function was measured. The women were then moved into a supine position and the Tei index was re-measured. Results The mean Tei index when measured in an upright seated position was significantly lower than that measured in a supine positioning for all fetuses (0.528±0.103 vs. 0.555±0.106, P=0.014, respectively). This difference was also noted in fetuses with a gestational age of 28–40 weeks (0.539±0.107 vs. 0.574±0.102, P=0.011, respectively). However, there was no difference in the Tei index between an upright seated and a supine position among fetuses with a gestational age of <28 weeks (0.505±0.091 vs. 0.516±0.103, P=0.571, respectively). Conclusion Postural changes from an upright seated to a supine position result in an increased Tei index after a gestational age of 28 weeks. This appears to reflect maturation in the adaptive responses of the fetal cardiovascular system to postural changes. PMID:27896244

  17. Gestational Age and Autism Spectrum Disorder: Trends in Risk Over Time.

    PubMed

    Atladóttir, H Ó; Schendel, D E; Henriksen, T B; Hjort, L; Parner, E T

    2016-02-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a serious neurodevelopmental disorder. Several previous studies have identified preterm birth as a risk factor for ASD but none has studied whether the association between gestational age and ASD has changed over time. This is a Danish population-based follow-up study including live-born singletons born in Denmark between 1980 and 2009, identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry, a study population of 1,775,397 children. We used a Cox regression model combined with spline to study the risk for ASD by gestational age across three decades of birth cohorts. We included 19,020 children diagnosed with ASD. Across all birth year cohorts, we found that the risk of being diagnosed with ASD increased with lower gestational age (P-value: <0.01). Across all gestational weeks, we found a statistically significant higher risk estimates in birth cohort 1980 to 1989, compared to birth cohorts 1990 to 1999 and 2000 to 2009, respectively. No statistically significant difference in risk estimates was observed between birth cohort 1990 to 1999 and 2000 to 2009. The observed time trend in risk of ASD after preterm birth may reflect: (1) a change in the risk profile of persons with ASD due to the broadening of ASD diagnostic criteria over time; or (2) improved neonatal care for low GA infants, which has reduced risk of adverse outcomes like ASD in preterm children.

  18. Inventory management in the just-in-time age.

    PubMed

    Jordan, H H

    1990-08-01

    JIT will change our conventional thinking concerning the management of inventories and streamline our methods for inventory control. Proper selection and implementation of these methods will yield substantial benefits by improving customer service, shortening delivery lead times, and significantly reducing inventory investment. It does not, however, eliminate the need for sound inventory planning.

  19. Increase of posterior connectivity in aging within the Ventral Attention Network: A functional connectivity analysis using independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Deslauriers, Johnathan; Ansado, Jennyfer; Marrelec, Guillaume; Provost, Jean-Sébastien; Joanette, Yves

    2017-02-15

    Multiple studies have found neurofunctional changes in normal aging in a context of selective attention. Furthermore, many articles report intrahemispheric alteration in functional networks. However, little is known about age-related changes within the Ventral Attention Network (VAN), which underlies selective attention. The aim of this study is to examine age-related changes within the VAN, focusing on connectivity between its regions. Here we report our findings on the analysis of 27 participants' (13 younger and 14 older healthy adults) BOLD signals as well as their performance on a letter-matching task. We identified the VAN independently for both groups using spatial independent component analysis. Three main findings emerged: First, younger adults were faster and more accurate on the task. Second, older adults had greater connectivity among posterior regions (right temporoparietal junction, right superior parietal lobule, right middle temporal gyrus and left cerebellum crus I) than younger adults but lower connectivity among anterior regions (right anterior insula, right medial superior frontal gyrus and right middle frontal gyrus). Older adults also had more connectivity between anterior and posterior regions than younger adults. Finally, correlations between connectivity and response time on the task showed a trend toward connectivity in posterior regions for the older group and in anterior regions for the younger group. Thus, this study shows that intrahemispheric neurofunctional changes in aging also affect the VAN. The results suggest that, in contexts of selective attention, posterior regions increased in importance for older adults, while anterior regions had reduced centrality.

  20. Lake Erie Yellow perch age estimation based on three structures: Precision, processing times, and management implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergoot, C.S.; Bur, M.T.; Powell, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Yellow perch Perca flavescens support economically important recreational and commercial fisheries in Lake Erie and are intensively managed. Age estimation represents an integral component in the management of Lake Erie yellow perch stocks, as age-structured population models are used to set safe harvest levels on an annual basis. We compared the precision associated with yellow perch (N = 251) age estimates from scales, sagittal otoliths, and anal spine sections and evaluated the time required to process and estimate age from each structure. Three readers of varying experience estimated ages. The precision (mean coefficient of variation) of estimates among readers was 1% for sagittal otoliths, 5-6% for anal spines, and 11-13% for scales. Agreement rates among readers were 94-95% for otoliths, 71-76% for anal spines, and 45-50% for scales. Systematic age estimation differences were evident among scale and anal spine readers; less-experienced readers tended to underestimate ages of yellow perch older than age 4 relative to estimates made by an experienced reader. Mean scale age tended to underestimate ages of age-6 and older fish relative to otolith ages estimated by an experienced reader. Total annual mortality estimates based on scale ages were 20% higher than those based on otolith ages; mortality estimates based on anal spine ages were 4% higher than those based on otolith ages. Otoliths required more removal and preparation time than scales and anal spines, but age estimation time was substantially lower for otoliths than for the other two structures. We suggest the use of otoliths or anal spines for age estimation in yellow perch (regardless of length) from Lake Erie and other systems where precise age estimates are necessary, because age estimation errors resulting from the use of scales could generate incorrect management decisions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  1. Increased expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome truncated lamin A transcript during cell aging.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Sofia; Coppedè, Fabio; Sagelius, Hanna; Eriksson, Maria

    2009-07-01

    Most cases of the segmental progeroid syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are caused by a de novo dominant mutation within a single codon of the LMNA gene. This mutation leads to the increased usage of an internal splice site that generates an alternative lamin A transcript with an internal deletion of 150 nucleotides, called lamin A Delta 150. The LMNA gene encodes two major proteins of the inner nuclear lamina, lamins A and C, but not much is known about their expression levels. Determination of the overall expression levels of the LMNA gene transcripts is an important step to further the understanding of the HGPS. In this study, we have performed absolute quantification of the lamins A, C and A Delta 150 transcripts in primary dermal fibroblasts from HGPS patients and unaffected age-matched and parent controls. We show that the lamin A Delta 150 transcript is present in unaffected controls but its expression is >160-fold lower than that in samples from HGPS patients. Analysis of transcript expression during in vitro aging shows that although the levels of lamin A and lamin C transcripts remain unchanged, the lamin A Delta 150 transcript increases in late passage cells from HGPS patients and parental controls. This study provides a new method for LMNA transcript analysis and insights into the expression of the LMNA gene in HGPS and normal cells.

  2. Quest for Cells Responsible for Age-related Increase of Salivary Glycine and Proline.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shunsuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Matsuta, Tomohiko; Horie, Norio; Shimoyama, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Shoji; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that salivary glycine and proline levels are increased to nearly butanoate level in elderly people. In order to identify the source of glycine and proline, we performed high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of amino acid production to a total of seven oral cells before and after stimulation with inflammation inducers. We found that production of amino acids (per a given number of cells) by normal oral mesenchymal cells (gingival fibroblast, pulp cell, periodontal ligament fibroblast) was approximately three-fold that of oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HSC-2, HSC-3, HSC-4, Ca9-22), and that production of glycine and especially proline by all these seven cells was much lower than that of glutamine and glutamic acid. Treatment of three oral mesenchymal cells with interleukin (IL)-1β or lipopoly-saccharide (LPS) reproducibly increased the production of glutamic acid and glutamine, but not that of glycine and proline. Glycine and proline only marginally stimulated the IL-8 production by IL-1β-stimulated gingival fibroblast, whereas glycine dose-dependently inhibited the nitric oxide production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. These data demonstrated that normal oral mesenchymal cells are not the major source of glycine and proline that accumulates in the saliva of aged people, suggesting the involvement of the deregulation of collagen metabolism during aging.

  3. Overestimation of the second time interval replaces time-shrinking when the difference between two adjacent time intervals increases.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Hasuo, Emi; Yamashita, Miki; Haraguchi, Yuki

    2014-01-01

    When the onsets of three successive sound bursts mark two adjacent time intervals, the second time interval can be underestimated when it is physically longer than the first time interval by up to 100 ms. This illusion, time-shrinking, is very stable when the first time interval is 200 ms or shorter (Nakajima et al., 2004, Perception, 33). Time-shrinking had been considered a kind of perceptual assimilation to make the first and the second time interval more similar to each other. Here we investigated whether the underestimation of the second time interval was replaced by an overestimation if the physical difference between the neighboring time intervals was too large for the assimilation to take place; this was a typical situation in which a perceptual contrast could be expected. Three experiments to measure the overestimation/underestimation of the second time interval by the method of adjustment were conducted. The first time interval was varied from 40 to 280 ms, and such overestimations indeed took place when the first time interval was 80-280 ms. The overestimations were robust when the second time interval was longer than the first time interval by 240 ms or more, and the magnitude of the overestimation was larger than 100 ms in some conditions. Thus, a perceptual contrast to replace time-shrinking was established. An additional experiment indicated that this contrast did not affect the perception of the first time interval substantially: The contrast in the present conditions seemed unilateral.

  4. Age decreases mitochondrial motility and increases mitochondrial size in vascular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Susan; Saunter, Christopher D.; Girkin, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Age is proposed to be associated with altered structure and function of mitochondria; however, in fully‐differentiated cells, determining the structure of more than a few mitochondria at a time is challenging. In the present study, the structures of the entire mitochondrial complements of cells were resolved from a pixel‐by‐pixel covariance analysis of fluctuations in potentiometric fluorophore intensity during ‘flickers’ of mitochondrial membrane potential.Mitochondria are larger in vascular myocytes from aged rats compared to those in younger adult rats.A subpopulation of mitochondria in myocytes from aged, but not younger, animals is highly‐elongated.Some mitochondria in myocytes from younger, but not aged, animals are highly‐motile.Mitochondria that are motile are located more peripherally in the cell than non‐motile mitochondria. Abstract Mitochondrial function, motility and architecture are each central to cell function. Age‐associated mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to vascular disease. However, mitochondrial changes in ageing remain ill‐defined because of the challenges of imaging in native cells. We determined the structure of mitochondria in live native cells, demarcating boundaries of individual organelles by inducing stochastic ‘flickers’ of membrane potential, recorded as fluctuations in potentiometric fluorophore intensity (flicker‐assisted localization microscopy; FaLM). In freshly‐isolated myocytes from rat cerebral resistance arteries, FaLM showed a range of mitochondrial X‐Y areas in both young adult (3 months; 0.05–6.58 μm2) and aged rats (18 months; 0.05–13.4 μm2). In cells from young animals, most mitochondria were small (mode area 0.051 μm2) compared to aged animals (0.710 μm2). Cells from older animals contained a subpopulation of highly‐elongated mitochondria (5.3% were >2 μm long, 4.2% had a length:width ratio >3) that was rare in younger animals (0.15% of mitochondria >2

  5. The effect of sol aging time on Structural and Optical properties of sol gel ZnO doped Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hallani, G.; Fazouan, N.; Liba, A.; Khuili, M.

    2016-10-01

    Currently the doped or undoped ZnO semiconductor is of great importance in the field of electronic and optoelectronic devices such as transparent conductors and optical windows of solar cells based on silicon. ZnO thin films are produced by several techniques such as sol-gel method which is a chemical technique usually dependent on solution conditions. However, the sol gel aging time is an important parameter, which can have a significant impact on the properties of thin films. In this work we studied the effect of aging times (0h, 24h, 48h, 72h, 1 week) of the precursor solution on the structural and optical properties of ZnO doped Al (3 at.%). Thin films prepared by spin coating on glass substrates were investigated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the ZnO doped Al (3 at.%) exhibit the hexagonal wurtzite structure with a preferential orientation along [002] direction. The shift of (002) peaks towards higher diffraction angles is observed with sol aging time and also, a variation of crystallite sizes and thickness of thin films are shown with increasing sol aging time. All films present an average optical transmittance around 90% in the visible range with some interference fringes indicating a relative smoothness of films. We note an increasing in transmittance level with sol aging time from 0h to 48h. We can conclude that the aging times of the precursor solution influences the structural and optical properties of studied thin films.

  6. Increasing Paid Work Time? A New Puzzle for Multinational Time-Diary Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershuny, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This explores the reasons that paid work time may be rising, at least in anglophone countries. Three explanations are discussed. (1) An historical reversal of the work/leisure gradient with respect to social position or social status. This gradient was once positive, but is now negative; evidence of this change from 11 developed countries is drawn…

  7. Absence of DJ-1 causes age-related retinal abnormalities in association with increased oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bonilha, Vera L; Bell, Brent A; Rayborn, Mary E; Samuels, Ivy S; King, Anna; Hollyfield, Joe G; Xie, Chengsong; Cai, Huaibin

    2017-03-01

    Oxidative stress alters physiological function in most biological tissues and can lead to cell death. In the retina, oxidative stress initiates a cascade of events leading to focal loss of RPE and photoreceptors, which is thought to be a major contributing factor to geographic atrophy. Despite these implications, the molecular regulation of RPE oxidative stress under normal and pathological conditions remains largely unknown. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in regulating RPE and photoreceptors oxidative stress response is greatly needed. To this end we evaluated photoreceptor and RPE changes in mice deficient in DJ-1, a protein that is thought to be important in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Young (3 months) and aged (18 months) DJ-1 knockout (DJ-1 KO) and age-matched wild-type mice were examined. In both group of aged mice, scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) showed the presence of a few autofluorescent foci. The 18 month-old DJ-1 KO retinas were also characterized by a noticeable increase in RPE fluorescence to wild-type. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging demonstrated that all retinal layers were present in the eyes of both DJ-1 KO groups. ERG comparisons showed that older DJ-1 KO mice had reduced sensitivity under dark- and light-adapted conditions compared to age-matched control. Histologically, the RPE contained prominent vacuoles in young DJ-1 KO group with the appearance of enlarged irregularly shaped RPE cells in the older group. These were also evident in OCT and in whole mount RPE/choroid preparations labeled with phalloidin. Photoreceptors in the older DJ-1 KO mice displayed decreased immunoreactivity to rhodopsin and localized reduction in cone markers compared to the wild-type control group. Lower levels of activated Nrf2 were evident in retina/RPE lysates in both young and old DJ-1 KO mouse groups compared to wild-type control levels. Conversely, higher levels of protein carbonyl derivatives and i

  8. Adaptation of Diaphyseal Structure With Aging and Increased Mechanical Usage in the Adult Rat: A Histomorphometrical and Biomechanical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Li, Xiao Jian; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    1991-01-01

    The experimental increase in mechanical usage or overloading of the left hindlimb was produced by immobilization of the contralateral hindlimb. The right hindlimb was placed in a flexed position against the body and was immobilized using an elastic bandage. Some control animals were sacrificed initially at time zero and increased mechanical usage and age-matched control animals were sacrificed after 2, 10, 18, and 26 weeks of treatment. All animals received double bone fluorochrome labeling prior to sacrifice. Cortical bone histomorphometry and cross-sectional moments of inertia were determined. Marrow cavity enlargement and total cross-sectional area expansion represented the age-related cortical bone changes. Increased mechanical usage enhanced periosteal bone modeling in the formation mode and dampened endocortical bone remodeling and bone modeling in the resorption mode (resorption drift) to create a slight positive bone balance. These observations are in general agreement with Frost's postulate for mechanical effects on bone modeling and remodeling. The maximum moment of inertia did not change significantly in either control or overloaded tibial shafts. The minimum and polar moment of inertias in overloaded bones increases over those of controls at 18 and 26 weeks of the experiment.

  9. Adaptation of Diaphyseal Structure with Aging and Increased Mechanical Usage in the Adult Rat: A Histomorphometrical and Biomechanical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Li, Xiao Jian; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    1991-01-01

    The experimental increase in mechanical usage or overloading of the left hindlimb was produced by immobilization of the contralateral hindlimb. The right hindlimb was placed in a flexed position against the body and was immobilized using an elastic bandage. Some control animals were sacrificed initially at time zero and increased mechanical usage and age-matched control animals were sacrificed after 2, 10, 18, and 26 weeks of treatment. All animals received double bone fluorochrome labeling prior to sacrifice. Cortical bone histomorphometry and cross-sectional moments of inertia were determined. Marrow cavity enlargement and total cross-sectional area expansion represented the age-related cortical bone changes. Increased mechanical usage enhanced periosteal bone modeling in the formation mode and dampened endocortical bone remodeling and bone modeling in the resorption mode (resorption drift) to create a slight positive bone balance. These observations are in general agreement with Frost's postulate for mechanical effects on bone modeling and remodeling. The maximum moment of inertia did not change significantly in either control or overloaded tibial shafts. The minimum and polar moment of inertias in overloaded bones increases over those of controls at 18 and 26 weeks of the experiment.

  10. Does Raising the Early Retirement Age Increase Employment of Older Workers?

    PubMed

    Staubli, Stefan; Zweimüller, Josef

    2013-12-01

    Two pension reforms in Austria increased the early retirement age (ERA) from 60 to 62 for men and from 55 to 58.25 for women. We find that raising the ERA increased employment by 9.75 percentage points among affected men and by 11 percentage points among affected women. The reforms had large spillover effects on the unemployment insurance program but negligible effects on disability insurance claims. Specifically, unemployment increased by 12.5 percentage points among men and by 11.8 percentage points among women. The employment response was largest among high-wage and healthy workers, while low-wage and less healthy workers either continued to retire early via disability benefits or bridged the gap to the ERA via unemployment benefits. Taking spillover effects and additional tax revenues into account, we find that for a typical birth-year cohort a one year increase in the ERA resulted in a reduction of net government expenditures of 107 million euros for men and of 122 million euros for women.

  11. Does Raising the Early Retirement Age Increase Employment of Older Workers?*

    PubMed Central

    Staubli, Stefan; Zweimüller, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Two pension reforms in Austria increased the early retirement age (ERA) from 60 to 62 for men and from 55 to 58.25 for women. We find that raising the ERA increased employment by 9.75 percentage points among affected men and by 11 percentage points among affected women. The reforms had large spillover effects on the unemployment insurance program but negligible effects on disability insurance claims. Specifically, unemployment increased by 12.5 percentage points among men and by 11.8 percentage points among women. The employment response was largest among high-wage and healthy workers, while low-wage and less healthy workers either continued to retire early via disability benefits or bridged the gap to the ERA via unemployment benefits. Taking spillover effects and additional tax revenues into account, we find that for a typical birth-year cohort a one year increase in the ERA resulted in a reduction of net government expenditures of 107 million euros for men and of 122 million euros for women. PMID:24319299

  12. Gender Transitions in Later Life: The Significance of Time in Queer Aging

    PubMed Central

    Fabbre, Vanessa D.

    2014-01-01

    Concepts of time are ubiquitous in studies of aging. This article integrates an existential perspective on time with a notion of queer time based on the experiences of older transgender persons who contemplate or pursue a gender transition in later life. Interviews were conducted with male-to-female identified persons aged 50 years or older (N=22), along with participant observation at three national transgender conferences (N=170 hours). Interpretive analyses suggest that an awareness of “time left to live” and a feeling of “time served” play a significant role in later life development and help expand gerontological perspectives on time and queer aging. PMID:24798691

  13. Intraindividual Variability in Basic Reaction Time Predicts Middle-Aged and Older Pilots’ Flight Simulator Performance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Intraindividual variability (IIV) is negatively associated with cognitive test performance and is positively associated with age and some neurological disorders. We aimed to extend these findings to a real-world task, flight simulator performance. We hypothesized that IIV predicts poorer initial flight performance and increased rate of decline in performance among middle-aged and older pilots. Method. Two-hundred and thirty-six pilots (40–69 years) completed annual assessments comprising a cognitive battery and two 75-min simulated flights in a flight simulator. Basic and complex IIV composite variables were created from measures of basic reaction time and shifting and divided attention tasks. Flight simulator performance was characterized by an overall summary score and scores on communication, emergencies, approach, and traffic avoidance components. Results. Although basic IIV did not predict rate of decline in flight performance, it had a negative association with initial performance for most flight measures. After taking into account processing speed, basic IIV explained an additional 8%–12% of the negative age effect on initial flight performance. Discussion. IIV plays an important role in real-world tasks and is another aspect of cognition that underlies age-related differences in cognitive performance. PMID:23052365

  14. Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged 5 years and under

    PubMed Central

    Wolfenden, Luke; Wyse, Rebecca J; Britton, Ben I; Campbell, Karen J; Hodder, Rebecca K; Stacey, Fiona G; McElduff, Patrick; James, Erica L

    2014-01-01

    Background Insufficient consumption of fruits and vegetables in childhood increases the risk of future chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease. Objectives To assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and associated adverse events of interventions designed to increase the consumption of fruit and/or vegetables amongst children aged five years and under. Search methods The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2010, MEDLINE (1950 to 2010 April week 4), EMBASE (1947 to 2010 week 18), CINAHL (up to 12 May 2010), PsycINFO (up to 12 May 2010) and Proquest Dissertations and Theses (up to February 2011) were searched to identify eligible trials, as well as electronic trial registers (also up to February 2011). The reference lists of included trials were reviewed and handsearches of three international nutrition journals were also performed. Authors of all included trials were contacted in order to identify further potentially relevant trials. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), including cluster-randomised controlled trials, of any intervention primarily targeting fruit and/or vegetable consumption among children aged five years and under and incorporating a biochemical or dietary assessment of fruit and/or vegetable consumption. Two review authors independently screened the titles and abstracts of identified papers. A third review author with expertise in review methodology resolved any disagreements regarding study eligibility. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. A third reviewer resolved disagreements between review authors. Fixed-effect models were used to perform meta-analysis for the primary review outcomes where a sufficient number of trials with suitable data and homogeneity were identified. Main results Five trials, with 13 trial arms and 3967 participants were included in

  15. Pubertal timing and bone phenotype in early old age: findings from a British birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kuh, Diana; Muthuri, Stella G; Moore, Adam; Cole, Tim J; Adams, Judith E; Cooper, Cyrus; Hardy, Rebecca; Ward, Kate A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of pubertal timing, assessed in adolescence, on bone size, strength and density in men and women in early old age Design A British birth cohort study with prospective indicators of pubertal timing based on age at menarche, clinical assessment of pubertal stage, and growth tempo from serial height measures, and bone measures derived from peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at 60-64 years on 866 women and 792 men. Methods A first set of regression models investigated the relationships between pubertal timing and bone size, strength and density, adjusting for current height and weight, smoking and adult socioeconomic position. To make an equivalent comparison between men and women, the percentage difference in bone outcomes was calculated for a five-year difference in age at menarche, and in men a comparison between those who were fully mature or pre-adolescent at 14.5 years. A second set of models investigated the percentage difference in bone outcomes for a 5-year difference in timing of peak height velocity (height tempo) derived from longitudinal growth modelling (SITAR). Results After adjustment for current height and weight, a 5-year increase in age at menarche was associated with an 8% (95% CI -17%, 0.5%, p=0.07) lower trabecular volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD); men who were pre-adolescent at 14.5 years had a 9%, (95%CI -14%,-4%; p=.001) lower trabecular vBMD compared with those who had been fully mature. Other confounders did not attenuate these estimates further. Patterns of association were similar but somewhat weaker for lumbar spine and total hip areal BMD. Age at peak height velocity was associated with even larger differences in BMD in men and women, and was negatively associated with bone size and strength. Conclusions The association between later puberty and lower BMD persists into early old age. The 9-10% lower trabecular vBMD in later compared with

  16. Voluntary aerobic exercise increases arterial resilience and mitochondrial health with aging in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A.; Battson, Micah L.; Cuevas, Lauren M.; Zigler, Melanie C.; Sindler, Amy L.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysregulation and associated excessive reactive oxygen species (mtROS) production is a key source of oxidative stress in aging arteries that reduces baseline function and may influence resilience (ability to withstand stress). We hypothesized that voluntary aerobic exercise would increase arterial resilience in old mice. An acute mitochondrial stressor (rotenone) caused greater (further) impairment in peak carotid EDD in old (~27 mo., OC, n=12;−32.5±-10.5%) versus young (~7 mo., YC n=11;−5.4±- 3.7%) control male mice, whereas arteries from young and old exercising (YVR n=10 and OVR n=11, 10-wk voluntary running;−0.8±-2.1% and −8.0±4.9%, respectively) mice were protected. Ex-vivo simulated Western diet (WD, high glucose and palmitate) caused greater impairment in EDD in OC (-28.5±8.6%) versus YC (-16.9±5.2%) and YVR (-15.3±2.3%), whereas OVR (-8.9±3.9%) were more resilient (not different versus YC). Simultaneous ex-vivo treatment with mitochondria-specific antioxidant MitoQ attenuated WD-induced impairments in YC and OC, but not YVR or OVR, suggesting that exercise improved resilience to mtROS-mediated stress. Exercise normalized age-related alterations in aortic mitochondrial protein markers PGC-1α, SIRT-3 and Fis1 and augmented cellular antioxidant and stress response proteins. Our results indicate that arterial aging is accompanied by reduced resilience and mitochondrial health, which are restored by voluntary aerobic exercise. PMID:27875805

  17. Age and Time Population Differences: Young Adults, Gen Xers, and Millennials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Lauren A.

    2013-01-01

    Age and Time disparities in young adult research populations are common because young adults are defined by varying age spans; members of Generation X and Millennial generations may both be considered young adults; study years vary, affecting populations; and qualitative methods with limited age/year samples are frequently utilized. The current…

  18. Excipient hydrolysis and ester formation increase pH in a parenteral solution over aging.

    PubMed

    Hirakura, Yutaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Wakasawa, Tatsuyoshi; Ban, Kazutoshi; Yokota, Shoji; Kitamura, Satoshi

    2006-11-15

    Recently, the number of drug substances that are poorly water-soluble has increased dramatically. This makes improving solubility one of the most critical tasks in pharmaceutical development today. In this study, the physicochemical stability of an injectable solution of conivaptan hydrochloride salt was investigated. Because its free form is hydrophobic, the drug substance was solubilized in a co-solvent system, 40% of which was composed of different alcohols. Since the free form is also alkaline, lactic acid was added to the co-solvent system to further improve its solubility. Remarkably, the pH of the solution was found to increase gradually over time. Considering the physicochemical nature of the drug substance, uncontrolled increases in pH would pose a potential threat of reducing solubility and forming precipitates. For this reason, a risk evaluation was performed. The evaluation revealed that the pH increase was caused by the hydrolysis of lactic acid oligomers as well as by the ester formation occurring between lactic acid and the alcohols. High concentrations of lactic acid supplied as an excipient usually contain lactic acid oligomers, which are hydrolyzed into lactic acid monomers upon dilution with water. Commercial software was used to determine the pK(a) values of the lactic acid oligomers, which were found to be lower than that of lactic acid monomers. This indicates that hydrolysis causes the pH to increase. Ester formation consumes the acid, which also causes the pH to increase. However, both hydrolysis and ester formation equilibrated by the 16-month time point when stored at 25 degrees C. This information allowed the upper limit of the pH increase to be determined molecularly, thereby ensuring product quality through the prevention of precipitate formation due to reduced solubility. Increased awareness of the importance of risk evaluation in pharmaceutical development is critical as these kinds of chemical reactions between excipients constitute

  19. Wake Up Time, Light, and Mood in a Population Sample Age 40-64 Years

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Takuro; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Concern that disturbances of sleep and light exposures at night might increase cancer risks have been expressed, but little actual exposure data has been collected. Measurements from a representative population sample were examined to understand the magnitude of in-bed light exposure at night and possible correlates. Methods From 1990 to 1994, a home survey of sleep disorders among adults ages 40-64 was conducted in the City of San Diego California, using stratified representative sampling techniques. Along with questionnaires, sleep logs, and 3-night wrist activity and pulse oximetry measures, bedside illumination was measured with a computer recording system. Questionnaires included the CESD depression scale and a scale of symptoms typical of winter depression. Results Complete data were available from 286 men and women, whose mean in-bed intervals averaged 7 hours and 42 minutes. The mean room illumination during the first part of the night was mean 12.7 lux (median 3.2 lux) and during the last 2 hours in bed averaged 28.7 lux (median 18.9 lux). Nocturnal light exposure was positively correlated with age, male gender, summer season, time in bed, wake-up time, and depressive symptoms. Conclusion Complex bi-directional interactions may take place between sleep disturbances, depression, time in bed, wake-up-time, and in-bed illumination. The most crucial light exposures appear to occur in the last 2 hours in bed, largely after dawn, so daylight exposure may be an important factor. PMID:25866517

  20. Use of an operating microscope during spine surgery is associated with minor increases in operating room times and no increased risk of infection

    PubMed Central

    Basques, Bryce A.; Golinvaux, Nicholas S.; Bohl, Daniel D.; Yacob, Alem; Toy, Jason O.; Varthi, Arya G.; Grauer, Jonathan N.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective database review. Objective To evaluate whether microscope use during spine procedures is associated with increased operating room times or increased risk of infection. Summary of Background Data Operating microscopes are commonly used in spine procedures. It is debated whether the use of an operating microscope increases operating room time or confers increased risk of infection. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database, which includes data from over 370 participating hospitals, was used to identify patients undergoing elective spinal procedures with and without an operating microscope for the years 2011 and 2012. Bivariate and multivariate linear regressions were used to test the association between microscope use and operating room times. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were similarly conducted to test the association between microscope use and infection occurrence within 30 days of surgery. Results A total of 23,670 elective spine procedures were identified, of which 2,226 (9.4%) used an operating microscope. The average patient age was 55.1 ± 14.4 years. The average operative time (incision to closure) was 125.7 ± 82.0 minutes. Microscope use was associated with minor increases in preoperative room time (+2.9 minutes, p=0.013), operative time (+13.2 minutes, p<0.001), and total room time (+18.6 minutes, p<0.001) on multivariate analysis. A total of 328 (1.4%) patients had an infection within 30 days of surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed no significant difference between the microscope and non-microscope groups for occurrence of any infection, superficial surgical site infection (SSI), deep SSI, organ space infection, or sepsis/septic shock, regardless of surgery type. Conclusions We did not find operating room times or infection risk to be significant deterrents for use of an operating microscope during spine surgery. PMID:25188600

  1. Inhibition of Adenylyl Cyclase Type 5 Increases Longevity and Healthful Aging through Oxidative Stress Protection

    PubMed Central

    Vatner, Stephen F.; Pachon, Ronald E.; Vatner, Dorothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Mice with disruption of adenylyl cyclase type 5 (AC5 knockout, KO) live a third longer than littermates. The mechanism, in part, involves the MEK/ERK pathway, which in turn is related to protection against oxidative stress. The AC5 KO model also protects against diabetes, obesity, and the cardiomyopathy induced by aging, diabetes, and cardiac stress and also demonstrates improved exercise capacity. All of these salutary features are also mediated, in part, by oxidative stress protection. For example, chronic beta adrenergic receptor stimulation induced cardiomyopathy was rescued by AC5 KO. Conversely, in AC5 transgenic (Tg) mice, where AC5 is overexpressed in the heart, the cardiomyopathy was exacerbated and was rescued by enhancing oxidative stress resistance. Thus, the AC5 KO model, which resists oxidative stress, is uniquely designed for clinical translation, since it not only increases longevity and exercise, but also protects against diabetes, obesity, and cardiomyopathy. Importantly, inhibition of AC5's action to prolong longevity and enhance healthful aging, as well as its mechanism through resistance to oxidative stress, is unique among all of the nine AC isoforms. PMID:25945149

  2. Beaver ponds increase methylmercury concentrations in Canadian shield streams along vegetation and pond-age gradients.

    PubMed

    Roy, Virginie; Amyot, Marc; Carignan, Richard

    2009-08-01

    Beaver impoundments flood forested areas and may be important production sites for methylmercury (MeHg) because of the resulting enhanced microbial activity and oxygen depletion. The influence of 17 beaver impoundments on streamwater chemistry (total mercury (THg), MeHg, nutrients, cations, and anions)] was investigated by sampling sites located along vegetation and pond-age gradients in southwestern Quebec (Canada). Recently inundated beaver ponds (< 10 years old) and those located in coniferous watersheds had the highest MeHg concentrations (range, 0.10-4.53 ng L(-1)) and greatest methylation efficiencies (% THg as MeHg; range, 10-74%). High heterotrophic activity likely occurred in the beaver ponds as suggested by depletions of dissolved oxygen, sulfate and nitrite-nitrate concentrations, and increases in nutrients (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen) in outlets compared to inlets. Acidic waters at coniferous sites may have stimulated more MeHg production than in mixed woodland regions. Lower methylation efficiencies in older ponds (> 20 years old) may be due to the degradation of less labile organic matter as ponds age. Beavers actively alter watersheds by building impoundments, and our findings indicate that this landscape disturbance may be a significant source of MeHg to downstream water bodies.

  3. Water age, exposure time, and local flushing time in semi-enclosed, tidal basins with negligible freshwater inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; Defina, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of tidally flushed, semi-enclosed basins with negligible freshwater inflow, and under steady periodic flow conditions, three frequently used local transport time scales to quantify the efficiency of water renewal, namely water age, exposure time, and local flushing time are studied and compared to each other. In these environments, water renewal is strongly controlled by diffusion, and it is significantly affected by the return flow (i.e., the fraction of effluent water that returns into the basin on each flood tide). The definition of water age is here modified to account for the return flow, in analogy with exposure time and local flushing time. We consider approximate time scales, whose accuracy is analyzed, in order to overcome problems related to the size of the computational domain and to reduce the computational effort. A new approximate procedure is introduced to estimate water age, which is based on the water aging rate. Also, the concept of local flushing time as a relevant time scale is introduced. Under steady periodic conditions, we demonstrate that the local flushing time quantitatively corresponds to water age, and well approximates exposure time when the flow is dominated by diffusion. Since the effort required to compute water age and exposure time is greater than that required to compute the local flushing time, the present results can also have a practical interest in the assessment of water renewal efficiency of semi-enclosed water basins. The results of a modeling study, in which the lagoon of Venice is used as a benchmark, confirm the substantial quantitative equivalence between these three transport time scales in highly diffusive environments.

  4. The timing and precision of action prediction in the aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alex L.; Cross, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Successful social interactions depend on the ability to anticipate other people's actions. Current conceptualizations of brain function propose that causes of sensory input are inferred through their integration with internal predictions generated in the observer's motor system during action observation. Less is known concerning how action prediction changes with age. Previously we showed that internal action representations are less specific in older compared with younger adults at behavioral and neural levels. Here, we characterize how neural activity varies while healthy older adults aged 56–71 years predict the time‐course of an unfolding action as well as the relation to task performance. By using fMRI, brain activity was measured while participants observed partly occluded actions and judged the temporal coherence of the action continuation that was manipulated. We found that neural activity in frontoparietal and occipitotemporal regions increased the more an action continuation was shifted backwards in time. Action continuations that were shifted towards the future preferentially engaged early visual cortices. Increasing age was associated with neural activity that extended from posterior to anterior regions in frontal and superior temporal cortices. Lower sensitivity in action prediction resulted in activity increases in the caudate. These results imply that the neural implementation of predicting actions undergoes similar changes as the neural process of executing actions in older adults. The comparison between internal predictions and sensory input seems to become less precise with age leading to difficulties in anticipating observed actions accurately, possibly due to less specific internal action models. Hum Brain Mapp 37:54–66, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26503586

  5. [Population ageing and health implication. Thinking time trends in Emilia-Romagna Region].

    PubMed

    Mazzocchetti, Angelina; Caranci, Nicola; Addis, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Ageing is doubtless a factor characterizing population in Europe, and particularly in Emilia-Romagna, a north-east Italian region of about 4,5 million people. From 1990 to 2010 life expectancy in Emilia-Romagna has grown by about 6 years for men and 5 for women. At the same time good health life expectancy has grown even more rapidly, particularly among women. While it is expected that in 2030 the number of over-65s will have exceeded one million people, the trends in good health life expectancy is not granted. Strengthen actions aimed at increasing good health conditions promotes ageing sustainability and can feed the positive trend observed for the life expectancy in good health. The Emilia-Romagna Region takes up the demographic challenge of the coming years in the European context and promotes strategies for active and healthy ageing, working on prevention in its broadest sense and for the entire life span, with the aim of actively contribute to the achievement of the EU2020 target of an increase of two years in life expectancy in good health of European citizens.

  6. Can we explain increases in young people's psychological distress over time?

    PubMed

    Sweeting, Helen; West, Patrick; Young, Robert; Der, Geoff

    2010-11-01

    This paper aims to explain previously described increases in self-reported psychological distress between 1987 and 2006 among samples identical in respect of age (15 years), school year and geographical location (West of Scotland). Such increases might be explained by changes in exposure (changes in levels of risk or protective factors) and/or by changes in vulnerability (changes in the relationship between risk/protective factors and psychological distress). Key areas of social change over this time period allow identification of potential explanatory factors, categorised as economic, family, educational, values and lifestyle and represented by variables common to each study. Psychological distress was measured via the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, Likert scored. Analyses were conducted on those with complete data on all variables (N = 3276 of 3929), and separately for males and females. Between 1987 and 2006, levels of almost every potential explanatory factor changed in line with general societal trends. Associations between explanatory factors and GHQ tended to be stronger among females, and at the later date. The strongest associations were with worries, arguments with parents, and, at the later date, school disengagement. The factors which best accounted for the increase in mean GHQ between 1987 and 2006 were arguments with parents, school disengagement, worry about school and, for females, worry about family relationships, reflecting both increasing exposure and vulnerability to these risk factors. A number of limitations to our analysis can be identified. However, our results reinforce the conclusions of others in highlighting the role of family and educational factors as plausible explanations for increases in young people's psychological distress.

  7. Can we explain increases in young people’s psychological distress over time?

    PubMed Central

    Sweeting, Helen; West, Patrick; Young, Robert; Der, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to explain previously described increases in self-reported psychological distress between 1987 and 2006 among samples identical in respect of age (15 years), school year and geographical location (West of Scotland). Such increases might be explained by changes in exposure (changes in levels of risk or protective factors) and/or by changes in vulnerability (changes in the relationship between risk/protective factors and psychological distress). Key areas of social change over this time period allow identification of potential explanatory factors, categorised as economic, family, educational, values and lifestyle and represented by variables common to each study. Psychological distress was measured via the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, Likert scored. Analyses were conducted on those with complete data on all variables (N = 3276 of 3929), and separately for males and females. Between 1987 and 2006, levels of almost every potential explanatory factor changed in line with general societal trends. Associations between explanatory factors and GHQ tended to be stronger among females, and at the later date. The strongest associations were with worries, arguments with parents, and, at the later date, school disengagement. The factors which best accounted for the increase in mean GHQ between 1987 and 2006 were arguments with parents, school disengagement, worry about school and, for females, worry about family relationships, reflecting both increasing exposure and vulnerability to these risk factors. A number of limitations to our analysis can be identified. However, our results reinforce the conclusions of others in highlighting the role of family and educational factors as plausible explanations for increases in young people’s psychological distress. PMID:20870334

  8. Family Structure and the Timing of Transitions from 70 to 103 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Colleen L.; Troll, Lillian

    1996-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional analysis of 250 white individuals, 70-103 years of age, this article questions whether a vertical family structure is found with increasing age. Findings indicate, among other things, that at least until age 90 the proportion of individuals with a vertical family structure with four generations never exceeds the numbers of…

  9. Increase in penguin populations during the Little Ice Age in the Ross Sea, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi-Hou; Sun, Li-Guang; Xie, Zhou-Qing; Emslie, Steven D; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Penguins are an important seabird species in Antarctica and are sensitive to climate and environmental changes. Previous studies indicated that penguin populations increased when the climate became warmer and decreased when it became colder in the maritime Antarctic. Here we determined organic markers in a sediment profile collected at Cape Bird, Ross Island, high Antarctic, and reconstructed the history of Adélie penguin colonies at this location over the past 700 years. The region transformed from a seal to a penguin habitat when the Little Ice Age (LIA; 1500-1800 AD) began. Penguins then became the dominant species. Penguin populations were the highest during ca. 1490 to 1670 AD, a cold period, which is contrary to previous results in other regions much farther north. Different responses to climate change may occur at low latitudes and high latitudes in the Antarctic, even if for same species.

  10. Financial strain is associated with increased oxidative stress levels: the Women's Health and Aging Studies.

    PubMed

    Palta, Priya; Szanton, Sarah L; Semba, Richard D; Thorpe, Roland J; Varadhan, Ravi; Fried, Linda P

    2015-01-01

    Elevated oxidative stress levels may be one mechanism contributing to poor health outcomes. Financial strain and oxidative stress are each predictors of morbidity and mortality, but little research has investigated their relationship. Community-dwelling older adults (n = 728) from the Women's Health and Aging Studies I and II were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Financial strain was ascertained as an ordinal response to: "At the end of the month, do you have more than enough money left over, just enough, or not enough?" Oxidative stress was measured using serum protein carbonyl concentrations. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship between financial strain and oxidative stress. Participants who reported high financial strain exhibited 13.4% higher protein carbonyl concentrations compared to individuals who reported low financial strain (p = 0.002). High financial strain may be associated with increased oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress could mediate associations between financial strain and poor health.

  11. Axone, an ethnic probiotic containing food, reduces age of sexual maturity and increases poultry production.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhoj Raj; Singh, R K

    2014-06-01

    Axone (Akhuni) is a homemade synbiotic (Nagamese fermented soybean product) served as side dish in North Eastern India. In this study, effects of Axone feeding on growth, weight gain, sexual maturity and egg production on Vanaraja birds (a strain of poultry bird developed at PDP Hyderabad for villages and backyard poultry) were evaluated. Axone incorporation in commercial poultry feed at the rate of 5% (W/W) significantly improved growth rate (weight gain) both in male (p 0.001) and female (p 0.05) chicks, reduced age by 13 days at first egg laying (p 0.01), increased egg production (p ≤ 0.001) and improved egg weight (p ≤ 0.01). Microbiological analysis of Axone sample revealed that the major bacteria in Axone samples were Bacillus coagulans, well known for their probiotic value.

  12. Increase in density and accumulation of serotonin by human aging platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzano, D.; Aranda, E.; Rodriguez, S.; Foradori, A.; Lira, P.

    1984-07-01

    /sup 51/Cr-labeled autologous platelets were infused into splenectomized subjects and the specific radioactivities of high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet subpopulations were determined sequentially in postinfusion samples. These findings confirm previous observations in eusplenic individuals and support the hypothesis that human LD platelets are, on the average, younger than HD platelets. LD platelets contain 33.8 +/- 13.5 ng serotonin (5HT)/10(8) platelets and HD platelets 76.8 +/- 9.5 ng 5HT/10(8) platelets. Sequential measurements of 5HT in PRP platelets were performed during the recovery phase of thrombocytopenia following splenectomy in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), a condition associated with aging of platelets in circulation. Presplenectomy platelet 5HT was 17.7 ng/10(8) platelets and on days 1, 6, and 12 after surgery it increased to 18.1, 37.8, and 61.0 ng/10(8) platelets. When three healthy volunteers were given aspirin (500 mg/day) for up to 15 days, no significant change in the 5HT content of circulating platelets was observed. The observation that human HD platelets, enriched with older cells, contain more 5HT than LD platelets taken together with the parallel increase in platelet 5HT and age during the recovery from thrombocytopenia in ITP patients and the lack of effect of aspirin on platelet 5HT content, provides initial evidence that human platelets accumulate 5HT during their life-span in circulation.

  13. Features of severe asthma in school-age children: Atopy and increased exhaled nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Teague, W. Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Background Children with severe asthma have persistent symptoms despite treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). The differentiating features of severe asthma in children are poorly defined. Objective To identify features of severe versus mild-to-moderate asthma in school-age children using noninvasive assessments of lung function, atopy, and airway inflammation. Methods A total of 75 children (median age, 10 years) with asthma underwent baseline characterization including spirometry and lung volume testing, methacholine bronchoprovocation, allergy evaluation, and offline measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO). Twenty-eight were followed longitudinally over 6 months. Participants were assigned to the severe asthma subgroup if they required high-dose ICS plus 2 or more minor criteria. Results Children with severe versus mild-to-moderate asthma had more symptoms, greater airway obstruction, more gas trapping, and increased bronchial responsiveness to methacholine. Subjects with severe asthma also had higher concentrations of FENO and significantly greater sensitization to aeroallergens. With long-term study, both the reduction in FEV1 and increase in FENO persisted in the severe versus mild-to-moderate group. Furthermore, despite adjustments in ICS doses, the frequency of exacerbations was significantly higher in subjects with severe (83%) versus mild-to-moderate asthma (43%). Conclusion Severe asthma in childhood is characterized by poor symptom control despite high-dose ICS treatment and can be differentiated from mild-to-moderate asthma by measurement of lung function and FENO. Clinical implications Clinicians should suspect severe asthma in children with poor response to ICS, airway obstruction, and high FENO. PMID:17157650

  14. Interactive vs passive screen time and nighttime sleep duration among school-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Yland, Jennifer; Guan, Stanford; Emanuele, Erin; Hale, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Insufficient sleep among school-aged children is a growing concern, as numerous studies have shown that chronic short sleep duration increases the risk of poor academic performance and specific adverse health outcomes. We examined the association between weekday nighttime sleep duration and 3 types of screen exposure: television, computer use, and video gaming. Methods We used age 9 data from an ethnically diverse national birth cohort study, the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, to assess the association between screen time and sleep duration among 9-year-olds, using screen time data reported by both the child (n = 3269) and by the child's primary caregiver (n= 2770). Results Within the child-reported models, children who watched more than 2 hours of television per day had shorter sleep duration by approximately 11 minutes per night compared to those who watched less than 2 hours of television (β = −0.18; P < .001). Using the caregiver-reported models, both television and computer use were associated with reduced sleep duration. For both child- and parent-reported screen time measures, we did not find statistically significant differences in effect size across various types of screen time. Conclusions Screen time from televisions and computers is associated with reduced sleep duration among 9-year-olds, using 2 sources of estimates of screen time exposure (child and parent reports). No specific type or use of screen time resulted in significantly shorter sleep duration than another, suggesting that caution should be advised against excessive use of all screens. PMID:27540566

  15. Associations between Menarcheal Timing and Behavioral Developmental Trajectories for Girls from Age 6 to Age 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRose, Laura M.; Shiyko, Mariya P.; Foster, Holly; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Substantial evidence from cross-sectional and short time-span longitudinal studies exists about negative associations between early pubertal maturation on a number of psychological outcomes. The objective of the present study was to assess the association between early maturation and developmental trajectories of social skills and internalizing…

  16. Prolonged clot lysis time increases the risk of a first but not recurrent venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Karasu, Alev; Baglin, Trevor P; Luddington, Roger; Baglin, Caroline A; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid

    2016-03-01

    The role of the fibrinolytic system in the development of venous thrombosis (VT) is unclear. We studied the risk of first and recurrent VT associated with reduced fibrinolysis, as measured by clot lysis time (CLT). We also studied the relationship between CLT and thrombin generation to determine if any relationship between CLT and VT was affected by thrombin generation. Analyses were performed in the Thrombophilia Hypercoagulability Environmental risk for Venous Thromboembolism Study, a two-centre population-based case-control study, including 579 patients and 338 controls, with patients followed from the event to determine incidence of recurrent VT. Hypofibrinolysis was associated with a 1·8-fold increased risk of a first VT [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·2-2·7]. Adjustment for sex, age, study location and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) did not change the result. The risk of VT was 2·9-fold increased when the 90th percentiles of prolonged CLT and high ETP were combined, with the highest risk for unprovoked first events (Odds Ratio = 4·2, 95% CI 1·3-13·5). In the follow-up study the Hazard Ratio for a recurrent VT associated with hypofibrinolysis was 1·5 (95% CI 0·9-2·6). A weak dose response effect was observed in relation to prolongation of CLT and recurrent VT. Although hypofibrinolysis constitutes a risk factor for a first VT, an association with recurrence is, at best, weak.

  17. Age-dependent increase in the expression of antioxidant-like protein-1 in the gerbil hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-A; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Jong-Dai; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Choong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant-like protein-1 (AOP-1) reduces the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species. In the present study, the age-related change in AOP-1 expression in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged gerbils was compared using western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that the protein expression of AOP-1 was gradually and significantly increased in the hippocampus during the normal aging process. In addition, the age-dependent increase in AOP-1 immunoreactivity was also observed in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus proper; however, in the dentate gyrus, AOP-1 immunoreactivity was not altered during the normal aging process. These results indicated that the expression of AOP-1 is significantly increased in the hippocampus proper, but not in the dentate gyrus, during the normal aging process. PMID:27511601

  18. Non-linear increase of vitamin D content in eggs from chicks treated with increasing exposure times of ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Julia; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Hirche, Frank; Baur, Anja C; Mielenz, Norbert; Stangl, Gabriele I

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin D fortified food can help to reduce the prevalence for vitamin D deficiency. Previous data provided evidence that eggs from hens exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light contain large quantities of vitamin D. In the current study, we assessed the efficacy of vitamin D enrichment in eggs upon increasing daily UVB exposure times. We further addressed the question whether extended UVB irradiation affects the skin content of 7-dehydrocholesterol. To this end, 35 hens were assigned to 7 groups of 5 animals each and were exposed to UVB light (76μW/cm(2)) for 0, 15, 30, 60, 120, 180 and 300min per day, respectively. Eggs from the treatment groups were collected at baseline and after 2, 3 and 4 weeks of treatment, respectively. Skin samples were gained at the end of 4 weeks. Vitamin D metabolites were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The contents of vitamin D3 and 25(OH)D3 in egg yolk raised non-linear in response to increasing daily UVB exposure times. The vitamin D3 content did not reach a clear-cut plateau within the chosen UVB treatment times. A daily UVB exposure time of 300min resulted in vitamin D3 contents of 28.6μg/100g egg yolk dry matter. In contrast to vitamin D3, the 25(OH)D3 content in the egg yolk achieved a maximum upon an UVB irradiation time of 60min/d. The cutaneous 7-dehydrocholesterol contents were not altered in response to the chosen UVB irradiation times. In conclusion, the data show a distinct non-linear dose-response relationship of UVB exposure times on the total vitamin D content in eggs. This article is part of a special issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  19. Effect of Blade Tenderization, Aging Time, and Aging Temperature on Tenderness of Beef Longissimus Lumborum and Gluteus Medius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purveyors are concerned about the food safety risk of non-intact meat products and are seeking strategies to ensure adequate meat tenderness without blade tenderization. This study was conducted to determine the effects of blade tenderization and time and temperature of aging on beef longissimus lu...

  20. Deposition times in the northeastern United States during the Holocene: establishing valid priors for Bayesian age models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goring, S.; Williams, J. W.; Blois, J. L.; Jackson, S. T.; Paciorek, C. J.; Booth, R. K.; Marlon, J. R.; Blaauw, M.; Christen, J. A.

    2012-08-01

    Age-depth relationships in sedimentary archives such as lakes, wetlands and bogs are non-linear with irregular probability distributions associated with calibrated radiocarbon dates. Bayesian approaches are thus well-suited to understanding relationships between age and depth for use in paleoecological studies. Bayesian models for the accumulation of sediment and organic matter within basins combine dated material from one or more records with prior information about the behavior of deposition times (yr/cm) based on expert knowledge. Well-informed priors are essential to good modeling of the age-depth relationship, but are particularly important in cases where data may be sparse (e.g., few radiocarbon dates), or unclear (e.g., age-reversals, coincident dates, age offsets, outliers and dates within a radiocarbon plateau). Here we assessed Holocene deposition times using 204 age-depth models obtained from the Neotoma Paleoecology Database (www.neotomadb.org) for both lacustrine and palustrine environments across the northeastern United States. These age-depth models were augmented using biostratigraphic events identifiable within pollen records from the northeastern United States during the Holocene and late-Pleistocene. Deposition times are significantly related to depositional environment (palustrine and lacustrine), sediment age, and sediment depth. Spatial variables had non-significant relationships with deposition time when site effects were considered. The best-fit model was a generalized additive mixed model that relates deposition time to age, stratified by depositional environment with site as a random factor. The best-fit model accounts for 63.3% of the total deviance in deposition times. The strongly increasing accumulation rates of the last 500-1000 years indicate that gamma distributions describing lacustrine deposition times (α = 1.08, β = 18.28) and palustrine deposition times (α = 1.23, β = 22.32) for the entire Holocene may be insufficient for

  1. Quality Saving Mechanisms of Mitochondria during Aging in a Fully Time-Dependent Computational Biophysical Model

    PubMed Central

    Mellem, Daniel; Fischer, Frank; Jaspers, Sören; Wenck, Horst; Rübhausen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for the energy production of eukaryotic cells. During aging mitochondria run through various processes which change their quality in terms of activity, health and metabolic supply. In recent years, many of these processes such as fission and fusion of mitochondria, mitophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy consumption have been subject of research. Based on numerous experimental insights, it was possible to qualify mitochondrial behaviour in computational simulations. Here, we present a new biophysical model based on the approach of Figge et al. in 2012. We introduce exponential decay and growth laws for each mitochondrial process to derive its time-dependent probability during the aging of cells. All mitochondrial processes of the original model are mathematically and biophysically redefined and additional processes are implemented: Mitochondrial fission and fusion is separated into a metabolic outer-membrane part and a protein-related inner-membrane part, a quality-dependent threshold for mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis is introduced and processes for activity-dependent internal oxidative stress as well as mitochondrial repair mechanisms are newly included. Our findings reveal a decrease of mitochondrial quality and a fragmentation of the mitochondrial network during aging. Additionally, the model discloses a quality increasing mechanism due to the interplay of the mitophagy and biogenesis cycle and the fission and fusion cycle of mitochondria. It is revealed that decreased mitochondrial repair can be a quality saving process in aged cells. Furthermore, the model finds strategies to sustain the quality of the mitochondrial network in cells with high production rates of reactive oxygen species due to large energy demands. Hence, the model adds new insights to biophysical mechanisms of mitochondrial aging and provides novel understandings of the interdependency of mitochondrial processes. PMID:26771181

  2. Increased Aβ pathology in aged Tg2576 mice born to mothers fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Nizari, Shereen; Carare, Roxana O; Hawkes, Cheryl A

    2016-02-25

    Maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of developing diabetes, obesity and premature death in adult offspring. Mid-life diabetes, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia are risk factors for the development of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). A key pathogenic feature of AD is the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high fat diet feeding during early life on Aβ pathology in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. Female mice were fed a standard (C) or high fat (HF) diet before mating and during gestation and lactation. At weaning, male offspring were fed a C diet. Significantly higher levels of guanidine-soluble Aβ and plaque loads were observed in the hippocampi of 11-month old Tg2576 mice born to mothers fed a HF diet. Changes in the extracellular matrix led to increased retention of Aβ within the parenchyma. These data support a role for maternal and gestational health on the health of the aged brain and pathologies associated with AD and may provide a novel target for both the prevention and treatment of AD.

  3. Interventions to Increase Physical Activity in Children Aged 2-5 Years: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiying; Robbins, Lorraine B; Wen, Fujun; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of prior interventions designed to increase preschoolers' physical activity is lacking. This systematic review aimed to examine the effect of interventions on objectively measured physical activity in children aged 2-5 years. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. In May 2014, we searched PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, SPORTDiscus, Cochrane, and Embase. Two reviewers independently identified and appraised the studies. Twenty-four articles describing 23 independent studies and 20 unique interventions met inclusion criteria. Of the 8 interventions resulting in a significant effect in objectively measured physical activity, all were center-based and included a structured physical activity component, 6 included multiple components, 5 integrated theories or models, and 4 actively involved parents. Seven of the 8 were randomized controlled trials. Due to the heterogeneity of the study designs, physical activity measures, and interventions, drawing definitive conclusions was difficult. Although the overall intervention effect was less than optimal, the review indicated that theory-driven, multicomponent interventions including a structured physical activity component and targeting both parents and their children may be a promising approach for increasing preschoolers' physical activity and warrant continued investigation using rigorous designs to identify those that are most effective.

  4. Increased Aβ pathology in aged Tg2576 mice born to mothers fed a high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Nizari, Shereen; Carare, Roxana O.; Hawkes, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of developing diabetes, obesity and premature death in adult offspring. Mid-life diabetes, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia are risk factors for the development of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A key pathogenic feature of AD is the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high fat diet feeding during early life on Aβ pathology in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. Female mice were fed a standard (C) or high fat (HF) diet before mating and during gestation and lactation. At weaning, male offspring were fed a C diet. Significantly higher levels of guanidine-soluble Aβ and plaque loads were observed in the hippocampi of 11-month old Tg2576 mice born to mothers fed a HF diet. Changes in the extracellular matrix led to increased retention of Aβ within the parenchyma. These data support a role for maternal and gestational health on the health of the aged brain and pathologies associated with AD and may provide a novel target for both the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:26911528

  5. Age-Related Changes to Speech Breathing with Increased Vocal Loudness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jessica E.; Spruill, John, III

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The present study examines the effect of normal aging on respiratory support for speech when utterance length is controlled. Method: Fifteen women (M = 71 years of age) and 10 men (M = 73 years of age) produced 2 sentences of different lengths in 4 loudness conditions while respiratory kinematics were measured. Measures included those…

  6. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging) of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Clark, Michelle W; Yie, Anna M; Eder, Elizabeth K; Dennis, Richard G; Basting, Preston J; Martinez, Keith A; Jones, Brian D; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2015-01-01

    Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH), no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5) the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2-7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress.

  7. Effect of ageing time on mechanical properties of plasticized poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, Giuseppe; Cinelli, Patrizia; Anguillesi, Irene; Salvadori, Sara; Coltelli, Maria-Beatrice; Lazzeri, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) based materials were prepared by melt extrusion by using different plasticizers, such as poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEG)s having different molecular weight (400, 1500 and 4000). The plasticizers content was varied in the range 10-20% by weight versus the PHB polymeric matrix. The variation of tensile properties of the different samples was monitored as a function of time of ageing to study the stability of the material. The elastic modulus and tensile strength increased as a function of time, whereas the strain at break decreased. The experimental results were explained by considering both the demixing of the plasticizers and the occurring of secondary crystallization. Moreover the variation in mechanical properties was correlated to the structure and concentration of the different plasticizers employed.

  8. Effect of sol aging time on the anti-reflective properties of silica coatings templated with phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wen; Li, Haibin; Chen, Xiaojing; Chang, Chengkang

    Silica anti-reflective coatings have been prepared by a sol-gel dip-coating process using the sol containing phosphoric acid as a pore-forming template. The effect of the aging time of the sol on the anti-reflective properties has been investigated. The surface topography of the silica AR coatings has been characterized. With increasing sol aging time, more over-sized pores larger than 100 nm are formed in the silica coatings. These could act as scattering centers, scattering visible light and thereby lowering transmittance. The optimal aging time was identified as 1 day, and the corresponding silica coatings showed a maximum transmittance of 99.2%, representing an 8% increase compared to the bare glass substrate.

  9. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of middle-aged vs. aged vastus lateralis reveals increased levels of carbonic anhydrase isoform 3 in senescent human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Staunton, Lisa; Zweyer, Margit; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-10-01

    The age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and associated progressive decline in contractile strength is a serious pathophysiological issue in the elderly. In order to investigate global changes in the skeletal muscle proteome after the fifth decade of life, this study analysed total extracts from human vastus lateralis muscle by fluorescence difference in-gel electrophoresis. Tissue specimens were derived from middle-aged (47-62 years) vs. aged (76-82 years) individuals and potential changes in the protein expression profiles were compared between these two age groups by a comprehensive gel electrophoresis-based survey. Age-dependent alterations in the concentration of 19 protein spots were revealed and mass spectrometry identified these components as being involved in the excitation-contraction-relaxation cycle, muscle metabolism, ion handling and the cellular stress response. This indicates a generally perturbed protein expression pattern in senescent human muscle. Increased levels of mitochondrial enzymes and isoform switching of the key contractile protein, actin, support the idea of glycolytic-to-oxidative and fast-to-slow transition processes during muscle aging. Importantly, the carbonic anhydrase (CA)3 isoform displayed an increased abundance during muscle aging, which was independently verified by immunoblotting of differently aged human skeletal muscle samples. Since the CA3 isoform is relatively muscle-specific and exhibits a fibre type-specific expression pattern, this enzyme may represent an interesting new biomarker of sarcopenia. Increased levels of CA are indicative of an increased demand of CO₂-removal in senescent muscle, and also suggest age-related fibre type shifting to slower-contracting muscles during human aging.

  10. Physical Activity, Sedentary Time and Physical Capability in Early Old Age: British Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Andrew J. M.; Simmons, Rebecca K.; Kuh, Diana; Brage, Soren; Cooper, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the associations of time spent sedentary, in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) with physical capability measures at age 60-64 years. Methods Time spent sedentary and in MVPA and, PAEE were assessed using individually calibrated combined heart rate and movement sensing among 1727 participants from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development in England, Scotland and Wales as part of a detailed clinical assessment undertaken in 2006-2010. Multivariable linear regression models were used to examine the cross-sectional associations between standardised measures of each of these behavioural variables with grip strength, chair rise and timed up-&-go (TUG) speed and standing balance time. Results Greater time spent in MVPA was associated with higher levels of physical capability; adjusted mean differences in each capability measure per 1standard deviation increase in MVPA time were: grip strength (0.477 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.015 to 0.939), chair rise speed (0.429 stands/min, 95% CI: 0.093 to 0.764), standing balance time (0.028 s, 95% CI: 0.003 to 0.053) and TUG speed (0.019 m/s, 95% CI: 0.011 to 0.026). In contrast, time spent sedentary was associated with lower grip strength (-0.540 kg, 95% CI: -1.013 to -0.066) and TUG speed (-0.011 m/s, 95% CI: -0.019 to -0.004). Associations for PAEE were similar to those for MVPA. Conclusion Higher levels of MVPA and overall physical activity (PAEE) are associated with greater levels of physical capability whereas time spent sedentary is associated with lower levels of capability. Future intervention studies in older adults should focus on both the promotion of physical activity and reduction in time spent sedentary. PMID:25961736

  11. Increases in Perspective Embedding Increase Reading Time Even with Typical Text Presentation: Implications for the Reading of Literature.

    PubMed

    Whalen, D H; Zunshine, Lisa; Holquist, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Reading fiction is a major component of intellectual life, yet it has proven difficult to study experimentally. One aspect of literature that has recently come to light is perspective embedding ("she thought I left" embedding her perspective on "I left"), which seems to be a defining feature of fiction. Previous work (Whalen et al., 2012) has shown that increasing levels of embedment affects the time that it takes readers to read and understand short vignettes in a moving window paradigm. With increasing levels of embedment from 1 to 5, reading times in a moving window paradigm rose almost linearly. However, level 0 was as slow as 3-4. Accuracy on probe questions was relatively constant until dropping at the fifth level. Here, we assessed this effect in a more ecologically valid ("typical") reading paradigm, in which the entire vignette was visible at once, either for as long as desired (Experiment 1) or a fixed time (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, reading times followed a pattern similar to that of the previous experiment, with some differences in absolute speed. Accuracy matched previous results: fairly consistent accuracy until a decline at level 5, indicating that both presentation methods allowed understanding. In Experiment 2, accuracy was somewhat reduced, perhaps because participants were less successful at allocating their attention than they were during the earlier experiment; however, the pattern was the same. It seems that literature does not, on average, use easiest reading level but rather uses a middle ground that challenges the reader, but not too much.

  12. Increase in Trx2/Prx3 redox system immunoreactivity in the spinal cord and hippocampus of aged dogs.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Choi, Jung Hoon; Song, Ju Min; Lee, Choong Hyun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Jin Sang; Shin, Hyung-Cheul; Won, Moo-Ho

    2011-11-01

    We previously reported that no distinct neuronal loss occurred in the aged dog spinal cord, although oxidative stress was increased in the aged dog spinal cord. Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2)/peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) redox system is a major route for removing H(2)O(2) in the central nervous system. In the present study, we compared the distribution and immunoreactivity of thioredoxin reductase 2 (TrxR2), Trx2 and Prx3 and their protein levels in the spinal cord and hippocampus between the adult (2-3 years) and aged (10-12 years) dogs. The number of TrxR2-immunoreactive neurons was slightly increased; however, its immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the aged spinal cord compared to that in the adult spinal cord. On the other hand, the number and immunoreactivity of both Trx2- and Prx3-immunoreactive neurons were significantly increased in the spinal cord of the aged dog. Similarly, in the hippocampus of the aged dog, TrxR2, Trx2 and Prx3 immunoreactivity and protein levels were markedly increased compared to those in the adult dog. These results indicate that the increases of TrxR2, Trx2 and Prx3 immunoreactivity and their protein levels in the aged spinal cord and hippocampus may contribute to reducing neuronal damage against oxidative stresses during normal aging.

  13. Real time studies of Elastic Moduli Pu Aging using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, Boris

    Elastic moduli are fundamental thermodynamic susceptibilities that connect directly to thermodynamics, electronic structure and give important information about mechanical properties. To determine the time evolution of the elastic properties in 239Pu and it Ga alloys, is imperative to study its phase stability and self-irradiation damage process. The most-likely sources of these changes include a) ingrowth of radioactive decay products like He and U, b) the introduction of radiation damage, c) δ-phase instabilities towards α-Pu or to Pu3Ga. The measurement of mechanical resonance frequencies can be made with extreme precision and used to compute the elastic moduli without corrections giving important insight in this problem. Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, we measured the time dependence of the mechanical resonance frequencies of fine-grained polycrystalline δ-phase 239Pu, from 300K up to 480K. At room temperature, the shear modulus shows an increase in time (stiffening), but the bulk modulus decreases (softening). These are the first real-time measurements of room temperature aging of the elastic moduli, and the changes are consistent with elastic moduli measurements performed on 44 year old δ-Pu. As the temperature is increased, the rate of change increases exponentially, with both moduli becoming stiffer with time. For T>420K an abrupt change in the time dependence is observed indicating that the bulk and shear moduli have opposite rates of change. Our measurements provide a basis for ruling out the decomposition of δ-Pu towards α-Pu or Pu3Ga, and indicate a complex defect-related scenario from which we are gathering important clues.

  14. Age, time period, and birth cohort differences in self-esteem: Reexamining a cohort-sequential longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Twenge, Jean M; Carter, Nathan T; Campbell, W Keith

    2016-12-08

    Orth, Trzesniewski, and Robins (2010) concluded that the nationally representative Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) cohort-sequential study demonstrated moderate to large age differences in self-esteem, and no birth cohort (generational) differences in the age trajectory. In a reanalysis of these data using 2 different statistical techniques, we find significant increases in self-esteem that could be attributed to birth cohort or time period. First, hierarchical linear modeling analyses with birth cohort as a continuous variable (vs. the multiple group formulation used by Orth et al.) find that birth cohort has a measurable influence on self-esteem through its interaction with age. Participants born in later years (e.g., 1960) were higher in self-esteem and were more likely to increase in self-esteem as they aged than participants born in earlier years (e.g., 1920). However, the estimated age trajectory up to age 60 is similar in Orth et al.'s results and in the results from our analyses including cohort. Second, comparing ACL respondents of the same age in 1986 versus 2002 (a time-lag design) yields significant birth cohort differences in self-esteem, with 2002 participants of the same age higher in self-esteem than those in 1986. Combined with some previous studies finding significant increases in self-esteem and positive self-views over time, these results suggest that cultural change in the form of cohort and time period cannot be ignored as influences in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Simulation of Water Age and Residence Time in the New York Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. G.; Wilkin, J. L.; Schofield, O. M.

    2008-12-01

    Aiming at investigating the time scale of transporting biogeochemical tracers in the New York Bight (NYB), this work looks into the time scale associated with freshwater propagation in NYB. The Constituent-oriented Age and Residence-time Theory is applied in Regional Ocean Modeling System and then verified. Three-year mean age and two-year mean residence time simulations are carried out. Comparison between snapshots of modeled surface freshwater mean age and satellite measured channel ratio, an empirical proxy of age, shows agreement on the general patterns. Least square fit gives the first order estimation of the relationship between channel ratio and mean age. Time series show temporal and spatial variation in mean age, and seasonal averages demonstrate seasonality of surface mean age consistent with surface circulation. Correlation between surface mean age and wind shows major effects wind in different directions has on mean age. Time series of the mean residence time exhibits strong temporal fluctuation in the scale of days, and seasonal averages show seasonality in surface mean residence time, too. The surprising high value of mean residence time along the Long Island coast in spring and summer is caused by the reentry of previously exited water from the eastern boundary after wind changes direction. Correlation between mean residence time and wind shows major effects wind has on the time freshwater and tracers spend in the New York apex area. Results obtained here are very useful for coastal management and studies of local biogeochemical processes and larval dispersal given the ecological and economical importance of the New York Bay.

  16. Investigation of telomere lengths measurement by quantitative real-time PCR to predict age.

    PubMed

    Hewakapuge, Sudinna; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Lewandowski, Paul; Baindur-Hudson, Swati

    2008-09-01

    Currently DNA profiling methods only compare a suspect's DNA with DNA left at the crime scene. When there is no suspect, it would be useful for the police to be able to predict what the person of interest looks like by analysing the DNA left behind in a crime scene. Determination of the age of the suspect is an important factor in creating an identikit. Human somatic cells gradually lose telomeric repeats with age. This study investigated if one could use a correlation between telomere length and age, to predict the age of an individual from their DNA. Telomere length, in buccal cells, of 167 individuals aged between 1 and 96 years old was measured using real-time quantitative PCR. Telomere length decreased with age (r=-0.185, P<0.05) and the age of an individual could be roughly determined by the following formula: (age=relative telomere length -1.5/-0.005). The regression (R(2)) value between telomere length and age was approximately 0.04, which is too low to be use for forensics. The causes for the presence of large variation in telomere lengths in the population were further investigated. The age prediction accuracies were low even after dividing samples into non-related Caucasians, males and females (5%, 9% and 1%, respectively). Mean telomere lengths of eight age groups representing each decade of life showed non-linear decrease in telomere length with age. There were variations in telomere lengths even among similarly aged individuals aged 26 years old (n=10) and age 54 years old (n=9). Therefore, telomere length measurement by real-time quantitative PCR cannot be used to predict age of a person, due to the presence of large inter-individual variations in telomere lengths.

  17. Rapid increases and time-lagged declines in amphibian occupancy after wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hossack, Blake R.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and severity of drought and wildfire. Aquatic and moisture-sensitive species, such as amphibians, may be particularly vulnerable to these modified disturbance regimes because large wildfires often occur during extended droughts and thus may compound environmental threats. However, understanding of the effects of wildfires on amphibians in forests with long fire-return intervals is limited. Numerous stand-replacing wildfires have occurred since 1988 in Glacier National Park (Montana, U.S.A.), where we have conducted long-term monitoring of amphibians. We measured responses of 3 amphibian species to fires of different sizes, severity, and age in a small geographic area with uniform management. We used data from wetlands associated with 6 wildfires that burned between 1988 and 2003 to evaluate whether burn extent and severity and interactions between wildfire and wetland isolation affected the distribution of breeding populations. We measured responses with models that accounted for imperfect detection to estimate occupancy during prefire (0-4 years) and different postfire recovery periods. For the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), occupancy was not affected for 6 years after wildfire. But 7-21 years after wildfire, occupancy for both species decreased ≥ 25% in areas where >50% of the forest within 500 m of wetlands burned. In contrast, occupancy of the boreal toad (Anaxyrus boreas) tripled in the 3 years after low-elevation forests burned. This increase in occupancy was followed by a gradual decline. Our results show that accounting for magnitude of change and time lags is critical to understanding population dynamics of amphibians after large disturbances. Our results also inform understanding of the potential threat of increases in wildfire frequency or severity to amphibians in the region.

  18. Rapid increases and time-lagged declines in amphibian occupancy after wildfire.

    PubMed

    Hossack, Blake R; Lowe, Winsor H; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2013-02-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and severity of drought and wildfire. Aquatic and moisture-sensitive species, such as amphibians, may be particularly vulnerable to these modified disturbance regimes because large wildfires often occur during extended droughts and thus may compound environmental threats. However, understanding of the effects of wildfires on amphibians in forests with long fire-return intervals is limited. Numerous stand-replacing wildfires have occurred since 1988 in Glacier National Park (Montana, U.S.A.), where we have conducted long-term monitoring of amphibians. We measured responses of 3 amphibian species to fires of different sizes, severity, and age in a small geographic area with uniform management. We used data from wetlands associated with 6 wildfires that burned between 1988 and 2003 to evaluate whether burn extent and severity and interactions between wildfire and wetland isolation affected the distribution of breeding populations. We measured responses with models that accounted for imperfect detection to estimate occupancy during prefire (0-4 years) and different postfire recovery periods. For the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), occupancy was not affected for 6 years after wildfire. But 7-21 years after wildfire, occupancy for both species decreased ≥ 25% in areas where >50% of the forest within 500 m of wetlands burned. In contrast, occupancy of the boreal toad (Anaxyrus boreas) tripled in the 3 years after low-elevation forests burned. This increase in occupancy was followed by a gradual decline. Our results show that accounting for magnitude of change and time lags is critical to understanding population dynamics of amphibians after large disturbances. Our results also inform understanding of the potential threat of increases in wildfire frequency or severity to amphibians in the region.

  19. DNA methylation-based measures of biological age: meta-analysis predicting time to death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian H; Marioni, Riccardo E; Colicino, Elena; Peters, Marjolein J; Ward-Caviness, Cavin K; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Roetker, Nicholas S; Just, Allan C; Demerath, Ellen W; Guan, Weihua; Bressler, Jan; Fornage, Myriam; Studenski, Stephanie; Vandiver, Amy R; Moore, Ann Zenobia; Tanaka, Toshiko; Kiel, Douglas P; Liang, Liming; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Murabito, Joanne M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Hernandez, Dena G; Melzer, David; Nalls, Michael; Pilling, Luke C; Price, Timothy R; Singleton, Andrew B; Gieger, Christian; Holle, Rolf; Kretschmer, Anja; Kronenberg, Florian; Kunze, Sonja; Linseisen, Jakob; Meisinger, Christine; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Waldenberger, Melanie; Visscher, Peter M; Shah, Sonia; Wray, Naomi R; McRae, Allan F; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles; Levine, Morgan E; Lu, Ake T; Tsao, Philip S; Hou, Lifang; Manson, JoAnn E; Carty, Cara L; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Reiner, Alexander P; Spector, Tim D; Feinberg, Andrew P; Levy, Daniel; Baccarelli, Andrea; van Meurs, Joyce; Bell, Jordana T; Peters, Annette; Deary, Ian J; Pankow, James S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Horvath, Steve

    2016-09-28

    Estimates of biological age based on DNA methylation patterns, often referred to as "epigenetic age", "DNAm age", have been shown to be robust biomarkers of age in humans. We previously demonstrated that independent of chronological age, epigenetic age assessed in blood predicted all-cause mortality in four human cohorts. Here, we expanded our original observation to 13 different cohorts for a total sample size of 13,089 individuals, including three racial/ethnic groups. In addition, we examined whether incorporating information on blood cell composition into the epigenetic age metrics improves their predictive power for mortality. All considered measures of epigenetic age acceleration were predictive of mortality (p≤8.2x10(-9)), independent of chronological age, even after adjusting for additional risk factors (p<5.4x10(-4)), and within the racial/ethnic groups that we examined (non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, African Americans). Epigenetic age estimates that incorporated information on blood cell composition led to the smallest p-values for time to death (p=7.5x10(-43)). Overall, this study a) strengthens the evidence that epigenetic age predicts all-cause mortality above and beyond chronological age and traditional risk factors, and b) demonstrates that epigenetic age estimates that incorporate information on blood cell counts lead to highly significant associations with all-cause mortality.

  20. Initiation of calorie restriction in middle-aged male rats attenuates aging-related motoric decline and bradykinesia without increased striatal dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Michael F.; Terrebonne, Jennifer; Fields, Victoria; Nodurft, Danielle; Runfalo, Cori; Latimer, Brian; Ingram, Donald K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related bradykinesia affects ~15% of those reaching age 65 and 50% of those reaching their 80s. Given this high risk and lack of pharmacological therapeutics, non-invasive lifestyle strategies should be identified to diminish its risk and identify the neurobiological targets to reduce aging-related bradykinesia. Early-life, long-term calorie restriction (CR) attenuates aging-related bradykinesia in rodents. Here, we addressed whether CR initiation at middle age could attenuate aging-related bradykinesia and motoric decline measured as rotarod performance. A 30% CR regimen was implemented for 6 months duration in 12-month old male Brown-Norway Fischer 344 F1 hybrid rats after establishing individual baseline locomotor activities. Locomotor capacity was assessed every 6 weeks thereafter. The ad libitum (AL) group exhibited predictably decreased locomotor activity, except movement speed, out to 18 months of age. In contrast, in the CR group, movement number and horizontal activity did not decrease during the 6-month trial and aging-related decline in rotarod performance was attenuated. The response to CR was influenced by baseline locomotor activity. The lower the locomotor activity level at baseline, the greater the response to CR. Rats in the lower 50th percentile surpassed their baseline level of activity, whereas rats in the top 50th percentile decreased at 6 weeks and then returned to baseline by 12 weeks of CR. We hypothesized that nigrostriatal dopamine tissue content would be greater in the CR group and observed a modest increase only in substantia nigra with no group differences in striatum, nucleus accumbens, or ventral tegmental area. These results indicate initiation of CR at middle age may reduce aging-related bradykinesia and, furthermore, subjects with below average locomotor activity may increase baseline activity. Sustaining nigral DA neurotransmission may be one component of preserving locomotor capabilities during aging. PMID:26610387

  1. The Load and Time Dependence of Chemical Bonding-Induced Frictional Ageing of Silica at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, K.; Gosvami, N. N.; Goldsby, D. L.; Carpick, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are empirical relationships that describe the frictional behavior of rocks and other materials in experiments, and reproduce a variety of observed natural behavior when employed in earthquake models. A pervasive observation from rock friction experiments is the linear increase of static friction with the log of contact time, or 'ageing'. Ageing is usually attributed to an increase in real area of contact associated with asperity creep. However, recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrate that ageing of nanoscale silica-silica contacts is due to progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds in the absence of plastic deformation, in a manner consistent with the multi-contact ageing behavior of rocks [Li et al., 2011]. To further investigate chemical bonding-induced ageing, we explored the influence of normal load (and thus contact normal stress) and contact time on ageing. Experiments that mimic slide-hold-slide rock friction experiments were conducted in the AFM for contact loads and hold times ranging from 23 to 393 nN and 0.1 to 100 s, respectively, all in humid air (~50% RH) at room temperature. Experiments were conducted by sequentially sliding the AFM tip on the sample at a velocity V of 0.5 μm/s, setting V to zero and holding the tip stationary for a given time, and finally resuming sliding at 0.5 μm/s to yield a peak value of friction followed by a drop to the sliding friction value. Chemical bonding-induced ageing, as measured by the peak friction minus the sliding friction, increases approximately linearly with the product of normal load and the log of the hold time. Theoretical studies of the roles of reaction energy barriers in nanoscale ageing indicate that frictional ageing depends on the total number of reaction sites and the hold time [Liu & Szlufarska, 2012]. We combine chemical kinetics analyses with contact mechanics models to explain our results, and develop a new approach for curve

  2. Diminished acute phase response and increased hepatic inflammation of aged rats in response to intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Christian R; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Pérez, Claudio; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Riquelme, Denise M; Ordenes, Gamaliel; Oshima, Kiyoko; Aravena, Mauricio; Pérez, Viviana I; Nishimura, Sumiyo; Sabaj, Valeria; Walter, Robin; Sierra, Felipe

    2008-12-01

    Aging is associated with a deterioration of the acute phase response to inflammatory challenges. However, the nature of these defects remains poorly defined. We analyzed the hepatic inflammatory response after intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) given to Fisher 344 rats aged 6, 15, and 22-23 months. Induction of the acute phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, and T-kininogen was reduced and/or retarded with aging. Initial induction of interleukin-6 in aged rats was normal, but the later response was increased relative to younger counterparts. An exacerbated hepatic injury was observed in aged rats receiving LPS, as evidenced by the presence of multiple microabscesses in portal tracts, confluent necrosis, higher neutrophil accumulation, and elevated serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, relative to younger animals. Our results suggest that aged rats displayed a reduced expression of APPs and increased hepatic injury in response to the inflammatory insult.

  3. Labor force participation and human capital increases in an aging population and implications for U.S. research investment.

    PubMed

    Manton, Kenneth G; Lowrimore, Gene R; Ullian, Arthur D; Gu, Xiliang; Tolley, H Dennis

    2007-06-26

    The proportion of the United States labor force >/=65 years of age is projected to increase between 2004 and 2014 by the passing of age 65 of the large post-World War II baby boom cohorts starting in 2010 and their greater longevity, income, education, and health [Toossi M (2005) Mon Labor Rev 128(11):25-44]. The aging of the U.S. labor force will continue to at least 2034, when the largest of the baby boom cohorts reaches age 70. Thus, the average health and functional capacity of persons age 65+ must improve for sufficient numbers of elderly persons to be physically and cognitively capable of work. This will require greater investments in research, public health, and health care. We examine how disability declines and improved health may increase human capital at later ages and stimulate the growth of gross domestic product and national wealth.

  4. Labor force participation and human capital increases in an aging population and implications for U.S. research investment

    PubMed Central

    Manton, Kenneth G.; Lowrimore, Gene R.; Ullian, Arthur D.; Gu, XiLiang; Tolley, H. Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The proportion of the United States labor force ≥65 years of age is projected to increase between 2004 and 2014 by the passing of age 65 of the large post-World War II baby boom cohorts starting in 2010 and their greater longevity, income, education, and health [Toossi M (2005) Mon Labor Rev 128(11):25–44]. The aging of the U.S. labor force will continue to at least 2034, when the largest of the baby boom cohorts reaches age 70. Thus, the average health and functional capacity of persons age 65+ must improve for sufficient numbers of elderly persons to be physically and cognitively capable of work. This will require greater investments in research, public health, and health care. We examine how disability declines and improved health may increase human capital at later ages and stimulate the growth of gross domestic product and national wealth. PMID:17573526

  5. Increased reservoir ages and poorly ventilated deep waters inferred in the glacial Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Maria; Skinner, Luke; Calvo, Eva; Pelejero, Carles; Cacho, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Consistent evidence for a poorly ventilated deep Pacific Ocean that could have released its radiocarbon-depleted carbon stock to the atmosphere during the last deglaciation has long been sought. Such evidence remains lacking, in part due to a paucity of surface reservoir age reconstructions required for accurate deep-ocean ventilation age estimates. Here we combine new radiocarbon data from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) with chronostratigraphic calendar age constraints to estimate shallow sub-surface reservoir age variability, and thus provide estimates of deep-ocean ventilation ages. Both shallow- and deep-water ventilation ages drop across the last deglaciation, consistent with similar reconstructions from the South Pacific and Southern Ocean. The observed regional fingerprint linking the Southern Ocean and the EEP is consistent with a dominant southern source for EEP thermocline waters and suggests relatively invariant ocean interior transport pathways but significantly reduced air–sea gas exchange in the glacial southern high latitudes. PMID:26137976

  6. INCREASING SAVING BEHAVIOR THROUGH AGE-PROGRESSED RENDERINGS OF THE FUTURE SELF

    PubMed Central

    HERSHFIELD, HAL E.; GOLDSTEIN, DANIEL G.; SHARPE, WILLIAM F.; FOX, JESSE; YEYKELIS, LEO; CARSTENSEN, LAURA L.; BAILENSON, JEREMY N.

    2014-01-01

    Many people fail to save what they need to for retirement (Munnell, Webb, and Golub-Sass 2009). Research on excessive discounting of the future suggests that removing the lure of immediate rewards by pre-committing to decisions, or elaborating the value of future rewards can both make decisions more future-oriented. In this article, we explore a third and complementary route, one that deals not with present and future rewards, but with present and future selves. In line with thinkers who have suggested that people may fail, through a lack of belief or imagination, to identify with their future selves (Parfit 1971; Schelling 1984), we propose that allowing people to interact with age-progressed renderings of themselves will cause them to allocate more resources toward the future. In four studies, participants interacted with realistic computer renderings of their future selves using immersive virtual reality hardware and interactive decision aids. In all cases, those who interacted with virtual future selves exhibited an increased tendency to accept later monetary rewards over immediate ones. PMID:24634544

  7. INCREASING SAVING BEHAVIOR THROUGH AGE-PROGRESSED RENDERINGS OF THE FUTURE SELF.

    PubMed

    Hershfield, Hal E; Goldstein, Daniel G; Sharpe, William F; Fox, Jesse; Yeykelis, Leo; Carstensen, Laura L; Bailenson, Jeremy N

    2011-11-01

    Many people fail to save what they need to for retirement (Munnell, Webb, and Golub-Sass 2009). Research on excessive discounting of the future suggests that removing the lure of immediate rewards by pre-committing to decisions, or elaborating the value of future rewards can both make decisions more future-oriented. In this article, we explore a third and complementary route, one that deals not with present and future rewards, but with present and future selves. In line with thinkers who have suggested that people may fail, through a lack of belief or imagination, to identify with their future selves (Parfit 1971; Schelling 1984), we propose that allowing people to interact with age-progressed renderings of themselves will cause them to allocate more resources toward the future. In four studies, participants interacted with realistic computer renderings of their future selves using immersive virtual reality hardware and interactive decision aids. In all cases, those who interacted with virtual future selves exhibited an increased tendency to accept later monetary rewards over immediate ones.

  8. Has Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Increased the Time to Seroreversion in HIV Exposed but Uninfected Children?

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Mavel; Ludwig, David A.; Khan, Safia S.; Chaparro, Aida A.; Rivera, Delia M.; Cotter, Amanda M.; Scott, Gwendolyn B.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in pregnancy in the United States, the time of seroreversion in infants born to HIV-infected mothers has not been documented. The objective of this study was to determine the timing of clearance of HIV antibodies and to identify any associated biological and clinical factors. Methods. A retrospective analysis of infants who remained uninfected after perinatal HIV exposure was performed. Infant and maternal medical records from January 2000 to December 2007 were reviewed and the time of seroreversion was estimated using methods for censored survival data. Results. In total, 744 infants were included in the study, with prenatal data available for 551 mothers. The median age of seroreversion was 13.9 months, and 14% of infants remained seropositive after 18 months, 4.3% after 21 months, and 1.2% after 24 months. Earlier age of seroreversion was associated with higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels at 3–7 months of age (P = .0029) and a higher rate of IgG change over the next 6 months of life (P = .003). Infants born by vaginal delivery were more likely to serorevert at a younger age (P = .0052), and maternal exposure to protease inhibitors was associated with a later age of seroreversion (P = .026). Conclusions. Clearance of HIV antibodies in uninfected infants was found to occur at a later age than has been previously reported. Fourteen percent of the infants had persistence of HIV antibodies at or beyond 18 months of age. PMID:22851494

  9. Abnormal shortened diastolic time length at increasing heart rates in patients with abnormal exercise-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The degree of pulmonary hypertension is not independently related to the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction but is frequently associated with diastolic filling abnormalities. The aim of this study was to assess diastolic times at increasing heart rates in normal and in patients with and without abnormal exercise-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure (PASP). Methods. We enrolled 109 patients (78 males, age 62 ± 13 years) referred for exercise stress echocardiography and 16 controls. The PASP was derived from the tricuspid Doppler tracing. A cut-off value of PASP ≥ 50 mmHg at peak stress was considered as indicative of abnormal increase in PASP. Diastolic times and the diastolic/systolic time ratio were recorded by a precordial cutaneous force sensor based on a linear accelerometer. Results At baseline, PASP was 30 ± 5 mmHg in patients and 25 ± 4 in controls. At peak stress the PASP was normal in 95 patients (Group 1); 14 patients (Group 2) showed an abnormal increase in PASP (from 35 ± 4 to 62 ± 12 mmHg; P < 0.01). At 100 bpm, an abnormal (< 1) diastolic/systolic time ratio was found in 0/16 (0%) controls, in 12/93 (13%) Group 1 and 7/14 (50%) Group 2 patients (p < 0.05 between groups). Conclusion The first and second heart sound vibrations non-invasively monitored by a force sensor are useful for continuously assessing diastolic time during exercise. Exercise-induced abnormal PASP was associated with reduced diastolic time at heart rates beyond 100 beats per minute. PMID:22104611

  10. Subliminal strengthening: improving older individuals' physical function over time with an implicit-age-stereotype intervention.

    PubMed

    Levy, Becca R; Pilver, Corey; Chung, Pil H; Slade, Martin D

    2014-12-01

    Negative age stereotypes that older individuals assimilate from their culture predict detrimental outcomes, including worse physical function. We examined, for the first time, whether positive age stereotypes, presented subliminally across multiple sessions in the community, would lead to improved outcomes. Each of 100 older individuals (age=61-99 years, M=81) was randomly assigned to an implicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, an explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, a combined implicit- and explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, or a control group. Interventions occurred at four 1-week intervals. The implicit intervention strengthened positive age stereotypes, which strengthened positive self-perceptions of aging, which, in turn, improved physical function. The improvement in these outcomes continued for 3 weeks after the last intervention session. Further, negative age stereotypes and negative self-perceptions of aging were weakened. For all outcomes, the implicit intervention's impact was greater than the explicit intervention's impact. The physical-function effect of the implicit intervention surpassed a previous study's 6-month-exercise-intervention's effect with participants of similar ages. The current study's findings demonstrate the potential of directing implicit processes toward physical-function enhancement over time.

  11. Increased cortical capillary transit time heterogeneity in Alzheimer's disease: a DSC-MRI perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Eskildsen, Simon F; Gyldensted, Louise; Nagenthiraja, Kartheeban; Nielsen, Rune B; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Dalby, Rikke B; Frandsen, Jesper; Rodell, Anders; Gyldensted, Carsten; Jespersen, Sune N; Lund, Torben E; Mouridsen, Kim; Brændgaard, Hans; Østergaard, Leif

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and neurotoxic Aβ in the brain parenchyma. Hypoxia caused by microvascular changes and disturbed capillary flows could stimulate this build-up of AD-specific proteins in the brain. In this study, we compared cerebral microcirculation in a cohort of AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with that of age-matched controls, all without a history of diabetes or of hypertension for more than 2 years, using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI). Vascular flow disturbances were quantified using a parametric model and mapped to the mid-cortical surface for group-wise statistical analysis. We found widespread hypoperfusion in patients compared with controls and identified areas of increased relative capillary transit time heterogeneity (RTH), consistent with low tissue oxygen tension. Notably, RTH was positively correlated with white matter hyperintensities and positively correlated with symptom severity in the patient cohort. These correlations extended over large parts of the temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices. The results support the hypothesis of disturbed capillary flow patterns in AD and suggest that DSC-MRI may provide imaging biomarkers of impaired cerebral microcirculation in AD.

  12. Old age at diagnosis increases risk of tumor progression in nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao-Xuan; Chen, Xiao-Di; Zhang, Guo-Ye; Li, Zhi-Kun; Hong, Jing; Xie, Dan; Cai, Mu-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Age at diagnosis has been found to be a prognostic factor of outcomes in various cancers. However, the effect of age at diagnosis on nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) progression has not been explored. We retrospectively evaluated the relationship between age and disease progression in 3,153 NPC patients who underwent radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy between 2007 and 2009. Patients were randomly assigned to either a testing cohort or a validation cohort by computer-generated random assignment. X-tile plots determined the optimal cut-point of age based on survival status to be ≤61 vs. >61 years. Further correlation analysis showed that age >61 years was significantly correlated with the tumor progression and therapeutic regimen in both testing and validation cohorts (P <0.05). In the present study, we observed that older age (>61 years) was a strong and independent predictor of poor disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS), in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Age was also found to be a significant prognostic predictor as well (P <0.05) when evaluating patients with the same disease stage. ROC analysis confirmed the predictive value of age on NPC-specific survival in both cohorts (P <0.001) and suggested that age may improve the ability to discriminate outcomes in NPCs, especially regarding tumor progression. In conclusion, our study suggests that older age at NPC diagnosis is associated with a higher incidence of tumor progression and cancer-specific mortality. Age is a strong and independent predictor of poor outcomes and may allow for more tailored therapeutic decision-making and individualized patient counseling. PMID:27463012

  13. Increases in Perspective Embedding Increase Reading Time Even with Typical Text Presentation: Implications for the Reading of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, D. H.; Zunshine, Lisa; Holquist, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Reading fiction is a major component of intellectual life, yet it has proven difficult to study experimentally. One aspect of literature that has recently come to light is perspective embedding (“she thought I left” embedding her perspective on “I left”), which seems to be a defining feature of fiction. Previous work (Whalen et al., 2012) has shown that increasing levels of embedment affects the time that it takes readers to read and understand short vignettes in a moving window paradigm. With increasing levels of embedment from 1 to 5, reading times in a moving window paradigm rose almost linearly. However, level 0 was as slow as 3–4. Accuracy on probe questions was relatively constant until dropping at the fifth level. Here, we assessed this effect in a more ecologically valid (“typical”) reading paradigm, in which the entire vignette was visible at once, either for as long as desired (Experiment 1) or a fixed time (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, reading times followed a pattern similar to that of the previous experiment, with some differences in absolute speed. Accuracy matched previous results: fairly consistent accuracy until a decline at level 5, indicating that both presentation methods allowed understanding. In Experiment 2, accuracy was somewhat reduced, perhaps because participants were less successful at allocating their attention than they were during the earlier experiment; however, the pattern was the same. It seems that literature does not, on average, use easiest reading level but rather uses a middle ground that challenges the reader, but not too much. PMID:26635684

  14. Meta-analysis of Gene Expression in the Mouse Liver Reveals Biomarkers Associated with Inflammation Increased Early During Aging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging is associated with a predictable loss of cellular homeostasis, a decline in physiological function and an increase in various diseases. We hypothesized that similar age-related gene expression profiles would be observed in mice across independent studies. Employing a metaan...

  15. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jiang, Jiang; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O.; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-04-01

    We develop a theory for residence times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Forster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of residence time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory is consistent with the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the carbon cycle, which is a simplified version of the Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach (CASA) model.

  16. Effects of time on feed and post-mortem aging on palatability and lipid composition of crossbred Wagyu beef.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y R; Busboom, J R; Cornforth, D P; Shenton, H T; Gaskins, C T; Johnson, K A; Reeves, J J; Wright, R W; Cronrath, J D

    1996-06-01

    Twenty-seven Wagyu-sired steers were fed for 90 (14 steers) or 170 (13 steers) days to study the effects of time on feed on palatability and fatty acid composition, and the effects of post-mortem aging time (2, 4 or 10 days) on palatability. Hot carcass weight, fat thickness, longissimus dorsi muscle area, yield grade, estimated kidney, pelvic and heart fat and maturity score were increased (p < 0.05) by an additional 80 days on the high concentrate feed, but marbling was not changed (p > 0.05). Feeding the high concentrate diet for 170 days increased Warner-Bratzler shear force values (p < 0.05) and tended to decrease tenderness (p > 0.05), flavor intensity and connective tissue scores. For the 90 day feeding group, 4 days of aging improved connective tissue score (p < 0.05) and tended to increase (p > 0.05) tenderness scores and decrease shear force, compared with 2 days of aging. For the 170 day feeding group, 10 days of aging improved (p < 0.05) shear force and all sensory attributes except flavor intensity, compared to 2 days of aging. An additional 80 days on feed decreased (p < 0.05) stearic acid and total saturated fatty acids (SFA) and generally increased (p < 0.05) monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), MUFA:SFA, and PUFA:SFA in subcutaneous fat and longissimus dorsi muscle. The cholesterol content of fat and muscle increased (p < 0.05) as time on feed increased. Ninety days on a high concentrate diet was adequate for yearling crossbred Wagyu steers to produce highly acceptable carcasses. The additional 80 days on feed produced little or no overall benefit and the steers became overfinished and less tender. Ten days post-mortem aging improved (p < 0.05) all palatability attributes except flavor intensity.

  17. Serotonin Mediates a Learned Increase in Attraction to High Concentrations of Benzaldehyde in Aged "C. elegans"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsui, David; van der Kooy, Derek

    2008-01-01

    We utilized olfactory-mediated chemotaxis in "Caenorhabditis elegans" to examine the effect of aging on information processing and animal behavior. Wild-type (N2) young adults (day 4) initially approach and eventually avoid a point source of benzaldehyde. Aged adult animals (day 7) showed a stronger initial approach and a delayed avoidance to…

  18. Exercise-Mediated Increase in Nigral Tyrosine Hydroxylase Is Accompanied by Increased Nigral GFR-α1 and EAAC1 Expression in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jennifer C.; Salvatore, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise may alleviate locomotor impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) or aging. Identifying molecular responses immediately engaged by exercise in the nigrostriatal pathway and allied tissue may reveal critical targets associated with its long-term benefits. In aging, there is loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) receptor, GFR-α1, in the substantia nigra (SN). Exercise can increase GDNF expression, but its effect on GFR-α1 expression is unknown. Infusion of GDNF into striatum or GFR-α1 in SN, respectively, can increase locomotor activity and TH function in SN but not striatum in aged rats. GDNF may also increase glutamate transporter expression, which attenuates TH loss in PD models. We utilized a footshock-free treadmill exercise regimen to determine the immediate impact of short-term exercise on GFR-α1 expression, dopamine regulation, glutamate transporter expression, and glutamate uptake in 18 month old male Brown-Norway/Fischer 344 F1 hybrid rats. GFR-α1 and TH expression significantly increased in SN but not striatum. This exercise regimen did not affect glutamate uptake or glutamate transporter expression in striatum. However, EAAC1 expression increased in SN. These results indicate that nigral GFR-α1 and EAAC1 expression increased in conjunction with increased nigral TH expression following short-term exercise. PMID:26599339

  19. Behavioral decay in aging male C. elegans correlates with increased cell excitability

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoyan; Navetta, Andrew; Gualberto, Daisy G.; García, L. René

    2012-01-01

    Deteriorative changes in behavioral functions are natural processes that accompany aging. In advanced aged C. elegans nematodes, gross decline in general behaviors, such as locomotion and feeding, is correlated with degeneration of muscle structure and contractile function. In this study, we characterized the age-related changes in C. elegans male mating behavior to determine possible causes that ultimately lead to age-related muscle frailty. Unlike the kinetics of general behavioral decline, we found that mating behavior deteriorates early in adulthood, with no obvious muscle fiber disorganization or sperm dysfunction. Through direct mating behavior observations, Ca2+ imaging and pharmacological tests, we found that the muscular components used for mating become more excitable as the males age. Interestingly, manipulating either the expression of AChR genes or dietary-mediated ether-a-go-go family K+ channel function can reduce the muscle excitability of older males and concurrently improve mating behavior, suggesting a correlation between these biological processes. PMID:22285759

  20. Biological N2-Fixation Increases with Peatland Age and Decreases with N Deposition in Bogs of Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, H.; Popma, J. M.; Dynarski, K. A.; Wieder, R.; Vile, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Most terrestrial ecosystems are thought be limited primarily by nitrogen, including boreal peatlands located in pristine regions. Bogs receive nutrients solely from atmospheric deposition. Because of the historically low rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Alberta, Canada, the Sphagnum mosses that dominate bog ground cover in this region have formed relationships with diazotrophs in order to meet their nitrogen needs, making biological N2- fixation the dominant input of new nitrogen to these bogs. The process of N2-fixation is highly variable and is governed by a number of environmental factors. In Alberta, one factor is water availability, as these bogs occur in some of the driest climates in which peatlands are known to exist. More recent factors with the potential to greatly alter N2-fixation dynamics include increasing nitrogen deposition associated with the growing oil sands mining operations and wildfires increasing in frequency and severity with global climate change. To determine the potential importance of N2-fixation to the overall peatland nitrogen balance under current and future conditions, we incubated the moss Sphagnum fuscum, using the acetylene reduction assay calibrated with 15N2, from 3 bogs representing ages of 3, 13, and 30 years since fire. Each bog was fertilized 8 times throughout the growing season with 0, 10, and 20 kg N/ha/yr. N2-fixation rates were measured 5 times at each site throughout the summer of 2013 to account for variation due to season and weather. Mean rates of N2-fixation increased with bog age, with higher rates in the 30 year old bog (36.90 × 8.38) and subsequently lower rates in the 13 yr (25.08 × 5.63) and 3 yr (11.58 × 6.33) old bogs. As expected, we saw decreasing rates of N2-fixation in the 10 (16.96 × 5.39) and 20 kg N/ha/yr treatments (3.35 × 1.34), as compared to water-only controls (47.62 × 12.18). These results indicate that N2-fixation supplies abundant N to support net primary productivity for bogs

  1. Mild eccentric exercise increases Hsp72 content in skeletal muscles from adult and late middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Evan J H; Ramsook, Andrew H; Locke, Marius; Amara, Catherine E

    2013-09-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age or sarcopenia contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. Thus, preventing muscle loss with age is important for maintaining health. Hsp72, the inducible member of the Hsp70 family, is known to provide protection to skeletal muscle and can be increased by exercise. However, ability to increase Hsp72 by exercise is intensity-dependent and appears to diminish with advanced age. Thus, other exercise modalities capable of increasing HSP content and potentially preventing the age related loss of muscle need to be explored. The purpose of this study was to determine if the stress from one bout of mild eccentric exercise was sufficient to elicit an increase in Hsp72 content in the vastus intermedius (VI) and white gastrocnemius (WG) muscles, and if the Hsp72 response differed between adult and late middle-aged rats. To do this, 30 adult (6 months) and late middle-aged (24 months) F344BN rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 6/group): control (C), level exercise (16 m x min(-1)) and eccentric exercise (16 m x min(-1), 16 degree decline). Exercised animals were sacrificed immediately post-exercise or after 48 hours. Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was used to assess muscle damage, while Western Blotting was used to measure muscle Hsp72 content. A nested ANOVA with Tukey post hoc analysis was performed to determine significant difference (p < 0.05) between groups. Hsp72 content was increased in the VI for both adult and late middle-aged rats 48 hours after eccentric exercise when compared to level and control groups but no differences between age groups was observed. Hsp72 was not detected in the WG following any type of exercise. In conclusion, mild eccentric exercise can increase Hsp72 content in the rat VI muscle and this response is maintained into late middle-age.

  2. Using prime-time animation to engage students in courses on aging.

    PubMed

    Curch, Lisa M

    2010-01-01

    Prime-time animation is a television genre that frequently reflects on issues that are significant in contemporary society, including aging issues. Using such programs to present aging-related content can be a constructive pedagogical device, offering a means of actively engaging students. This article provides a brief overview of the use of media, popular culture, and prime-time animation in college teaching and addresses specific issues in, as well as examples of, how such programs can be used in college courses, particularly aging courses. The article also reports on a small survey of students who were exposed to such a teaching technique in an undergraduate aging course. Results showed that, in general, students were positive about viewing prime-time animation videos in class and indicated that they found the viewings and associated assignments helpful for learning about concepts and issues in aging.

  3. Increased Learning Time under Stimulus-Funded School Improvement Grants: High Hopes, Varied Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurrer, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Research has long suggested that significantly increasing quality time in school for teaching and learning can have a positive impact on student achievement. Recognizing this connection, federal guidance requires low-performing schools to increase student learning time if they are implementing two popular reform models using school improvement…

  4. [Are loss of glistening of normal colour and increased friability normal aspects of the oesophagus in old age? (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Leu, H; Schüle, A; Brändli, H; Pelloni, S; Blum, L

    1978-07-01

    Friability of the esophageal mucosq increases with old age. Old patients without esophageal disease also show loss of glistening and of the normal pink color of the mucosa. These findings on their own are therefore no signs of esophagitis,

  5. Does effect of BCG vaccine decrease with time since vaccination and increase tuberculin skin test reaction?

    PubMed

    Subramani, R; Datta, Manjula; Swaminathan, S

    2015-10-01

    The protective efficacy of BCG was studied for over 15 years, from 1968, in South India. A secondary analysis of data was performed to investigate the relationship between Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and tuberculosis (TB) disease and between BCG and positive tuberculin skin test for different time periods among children aged less than 10 years. A randomized controlled trial was conducted, where 281,161 persons were allocated to receive BCG 0.1mg, BCG 0.01mg or placebo. Tuberculin skin test was performed at baseline and at 4 years after BCG vaccination. Surveys were conducted every 2.5 years to detect all new cases of culture-positive/smear-positive TB occurring in the community over a 15-year period. Relative risk (RR) was obtained from the ratio of incidence among the vaccinated and the placebo groups. Among those children vaccinated with 0.1mg of BCG, the RR for TB was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.32-0.87, P=0.01) at 12.5 years but increased to 0.73 later. Similar pattern was seen with 0.01mg. The increase in the number of skin test positives with 0.1mg of BCG was 57.8%, 49.4% and 34% for cut-off points at ≥10mm, ≥12mm and ≥15mm, respectively. The study suggests that the effect of BCG may decrease since vaccination and the tuberculin positive was higher at post-vaccination test period due to BCG.

  6. The age-related increase in arterial stiffness is augmented in phases according to the severity of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Arai, Tomio; Koji, Yutaka; Yambe, Minoru; Motobe, Kohki; Zaydun, Glunisa; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Hori, Saburoh; Yamashina, Akira

    2004-07-01

    Although blood pressure and age are major determinants of arterial stiffness, it is still unclear whether age-related changes in arterial stiffness are similar among subjects with different degrees of severity of hypertension. The present study examined the association between age and pulse wave velocity in subjects with different degrees of hypertension stratified according to the JNC-7 classification (Normal, Prehypertensive, and Stage I or II Hypertensive subjects). A number of 5,312 subjects (age range, 30-79 years) with no atherosclerotic risk factors other than high blood pressure were selected from two cohorts who regularly underwent annual health checkups, including the measurement of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). baPWV was increased according to the severity of hypertension in all age groups. The association between age and baPWV formed a quadratic curve in each stage in both genders. The steepness of the slope of the quadratic curve increased according to the severity of hypertension. In each stage of hypertension, age and the baPWV were divided into tertiles. After adjustment for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, the odds ratio of having an increased baPWV in the 3rd age tertile (the highest-age group) was found to increase according to the severity of hypertension. In conclusion, the age-related increase of baPWV was shown to be augmented in phases according to the severity of hypertension, and this augmentation occurred even between the Normal and Prehypertensive stages. These results support the JNC-7 recommendations for a strict control of blood pressure even in the elderly.

  7. Time-dependent dysregulation of autophagy: Implications in aging and mitochondrial homeostasis in the kidney proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Kimura, Tomonori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Namba, Tomoko; Matsuda, Jun; Minami, Satoshi; Kaimori, Jun-ya; Matsui, Isao; Kitamura, Harumi; Matsusaka, Taiji; Niimura, Fumio; Yanagita, Motoko; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy plays an essential role in cellular homeostasis through the quality control of proteins and organelles. Although a time-dependent decline in autophagic activity is believed to be involved in the aging process, the issue remains controversial. We previously demonstrated that autophagy maintains proximal tubular cell homeostasis and protects against kidney injury. Here, we extend that study and examine how autophagy is involved in kidney aging. Unexpectedly, the basal autophagic activity was higher in the aged kidney than that in young kidney; short-term cessation of autophagy in tamoxifen-inducible proximal tubule-specific autophagy-deficient mice increased the accumulation of SQSTM1/p62- and ubiquitin-positive aggregates in the aged kidney. By contrast, autophagic flux in response to metabolic stress was blunted with aging, as demonstrated by the observation that transgenic mice expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B fusion construct, showed a drastic increase of GFP-positive puncta in response to starvation in young mice compared to a slight increase observed in aged mice. Finally, proximal tubule-specific autophagy-deficient mice at 24 mo of age exhibited a significant deterioration in kidney function and fibrosis concomitant with mitochondrial dysfunction as well as mitochondrial DNA abnormalities and nuclear DNA damage, all of which are hallmark characteristics of cellular senescence. These results suggest that age-dependent high basal autophagy plays a crucial role in counteracting kidney aging through mitochondrial quality control. Furthermore, a reduced capacity for upregulation of autophagic flux in response to metabolic stress may be associated with age-related kidney diseases. PMID:26986194

  8. Do Sources of Cigarettes among Adolescents Vary by Age over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenk, Kathleen M.; Toomey, Traci L.; Shi, Qun; Erickson, Darin J.; Forster, Jean L.

    2014-01-01

    Trends in sources of cigarettes among adolescents were assessed using data from a teen cohort (2000-2006). Five sources--bought from store, got from other teen, stole from others, bought from others, and got from an adult--were measured over time by age. The most common source among all ages was other teens. Fewer teens bought cigarettes from…

  9. Using Prime-Time Animation to Engage Students in Courses on Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curch, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Prime-time animation is a television genre that frequently reflects on issues that are significant in contemporary society, including aging issues. Using such programs to present aging-related content can be a constructive pedagogical device, offering a means of actively engaging students. This article provides a brief overview of the use of…

  10. Age Differences in Goal Concordance, Time Use, and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yiwei; Lee, Yue-Ting; Pethtel, Olivia L.; Gutowitz, Michael S.; Kirk, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate age differences in goal concordance, time use, and Well-Being. Past research has found that despite age-related decline in life circumstances (e.g., health), the Well-Being of older adults is as high as young adults. The present study used a novel approach to explore the Paradox of…

  11. Syllable-Timed Speech Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Cheryl; O'Brian, Sue; Harrison, Elisabeth; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This clinical trial determined the outcomes of a simple syllable-timed speech (STS) treatment for school-age children who stutter. Method: Participants were 10 children, ages 6-11 years, who stutter. Treatment involved training the children and their parents to use STS at near normal speech rates. The technique was practiced in the clinic…

  12. Age of Inhalant First Time Use and Its Association to the Use of Other Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Kele; Chang, G. Andy; Southerland, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Inhalants are the 4th most commonly abused drugs after alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana. Although inhalants are often referred as Gateway Drugs this hypothesis is less examined. Using the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data, age of first time inhalant use was compared with the age of onset of other drugs among 6466 inhalant users who…

  13. Neurobehavioral Deficits and Increased Blood Pressure in School-Age Children Prenatally Exposed to Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Raul; Julvez, Jordi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Barr, Dana; Bellinger, David C.; Debes, Frodi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background The long-term neurotoxicity risks caused by prenatal exposures to pesticides are unclear, but a previous pilot study of Ecuadorian school children suggested that blood pressure and visuospatial processing may be vulnerable. Objectives In northern Ecuador, where floriculture is intensive and relies on female employment, we carried out an intensive cross-sectional study to assess children’s neurobehavioral functions at 6–8 years of age. Methods We examined all 87 children attending two grades in the local public school with an expanded battery of neurobehavioral tests. Information on pesticide exposure during the index pregnancy was obtained from maternal interview. The children’s current pesticide exposure was assessed from the urinary excretion of organophosphate metabolites and erythrocyte acetylcholine esterase activity. Results Of 84 eligible participants, 35 were exposed to pesticides during pregnancy via maternal occupational exposure, and 23 had indirect exposure from paternal work. Twenty-two children had detectable current exposure irrespective of their prenatal exposure status. Only children with prenatal exposure from maternal greenhouse work showed consistent deficits after covariate adjustment, which included stunting and socioeconomic variables. Exposure-related deficits were the strongest for motor speed (Finger Tapping Task), motor coordination (Santa Ana Form Board), visuospatial performance (Stanford-Binet Copying Test), and visual memory (Stanford-Binet Copying Recall Test). These associations corresponded to a developmental delay of 1.5–2 years. Prenatal pesticide exposure was also significantly associated with an average increase of 3.6 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and a slight decrease in body mass index of 1.1 kg/m2. Inclusion of the pilot data strengthened these results. Conclusions These findings support the notion that prenatal exposure to pesticides—at levels not producing adverse health outcomes in the mother

  14. Aging in Place: Evolution of a Research Topic Whose Time Has Come

    PubMed Central

    Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha; Steinman, Bernard A.; Liebig, Phoebe S.; Pynoos, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, policy makers and professionals who provide services to older adults with chronic conditions and impairments have placed greater emphasis on conceptualizing aging in place as an attainable and worthwhile goal. Little is known, however, of the changes in how this concept has evolved in aging research. To track trends in aging in place, we examined scholarly articles published from 1980 to 2010 that included the concept in eleven academic gerontology journals. We report an increase in the absolute number and proportion of aging-in-place manuscripts published during this period, with marked growth in the 2000s. Topics related to the environment and services were the most commonly examined during 2000–2010 (35% and 31%, resp.), with a substantial increase in manuscripts pertaining to technology and health/functioning. This underscores the increase in diversity of topics that surround the concept of aging-in-place literature in gerontological research. PMID:22175020

  15. Rapid increase in human life expectancy: will it soon be limited by the aging of elastin?

    PubMed

    Robert, L; Robert, A M; Fülöp, T

    2008-04-01

    The postponement of the most frequent age-related diseases stimulated speculations of the possibility of "dying of old age". The selective decline of individual physiological functions-aging in spare-parts-indicates however the potential limitation of the life-span by the rapid decline of some of the vital parameters. We explored a possibility of such a limitation of maximal life-span by the age-related alteration of elastin, consisting in Ca-accumulation, lipid deposition and elastolytic degradation. The quantitative evaluation of these processes suggests an approximative upper limit for the elastic properties of the cardio-respiratory system of about 100-120 years, at least, as far as elastin is involved. This process, age-related alterations of elastic fibers, is however not the only one limiting the functional value of the cardiovascular system. Crosslinking of collagen fibers by advanced glycation end-products certainly contributes also to the age-dependent rigidification of the cardiovascular system. Therefore the answer to the initial question, can age-dependent alterations of a single matrix macromolecule be limiting such vital functions as the cardio-respiratory system-is a cautious yes, with however the caveat that other, independent mechanisms, such as the Maillard reaction, can also interfere with and limit further the functional value of such vital physiological functions.

  16. Tethering telomerase to telomeres increases genome instability and promotes chronological aging in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; He, Ming-Hong; Peng, Jing; Duan, Yi-Min; Lu, Yi-Si; Wu, Zhenfang; Gong, Ting; Li, Hong-Tao; Zhou, Jin-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Chronological aging of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is attributed to multi-faceted traits especially those involving genome instability, and has been considered to be an aging model for post-mitotic cells in higher organisms. Telomeres are the physical ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, and are essential for genome integrity and stability. It remains elusive whether dysregulated telomerase activity affects chronological aging. We employed the CDC13-EST2 fusion gene, which tethers telomerase to telomeres, to examine the effect of constitutively active telomerase on chronological lifespan (CLS). The expression of Cdc13-Est2 fusion protein resulted in overlong telomeres (2 to 4 folds longer than normal telomeres), and long telomeres were stably maintained during long-term chronological aging. Accordingly, genome instability, manifested by accumulation of extra-chromosomal rDNA circle species, age-dependent CAN1 marker-gene mutation frequency and gross chromosomal rearrangement frequency, was significantly elevated. Importantly, inactivation of Sch9, a downstream kinase of the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1), suppressed both the genome instability and accelerated chronological aging mediated by CDC13-EST2 expression. Interestingly, loss of the CDC13-EST2 fusion gene in the cells with overlong telomeres restored the regular CLS. Altogether, these data suggest that constitutively active telomerase is detrimental to the maintenance of genome stability, and promotes chronological aging in yeast. PMID:27855118

  17. Increasing Sibling Relative Risk of Survival to Older and Older Ages and the Importance of Precise Definitions of “Aging,” “Life Span,” and “Longevity”

    PubMed Central

    Sebastiani, Paola; Nussbaum, Lisa; Andersen, Stacy L.; Black, Mara J.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a formal definition of human longevity continues to generate confusion about its genetic and nongenetic determinants. In order to characterize how differences in birth year cohorts and percentiles of survival are associated with familial contribution to variation in survival, we estimated sibling relative risk of living to increasingly rare percentiles of survival based on a dataset of 1,917 validated sibships each containing at least one individual living to age 90 years. About 1,042 of the sibships included at least one individual who survived to age 100 and 511 included at least one individual who survived to age 105 and older. We show that sibling relative risk increases with older ages, sex, and earlier birth year cohorts of the proband and siblings of male 90-year-olds (5th percentile of survival) have 1.73 (95% CI: 1.5; 2.0) times the chance of living to age 90, while siblings of both male and female probands who survived to age 105 years (~0.01 percentile of survival) have 35.6 (95%CI: 15.1; 67.7) times the chance of living to age 105 compared with population controls. These results emphasize the importance of consistently defining the longevity phenotype in terms of rarity of survival for appropriate comparisons across studies. PMID:25814633

  18. Increased myogenic repressor Id mRNA and protein levels in hindlimb muscles of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Alway, Stephen E; Degens, Hans; Lowe, Dawn A; Krishnamurthy, Gururaj

    2002-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if levels of repressors to myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) differ between muscles from young adult and aged animals. Total RNA from plantaris, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles of Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats aged 9 mo (young adult, n = 10) and 37 mo (aged, n = 10) was reverse transcribed and then amplified by PCR. To obtain a semiquantitative measure of the mRNA levels, PCR signals were normalized to cyclophilin or 18S signals from the corresponding reverse transcription product. Normalization to cyclophilin and 18S gave similar results. The mRNA levels of MyoD and myogenin were approximately 275-650% (P < 0.001) and approximately 500-1,100% (P < 0.001) greater, respectively, in muscles from aged compared with young adults. In contrast, the protein levels were lower in plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles and similar in the soleus muscle of aged vs. young adult rats. Id repressor mRNA levels were approximately 300-900% greater in fast and slow muscles of aged animals (P < or = 0.02), and Mist 1 mRNA was approximately 50% greater in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles (P < 0.01). The mRNA level of Twist mRNA was not significantly affected by aging. Id-1, Id-2, and Id-3 protein levels were approximately 17-740% greater (P < 0.05) in hindlimb muscles of aged rats compared with young adult rats. The elevated levels of Id mRNA and protein suggest that MRF repressors may play a role in gene regulation of fast and slow muscles in aged rats.

  19. HIV-1 replication in central nervous system increases over time on only protease inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Donath, Maximilian; Wolf, Timo; Stürmer, Martin; Herrmann, Eva; Bickel, Markus; Khaykin, Pavel; Göpel, Siri; Gute, Peter; Haberl, Annette; de Leuw, Philipp; Schüttfort, Gundolf; Berger, Annemarie; Stephan, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    There are concerns about central nervous system (CNS)-replication of HIV-1 in patients on boosted protease inhibitors. Purpose of this study was to compare HIV-1 viral loads (VLs) from patients treated with only boosted dual protease inhibitor (bdPI), versus combination antiretroviral therapy (cART group), containing two nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and a third partner. All patients from a large German HIV-treatment cohort with available medication, clinical and demographic data, including results from simultaneous HIV-1 viral load (VL) assessments in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma, were retrospectively evaluated as controlled cross-sectional study. CSF had been obtained from patients with variable neurological symptoms during 2005-2014. Statistical analysis comprised nonparametric tests, regression and correlation techniques accounting for undetectable quantifications. Statistical analysis comprised nonparametric tests, regression and correlation techniques accounting for undetectable quantifications. Overall, 155 patients were evaluable (bdPI: 24; cART: 131). At time of CSF-collection, both groups were comparable in age, gender, CD4-cell counts, or primary HIV-transmission risks, though bdPI patients were clinically more advanced. The proportion of patients with undetectable HIV-1 (<50 copies/ml) in CSF was lower for bdPI group (25 vs 49.6 %; p = 0.026), but similar in plasma (46 vs 41 %). Median CSF-VL was higher in bdPI group (600 vs 50 copies/ml; p = 0.027) and similar in plasma. Mean VL CSF/plasma ratio was 342.91 for bdPI- and 54.48 for cART patients (p < 0.001). Pearson's regression analysis revealed a trend for an elevated VL-ratio over time within bdPI group. HIV-1 replication was higher and more frequently detectable in CSF from bdPI patients, indicating a worse CNS penetration effectiveness of used boosted PI. Within bdPI group, measured CNS-viral replication was increasing over time, suggesting an over

  20. Experiencing Term-Time Employment as a Non-Traditional Aged University Student: A Welsh Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Jenny; Clay, James; Etheridge, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    Engaging in term-time employment appears to be becoming a common feature of contemporary UK student life. This study examined the ways in which a cohort of full-time non-traditional aged students negotiated paid employment whilst pursuing a full-time higher education course in Wales. Taking a qualitative approach to explore this further,…

  1. Increased level of reactive oxygen species persuades postovulatory aging-mediated spontaneous egg activation in rat eggs cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Karuppanan V; Chaube, Shail K

    2016-05-01

    The present study was aimed to find out whether increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) particularity hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) could persuade postovulatory aging-mediated abortive spontaneous egg activation (SEA) in rat eggs cultured in vitro. For this purpose, ROS and H2O2 levels, mitochondria distribution and its membrane potential, p286-CaMK-II, Emi2, Thr-161 phophorylated cyclin-dependent protein kinase1 (Cdk1) as well as cyclin B1 levels, in vitro effects of 3-tert-butyl-4 hydroxy anisole (BHA), pentoxifylline and dibutyryl-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (db-cAMP) were analyzed during postovulatory aging-induced abortive SEA in vitro. Data of the present study suggest that postovulatory aging increased H2O2 levels, disturbed mitochondrial distribution pattern and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in eggs. There was an significant increase of p286-CaMK-II level, while Emi2 level reduced significantly during egg aging in vitro. The reduced Emi2 level was associated with decreased Thr-161 phosphorylated cyclin-dependent kinase-1 (Cdk1) as well as cyclin B1 level in aged eggs that underwent abortive SEA. Further, supplementation of pentoxifylline, db-cAMP, and BHA protected postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA in concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that postovulatory aging increased H2O2 levels, reduced MMP, and increased p286-CaMK-II. The increased p286-CaMK-II was associated with reduced Emi2 level and maturation-promoting factor levels during postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA. Drugs that elevate cAMP directly or indirectly and BHA protected postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA possibly by reducing ROS level in rat eggs cultured in vitro.

  2. Age class, longevity and growth rate relationships: protracted growth increases in old trees in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah E; Abrams, Marc D

    2009-11-01

    This study uses data from the International Tree-Ring Data Bank website and tree cores collected in the field to explore growth rate (basal area increment, BAI) relationships across age classes (from young to old) for eight tree species in the eastern US. These species represent a variety of ecological traits and include those in the genera Populus, Quercus, Pinus, Tsuga and Nyssa. We found that most trees in all age classes and species exhibit an increasing BAI throughout their lives. This is particularly unusual for trees in the older age classes that we expected to have declining growth in the later years, as predicted by physiological growth models. There exists an inverse relationship between growth rate and increasing age class. The oldest trees within each species have consistently slow growth throughout their lives, implying an inverse relationship between growth rate and longevity. Younger trees (< 60 years of age) within each species are consistently growing faster than the older trees when they are of the same age resulting from a higher proportion of fast-growing trees in these young age classes. Slow, but increasing, BAI in the oldest trees in recent decades is a continuation of their growth pattern established in previous centuries. The fact that they have not shown a decreasing growth rate in their old age contradicts physiological growth models and may be related to the stimulatory effects of global change phenomenon (climate and land-use history).

  3. False positive hepatitis C antibody test results in left ventricular assist device recipients: increased risk with age and transfusions.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Grace Y; Lee, Doreen; Colovai, Adriana; Levy, Dana; Vasovic, Ljiljana; Roach, Keith W; Shuter, Jonathan; Goldstein, Daniel; D'Alessandro, David; Jorde, Ulrich P; Muggia, Victoria A

    2017-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been successfully used in patients with heart failure. However, LVADs may trigger immune activation, leading to higher frequencies of autoantibodies. We describe the clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of LVAD recipients with false positive hepatitis C (FPHC) serology among 39 consecutive adult LVAD recipients who bridged to heart transplantation from January 2007 to January 2013 at Montefiore Medical Center. FPHC patients were identified as those with post-LVAD positive hepatitis C ELISA antibody tests and negative confirmatory testing with hepatitis C RNA PCR and/or radioimmunoblot assay. Ten (26%) patients previously seronegative for hepatitis C were found to have FPHC after device placement. Of the 39 patients, 32 had HeartMate II devices. The mean age at LVAD placement was 55 years. FPHC correlated with older age at the time of LVAD implantation and with receipt of packed red blood cell transfusions, but not with gender, fresh frozen plasma transfusions, panel reactive antibodies, globulin fraction, rheumatoid factor, or anticardiolipin antibodies. Clinicians should be aware of this increased risk of FPHC in older LVAD patients and those more heavily transfused in order to avoid unnecessary apprehension and possible delay in transplantation. Further studies should be done to evaluate the possible relationship between transfused blood products and immunomodulation.

  4. False positive hepatitis C antibody test results in left ventricular assist device recipients: increased risk with age and transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Doreen; Colovai, Adriana; Levy, Dana; Vasovic, Ljiljana; Roach, Keith W.; Shuter, Jonathan; Goldstein, Daniel; D’Alessandro, David; Jorde, Ulrich P.; Muggia, Victoria A.

    2017-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been successfully used in patients with heart failure. However, LVADs may trigger immune activation, leading to higher frequencies of autoantibodies. We describe the clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of LVAD recipients with false positive hepatitis C (FPHC) serology among 39 consecutive adult LVAD recipients who bridged to heart transplantation from January 2007 to January 2013 at Montefiore Medical Center. FPHC patients were identified as those with post-LVAD positive hepatitis C ELISA antibody tests and negative confirmatory testing with hepatitis C RNA PCR and/or radioimmunoblot assay. Ten (26%) patients previously seronegative for hepatitis C were found to have FPHC after device placement. Of the 39 patients, 32 had HeartMate II devices. The mean age at LVAD placement was 55 years. FPHC correlated with older age at the time of LVAD implantation and with receipt of packed red blood cell transfusions, but not with gender, fresh frozen plasma transfusions, panel reactive antibodies, globulin fraction, rheumatoid factor, or anticardiolipin antibodies. Clinicians should be aware of this increased risk of FPHC in older LVAD patients and those more heavily transfused in order to avoid unnecessary apprehension and possible delay in transplantation. Further studies should be done to evaluate the possible relationship between transfused blood products and immunomodulation. PMID:28203425

  5. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jiang, Jiang; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O.; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying -Ping; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a theory for transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Förster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of transit time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory generalises the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the terrestrial carbon cycle, which is a modification of the Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach model, and we demonstrate that the nonautonomous versions of transit time and mean age differ significantly from the autonomous quantities when calculated for that model.

  6. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    DOE PAGES

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; ...

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a theory for transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Förster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of transit time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory generalises the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the terrestrial carbon cycle, which is a modification of themore » Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach model, and we demonstrate that the nonautonomous versions of transit time and mean age differ significantly from the autonomous quantities when calculated for that model.« less

  7. Older Men's Lay Definitions of Successful Aging over Time: The Manitoba Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Robert B.; Swift, Audrey U.; Bayomi, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of "successful aging" has become widely accepted in gerontology, yet continues to have no common underlying definition. Researchers have increasingly looked to older individuals for their lay definitions of successful aging. The present analysis is based on responses to five questionnaires administered to surviving…

  8. DNA methylation-based measures of biological age: meta-analysis predicting time to death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian H.; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Colicino, Elena; Peters, Marjolein J.; Ward-Caviness, Cavin K.; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Roetker, Nicholas S.; Just, Allan C.; Demerath, Ellen W.; Guan, Weihua; Bressler, Jan; Fornage, Myriam; Studenski, Stephanie; Vandiver, Amy R.; Moore, Ann Zenobia; Tanaka, Toshiko; Kiel, Douglas P.; Liang, Liming; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Hernandez, Dena G.; Melzer, David; Nalls, Michael; Pilling, Luke C.; Price, Timothy R.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Gieger, Christian; Holle, Rolf; Kretschmer, Anja; Kronenberg, Florian; Kunze, Sonja; Linseisen, Jakob; Meisinger, Christine; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Waldenberger, Melanie; Visscher, Peter M.; Shah, Sonia; Wray, Naomi R.; McRae, Allan F.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles; Levine, Morgan E.; Lu, Ake T.; Tsao, Philip S.; Hou, Lifang; Manson, JoAnn E.; Carty, Cara L.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Spector, Tim D.; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Levy, Daniel; Baccarelli, Andrea; van Meurs, Joyce; Bell, Jordana T.; Peters, Annette; Deary, Ian J.; Pankow, James S.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Horvath, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Estimates of biological age based on DNA methylation patterns, often referred to as “epigenetic age”, “DNAm age”, have been shown to be robust biomarkers of age in humans. We previously demonstrated that independent of chronological age, epigenetic age assessed in blood predicted all-cause mortality in four human cohorts. Here, we expanded our original observation to 13 different cohorts for a total sample size of 13,089 individuals, including three racial/ethnic groups. In addition, we examined whether incorporating information on blood cell composition into the epigenetic age metrics improves their predictive power for mortality. All considered measures of epigenetic age acceleration were predictive of mortality (p≤8.2×10−9), independent of chronological age, even after adjusting for additional risk factors (p<5.4×10−4), and within the racial/ethnic groups that we examined (non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, African Americans). Epigenetic age estimates that incorporated information on blood cell composition led to the smallest p-values for time to death (p=7.5×10−43). Overall, this study a) strengthens the evidence that epigenetic age predicts all-cause mortality above and beyond chronological age and traditional risk factors, and b) demonstrates that epigenetic age estimates that incorporate information on blood cell counts lead to highly significant associations with all-cause mortality. PMID:27690265

  9. Field demonstration of age dependent increase in lead phytoextraction by Pelargonium cultivar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Pinelli, Eric; Alric, Alain; Kaemmerer, Michel; Pradere, Philippe; Dumat, Camille

    2013-04-01

    Unnecessary for living organisms, lead (Pb) is one of the major widespread toxic metals found in the environment with potential danger to human health and to ecosystems (Shahid et al. 2012). Lead is known to induce a broad range of toxic effects to living organism, including those that are morphological, physiological and biochemical in origin (Pourrut et al. 2011). A field study was carried out in the vicinity of Pb recycling plant near Toulouse-France, and contaminated by atmospheric fallouts to evaluate lead extraction and uptake efficiency of hyperaccumulater Attar of Roses Pelargonium cultivar. It was found that Attar of Roses has ability to accumulate (8644 mgPb/kg DW plant) and survive on highly contaminated acidic soil (39250 mg kg-1 of total Pb) without any morpho-phytotoxicity symptoms. Moreover Attar showed increased extraction of lead from bulk soil to rhizosphere through Pb mobilization and ultimately increased uptake by roots and translocation to shoots. The studied contaminated soil could be cleaned up in few years by planting hyperaccumulater Attar of Rose for longer time period. Under optimum fertlization, irrigation and use of natural or synthetic chelates (EDTA, LMOWA, humic substances etc.) along with old Attar of rose plants, time requires for complete remediation of contaminated site can be reduced to practically applicable time period. Moreover, the use of Pelargonium for remediation has several additional practical, esthetical and economic advantages. The extraction of value-added essential oils from harvested biomass could offset the cost of deploying phytoremediation and renders it as a viable approach for remediating highly contaminated soils, on large scale. Keywords: metal uptake, Pelargonium, phytoremediation, cultivar, soil-plant transfer and kinetic. References Pourrut, B., Shahid, M., Dumat, C., Winterton, P., Pinelli, E., 2011a. Lead uptake, toxicity and detoxification in plants. Rev. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 213, 113-136. Shahid

  10. Diminished Vision in Healthy Aging Is Associated with Increased Retinal L-Type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Ion Influx

    PubMed Central

    Bissig, David; Goebel, Dennis; Berkowitz, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive evidence implicates an increase in hippocampal L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC) expression, and ion influx through these channels, in age-related cognitive declines. Here, we ask if this “calcium hypothesis" applies to the neuroretina: Is increased influx via L-VGCCs related to the well-documented but poorly-understood vision declines in healthy aging? In Long-Evans rats we find a significant age-related increase in ion flux through retinal L-VGCCs in vivo (manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI)) that are longitudinally linked with progressive vision declines (optokinetic tracking). Importantly, the degree of retinal Mn2+ uptake early in adulthood significantly predicted later visual contrast sensitivity declines. Furthermore, as in the aging hippocampus, retinal expression of a drug-insensitive L-VGCC isoform (α1D) increased – a pattern confirmed in vivo by an age-related decline in sensitivity to L-VGCC blockade. These data highlight mechanistic similarities between retinal and hippocampal aging, and raise the possibility of new treatment targets for minimizing vision loss during healthy aging. PMID:23457553

  11. The adipokine leptin increases skeletal muscle mass and significantly alters skeletal muscle miRNA expression profile in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, Mark W.; Herberg, Samuel; Arounleut, Phonepasong; He, Hong-Zhi; Shiver, Austin; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhou, Li; Isales, Carlos M.; and others

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Aging is associated with muscle atrophy and loss of muscle mass, known as the sarcopenia of aging. {yields} We demonstrate that age-related muscle atrophy is associated with marked changes in miRNA expression in muscle. {yields} Treating aged mice with the adipokine leptin significantly increased muscle mass and the expression of miRNAs involved in muscle repair. {yields} Recombinant leptin therapy may therefore be a novel approach for treating age-related muscle atrophy. -- Abstract: Age-associated loss of muscle mass, or sarcopenia, contributes directly to frailty and an increased risk of falls and fractures among the elderly. Aged mice and elderly adults both show decreased muscle mass as well as relatively low levels of the fat-derived hormone leptin. Here we demonstrate that loss of muscle mass and myofiber size with aging in mice is associated with significant changes in the expression of specific miRNAs. Aging altered the expression of 57 miRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle, and many of these miRNAs are now reported to be associated specifically with age-related muscle atrophy. These include miR-221, previously identified in studies of myogenesis and muscle development as playing a role in the proliferation and terminal differentiation of myogenic precursors. We also treated aged mice with recombinant leptin, to determine whether leptin therapy could improve muscle mass and alter the miRNA expression profile of aging skeletal muscle. Leptin treatment significantly increased hindlimb muscle mass and extensor digitorum longus fiber size in aged mice. Furthermore, the expression of 37 miRNAs was altered in muscles of leptin-treated mice. In particular, leptin treatment increased the expression of miR-31 and miR-223, miRNAs known to be elevated during muscle regeneration and repair. These findings suggest that aging in skeletal muscle is associated with marked changes in the expression of specific miRNAs, and that nutrient

  12. Effects of reaction time variability and age on brain activity during Stroop task performance.

    PubMed

    Tam, Angela; Luedke, Angela C; Walsh, Jeremy J; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Garcia, Angeles

    2015-09-01

    Variability in reaction time during task performance may reflect fluctuations in attention and cause reduced performance in goal-directed tasks, yet it is unclear whether the mechanisms behind this phenomenon change with age. Using fMRI, we tested young and cognitively healthy older adults with the Stroop task to determine whether aging affects the neural mechanisms underlying intra-individual reaction time variability. We found significant between-group differences in BOLD activity modulated by reaction time. In older adults, longer reaction times were associated with greater activity in frontoparietal attentional areas, while in younger adults longer reaction times were associated with greater activity in default mode network areas. Our results suggest that the neural correlates of reaction time variability change with healthy aging, reinforcing the concept of functional plasticity to maintain high cognitive function throughout the lifespan.

  13. Advanced paternal age increases the risk of schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejing; Liu, Xiang; Luo, Hongrong; Deng, Wei; Zhao, Gaofeng; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Lan; Ma, Xiaohong; Liu, Xiehe; Murray, Robin A; Collier, David A; Li, Tao

    2012-08-15

    Using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, patient and non-patient version (SCID-P/NP), this study investigated 351 patients with schizophrenia, 122 with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and 238 unrelated healthy volunteers in a Chinese Han population. The relative risks posed by advanced paternal age for schizophrenia and OCD in offspring were computed under logistic regression analyses and adjusted for the participant's sex, age and co-parent age at birth. Compared to the offspring with paternal age of 25-29 years old, the relative risks rose from 2.660 to 10.183 in the paternal age range of 30-34 and ≥35. The relative risks for OCD increased from 2.225 to 5.413 in 30-34 and ≥35. For offspring with paternal age of <25, the odds ratios of developing schizophrenia and OCD were 0.628 and 0.289 respectively, whereas an association between increased maternal age and risk for schizophrenia/OCD was not seen. Interaction analysis showed an interaction effect between paternal age and maternal age at birth. Such a tendency of risk affected by parental age for schizophrenia and OCD existed after splitting out the data of early onset patients. Sex-specific analyses found that the relative risks for schizophrenia with paternal age of 30-34 and ≥35 in male offspring were 2.407 and 10.893, and in female offspring were 3.080 and 9.659. The relative risks for OCD with paternal age of 30-34 and ≥35 in male offspring were 3.493 and 7.373, and in female offspring 2.005 and 4.404. The mean paternal age of schizophrenia/OCD patients born before the early 1980s was much greater than that of patients who were born after then. The findings illustrated that advanced paternal age is associated with increased risk for both schizophrenia and OCD in a Chinese Han population, prominently when paternal age is over 35. Biological and non-biological mechanisms may both be involved in the effects of advanced paternal age on schizophrenia and OCD.

  14. Diverse Family Types and Out-Of-School Learning Time of Young School Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    =Sources of differentials in out-of-school learning time between children in first marriage biological parent families and children in six nontraditional family types are identified. Analyses of time diaries reveal that children in four of the six nontraditional family types spend fewer minutes learning than do children in first marriage biological parent families. In all four cases, however, the differentials are explained by the presence of siblings age 18+, lower levels of family income, or younger maternal age. PMID:21532970

  15. Effectiveness of Surgical Release in Patients With Neglected Congenital Muscular Torticollis According to Age at the Time of Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyung-Jay; Ahn, Ah-Reum; Park, Eun-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the correlation between change in spinal deformities after surgical release and age at the time of surgery, and the effectiveness of surgical release in patients with neglected congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). Methods This was a retrospective study of 46 subjects with neglected CMT who had undergone surgical release at age ≥5 years at a tertiary medical center between January 2009 and January 2014. Spinal deformities were measured on anteroposterior plain radiographs of the cervical and whole spine, both preoperatively and postoperatively, to assess 3 parameters: cervicomandibular angle (CMA), lateral shift (LS), and Cobb angle (CA). We analyzed the change in spinal deformities after surgical release in consideration of age at the time of surgery. Results The median age at the time of surgery was 12.87 years. All 3 parameters showed significant improvement after surgical release (median values, pre- to post-surgery: CMA, 12.13° to 4.02°; LS, 18.13 mm to 13.55 mm; CA, 6.10° to 4.80°; all p<0.05). There was no significant correlation between age at the time of surgery and change in CMA (R=0.145, p=0.341) and LS (R=0.103, p=0.608). However, CA showed significant improvement with increasing age (R=0.150, p=0.046). Conclusion We assessed the correlation between change in spinal deformities after surgical release and age at the time of surgery. We found that that surgical release is effective for spinal deformities, even in older patients. These findings enhance our understanding of the effectiveness and timing of surgical release in patients with neglected CMT. PMID:26949667

  16. Learning to eat vegetables in early life: the role of timing, age and individual eating traits.

    PubMed

    Caton, Samantha J; Blundell, Pam; Ahern, Sara M; Nekitsing, Chandani; Olsen, Annemarie; Møller, Per; Hausner, Helene; Remy, Eloïse; Nicklaus, Sophie; Chabanet, Claire; Issanchou, Sylvie; Hetherington, Marion M

    2014-01-01

    Vegetable intake is generally low among children, who appear to be especially fussy during the pre-school years. Repeated exposure is known to enhance intake of a novel vegetable in early life but individual differences in response to familiarisation have emerged from recent studies. In order to understand the factors which predict different responses to repeated exposure, data from the same experiment conducted in three groups of children from three countries (n = 332) aged 4-38 m (18.9±9.9 m) were combined and modelled. During the intervention period each child was given between 5 and 10 exposures to a novel vegetable (artichoke puree) in one of three versions (basic, sweet or added energy). Intake of basic artichoke puree was measured both before and after the exposure period. Overall, younger children consumed more artichoke than older children. Four distinct patterns of eating behaviour during the exposure period were defined. Most children were "learners" (40%) who increased intake over time. 21% consumed more than 75% of what was offered each time and were labelled "plate-clearers". 16% were considered "non-eaters" eating less than 10 g by the 5th exposure and the remainder were classified as "others" (23%) since their pattern was highly variable. Age was a significant predictor of eating pattern, with older pre-school children more likely to be non-eaters. Plate-clearers had higher enjoyment of food and lower satiety responsiveness than non-eaters who scored highest on food fussiness. Children in the added energy condition showed the smallest change in intake over time, compared to those in the basic or sweetened artichoke condition. Clearly whilst repeated exposure familiarises children with a novel food, alternative strategies that focus on encouraging initial tastes of the target food might be needed for the fussier and older pre-school children.

  17. B cells in the aging immune system: time to consider B-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Holodick, Nichol E; Rothstein, Thomas L

    2015-12-01

    The investigation of immune senescence has uncovered many changes in B cell development, maintenance, and function with increasing age. However, most of these studies have focused on conventional B cell subsets in the spleen. The B-1 cell subset is an essential arm of the innate immune system, which in general has been understudied in terms of immune senescence. Here, we review what is currently known about B cells during aging and go on to describe why B-1 cell biology is an important component of the aging immune system in the context of diseases that most affect the aged population.

  18. Estimating survival rates with time series of standing age-structure data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udevitz, Mark S.; Gogan, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that age-structure data contain useful information for assessing the status and dynamics of wildlife populations. For example, age-specific survival rates can be estimated with just a single sample from the age distribution of a stable, stationary population. For a population that is not stable, age-specific survival rates can be estimated using techniques such as inverse methods that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data. However, estimation of survival rates using these methods typically requires numerical optimization, a relatively long time series of data, and smoothing or other constraints to provide useful estimates. We developed general models for possibly unstable populations that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data to provide explicit maximum likelihood estimators of age-specific survival rates with as few as two years of data. As an example, we applied these methods to estimate survival rates for female bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone National Park, USA. This approach provides a simple tool for monitoring survival rates based on age-structure data.

  19. Age-dependent inhibition of pentobarbital sleeping time by ozone in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, A.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Leonard, D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of age on the metabolism of pentobarbital in mice and rats was investigated following exposure to 0.3 ppm of ozone for 3.75 hr. Young animals were 2.5 months of age and the mature were 18 months. The pentobarbital sleeping time was significantly prolonged following the ozone exposure in both the mice and rats when compared with an air control. No ozone effect on sleeping time was found in the young animals. The results indicate that there may be an age-related sensitivity to the occurrence of ozone-related inhibition of pentobarbital metabolism.

  20. Use of age-adjusted rates of suicide in time series studies in Israel.

    PubMed

    Bridges, F Stephen; Tankersley, William B

    2009-01-01

    Durkheim's modified theory of suicide was examined to explore how consistent it was in predicting Israeli rates of suicide from 1965 to 1997 when using age-adjusted rates rather than crude ones. In this time-series study, Israeli male and female rates of suicide increased and decreased, respectively, between 1965 and 1997. Conforming to Durkheim's modified theory, the Israeli male rate of suicide was lower in years when rates of marriage and birth are higher, while rates of suicide are higher in years when rates of divorce are higher, the opposite to that of Israeli women. The corrected regression coefficients suggest that the Israeli female rate of suicide remained lower in years when rate of divorce is higher, again the opposite suggested by Durkheim's modified theory. These results may indicate that divorce affects the mental health of Israeli women as suggested by their lower rate of suicide. Perhaps the "multiple roles held by Israeli females creates suicidogenic stress" and divorce provides some sense of stress relief, mentally speaking. The results were not as consistent with predictions suggested by Durkheim's modified theory of suicide as were rates from the United States for the same period nor were they consistent with rates based on "crude" suicide data. Thus, using age-adjusted rates of suicide had an influence on the prediction of the Israeli rate of suicide during this period.

  1. Resiliency Over Time of Elders’ Age Stereotypes After Encountering Stressful Events

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Martin D.; Chung, Pil H.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether the age stereotypes of older individuals would become more negative or else show resiliency following stressful events and to examine whether age-stereotype negativity would increase the likelihood of experiencing a stressful event (i.e., hospitalization). Method. Age stereotypes of 231 participants, 70 years and older, were assessed across 10 years, before and after the occurrence of hospitalizations and bereavements. Results. Age-stereotype negativity was resilient despite encountering stressful events. In contrast, more negative age stereotypes were associated with a 50% greater likelihood of experiencing a hospitalization. Discussion. The robustness of negative age stereotypes was expressed in their capacity to resist change as well as generate it. PMID:24997287

  2. Increased hepatic CD36 expression with age is associated with enhanced susceptibility to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheedfar, Fareeba; Sung, Miranda MY; Aparicio-Vergara, Marcela; Kloosterhuis, Niels J; Miquilena-Colina, Maria Eugenia; Vargas-Castrillón, Javier; Febbraio, Maria; Jacobs, René L; de Bruin, Alain; Vinciguerra, Manlio; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Hofker, Marten H; Dyck, Jason RB; Koonen, Debby PY

    2014-01-01

    CD36 has been associated with obesity and diabetes in human liver diseases, however, its role in age-associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Therefore, liver biopsies were collected from individuals with histologically normal livers (n=30), and from patients diagnosed with simple steatosis (NAS; n=26). Patients were divided into two groups according to age and liver biopsy samples were immunostained for CD36. NAFLD parameters were examined in young (12-week) and middle-aged (52-week) C57BL/6J mice, some fed with chow-diet and some fed with low-fat (LFD; 10% kcal fat) or high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal fat) for 12-weeks. CD36 expression was positively associated with age in individuals with normal livers but not in NAS patients. However, CD36 was predominantly located at the plasma membrane of hepatocytes in aged NAS patients as compared to young. In chow-fed mice, aging, despite an increase in hepatic CD36 expression, was not associated with the development of NAFLD. However, middle-aged mice did exhibit the development of HFD-induced NAFLD, mediated by an increase of CD36 on the membrane. Enhanced CD36-mediated hepatic fat uptake may contribute to an accelerated progression of NAFLD in mice and humans. Therapies to prevent the increase in CD36 expression and/or CD36 from anchoring at the membrane may prevent the development of NAFLD. PMID:24751397

  3. Increased radial glia quiescence, decreased reactivation upon injury and unaltered neuroblast behavior underlie decreased neurogenesis in the aging zebrafish telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Kathrin; Glashauser, Lena; Sprungala, Susanne; Hesl, Birgit; Fritschle, Maike; Ninkovic, Jovica; Godinho, Leanne; Chapouton, Prisca

    2013-09-01

    The zebrafish has recently become a source of new data on the mechanisms of neural stem cell (NSC) maintenance and ongoing neurogenesis in adult brains. In this vertebrate, neurogenesis occurs at high levels in all ventricular regions of the brain, and brain injuries recover successfully, owing to the recruitment of radial glia, which function as NSCs. This new vertebrate model of adult neurogenesis is thus advancing our knowledge of the molecular cues in use for the activation of NSCs and fate of their progeny. Because the regenerative potential of somatic stem cells generally weakens with increasing age, it is important to assess the extent to which zebrafish NSC potential decreases or remains unaltered with age. We found that neurogenesis in the ventricular zone, in the olfactory bulb, and in a newly identified parenchymal zone of the telencephalon indeed declines as the fish ages and that oligodendrogenesis also declines. In the ventricular zone, the radial glial cell population remains largely unaltered morphologically but enters less frequently into the cell cycle and hence produces fewer neuroblasts. The neuroblasts themselves do not change their behavior with age and produce the same number of postmitotic neurons. Thus, decreased neurogenesis in the physiologically aging zebrafish brain is correlated with an increasing quiescence of radial glia. After injuries, radial glia in aged brains are reactivated, and the percentage of cell cycle entry is increased in the radial glia population. However, this reaction is far less pronounced than in younger animals, pointing to irreversible changes in aging zebrafish radial glia.

  4. Increased telomere length and proliferative potential in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of adults of different ages stimulated with concanavalin A

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, a direct correlation with telomere length, proliferative potential and telomerase activity has been found in the process of aging in peripheral blood cells. The objective of the study was to evaluate telomere length and proliferative potential in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after stimulation with Concanavalin A (ConA) of young adults compared with older adults. Methods Blood samples were obtained from 20 healthy young males (20–25 years old) (group Y) and 20 males (60–65 years old) (group O). We compared PBMC proliferation before and after stimulation with ConA. DNA was isolated from cells separated before and after culture with ConA for telomeric measurement by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results In vitro stimulation of PBMCs from young subjects induced an increase of telomere length as well as a higher replicative capacity of cell proliferation. Samples from older adults showed higher loss of telomeric DNA (p = 0.03) and higher levels of senescent (≤6.2 kb) telomeric DNA (p = 0.02) and displayed a marked decrease of proliferation capacity. Viability cell counts and CFSE tracking in 72-h-old cell cultures indicated that group O PBMCs (CD8+ and CD4+ T cells) underwent fewer mitotic cycles and had shorter telomeres than group Y (p = 0.04). Conclusions Our findings confirm that telomere length in older-age adults is shorter than in younger subjects. After stimulation with ConA, cells are not restored to the previous telomere length and undergo replicative senescence. This is in sharp contrast to the response observed in young adults after ConA stimulation where cells increase in telomere length and replicative capacity. The mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are not yet clear and merit further investigation. PMID:24063536

  5. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  6. Resveratrol prevents age-related memory and mood dysfunction with increased hippocampal neurogenesis and microvasculature, and reduced glial activation.

    PubMed

    Kodali, Maheedhar; Parihar, Vipan K; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2015-01-28

    Greatly waned neurogenesis, diminished microvasculature, astrocyte hypertrophy and activated microglia are among the most conspicuous structural changes in the aged hippocampus. Because these alterations can contribute to age-related memory and mood impairments, strategies efficacious for mitigating these changes may preserve cognitive and mood function in old age. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in the skin of red grapes having angiogenic and antiinflammatory properties, appears ideal for easing these age-related changes. Hence, we examined the efficacy of resveratrol for counteracting age-related memory and mood impairments and the associated detrimental changes in the hippocampus. Two groups of male F344 rats in late middle-age having similar learning and memory abilities were chosen and treated with resveratrol or vehicle for four weeks. Analyses at ~25 months of age uncovered improved learning, memory and mood function in resveratrol-treated animals but impairments in vehicle-treated animals. Resveratrol-treated animals also displayed increased net neurogenesis and microvasculature, and diminished astrocyte hypertrophy and microglial activation in the hippocampus. These results provide novel evidence that resveratrol treatment in late middle age is efficacious for improving memory and mood function in old age. Modulation of the hippocampus plasticity and suppression of chronic low-level inflammation appear to underlie the functional benefits mediated by resveratrol.

  7. Spermidine Suppresses Age-Associated Memory Impairment by Preventing Adverse Increase of Presynaptic Active Zone Size and Release

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun K.; Pech, Ulrike; Fulterer, Andreas; Ender, Anatoli; Mauermann, Stephan F.; Andlauer, Till F. M.; Beuschel, Christine; Thriene, Kerstin; Quentin, Christine; Schwärzel, Martin; Mielke, Thorsten; Madeo, Frank; Dengjel, Joern; Fiala, André; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2016-01-01

    Memories are assumed to be formed by sets of synapses changing their structural or functional performance. The efficacy of forming new memories declines with advancing age, but the synaptic changes underlying age-induced memory impairment remain poorly understood. Recently, we found spermidine feeding to specifically suppress age-dependent impairments in forming olfactory memories, providing a mean to search for synaptic changes involved in age-dependent memory impairment. Here, we show that a specific synaptic compartment, the presynaptic active zone (AZ), increases the size of its ultrastructural elaboration and releases significantly more synaptic vesicles with advancing age. These age-induced AZ changes, however, were fully suppressed by spermidine feeding. A genetically enforced enlargement of AZ scaffolds (four gene-copies of BRP) impaired memory formation in young animals. Thus, in the Drosophila nervous system, aging AZs seem to steer towards the upper limit of their operational range, limiting synaptic plasticity and contributing to impairment of memory formation. Spermidine feeding suppresses age-dependent memory impairment by counteracting these age-dependent changes directly at the synapse. PMID:27684064

  8. Age-related increase in top-down activation of visual features

    PubMed Central

    Madden, David J.; Spaniol, Julia; Bucur, Barbara; Whiting, Wythe L.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research suggests that, during visual search and discrimination tasks, older adults place greater emphasis than younger adults on top-down attention. This experiment investigated the relative contribution of target activation and distractor inhibition to this age difference. Younger and older adults performed a singleton discrimination task in which either an E or an R target (colour singleton) was present among distractor letters. Relative to a baseline condition in which the colours of the targets and distractors remained constant, an age-related slowing of performance was evident when either the colour of the target or that of the distractors varied across trials. The age-related slowing was more pronounced in response to target colour variation, suggesting that older adults place relatively greater emphasis on the top-down activation of target features. PMID:17455072

  9. The Oportunidades program increases the linear growth of children enrolled at young ages in urban Mexico.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Jef L; García-Guerra, Armando; García, Raquel; Dominguez, Clara; Rivera, Juan; Neufeld, Lynnette M

    2008-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of Mexico's conditional cash transfer program, Oportunidades, on the growth of children <24 mo of age living in urban areas. Beneficiary families received cash transfers, a fortified food (targeted to pregnant and lactating women, children 6-23 mo, and children with low weight 2-4 y), and curative health services, among other benefits. Program benefits were conditional on preventative health care utilization and attendance of health and nutrition education sessions. We estimated the impact of the program after 2 y of operation in a panel of 432 children <24 mo of age at baseline (2002). We used difference-in-difference propensity score matching, which takes into account nonrandom program participation and the effects of unobserved fixed characteristics on outcomes. All models controlled for child age, sex, baseline anthropometry, and maternal height. Anthropometric Z-scores were calculated using the new WHO growth reference standards. There was no overall association between program participation and growth in children 6 to 24 mo of age. Children in intervention families younger than 6 mo of age at baseline grew 1.5 cm (P < 0.05) more than children in comparison families, corresponding to 0.41 height-for-age Z-scores (HAZ) (P < 0.05). They also gained an additional 0.76 kg (P < 0.01) or 0.47 weight-for-height Z-scores (P < 0.05). Children living in the poorest intervention households tended (0.05 < P < 0.10) to be taller than comparison children (0.9 cm, 0.27 HAZ). Oportunidades, with its strong nutrition component, is an effective tool to improve the growth of infants in poor urban households.

  10. Ergodicity breaking, ageing, and confinement in generalized diffusion processes with position and time dependent diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    We study generalized anomalous diffusion processes whose diffusion coefficient D(x, t) ∼ D0|x|αtβ depends on both the position x of the test particle and the process time t. This process thus combines the features of scaled Brownian motion and heterogeneous diffusion parent processes. We compute the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements of this generalized diffusion process. The scaling exponent of the ensemble averaged mean squared displacement is shown to be the product of the critical exponents of the parent processes, and describes both subdiffusive and superdiffusive systems. We quantify the amplitude fluctuations of the time averaged mean squared displacement as function of the length of the time series and the lag time. In particular, we observe a weak ergodicity breaking of this generalized diffusion process: even in the long time limit the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements are strictly disparate. When we start to observe this process some time after its initiation we observe distinct features of ageing. We derive a universal ageing factor for the time averaged mean squared displacement containing all information on the ageing time and the measurement time. External confinement is shown to alter the magnitudes and statistics of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements.

  11. Age-related increases in F344 rat intestine microsomal quercetin glucuronidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to establish the extent age modifies intestinal quercetin glucuronidation capacity. Pooled microsomal fractions of three equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats (n=8/group) were employed to model the enzyme kinetics of UDP-gl...

  12. Aging Reduces Veridical Remembering but Increases False Remembering: Neuropsychological Test Correlates of Remember-Know Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, David P.; Roediger, Henry L., III; McDaniel, Mark A.; Balota, David A.

    2009-01-01

    In 1985 Tulving introduced the remember-know procedure, whereby subjects are asked to distinguish between memories that involve retrieval of contextual details (remembering) and memories that do not (knowing). Several studies have been reported showing age-related declines in remember hits, which has typically been interpreted as supporting…

  13. Anticipatory Action Planning Increases from 3 to 10 Years of Age in Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jongbloed-Pereboom, Marjolein; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.; Saraber-Schiphorst, Nicole; Craje, Celine; Steenbergen, Bert

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the development of action planning in a group of typically developing children aged 3 to 10 years (N = 351). The second aim was to assess reliability of the action planning task and to relate the results of the action planning task to results of validated upper limb motor performance tests. Participants…

  14. Advancing Maternal Age Is Associated with Increasing Risk for Autism: A Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandin, Sven; Hultman, Christina M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Gross, Raz; MacCabe, James H.; Reichenberg, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies investigating the association between maternal age and autism. Method: Using recommended guidelines for performing meta-analyses, we systematically selected, and extracted results from, epidemiological scientific studies reported before January 2012. We calculated pooled risk…

  15. Nitric oxide availability is increased in contracting skeletal muscle from aged mice, but does not differentially decrease muscle superoxide.

    PubMed

    Pearson, T; McArdle, A; Jackson, M J

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species have been implicated in the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function that occurs during aging. Nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide are generated by skeletal muscle and where these are generated in proximity their chemical reaction to form peroxynitrite can compete with the superoxide dismutation to hydrogen peroxide. Changes in NO availability may therefore theoretically modify superoxide and peroxynitrite activities in tissues, but published data are contradictory regarding aging effects on muscle NO availability. We hypothesised that an age-related increase in NO generation might increase peroxynitrite generation in muscles from old mice, leading to an increased nitration of muscle proteins and decreased superoxide availability. This was examined using fluorescent probes and an isolated fiber preparation to examine NO content and superoxide in the cytosol and mitochondria of muscle fibers from adult and old mice both at rest and following contractile activity. We also examined the 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and peroxiredoxin 5 (Prx5) content of muscles from mice as markers of peroxynitrite activity. Data indicate that a substantial age-related increase in NO levels occurred in muscle fibers during contractile activity and this was associated with an increase in muscle eNOS. Muscle proteins from old mice also showed an increased 3-NT content. Inhibition of NOS indicated that NO decreased superoxide bioavailability in muscle mitochondria, although this effect was not age related. Thus increased NO in muscles of old mice was associated with an increased 3-NT content that may potentially contribute to age-related degenerative changes in skeletal muscle.

  16. Preterm birth is associated with an increased fundamental frequency of spontaneous crying in human infants at term-equivalent age

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Yuta; Kawai, Masahiko; Niwa, Fusako; Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2014-01-01

    Human infant crying has been researched as a non-invasive tool for assessing neurophysiological states at an early developmental stage. Little is known about the acoustic features of spontaneous cries in preterm infants, although their pain-induced cries are at a higher fundamental frequency (F0) before term-equivalent age. In this study, we investigated the effects of gestational age, body size at recording and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) on the F0 of spontaneous cries in healthy preterm and full-term infants at term-equivalent age. We found that shorter gestational age was significantly associated with higher F0, although neither smaller body size at recording nor IUGR was related to increased F0 in preterm infants. These findings suggest that the increased F0 of spontaneous cries is not caused by their smaller body size, but instead might be caused by more complicated neurophysiological states owing to their different intrauterine and extrauterine experiences. PMID:25122740

  17. Increased Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Detection in Women of Childbearing Age and Potential Risk for Vertical Transmission - United States and Kentucky, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Koneru, Alaya; Nelson, Noele; Hariri, Susan; Canary, Lauren; Sanders, Kathy J; Maxwell, Justine F; Huang, Xiaohua; Leake, John A D; Ward, John W; Vellozzi, Claudia

    2016-07-22

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality (1). Transmission of HCV is primarily via parenteral blood exposure, and HCV can be transmitted vertically from mother to child. Vertical transmission occurs in 5.8% (95% confidence interval = 4.2%-7.8%) of infants born to women who are infected only with HCV and in up to twice as many infants born to women who are also infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (2) or who have high HCV viral loads (3,4); there is currently no recommended intervention to prevent transmission of infection from mother to child (3). Increased reported incidence of HCV infection among persons aged ≤30 years (5,6) with similar increases among women and men in this age group (6), raises concern about increases in the number of pregnant women with HCV infection, and in the number of infants who could be exposed to HCV at birth. Data from one large commercial laboratory and birth certificate data were used to investigate trends in HCV detection among women of childbearing age,* HCV testing among children aged ≤2 years, and the proportions of infants born to HCV-infected women nationally and in Kentucky, the state with the highest incidence of acute HCV infection during 2011-2014 (6). During 2011-2014, commercial laboratory data indicated that national rates of HCV detection (antibody or RNA positivity(†)) among women of childbearing age increased 22%, and HCV testing (antibody or RNA) among children aged ≤2 years increased 14%; birth certificate data indicated that the proportion of infants born to HCV-infected mothers increased 68%, from 0.19% to 0.32%. During the same time in Kentucky, the HCV detection rate among women of childbearing age increased >200%, HCV testing among children aged ≤2 years increased 151%, and the proportion of infants born to HCV-infected women increased 124%, from 0.71% to 1.59%. Increases in the rate of HCV detection among women of childbearing age

  18. Release of quantum dot nanoparticles in porous media: role of cation exchange and aging time.

    PubMed

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu; Masoudih, Arash

    2013-10-15

    Understanding the fate and transport of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in subsurface environments is required for developing the best strategy for waste management and disposal of these materials. In this study, the deposition and release of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles were studied in saturated sand columns. The QDs were first deposited in columns using 100 mM NaCl or 2 mM CaC12 solutions. Deposited QDs were then contacted with deionized (DI) water and/or varying Na(+) concentrations to induce release. QDs deposited in 100 mM Na(+) were easily reversible when the column was rinsed with DI water. Conversely, QDs deposited in the presence of Ca(2+) exhibited resistance to release with DI water. However, significant release occurred when the columns were flushed with NaCl solutions. This release behavior was explained by cation exchange (Ca(2+) in exchange sites were replaced by Na(+)) which resulted in the breakdown of calcium bridging. We also studied the effect of aging time on the QD release. As the aging time increased, smaller amounts of QDs were released following cation exchange. However, deposited QDs were subsequently released when the column was flushed with DI water. The release behavior was modeled using a single first-order kinetic release process and changes in the maximum solid phase concentration of deposited QDs with transition in solution chemistry. The results of this study demonstrate that the presence of carboxyl groups on ENPs and divalent ions in the solution plays a key role in controlling ENP mobility in the subsurface environment.

  19. Age Dating Fluvial Sediment Storage Reservoirs to Construct Sediment Waiting Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalak, K.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Benthem, A.; Karwan, D. L.; Mahan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Suspended sediment transport is an important geomorphic process that can often control the transport of nutrients and contaminants. The time a particle spends in storage remains a critical knowledge gap in understanding particle trajectories through landscapes. We dated floodplain deposits in South River, VA, using fallout radionuclides (Pb-210, Cs-137), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and radiocarbon dating to determine sediment ages and construct sediment waiting time distributions. We have a total of 14 age dates in two eroding banks. We combine these age dates with a well-constrained history of mercury concentrations on suspended sediment in the river from an industrial release. Ages from fallout radionuclides document sedimentation from the early 1900s to the present, and agree with the history of mercury contamination. OSL dates span approximately 200 to 17,000 years old. We performed a standard Weibull analysis of nonexceedance to construct a waiting time distribution of floodplain sediment for the South River. The mean waiting time for floodplain sediment is 2930 years, while the median is approximately 710 years. When the floodplain waiting time distribution is combined with the waiting time distribution for in-channel sediment storage (available from previous studies), the mean waiting time shifts to approximately 680 years, suggesting that quantifying sediment waiting times for both channel and floodplain storage is critical in advancing knowledge of particle trajectories through watersheds.

  20. The Relationship of Time Perspective to Age, Gender, and Academic Achievement among Academically Talented Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Zena R.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2006-01-01

    Time perspective is a useful psychological construct associated with educational outcomes (Phalet, Andriessen, & Lens, 2004) and may prove fruitful for research focusing on academically talented adolescents. Thus, the relationship of time perspective to age, gender, and academic achievement was examined among 722 academically talented middle and…

  1. Time Delay Embedding Increases Estimation Precision of Models of Intraindividual Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Oertzen, Timo; Boker, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the precision of parameters estimated from local samples of time dependent functions. We find that "time delay embedding," i.e., structuring data prior to analysis by constructing a data matrix of overlapping samples, increases the precision of parameter estimates and in turn statistical power compared to standard…

  2. Increasing On-Task Behavior Using Teacher Attention Delivered on a Fixed-Time Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Jessica L.; McKevitt, Brian C.; Shriver, Mark D.; Allen, Keith D.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of fixed-time delivery of attention to increase the on-task behavior of 2 students in general education was examined. The teacher in this study provided attention to students on a 5-min fixed-time schedule and responded to students in her typical manner between cued intervals. An ABAB withdrawal design was used to test the…

  3. Increased low back pain prevalence in females than in males after menopause age: evidences based on synthetic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wáng, Jùn-Qīng; Káplár, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Female sex hormones play an important role in the etiology and pathophysiology of a variety of musculoskeletal degenerative diseases. Postmenopausal women show accelerated disc degeneration due to relative estrogen deficiency. This literature review aims to validate or falsify this hypothesis, i.e., while overall females have higher prevalence of low back pain (LBP) across all age groups, this male vs. female difference in LBP prevalence further increases after female menopause age. The literature search was performed on PubMed on January 2, 2016. The search word combination was (low back pain) AND prevalence AND [(males OR men) AND (females OR women)]. The following criteria were taken to include the papers for synthetic analysis: (I) only English primary literatures on nonspecific pain; (II) only prospective studies on general population, but not population with occupational LBP causes, of both males and female subjects studied using the same LBP criterion, ages-specific information available, and males and female subjects were age-matched; (III) studies without major quality flaws. In total 98 studies with 772,927 subjects were analyzed. According to the information in the literature, participant subjects were divided into four age groups: (I) school age children group: 6–19 years; (II) young and middle aged group: 20–50 years; (III) mixed age group: data from studies did not differentiate age groups; (IV) elderly group: ≥50 years old. When individual studies were not weighted by participant number and each individual study is represented as one entry regardless of their sample size, the median LBP prevalence ratio of female vs. males was 1.310, 1.140, 1.220, and 1.270 respectively for the four age groups. When individual studies were weighted by participant number, the LBP prevalence ratio of female vs. males was 1.360, 1.127, 1.185, and 1.280 respectively for the four groups. The higher LBP prevalence in school age girls than in school age boys is likely

  4. Height loss starting in middle age predicts increased mortality in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Masunari, Naomi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Takahashi, Ikuno; Yamada, Michiko; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mortality risk among Japanese men and women with height loss starting in middle age, taking into account lifestyle and physical factors. A total of 2498 subjects (755 men and 1743 women) aged 47 to 91 years old underwent physical examinations during the period 1994 to 1995. Those individuals were followed for mortality status through 2003. Mortality risk was estimated using an age-stratified Cox proportional hazards model. In addition to sex, adjustment factors such as radiation dose, lifestyle, and physical factors measured at the baseline--including smoking status, alcohol intake, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and diagnosed diseases--were used for analysis of total mortality and mortality from each cause of death. There were a total of 302 all-cause deaths, 46 coronary heart disease and stroke deaths, 58 respiratory deaths including 45 pneumonia deaths, and 132 cancer deaths during the follow-up period. Participants were followed for 20,787 person-years after baseline. Prior history of vertebral deformity and hip fracture were not associated with mortality risk. However, more than 2 cm of height loss starting in middle age showed a significant association with all-cause mortality among the study participants (HR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.31 to 2.38, p = 0.0002), after adjustment was made for sex, attained age, atomic-bomb radiation exposure, and lifestyle and physical factors. Such height loss also was significantly associated with death due to coronary heart disease or stroke (HR = 3.35, 95% CI 1.63 to 6.86, p = 0.0010), as well as respiratory-disease death (HR = 2.52, 95% CI 1.25 to 5.22, p = 0.0130), but not cancer death. Continuous HL also was associated with all-cause mortality and CHD- or stroke-caused mortality. Association between height loss and mortality was still significant, even after excluding persons with vertebral deformity. Height loss of more than 2 cm starting in middle age

  5. Increased Serum Insulin Exposure Does Not Affect Age or Stage of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Diagnosis in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chao, David T.; Shah, Nilesh H.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Bahary, Nathan; Whitcomb, David C.; Brand, Randall E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In considering whether medications that increase insulin levels accelerate pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) development, we hypothesized that PC patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) who used exogenous insulin or insulin-stimulating medications should have an earlier age of diagnosis or present with more advanced disease. Methods Patients enrolled in our PC registry from 6/1/2003 to 5/31/2012 were stratified according to treatment solely with insulin, insulin-stimulating medications, or insulin-independent medications. Age of PC diagnosis, PC stage, and years between DM and PC diagnoses were analyzed among the cohorts. Results Of 122 DM patients (mean age: 67.4 ± 10.2 years), the mean age of PC diagnosis within the insulin-only (n=40), insulin-stimulating (n=11), insulin-independent (n=71), and non-DM (n=321) cohorts were 68.7 ± 10.5 years, 69.6 ± 10.8 years, 66.3 ± 9.7 years, and 65.5 ± 10.5 years, respectively. No significant difference among the age of PC diagnosis was observed based on duration or type of DM treatment. There was no correlation between PC stage and increased insulin exposure. Conclusions Anti-DM medications that increase exposure to insulin do not appear to accelerate PC development using outcomes of mean age of PC diagnosis, PC stage, or duration between DM and PC diagnoses. PMID:26418902

  6. Effect of Aging Time on Physicochemical Meat Quality and Sensory Property of Hanwoo Bull Beef.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soohyun; Kang, Sun Moon; Seong, Pilnam; Kang, Geunho; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Jinhyung; Lee, Seounghwan; Kim, Sidong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the meat quality and sensory properties of 12 major cuts from 10 Hanwoo bulls (25-32 mon of age) after they were aged at 2℃ for 0, 7, 14, and 21 d. Protein content (%) was between 19.17 and 22.50%. Intramuscular fat content ranged from 2.79 to 8.39%. The collagen content of the chuck roll, chuck tender, and short plate muscles was higher (1.97-2.04%) than that of the striploin muscles (1.48%) (p<0.05). CIE lightness (L*) values increased with an increase in aging days for tenderloin, loin, chuck roll, oyster blade, short plate, top sirloin, and eye of round muscles (p<0.05). Most muscles, except the short plate, showed no significant changes in redness CIE (a*) and yellowness (b*) color values during aging. The tenderloin, loin, and striploin showed significantly higher water holding capacity (58.60-62.06%) than that of chuck roll and short plate (53.86-57.07%) muscles (p<0.05). The Warner-Bratzler shear force values of most muscles decreased significantly as the aging period increased (p<0.05), exception the tenderloin. The chuck tender muscles showed the highest cooking loss, whereas tenderloin muscle showed the lowest (p<0.05). The tenderloin muscle had the longest sarcomere length (SL) (3.67-3.86 μm) and the bottom round muscle had the shortest SL (2.21-2.35 μm) (p<0.05). In the sensory evaluation, tenderness and overall-likeness scores of most muscles increased with increase in aging days. The tenderloin and oyster blade showed relatively higher tenderness and overall-likeness values than did the other muscles during the aging period. No significant differences were noted in juiciness and flavor-likeness scores among muscles and aging days.

  7. Effect of Aging Time on Physicochemical Meat Quality and Sensory Property of Hanwoo Bull Beef

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seounghwan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the meat quality and sensory properties of 12 major cuts from 10 Hanwoo bulls (25-32 mon of age) after they were aged at 2℃ for 0, 7, 14, and 21 d. Protein content (%) was between 19.17 and 22.50%. Intramuscular fat content ranged from 2.79 to 8.39%. The collagen content of the chuck roll, chuck tender, and short plate muscles was higher (1.97-2.04%) than that of the striploin muscles (1.48%) (p<0.05). CIE lightness (L*) values increased with an increase in aging days for tenderloin, loin, chuck roll, oyster blade, short plate, top sirloin, and eye of round muscles (p<0.05). Most muscles, except the short plate, showed no significant changes in redness CIE (a*) and yellowness (b*) color values during aging. The tenderloin, loin, and striploin showed significantly higher water holding capacity (58.60-62.06%) than that of chuck roll and short plate (53.86-57.07%) muscles (p<0.05). The Warner-Bratzler shear force values of most muscles decreased significantly as the aging period increased (p<0.05), exception the tenderloin. The chuck tender muscles showed the highest cooking loss, whereas tenderloin muscle showed the lowest (p<0.05). The tenderloin muscle had the longest sarcomere length (SL) (3.67-3.86 μm) and the bottom round muscle had the shortest SL (2.21-2.35 μm) (p<0.05). In the sensory evaluation, tenderness and overall-likeness scores of most muscles increased with increase in aging days. The tenderloin and oyster blade showed relatively higher tenderness and overall-likeness values than did the other muscles during the aging period. No significant differences were noted in juiciness and flavor-likeness scores among muscles and aging days. PMID:27499666

  8. Simulation of Transient Groundwater Age Distribution in Space and Time, Wairarapa Valley, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toews, M. W.; Daughney, C.; Morgenstern, U.; Petrus, K.; Evison, R.; Jackson, B. M.; Cornaton, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    The 3000 km2 Wairarapa Valley is an important agricultural region near Wellington, New Zealand. Improved management of land and water within the region requires understanding of the spatial and temporal variations of water age. This study combines the two main methods currently available for determination of water age: numerical groundwater models and hydrological tracers. A transient finite element groundwater flow and mass transport model was calibrated to match time series measurements of groundwater level and tritium concentration. The groundwater flow model incorporates spatio-temporal recharge, variable stream flow and levels, and variable pump rates. The time-marching Laplace transform Galerkin (TMLTG) technique was then used to evaluate the full spectrum of groundwater age (i.e. age distribution) at each model node and at each time step. To our knowledge this study is the first application of the TMLTG technique to a real-world example, made possible by the rich time-series dataset of tritium measurements that exists for the Wairarapa Valley. Results showed that travel time from the land surface through the aquifer system varies from a few years to several decades and is strongly dependent on location and time. Results also demonstrated important differences between the transient age distributions derived from the TMLTG technique compared to the much simpler steady-state lumped parameter models that are frequently applied to interpret age tracer data. Finally, results had direct application to land and water management, for example for identification of land areas where age distributions vary seasonally, affecting the security of groundwater supplies used for drinking water.

  9. Estimating Black Carbon Aging Time-Scales with a Particle-Resolved Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Nicole; West, Matt; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-01-13

    Understanding the aging process of aerosol particles is important for assessing their chemical reactivity, cloud condensation nuclei activity, radiative properties and health impacts. In this study we investigate the aging of black carbon containing particles in an idealized urban plume using a new approach, the particleresolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC. We present a method to estimate aging time-scales using an aging criterion based on cloud condensation nuclei activation. The results show a separation into a daytime regime where condensation dominates and a nighttime regime where coagulation dominates. For the chosen urban plume scenario, depending on the supersaturation threshold, the values for the aging timescales vary between 0.06 hours and 10 hours during the day, and between 6 hours and 20 hours during the night.

  10. Effects of Age and Task Load on Drivers’ Response Accuracy and Reaction Time When Responding to Traffic Lights

    PubMed Central

    Salvia, Emilie; Petit, Claire; Champely, Stéphane; Chomette, René; Di Rienzo, Franck; Collet, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Due to population aging, elderly drivers represent an increasing proportion of car drivers. Yet, how aging alters sensorimotor functions and impacts driving safety remains poorly understood. This paper aimed at assessing to which extent elderly drivers are sensitive to various task loads and how this affects the reaction time (RT) in a driving context. Old and middle-aged people completed RT tasks which reproduced cognitive demands encountered while driving. Participants had to detect and respond to traffic lights or traffic light arrows as quickly as possible, under three experimental conditions of incremental difficulty. In both groups, we hypothesized that decision-making would be impacted by the number of cues to be processed. The first test was a simple measure of RT. The second and third tests were choice RT tasks requiring the processing of 3 and 5 cues, respectively. Responses were collected within a 2 s time-window. Otherwise, the trial was considered a no-response. In both groups, the data revealed that RT, error rate (incorrect answers), and no-response rate increased along with task difficulty. However, the middle-aged group outperformed the elderly group. The RT difference between the two groups increased drastically along with task difficulty. In the third test, the rate of no-response suggested that elderly drivers needed more than 2 s to process complex information and respond accurately. Both prolonged RT and increased no-response rate, especially for difficult tasks, might attest an impairment of cognitive abilities in relation to aging. Accordingly, casual driving conditions for young drivers may be particularly complex and stressful for elderly people who should thus be informed about the effects of normal aging upon driving. PMID:27462266

  11. TIME PERSPECTIVE AND EXERCISE, OBESITY AND SMOKING: MODERATION OF ASSOCIATIONS BY AGE

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, LC; Butler, SC; Lessl, K; Ochi, O; Ward, MM

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Time perspective, a psychological construct denoting subjective orientation to either present or future concerns, has been inconsistently associated with healthy behaviors in adults. We hypothesized that associations would be stronger in young adults, who are first developing independent attitudes, than in older adults. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Three cities in the Mid-Atlantic region. Subjects 790 patrons of barber and beauty shops. Measures Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory future, present-fatalistic, and present-hedonistic subscales, current smoking, days per week of recreational exercise, and height and weight, by self-report. Analysis We tested if associations between time perspective and exercise, obesity, and current smoking differed by age group (18–24 years, 25–34 years, and 35 and older) using analysis of variance and logistic regression. Results Higher future time perspective scores, indicating greater focus on future events, was associated with more frequent exercise, while higher present-fatalistic time perspective scores, indicating more hopelessness, was associated with less frequent exercise in 18 – 24 year olds, but not in older individuals. Lower future time perspective scores, and higher present-hedonistic time perspective scores, indicating interest in pleasure-seeking, were also associated with obesity only in 18 – 24 year olds. Current smoking was not related to time perspective in any age group. Conclusion Time perspective has age-specific associations with exercise and obesity, suggesting stages when time perspective may influence health behavior decision-making. PMID:24200252

  12. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Impact of increasing ionic strength during synthesis, reflux, and hydrothermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Isley, Sara L.; Jordan, David S.; Penn, R. Lee

    2009-01-08

    This work investigates the role of ionic strength during synthesis, reflux, and hydrothermal aging of sol-gel synthesized titanium dioxide. Research presented here uses X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements to quantify anatase, brookite, and rutile phases as functions of synthetic and aging variables. In addition, the Scherrer equation is used to obtain average crystallite sizes for each phase quantified. Results presented in this work demonstrate that the most control over the sol-gel products can be obtained by modifying the pH during hydrolysis. In addition, while varying the ionic strength during reflux and hydrothermal aging can result in enhanced control over the crystalline phase and crystallite size, the most control can be achieved by varying the ionic strength during synthesis. Finally, sol-gel synthesis at low pH (-0.6) and high-chloride concentration (3 M NaCl) produced a heterogeneous sample composed of nanocrystalline anatase (3.8 nm) and rutile (2.9 nm)

  13. Meiosis in oocytes: predisposition to aneuploidy and its increased incidence with age.

    PubMed

    Jones, Keith T

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes begin meiosis in the fetal ovary, but only complete it when fertilized in the adult reproductive tract. This review examines the cell biology of this protracted process: from entry of primordial germ cells into meiosis to conception. The defining feature of meiosis is two consecutive cell divisions (meiosis I and II) and two cell cycle arrests: at the germinal vesicle (GV), dictyate stage of prophase I and at metaphase II. These arrests are spanned by three key events, the focus of this review: (i) passage from mitosis to GV arrest during fetal life, regulated by retinoic acid; (ii) passage through meiosis I and (iii) completion of meiosis II following fertilization, both meiotic divisions being regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK1) activity. Meiosis I in human oocytes is associated with an age-related high rate of chromosomal mis-segregation, such as trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome), resulting in aneuploid conceptuses. Although aneuploidy is likely to be multifactorial, oocytes from older women may be predisposed to be becoming aneuploid as a consequence of an age-long decline in the cohesive ties holding chromosomes together. Such loss goes undetected by the oocyte during meiosis I either because its ability to respond and block division also deteriorates with age, or as a consequence of being inherently unable to respond to the types of segregation defects induced by cohesion loss.

  14. MYBL2 haploinsufficiency increases susceptibility to age-related haematopoietic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, M; Dumon, S; Ward, C; Jäger, R; Freeman, S; Dawood, B; Sheriff, L; Lorvellec, M; Kralovics, R; Frampton, J; García, P

    2013-01-01

    The haematopoietic system is prone to age-related disorders ranging from deficits in functional blood cells to the development of neoplastic states. Such neoplasms often involve recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities, among which a deletion in the long arm of chromosome 20 (del20q) is common in myeloid malignancies. The del20q minimum deleted region contains nine genes, including MYBL2, which encodes a key protein involved in the maintenance of genome integrity. Here, we show that mice expressing half the normal levels of Mybl2 (Mybl2+/Δ) develop a variety of myeloid disorders upon ageing. These include myeloproliferative neoplasms, myelodysplasia (MDS) and myeloid leukaemia, mirroring the human conditions associated with del20q. Moreover, analysis of gene expression profiles from patients with MDS demonstrated reduced levels of MYBL2, regardless of del20q status and demonstrated a strong correlation between low levels of MYBL2 RNA and reduced expression of a subset of genes related to DNA replication and checkpoint control pathways. Paralleling the human data, we found that these pathways are also disturbed in our Mybl2+/Δ mice. This novel mouse model, therefore, represents a valuable tool for studying the initiation and progression of haematological malignancies during ageing, and may provide a platform for preclinical testing of therapeutic approaches. PMID:22910183

  15. Transit times and age distributions for reservoir models represented as nonlinear non-autonomuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Meztler, Holger; Glatt, Anna; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We present theoretical methods to compute dynamic residence and transit time distributions for non-autonomous systems of pools governed by coupled nonlinear differential equations. Although transit time and age distributions have been used to describe reservoir models for a long time, a closer look to their assumptions reveals two major restrictions of generality in previous studies. First, the systems are assumed to be in equilibrium; and second, the equations under consideration are assumed to be linear. While both these assumptions greatly ease the computation and interpretation of transit time and age distributions they are not applicable to a wide range of problems. Moreover, the transfer of previous results learned from linear systems in steady state to the more complex nonlinear non-autonomous systems that do not even need to have equilibria, can be dangerously misleading. Fortunately the topic of time dependent age and transit time distributions has received some attention recently in hydrology, we aim to compute these distributions for systems of multiple reservoirs. We will discuss how storage selection functions can augment the information represented in an ODE system describing a system of reservoirs. We will present analytical and numerical algorithms and a Monte Carlo simulator to compute solutions for system transit time and age distributions for system-wide storage selection functions including the most simple, but important case of well mixed pools.

  16. Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation Increase p16(INK4a) Expression, a Biomarker of T-cell Aging.

    PubMed

    Wood, William A; Krishnamurthy, Janakiraman; Mitin, Natalia; Torrice, Chad; Parker, Joel S; Snavely, Anna C; Shea, Thomas C; Serody, Jonathan S; Sharpless, Norman E

    2016-09-01

    The expression of markers of cellular senescence increases exponentially in multiple tissues with aging. Age-related physiological changes may contribute to adverse outcomes in cancer survivors. To investigate the impact of high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation on senescence markers in vivo, we collected blood and clinical data from a cohort of 63 patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. The expression of p16(INK4a), a well-established senescence marker, was determined in T-cells before and 6months after transplant. RNA sequencing was performed on paired samples from 8 patients pre- and post-cancer therapy. In patients undergoing allogeneic transplant, higher pre-transplant p16(INK4a) expression was associated with a greater number of prior cycles of chemotherapy received (p=0.003), prior autologous transplantation (p=0.01) and prior exposure to alkylating agents (p=0.01). Transplantation was associated with a marked increase in p16(INK4a) expression 6months following transplantation. Patients receiving autologous transplant experienced a larger increase in p16(INK4a) expression (3.1-fold increase, p=0.002) than allogeneic transplant recipients (1.9-fold increase, p=0.0004). RNA sequencing of T-cells pre- and post- autologous transplant or cytotoxic chemotherapy demonstrated increased expression of transcripts associated with cellular senescence and physiological aging. Cytotoxic chemotherapy, especially alkylating agents, and stem cell transplantation strongly accelerate expression of a biomarker of molecular aging in T-cells.

  17. The impact of male age on embryo quality: a retrospective study using time-lapse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosário, Guilherme R. F.; Vidal, Diana S.; Silva, Adriana V.; Franco, Antônio C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to correlate male age with embryo morphokinetic parameters on D3 considering the timing and the exact moment of embryo cleavage. Methods Time-lapse imaging was used to produce an ideal cleavage curve for the embryos analyzed. The percentage of embryos under the curve was analyzed and correlated with male age. Results 32.6% of the embryos from patients aged 28-33 years were under the curve; 36.2% of the embryos from patients aged 34-39 years were under the curve; 41.3% of the embryos from patients aged 40-45 years were under the curve; and 26.3% of the embryos fro patients aged 46-57 years were under the curve. Conclusions a statistically non-significant decrease was observed in the percentage of embryos under the optimal cleavage curve on D3 in the group of men aged between 40 and 45 years. Further studies looking into embryos in the blastocyst stage (D5 or D6) are required. PMID:28050955

  18. Wolf (Canis lupus) Generation Time and Proportion of Current Breeding Females by Age

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Information is sparse about aspects of female wolf (Canis lupus) breeding in the wild, including age of first reproduction, mean age of primiparity, generation time, and proportion of each age that breeds in any given year. We studied these subjects in 86 wolves (113 captures) in the Superior National Forest (SNF), Minnesota (MN), during 1972–2013 where wolves were legally protected for most of the period, and in 159 harvested wolves from throughout MN wolf range during 2012–2014. Breeding status of SNF wolves were assessed via nipple measurements, and wolves from throughout MN wolf range, by placental scars. In the SNF, proportions of currently breeding females (those breeding in the year sampled) ranged from 19% at age 2 to 80% at age 5, and from throughout wolf range, from 33% at age 2 to 100% at age 7. Excluding pups and yearlings, only 33% to 36% of SNF females and 58% of females from throughout MN wolf range bred in any given year. Generation time for SNF wolves was 4.3 years and for MN wolf range, 4.7 years. These findings will be useful in modeling wolf population dynamics and in wolf genetic and dog-domestication studies. PMID:27258193

  19. Breed, slaughter weight and ageing time effects on consumer appraisal of three muscles of lamb.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cerezo, S; Sañudo, C; Panea, B; Olleta, J L

    2005-04-01

    Consumers (n=265) tasted semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM) and gluteo biceps (GB) (right and left) from 180 entire male lambs. Muscles were from three Spanish breeds: Rasa Aragonesa (local meat breed), Churra (local dairy breed) and Spanish Merino. Within breed, three slaughter live weights were considered (10-12, 20-22 or 30-32 kg). Isolated muscles were aged under vacuum package for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 days. Consumers evaluated tenderness, flavour quality and overall acceptability. Globally, the three attributes were significantly influenced by breed, slaughter live weight and ageing. Considering breed effect, Churra had the lowest scores for tenderness in the heaviest lambs while Spanish Merino was the most tender at 20-22 kg but there were no differences between either for 10-12 kg lambs. Muscles from the heaviest lambs were considered the toughest and those from the 10-12 kg lambs the most tender. Tenderness improved with ageing, but more for SM and GB. Flavour was better in the lightest lambs and, in general, it was not affected negatively by ageing. Consumers preferred meat from the 10-12 kg lambs in all breeds (the most tender and with the best flavour) and aged for intermediate to long periods (4-16 days). For the three attributes, the ST muscle had the best ratings at short ageing times and GB at long ageing times.

  20. Wolf (Canis lupus) generation time and proportion of current breeding females by age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Barber-Meyer, Shannon M.; Erb, John

    2016-01-01

    Information is sparse about aspects of female wolf (Canis lupus) breeding in the wild, including age of first reproduction, mean age of primiparity, generation time, and proportion of each age that breeds in any given year. We studied these subjects in 86 wolves (113 captures) in the Superior National Forest (SNF), Minnesota (MN), during 1972–2013 where wolves were legally protected for most of the period, and in 159 harvested wolves from throughout MN wolf range during 2012–2014. Breeding status of SNF wolves were assessed via nipple measurements, and wolves from throughout MN wolf range, by placental scars. In the SNF, proportions of currently breeding females (those breeding in the year sampled) ranged from 19% at age 2 to 80% at age 5, and from throughout wolf range, from 33% at age 2 to 100% at age 7. Excluding pups and yearlings, only 33% to 36% of SNF females and 58% of females from throughout MN wolf range bred in any given year. Generation time for SNF wolves was 4.3 years and for MN wolf range, 4.7 years. These findings will be useful in modeling wolf population dynamics and in wolf genetic and dog-domestication studies.

  1. Age-related differences in the neural correlates of trial-to-trial variations of reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Adleman, Nancy E.; Chen, Gang; Reynolds, Richard C.; Frackman, Anna; Razdan, Varun; Weissman, Daniel H.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Intra-subject variation in reaction time (ISVRT) is a developmentally-important phenomenon that decreases from childhood through young adulthood in parallel with the development of executive functions and networks. Prior work has shown a significant association between trial-by-trial variations in reaction time (RT) and trial-by-trial variations in brain activity as measured by the blood-oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD) response in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. It remains unclear, however, whether such “RT-BOLD” relationships vary with age. Here, we determined whether such trial-by-trial relationships vary with age in a cross-sectional design. We observed an association between age and RT-BOLD relationships in 11 clusters located in visual/occipital regions, frontal and parietal association cortex, precentral/postcentral gyrus, and thalamus. Some of these relationships were negative, reflecting increased BOLD associated with decreased RT, manifesting around the time of stimulus presentation and positive several seconds later. Critically for present purposes, all RT-BOLD relationships increased with age. Thus, RT-BOLD relationships may reflect robust, measurable changes in the brain-behavior relationship across development. PMID:27239972

  2. Size and age distributions of Juvenile Connecticut River American shad above Hadley Falls: Influence on outmigration representation and timing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, M. J.; Letcher, B.H.

    2008-01-01

    Age- and size-based habitat use and movement patterns of young-of-year American shad in rivers are not well understood. Adult females reach their natal rivers at different times and ascend the river at different rates, which may lead to variation of hatch dates at a single location. Also, shad are serial spawners, so eggs of the same female may be released at different distances from the river mouth. It has long been hypothesized that juvenile shad emigration is a function of size or age, and not necessarily keyed only to a decrease in water temperature during the fall. We seined three sites in the Connecticut River biweekly to collect pre-migrant shad during river residence (spring to fall). During emigration, samples were also collected weekly at two hydroelectric facilities. Otoliths were removed from ???20% of the fish to obtain age and growth rate information. We found increases in length and age over time until late in the season, after which such increases were mostly insigniftlant. Cohorts collected early in the year as pre-migrants were never sampled as migrants later in the year at the hydroelectric projects. Cohorts collected late in the year as migrants were never collected earlier in the year as pre-migrants. Only during a narrow window of time were fish collected as both pre-migrants and migrants. Fish that were hatched later in the season exhibited higher growth rates than fish that were hatched earlier in the season. Copyright ?? 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Middle-aged rats orally supplemented with gel-encapsulated catechin favorably increases blood cytosolic NADPH levels.

    PubMed

    Cueno, Marni E; Tamura, Muneaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2015-04-15

    Green tea catechins are primarily known to function as free radical scavengers and have several beneficial uses. Orally supplemented catechin (OSC) was previously shown to increase mitochondrial heme and catalase levels in rat heart blood, however, its effect in the cytosol has not been elucidated. Here, we determined the effects of OSC in the rat heart blood cytosol. We used middle-aged (40 week-old) and young (4 week-old) rats throughout the study. We isolated blood cytosol, verified its purity, and determined heme, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels, catalase (CAT) activities, gp91(phox) amounts, NADP and NAD pools, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities, and free fatty acids (FFA). We established that OSC is associated with decreased heme-dependent H2O2 amounts while increasing heme-independent CAT activity. Moreover, we found that OSC-related decrease in NAD(+) amounts among middle-aged rats is associated to increased NADPH levels and SIRT1 activity. In contrast, we associated OSC-related decrease in NAD(+) amounts among young rats to decreased NADPH levels and increased SIRT1 activity. This highlights a major difference between catechin-treated middle-aged and young rats. Furthermore, we observed that cytosolic FFA and GR levels were significantly increased only among OSC-treated middle-aged rats which we hypothesize are related to increased NADPH levels. This insinuates that OSC treatment allows higher catechin amounts to enter the bloodstream of middle-aged rats. We propose that this would favorably increase NADPH amounts and lead to the simultaneous decrease in NADPH-related pro-oxidant activity and increase in NADPH-related biomolecules and anti-oxidant activities.

  4. The Evolution of the Age at Menarche from Prehistorical to Modern Times.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Anastasios

    2016-12-01

    Menarche denotes the onset of the female reproductive capacity. The age that menarche occurs is mostly attributed to the interaction of genetics and various environmental factors. Herein, the author describes the evolution of the age at menarche from prehistoric to the present times. Data from skeletal remains suggest that in the Paleolithic woman menarche occurred at an age between 7 and 13 years, early sexual maturation being a trade-off for reduced life expectancy. In the classical, as well as in the medieval years, the age at menarche was generally reported to be at approximately 14 years, with a range from 12 to 15 years. A significant retardation of the age at menarche occurred in the beginning of the modern times, soon after the industrial revolution, due to the deterioration of the living conditions, with most studies reporting menarche to occur at 15-16 years. In the 20th century, especially in the second half of it, in the industrialized countries, the age at menarche decreased significantly, as a result of the improvement of the socioeconomic conditions, occurring at 12-13 years. In the present times, in the developed countries, this trend seems to slow down or level off.

  5. Cutaneous Resonance Running Time Varies with Age, Body Site and Gender in a Normal Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shujun; Man, Wenyan; Fluhr, Joachim W.; Song, Shunpeng; Elias, Peter M; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Background/objectives One phenomenon of skin aging is loss of cutaneous elasticity. Measurement of cutaneous resonance running time (CRRT) is a method to assess skin elasticity. Yet, information regarding directional changes of CRRT associated with age, body sites and gender is not yet available. In the present study, we assessed whether changes in CRRT vary with age, body sites and gender in a normal Chinese population. Methods A Reviscometer was used to measure CRRTs in various directions on the left dorsal hand, the forehead and the left canthus of 806 normal Chinese volunteers, aged 2.5-94 years. Results With aging, CRRTs decreased in all directions on the hand, the forehead, and the canthus. A more dramatic reduction of CRRTs on the forehead and the canthus were observed at both the 2–8 and 3–9 o’clock directions. CRRTs in males aged 11– 20 years old were longer than those in females at some directions on all three body sites. Females between 21 and 40 years old showed longer CRRTs than males in some directions of the hand. There were no gender differences in subjects aged 0–10 (except on the canthus) and over 81 years old. Conclusion CRRTs vary with age, body sites and gender. PMID:21039906

  6. Recombinant cells in the lung increase with age via de novo recombination events and clonal expansion.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Takafumi; Kay, Jennifer E; Li, Na; Engelward, Bevin P

    2017-04-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a critical DNA repair pathway, which is usually error-free, but can sometimes lead to cancer-promoting mutations. Despite the importance of HR as a driver of mutations, the spontaneous frequency of such mutations has proven difficult to study. To gain insight to location, cell type, and subsequent proliferation of mutated cells, we used the Rosa26 Direct Repeat (RaDR) mice for in situ detection and quantification of recombinant cells in the lung. We developed a method for automated enumeration of recombinant cells in lung tissue using the Metafer 4 slide-scanning platform. The mean spontaneous HR frequencies of the lung tissue in young and aged mice were 2 × 10(-6) and 30 × 10(-6) , respectively, which is consistent with our previous reports that mutated cells accumulate with age. In addition, by using the capability of Metafer 4 to mark the position of fluorescent cells, we found that recombinant cells from the aged mice formed clusters in the lung tissue, likely due to clonal expansion of a single mutant cell. The recombinant cells primarily consisted of alveolar epithelial type II or club (previously known as Clara) cells, both of which have the potential to give rise to cancer. This approach to tissue image analysis reveals the location and cell types that have undergone HR. Being able to quantify mutant cells in situ within lung tissue opens doors to studies of exposure-induced mutations and clonal expansion, giving rise to new opportunities for understanding how genetic and environmental factors cause tumorigenic mutations. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:135-145, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increases in plasma and colon tissue prior to estrus and circulating levels change with increasing age in reproductively competent Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michelle L; Saffrey, M Jill; Taylor, Victoria J

    2017-02-22

    There is a well-documented association between cyclic changes to food intake and the changing ovarian hormone levels of the reproductive cycle in female mammals. Limited research on appetite-controlling gastrointestinal peptides has taken place in females, simply because regular reproductive changes in steroid hormones present additional experimental factors to account for. This study focussed directly on the roles that gastrointestinal-secreted peptides may have in these reported, naturally occurring, changes to food intake during the rodent estrous cycle and aimed to determine whether peripheral changes occurred in the anorexigenic (appetite-reducing) hormones peptide-YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in female Wistar rats (32-44 weeks of age). Total forms of each peptide were measured in matched fed and fasted plasma and descending colon tissue samples for each animal during the dark (feeding) phase. PYY concentrations did not significantly change between defined cycle stages, in either plasma or tissue samples. GLP-1 concentrations in fed plasma and descending colon tissue were significantly increased during proestrus, just prior to a significant reduction in fasted stomach contents at estrus, suggesting increased satiety and reduced food intake at this stage of the cycle. Increased proestrus GLP-1 concentrations could contribute to the reported reduction in food intake during estrus and may also have biological importance in providing the optimal nutritional and metabolic environment for gametes at the potential point of conception. Additional analysis of the findings demonstrated significant interactions of ovarian cycle stage and fed/fasted status with age on GLP-1, but not PYY plasma concentrations. Slightly older females had reduced fed plasma GLP-1 suggesting that a relaxation of regulatory control of this incretin hormone may also take place with increasing age in reproductively competent females.

  8. Chronic Pyruvate Supplementation Increases Exploratory Activity and Brain Energy Reserves in Young and Middle-Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Hennariikka; Leinonen, Henri; Puurula, Mari; Hafez, Hani Sayed; Barrera, Glenda Alquicer; Stridh, Malin H.; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Tiainen, Mika; Soininen, Pasi; Zilberter, Yuri; Tanila, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported neuroprotective effects of pyruvate when given in systemic injections. Impaired glucose uptake and metabolism are found in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and in AD mouse models. We tested whether dietary pyruvate supplementation is able to provide added energy supply to brain and thereby attenuate aging- or AD-related cognitive impairment. Mice received ~800 mg/kg/day Na-pyruvate in their chow for 2–6 months. In middle-aged wild-type mice and in 6.5-month-old APP/PS1 mice, pyruvate facilitated spatial learning and increased exploration of a novel odor. However, in passive avoidance task for fear memory, the treatment group was clearly impaired. Independent of age, long-term pyruvate increased explorative behavior, which likely explains the paradoxical impairment in passive avoidance. We also assessed pyruvate effects on body weight, muscle force, and endurance, and found no effects. Metabolic postmortem assays revealed increased energy compounds in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as increased brain glycogen storages in the pyruvate group. Pyruvate supplementation may counteract aging-related behavioral impairment, but its beneficial effect seems related to increased explorative activity rather than direct memory enhancement. PMID:27014054

  9. Age-related increase in brain activity during task-related and -negative networks and numerical inductive reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Liang, Peipeng; Jia, Xiuqin; Qi, Zhigang; Li, Kuncheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that elderly adults exhibit increased and decreased activation on various cognitive tasks, yet little is known about age-related changes in inductive reasoning. Methods: To investigate the neural basis for the aging effect on inductive reasoning, 15 young and 15 elderly subjects performed numerical inductive reasoning while in a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Results: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis revealed that numerical inductive reasoning, relative to rest, yielded multiple frontal, temporal, parietal, and some subcortical area activations for both age groups. In addition, the younger participants showed significant regions of task-induced deactivation, while no deactivation occurred in the elderly adults. Direct group comparisons showed that elderly adults exhibited greater activity in regions of task-related activation and areas showing task-induced deactivation (TID) in the younger group. Conclusions: Our findings suggest an age-related deficiency in neural function and resource allocation during inductive reasoning. PMID:25337240

  10. That's a good one! Belief in efficacy of mnemonic strategies contributes to age-related increase in associative memory.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Ana M; Ofen, Noa

    2015-08-01

    The development of associative memory during childhood may be influenced by metacognitive factors. Here, one aspect of metamemory function--belief in strategy efficacy-was tested for a role in the effective use of encoding strategies. A sample of 61 children and adults (8-25 years of age) completed an associative recognition memory test and were assessed on belief in the efficacy of encoding strategies. Independent of age, belief ratings identified two factors: "deep" and "shallow" encoding strategies. Although the strategy factor structure was stable across age, adolescents and adults were more likely to prefer using a deep encoding strategy, whereas children were equally likely to prefer a shallow strategy. Belief ratings of deep encoding strategies increased with age and, critically, accounted for better associative recognition.

  11. Striking effect of time variation in the estimation of groundwater age in the Wairarapa valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrus, Karine; Toews, Michael; Daughney, Christopher; Cornaton, Fabien

    2014-05-01

    The Wairarapa Valley exhibits complex interactions between its rivers and shallow aquifers. With agriculture being an essential part of the region the risk of contamination and depletion of groundwater exists. In order to assist with water resource management in the region, we can do predictions with the help of numerical models. Among these predictions, the evaluation of groundwater age is critical for decision making. This project builds on work done by Greater Wellington Regional Council and will focus on the Wairarapa Valley. The aim of this study is to evaluate the age of the groundwater in the Wairarapa region. Investigations have already been done thanks to hydrochemistry. However radiometric age can be misleading in the sense that it does not consider the mixing process in the motion of groundwater particules. Therefore another approach can be considered .This latter is physic based by considering the age as a property that we transport through two main processes: advection at a macroscopic scale and diffusion at a microscopic scale. The determination of the distribution age by this approach has already been done for the Lake Rotorua but in the steady state case (cf Daughney). The unique contribution of the present study is to estimate the changes in groundwater age distribution through time within the region. Indeed transient simulations are needed to explicitly account for seasonally variable rainfall and pumping wells. This affects the simulated flow solution and then the simulated age solution. In order to solve numerically the transport of age distribution we have chosen to use the Time Marching Laplace Transform Galerkin technique which has been developed in a research code by Fabien Cornaton. The obtained results depict that temporal variations in groundwater age are present and have important implication for resource management

  12. Changes in plasma amino acid concentrations with increasing age in patients with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Amann, Edda; Haberlandt, Edda; Albrecht, Ursula; Ertl, Claudia; Sigl, Sara Baumgartner; Lagler, Florian; Rostasy, Kevin; Karall, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the study is to analyze plasma amino acid concentrations in propionic acidemia (PA) for the purpose of elucidating possible correlations between propionyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency and distinct amino acid behavior. Plasma concentrations of 19 amino acids were measured in 240 random samples from 11 patients (6 families) with enzymatically and/or genetically proven propionic acidemia (sampling period, January 2001-December 2007). They were compared with reference values from the literature and correlated with age using the Pearson correlation coefficient test. Decreased plasma concentrations were observed for glutamine, histidine, threonine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine and arginine. Levels of glycine, alanine and aspartate were elevated, while values of serine, asparagine, ornithine and glutamate were normal. For lysine, proline and methionine a clear association was not possible. Significant correlations with age were observed for 13 amino acids (positive correlation: asparagine, glutamine, proline, alanine, histidine, threonine, methionine, arginine; negative correlation: leucine, phenylalanine, ornithine, glutamate and aspartate). This study gives new insight over long-term changes in plasma amino acid concentrations and may provide options for future therapies (e.g., substitution of anaplerotic substances) in PA patients.

  13. Understanding and improving communication processes in an increasingly multicultural aged care workforce.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Pam; Horner, Barbara; Fyfe, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how culture shapes relationships in aged care and the extent to which the residential aged care sector supports a cohesive multicultural workforce. An exploratory methodology utilising semi-structured questionnaires collected data from 58 participants comprising: staff who provide direct care to residents; managers; and family members from six residential care facilities in Perth, Western Australia. Communication issues emerged as an over-arching theme, and included interpersonal communication, the effect of cultural norms on communication and the impact of informal and formal workplace policies relating to spoken and written language. Sixty percent of participants from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) background had experienced negative reactions from residents with dementia, linked to visible cultural difference. They used a range of coping strategies including ignoring, resilience and avoidance in such situations. CaLD participants also reported prejudicial treatment from non-CaLD staff. The findings highlight the need for organisations to incorporate explicit processes which address the multiple layers of influence on cross cultural communication: internalised beliefs and values; moderating effects of education, experience and social circumstance; and factors external to the individuals, including workplace culture and the broader political economy, to develop a cohesive multicultural workplace.

  14. Aging somatosensory cortex displays increased density of WFA-binding perineuronal nets associated with GAD-negative neurons.

    PubMed

    Karetko-Sysa, M; Skangiel-Kramska, J; Nowicka, D

    2014-09-26

    The mechanisms of aging in the brain and the subsequent decrease in cognitive abilities remain elusive. While most studies refer to research conducted in old and senile animals, little is known about the early symptoms of normal, healthy aging. In this study, we examined whether perineuronal nets (PNNs), a special form of extracellular matrix (ECM) tightly associated with neurons that is thought to be involved in limiting neuronal plasticity, undergo changes in density during early aging. Using histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, we found that in middle-aged mice (1-year-old), the density of WFA-binding PNNs in the somatosensory cortex as well as in the visual cortex was increased in comparison to that in young adults (3-month-old). Moreover, in the somatosensory cortex, this increase was not associated with any of the GABAergic neuron types that were examined. We propose that early age-related changes in neuronal plasticity may be associated with this increase and can be conceptualized as the spreading of structural brakes for synaptic rearrangements.

  15. What is the age for the fastest ultra-marathon performance in time-limited races from 6 h to 10 days?

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Valeri, Fabio; Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings suggested that the age of peak ultra-marathon performance seemed to increase with increasing race distance. The present study investigated the age of peak ultra-marathon performance for runners competing in time-limited ultra-marathons held from 6 to 240 h (i.e. 10 days) during 1975-2013. Age and running performance in 20,238 (21%) female and 76,888 (79%) male finishes (6,863 women and 24,725 men, 22 and 78%, respectively) were analysed using mixed-effects regression analyses. The annual number of finishes increased for both women and men in all races. About one half of the finishers completed at least one race and the other half completed more than one race. Most of the finishes were achieved in the fourth decade of life. The age of the best ultra-marathon performance increased with increasing race duration, also when only one or at least five successful finishes were considered. The lowest age of peak ultra-marathon performance was in 6 h (33.7 years, 95% CI 32.5-34.9 years) and the highest in 48 h (46.8 years, 95% CI 46.1-47.5). With increasing number of finishes, the athletes improved performance. Across years, performance decreased, the age of peak performance increased, and the age of peak ultra-marathon performance increased with increasing number of finishes. In summary, the age of peak ultra-marathon performance increased and performance decreased in time-limited ultra-marathons. The age of peak ultra-marathon performance increased with increasing race duration and with increasing number of finishes. These athletes improved race performance with increasing number of finishes.

  16. Behavioral and Neurochemical Deficits in Aging Rats with Increased Neonatal Iron Intake: Silibinin’s Neuroprotection by Maintaining Redox Balance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hanqing; Wang, Xijin; Wang, Meihua; Yang, Liu; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yuhong; Liu, Zhenguo

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a critical risk factor for Parkinson’s disease. Silibinin, a major flavonoid in Silybum marianum, has been suggested to display neuroprotective properties against various neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we observed that neonatal iron (120 μg/g body weight) supplementation resulted in significant abnormality of behavior and depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) in the aging male and female rats while it did not do so in the young male and female rats. No significant change in striatal serotonin content was observed in the aging male and female rats with neonatal supplementation of the same dose of iron. Furthermore, we found that the neonatal iron supplementation resulted in significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) and decrease in glutathione (GSH) in the substantia nigra (SN) of the aging male and female rats. No significant change in content of MDA and GSH was observed in the cerebellum of the aging male and female rats with the neonatal iron supplementation. Interestingly, silibinin (25 and 50 mg/kg body weight) treatment significantly and dose-dependently attenuated depletion of striatal DA and improved abnormality of behavior in the aging male and female rats with the neonatal iron supplementation. Moreover, silibinin significantly reduced MDA content and increased GSH content in the SN of the aging male and female rats. Taken together, our results indicate that elevated neonatal iron supplementation may result in neurochemical and behavioral deficits in the male and female rats with aging and silibinin may exert dopaminergic neuroprotection by maintaining redox balance. PMID:26578951

  17. Mild cerebellar neurodegeneration of aged heterozygous PCD mice increases cell fusion of Purkinje and bone marrow-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz, David; Recio, Javier S; Weruaga, Eduardo; Alonso, José R

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells have different plastic properties, especially regarding cell fusion, which increases with time and is prompted by tissue injury. Several recessive mutations, including Purkinje Cell Degeneration, affect the number of Purkinje cells in homozygosis; heterozygous young animals have an apparently normal phenotype but they undergo Purkinje cell loss as they age. Our findings demonstrate that heterozygous pcd mice undergo Purkinje cell loss at postnatal day 300, this slow but steadily progressing cell death starting sooner than has been reported previously and without massive reactive gliosis or inflammation. Here, transplantation of bone marrow stem cells was performed to assess the arrival of bone marrow-derived cells in the cerebellum in these heterozygous mice. Our results reveal that a higher number of cell fusion events occurs in heterozygous animals than in the controls, on days 150 and 300 postnatally. In sum, this study indicates that mild cell death promotes the fusion of bone marrow-derived cells with surviving Purkinje neurons. This phenomenon suggests new therapies for long-lasting neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. A Rising Tide: The Increasing Age and Psychiatric Length of Stay for Individuals with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patil, D.; Keown, P.; Scott, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is unclear whether the substantial decline in number and duration of admissions for patients with intellectual disability (ID) have occurred uniformly over time with respect to age, gender, severity of disability, legal status and location of treatment. Method: A retrospective analysis of NHS (National Health Service) admissions for…

  19. NIH Study Offers Insight into Why Cancer Incidence Increases with Age

    MedlinePlus

    ... increases cancer risk remains unclear. Researchers suspect that DNA methylation, or the binding of chemical tags, called methyl groups, onto DNA, may be involved. Methyl groups activate or silence ...

  20. Excess selenium increases Ca sup ++ -induced clotting times in chicks and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Herz, W.C.; Combs, G.F. Jr. )

    1991-03-11

    Calcium (Ca{sup ++})-induced clotting times (i.e., prothrombin times, PT times) in young White Leghorn chickens and male weanling Sprague Dawley rats were shown to be elevated in animals fed diets for 20-30 days containing excess Se. Clotting times of chicks were prolonged from those of controls in animals fed either deficient or excess Se, although all dietary treatment groups showed comparable concentrations of total plasma protein. Rats showed significantly prolonged PT times when fed Se at either 5 ppm or 10 ppm. The plasma activities of certain enzymes of hepatic origin (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase) in rats fed excess Se were comparable to those of controls, despite the increase in the PT times. Body weights and liver weights were significantly depressed in those animals only at the 10 ppm Se level. These results demonstrate increased PT times in both chicks and rats. In each species, this effect is independent of feed intake and body weight, and is apparent at levels of Se intake that do not affect other indicators of hepatic damage. Therefore, prolonged PT time may be an early indicator of sub-acute selenosis.

  1. Epidemiology of bacteremia episodes in a single center: increase in Gram-negative isolates, antibiotics resistance, and patient age.

    PubMed

    Marchaim, D; Zaidenstein, R; Lazarovitch, T; Karpuch, Y; Ziv, T; Weinberger, M

    2008-11-01

    Increased resistance among isolates causing bacteremia constitutes a major challenge to medical practitioners and institutions. Variability between institutes is substantial, and requires the individual analysis of local trends. An eight-year (1997-2004) surveillance study of episodes of bacteremia was conducted in an 850-bed university hospital in central Israel. Trends of incidence, resistance, age, and mortality were analyzed. We studied 6,096 patient-unique episodes of bacteremia, of which, 2,722 (45.3%) were nosocomial and 523 (9.2%) involved children less than 18 years of age. The overall incidence of bacteremia episodes has increased over the study years by 39% and the patient mean age by 7.5 years. Gram-negative organisms accounted for 72% of hospital-acquired cases and 69% of community-acquired cases. There was a substantial increase in the incidence of nosocomial episodes, predominantly due to Gram-negative isolates, mainly Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Increased resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics was noted among Gram-negative organisms, including quinolones (in K. pneumoniae), imipenem (A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa), piperacillin-tazobactam (K. pneumoniae), and amikacin (A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa). Increased resistance to oxacillin among coagulase-negative staphylococci was also noted. The all-cause mortality rates showed a significant rise. The patient age, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and hospital acquisition were independently associated with mortality. We describe an increase in the incidence and resistance of Gram-negative organisms causing bacteremia and concomitant ageing of the patients with bacteremia. Similar patterns have been reported from other localities, and are of real concern.

  2. Racial disparities in age at time of homicide victimization: a test of the multiple disadvantage model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Celia C; Howell, Rebecca J; Cheng, Tyrone C

    2015-01-01

    This study sought the factors associated with race/ethnicity disparities in the age at which homicide deaths tend to occur. We used the multiple disadvantage model to take race into account as we evaluated associations between age at time of homicide victimization and several social structural, mental health-related, and lifestyle factors. Data were derived from the 1993 National Mortality Followback Survey, a cross-sectional interview study of spouses, next of kin, other relatives, and close friends of individuals 15 years and older who died in the United States in 1993. Our results showed age at time of homicide mortality to be related to the three types of factors; race moderated some of these relationships. In general, being employed, married, and a homeowner appeared associated with reduced victimization while young. The relationship of victimization age and employment was not uniform across racial groups, nor was the relationship of victimization age and marital status uniform across groups. Among Blacks, using mental health services was associated with longer life. Homicide by firearm proved important for our Black and Hispanic subsamples, while among Whites, alcohol's involvement in homicide exerted significant effects. Our results suggest that programs and policies serving the various racial/ethnic groups can alleviate multiple disadvantages relevant in homicide victimization at an early age.

  3. TV viewing time is associated with increased all-cause mortality in Brazilian adults independent of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Turi, Bruna Camilo; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz; Ribeiro Lemes, Ítalo; Codogno, Jamile Sanches; Lynch, Kyle Robinson; Asahi Mesquita, Camila Angélica; Fernandes, Rômulo Araújo

    2017-03-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between television (TV) viewing and all-cause mortality among Brazilian adults after six years of follow-up. This longitudinal study started in 2010 in the city of Bauru, SP, Brazil, and involved 970 adults aged ≥ 50 years. Mortality was reported by relatives and confirmed in medical records of the Brazilian National Health System. Physical activity (PA) and TV viewing were assessed by the Baecke questionnaire. Health status, sociodemographic and behavioural covariates were considered as potential confounders. After six years of follow-up, 89 deaths were registered (9.2% [95%CI= 7.4% to 11%]). Type 2 diabetes mellitus was associated with higher risk of mortality (p-value= 0.012). Deaths correlated significantly with age (rho= 0.188; p-value= 0.001), overall PA score (rho= -0.128; p-value= 0.001) and TV viewing (rho= 0.086; p-value= 0.007). Lower percentage of participants reported TV viewing time as often (16%) and very often (5.7%), but there was an association between higher TV viewing time ("often" and "very often" grouped together) and increased mortality after six years of follow-up (p-value= 0.006). The higher TV viewing time was associated with a 44.7% increase in all-cause mortality (HR= 1.447 [1.019 to 2.055]), independently of other potential confounders. In conclusion, the findings from this cohort study identified increased risk of mortality among adults with higher TV viewing time, independently of physical activity and other variables. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Waiting time before release increases the motivation to home in homing pigeons (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Dell'Ariccia, Gaia; Costantini, David; Dell'Omo, Giacomo; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2009-10-01

    When performing homing experiments with individual releases, pigeons have to wait in a transport box for a certain amount of time before being released and hence perceive the departure of companions. Quite often, the last pigeons disappear straightforward from the release site. The question is whether this reflects improved orientation because of prolonged exposure to the release place or whether it reflects increased homing motivation. By releasing pigeons from a familiar site, we investigated the effects of the time spent at the release site on homing performance, recording pigeons' flights with GPS loggers. Our results show that, despite individual peculiarities of flight patterns, the waiting time at release site had a positive effect on homing speed and time, and reduced the time spent circling around the release point. However, the overall path efficiency as derived from GPS tracking was not influenced. These results suggest that a longer waiting time before release improves homing performance and this is related not only to increased navigational abilities but also to increased homing motivation.

  5. Whole-Body Vibration Partially Reverses Aging-Induced Increases in Visceral Adiposity and Hepatic Lipid Storage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Theo H.; Havinga, Rick; van der Zee, Eddy A.; Groen, Albert K.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Bakker, Barbara M.; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2016-01-01

    At old age, humans generally have declining muscle mass and increased fat deposition, which can increase the risk of developing cardiometabolic diseases. While regular physical activity postpones these age-related derangements, this is not always possible in the elderly because of disabilities or risk of injury. Whole-body vibration (WBV) training may be considered as an alternative to physical activity particularly in the frail population. To explore this possibility, we characterized whole-body and organ-specific metabolic processes in 6-month and 25-month old mice, over a period of 14 weeks of WBV versus sham training. WBV training tended to increase blood glucose turnover rates and stimulated hepatic glycogen utilization during fasting irrespective of age. WBV was effective in reducing white fat mass and hepatic triglyceride content only in old but not in young mice and these reductions were related to upregulation of hepatic mitochondrial uncoupling of metabolism (assessed by high-resolution respirometry) and increased expression of uncoupling protein 2. Because these changes occurred independent of changes in food intake and whole-body metabolic rate (assessed by indirect calorimetry), the liver-specific effects of WBV may be a primary mechanism to improve metabolic health during aging, rather than that it is a consequence of alterations in energy balance. PMID:26886917

  6. Ar-Ar Impact Heating Ages of Eucrites and Timing of the LHB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald; Garrison, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Eucrites and howardites, more than most meteorite types, show extensive impact resetting of their Ar-39-Ar-40 (K-Ar) ages approximately equal to 3.4-4.1 Ga ago, and many specimens show some disturbance of other radiometry chronometers as well. Bogard (1995) argued that this age resetting occurred on Vesta and was produced by the same general population of objects that produced many of the lunar impact basins. The exact nature of the lunar late heavy bombardment (LHB or 'cataclysm') remains controversial, but the timing is similar to the reset ages of eucrites. Neither the beginning nor ending time of the lunar LHB is well constrained. Comparison of Ar-Ar ages of brecciated eucrites with data for the lunar LHB can resolve both the origin of these impactors and the time period over which they were delivered to the inner solar system. This abstract reports some new Ar-Ar age data for eucrites, obtained since the authors' 1995 and 2003 papers.

  7. Increased Apoptosis and Myocyte Enlargement with Decreased Cardiac Mass; Distinctive Features of the Aging Male, but not Female, Monkey Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Vatner, Stephen F.; Shen, You-Tang; Rossi, Franco; Tian, Yimin; Peppas, Athanasios; Resuello, Ranillo R.G.; Natividad, Filipinas F.; Vatner, Dorothy E.

    2009-01-01

    We studied gender-specific changes in aging cardiomyopathy in a primate model, Macaca fascicularis, free of the major human diseases, complicating the interpretation of data specific to aging in humans. Left ventricular (LV) weight/body weight decreased, p<0.05, in old males, but did not change in old females. However, despite the decrease in LV weight, mean myocyte cross-sectional area in the old males increased by 51%. This increase in myocyte size was not uniform in old males, i.e., it was manifest in only 20–30% of all the myocytes from old males. In old males there was a 4-fold increase in frequency of myocyte apoptosis without any increase in proliferation-capable myocytes assessed by Ki-67 expression. Apoptosis was unchanged in old female monkey hearts, whereas the frequency of myocytes expressing Ki-67 declined 90%. These results, opposite to findings from rodent studies, indicate distinct differences in which male and female monkeys maintain functional heart mass during aging. The old male hearts demonstrated increased apoptosis, which more than offset the myocyte hypertrophy, which interestingly was not uniform, without a significant increase in myocyte proliferation. PMID:17720187

  8. Elevation of night-time temperature increases terpenoid emissions from Betula pendula and Populus tremula

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; Mäenpää, Maarit; Hassinen, Viivi; Kontunen-Soppela, Sari; Malec, Lukáš; Rousi, Matti; Pietikäinen, Liisa; Tervahauta, Arja; Kärenlampi, Sirpa; Holopainen, Jarmo K.; Oksanen, Elina J.

    2010-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are expected to have an important role in plant adaptation to high temperatures. The impacts of increasing night-time temperature on daytime terpenoid emissions and related gene expression in silver birch (Betula pendula) and European aspen (Populus tremula) clones were studied. The plants were grown under five different night-time temperatures (6, 10, 14, 18, and 22 °C) while daytime temperature was kept at a constant 22 °C. VOC emissions were collected during the daytime and analysed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In birch, emissions per leaf area of the C11 homoterpene 4,8-dimethy1-nona-1,3,7-triene (DMNT) and several sesquiterpenes were consistently increased with increasing ni