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Sample records for agitated saline contrast

  1. Is bacteriostatic saline superior to normal saline as an echocardiographic contrast agent?

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Shaun; Gunasekaran, Prasad; Patel, Hena; McGorisk, Timothy; Toosi, Mehrdad; Faraz, Haroon; Zalawadiya, Sandip; Alesh, Issa; Kottam, Anupama; Afonso, Luis

    2014-12-01

    Objective data on the performance characteristics and physical properties of commercially available saline formulations [normal saline (NS) vs. bacteriostatic normal saline (bNS)] are sparse. This study sought to compare the in vitro physical properties and in vivo characteristics of two commonly employed echocardiographic saline contrast agents in an attempt to assess superiority. Nineteen patients undergoing transesophageal echocardiograms were each administered agitated regular NS and bNS injections in random order and in a blinded manner according to a standardized protocol. Video time-intensity (TI) curves were constructed from a representative region of interest, placed paraseptally within the right atrium, in the bicaval view. TI curves were analyzed for maximal plateau acoustic intensity (Vmax, dB) and dwell time (DT, s), defined as time duration between onset of Vmax and decay of video intensity below clinically useful levels, reflecting the duration of homogenous opacification of the right atrium. To further characterize the physical properties of the bubbles in vitro, fixed aliquots of similarly agitated saline were injected into a glass well slide-cover slip assembly and examined using an optical microscope to determine bubble diameter in microns (µm) and concentration [bubble count/high power field (hpf)]. A higher acoustic intensity (a less negative dB level), higher bubble concentration and longer DT were considered properties of a superior contrast agent. For statistical analysis, a paired t test was conducted to evaluate the differences in means of Vmax and DT. Compared to NS, bNS administration was associated with superior opacification (video intensity -8.69 ± 4.7 vs. -10.46 ± 4.1 dB, P = 0.002), longer DT (17.3 ± 6.1 vs. 10.2 ± 3.7 s) in vivo and smaller mean bubble size (43.4 vs. 58.6 μm) and higher bubble concentration (1,002 vs. 298 bubble/hpf) in vitro. bNS provides higher intensity and more sustained opacification of the right atrium

  2. Pulmonary transit of agitated contrast is associated with enhanced pulmonary vascular reserve and right ventricular function during exercise.

    PubMed

    La Gerche, André; MacIsaac, Andrew I; Burns, Andrew T; Mooney, Don J; Inder, Warrick J; Voigt, Jens-Uwe; Heidbüchel, Hein; Prior, David L

    2010-11-01

    Pulmonary transit of agitated contrast (PTAC) occurs to variable extents during exercise. We tested the hypothesis that the onset of PTAC signifies flow through larger-caliber vessels, resulting in improved pulmonary vascular reserve during exercise. Forty athletes and fifteen nonathletes performed maximal exercise with continuous echocardiographic Doppler measures [cardiac output (CO), pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), and myocardial velocities] and invasive blood pressure (BP). Arterial gases and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured at baseline and peak exercise. Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was determined as the regression of PASP/CO and was compared according to athletic and PTAC status. At peak exercise, athletes had greater CO (16.0 ± 2.9 vs. 12.4 ± 3.2 l/min, P < 0.001) and higher PASP (60.8 ± 12.6 vs. 47.0 ± 6.5 mmHg, P < 0.001), but PVR was similar to nonathletes (P = 0.71). High PTAC (defined by contrast filling of the left ventricle) occurred in a similar proportion of athletes and nonathletes (18/40 vs. 10/15, P = 0.35) and was associated with higher peak-exercise CO (16.1 ± 3.4 vs. 13.9 ± 2.9 l/min, P = 0.010), lower PASP (52.3 ± 9.8 vs. 62.6 ± 13.7 mmHg, P = 0.003), and 37% lower PVR (P < 0.0001) relative to low PTAC. Right ventricular (RV) myocardial velocities increased more and BNP increased less in high vs. low PTAC subjects. On multivariate analysis, maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)) (P = 0.009) and maximal exercise output (P = 0.049) were greater in high PTAC subjects. An exercise-induced decrease in arterial oxygen saturation (98.0 ± 0.4 vs. 96.7 ± 1.4%, P < 0.0001) was not influenced by PTAC status (P = 0.96). Increased PTAC during exercise is a marker of pulmonary vascular reserve reflected by greater flow, reduced PVR, and enhanced RV function.

  3. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Martin; Mateiescu, Serban Busch, Martin; Becker, Jan Garmer, Marietta Groenemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  4. Sodium bicarbonate versus isotonic saline solution to prevent contrast-induced nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Chica, Carlos Andres; Bello Marquez, Diana; Nieto-Ríos, John Fredy; Casas-Arroyave, Fabian David; Donado-Gómez, Jorge Hernando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Contrast-induced nephropathy is one of the main causes of acute kidney injury and increased hospital-acquired morbidity and mortality. The use of sodium bicarbonate for nephroprotection has emerged as a preventative strategy; however, its efficacy is controversial compared to other strategies, such as hydration using 0.9% saline solution. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate vs. hydration using 0.9% saline solution to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Methods: A systematic review of studies registered in the COCHRANE, PUBMED, MEDLINE, LILACS, SCIELO and EMBASE databases was conducted. Randomized controlled studies that evaluated the use of 0.9% saline solution vs. sodium bicarbonate to prevent contrast-induced nephropathy were included. Results: A total of 22 studies (5,686 patients) were included. Sodium bicarbonate did not decrease the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy (RD= 0.00; 95% CI= -0.02 to 0.03; p= 0.83; I2= 0%). No significant differences were found in the demand for renal replacement therapy (RD= 0.00; 95% CI= -0.01 to 0-01; I2= 0%; p= 0.99) or in mortality (RD= -0.00; 95% CI= -0.001 to 0.001; I2= 0%; p= 0.51). Conclusions: Sodium bicarbonate administration is not superior to the use of 0.9% saline solution for preventing contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with risk factors, nor is it better at reducing mortality or the need for renal replacement therapy. PMID:26600623

  5. Proteomics of contrasting rice genotypes: Identification of potential targets for raising crops for saline environment.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Nita; Kaur, Charanpreet; Anwar, Khalid; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata; Pareek, Ashwani

    2017-03-24

    High salinity is one of the major problems in crop productivity, affecting seed germination as well as yield. In order to enhance tolerance of crops towards salinity, it is essential to understand the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms. In this endeavor, study of contrasting genotypes of the same species differing in their response towards salinity stress can be very useful. In the present study, we have investigated temporal differences in morphological, physiological and proteome profiles of two contrasting genotypes of rice to understand the basis of salt-tolerance. When compared to IR64 rice, Pokkali, the salt-tolerant wild genotype, has enhanced capacity to cope with stress, has better growth rate, possess efficient antioxidant system, as well as better photosynthetic machinery. Our proteome studies revealed a higher and an early abundance of proteins involved in stress-tolerance and in photosynthesis in Pokkali in comparison with IR64, which in contrast, showed greater changes in metabolic machinery even during early stress duration. Our findings suggest important differences in physicochemical and proteome profiles of the two genotypes, which may be the basis of observed stress tolerance in the salt-tolerant Pokkali.

  6. Salares versus coastal ecotypes of quinoa: Salinity responses in Chilean landraces from contrasting habitats.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Karina B; Aloisi, Iris; Del Duca, Stefano; Canelo, Valentina; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Silva, Herman; Biondi, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a highly salt-tolerant species subdivided into five ecotypes and exhibiting broad intra-specific differences in tolerance levels. In a greenhouse study, Chilean landraces belonging either to the salares (R49) or coastal lowlands (VI-1, Villarrica) ecotype with contrasting agro-ecological origins were investigated for their responses to high salinity. The effects of two levels of salinity, 100 (T1) and 300 (T2) mM NaCl, on plant growth and on some physiological parameters were measured. Leaf and root Na(+) accumulation differed among landraces. T2 reduced growth and seed yield in all landraces with maximum inhibition relative to controls in R49. Salinity negatively affected chlorophyll and total polyphenol content (TPC) in VI-1 and Villarrica but not R49. Germination on saline or control media of seeds harvested from plants treated or not with NaCl was sometimes different; the best performing landrace was R49 insofar as 45-65% of seeds germinated on 500 mM NaCl-containing medium. In all landraces, average seedling root length declined strongly with increasing NaCl concentration, but roots of R49 were significantly longer than those of VI-1 and Villarrica up to 300 mM NaCl. Salt caused increases in seed TPC relative to controls, but radical scavenging capacity was higher only in seeds from T2 plants of R49. Total SDS-extractable seed proteins were resolved into distinct bands (10-70 kDa) with some evident differences between landraces. Salt-induced changes in protein patterns were landrace-specific. The responses to salinity of the salares landrace are discussed in relation to its better adaptation to an extreme environment.

  7. Reducing agitator energy consumption without sacrificing agitation

    SciTech Connect

    Golobic, R.A.; Derrickson, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    Rising energy costs and their increasing net effect on the cost of a mineral product requires that every aspect of processing-plant operations reduce consumed horsepower without sacrificing the grade of the product. This paper addresses two principles in the design and selection of axial-flow agitator propellers that contribute to significant reductions in required horsepower. The first of these involves the use of good design principles. The swirling wake generated by an agitator propeller induces losses in the pumping action. By designing an agitator of proper twist and shape one can minimize these losses. Depending upon the design chosen for comparison, these losses can be reduced by 30 to 50% without any sacrifice in pumping or without increasing the complexity of the design. The second aspect involves an appropriate selection of the agitator propeller diameter. The required horsepower can be significantly reduced by using a propeller of larger diameter while operating it at a lower revolutions per minute (RPM) with no sacrifice in the pumping. 3 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Contrasting responses of salinity-stressed salt-tolerant and intolerant winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars to ozone pollution.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y H; Li, X; Li, Y G; Miao, B H; Xu, H; Simmons, M; Yang, X H

    2012-03-01

    Contrasting winter wheat cultivars, salt-tolerant DK961 and intolerant JN17, which sown in no salinity (-S) and salinity (+S) boxes were exposed to charcoal filtered air (CF) and elevated O(3) (+O(3)) in open top chambers (OTCs) for 30 days. In -S DK961 and JN17 plants, +O(3) DK961 and JN17 plants had significantly lower light-saturated net photosynthetic rates (A(sat), 26% and 24%), stomatal conductance (g(s), 20% and 32%) and chlorophyll contents (10% and 21%), while O(3) considerably increased foliar electrolyte leakage (13% and 39%), malondialdehyde content (9% and 23%), POD activity and ABA content. However, responses of these parameters to O(3) were significant in DK961 but not in JN17 in +S treatment. Correlation coefficient of DK961 reached significance level of 0.01, but it was not significant in JN17 under interaction of O(3) and salinity. O(3)-induced reductions were larger in shoot than in root in both cultivars. Results indicate that the salt-tolerant cultivar sustained less damage from salinity than did the intolerant cultivar but was severely injured by O(3) under +S condition. Therefore, selecting for greater salt tolerance may not lead to the expected gains in yield in areas of moderate (100 mM) salinity when O(3) is present in high concentrations. In contrast, salinity-induced stomatal closure effectively reduced sensitivity to O(3) in the salt-intolerant cultivar. Hence we suggest salt-tolerant winter wheat cultivars might be well adapted to areas of high (>100 mM) salinity and O(3) stress, while intolerant cultivars might be adaptable to areas of mild/moderate salinity but high O(3) pollution.

  9. Salinity stress in roots of contrasting barley genotypes reveals time-distinct and genotype-specific patterns for defined proteins.

    PubMed

    Witzel, Katja; Matros, Andrea; Strickert, Marc; Kaspar, Stephanie; Peukert, Manuela; Mühling, Karl H; Börner, Andreas; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2014-02-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most severe abiotic stress factors threatening agriculture worldwide. Hence, particular interest exists in unraveling mechanisms leading to salt tolerance and improved crop plant performance on saline soils. Barley is considered to be one of the most salinity-tolerant crops, but varying levels of tolerance are well characterized. A proteomic analysis of the roots of two contrasting cultivars (cv. Steptoe and cv. Morex) is presented. Young plants were exposed to a period of 1, 4, 7, or 10 d at 0, 100, or 150 mM NaCl. The root proteome was analyzed based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A number of cultivar-specific and salinity stress-responsive proteins were identified. Mass spectrometry-based identification was successful for 74 proteins, and a hierarchical clustering analysis grouped these into five clusters based on similarity of expression profile. The rank product method was applied to statistically access the early and late responses, and this delivered a number of new candidate proteins underlying salinity tolerance in barley. Among these were some germin-like proteins, some pathogenesis-related proteins, and numerous as-yet uncharacterized proteins. Notably, proteins involved in detoxification pathways and terpenoid biosynthesis were detected as early responsive to salinity and may function as a means of modulating growth-regulating mechanisms and membrane stability via fine tuning of phytohormone and secondary metabolism in the root.

  10. How salinity and temperature combine to affect physiological state and performance in red knots with contrasting non-breeding environments.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Jorge S; Soriano-Redondo, Andrea; Dekinga, Anne; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Masero, José A; Piersma, Theunis

    2015-08-01

    Migratory shorebirds inhabit environments that may yield contrasting salinity-temperature regimes-with widely varying osmoregulatory demands, even within a given species-and the question is: by which physiological means and at which organisational level do they show adjustments with respect to these demands? Red knots Calidris canutus winter in coastal areas over a range of latitudes. The nominal subspecies winters in salty areas in the tropics, whereas the subspecies Calidris canutus islandica winters in north-temperate regions of comparatively lower salinities and temperatures. In this study, both subspecies of red knot were acclimated to different salinity (28/40‰)-temperature (5/35 °C) combinations for 2-week periods. We then measured food/salt intakes, basal metabolic rate (BMR), body mass and temperature, fat and salt gland scores, gizzard mass, heat-shock proteins, heterophils/lymphocytes (H/L) ratio and plasma Na(+) to assess the responses of each taxon to osmoregulatory challenges. High salinity (HS)-warm-acclimated birds reduced food/salt intake, BMR, body mass, fat score and gizzard mass, showing that salt/heat loads constrained energy acquisition rates. Higher salt gland scores in saltier treatments indicated that its size was adjusted to higher osmoregulatory demands. Elevated plasma Na(+) and H/L ratio in high-salinity-warm-acclimated birds indicated that salt/heat loads might have a direct effect on the water-salt balance and stress responses of red knots. Subspecies had little or no effect on most measured parameters, suggesting that most adjustments reflect phenotypic flexibility rather than subspecific adaptations. Our results demonstrate how salinity and temperature affect various phenotypic traits in a migrant shorebird, highlighting the importance of considering these factors jointly when evaluating the environmental tolerances of air-breathing marine taxa.

  11. Root-specific transcript profiling of contrasting rice genotypes in response to salinity stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated salinity imposes osmotic and ion toxicity stresses on living cells and requires a multitude of responses in order to enable plant survival. Building on earlier work profiling transcript levels in rice (Oryza sativa) shoots of FL478, a salt-tolerant indica recombinant inbred line, and IR29, ...

  12. Comparative Transcriptional Profiling of Two Contrasting Rice Genotypes under Salinity Stress during the Vegetative Growth Stage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa), a salt-sensitive species, has considerable genetic variation for salt tolerance within the cultivated gene pool. Two indica rice genotypes, FL478, a recombinant inbred line derived from a population developed for salinity tolerance studies, and IR29, the sensitive parent of the ...

  13. Physiological, Morphological and Behavioural Responses of Self-Feeding Precocial Chicks Copying with Contrasting Levels of Water Salinity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Afonso R.; Silva, Rita; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Guzmán, Juan M.; Ramos, Jaime A.; Masero, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Combined physiological and behavioural responses to salt loads during development have rarely been studied in air-breathing vertebrates able to inhabit hypersaline habitats, but they may be of particular importance in understanding, for example, the differences among species in patterns of habitat use or ontogenetic diet switches. Here, we compared the physiological and behavioural responses of self-feeding precocial chicks developed in contrasting levels of water salinity. The model species was the Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) a precocial shorebird that breeds in a range of habitats from freshwater to hypersaline wetlands. Specifically, we compared resting metabolic rate (RMR), heat shock proteins (Hsp70), plasma ions, hematocrit, body mass, body size, growth rate and head-shaking behaviour of captive-reared Black-winged Stilt fledglings developed under fresh (0 ‰), saline (20 ‰), and hypersaline (60 ‰) water. Contrary to expectations, none of the physiological and morphological variables measured differed significantly among treatments. Likewise, the RMR of wild and captive-reared fledglings was similar. Surprisingly, the saltgland mass of wild fledglings from freshwater and those from hypersaline habitats was also similar. However, head-shaking, a behavioural response associated to minimize salt intake and to expel the secretions of salt glands, differed according to salinity source: head-shaking rate increased with increasing salinity. The results of this study support the key role of behavioural osmoregulation in avoiding salt stress during development. PMID:27788200

  14. Phenotypic and metabolic responses to drought and salinity of four contrasting lentil accessions.

    PubMed

    Muscolo, A; Junker, A; Klukas, C; Weigelt-Fischer, K; Riewe, D; Altmann, T

    2015-09-01

    Drought and salinity are among the major abiotic stresses which, often inter-relatedly, adversely affect plant growth and productivity. Plant stress responses depend on the type of stress, on its intensity, on the species, and also on the genotype. Different accessions of a species may have evolved different mechanisms to cope with stress and to complete their life cycles. This study is focused on lentil, an important Mediterranean legume with high quality protein for the human diet. The effects of salinity and drought on germination and early growth of Castelluccio di Norcia (CAST), Pantelleria (PAN), Ustica (UST), and Eston (EST) accessions were evaluated to identify metabolic and phenotypic traits related to drought and/or salinity stress tolerance. The results showed a relationship between imposed stresses and performance of the cultivars. According to germination frequencies, the accession ranking was as follows: NaCl resistant > susceptible, PAN > UST > CAST > EST; polyethylene glycol (PEG) resistant > susceptible, CAST > UST > EST > PAN. Seedling tolerance rankings were: NaCl resistant > susceptible, CAST ≈ UST > PAN ≈ EST; PEG resistant > susceptible, CAST > EST ≈ UST > PAN. Changes in the metabolite profiles, mainly quantitative rather than qualitative, were observed in the same cultivar in respect to the treatments, and among the cultivars under the same treatment. Metabolic differences in the stress tolerance of the different genotypes were related to a reduction in the levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. The relevant differences, between the most NaCl-tolerant genotype (PAN) and the most sensitive one (EST) were related to the decrease in the threonic acid level. Stress-specific metabolite indicators were also identified: ornithine and asparagine as markers of drought stress and alanine and homoserine as markers of salinity stress.

  15. Phenotypic and metabolic responses to drought and salinity of four contrasting lentil accessions

    PubMed Central

    Muscolo, A.; Junker, A.; Klukas, C.; Weigelt-Fischer, K.; Riewe, D.; Altmann, T.

    2015-01-01

    Drought and salinity are among the major abiotic stresses which, often inter-relatedly, adversely affect plant growth and productivity. Plant stress responses depend on the type of stress, on its intensity, on the species, and also on the genotype. Different accessions of a species may have evolved different mechanisms to cope with stress and to complete their life cycles. This study is focused on lentil, an important Mediterranean legume with high quality protein for the human diet. The effects of salinity and drought on germination and early growth of Castelluccio di Norcia (CAST), Pantelleria (PAN), Ustica (UST), and Eston (EST) accessions were evaluated to identify metabolic and phenotypic traits related to drought and/or salinity stress tolerance. The results showed a relationship between imposed stresses and performance of the cultivars. According to germination frequencies, the accession ranking was as follows: NaCl resistant > susceptible, PAN > UST > CAST > EST; polyethylene glycol (PEG) resistant > susceptible, CAST > UST > EST > PAN. Seedling tolerance rankings were: NaCl resistant > susceptible, CAST ≈ UST > PAN ≈ EST; PEG resistant > susceptible, CAST > EST ≈ UST > PAN. Changes in the metabolite profiles, mainly quantitative rather than qualitative, were observed in the same cultivar in respect to the treatments, and among the cultivars under the same treatment. Metabolic differences in the stress tolerance of the different genotypes were related to a reduction in the levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. The relevant differences, between the most NaCl-tolerant genotype (PAN) and the most sensitive one (EST) were related to the decrease in the threonic acid level. Stress-specific metabolite indicators were also identified: ornithine and asparagine as markers of drought stress and alanine and homoserine as markers of salinity stress. PMID:25969553

  16. Contrasting microbial functional genes in two distinct saline-alkali and slightly acidic oil-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuting; Zhao, Huihui; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Guanghe

    2014-07-15

    To compare the functional gene structure and diversity of microbial communities in saline-alkali and slightly acidic oil-contaminated sites, 40 soil samples were collected from two typical oil exploration sites in North and South China and analyzed with a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0). The overall microbial pattern was significantly different between the two sites, and a more divergent pattern was observed in slightly acidic soils. Response ratio was calculated to compare the microbial functional genes involved in organic contaminant degradation and carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur cycling. The results indicated a significantly low abundance of most genes involved in organic contaminant degradation and in the cycling of nitrogen and phosphorus in saline-alkali soils. By contrast, most carbon degradation genes and all carbon fixation genes had similar abundance at both sites. Based on the relationship between the environmental variables and microbial functional structure, pH was the major factor influencing the microbial distribution pattern in the two sites. This study demonstrated that microbial functional diversity and heterogeneity in oil-contaminated environments can vary significantly in relation to local environmental conditions. The limitation of nitrogen and phosphorus and the low degradation capacity of organic contaminant should be carefully considered, particularly in most oil-exploration sites with saline-alkali soils.

  17. Agitation apparatus. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Beets, A.L.; Lewis, B.E. Jr.

    1982-03-12

    Agitation apparatus includes a tank with a cylindrical upper portion, a frustoconical intermediate portion, and a cylindrical lower portion, a lift tube extending from the upper portion of the tank to a point near an end cap attached to the lower portion of the tank, the lift tube being concentric with the lower portion of the tank to provide a flow passage there between, and a plurality of air supply conduits extending along the lift tube and spaced apart around its perimeter, these air supply conduits terminating adjacent the lower end of the lift tube. Air discharged from the lower ends of the air supply conduits causes liquid in the tank to flow upwardly through the lift tube and out of apertures in the upper portion thereof. Due to the unique properties of nuclear fuel dissolver solutions and the constraint placed on the amount of air that can be injected therein by conventional apparatus, there has been a need for a more effective means for agitating liquid in nuclear fuel digester tanks.

  18. Greater aerial moisture transport distances with warming amplify interbasin salinity contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Hansi K. A.; Donohoe, Aaron; Bitz, Cecilia M.; Nusbaumer, Jesse; Noone, David C.

    2016-08-01

    The distance atmospheric moisture travels is fundamental to Earth's hydrologic cycle, governing how much evaporation is exported versus precipitated locally. The present-day tropical Atlantic is one region that exports much locally evaporated moisture away, leading to more saline surface waters in the Atlantic compared to the Indo-Pacific at similar latitudes. Here we use a state-of-the-art global climate model equipped with numerical water tracers to show that over half of the atmospheric freshwater exported from the Atlantic originates as evaporation in the northern Atlantic subtropics, primarily between 10°N and 20°N, and is transported across Central America via prevailing easterlies into the equatorial Pacific. We find enhanced moisture export from the Atlantic to Pacific with warming is due to greater distances between moisture source and sink regions, which increases moisture export from the Atlantic at the expense of local precipitation. Distance traveled increases due to longer moisture residence times, not simply Clausius-Clapeyron scaling.

  19. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  20. Cavitation-controlled ultrasonic agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Lawrence, W.P.; Raptis, A.C.

    1989-10-01

    High-intensity ultrasound generally produces nonlinear acoustic cavitation and streaming in liquids. The ultrasonic energy required to cause cavitation and streaming in a liquid depends on the physical properties of the liquid, e.g., surface tension, viscosity, and entrained gases. Both cavitation and streaming generate acoustic noise whose signatures may be used to distinguish the stage of agitation and thus allow the process to be controlled. An ultrasonic agitator has been designed for application in a confined area with a high-temperature, high-pressure, and corrosive environment. Control of this agitator is based on the detection of noise levels and subharmonics produced during cavitation and streaming. Noise signatures of agitation in different liquids and in liquids with particles have been determined, and discussed. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Downhole gaseous liquid flow agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Kamilos, N.; Kennedy, D.D.; Lederhos, L.J. Jr.

    1989-03-14

    An apparatus is described for agitating and mixing of a gaseous phase and a liquid phase comprising: a first tube having non-blocking internal threads within the first tube to agitate a liquid phase adhering thereto with a gaseous phase passing therethrough, whereby a uniform gaseous phase and liquid phase mixture is formed; and a second tube connected to an end of the first tube having non-blocking internal threads of opposite handedness.

  2. Leaf gas exchange and nutrient use efficiency help explain the distribution of two Neotropical mangroves under contrasting flooding and salinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardona-Olarte, Pablo; Krauss, Ken W.; Twilley, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa co-occur along many intertidal floodplains in the Neotropics. Their patterns of dominance shift along various gradients, coincident with salinity, soil fertility, and tidal flooding. We used leaf gas exchange metrics to investigate the strategies of these two species in mixed culture to simulate competition under different salinity concentrations and hydroperiods. Semidiurnal tidal and permanent flooding hydroperiods at two constant salinity regimes (10 g L−1 and 40 g L−1) were simulated over 10 months. Assimilation (A), stomatal conductance (gw), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), instantaneous photosynthetic water use efficiency (PWUE), and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE) were determined at the leaf level for both species over two time periods. Rhizophora mangle had significantly higher PWUE than did L. racemosa seedlings at low salinities; however, L. racemosa had higher PNUE and stomatal conductance and gw, accordingly, had greater intercellular CO2 (calculated) during measurements. Both species maintained similar capacities for assimilation at 10 and 40 g L−1 salinity and during both permanent and tidal hydroperiod treatments. Hydroperiod alone had no detectable effect on leaf gas exchange. However, PWUE increased and PNUE decreased for both species at 40 g L−1 salinity compared to 10 g L−1. At 40 g L−1 salinity, PNUE was higher for L. racemosa than R. mangle with tidal flooding. These treatments indicated that salinity influences gas exchange efficiency, might affect how gases are apportioned intercellularly, and accentuates different strategies for distributing leaf nitrogen to photosynthesis for these two species while growing competitively.

  3. In vivo physiological saline-infused hepatic vessel imaging using a two-crystal-interferometer-based phase-contrast X-ray technique.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yoneyama, Akio; Wu, Jin; Momose, Atsushi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2012-03-01

    Using a two-crystal-interferometer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging system, the portal vein, capillary vessel area and hepatic vein of live rats were revealed sequentially by injecting physiological saline via the portal vein. Vessels greater than 0.06 mm in diameter were clearly shown with low levels of X-rays (552 µGy). This suggests that in vivo vessel imaging of small animals can be performed as conventional angiography without the side effects of the presently used iodine contrast agents.

  4. Treating agitation with dexmedetomidine in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit frequently experience delirium, anxiety, and agitation, with a variety of treatments used. This article discusses the role of an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist, dexmedetomidine, and its clinical relevance and advantages for the agitated patient.

  5. Agitation in DWPF Precipitate Pump Pit Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.C.

    1986-01-20

    An experimental program to test the reference agitator design for DWPF Precipitate Pump Pit Tanks has been completed. It was not known whether the reference agitator design would produce uniform mixing of precipitate slurry. There was also a concern that the reference agitator would produce excessive foaming of precipitate. An alternative agitator design that produces good mixing with little or no foam buildup was identified in the tests and is recommended for use in DWPF Precipitate Pump Pit Tanks. 7 refs.

  6. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  7. 7 CFR 58.513 - Agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agitators. 58.513 Section 58.513 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....513 Agitators. Mechanical agitators shall meet the requirements of § 58.417....

  8. 7 CFR 58.513 - Agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agitators. 58.513 Section 58.513 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....513 Agitators. Mechanical agitators shall meet the requirements of § 58.417....

  9. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  10. 7 CFR 58.513 - Agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agitators. 58.513 Section 58.513 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....513 Agitators. Mechanical agitators shall meet the requirements of § 58.417....

  11. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  12. 7 CFR 58.513 - Agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agitators. 58.513 Section 58.513 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....513 Agitators. Mechanical agitators shall meet the requirements of § 58.417....

  13. 7 CFR 58.513 - Agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agitators. 58.513 Section 58.513 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....513 Agitators. Mechanical agitators shall meet the requirements of § 58.417....

  14. Agitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... alertness (altered consciousness) can be a sign of delirium . Delirium has a medical cause and should be checked ... PCP, or opiates) Hospitalization (older adults often have delirium while in the hospital) Overactive thyroid gland ( hyperthyroidism ) ...

  15. Osmolality and δ 13C of Leaf Tissues of Mangrove Species from Environments of Contrasting Rainfall and Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, E.; Francisco, M.

    1997-09-01

    Neotropical species of the generaRhizophora, LagunculariaandAvicenniagrow in environments of variable salinity and flooding stress. Species ofRhizophorapredominate in riverine and low-energy coastal fringe environments with continuous water movement, whileLaguncularia racemosa, and particularlyAvicennia germinans, grow in areas with stagnating water.Avicennia germinansappears to have the largest range of salinity tolerance. The osmotic characteristics ofRhizophoraspp.,L. racemosaandA. germinansin riverine and coastal environments of north-eastern Venezuela are described and correlated with edaphic and climatic factors. Mature, fully-exposed leaves were collected in humid riverine sites (San Juan River Estuary, Monagas and Sucre States), and seasonally dry coastal fringe habitats (the Unare Coastal Lagoon, and the Chimana Islands off-shore Puerto de La Cruz, Anzoátegui State). Cleaned leaf samples were frozen until measurement of leaf dimensions, chlorophyll, phosphorus and nitrogen contents, δ13C, osmolality of cell sap, and cell sap content of Na, K and Cl. Results indicate: (1) in all species, leaf sap osmolality is highly and positively correlated with interstitial water salinity, and negatively correlated with leaf area; (2) nitrogen and phosphorus contents of leaves are generally lower in dry areas, but average values are not significantly different. Therefore, it appears that nutrient deficiency is not a main factor determining variations in community structure. Nitrogen content per unit dry weight is, in general, twice as high inA. germinanscompared toRhizophoraspecies andL. racemosa; (3) cell sap osmolality is mostly explained by the concentration of Na and Cl; (4) osmolality of riverine plants (957-1253 mmol kg-1) is lower than that of coastal plants (1558-1761 mmol kg-1); and (5) δ13C values are more negative in riverine (-27·4 to -28·1‰) than in coastal plants (-25·4 to -27·2‰), indicating a higher water-use efficiency in the latter. Coastal

  16. Agitated Depression in Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Gelernter, Joel; Oslin, David; Anton, Raymond F.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression with psychomotor agitation (PMA; “agitated depression”) is a putative psychiatric phenotype that appears to associate with some forms of substance dependence. However, it is unclear whether such relationships extend across different substances and independent (I-MDE) versus substance-induced (SI-MDE) subtypes of major depressive episodes. Method We examined whether lifetime depression with (vs. without) PMA was associated with lifetime substance dependence across individuals with lifetime: (1) I-MDE only (n = 575); and (2) SI-MDE only (n = 1683). Data were pooled from several family and genetic studies of substance dependence in which participants received identical structured interviews to diagnose DSM-IV mental disorders. Results In I-MDE, PMA was significantly associated with alcohol, cocaine, opioid, other drug (hallucinogen, inhalant, speed-ball), and sedative dependence. After controlling for demographic and clinical co-factors, PMA's relationship to dependence on opioids, other drugs, and sedatives remained significant, but not its relationship to alcohol or cocaine. In SI-MDE, PMA was significantly associated with alcohol, cocaine, opioid, and other drug dependence. After adjusting for co-factors, associations remained significant for dependence on cocaine and opioids, but not alcohol or other drugs. Relationships between PMA and opioid dependence were stronger in I-MDE than SI-MDE. Depression subtype (I-MDE vs. SI-MDE) did not moderate relations between PMA and non-opioid forms of substance dependence. Conclusions Agitated depression associates with certain forms of substance dependence, particularly opioid dependence. MDE subtype did not alter most PMA-dependence associations, which suggests that the mechanisms underlying this comorbidity are complex and potentially bidirectional. PMID:21277711

  17. A Controlled Agitation Process for Improving Quality of Canned Green Beans during Agitation Thermal Processing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anika; Pratap Singh, Anubhav; Ramaswamy, Hosahalli S

    2016-06-01

    This work introduces the concept of a controlled agitation thermal process to reduce quality damage in liquid-particulate products during agitation thermal processing. Reciprocating agitation thermal processing (RA-TP) was used as the agitation thermal process. In order to reduce the impact of agitation, a new concept of "stopping agitations after sufficient development of cold-spot temperature" was proposed. Green beans were processed in No. 2 (307×409) cans filled with liquids of various consistency (0% to 2% CMC) at various frequencies (1 to 3 Hz) of RA-TP using a full-factorial design and heat penetration results were collected. Corresponding operator's process time to impart a 10-min process lethality (Fo ) and agitation time (AT) were calculated using heat penetration results. Accordingly, products were processed again by stopping agitations as per 3 agitation regimes, namely; full time agitation, equilibration time agitation, and partial time agitation. Processed products were photographed and tested for visual quality, color, texture, breakage of green beans, turbidity, and percentage of insoluble solids in can liquid. Results showed that stopping agitations after sufficient development of cold-spot temperatures is an effective way of reducing product damages caused by agitation (for example, breakage of beans and its leaching into liquid). Agitations till one-log temperature difference gave best color, texture and visual product quality for low-viscosity liquid-particulate mixture and extended agitations till equilibration time was best for high-viscosity products. Thus, it was shown that a controlled agitation thermal process is more effective in obtaining high product quality as compared to a regular agitation thermal process.

  18. Particle Breakage in Agitated Dryers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Colin L.; Ghadiri, Mojtaba; Dennehy, Robert; Collier, Alan

    2009-06-01

    A method for predicting particle breakage in agitated dryers is described. The method utilizes an estimation of stresses and strains occurring in a dryer bed sheared by an impeller using the Distinct Element Method (DEM). An assemblage of particles is then subjected to these stresses in a shear cell to assess the extent of attrition under a range of stresses and strains. Paracetamol particles in the size range 500-600 μm are used for the experimental work. The relationship of attrition with stress and strain is then incorporated into the distribution of stress and strain in the dryer estimated by DEM. The extent of attrition for a range of conditions including the impeller speed has been analysed. The prediction shows impeller speed to have limited effect on attrition within the range of speeds tested.

  19. Emma Goldman: A Study in Female Agitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Elizabeth

    The role of the agitator in society and the special characteristics of women agitators--in particular, Emma Goldman, an American anarchist from the early twentieth century--are discussed in this paper. Specific examples of the rhetoric used by Emma Goldman in her speeches (supporting anarchism, against women's suffrage, against abortion control,…

  20. Biological activity of insulin in GMO gels and the effect of agitation.

    PubMed

    Sadhale, Y; Shah, J C

    1999-11-25

    Glyceryl monooleate (GMO)-water cubic phase gel was previously shown to protect insulin from agitation induced aggregation. However, it is not known if insulin is biologically active in the gel and what effect agitation has on insulin in the gel. Therefore, the objective was to determine the stability of insulin in cubic phase gel in terms of its biological activity in a suitable animal model such as Sprague-Dawley rats. Effect of agitation on biological activity of insulin in cubic phase GMO gel was determined by subcutaneous injections of the agitated and non-agitated gels to two groups of previously fasted rats and measuring the effect on their blood glucose levels. Two groups of rats administered with agitated insulin solution and normal saline were used as controls. The biological activity of insulin was evaluated by comparing AAC (area above the blood glucose level-time curve, in %-h), C(max) (maximum % decrease in blood glucose levels) and t(max) (time required to attain C(max), in h) values for the four groups of rats. Since cubic phase gel is highly viscous, therapeutic equivalency of insulin in the lamellar phase gel, which converts in situ into cubic phase gel, was compared to insulin solution with normal saline as the control, using AAC, C(max) and t(max) of the blood glucose profile. Insulin was biologically active in both agitated and non-agitated gels; however, upon agitation, insulin in solution totally lost its hypoglycemic activity. Agitation of insulin in the cubic phase gel was seen to have very little deleterious effect on its biological activity. Insulin in the lamellar phase gel was not only biologically active but also therapeutically equivalent to insulin solution based on AAC (327.9+/-100.8 and 431.7+/-113.3), C(max) (57. 1+/-7.0 and 70.2+/-6.5) and t(max) (2.8+/-0.7 and 4.0+/-1.7) for the lamellar phase gel and insulin solution, respectively (no significant difference, P0.05). In summary, GMO cubic phase gel protected insulin from

  1. Randomized Trial of Bicarbonate or Saline Study for the Prevention of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Paul; Manoukian, Steven V.; Abbott, J. Dawn; Kereiakes, Dean J.; Jeremias, Allen; Kim, Michael; Dauerman, Harold L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Sodium bicarbonate has been proposed for protection of the kidney from contrast-induced AKI (CIAKI). However, the effects of bicarbonate on long-term important clinical outcomes are uncertain. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In a prospective, double-blind, multicenter randomized clinical trial, 391 patients with an eGFR<45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 undergoing elective coronary or peripheral angiography were randomized to an infusion with a high dose of isotonic sodium bicarbonate (target 2.0 mEq/kg) or a similar molar amount of isotonic sodium chloride. The primary outcome was a composite of mortality, dialysis, or a sustained 20% reduction in eGFR at 6 months. Results There were 391 patients enrolled between March 2010 and May 2012. The incidence of the primary outcome was 14.9% in the bicarbonate group and 16.3% in the control group in the intention-to-treat population (P=0.78). There was also no difference in the incidence of CIAKI between the treatment groups (14.5% versus 12.1%, respectively; P=0.20). CIAKI was associated with a higher incidence of sustained loss of kidney function at 6 months compared with those without CIAKI (21.2% versus 7.7%, respectively; P=0.06). Conclusions High-dose sodium bicarbonate infusion in patients with eGFR<45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 undergoing angiography did not demonstrate a difference in incidence of the composite of death, dialysis, or sustained 6-month reduction in eGFR or CIAKI compared with sodium chloride. PMID:26185263

  2. Quantification of sub-resolution porosity in carbonate rocks by applying high-salinity contrast brine using X-ray microtomography differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qingyang; Al-Khulaifi, Yousef; Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2016-10-01

    Characterisation of the pore space in carbonate reservoirs and aquifers is of utmost importance in a number of applications such as enhanced oil recovery, geological carbon storage and contaminant transport. We present a new experimental methodology that uses high-salinity contrast brine and differential imaging acquired by X-ray tomography to non-invasively obtain three-dimensional spatially resolved information on porosity and connectivity of two rock samples, Portland and Estaillades limestones, including sub-resolution micro-porosity. We demonstrate that by injecting 30 wt% KI brine solution, a sufficiently high phase contrast can be achieved allowing accurate three-phase segmentation based on differential imaging. This results in spatially resolved maps of the solid grain phase, sub-resolution micro-pores within the grains, and macro-pores. The total porosity values from the three-phase segmentation for two carbonate rock samples are shown to be in good agreement with Helium porosity measurements. Furthermore, our flow-based method allows for an accurate estimate of pore connectivity and a distribution of porosity within the sub-resolution pores.

  3. Properly choose mechanical agitators for viscous liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, A.; Gates, L.E.

    1995-12-01

    High-viscosity mixing applications occur in most chemical process industries (CPI) plants. High-viscosity applications occur in the production of food, paint, drilling mud, and greases, to name a few. Mixing can occur in pipeline systems with motionless mixers, or in vessels using mechanical agitators, depending on the application and the process requirements. A wide variety of both motionless mixers and mechanical agitators is available to handle specific mixing problems and fluid types. This article gives an overview of designing the most commonly used agitator for blending applications: a top-entering agitator with a single shaft. The agitator can be equipped with multiple turbine-style impellers of different design, or with helical-ribbon or anchor-style impellers to optimize the agitator for the specific application and blending problem on hand. Although turbulent blending will be briefly discussed here also, this article will focus on blending in the laminar and transitional regimes. Also, the authors will discuss the special requirements for blending non-newtonian fluids, with and without yield stress. They first discuss the flow patterns and applicability of different impeller types and then present some design guidelines.

  4. Microbial Ecology in Anaerobic Digestion at Agitated and Non-Agitated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhuoli; Cabrol, Léa; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo; Pullammanappallil, Pratap

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the distribution and dynamics of microbial community in anaerobic digestion at agitated and non-agitated condition, 454 pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA was conducted. It revealed the distinct community compositions between the two digesters and their progressive shifting over time. Methanogens and syntrophic bacteria were found much less abundant in the agitated digester, which was mainly attributed to the presence of bacterial genera Acetanaerobacterium and Ruminococcus with relatively high abundance. The characterization of the microbial community corroborated the digestion performance affected at the agitated condition, where lower methane yield and delayed methane production rate were observed. This was further verified by the accumulation of propionic acid in the agitated digester. PMID:25313520

  5. Coal storage hopper with vibrating screen agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1984-09-11

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyor mechanism. The vibrating screen agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  6. Coal storage hopper with vibrating screen agitator

    DOEpatents

    Daw, Charles S.; Lackey, Mack E.; Sy, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyor mechanism. The vibrating screen agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  7. An Agitation Experiment with Multiple Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Jordan L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a multifaceted agitation and mixing experiment. The relatively inexpensive apparatus includes a variable-speed stirrer motor, two polycarbonate tanks, and an instrumented torque table. Students measure torque as a function of stirrer speed, and use conductive tracer data to estimate two parameters of a flow model. The effect…

  8. Salinization and Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    One of the most conspicuous phenomena of water-quality degradation, particularly in arid and semi-arid zones, is salinization of water and soil resources. Salinization is a long-term phenomenon, and during the last century many aquifers and river basins have become unsuitable for human consumption owing to high levels of salinity. Future exploitation of thousands of wells in the Middle East and in many other water-scarce regions in the world depends, to a large extent, on the degree and rate of salinization. Moreover, every year a large fraction of agricultural land is salinized and becomes unusable.Salinization is a global environmental phenomenon that affects many different aspects of our life (Williams, 2001a, b): changing the chemical composition of natural water resources (lakes, rivers, and groundwater), degrading the quality of water supply to the domestic and agriculture sectors, contribution to loss of biodiversity, taxonomic replacement by halotolerant species ( Williams, 2001a, b), loss of fertile soil, collapse of agricultural and fishery industries, changing of local climatic conditions, and creating severe health problems (e.g., the Aral Basin). The damage due to salinity in the Colorado River Basin alone, for example, ranges between 500 and 750 million per year and could exceed 1 billion per year if the salinity in the Imperial Dam increases from 700 mg L-1 to 900 mg L-1 (Bureau of Reclamation, 2003, USA). In Australia, accelerating soil salinization has become a massive environmental and economic disaster. Western Australia is "losing an area equal to one football oval an hour" due to spreading salinity ( Murphy, 1999). The annual cost for dryland salinity in Australia is estimated as AU700 million for lost land and AU$130 million for lost production ( Williams et al., 2002). In short, the salinization process has become pervasive.Salinity in water is usually defined by the chloride content (mg L-1) or total dissolved solids content (TDS, mg L-1or g

  9. Impact of osmoregulation on the differences in Cd accumulation between two contrasting edible amaranth cultivars grown on Cd-polluted saline soils.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Min; Li, Qu-Sheng; Yang, Ping; Ye, Han-Jie; Chen, Zi-Shuo; Guo, Shi-Hong; Wang, Li-Li; He, Bao-Yan; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the difference of osmoregulation between two edible amaranth cultivars, Liuye (high Cd accumulator) and Quanhong (low Cd accumulator), under salinity stress and determine the effects of such difference on Cd accumulation. A pot experiment was conducted to expose the plants to sewage-irrigated garden soil (mean 2.28 mg kg(-1) Cd) pretreated at three salinity levels. Under salinity stress, the concentrations of Cd in the two cultivars were significantly elevated compared with those in the controls, and the Cd concentration in Liuye was statistically higher than that in Quanhong (p < 0.05). Salinity-induced osmoregulation triggered different biogeochemical processes involved in Cd mobilization in the rhizosphere soil, Cd absorption, and translocation by the two cultivars. Rhizosphere acidification induced by an imbalance of cation over anion uptake was more serious in Liuye than in Quanhong, which obviously increased soil Cd bioavailability. Salinity-induced injuries in the cell wall pectin and membrane structure were worse in Liuye than in Quanhong, increasing the risk of Cd entering the protoplasts. The chelation of more cytoplasmic Cd(2+) with Cl(-) ions in the roots of Liuye promoted Cd translocation into the shoots. Furthermore, the less organic solutes in the root sap of Liuye than in that of Quanhong also favored Cd translocation into the shoots. Hence, osmoregulation processes can be regarded as important factors in reducing Cd accumulation in crop cultivars grown on saline soils.

  10. External potassium (K(+)) application improves salinity tolerance by promoting Na(+)-exclusion, K(+)-accumulation and osmotic adjustment in contrasting peanut cultivars.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bhaduri, Debarati; Meena, Har Narayan; Kalariya, Kuldeepsingh

    2016-06-01

    Achieving salt-tolerance is highly desirable in today's agricultural context. Apart from developing salt-tolerant cultivars, possibility lies with management options, which can improve crop yield and have significant impact on crop physiology as well. Thus present study was aimed to evaluate the ameliorative role of potassium (K(+)) in salinity tolerance of peanut. A field experiment was conducted using two differentially salt-responsive cultivars and three levels of salinity treatment (control, 2.0 dS m(-1), 4.0 dS m(-1)) along with two levels (with and without) of potassium fertilizer (0 and 30 kg K2O ha(-1)). Salinity treatment incurred significant changes in overall physiology in two peanut cultivars, though the responses varied between the tolerant and the susceptible one. External K(+) application resulted in improved salinity tolerance in terms of plant water status, biomass produced under stress, osmotic adjustment and better ionic balance. Tolerant cv. GG 2 showed better salt tolerance by excluding Na(+) from uptake and lesser accumulation in leaf tissue and relied more on organic osmolyte for osmotic adjustment. On the contrary, susceptible cv. TG 37A allowed more Na(+) to accumulate in the leaf tissue and relied more on inorganic solute for osmotic adjustment under saline condition, hence showed more susceptibility to salinity stress. Application of K(+) resulted in nullifying the negative effect of salinity stress with slightly better response in the susceptible cultivar (TG 37A). The present study identified Na(+)-exclusion as a key strategy for salt-tolerance in tolerant cv. GG 2 and also showed the ameliorating role of K(+) in salt-tolerance with varying degree of response amongst tolerant and susceptible cultivars.

  11. The effects of excipients on protein aggregation during agitation: an interfacial shear rheology study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Qi, Wei; Schwartz, Daniel K; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the effects of excipients in solutions of keratinocyte growth factor 2 (KGF-2) on protein aggregation during agitation as well as on interfacial shear rheology at the air-water interface. Samples were incubated with or without agitation, and in the presence or absence of the excipients heparin, sucrose, or polysorbate 80 (PS80). The effect of excipients on the extent of protein aggregation was determined by UV-visible spectroscopy and micro-flow imaging. Interfacial shear rheology was used to detect the gelation time and strength of protein gels at the air-water interface. During incubation, protein particles of size ≥1 μm and insoluble aggregates formed faster for KGF-2 solutions subjected to agitation. Addition of either heparin or sucrose promoted protein aggregation during agitation. In contrast, PS80 substantially inhibited agitation-induced KGF-2 aggregation but facilitated protein particulate formation in quiescent solutions. The combination of PS80 and heparin or sucrose completely prevented protein aggregation during both nonagitated and agitated incubations. Interfacial rheological measurements showed that KGF-2 in buffer alone formed an interfacial gel within a few minutes. In the presence of heparin, KGF-2 interfacial gels formed too quickly for gelation time to be determined. KGF-2 formed gels in about 10 min in the presence of sucrose. The presence of PS80 in the formulation inhibited gelation of KGF-2. Furthermore, the interfacial gels formed by the protein in the absence of PS80 were reversible when PS80 was added to the samples after gelation. Therefore, there is a correspondence between formulations that exhibited interfacial gelation and formulations that exhibited agitation-induced aggregation.

  12. 82. VIEW OF AGITATORS FROM EAST. DRIVE AND STRUCTURAL SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. VIEW OF AGITATORS FROM EAST. DRIVE AND STRUCTURAL SUPPORT OF AGITATOR No. 1 IN FOREGROUND. HORIZONTAL AIR LINE PARALLELS AGITATORS IN RIGHT HALF OF VIEW. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  13. 83. AGITATORS No. 2, No. 3, AND No. 4 FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. AGITATORS No. 2, No. 3, AND No. 4 FROM EAST. AIR SUPPLY RUNS THROUGH BENT BRACES ON RIGHT. NOTE AGITATOR RAKE LEANING AGAINST RETAINING WALL BETWEEN AGITATOR No. 2 AND No. 3. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  14. Advanced impeller geometry boosts liquid agitation

    SciTech Connect

    Fasano, J.B.; Bakker, A.; Penney, W.R. )

    1994-08-01

    A traditional agitator impeller often functions as a rather inefficient pump because of the way it produces fluid motion and pressure head. However, one can improve the amount of flow or shear generated by an impeller at constant power consumption and torque by changing its design. For example, a high-efficiency, axial-flow impeller produces more fluid motion per unit of power at constant torque than an otherwise similar pitched-blade turbine. The more-vigorous fluid motion cuts blend time and enhances heat-transfer in various flow-controlled mixing operations, such as blending of miscible fluids. For most applications, a higher degree of agitation intensity can be achieved on the same machine by substituting a high-efficiency impeller for a conventional pitched-blade unit. The high-efficiency impeller features a larger geometric pitch angle (30--60 deg) at the hub than at the tip (10--30 deg). Results from recently conducted controlled experiments indicate the beneficial effects of the high-efficiency impeller on blend time and heat-transfer coefficients in liquid-liquid mixing as well as solids suspension. This articles focuses on liquid agitation, with discussions of solids suspension set aside for a forthcoming piece in this series of articles on mixing.

  15. Fuel agitating device for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Scouten, D.G.

    1992-09-22

    This patent describes an agitator for fuel being conducted to an internal combustion engine. It comprises: a casing, a chamber within the casing between the fuel inlet conduit and the fuel outlet conduit, flow divider means in the chamber for dividing the chamber into a plurality of fuel flow paths on opposite sides thereof, an inner wall in the casing defining the exit portion, flange means in the casing within the chamber and spaced radially inwardly from the inner wall, and conduit means within the flange means for conducting fuel to the outlet conduit.

  16. Spontaneous knotting of an agitated string.

    PubMed

    Raymer, Dorian M; Smith, Douglas E

    2007-10-16

    It is well known that a jostled string tends to become knotted; yet the factors governing the "spontaneous" formation of various knots are unclear. We performed experiments in which a string was tumbled inside a box and found that complex knots often form within seconds. We used mathematical knot theory to analyze the knots. Above a critical string length, the probability P of knotting at first increased sharply with length but then saturated below 100%. This behavior differs from that of mathematical self-avoiding random walks, where P has been proven to approach 100%. Finite agitation time and jamming of the string due to its stiffness result in lower probability, but P approaches 100% with long, flexible strings. We analyzed the knots by calculating their Jones polynomials via computer analysis of digital photos of the string. Remarkably, almost all were identified as prime knots: 120 different types, having minimum crossing numbers up to 11, were observed in 3,415 trials. All prime knots with up to seven crossings were observed. The relative probability of forming a knot decreased exponentially with minimum crossing number and Möbius energy, mathematical measures of knot complexity. Based on the observation that long, stiff strings tend to form a coiled structure when confined, we propose a simple model to describe the knot formation based on random "braid moves" of the string end. Our model can qualitatively account for the observed distribution of knots and dependence on agitation time and string length.

  17. Finite element analysis of vessel nozzle for agitator supports

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.M.

    1996-12-01

    There are many industrial applications involving agitators/mixers supported by a vessel head and nozzle. The flow-induced agitator loads are often neglected or only partially considered in the vessel design stage. Inadequate supports reduce agitator drive operating life and in most cases promote vibration problems leading to fatigue failures. The vessel head and nozzle should be stiff enough to withstand the induced agitator loads. Some of the more significant design criteria are: (1) nozzle and head stiffness should be at least 1 million lb/in; (2) agitator shaft deflection should not be more than 1/32 inch per foot of shaft extension; (3) agitator support plane should not rotate more than 0.15 degree. This paper deals with a parametric finite element study of three tank sizes (4 ft., 8 ft. and 12 ft. diameter) to verify the validity and ease of compliance of these criteria in vessel design.

  18. The use of salinity contrast for density difference compensation to improve the thermal recovery efficiency in high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lopik, Jan H.; Hartog, Niels; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of heat recovery in high-temperature (>60 °C) aquifer thermal energy storage (HT-ATES) systems is limited due to the buoyancy of the injected hot water. This study investigates the potential to improve the efficiency through compensation of the density difference by increased salinity of the injected hot water for a single injection-recovery well scheme. The proposed method was tested through numerical modeling with SEAWATv4, considering seasonal HT-ATES with four consecutive injection-storage-recovery cycles. Recovery efficiencies for the consecutive cycles were investigated for six cases with three simulated scenarios: (a) regular HT-ATES, (b) HT-ATES with density difference compensation using saline water, and (c) theoretical regular HT-ATES without free thermal convection. For the reference case, in which 80 °C water was injected into a high-permeability aquifer, regular HT-ATES had an efficiency of 0.40 after four consecutive recovery cycles. The density difference compensation method resulted in an efficiency of 0.69, approximating the theoretical case (0.76). Sensitivity analysis showed that the net efficiency increase by using the density difference compensation method instead of regular HT-ATES is greater for higher aquifer hydraulic conductivity, larger temperature difference between injection water and ambient groundwater, smaller injection volume, and larger aquifer thickness. This means that density difference compensation allows the application of HT-ATES in thicker, more permeable aquifers and with larger temperatures than would be considered for regular HT-ATES systems.

  19. Boiling heat transfer enhancement of nanofluids on a smooth surface with agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xin; Qi, Baojin; Wei, Jinjia; Li, Wei; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Yonghai

    2016-12-01

    The pool boiling heat transfer performance on a smooth silicon chip surface with agitation was experimentally investigated in this study. The nanofluids (Ag/alcohol) of 0.02 % volume concentration and ethyl alcohol with purification over 99.9 % were the two contrast working fluids. For each group, subcoolings of 40, 50 and 60 K were conducted under atmospheric pressure. To enhance the heat transfer performance, an agitating device was fixed above the top of the chip. The experimental results indicated that nanofluids could enhance the heat transfer performance especially in the nucleate boiling region. The heat transfer coefficient was significantly increased with nanofluids, while the critical heat flux (CHF) was nearly not changed. In the agitation Reynolds number of 20,300, the heat transfer performance of nanofluids was significantly enhanced in the convection region, and the CHF was increased by more than 25 % for all groups. This boiling phenomenon was observed for both nanofluids and alcohol groups. Meanwhile, the boiling curves of different liquid subcoolings in the nucleate region were quite similar to each other under agitation.

  20. Indicators: Salinity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Salinity is the dissolved salt content of a body of water. Excess salinity, due to evaporation, water withdrawal, wastewater discharge, and other sources, is a chemical sterssor that can be toxic for aquatic environments.

  1. Modelling gas exchange during platelet storage without agitation.

    PubMed

    Torres, R; Tormey, C A

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to create a model of oxygen distribution within platelet storage bags to evaluate implications of reduced agitation approaches. Based on our model, platelet concentration and surface area most affect internal partial pressure of oxygen, while temperature modifications have least effect, indicating primary potential approaches for optimization of platelet storage with reduced or absent agitation.

  2. Effect of Preferred Music on Agitation After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyun; Williams, Reg Arthur; Lee, Donghyun

    2016-04-01

    Agitation is a common behavioral problem after traumatic brain injury (TBI), which threatens the safety of patients and caregivers and disrupts the rehabilitation process. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a preferred music intervention on the reduction of agitation in TBI patients and to compare the effects of preferred music with those of classical "relaxation" music. A single group, within-subjects, randomized crossover trial design was formed, consisting of 14 agitated patients with cognitive impairment after severe TBI. Patients listened to preferred music and classical "relaxation" music, with a wash-out period in between. Patients listening to the preferred music reported a significantly greater reduction in agitation compared with the effect seen during the classical "relaxation" music intervention (p = .046). These findings provide preliminary evidence that the preferred music intervention may be effective as an environmental therapeutic approach for reducing agitation after TBI.

  3. Effects of Tween 80 on cellulase stability under agitated conditions.

    PubMed

    Okino, Shohei; Ikeo, Makoto; Ueno, Yoshiki; Taneda, Daisuke

    2013-08-01

    The mechanism of the increase in the hydrolysis rate and yield by the addition of Tween 80 to the hydrolysis reaction of filter paper was investigated under static and agitated conditions. The increase in the hydrolysis rate by addition of Tween 80 was observed under the agitated condition only. The effects of Tween 80 on the changes in the protein concentration of individual cellulase components were investigated in the absence of substrates. Agitation of the enzyme solution resulted in the drastic decrease of SDS-PAGE bands intensity of CBH2 (cellobiohydrolase 2). The addition of Tween 80 prevented this. Thus, the Tween 80 functions to stabilize instable cellulase components under the agitated condition. Moreover, addition of Tween 80 completely suppressed the decrease of CBH2 intensity by agitation at 30°C. Results suggest that Tween 80 stabilizes instable cellulase components not only during hydrolysis, but during enzyme production also.

  4. Dexmedetomidine Injection during Strabismus Surgery Reduces Emergence Agitation without Increasing the Oculocardiac Reflex in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ah-Young; Baik, Ji-Seok; Kim, Jin Hee; Hwang, Jung- Won; Jeon, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dexmedetomidine is known to reduce the incidence of emergence agitation, which is a common complication after inhalational anesthesia like sevoflurane or desflurane in children. However, the dose of dexmedetomidine used for this purpose is reported variously and the most effective dose is not known. In this study, we tried to find the most effective dose of dexmedetomidine to reduce the incidence of emergence agitation in children undergoing strabismus surgery without the complications like oculocardiac reflex (OCR) or postoperative vomiting. Methods We randomized 103 pediatric patients aged 2–6 years and undergoing elective strabismus surgery into four groups. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane and maintained with desflurane. At the start of induction, dexmedetomidine, delivered at 0.25, 0.5, or 1 μg/kg, or saline was infused intravenously in the D0.25, D0.5, D1 groups, respectively. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of emergence agitation and the secondary outcome measure was the incidence of intraoperative OCR, postoperative vomiting, and desaturation events. Results The incidence of emergence agitation was 60, 48, 44, and 21% (P = 0.005) and the incidence of intraoperative OCR was 36, 36, 36, and 37% (P = 0.988) in the control, D0.25, D0.5, and D1 groups, respectively. And, postoperative vomiting rate and desaturation events were low in the all groups. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine decreased the incidence of emergence agitation without increasing intraoperative oculocardiac reflex. Dexmedetomidine delivered at 1 μg/kg was more effective at reducing emergence agitation than lower doses in children undergoing strabismus surgery under desflurane anesthesia. Trial Registration Clinical Research Information Service KCT0000141 PMID:27617832

  5. Agitated Honeybees Exhibit Pessimistic Cognitive Biases

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Melissa; Desire, Suzanne; Gartside, Sarah E.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Whether animals experience human-like emotions is controversial and of immense societal concern [1–3]. Because animals cannot provide subjective reports of how they feel, emotional state can only be inferred using physiological, cognitive, and behavioral measures [4–8]. In humans, negative feelings are reliably correlated with pessimistic cognitive biases, defined as the increased expectation of bad outcomes [9–11]. Recently, mammals [12–16] and birds [17–20] with poor welfare have also been found to display pessimistic-like decision making, but cognitive biases have not thus far been explored in invertebrates. Here, we ask whether honeybees display a pessimistic cognitive bias when they are subjected to an anxiety-like state induced by vigorous shaking designed to simulate a predatory attack. We show for the first time that agitated bees are more likely to classify ambiguous stimuli as predicting punishment. Shaken bees also have lower levels of hemolymph dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin. In demonstrating state-dependent modulation of categorization in bees, and thereby a cognitive component of emotion, we show that the bees' response to a negatively valenced event has more in common with that of vertebrates than previously thought. This finding reinforces the use of cognitive bias as a measure of negative emotional states across species and suggests that honeybees could be regarded as exhibiting emotions. Video Abstract PMID:21636277

  6. Nanocellulose Composite Materials Synthesizes with Ultrasonic Agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Timothy; Folken, Andrew; Fritch, Byron; Bradley, Derek

    We have extended current techniques in forming nanocellulose composite solids, suspensions and aerogels to enhance the breakdown of cellulose into its molecular components. Using only mechanical processing which includes ball milling, using a simple mortar and pestle, and ultrasonic agitation, we are able to create very low concentration uniform nanocellulose suspensions in water, as well as incorporate other materials such as graphite, carbon nanotubes, and magnetic materials. Of interest is that no chemical processing is necessary, nor is the use of nanoparticles, necessary for composite formation. Using both graphite and carbon nanotubes, we are able to achieve conducting nanocellulose solids and aerogels. Standard magnetic powder can also be incorporated to create magnetic solids. The technique also allows for the creation of an extremely fine nanocellulose suspension in water. Using extremely low concentrations, less than 1% cellulose by mass, along with careful control over processing parameters, we are able to achieve highly dilute, yet homogenous nanocellulose suspensions. When air dried, these suspensions have similar hardness and strength properties to those created with more typical starting cellulose concentrations (2-10%). However, when freeze-dried, these dilute suspensions form aerogels with a new morphology with much higher surface area than those with higher starting concentrations. We are currently examining the effect of this higher surface area on the properties of nanocellulose aerogel composites and how it influences the impact of incorporating nanocellulose into other polymer materials.

  7. Risk factors for agitation in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Thiago Miranda Lopes; de Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Nosé, Paulo Maurício Garcia; de Freitas, Flavio Geraldo Resende; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of agitation in the first 7 days after intensive care unit admission, its risk factors and its associations with clinical outcomes. Methods This single-center prospective cohort study included all patients older than 18 years with a predicted stay > 48 hours within the first 24 hours of intensive care unit admission. Agitation was defined as a Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale score ≥ +2, an episode of agitation or the use of a specific medication recorded in patient charts. Results Agitation occurred in 31.8% of the 113 patients. Multivariate analysis showed that delirium [OR = 24.14; CI95% 5.15 - 113.14; p < 0.001], moderate or severe pain [OR = 5.74; CI95% 1.73 - 19.10; p = 0.004], mechanical ventilation [OR = 10.14; CI95% 2.93 - 35.10; p < 0.001], and smoking habits [OR = 4.49; CI95% 1.33 - 15.17; p = 0.015] were independent factors for agitation, while hyperlactatemia was associated with a lower risk [OR = 0.169; CI95% 0.04 - 0.77; p = 0.021]. Agitated patients had fewer mechanical ventilation-free days at day 7 (p = 0.003). Conclusion The incidence of agitation in the first 7 days after admission to the intensive care unit was high. Delirium, moderate/severe pain, mechanical ventilation, and smoking habits were independent risk factors. Agitated patients had fewer ventilator-free days in the first 7 days. PMID:28099638

  8. Paradoxical severe agitation induced by add-on high-doses quetiapine in schizo-affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Fond, Guillaume; MacGregor, Alexandra; Ducasse, Deborah; Brittner, Marie

    2014-05-15

    We report the case of a 35-year-old patient suffering from schizo-affective disorder since the age of 19 years, treated by a combination of first-generation antipsychotics, zuclopenthixol (100 mg/day) and lithium (1200 mg/day) (serum lithium=0.85 mEq/l). This patient had no associated personality disorder (particularly no antisocial disorder) and no substance abuse disorder. Within the 48 h following the gradual introduction of quetiapine (up to 600 mg/day), the patient presented severe agitation without an environmental explanation, contrasting with the absence of a history of aggressiveness or personality disorder. The diagnoses of manic shift and akathisia were dismissed. The withdrawal and the gradual reintroduction of quetiapine 2 weeks later, which led to another severe agitation, enabled us to attribute the agitation specifically to quetiapine.

  9. 91. VIEW OF PORTLAND FILTER VACUUM RECEIVER FROM NORTHWEST. AGITATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW OF PORTLAND FILTER VACUUM RECEIVER FROM NORTHWEST. AGITATORS No. 4 AND No. 5 VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  10. 84. AGITATORS No. 3, No. 4 AND No. 5 FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. AGITATORS No. 3, No. 4 AND No. 5 FROM SOUTHEAST. OLD PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR IS SEEN THROUGH FRAMING, LOWER RIGHT. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  11. Agitation in Dementia: Relation to Core Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bloniecki, Victor; Aarsland, Dag; Cummings, Jeffrey; Blennow, Kaj; Freund-Levi, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to examine the associations of agitation with the cerebrospinal fluid dementia biomarkers total-tau (T-tau), phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) and Aβ1-42. Methods One hundred patients (mean age ± SD, 78.6 ± 7.5 years) with dementia and neuropsychiatric symptoms, of whom 67% were female, were included. Agitation was measured using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI; 46.5 ± 11.8 points). Results Total CMAI correlated with T-tau [rs (31) = 0.36, p = 0.04] and P-tau [rs (31) = 0.35, p = 0.05] in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 33) but not in the total dementia population (n = 95). Conclusions Our results suggest that tau-mediated pathology including neurofibrillary tangles and the intensity of the disease process might be associated with agitation in AD. PMID:25298777

  12. 6. VIEW OF BRINING TANK Older, redwood model. Paddles agitated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BRINING TANK Older, redwood model. Paddles agitated the skins while they soaked in brine. The skins were then hung to dry. - Sealing Plant, St. George Island, Pribilof Islands, Saint George, Aleutians West Census Area, AK

  13. Hydrodynamic effects on cell growth in agitated microcarrier bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1988-01-01

    The net growth rate of bovine embryonic kidney cells in microcarrier bioreactor is the result of a variable death rate imposed on a cell culture trying to grow at a constant intrinsic growth rate. The death rate is a function of the agitation conditions in the system, and increases at higher agitation because of increasingly energetic interactions of the cell covered microcarriers with turbulent eddies in the fluid. At very low agitation rates bead-bead bridging becomes important; the large clumps formed by bridging can interact with larger eddies than single beads, leading to a higher death rate at low agitation. The growth and death rate were correlated with a dimensionless eddy number which compares eddy forces to the buoyant force on the bead.

  14. Design of agitation systems in Bingham slurries by pilot simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    A method was required to determine the optimum agitator speed needed to produce overall motion of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) high-level waste slurries in remote process cell vessels. Project schedule and limited process space required an accurate determination of agitator horsepower and size without the benefit of full-scale testing. The small scale testing of unique clear rheologically similar fluid is described along with tests and scale-up procedures. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Agitator Mixing Analysis in a HB-Line Flat Tank

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2002-07-31

    In support of the HB-Line Engineering agitator mixing project, flow pattern calculations have been made for a 45 degrees pitched three-blade agitator submerged in a flat rectangular tank. The work is intended to determine agitator speeds that provide acceptable mixing performance for various tank liquid levels based on flow rates past solids deposited on the bottom surface of the flat tank. The modeling results will help ensure the acceptable suspension of solid particles as a function of agitator speed and tank liquid level during precipitation operations. The numerical modeling and calculations have been performed using a computational fluid dynamics approach. Three-dimensional steady-state momentum and continuity equations were used as the basic equations to estimate fluid motion driven by an agitator with three 45 degrees pitched blades. Hydraulic conditions were fully turbulent (Reynolds number about 2x104). A standard two-equation turbulence model (k-e), was used to capture turbulent eddy motion. The commercial finite volume code, Fluent [7], was used to create a prototypic geometry file with a non-orthogonal mesh. Hybrid meshing was used to fill the computational region between the round-edged tank bottom and agitator regions. At high rotational speeds and low tank levels, a surface vortex can reach the agitator blades and allow air to be drawn into the solid-fluid mixing zone. This is not desirable in terms of mixing performance. The analysis results show that the lowest liquid level among the four considered, 4.5 inches, is higher than the critical liquid height for air entrainment for agitator speeds up to 600 rpm. All the analysis results demonstrate that about 600 rpm provides adequate solids mixing capability for various tank levels (12, 8.5, 7, and 4.5 inches) containing 20-micron solids with a specific gravity of 2.5.

  16. Salinity Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the costs of deriving energy from the earth's natural reserves of salt. Argues that, as fossil fuel supplies become more depleted in the future, the environmental advantages of salinity power may prove to warrant its exploitation. (TW)

  17. Application of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs to large agitators

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.E.; Anderson, T.D. ); Bethmann, H.K. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the basis for and implementation of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs for large tank-mounted agitators. This modification to the original design was intended to minimize maintenance personnel exposure to ionizing radiation and also provide for disassembly capability without damage to shafts or hubs. In addition to realizing these objectives, test confirmed that the modified couplings reduced agitator shaft end runouts approximately 65%, thereby reducing bearing loads and increasing service life, a significant enhancement for a nuclear facility. 5 refs.

  18. Application of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs to large agitators

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.E.; Anderson, T.D.; Bethmann, H.K.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the basis for and implementation of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs for large tank-mounted agitators. This modification to the original design was intended to minimize maintenance personnel exposure to ionizing radiation and also provide for disassembly capability without damage to shafts or hubs. In addition to realizing these objectives, test confirmed that the modified couplings reduced agitator shaft end runouts approximately 65%, thereby reducing bearing loads and increasing service life, a significant enhancement for a nuclear facility. 5 refs.

  19. Coal storage hopper with vibrating-screen agitator

    DOEpatents

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1982-04-27

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyer mechanism. The vibrating scrren agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  20. Investigating the influence of pH, temperature and agitation speed on yellow pigment production by Penicillium aculeatum ATCC 10409.

    PubMed

    Afshari, Majid; Shahidi, Fakhri; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali; Tabatabai, Farideh; Es'haghi, Zarin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the combined effect of pH, temperature and agitation speed on yellow pigment production and mycelial growth of Penicillium aculeatum ATCC 10409 was investigated in whey media. Different pH levels (5, 6.5 and 8), temperatures (25, 30 and 35°C) and agitation speed levels (100 and 150 rpm) were tested to determine the best conditions to produce a fungal yellow pigment under submerged fermentation. The best production of yellow pigment (1.38 g/L) was obtained with a pH value of 6.5, a temperature of 30°C and an agitation speed of 150 rpm. In contrast, the maximal biomass concentration (11.12 g/L) was obtained at pH value of 8, a temperature of 30°C and an agitation speed of 100 rpm. These results demonstrated that biomass and yellow pigment production were not directly associated. The identification of the structure of unknown P. aculeatum yellow pigment was detected using UV absorption spectrum and FT-IR spectroscopy.

  1. Mechanisms of cell damage in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1986-01-01

    Cells growing on microcarriers may be damaged by collisions of the microcarrier against another microcarrier or the reactor agitator. Bead-bead collisions are caused by small-scale turbulence, which can also cause high local shear stress on the cells. The cells are also exposed to 10-20 Hz cyclic shear stress by bead rotation.

  2. Magnetic shaft seals prevent hazardous leakage from wastewater agitators

    SciTech Connect

    Traino, F.A.

    1985-11-01

    The US Department of Energy's laboratory in Miamisburg, OH, operated by Monsanto Research Corporation, processes approximately 45,000 gallons per week of low-level radioactive wastewater to meet Federal Environmental Protection Agency quality standards. Preventing the spread of radioactive contamination throughout the operating area demands effective sealing of all process piping, valves, pumps, and agitators. Rotating shafts of pumps and agitators installed a the start of operations in 1947 were sealed by stuffing glands with graphite impregnated asbestos packing. These pumps proved to be unsatisfactory. In the mid-1970's, new process pumps with mechanical seals and some with magnetic drives were installed. Later, in January 1979, new agitator shaft drives with double tandem, spring-loaded mechanical seals were installed, maintenance of these pumps was costly. The agitator drive shafts were redesigned to accommodate magnetic seals of the type successfully used in blowers and vacuum/pressure pumps in other plant locations. One inherent advantage of the magnetic seal is that it operates with a face loading as much as 50% less than a conventional spring-loaded mechanical seal. The lower loading by a predetermined uniform magnetic force contributes to long face life. Other advantages include compactness, ease of assembly with only a few parts, and insensitivity to vibration. The magnetic shaft seals installed on the agitator shafts in February 1983 are still in service without any leakage or need for maintenance. Based on current operating data and a projected five-year meantime between failures, the estimated cost benefit of the magnetic seals over spring-loaded mechanical seals over spring-loaded mechanical seals will be $640 vs $2400 respectively per seal, with 60% less downtime for maintenance.

  3. The usefulness of contrast during exercise echocardiography for the assessment of systolic pulmonary pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Luis R; Loureiro, Maria J; Miranda, Rita; Almeida, Sofia; Almeida, Ana R; Cordeiro, Ana; Cotrim, Carlos; Carrageta, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Background The systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAPs) can be accurately estimated, non-invasively, using continuous-wave Doppler (CWD) ultrasound measurement of the peak velocity of a tricuspid regurgitant (TR) jet. However, it is often difficult to obtain adequate tricuspid regurgitation signals for measurement of PAPs, what could lead to its underestimation. Therefore, utilization of air-blood-saline contrast has been implemented for the improvement of Doppler signal in several clinical contexts. It is now recommended in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension. Physical activity is severely restricted in patients with PAH, being exertional dypnea the most typical symptom. Exercise stress echo-Doppler imaging allows assessment of the response to exercise. It is an excellent screening test for patients with suspected PAH. Our purpose was to evaluate the value and accuracy of agitated saline with blood contrast echocardiography, in the improvement of the Doppler signal, to quantify PAPs during treadmill exercise-echocardiography. Purpose To evaluate the value of contrast echocardiography, using agitated saline with blood, in the improvement of the Doppler signal used to quantify the pulmonary artery systolic pressure during exercise. Methods From a total of 41 patients (pts), we studied 38 pts (93%), 35 women, aged 54 ± 12 years-old. 27 with the diagnosis of systemic sclerosis, 10 with history of pulmonary embolism and one patient with a suspected idiopathic PAH, who were referred to the Unity of Heart Failure and Pulmonary Hypertension for screening of PAH. According to the Unity protocol, a transthoracic echocardiogram was made, in left decubitus (LD), with evaluation of right ventricle-right atria gradient (RV/RAg). A peripheral venous access was obtained, with a 3-way stopcock and the patients were placed in orthostatism (O), with a new evaluation of RV/RAg. Exercise echocardiography (EE) was begun, with evaluation of RV/RAg at peak exercise

  4. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  5. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  6. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  7. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  8. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  9. [Pain, agitation and delirium in acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Funk, G-C

    2016-02-01

    Avoiding pain, agitation and delirium as well as avoiding unnecessary deep sedation is a powerful yet challenging strategy in critical care medicine. A number of interactions between cerebral function and respiratory function should be regarded in patients with respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation. A cooperative sedation strategy (i.e. patient is awake and free of pain and delirium) is feasible in many patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. Especially patients with mild acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) seem to benefit from preserved spontaneous breathing. While completely disabling spontaneous ventilation with or without neuromuscular blockade is not a standard strategy in ARDS, it might be temporarily required in patients with severe ARDS, who have substantial dyssynchrony or persistent hypoxaemia. Since pain, agitation and delirium compromise respiratory function they should also be regarded during noninvasive ventilation and during ventilator weaning. Pharmacological sedation can have favourable effects in these situations, but should not be given routinely or uncritically.

  10. The effect of magnesium sulphate infusion on the incidence and severity of emergence agitation in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy using sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Abdulatif, M; Ahmed, A; Mukhtar, A; Badawy, S

    2013-10-01

    This randomised, controlled, double-blind study investigated the effects of intra-operative magnesium sulphate administration on the incidence of emergence agitation in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy using sevoflurane anaesthesia. Seventy children were randomly allocated to receive a 30 mg.kg(-1) bolus of intravenous magnesium sulphate after induction of anaesthesia followed by a continuous infusion of 10 mg.kg(-1).h(-1) or an equal volume of saline 0.9%. All children received titrated sevoflurane anaesthesia adjusted to maintain haemodynamic stability. The Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Score were used for the assessment of postoperative emergence agitation and pain, respectively. Emergence agitation was more common in the control group than in the magnesium group (23 (72%) and 12 (36%), respectively (p = 0.004)), with a relative risk of 0.51 (95% CI 0.31-0.84), an absolute risk reduction of 0.35 (95% CI 0.10-0.54), and number needed to treat of 3 (95% CI 2-9). Postoperative pain scores were comparable in the two groups. Magnesium sulphate reduces the incidence and severity of emergence agitation in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy using sevoflurane anaesthesia and is not associated with increased postoperative side-effects or delayed recovery.

  11. Ultrasonic agitation method for accelerating batch leaching tests

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, R.J.; Stegemann, J.A.; Chao, C.C.

    1996-12-31

    A method has been developed which uses ultrasonic cavitation to accelerate batch leaching tests. Batch leaching tests, in which attainment of an equilibrium between the solid sample and liquid leachant is desired, usually involve particle size reduction and mixing to hasten mass transfer of soluble compounds. In the study discussed here, mixing in the form of ultrasonic cavitation was used to supply an intense level of agitation. Breaking the liquid boundary layer surrounding individual waste particles ensured a maximum concentration gradient between the solid and liquid phases and accelerated attainment of steady state concentrations. Evaluation of the acceleration technique was made through comparison of leachate quality of stabilized/solidified (S/S) residue samples tested using the Wastewater Technology Centre`s (WTC) equilibrium extraction (EE) and an ultrasonically agitated version of the same test method (UEE). The sample preparation, liquid-to-solid ratio, extraction fluid, etc., specified in the EE method were held constant for the EE and UEE samples, while the duration and method of agitation was altered for the UEE samples. To date, this evaluation has been made using five metal finishing residues, which were selected based on their elevated concentrations of regulated contaminants. The results of the evaluations are presented and suggestions are made as to the applicability of this accelerated test method.

  12. Effect of agitation of EDTA with 808-nm diode laser on dentin microhardness.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hakan; Yeter, Kübra Y; Karatas, Ertugrul; Yilmaz, Cenk B; Ayranci, Leyla B; Ozsu, Damla

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of agitation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with diode laser at different agitation times on root dentin microhardness. Eighty-four specimens were divided randomly into seven groups, as follows: (1) distilled water, (2) 17% EDTA, (3) EDTA with 60 s ultrasonic agitation, (4) EDTA with 10 s laser agitation, (5) EDTA with 20 s laser agitation, (6) EDTA with 30 s laser agitation, and (7) EDTA with 40 s laser agitation. All of the specimens were irrigated with 5% NaOCl and distilled water except the distilled water group. Microhardness values were calculated before and after the procedures. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests. Statistically significant differences were determined between the distilled water and other groups. Also, statistically significant differences were observed between EDTA with 40 s laser agitation and EDTA, and EDTA with 10 and 20 s laser agitations. Ultrasonic agitation of EDTA affected microhardness of root dentin similar to EDTA (p > .05). All applications decreased the microhardness of root dentin when compared with distilled water. Agitation of EDTA with diode laser for 40 s caused more reduction in microhardness of root dentin when compared with EDTA.

  13. Practically Saline

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jonathan; O’Neal, Catherine; Jagneaux, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case. The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2), and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis. The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion. This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis. We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak. PMID:26668812

  14. Saline Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Figure 2

    These images of the Saline Valley area, California, were acquired March 30, 2000 and cover a full ASTER scene (60 by 60 km). Each image displays data from a different spectral region, and illustrates the complementary nature of surface compositional information available as a function of wavelength. This image displays visible and near infrared bands 3, 2, and 1 in red, green, and blue (RGB). Vegetation appears red, snow and dry salt lakes are white, and exposed rocks are brown, gray, yellow and blue. Rock colors mainly reflect the presence of iron minerals, and variations in albedo. Figure 1 displays short wavelength infrared bands 4, 6, and 8 as RGB. In this wavelength region, clay, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have diagnostic absorption features, resulting in distinct colors on the image. For example, limestones are yellow-green, and purple areas are kaolinite-rich. Figure 2 displays thermal infrared bands 13, 12 and 10 as RGB. In this wavelength region, variations in quartz content appear as more or less red; carbonate rocks are green, and mafic volcanic rocks are purple. The image is located at 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  15. Flow-induced agitations create a granular fluid.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Kiri; Zanin, Alexey; Bastien, Renaud; Wandersman, Elie; van Hecke, Martin

    2010-02-19

    We fluidize a granular medium through localized stirring and probe the mechanical response of quiescent regions far away from the main flow. In these regions the material behaves like a liquid: high-density probes sink, low-density probes float at the depth given by Archimedes' law, and drag forces on moving probes scale linearly with the velocity. The fluidlike character of the material is set by agitations generated in the stirred region, suggesting a nonlocal rheology: the relation between applied stress and observed strain rate in one location depends on the strain rate in another location.

  16. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1998-12-15

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers is disclosed using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer`s position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates. 4 figs.

  17. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1998-01-01

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer's position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates.

  18. Effect of viscosity on the mixing efficiency in a self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei-Kang; Guo, Yi-Ling; Xue, Mei; Du, Jing-Ru; Li, Weicheng; Li, Yu-You

    2015-05-01

    One special self-agitation reactor, which does not require a mechanical mixer or other equipment for mixing, has been introduced. Self-agitation is affected by variation in viscosity property. To obtain and research the effect of viscosity on mixing behavior in the self-agitation reactor, Fluent® was used to create numerical simulations and to visualize the fluid flow status. The results show that when the viscosity of the liquid is 1 mPa s, the entire self-agitation results in an almost completely mixed reactor. The substrate becomes difficult to agitate, and the diffusion of the substrate and the tracer become quite after every self-agitation, as the viscosity increases. Once the viscosity is higher than 25 mPa s, the substrate and tracer could not be mixed in the entire reactor, and the reactor is recognized as the combination of several completely mixed reactors between which little exchange of liquid occurs.

  19. State of Acute Agitation at Psychiatric Emergencies in Europe: The STAGE Study

    PubMed Central

    San, Luis; Marksteiner, Josef; Zwanzger, Peter; Figuero, María Aragüés; Romero, Francisco Toledo; Kyropoulos, Grigorios; Peixoto, Alberto Bessa; Chirita, Roxana; Boldeanu, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Background: Agitation is an array of syndromes and types of behaviors that are common in patients with psychiatric disorders. In Europe, the estimation of prevalence of agitation has been difficult due to the lack of standard studies or systematic data collection done on this syndrome. Objective: An observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study aimed to assess the prevalence of agitation episodes in psychiatric emergencies in different European countries. Method: For 1 week, all episodes of acute agitation that were attended to at the psychiatric emergency room (ER) or Acute Inpatient Unit (AIU) in the 27 participating centers were registered. The clinical characteristics and management of the agitation episode were also described. A descriptive analysis was performed. Results: A total of 334 agitation episodes out of 7295 psychiatric emergencies were recorded, giving a prevalence rate of 4.6% (95% CI: 4.12-5.08). Of them, 172 [9.4% (95% CI: 8.2-10.9)] were attended at the ER and 162 [2.8% (95% CI: 2.4-3.3)] at AIU. Only data from 165 episodes of agitation (those with a signed informed consent form) was registered and described in this report. The most common psychiatric conditions associated with agitation were schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and personality disorder. The management of agitation included from non-invasive to more coercive measures (mechanical, physical restraint or seclusion) that were unavoidable in more than half of the agitation episodes (59.5%). Conclusion: The results show that agitation is a common symptom in the clinical practice, both in emergency and inpatient psychiatric departments. Further studies are warranted to better recognize (using a standardized definition) and characterize agitation episodes. PMID:27857778

  20. Risk Factors of Emergence Agitation in Adults Undergoing General Anesthesia for Nasal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Hyo-Yeol; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Choi, Seung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the incidence and the risk factors of emergence agitation in adults undergoing general anesthesia for nasal surgery. Methods We retrospectively examined 792 patients aged ≥18 years who underwent general anesthesia for elective nasal surgery between July 2012 and August 2013. Patients in the postanesthesia care unit with a Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale≥+1 at any time were considered to have emergence agitation. Results The overall incidence of emergence agitation is 22.2%. From multivariate regression analysis, the following six variables were found to be significantly associated with emergence agitation (P<0.05): younger age, recent smoking, sevoflurane anesthesia, postoperative pain on the numerical rating scale (NRS)≥5, presence of a tracheal tube, and presence of a urinary catheter. Presence of a tracheal tube was the greatest risk factor, increasing the risk of developing emergence agitation by approximately fivefold (odds ratio, 5.448; 95% confidence interval, 2.973 to 9.982). Younger age was also a strong risk factor (odds ratio, 0.975 for each 1-year increase; 95% confidence interval, 0.964 to 0.987). Current smoking, sevoflurane anesthesia, postoperative pain of NRS≥5, and the presence of a urinary catheter nearly doubled the risk of emergence agitation. Conclusion Emergence agitation following general anesthesia is a common complication in adult nasal surgery patients. To reduce the occurrence and consequences of agitation episodes, elimination of the associated risk factors is necessary, especially in at-risk patients. PMID:25729495

  1. Effects of heat, pH, antioxidant, agitation and light on betacyanin stability using red-fleshed dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) juice and concentrate as models.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yen-Ming; Siow, Lee-Fong

    2015-05-01

    Red-fleshed dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is rich in antioxidants. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of heat pasteurization, pH adjustment, ascorbic acid addition as well as storage under agitation and light or dark condition on betacyanin content in red-fleshed dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) juice and concentrate. The concentrate was produced by concentrating clarified red-fleshed dragon fruit juice in a rotary evaporator at 40 °C. UV-Visible spectrophotometer was used for analyzing betacyanin content. Addition of 0.25 % ascorbic acid, pH 4.0, and pasteurization at 65 °C for 30 min were selected as the best processing conditions to retain betacyanin content in red-fleshed dragon fruit juice. Storage at the agitation speed of 220 rpm showed that the concentrated samples had higher betacyanin stability compared to juice, while both juice and concentrate had almost similar betacyanin stability when tested for storage in the presence of light. In summary, ascorbic acid stabilized betacyanin in both juice and concentrate at agitated or non-agitated conditions. In contrast, light degraded betacyanin in both juice and concentrate models.

  2. Improved performance in viscous mycelial fermentations by agitator retrofitting.

    PubMed

    Buckland, B C; Gbewonyo, K; Dimasi, D; Hunt, G; Westerfield, G; Nienow, A W

    1988-05-01

    For viscous mycelial fermentations it was demonstrated at the pilot-plant scale that the replacement of standard radial flow Rushton turbines with larger diameter axial-flow Prochem hydrofoil impellers significantly improved oxygen transfer efficiency. It was also determined that the Streptomyces broth under evaluation is highly shear thinning. Separate experiments using a Norcardia broth with similar Theological properties demonstrated that the oxygen transfer coefficient, K(L)a, can be greatly increased by use of water additions to reduce broth viscosity. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the improvement in oxygen transfer by changing agitator types is primarily due to an improvement in bulk mixing. A model is presented, based on the concepts of Bajpai and Reuss, which explains this improvement in performance in terms of enlargement of the well mixed micromixer region for viscous mycelial broths.

  3. Symptoms of agitated depression and/or akathisia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Marija Vučić; Prološčić, Joško; Blažević-Zelić, Sandra; Skarpa-Usmiani, Ivona; Peitl, Vjekoslav

    2011-03-01

    Akathisia is a syndrome characterized by the unpleasant sensation of "inner" restlessness that manifests itself in the inability of sitting still or not moving. Many types of medicaments can cause akathisia as an adverse event of their use and they include: antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiemetics, antihistamines, and psychoactive substances. We will present the case of a 50 year old patient, treated on two occasions for psychotic depression. During the second hospitalization it is possible that antipsychotic treatment combined with an antidepressant caused akathisia or there were symptoms of agitated depression and akathisia present at the same time, which is very difficult to determine in everyday clinical practice. We can conclude that in this case, as in many others, akathisia as a possible adverse effect of psychopharmacs was very hard to identify. Therefore, it is necessary to have akathisia in mind when using certain medicaments, especially when combining several that use the same enzymatic system and consequently raise levels of at least one of them.

  4. Hydrodynamic effects on cells in agitated tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, R. S.; Papoutsakis, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanisms by which hydrodynamic forces can affect cells grown on microcarrier beads in agitated cell culture reactors were investigated by analyzing the motion of microcarriers relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other, and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. It was found that harmful effects on cell cultures that have been previously attributed to shear can be better explained as the effects of turbulence (of a size scale comparable to the microcarriers or the spacing between them) or collisions. The primary mechanisms of cell damage involve direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies, collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow, and collisions against the impeller or other solid surfaces. The implications of these analytical results for the design of tissue culture reactors are discussed.

  5. A Longitudinal Examination of Agitation and Resident Characteristics in the Nursing Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgio, Louis D.; Park, Nan Sook; Hardin, J. Michael; Sun, Fei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Agitation frequently accompanies cognitive decline among nursing home residents. This study used cross-sectional and longitudinal (up to 18 months) methods to examine agitation among profoundly and moderately impaired residents using both staff report and direct observation methods. Design and Methods: The study included participants (N =…

  6. The Relationship between Agitated Behavior and Cognitive Functioning in Nursing Home Residents: Preliminary Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska

    Agitation is a significant problem for nursing home residents, their families, and their caretakers. Agitation is defined as inappropriate verbal, vocal, or motor activity which is not explained by needs or confusion per se. It includes behaviors such as aimless wandering, pacing, cursing, screaming, biting, and fighting. The inappropriate nature…

  7. Behavioral Characteristics of Agitated Nursing Home Residents with Dementia at the End of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rebecca S.; Burgio, Louis D.; Fisher, Susan E.; Hardin, J. Michael; Shuster, John L., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine group differences in verbal agitation, verbal interaction, bed restraint, pain, analgesic and neuroleptic medication use, and medical comorbidity among agitated nursing home residents who died during a 6-month clinical trial compared with residents of the same gender and similar initial cognitive…

  8. System for agitating the acid in a lead-acid battery

    DOEpatents

    Weintraub, Alvin; MacCormack, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    A system and method for agitating the acid in a large lead-sulfuric acid storage battery of the calcium type. An air-lift is utilized to provide the agitation. The air fed to the air-lift is humidified prior to being delivered to the air-lift.

  9. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... veins of the body, including vessels in the brain, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and legs soft tissues of the body, including the muscles, fat and skin brain breast Microbubble Contrast Materials Microbubble contrast materials are ...

  10. Relaxing music at mealtime in nursing homes: effects on agitated patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Hicks-Moore, Sandee Lynn

    2005-12-01

    Agitation in individuals with severe cognitive impairment is a significant problem that affects care and overall quality of life. Building on research conducted by Goddaer and Abraham (1994), this quasi-experimental study proposed that relaxing music played during meals would exert a calming effect and decrease agitated behaviors among nursing home residents with dementia. Thirty residents residing in a Special Care Unit participated in the 4-week study. The Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (Cohen-Mansfield, Marx, & Rosenthal, 1989) was used to gather data. Baseline data was obtained in Week 1 (no music). Music was introduced in Week 2, removed in Week 3, and reintroduced in Week 4. At the end of the 4-week study, overall reductions in the cumulative incidence of total agitated behaviors were observed. Reductions in absolute numbers of agitated behaviors were achieved during the weeks with music and a distinct pattern was observed.

  11. [Application of music therapy for managing agitated behavior in older people with dementia].

    PubMed

    Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chang, Anne M; Abbey, Jennifer

    2006-10-01

    Older people with dementia may display negative emotions, memory problems, sleep disturbance, and agitated behavior. Among these symptoms, agitated behavior has been identified by families and nursing staff as the care problem that presents the greatest challenge. Several studies have found that music therapy reduced agitated behaviors in those with dementia and recommended use of music as an effective strategy in managing this behavioral problem. Music therapy represents a lower cost, effective care approach that nursing staff can easily learn and apply to those with dementia. Furthermore, reductions in agitated behavior in dementia patients that result from music therapy can also alleviate caregiver stress and burden of care, leading to improvements in the health and quality of life of both dementia patients and their caregivers. This paper aims to introduce the principles and application of music therapy in the management of agitated behavior in those with dementia.

  12. Quetiapine reduces irritability and risk of suicide in patients with agitated depression.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Akiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2013-07-20

    Patients who suffer from agitated depression accompanied by psychomotor agitation and irritability are prone to suicidal ideation and attempts and must therefore be diagnosed and treated with utmost care. Clinically, there have been more than a few cases of suicidal attempts that seemed to have been provoked by careless prescription of antidepressant medication. In the present study, administration of quetiapine to 3 patients in the acute phase of agitated depression resulted in rapid improvement in irritability and alleviation of depression. Depression in these 3 patients was caused by chronic (persistent) anxiety and tension. During the acute phase, the patients evidenced psychomotor agitation and irritability, often experiencing a sudden, overwhelming urge to commit suicide. Findings from the present study suggest that treatment with quetiapine in patients with this type of agitated depression can quickly alleviate symptoms of anxiety and irritability and reduce the risk of suicide.

  13. Do sound levels and space contribute to agitation in nursing home residents with dementia?

    PubMed

    Joosse, Laura L

    2012-07-01

    Individuals with dementia living in nursing homes may be exposed to non-therapeutic levels of sound. There is insufficient research examining the relationship between sound levels, personal space, and agitation in people with dementia. Using an observational designed study, 53 participants from four southeastern Wisconsin nursing homes were observed; data on sound levels, space, and agitation levels were obtained. Sound was a significant predictor of agitation. The accumulation of sound predicted agitated behavior and explained 16% of the variance, F(5, 47) = 4.520, p < 0.002, and adjusted R(2) = 0.253. The findings suggest agitation may be a clue that sound in the environment is causing stress for residents with dementia.

  14. Measuring Salinity by Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapworth, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines procedures for constructing an instrument which uses an electrode and calibration methods to measure the salinity of waters in environments close to and affected by a saline estuary. (Author/DC)

  15. Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe

    MedlinePlus

    ... ounces of water. Using a soft rubber ear bulb syringe, infant nasal bulb or a commercial nasal saline rinse product from ... these steps: 1. Draw up saline into the bulb. Tilt your head downward over a sink (or ...

  16. Micro acoustic resonant chambers for heating/agitating/mixing (MARCHAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Noell, Aaron C.; Fisher, Anita M.; Takano, Nobuyuki; Grunthaner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A variety of applications require the mixing and/or heating of a slurry made from a powder/fluid mixture. One of these applications, Sub Critical Water Extraction (SCWE), is a process where water and an environmental powder sample (sieved soil, drill cuttings, etc.) are heated in a sealed chamber to temperatures greater than 200 degrees Celsius by allowing the pressure to increase, but without reaching the critical point of water. At these temperatures, the ability of water to extract organics from solid particulate increases drastically. This paper describes the modeling and experimentation on the use of an acoustic resonant chamber which is part of an amino acid detection instrument called Astrobionibbler [Noell et al. 2014, 2015]. In this instrument we use acoustics to excite a fluid- solid fines mixture in different frequency/amplitude regimes to accomplish a variety of sample processing tasks. Driving the acoustic resonant chamber at lower frequencies can create circulation patterns in the fluid and mixes the liquid and fines, while driving the chamber at higher frequencies one can agitate the fluid and powder and create a suspension. If one then drives the chamber at high amplitude at resonance heating of the slurry occurs. In the mixing and agitating cell the particle levitation force depends on the relative densities and compressibility's of the particulate and fluid and on the kinetic and potential energy densities associated with the velocity and pressure fields [Glynne-Jones, Boltryk and Hill 2012] in the cell. When heating, the piezoelectric transducer and chamber is driven at high power in resonance where the solid/fines region is modelled as an acoustic transmission line with a large loss component. In this regime, heat is pumped into the solution/fines mixture and rapidly heats the sample. We have modeled the piezoelectric transducer/chamber/ sample using Mason's equivalent circuit. In order to assess the validity of the model we have built and

  17. Agitation in nursing home residents: the role of gender and social context.

    PubMed

    Burgio, L D; Butler, F R; Roth, D L; Hardin, J M; Hsu, C C; Ung, K

    2000-12-01

    We investigated the relationship among gender of resident, staff social interaction, and agitation in 46 (31 male and 15 female) nursing home residents with clinically significant agitation. Direct observations were conducted of resident behaviors and environmental contextual events using a computer-assisted, real-time observational system. The system recorded frequency, duration, and temporal sequencing of events. Results show that female residents displayed almost three times the amount of agitation as male residents (35% vs. 13% of total observation time, respectively), although men in the study were more likely to receive psychoactive drugs for their agitation. Staff spent similar amounts of time verbally interacting and touching male and female residents. Sequential analyses were conducted to examine the likelihood of staff verbal and touch interactions both preceding and following resident agitation using Bakeman and Quera's (1995) SDIS-GSEQ program. Results suggest that staff touch and verbal interaction elicit agitation in a significant proportion of residents. Once agitation occurs, staff were likely to respond by interacting verbally, but not physically, with the resident.

  18. Biodiversity patterns of soil ciliates along salinity gradients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Xu, Kuidong

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated ciliate diversity in saline soils with a salinity range from 6.5 to 65 psu by the morphological method of the Ludox-quantitative protargol stain (QPS) and the molecular techniques of ciliate-specific clone library and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. No active ciliates could be detected with the Ludox-QPS method, while high molecular diversity of ciliates was found. The highest ciliate molecular diversity was obtained from the soil at salinity of 8.9 psu, moderate diversity was found at salinity of 6.5 psu, and the diversity sharply decreased at salinity of 50.5 psu. By contrast, the number of ciliate classes clearly decreased with increasing soil salinity: six, five, four and two classes from sites with salinity of 6.5 psu, 8.9 psu, 29.5 psu and 50.5 psu, respectively. Ciliate diversity pattern is different from that of bacteria, whose diversity is also high in extremely saline environments. Meanwhile, the composition of ciliate community was significantly different along salinity gradient. Colpodea and Oligohymenophorea were diverse in soils at salinity less than 29.5 psu, while absent in soils with salinity above 50.5 psu. BIOENV analysis indicated soil salinity and water content were the main factors regulating the distribution of ciliates in saline soils.

  19. Managing Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder in the Emergency Setting

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Scott L.; Citrome, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patient agitation represents a significant challenge in the emergency department (ED), a setting in which medical staff are working under pressure dealing with a diverse range of medical emergencies. The potential for escalation into aggressive behavior, putting patients, staff, and others at risk, makes it imperative to address agitated behavior rapidly and efficiently. Time constraints and limited access to specialist psychiatric support have in the past led to the strategy of “restrain and sedate,” which was believed to represent the optimal approach; however, it is increasingly recognized that more patient-centered approaches result in improved outcomes. The objective of this review is to raise awareness of best practices for the management of agitation in the ED and to consider the role of new pharmacologic interventions in this setting. Discussion The Best practices in Evaluation and Treatment of Agitation (BETA) guidelines address the complete management of agitation, including triage, diagnosis, interpersonal calming skills, and medicine choices. Since their publication in 2012, there have been further developments in pharmacologic approaches for dealing with agitation, including both new agents and new modes of delivery, which increase the options available for both patients and physicians. Newer modes of delivery that could be useful in rapidly managing agitation include inhaled, buccal/sublingual and intranasal formulations. To date, the only formulation administered via a non-intramuscular route with a specific indication for agitation associated with bipolar or schizophrenia is inhaled loxapine. Non-invasive formulations, although requiring cooperation from patients, have the potential to improve overall patient experience, thereby improving future cooperation between patients and healthcare providers. Conclusion Management of agitation in the ED should encompass a patient-centered approach, incorporating non-pharmacologic approaches

  20. Effects of ultrasonic agitation on adhesion strength of micro electroforming Ni layer on Cu substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Du, Liqun; Xu, Zheng; Shao, Ligeng

    2016-03-01

    Micro electroforming is an important technology, which is widely used for fabricating micro metal devices in MEMS. The micro metal devices have the problem of poor adhesion strength, which has dramatically influenced the dimensional accuracy of the devices and seriously limited the development of the micro electroforming technology. In order to improve the adhesion strength, ultrasonic agitation method is applied during the micro electroforming process in this paper. To explore the effect of the ultrasonic agitation, micro electroforming experiments were carried out under ultrasonic and ultrasonic-free conditions. The effects of the ultrasonic agitation on the micro electroforming process were investigated by polarization and alternating current (a.c.) impedance methods. The real surface area of the electroforming layer was measured by cyclic voltammetry method. The compressive stress and the crystallite size of the electroforming layer were measured by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method. The adhesion strength of the electroforming layer was measured by scratch test. The experimental results show that the imposition of the ultrasonic agitation decreases the polarization overpotential and increases the charge transfer process at the electrode-electrolyte interface during the electroforming process. The ultrasonic agitation increases the crystallite size and the real surface area, and reduces the compressive stress. Then the adhesion strength is improved about 47% by the ultrasonic agitation in average. In addition, mechanisms of the ultrasonic agitation improving the adhesion strength are originally explored in this paper. The mechanisms are that the ultrasonic agitation increases the crystallite size, which reduces the compressive stress. The lower the compressive stress is, the larger the adhesion strength is. Furthermore, the ultrasonic agitation increases the real surface area, enhances the mechanical interlocking strength and consequently increases the adhesion

  1. Change in agitation in Alzheimer's disease in the placebo arm of a 9-week controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Devanand, D.P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Ismail, Zahinoor; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Rabins, Peter V.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Newell, Jeffery; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Placebo responses raise significant challenges for design of clinical trials. We report changes in agitation outcomes in the placebo arm of a recent trial of citalopram for agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods In the Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease (Cit AD) study, all participants and caregivers received a psychosocial intervention and 92 were assigned to placebo for 9 weeks. Outcomes included Neurobehavioral Rating Scale agitation subscale (NBRS-A), modified Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC), Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI), the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) Agitation/Aggression domain (NPI A/A) and Total (NPI-Total) and ADLs. Continuous outcomes were analyzed with mixed-effects modeling and dichotomous outcomes with logistic regression. Results Agitation outcomes improved over 9 weeks: NBRS-A mean (SD) decreased from 7.8 (3.0) at baseline to 5.4 (3.2), CMAI from 28.7 (6.7) to 26.7 (7.4), NPI A/A from 8.0 (2.4) to 4.9 (3.8), and NPI-Total from 37.3 (17.7) to 28.4 (22.1). The proportion of CGI-C agitation responders ranged from 21 to 29% and was significantly different from zero. MMSE improved from 14.4 (6.9) to 15.7 (7.2) and ADLs similarly improved. Most of the improvement was observed by 3 weeks and was sustained through 9 weeks. The major predictor of improvement in each agitation measure was a higher baseline score in that measure. Conclusions We observed significant placebo response which may be due to regression to the mean, response to a psychosocial intervention, natural course of symptoms, or nonspecific benefits of participation in a trial. PMID:26305876

  2. Optimal nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer's disease: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Alonso-Búa, Begoña; de Labra, Carmen; González-Abraldes, Isabel; Maseda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with Alzheimer's disease will develop agitation at later stages of the disease, which constitutes one of the most challenging and distressing aspects of dementia. Recently, nonpharmacological therapies have become increasingly popular and have been proven to be effective in managing the behavioral symptoms (including agitation) that are common in the middle or later stages of dementia. These therapies seem to be a good alternative to pharmacological treatment to avoid unpleasant side effects. We present a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on the nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients aged 65 years and above. Of the 754 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. This review suggests that music therapy is optimal for the management of agitation in institutionalized patients with moderately severe and severe AD, particularly when the intervention includes individualized and interactive music. Bright light therapy has little and possibly no clinically significant effects with respect to observational ratings of agitation but decreases caregiver ratings of physical and verbal agitation. Therapeutic touch is effective for reducing physical nonaggressive behaviors but is not superior to simulated therapeutic touch or usual care for reducing physically aggressive and verbally agitated behaviors. Melissa oil aromatherapy and behavioral management techniques are not superior to placebo or pharmacological therapies for managing agitation in AD. Further research in clinical trials is required to confirm the effectiveness and long-term effects of nonpharmacological interventions for managing agitation in AD. These types of studies may lead to the development of future intervention protocols to improve the well-being and daily functioning of these patients, thereby avoiding residential care placement.

  3. Optimal nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer’s disease: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Alonso-Búa, Begoña; de Labra, Carmen; González-Abraldes, Isabel; Maseda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with Alzheimer’s disease will develop agitation at later stages of the disease, which constitutes one of the most challenging and distressing aspects of dementia. Recently, nonpharmacological therapies have become increasingly popular and have been proven to be effective in managing the behavioral symptoms (including agitation) that are common in the middle or later stages of dementia. These therapies seem to be a good alternative to pharmacological treatment to avoid unpleasant side effects. We present a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on the nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients aged 65 years and above. Of the 754 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. This review suggests that music therapy is optimal for the management of agitation in institutionalized patients with moderately severe and severe AD, particularly when the intervention includes individualized and interactive music. Bright light therapy has little and possibly no clinically significant effects with respect to observational ratings of agitation but decreases caregiver ratings of physical and verbal agitation. Therapeutic touch is effective for reducing physical nonaggressive behaviors but is not superior to simulated therapeutic touch or usual care for reducing physically aggressive and verbally agitated behaviors. Melissa oil aromatherapy and behavioral management techniques are not superior to placebo or pharmacological therapies for managing agitation in AD. Further research in clinical trials is required to confirm the effectiveness and long-term effects of nonpharmacological interventions for managing agitation in AD. These types of studies may lead to the development of future intervention protocols to improve the well-being and daily functioning of these patients, thereby avoiding residential care placement. PMID:26955265

  4. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators...

  5. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... § 63.1009 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... § 63.1009 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) (c) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  8. 40 CFR 65.110 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and..., valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid...

  9. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks...

  10. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks...

  11. 40 CFR 65.110 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and..., valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... § 63.1009 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  13. 40 CFR 65.110 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and..., valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators...

  15. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks...

  16. 40 CFR 65.110 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and..., valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) (c) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  18. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1) Each agitator shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks by the methods specified in § 63.180(b) of this...

  19. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) (c) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) (c) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... § 63.1009 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators...

  3. 40 CFR 65.110 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and..., valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid...

  4. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1) Each agitator shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks by the methods specified in § 63.180(b) of this...

  5. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks...

  6. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) (c) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators...

  10. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1) Each agitator shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks by the methods specified in § 63.180(b) of this...

  11. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1) Each agitator shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks by the methods specified in § 63.180(b) of this...

  12. Effect of individualized music on agitation in individuals with dementia who live at home.

    PubMed

    Park, Heeok; Pringle Specht, Janet K

    2009-08-01

    This pilot study investigated the effect of individualized music on agitation in individuals with dementia who live at home. Fifteen individuals listened to their preferred music for 30 minutes prior to peak agitation time, two times per week for 2 weeks, followed by no music intervention for 2 weeks. The process was repeated once. The findings showed that mean agitation levels were significantly lower while listening to music than before listening to the music. The findings of this pilot study suggest the importance of music intervention for individuals with dementia who live at home.

  13. Contrastive Lexicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, R. R. K.

    This paper deals with the relation between etymologically related words in different languages. A survey is made of seven stages in the development of contrastive lexicology. These are: prelinguistic word studies, semantics, lexicography, translation, foreign language learning, bilingualism, and finally contrastive analysis. Concerning contrastive…

  14. Contrastive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Carl

    Contrastive analysis is viewed as an interlinguistic, bidirectional phenomenon which is concerned with both the form and function of language. As such, contrastive analysis must view language psycholinguistically and sociolinguistically as a system to be both described and acquired. Due to the need for a psychological component in the analysis,…

  15. Hydraulic characteristics simulation of an innovative self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR).

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei-Kang; Hojo, Toshimasa; Li, Yu-You

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was conducted on a self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR) with agitation caused solely by the release of stored gas. The compound in the reactor is mixed without the use of any mechanical equipment and electricity. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation used to provide details of the flow pattern and information about the agitation process and a solid basis for design and optimization purposes. Every self-agitation cycle could be separated into the pressure energy storage process, the exergonic process and the buffer stage. The reactor is regarded as the combination of continuous stirred tank reactor and a small plug flow reactor. The liquid level and diffusion varies widely depending on the length of the U-tube. The compound transition phenomenon in the 1st chamber mainly occurs during the energy exergonic process and buffer stage. The fluid-diffusion in the 3rd and 4th chambers mainly happens after the buffer period.

  16. A meta-analytic review of the association between agitation and suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Megan L; Ringer, Fallon B; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Agitation has been implicated as an acute risk factor for suicidal behavior, yet the literature to date has not been consolidated to better understand this relationship. We conducted a meta-analysis of the association between agitation and suicidal behavior to synthesize the existing literature (k=13 studies) and point out future directions for research. Results indicated that the association between agitation and suicidal behavior is moderate (Hedge's g=0.40, p=0.007, 95% CI [0.08, 0.72]). Follow-up meta-regressions revealed that age, gender, and year of publication were not significant moderators of the magnitude of this relationship. However, there was evidence of publication bias, as shown by a funnel plot and Egger's test. These findings suggest the importance of future research that examines the nature of the association between agitation and suicidal behavior longitudinally and with novel research designs, as implications for clinical practice and suicide risk assessment may be substantial.

  17. Flocculation of colloidal sols: Diffusion-controlled vs agitation-induced flocculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A proposal for carrying out flocculation experiments in microgravity is presented. These experiments might allow a correlation between theory and experiment. First, all particles, whether single primary particles or aggregates of primary particles would not settle or cream at any agitation rate, or even in the absence of agitation. This failure to separate would keep all aggregates active, still serving as centers for diffusion-controlled flocculation. Keeping all particles suspended would allow the possibility of determining the total number of particles as a function of time from beginning to end of flocculation. Finally, the experiments would allow a definite separation diffusion-controlled and agitation-induced flocculation by studying diffusion-controlled flocculation with and without agitation.

  18. Caring for relatives with agitation at home: a qualitative study of positive coping strategies

    PubMed Central

    Jesnick, Leah; Turner, Rebecca; Leavey, Gerard; Livingston, Gill

    2017-01-01

    Background Trials of psychological interventions for reducing agitation in people with dementia living at home have been unsuccessful. Aims To inform future interventions by identifying successful strategies of family carers with relatives with dementia and agitation living at home. Method Qualitative in-depth individual interviews were performed with 18 family carers. We used thematic analysis to identify emerging themes. Results Carers described initial surprise and then acceptance that agitation is a dementia symptom and learned to respond flexibly. Their strategies encompassed: prevention of agitation by familiar routine; reduction of agitation by addressing underlying causes and using distraction; prevention of escalation by risk enablement, not arguing; and control of their emotional responses by ensuring their relative’s safety then walking away, carving out some time for themselves and using family and services for emotional and practical help. Conclusions These strategies can be manualised and tested in future randomised controlled trials for clinical effectiveness in reducing agitation in people with dementia living at home. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:28243464

  19. Effect of ketorolac on the prevention of emergence agitation in children after sevoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deokkyu; Doo, A Ram; Lim, Hyungsun; Son, Ji-Seon; Lee, Jun-Rae; Han, Young-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ketorolac on the incidence and severity of emergence agitation in children recovering from sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods Eighty-five children aged 3 to 7 years were randomly assigned to the control group or the ketorolac group (1 mg/kg ketorolac). The children were evaluated by the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale and a four-point agitation scale. Results The median agitation scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. The overall incidence of emergence agitation was similar in the two groups (41% in the control group vs. 32% in the ketorolac group, P = 0.526). The number of children who received rescue drugs for treatment of emergence agitation was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusions The administration of 1 mg/kg of ketorolac is not effective in decreasing the incidence and severity of emergence agitation in children aged 3 to 7 years after sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:23560190

  20. Effect of agitation on ligninase activity and ligninase production by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatadri, R.; Irvine, R.L. )

    1990-09-01

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces extracellular ligninases as part of its idiophasic ligninolytic system. Agitation has been widely reported to suppress both ligninase production and lignin degradation. Results show that mechanical inactivation of ligninase is possibly the reason why ligninase accumulation is low or absent in agitated shake-flask cultures. Agitation seems to affect the catalytic activity of ligninase and has no apparent effect on either the rate of ligninase production or the physiology of P. chrysosporium. The detergents Tween 20, Tween 40, Tween 60, Tween 80, and 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesuflonate (CHAPS) are able to protect both purified ligninase and extant ligninase in culture fluids (free of biomass) against mechanical inactivation due to agitation. Addition of Tween 80 at the end of primary growth to agitated shake flasks containing either pelleted or immobilized mycelial cultures results in production and maintenance of high levels of ligninase activity over several days under conditions of high agitation. Possible mechanisms by which the detergents could protect ligninase are discussed.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) insights into agitation stress methods in biopharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ge; Bee, Jared S; Biddlecombe, James G; Chen, Quanmin; Leach, W Thomas

    2012-02-28

    Agitation of small amounts of liquid is performed routinely in biopharmaceutical process, formulation, and packaging development. Protein degradation commonly results from agitation, but the specific stress responsible or degradation mechanism is usually not well understood. Characterization of the agitation stress methods is critical to identifying protein degradation mechanisms or specific sensitivities. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to model agitation of 1 mL of fluid by four types of common laboratory agitation instruments, including a rotator, orbital shaker, magnetic stirrer and vortex mixer. Fluid stresses in the bulk liquid and near interfaces were identified, quantified and compared. The vortex mixer provides the most intense stresses overall, while the stir bar system presented locally intense shear proximal to the hydrophobic stir bar surface. The rotator provides gentler fluid stresses, but the air-water interfacial area and surface stresses are relatively high given its low rotational frequency. The orbital shaker provides intermediate-level stresses but with the advantage of a large stable platform for consistent vial-to-vial homogeneity. Selection of experimental agitation methods with targeted types and intensities of stresses can facilitate better understanding of protein degradation mechanisms and predictability for "real world" applications.

  2. Pharmacological profile of essential oils derived from Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis with anti-agitation properties: focus on ligand-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Abuhamdah, Sawsan; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Dixon, Christine L; Elliot, Mark S J; Ballard, Clive; Holmes, Clive; Burns, Alistair; Perry, Elaine K; Francis, Paul T; Lees, George; Chazot, Paul L

    2008-11-01

    Both Melissa officinalis (Mo) and Lavandula angustifolia (La) essential oils have putative anti-agitation properties in humans, indicating common components with a depressant action in the central nervous system. A dual radioligand binding and electrophysiological study, focusing on a range of ligand-gated ion channels, was performed with a chemically validated essential oil derived from La, which has shown clinical benefit in treating agitation. La inhibited [35S] TBPS binding to the rat forebrain gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor channel (apparent IC50 = 0.040 +/- 0.001 mg mL(-1)), but had no effect on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) or nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A 50:50 mixture of Mo and La essential oils inhibited [3H] flunitrazepam binding, whereas the individual oils had no significant effect. Electrophysiological analyses with rat cortical primary cultures demonstrated that La reversibly inhibited GABA-induced currents in a concentration-dependent manner (0.01-1 mg mL(-1)), whereas no inhibition of NMDA- or AMPA-induced currents was noted. La elicited a significant dose-dependent reduction in both inhibitory and excitatory transmission, with a net depressant effect on neurotransmission (in contrast to the classic GABA(A) antagonist picrotoxin which evoked profound epileptiform burst firing in these cells). These properties are similar to those recently reported for Mo. The anti-agitation effects in patients and the depressant effects of La we report in neural membranes in-vitro are unlikely to reflect a sedative interaction with any of the ionotropic receptors examined here. These data suggest that components common to the two oils are worthy of focus to identify the actives underlying the neuronal depressant and anti-agitation activities reported.

  3. Salinity Management in Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Existing guidelines and standards for reclamation of saline soils and management to control salinity exist but have not been updated for over 25 years. In the past few years a looming water scarcity has resulted in questioning of the long term future of irrigation projects in arid and semi arid regi...

  4. Contrast lipocryolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Hernán; Melamed, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Alternative crystal structures are possible for all lipids and each different crystal structure is called a polymorphic form. Inter-conversion between polymorphisms would imply the possibility of leaning crystal formation toward the most effective polymorphism for adipocyte destruction. Food industry has been tempering lipids for decades. Tempering technology applied to lipocryolysis gave birth to “contrast lipocryolysis”, which involves pre- and post-lipocryolysis fat layer heating as part of a specific tempering protocol. In this study, we evaluated the skinfold thickness of 10 subjects after a single contrast lipocryolysis session and witnessed important and fast reductions. PMID:25068088

  5. Remote sensing of salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The complex dielectric constant of sea water is a function of salinity at 21 cm wavelength, and sea water salinity can be determined by a measurement of emissivity at 21 cm along with a measurement of thermodynamic temperature. Three aircraft and one helicopter experiments using two different 21 cm radiometers were conducted under different salinity and temperature conditions. Single or multiple ground truth measurements were used to calibrate the data in each experiment. It is inferred from these experiments that accuracies of 1 to 2%/OO are possible with a single surface calibration point necessary only every two hours if the following conditions are met--water temperatures above 20 C, salinities above 10%/OO, and level plane flight. More frequent calibration, constraint of the aircraft's orientation to the same as it was during calibration, and two point calibration (at a high and low salinity level) rather than single point calibration may give even better accuracies in some instances.

  6. Delayed egg hatching of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) pending water agitation.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Babak; Shakibi, Sanam; Foster, Woodbridge A

    2014-05-01

    Mosquito eggs laid on water surfaces typically hatch spontaneously soon after the embryos within them become fully formed first-instar larvae. However, we have found that Anopheles gambiae Giles, an important vector of malaria in Africa, exhibits delayed hatching until the water surface is agitated, a feature overlooked in most laboratory colonies. Agitation within 24 h postoviposition, before embryonation was complete, failed to stimulate delayed postembryonic hatching of isolated eggs on the following day (day 2), when < 1% had hatched spontaneously. However, 5 min of water agitation of these dormant pharate first-instar larvae on day 2 resulted in an almost immediate hatch of 63.3 versus 0% of nonagitated controls, plus another 3.9 versus 0.3%, respectively, during the following 24 h. With daily agitation, installment hatching occurred mainly during 2-6 d postoviposition. The mean cumulative hatch after 7 d of daily agitation was 83.1 versus 1.1% of nonagitated eggs. Experiments with eggs in groups demonstrated that egg density and activity of already-hatched larvae had no stimulatory effect. Eggs stored 1-4 wk at 25.5 or at 15.5 degrees C, and then agitated daily for 6 d at 25.5 degrees C, showed a gradual decline in viability. Viability was sustained longer at the lower temperature. Implications of agitation-induced egg hatching for rainy-season and dry-season ecology of An. gambiae are discussed. Suspended hatching and cool storage already are proving convenient for efficient mass rearing and accurate modeling of weather-based population dynamics.

  7. CFD simulation of local and global mixing time in an agitated tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liangchao; Xu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The Issue of mixing efficiency in agitated tanks has drawn serious concern in many industrial processes. The turbulence model is very critical to predicting mixing process in agitated tanks. On the basis of computational fluid dynamics(CFD) software package Fluent 6.2, the mixing characteristics in a tank agitated by dual six-blade-Rushton-turbines(6-DT) are predicted using the detached eddy simulation(DES) method. A sliding mesh(SM) approach is adopted to solve the rotation of the impeller. The simulated flow patterns and liquid velocities in the agitated tank are verified by experimental data in the literature. The simulation results indicate that the DES method can obtain more flow details than Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes(RANS) model. Local and global mixing time in the agitated tank is predicted by solving a tracer concentration scalar transport equation. The simulated results show that feeding points have great influence on mixing process and mixing time. Mixing efficiency is the highest for the feeding point at location of midway of the two impellers. Two methods are used to determine global mixing time and get close result. Dimensionless global mixing time remains unchanged with increasing of impeller speed. Parallel, merging and diverging flow pattern form in the agitated tank, respectively, by changing the impeller spacing and clearance of lower impeller from the bottom of the tank. The global mixing time is the shortest for the merging flow, followed by diverging flow, and the longest for parallel flow. The research presents helpful references for design, optimization and scale-up of agitated tanks with multi-impeller.

  8. Effect of Citalopram on Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease – The CitAD Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Drye, Lea T.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Devanand, D.P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Ismail, Zahinoor; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Rabins, Peter V.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Agitation is common, persistent, and associated with adverse consequences for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Pharmacological treatment options, including antipsychotics are not satisfactory. Objective The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy of citalopram for agitation in patients with AD. Key secondary objectives examined effects of citalopram on function, caregiver distress, safety, cognitive safety, and tolerability. Design, Setting and Participants The Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease Study (CitAD) was a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group trial that enrolled 186 patients with probable AD and clinically significant agitation from eight academic centers in the US and Canada from August 2009 to January 2013. Interventions Participants (n=186) were randomized to receive a psychosocial intervention plus either citalopram (n=94) or placebo (n=92) for 9 weeks. Dose began at 10 mg/d with planned titration to 30 mg/d over 3 weeks based on response and tolerability. Main Outcomes and Measures Primary outcome measures were the Neurobehavioral Rating Scale, agitation subscale (NBRS-A) and the modified Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (mADCS-CGIC) Other outcomes were the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), activities of daily living (ADLs), caregiver distress, cognitive safety (MMSE), and adverse events. Results Participants on citalopram showed significant improvement compared to placebo on both primary outcome measures. NBRS-A estimated treatment difference at week 9 (citalopram minus placebo) was −0.93 [95% CI: −1.80 to −0.06], p = 0.036. mADCS-CGIC results showed 40% of citalopram participants having moderate or marked improvement from baseline compared to 26% on placebo, with estimated treatment effect (odds ratio of being at or better than a given CGIC category) of 2.13 [95% CI 1.23 to 3.69], p = 0

  9. An investigation of long-term effects of group music therapy on agitation levels of people with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ledger, Alison J; Baker, Felicity A

    2007-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the long-term effects of group music therapy on agitation manifested by nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease. A non-randomised experimental design was employed with one group receiving weekly music therapy (n = 26) and another group receiving standard nursing home care (n = 19). Agitation levels were measured five times over one year using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (Cohen-Mansfield, J. (1989). Agitation in the elderly. In N. Billig & P. V. Rabins (Eds.), Issues in geriatric psychiatry (pp. 101-113). Basel, Switzerland: Karger). Although music therapy participants showed short-term reductions in agitation, there were no significant differences between the groups in the range, frequency, and severity of agitated behaviours manifested over time. Multiple measures of treatment efficacy are necessary to better understand the long-term effects music therapy programs have on this population.

  10. The Effect on Apheresis Platelet Quality During Shipment with Continued Interruption of Agitation for 24 and 48 Hours

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-26

    The Effect on Apheresis Platelet Quality During Shipment With Continued Interruption of Agitation for 24 and 48 Hours R.R. Leslie-Holt and V. W...EFFECT ON APHERESIS PLATELET QUALITY DURING SHIPMENT WITH CONTINUED INTERRUPTION OF AGITATION FOR 24 AND 48 HOURS. 6. AUTHOR(S) CAPT LESLIEHOLT RONNI...maintaining an oxidative metabolism. Key Words: Agitation, apheresis , lactate, pH, platelet , quality 4 INTRODUCTION The Armed Services Blood Program

  11. Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heat of the sun also forces evaporation at the ocean's surface, which puts water vapor into the atmosphere but leaves minerals and salts behind, keeping the ocean salty. The salinity of the oce...

  12. Effect of agitation on removal of acetic acid from pretreated hydrolysate by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Priddy, Sarah A; Hanley, Thomas R

    2003-01-01

    The effect of agitation on the adsorption of acetic acid by activated carbon was tested utilizing an external mass transfer-diffusion model. Simulated pretreated biomass was contacted with activated carbon under prescribed conditions of temperature and agitation. Adsorption isotherm studies are presented as well as batch kinetic rate studies. Use of these data enabled the determination of isotherm constants, an external mass transfer coefficient, and an effective diffusivity for each agitation rate studied. The external film coefficient results ranged from 33.62 microm/s to a complete absence of external mass transfer resistance, and the diffusivity results ranged from 0.8625 to 10.70 microm(2)/s. The optimum combination of no external film resistance, and highest diffusivity, 10.70 microm(2)/s, occurred at 250 rpm and 25 degrees C. The results of these models and the experimental parameters suggested an efficacious method and conditions for the removal of this undesirable chemical.

  13. Stabilization of tetanus toxoid formulation containing aluminium hydroxide adjuvant against agitation.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Vipul A; Jain, Nishant K; Roy, Ipsita

    2012-02-28

    The aggregation of tetanus toxoid leads to reduced bioavailability of the vaccine and failure of immunization programmes in many parts of the globe. One of the main reasons for denaturation and aggregation of tetanus toxoid formulations is agitation of the protein during transport. We have identified that agitation leads to collapse of the gel matrix of aluminium hydroxide which is used as an adjuvant in these preparations. This results in desorption of the toxoid from the matrix, which then loses its antigenicity due to agitation-induced denaturation of the protein. We show that incorporation of some compatible osmolytes like sorbitol, glucose and arginine, but not trehalose, is able to protect the adjuvant matrix from degradation, and retain the integrity of the vaccine preparation in terms of its antigenicity.

  14. The effects of researcher-composed music at mealtime on agitation in nursing home residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shu-Yuan; Lai, Hui-Ling; Jeng, Shaw-Yeu; Tang, Chih-Wei; Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chen, Pin-Wen

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effects of music at mealtimes on agitation in 22 nursing home residents with dementia. We used a pretest-posttest research design. We played researcher-composed music to residents at each of two mealtimes daily over a consecutive 4-week period. We observed and recorded agitation 24 hours daily for the 4-week period and the following 2-week period. Results revealed a significant decline in mean agitation scores. A cumulative dose effect and a short-term linger effect were observed. Findings suggest that soothing music may be beneficial in managing agitation in nursing home residents with dementia.

  15. Contrast cystography.

    PubMed

    Essman, Stephanie C

    2005-02-01

    Cystography is a radiographic study performed to aid in evaluation of the urinary bladder for extramural, mural, or intraluminal lesions. These lesions may primarily involve the urinary bladder or may be an extension of disease from adjacent organs. Cystography is easy to perform with relatively few complications. Different types of cystography (positive versus negative contrast) may be used depending on the type of information that the clinician hopes to obtain. Although a valuable technique, it is important to correlate the findings on cystography with other clinical information to arrive at the final diagnosis.

  16. Study of dissolution hydrodynamic conditions versus drug release from hypromellose matrices: the influence of agitation sequence.

    PubMed

    Asare-Addo, Kofi; Levina, Marina; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2010-12-01

    In this article, the influence of agitation in descending and ascending sequences as a systematic method development process for potentially discriminating fed and fasted states and evaluation of its effects on the drug release from swelling gel-forming hydrophilic matrix tablets were investigated. Theophylline extended release (ER) matrices containing hypromellose (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)) were evaluated in media with a pH range of 1.2-7.5, using an automated USP type III, Bio-Dis dissolution apparatus at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 dips per minute (dpm). Agitation had a profound effect on the drug release from the HPMC K100LV matrices. Drug release in pH 1.2 changed from about 40% at 5 dpm to about 80% at 30 dpm over a 60 min period alone. The matrices containing HPMC K4M, K15M and K100M however were not significantly affected by the agitation rate. The similarity factor f2 was calculated using drug release at 10 dpm as a reference. The ascending agitations of 5-30 dpm and the descending order of agitation 30-5 dpm were also evaluated. Anomalous transport was the only kinetic of release for the K4M, K15M and K100M tablet matrices. The lower viscous polymer of K100LV had some matrices exhibiting Fickian diffusion as its kinetics of release. The use of systematic change of agitation method may indicate potential fed and fasted effects on drug release from hydrophilic matrices.

  17. Time to response to citalopram treatment for agitation in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, Daniel; Drye, Lea T.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Devanand, D.P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Ismail, Zahinoor; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Rabins, Peter V.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Agitation is a common and significant problem in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the recent Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer’s Disease (CitAD) study, citalopram was efficacious for the treatment of AD agitation. Here we examined the time course and predictors of response to treatment. Methods Response in CitAD was defined as a modified Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (mADCS-CGIC) score of 1 or 2, or a Neurobehavioral Rating Scale agitation subscale (NBRS-A) score reduction ≥50% from baseline. “Stable early response” was defined as meeting the aforementioned criteria at both weeks 3 and 9, “late response” was response at week 9 but not at week 3, and “unstable response” was response at week 3 but not at week 9. Results In the primary analyses, citalopram was superior to placebo on both the CGIC and the NBRS-A response measures. There were little between-group differences in response rates in the first three weeks of the study (21% vs 19% on the CGIC). Citalopram patients were more likely than placebo patients to be a late responder (18% vs. 8% on CGIC, Fisher’s exact p=0.09; 31% vs. 15% on NBRS-A, Fisher’s exact p=0.02). Approximately half (45–56%) of citalopram responders at end-of-study achieved response later in the study, compared with 30–44% of placebo responders. Discussion Treatment with citalopram for agitation in AD needs to be at least nine weeks in duration to allow sufficient time for full response, and study duration is an important factor to consider in the design of clinical trials for agitation in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26238225

  18. The influence of turbulence on aggregation of small particles in agitated vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusters, Karel Antonius

    The influence of the hydrodynamics in baffled turbine agitated vessels on the turbulent coagulation of small solid particles is studied, with focus on the dependence of the aggregate size on stirrer speed, concentration of solids, destabilizer concentration, and vessel size. The following studies are presented: aggregation theory; hydrodynamics in stirred tanks; numerical particle tracking in a turbine agitated vessel; aggregation kinetics in stirred tanks; and maximum aggregate size in stirred tanks. The application of the model to describe the aggregation process in strirred tanks to experimental conditions other than those tested and to particulate systems with different physical properties is discussed.

  19. Lessons from crop plants struggling with salinity.

    PubMed

    Cabot, Catalina; Sibole, John V; Barceló, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2014-09-01

    Salinity is a persistent problem, causing important losses in irrigated agriculture. According to global climate change prediction models, salinity is expected to expand in the near future. Although intensive studies have been conducted on the mechanisms by which plants cope with saline conditions, the multi-component nature of salt stress tolerance has rendered most plant breeding efforts to improve the plant's response to salinity unsuccessful. This occurs despite the extensive genetic diversity shown by higher plants for salt tolerance and the similar mechanisms found in salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant genotypes in response to the presence of excess of salts in the growth media. On the other hand, there is an urge to increase crop yield to the maximum to cope with the growing world population demands for food and fuel. Here, we examine some major elements and signaling mechanisms involved in the plant's response to salinity following the pathway of salt-footprints from the soil environment to leaf. Some of the possible contrasting determinants for a better-balanced resource allocation between salt tolerance and plant growth and yield are considered.

  20. Women, Scientists, Agitators: Magazine Portrayal of Rachel Carson and Theo Colborn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Julia B.

    2001-01-01

    Utilizes a theoretical framework of the media's role in reporting conflict and uncertain science, and feminism and science in a thematic analysis of magazine coverage given Rachel Carson and "the Rachel Carson of '90s," Theo Colborn. Notes that Carson and Colborn's identities as women, scientists, and agitators led critics to charge that…

  1. The effect of agitation state on polyol synthesis of silver nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirjani, Amirmostafa; Marashi, Pirooz; Fatmehsari, Davoud Haghshenas

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the effect of agitation rate on the growth mechanism of silver nanowires is evaluated during polyol process. It was found that increasing the agitation rate leads to the increase in the oxygen transfer rate which in turn enhances the oxidative etching conditions leading to the formation of a variety of nanostructures (nanoparticles, nanorods and nanowires). In light of the obtained experimental results, it can be stated that agitation is not essential for synthesizing silver nanowires by polyol method and it is possible to obtain uniform nanowires with ~200 nm diameters in the length of 20-30 microns several microns length in the stagnant condition. By setting the stirring rate at 200 rpm, it is possible to reduce the nanowires diameters to ~130 nm and the obtained nanostructures are still mono-dispersed. This paper provides complete information about the effect of agitation state on the polyol synthesis of silver nanowires which is truly useful for further studies in this case.

  2. 5-day storage of platelet concentrates in CLX containers: effect of type of agitation.

    PubMed

    Snyder, E L; Bookbinder, M; Kakaiya, R; Ferri, P; Kiraly, T

    1983-01-01

    To determine the degree of platelet damage produced by different modes of agitation during storage of concentrates for 5 days in CLX blood bags, we studied pH, platelet counts, release of LDH and beta thromboglobulin, morphology and osmotic recovery. Platelets were maintained at 20-24 degrees C on elliptical, 6-rpm circular, 2-rpm circular and flat bed agitators. At 72-120 h platelet concentrates stored on the flat bed shaker had significantly lower pH values than units stored on the elliptical or on either of the circular rotators (p less than 0.05). The percent LDH discharged was highest for the units stored on the elliptical rotator (p less than 0.05). Remaining tests of platelet function were not significantly different for concentrates stored on any of the four agitators. Flat bed shakers were unable to resuspend the platelet 'button' which formed after the final preparative centrifugation. Based on our in vitro studies, we conclude that due to problems with low pH values, flat bed shakers may not be optimal for storing platelet concentrates in CLX blood bags and that some other form of agitation should be used.

  3. Pharmacological Management of Agitation and Aggression in an Adolescent with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Findling, Robert L.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Scahill, Lawrence; Hamarman, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an "autism vignette" and then poses an evaluative question to several autism specialists, documenting their varied responses to the scenario and question posed. A 13-year-old boy with autism and severe mental retardation presented to the inpatient psychiatric unit due to a recent increase in agitation and physical aggression.…

  4. Using Simulation to Train Junior Psychiatry Residents to Work with Agitated Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigman, Daniel; Young, Meredith; Chalk, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the benefit and feasibility of introducing a new, simulation-based learning intervention for junior psychiatry residents. Method: Junior psychiatry residents were invited to participate in a new simulation-based learning intervention focusing on agitated patients. Questionnaires were used to explore the success of…

  5. Escalation of Agitative Rhetoric: A Case Study of Mattachine Midwest, 1967-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darsey, James

    This paper examines the adequacy of Bowers and Ochs' theory of social movements as applied to the escalating agitative strategies of a dissident group, the homosexual-rights organization Mattachine Midwest. The group's activities are described chronologically, in terms of the strategies employed: petition, promulgation, polarization,…

  6. Brief Report: Retrospective Case Series of Oxcarbazepine for Irritability/Agitation Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jessica F.; Sanders, Kevin B.; Benneyworth, M. Hannah; Smith, Jessica L.; DeJean, Virginia M.; McGrew, Susan G.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    We examined response to oxcarbazepine prescribed for irritability/agitation symptoms in a retrospective case series of 30 patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The average patient was 12.0 years old (range 5-21) and taking two other psychotropic medications (range 0-4). Fourteen patients (47 %) had a clinical global impression of…

  7. Effect of agitation and storage temperature on water sorption and solubility of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Argolo, Saryta; Mathias, Paula; Aguiar, Thaiane; Lima, Adriano; Santos, Sara; Foxton, Richard; Cavalcanti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of storage temperature and flask agitation on the water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL) of simplified adhesive systems. Seventy-two disc-shaped specimens were prepared according to the adhesive system (water/ethanol-based: Adper Single Bond 2; and water-based: One Coat Bond SL) and experimental conditions tested (mechanical agitation and storage temperature). Statistical analysis (3-way ANOVA, alpha=5%) found significantly greater WS and SL means for the water/ethanol-based system when compared to the water-based. Irrespective of factors studied, significant differences in WS and SL were noted between cold and room temperatures, with greater values been obtained at 1°C, and lower ones at 20°C. Agitation provided increased WS for both materials at all temperatures, but did not affect their SL. The mechanical agitation of the flask may negatively affect the dynamics of diffusion of simplified adhesive systems, even at extremely cold or warm temperatures.

  8. Effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation and CO2 stress on Phytophthora nicotianae zoospore survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan was used as a model pathogen to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation, and aeration with CO2 or breathable air on the survival of Phytophthora zoospores in water. Injecting CO2 into 2 liters of zoospore-infested water for 5 min at 110.4 ml ...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... shall comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... shall comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... shall comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... shall comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... shall comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and...

  14. Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, Alkhafaji R.; Bao, Jianguo; Du, Jiangkun; Zheng, Dan; Luo, Ye

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • A novel method of stripping (agitation) was investigated for NH{sub 3}-N removal. • PFS coagulation followed agitation process enhanced the leachate biodegradation. • Nitrification–denitrification achieved by changing operation process in SBR treatment. • A dual filter of carbon-sand is suitable as a polishing treatment of leachate. • Combined treatment success for the complete treatment of non-biodegradable leachate. - Abstract: This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH{sub 3}-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s{sup −1} within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L{sup −1} at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD{sub 5}/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD{sub 5}, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH{sub 3}-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic–aerobic–anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD{sub 5}, suspended solid (SS), NH{sub 3}-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L{sup −1}, 22.8 mg L{sup −1}, 24.2 mg L{sup −1}, 18.4 mg L{sup −1} and 50.8 mg L{sup −1} respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated

  15. Enhancing the adhesion strength of micro electroforming layer by ultrasonic agitation method and the application.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Du, Liqun; Tao, Yousheng; Li, Qingfeng; Luo, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Micro electroforming is widely used for fabricating micro metal devices in Micro Electro Mechanism System (MEMS). However, there is the problem of poor adhesion strength between micro electroforming layer and substrate. This dramatically influences the dimensional accuracy of the device. To solve this problem, ultrasonic agitation method is applied during the micro electroforming process. To explore the effect of the ultrasonic agitation on the adhesion strength, micro electroforming experiments were carried out under different ultrasonic power (0W, 100W, 150W, 200W, 250W) and different ultrasonic frequencies (0kHz, 40kHz, 80kHz, 120kHz, 200kHz). The effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency on the micro electroforming process were investigated by polarization method and alternating current (a.c.) impedance method. The adhesion strength between the electroforming layer and the substrate was measured by scratch test. The compressive stress of the electroforming layer was measured by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method. The crystallite size of the electroforming layer was measured by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) method. The internal contact surface area of the electroforming layer was measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV) method. The experimental results indicate that the ultrasonic agitation can decrease the polarization overpotential and increase the charge transfer process. Generally, the internal contact surface area is increased and the compressive stress is reduced. And then the adhesion strength is enhanced. Due to the different depolarization effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency, the effects on strengthening the adhesion strength are different. When the ultrasonic agitation is 200W and 40kHz, the effect on strengthening the adhesion strength is the best. In order to prove the effect which the ultrasonic agitation can improve the adhesion strength of the micro devices, micro pillar arrays were fabricated under

  16. The Incidence of Patent Foramen Ovale in 1,000 Consecutive Patients: A Contrast Transesophageal Echocardiography Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Daniel C.; Fisher, Edward A.; Budd, Jacqueline H.; Rosen, Stacey E.; Goldman, Martin E.

    1995-01-01

    Study objective: Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is present in 10 to 35% of people and has been reported to be an important risk factor for cardioembolic cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) and transient ischemic attacks (TIAS), especially in younger patients. While contrast transthoracic echocardiography has been used to detect PFO, contrast transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has a greater sensitivity. Prior studies reported the incidence of PFO in patients presenting with a CVA or TIA. Design: To determine the incidence of PFO in a more general population, we reviewed 1,000 consecutive TEES performed with contrast and color Doppler for the presence of PFO and other cardioembolic risk factors, including atrial septal aneurysm (ASA), aortic plaque, atrial fibrillation (AFib), and atrial thrombi. While imaging with monoplane or biplane TEE, multiple injections of agitated saline solution were injected during cough or Valsalva maneuver to detect flow through a PFO. Patients: There were 482 male and 518 female patients with mean age of 60 + 17 years (range 11 to 93 years). Results: Patent foramen ovale was found in 9.2% of all patients and, though seen in all age groups divided by decade, the incidence in patients aged 40 to 49 years was greater than those aged 70 to 79 years (12.96% vs 6.15%',, p=0.03). Contrast TEE had a much higher detection rate than color Doppler alone. Importantly, there was no greater incidence of PFO in patients with CVA vs thos without CVA, or in male vs female patients. Also, there was a very strong correlation between the presence of ASA and PFO (p<.001). Conclusion: Thus, PFO detected by TEE, frequently seen with ASA, is seen in all age groups and does not in itself present a risk factor for CVA. The association of PFO with peripheral thrombosis and CVA needs further study.

  17. Salinity on irrigated lands

    SciTech Connect

    Westmore, R.A.; Manbeck, D.M.

    1984-02-01

    The technology for controlling salinity on irrigated lands is relatively simple, involving both minor and major changes in current land-management practices. Minor changes include more frequent irrigation, the use of salt-tolerant crops, preplanning irrigation, and seed placement. The major changes require a shift from gravity to sprinkler or drip systems, increased water supply and quality, soil modification, land grading, and improved drainage. Some of the major changes are difficult, and some impossible, to accomplish. Examples of reclamation include the Mardan Salinity Control and Reclamation Project (SCARP) in Pakistan. 5 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  18. Metabolomics for salinity research.

    PubMed

    Roessner, Ute; Beckles, Diane M

    2012-01-01

    Soil salinity devastates agriculture. It reduces crop yields and makes arable land unsuitable for later use. Many species have evolved highly efficient strategies to sense, transduce, and build up tolerance to high salinity and even sensitive species have endogenous mechanism for coping with this stress. These underlying physiological and metabolic mechanisms can be unraveled using metabolomics. Here we describe detailed protocols of how to extract polar metabolites for analysis using GC-MS and LC-MS. We also touch briefly on considerations that should be taken into account when designing the experiment and how the resulting data may be analyzed and visualized in a biological context.

  19. Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration.

    PubMed

    Abood, Alkhafaji R; Bao, Jianguo; Du, Jiangkun; Zheng, Dan; Luo, Ye

    2014-02-01

    This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH3-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s(-1) within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L(-1) at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD5/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD5, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH3-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic-aerobic-anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD5, suspended solid (SS), NH3-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L(-1), 22.8 mg L(-1), 24.2 mg L(-1), 18.4 mg L(-1) and 50.8 mg L(-1) respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated pollutant loading from landfill leachate.

  20. Swelling and erosion properties of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (Hypromellose) matrices--influence of agitation rate and dissolution medium composition.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Nicole; Corrigan, Owen I

    2004-07-26

    The effect of dissolution medium variables, such as medium composition, ionic strength and agitation rate, on the swelling and erosion of Hypromellose (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, HPMC) matrices of different molecular weights was examined. Swelling and erosion of HPMC polymers was determined by measuring the wet and subsequent dry weights of matrices. It was possible to describe the rate of dissolution medium uptake in terms of a square root relationship and the erosion of the polymer in terms of the cube root law. The extent of swelling increased with increasing molecular weight, and decreased with increasing agitation rate. The erosion rate was seen to increase with decrease in polymer molecular weight, with a decrease in ionic strength and with increasing agitation rate. The sensitivity of polymer erosion to the degree of agitation may influence the ability of these polymers to give reproducible, agitation-independent release, compared to more rigid non-eroding matrix materials, in the complex hydrodynamic environment of the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Measurement of agitation and aggression in adult and aged neuropsychiatric patients: review of definitions and frequently used measurement scales.

    PubMed

    Volicer, Ladislav; Citrome, Leslie; Volavka, Jan

    2017-02-09

    Agitation and aggression in adult psychiatric patients with psychoses and in persons with dementia increase the burden of disease and frequently cause hospitalization. The implementation of currently available management strategies and the development of new ones is hindered by inconsistent terminology that confuses agitation with aggression. This confusion is maintained by many rating scales that fail to distinguish between these two syndromes. We review the frequently used rating scales with a particular focus on their ability to separate agitation from aggression. Agitation and aggression are two different syndromes. For example, reactive aggression is often precipitated by rejection of care and may not be associated with agitation per se. We propose, in treatment studies of behavioral symptoms of dementia and challenging behaviors in psychoses, that outcomes should be evaluated separately for agitation and aggression. This is important for investigation of drug effectiveness since the medication may be effective against one syndrome but not the other. Separate assessments of agitation and aggression should be a general principle of trial design with particular salience for registration studies of medications proposed for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory bodies.

  2. Saline Systems highlights for 2006

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2007-01-01

    Saline Systems is a journal devoted to both basic and applied studies of saline and hypersaline environments and their biodiversity. Here, I review the reports and commentaries published in the journal in 2006, including some exploring the geochemistry of saline estuaries, lakes, and ponds, others on the ecology and molecular biology of the indigenous halophilic organisms, and still others addressing the environmental challenges facing saline environments. Several studies are relevant to applications in biotechnology and aquaculture. PMID:17244355

  3. ASSESSING THE IMPACTS OF SALINITY AND NUTRIENT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Healthy seagrass beds were once found throughout the shallow areas of Narragansett Bay, R.I. but have disappeared due to infilling, pollution and disease. In Greenwich Bay, a highly developed embayment within Narragansett Bay, Ruppia maritima has colonized an area on the northern shore once dominated by Zostera marina. This area is sandy, which may allow groundwater seepage. Ruppia is extremely salinity tolerant, and may also be more nutrient tolerant than Zostera. A six week microcosm experiment at two salinity (20 and 30 ppt) and 4 nutrient (0, 5, 10, and 30 µM inorganic N) levels to test their relative tolerance was conducted in 2014. Treatments were renewed daily to simulate tidal flushing and the exposure water was dosed with 15N for the first week of the experiment. At the end of the experiment, the plants were weighed and measured, and dried for later isotopic analysis. In the first experiment, Ruppia had significant structural responses to both nutrients and salinity; there was a slight decline in root weight and a decrease in the total number of shoots with increasing nutrients. Average Ruppia blade length decreased with increasing nutrients and this decrease was more evident at 30 ppt. In contrast, Zostera had no significant structural differences. For both species, there were no differences in shoot or root/rhizome weights in any treatment, nor were there differences in isotopic results due to salinity. However, δ15N in the tissue increase

  4. Process agitator operating problems and equipment failures, F-Canyon Reprocessing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, W.S.; Starks, J.B.; Low, J.M.; Galloway, W.D.

    1988-09-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) maintains a compilation of operating problems and equipment failures that have occurred in the fuel reprocessing areas of the Savannah River Plant (SRP). At present, the data bank contains more than 200,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with the potential for injury or contamination of personnel, or for economic loss. The data bank has been used extensively for a wide variety of purposes, such as failure analyses, trend analyses, and preparation of safety analyses. Typical of the data are problems associated with the F-Canyon process agitators. This report contains a compilation of the agitator operating problems and equipment failures primarily as an aid to organizations with related equipment. Publication of these data was prompted by a number of requests for this information by other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Highly sensitive detection and stochastic analysis of magnetization agitation induced in a single layered magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu; Motoi, Keiichi; Miyajima, Hideki

    2016-03-01

    This study shows that broadband magnetic noise in a ferromagnetic wire can be detected over a wide frequency range between 500 MHz and 8 GHz using a lock-in detection technique. The magnetic noise spectrum from a 20 nm-thick single-layered Fe19Ni81 wire biased with a dc current is measured as functions of an external field and dc current. This noise is caused by thermal agitation in magnetization due to ambient temperature and Joule heating. The noise behaviors are well reproduced by a stochastic model. Thus, this paper presents a stochastic analysis of magnetic noise behaviors induced by thermal agitation using a highly sensitive technique for detecting the magnetic noise in a single layered ferromagnetic wire.

  6. Dispersal of Aspergillus fumigatus from Sewage Sludge Compost Piles Subjected to Mechanical Agitation in Open Air

    PubMed Central

    Millner, Patricia D.; Bassett, David A.; Marsh, Paul B.

    1980-01-01

    Aerosolization of the thermophilous fungal opportunist Aspergillus fumigatus from mechanically agitated compost piles was examined at a pilot-scale sewage sludge composting facility and two other selected test sites. Aerosols of A. fumigatus downwind from stationary compost piles were insignificant in comparison with those downwind from agitated piles. These aerosols were generated by a front-end loader moving and dropping compost. Aerial concentrations of the fungus at distances downwind from the point of emission were used to determine an emission rate for A. fumigatus associated with the moving operations. The maximum emission rate, 4.6 × 106A. fumigatus particles per s, was used to calculate predicted concentrations in an unobstructed plume with restrictive, neutral, and dispersive atmospheric mixing conditions up to 1 km downwind from the emission source. PMID:16345563

  7. Effects of Tween 20 and Tween 80 on the stability of Albutropin during agitation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Danny K; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F; Manning, Mark Cornell

    2005-06-01

    The objectives of this work were to determine the effects of nonionic surfactants (Tween 20 and Tween 80) on agitation-induced aggregation of the recombinant fusion protein, Albutropintrade mark (human growth hormone genetically fused to human albumin), and to characterize the binding interactions between the surfactants and the protein. Knowing the binding stoichiometry would allow a rational choice of surfactant concentration to protect the protein from surface-induced aggregation. Fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) were employed to study Albutropin surfactant binding. Albutropin was agitated at 25 +/- 2 degrees C to induce aggregation, and samples were taken during a 96-h incubation. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC-HPLC) (HPLC, high-performance liquid chromatography) was used to detect and quantify the extent of protein aggregation. The effect of surfactants on the protein's free energy of unfolding was determined using guanidine HCl as a denaturant. Tween 20 and Tween 80 had saturable binding to Albutropin with a molar binding stoichiometry of 10:1 and 9:1 (surfactant:protein), respectively. Binding of the surfactants to Albutropin increased the free energy of unfolding by over 1 and 0.6 kcal/mol, respectively. In protein samples that were agitated in the absence of surfactant, soluble aggregates were detected within 24 h, and there was almost complete loss of monomer to soluble aggregates by the end of the 96-h experiment. At the molar binding stoichiometry, Tween 20 and Tween 80 prevented the formation of soluble aggregates, even though the concentrations of surfactants were well below their critical micelle concentrations (CMC). Tween 20 and Tween 80 protected Albutropin against agitation-induced aggregation, even at concentrations below the CMC. Equilibrium unfolding data indicate that Tween confer protection by increasing the free energy of unfolding of Albutropin.

  8. Hemolymph chemistry and histopathological changes in Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) in response to low salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Graeme; Handlinger, Judith; Jones, Brian; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie

    2014-09-01

    This study described seasonal differences in the histopathological and hemolymph chemistry changes in different family lines of Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, in response to the stress of an abrupt change to low salinity, and mechanical grading. The most significant changes in pallial cavity salinity, hemolymph chemistry and histopathological findings occurred in summer at low salinity. In summer (water temperature 18°C) at low salinity, 9 (25.7% of full salinity), the mean pallial cavity salinity in oysters at day 3 was 19.8±1.6 (SE) and day 10 was 22.8±1.6 (SE) lower than oysters at salinity 35. Associated with this fall in pallial cavity salinity, mean hemolymph sodium for oysters at salinity 9 on day 3 and 10 were 297.2mmol/L±20(SE) and 350.4mmol/L±21.3(SE) lower than oysters at salinity 35. Similarly mean hemolymph potassium in oysters held at salinity 9 at day 3 and 10 were 5.6mmol/L±0.6(SE) and 7.9mmol/L±0.6 (SE) lower than oysters at salinity 35. These oysters at low salinity had expanded intercellular spaces and significant intracytoplasmic vacuolation distending the cytoplasm of epithelial cells in the alimentary tract and kidney and hemocyte infiltrate (diapedesis) within the alimentary tract wall. In contrast, in winter (water temperature 8°C) oyster mean pallial cavity salinity only fell at day 10 and this was by 6.0±0.6 (SE) compared to that of oysters at salinity 35. There were limited histopathological changes (expanded intercellular spaces and moderate intracytoplasmic vacuolation of renal epithelial cells) in these oysters at day 10 in low salinity. Mechanical grading and family line did not influence the oyster response to sudden low salinity. These findings provide additional information for interpretation of non-lethal, histopathological changes associated with temperature and salinity variation.

  9. Irrigation scheduling, freeze warning and soil salinity detecting. [in Cameron County Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Correlations of multispectral scanner (MSS) digital data differences between vegetated and bare soil areas with salinity levels from the eight saline areas using MSS bands seven and ten in the infrared region were significant. Correlations were derived for Cameron County, Texas. Detection of saline soils may be possible, using either film density readings or multispectral scanner data, when the lower reflectance of vegetation on highly saline soil and the higher reflectance of vegetation on lower saline soil are considered by using film on MSS contrasts between vegetation and bare soil.

  10. Agitation and delirium at the end of life: "We couldn't manage him".

    PubMed

    Breitbart, William; Alici, Yesne

    2008-12-24

    Delirium is the most common neuropsychiatric complication experienced by patients with advanced illness, occurring in up to 85% of patients in the last weeks of life. Using the case of Mr L, a 59-year-old man with metastatic lung cancer who developed an agitated delirium in the last week of life, we review the evaluation and management of delirium near the end of life. Although some studies have identified agitation as a central feature of delirium in 13% to 46% of patients, other studies have found up to 80% of patients near the end of life develop a hypoactive, nonagitated delirium. Both the agitated (hyperactive) and nonagitated (hypoactive) forms of delirium are harbingers of impending death and are associated with increased morbidity in patients who are terminally ill, causing distress for patients, family members, and staff. Delirium is a sign of significant physiological disturbance, usually involving multiple causes, including infection, organ failure, and medication adverse effects. Often these causes of delirium are not reversible in the dying patient, and this influences the outcomes of its management. Delirium can also significantly interfere with the recognition and control of other physical and psychological symptoms, such as pain. Unfortunately, delirium is often misdiagnosed or unrecognized and thus inappropriately treated or untreated in terminally ill patients. To manage delirium in terminally ill patients, clinicians must be able to diagnose it accurately, undertake appropriate assessment of underlying causes, and understand the benefits and risks of the available pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions.

  11. Pumping Characteristics of a Helical Screw Agitator with a Draught Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Youn-Jea

    In the use of helical type agitator, the mixing process is usually restricted to the laminar flow regime. Common examples of laminar mixing are found where the fluid has a very high viscosity, i.e., pseudoplastic fluids. It can be indicated that a helical type agitator is sufficiently suited to the creeping flow mixing. The pumping characteristic of a Helical Screw Agitator with a draught tube (HSA) is required to evaluate its capacity for the optimal configuration of the mixing chamber. It could be executed by changing some parameters such as the number of helix, the angular velocity and the rotating direction and so on. In this study, the numerical simulation was carried out with the Eulerian multiphase mixture model and the moving mesh approximation. Some of the optimum design parameters have been developed with the aid of numerical data from the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. Using the commercial code, Fluent, the pumping characteristics in the HSA are investigated from the rheological properties, and the results are graphically depicted.

  12. Helically agitated mixing in dry dilute acid pretreatment enhances the bioconversion of corn stover into ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dry dilute acid pretreatment at extremely high solids loading of lignocellulose materials demonstrated promising advantages of no waste water generation, less sugar loss, and low steam consumption while maintaining high hydrolysis yield. However, the routine pretreatment reactor without mixing apparatus was found not suitable for dry pretreatment operation because of poor mixing and mass transfer. In this study, helically agitated mixing was introduced into the dry dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover and its effect on pretreatment efficiency, inhibitor generation, sugar production, and bioconversion efficiency through simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation (SSF) were evaluated. Results The overall cellulose conversion taking account of cellulose loss in pretreatment was used to evaluate the efficiency of pretreatment. The two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model on dry pretreatment was established and applied to analyze the mixing mechanism. The results showed that the pretreatment efficiency was significantly improved and the inhibitor generation was reduced by the helically agitated mixing, compared to the dry pretreatment without mixing: the ethanol titer and yield from cellulose in the SSF reached 56.20 g/L and 69.43% at the 30% solids loading and 15 FPU/DM cellulase dosage, respectively, corresponding to a 26.5% increase in ethanol titer and 17.2% increase in ethanol yield at the same fermentation conditions. Conclusions The advantage of helically agitated mixing may provide a prototype of dry dilute acid pretreatment processing for future commercial-scale production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:24387051

  13. Union Agitators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honawar, Vaishali

    2006-01-01

    A decade has passed since a few union leaders formed the network known as Teacher Union Reform Network (TURN) to search for innovative ways to enhance education. Selling their message has not always been easy. Created in 1995, TURN was the brain child of Adam Urbanski, the president of the Rochester (N.Y.) Teachers Association for the past 25…

  14. Granulation of core particles suitable for film coating by agitation fluidized bed III. Effect of scale, agitator rotational speed and blade shape on granule properties and development of a high accuracy scale-up theory.

    PubMed

    Hamashita, Tomohiro; Ono, Tetsuo; Ono, Masaki; Tsunenari, Yoshinobu; Aketo, Takao; Watano, Satoru

    2009-04-01

    The preparation of core particles suitable for subsequent film coating was examined using different scales of agitation fluidized beds. Specifically, the effects of agitator rotational speed and agitator blade shape in different scales of granulators on granule properties such as mass median diameter, apparent density, friability and shape factor were studied. As the agitator rotational speed was increased or when the agitator blade height and angle were large, the mass median diameter and friability of the granules decreased, while the apparent density and shape factor increased, in a manner independent of the vessel size because the granules were subjected to greater compression, shearing and rolling effects. The same core particles could not be prepared using granulators with different vessel sizes by simply adopting a conventional scale-up theory(1,2)) based on kinetic energy similarity. Here, a novel scale-up theory that takes into account agitator blade shape factors is proposed.(3)) When the two scale-up theories were compared, our new theory was capable of predicting the granule properties more accurately than the conventional theory. By adopting this novel theory, the same core particles could be prepared under different operating conditions in any scale of granulator.

  15. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny.

  16. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water.

  17. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-08-30

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

  18. Overview of SMOS Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, R.

    2014-12-01

    While it is well known that the ocean is one of the most important components of the climate system, with a heat capacity 1100 times greater than the atmosphere, the ocean is also the primary reservoir for freshwater transport to the atmosphere and largest component of the global water cycle. Two new satellite sensors, the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the NASA Aquarius SAC-D missions are now providing the first space borne measurements of the sea surface salinity (SSS). In this talk, we will present examples demonstrating how SMOS-derived SSS data are being used to better characterize key land-ocean and atmosphere-ocean interaction processes that occur within the marine hydrological cycle. In particular, we shall illustrate how SMOS and its ocean mapping capability provides observations across the world's largest tropical ocean fresh pool regions and we will discuss intra-seasonal to interannual precipitation impacts as well as large-scale river runoff from the Amazon-Orinoco and Congo rivers and its offshore advection. Synergistic multi-satellite analyses of these new surface salinity data sets combined with sea surface temperature, dynamical height and currents from altimetry, surface wind, ocean color, rainfall estimates, and in situ observations will be shown to yield new freshwater budget and ocean circulation insight. Examples of SMOS capabilities of monitoring salt exchanges across the Gulf Stream through meso-scale eddies will be provided. SSS observations from the SMOS and Aquarius/SAC-D sensors are combined to examine the response of the upper ocean to tropical cyclone passage including the potential role that a freshwater-induced upper ocean barrier layer may play in modulating surface cooling and enthalpy flux in tropical cyclone track regions.

  19. Salinity Adaptation and the Contribution of Parental Environmental Effects in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Moriuchi, Ken S.; Friesen, Maren L.; Cordeiro, Matilde A.; Badri, Mounawer; Vu, Wendy T.; Main, Bradley J.; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.; Strauss, Sharon Y.; von Wettberg, Eric J. B.

    2016-01-01

    High soil salinity negatively influences plant growth and yield. Some taxa have evolved mechanisms for avoiding or tolerating elevated soil salinity, which can be modulated by the environment experienced by parents or offspring. We tested the contribution of the parental and offspring environments on salinity adaptation and their potential underlying mechanisms. In a two-generation greenhouse experiment, we factorially manipulated salinity concentrations for genotypes of Medicago truncatula that were originally collected from natural populations that differed in soil salinity. To compare population level adaptation to soil salinity and to test the potential mechanisms involved we measured two aspects of plant performance, reproduction and vegetative biomass, and phenological and physiological traits associated with salinity avoidance and tolerance. Saline-origin populations had greater biomass and reproduction under saline conditions than non-saline populations, consistent with local adaptation to saline soils. Additionally, parental environmental exposure to salt increased this difference in performance. In terms of environmental effects on mechanisms of salinity adaptation, parental exposure to salt spurred phenological differences that facilitated salt avoidance, while offspring exposure to salt resulted in traits associated with greater salt tolerance. Non-saline origin populations expressed traits associated with greater growth in the absence of salt while, for saline adapted populations, the ability to maintain greater performance in saline environments was also associated with lower growth potential in the absence of salt. Plastic responses induced by parental and offspring environments in phenology, leaf traits, and gas exchange contribute to salinity adaptation in M. truncatula. The ability of plants to tolerate environmental stress, such as high soil salinity, is likely modulated by a combination of parental effects and within-generation phenotypic

  20. Salinity Adaptation and the Contribution of Parental Environmental Effects in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Moriuchi, Ken S; Friesen, Maren L; Cordeiro, Matilde A; Badri, Mounawer; Vu, Wendy T; Main, Bradley J; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Nuzhdin, Sergey V; Strauss, Sharon Y; von Wettberg, Eric J B

    2016-01-01

    High soil salinity negatively influences plant growth and yield. Some taxa have evolved mechanisms for avoiding or tolerating elevated soil salinity, which can be modulated by the environment experienced by parents or offspring. We tested the contribution of the parental and offspring environments on salinity adaptation and their potential underlying mechanisms. In a two-generation greenhouse experiment, we factorially manipulated salinity concentrations for genotypes of Medicago truncatula that were originally collected from natural populations that differed in soil salinity. To compare population level adaptation to soil salinity and to test the potential mechanisms involved we measured two aspects of plant performance, reproduction and vegetative biomass, and phenological and physiological traits associated with salinity avoidance and tolerance. Saline-origin populations had greater biomass and reproduction under saline conditions than non-saline populations, consistent with local adaptation to saline soils. Additionally, parental environmental exposure to salt increased this difference in performance. In terms of environmental effects on mechanisms of salinity adaptation, parental exposure to salt spurred phenological differences that facilitated salt avoidance, while offspring exposure to salt resulted in traits associated with greater salt tolerance. Non-saline origin populations expressed traits associated with greater growth in the absence of salt while, for saline adapted populations, the ability to maintain greater performance in saline environments was also associated with lower growth potential in the absence of salt. Plastic responses induced by parental and offspring environments in phenology, leaf traits, and gas exchange contribute to salinity adaptation in M. truncatula. The ability of plants to tolerate environmental stress, such as high soil salinity, is likely modulated by a combination of parental effects and within-generation phenotypic

  1. Toward an understanding of the effects of agitation and aeration on growth and laccases production by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Gómez-Cruz, Cristina; Galindo, Enrique; Serrano-Carreón, Leobardo

    2014-05-10

    Mycelial growth and laccase production by Pleurotus ostreatus CP50 cultured in a 10-L mechanically agitated bioreactor were assessed through a 2(3) factorial experimental design. The main effects and interactions of three factors (agitation, aeration and copper induction) over five responses (μ, αLacc, βLacc, maximal volumetric laccase activity and maximal biomass concentration) were analyzed. P. ostreatus growth was significantly improved when culturing was conducted with high agitation (5.9kW/m(3)s) and aeration flow (0.5vvm) rates. Under the experimental conditions evaluated, no evidence of hydrodynamic stress affecting fungal growth was observed. However, the high agitation and aeration conditions were detrimental for the growth-associated laccase production constant (αLacc), leading to a very complex optimization of the process. The maximal laccase volumetric activity (1.2 and 3.8U/ml for non-induced and copper-induced cultures, respectively) was observed when the culturing was performed at a low agitation rate (0.9kW/m(3)s) and a high aeration flow rate (0.5vvm). Laccase proteolysis may explain the complex interactions observed between agitation and aeration and the effects of these factors on the laccase volumetric activity observed in the cultures.

  2. Dexmedetomidine Infusion to Control Agitation due to Anticholinergic Toxidromes in Adolescents, a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ada; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2-adrenergic agonist approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the sedation of adults who are intubated on mechanical ventilation and in non-intubated adults who are undergoing surgical procedures. However, it has also recently become a commonly used sedative agent in varied clinical settings for the pediatric patient as well. We present the use of dexmedetomidine for sedation in a unique clinical scenario, the severely agitated and combative patient following the intentional misuse of anticholinergic drugs. Its applications in this situation are discussed, and previous reports in the literature are reviewed. PMID:26380573

  3. Methods for determining enzymatic activity comprising heating and agitation of closed volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David Neil; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Reed, David William; Jensen, Jill Renee

    2016-03-15

    Methods for determining thermophilic enzymatic activity include heating a substrate solution in a plurality of closed volumes to a predetermined reaction temperature. Without opening the closed volumes, at least one enzyme is added, substantially simultaneously, to the closed volumes. At the predetermined reaction temperature, the closed volumes are agitated and then the activity of the at least one enzyme is determined. The methods are conducive for characterizing enzymes of high-temperature reactions, with insoluble substrates, with substrates and enzymes that do not readily intermix, and with low volumes of substrate and enzyme. Systems for characterizing the enzymes are also disclosed.

  4. Treatment of post-electroconvulsive therapy delirium and agitation with donepezil.

    PubMed

    Logan, Christopher J; Stewart, Jonathan T

    2007-03-01

    Delirium and agitation are commonly encountered after administration of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Management is generally fairly straightforward, although some patients may have a severe, prolonged, or refractory course. We recently cared for a 65-year-old man who consistently developed severe and very prolonged post-ECT delirium that did not respond to typical pharmacological agents; the duration of delirium was dramatically shortened by the addition of donepezil. Cholinesterase inhibitors may have a place in mitigating severe and prolonged post-ECT delirium.

  5. Persistent genital arousal disorder: confluent patient history of agitated depression, paroxetine cessation, and a tarlov cyst.

    PubMed

    Eibye, Simone; Jensen, Hans Mørch

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a woman suffering from persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) after paroxetine cessation. She was admitted to a psychiatric department and diagnosed with agitated depression. Physical investigation showed no gynaecological or neurological explanation; however, a pelvic MRI scan revealed a Tarlov cyst. Size and placement of the cyst could not explain the patient's symptoms; thus neurosurgical approach would not be helpful. Her depression was treated with antidepressant with little effect. Electroconvulsive therapy improved the patient's symptoms though they did not fully resolve. More awareness of PGAD and thorough interdisciplinary conferences are necessary to insure an unequivocal treatment strategy.

  6. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder: Confluent Patient History of Agitated Depression, Paroxetine Cessation, and a Tarlov Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Hans Mørch

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a woman suffering from persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) after paroxetine cessation. She was admitted to a psychiatric department and diagnosed with agitated depression. Physical investigation showed no gynaecological or neurological explanation; however, a pelvic MRI scan revealed a Tarlov cyst. Size and placement of the cyst could not explain the patient's symptoms; thus neurosurgical approach would not be helpful. Her depression was treated with antidepressant with little effect. Electroconvulsive therapy improved the patient's symptoms though they did not fully resolve. More awareness of PGAD and thorough interdisciplinary conferences are necessary to insure an unequivocal treatment strategy. PMID:25525548

  7. Cd Isotope Fractionation During Adsorption Varies with Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasylenki, L. E.; Montanez, G.; Anbar, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    compositions were measured using MC-ICP-MS with a Ag spike for mass bias correction. The fractionation between dissolved and adsorbed Cd was ~0.3‰ in terms of δ114/110Cd (relative to our ICP standard solution) for the KNO3-only experiments (adsorbed Cd is lighter) and very near zero for the NaCl-rich experiments. Our NaCl-rich result is consistent with the results of [4] and [6]. In addition, our KNO3-only result suggests that adsorption of Cd to mineral surfaces in low salinity waters, such as riverine water or groundwater, could be one of the few abiotic processes that can significantly fractionate Cd isotopes. We hypothesize that NaCl concentration affects Cd fractionation in this system by changing Cd speciation. Cd likely complexes with Cl in predominantly tetrahedral molecules, in contrast to the octahedral hydrated Cd cations present in low-Cl solutions. [1] Boyle et al. (1976) Nature 263, 42. [2] Lacan et al. (2006) GCA 70, 5104. [3] Ripperger et al. (2007) EPSL 261, 670. [4] Rehkämper et al. (2008) GCA 72 Suppl., A392. [5] Wombacher et al. (2003) GCA 67, 4639. [6] Schmitt et al. GCA 71 Suppl., A898.

  8. Management of dryland saline seeps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Discussed is the identification, diagnosis, control, and reclamation of dryland saline seep problems as found in the North American Great Plains. Saline seeps develop because of geologic stratifications within the soil profile and insufficient use of precipitation by crops used in dryland farming s...

  9. Shear and mixing effects on cells in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1987-01-01

    Tissue cells are known to be sensitive to mechanical stresses imposed on them by agitation in bioreactors. The amount of agitation provided in a microcarrier or suspension bioreactor should be only enough to provide effective homogeneity. Three distinct flow regions can be identified in the reactor: bulk turbulent flow, bulk laminar flow and boundary-layer flows. Possible mechanisms of cell damage are examined by analyzing the motion of microcarriers or free cells relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. The primary mechanisms of cell damage appear to result from: (1) direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies; (2) collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow; and (3) collisions against the impeller or other stationary surfaces. If the smallest eddies of turbulent flow are of the same size as the microcarrier beads, they may cause high shear stresses on the cells. Eddies the size of the average interbead spacing may cause bead-bead collisions which damage cells. The severity of the collisions increases when the eddies are also of the same size as the beads. Impeller collisions occur when beads cannot avoid the impeller leading edge as it advances through the liquid. The implications of the results of this analysis on the design and operation of tissue culture reactors are discussed.

  10. [Current treatment of depression and agitation in the elderly -- clinical use of trazodone].

    PubMed

    Osváth, Péter

    2013-09-01

    Due to their increasing frequency, mental disorders among the elderly have special importance in the clinical practice. In this article we summarize the characteristics, diagnostic problems and modern treatments of mental disorders (especially depression) in old age. As this period of life means special somatic and psychic features in people's condition, it may be difficult to find the most effective and well-tolerated treatment, especially in case of comorbid dementia or agitated behaviour. In this article we review the therapeutic experience with the SARI antidepressant trazodone. Clinical studies and everyday practice indicate that trazodone due to its special multifunctional receptorprofile can be particularly effective in the treatment of depression accompanied by severe insomnia and anxiety. Due to its special anxiolytic and sleep normalising effect and well-tolerated side effect profile trazodone is found to be clinically useful not only in the treatment of depression in the elderly, but also in the case of serious comorbidity with dementia or agitated behaviour. We also illustrate the possibilities of using trazodone in the everyday practice with the presentation of two case reports. Furthermore we review the viewpoints of complex therapy which facilitates the successful treatment of depression in the elderly and the restoration of quality of life.

  11. Experimental study on agitated drying characteristics of sewage sludge under the effects of different additive agents.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenyi; Su, Yaxin

    2014-07-01

    Drying experiments of dewatered sewage sludge (DSS) were conducted on a agitated paddle dryer, and the effects of additive agents, i.e., CaO, pulverized coal (PC), heavy oil (HO), and dried sludge ("DS" through back mixing) on the agitated drying characteristics of DSS were investigated. The results indicated that CaO can significantly increase the drying rate of DSS. The drying rate at CaO/DSS (mass ratio)=1/100 was 135% higher than that of CaO/DSS=0. Pulverized coal has no obvious effect on drying rate, but the increase of PC/DSS can promote breaking up of sludge lump. Heavy oil was found to be slightly effective in improving the drying rate of DSS in the examined experimental range of HO/DSS=0-1/20. It is also found that HO can reduce the torque of the dryer shaft, due to its lubrication effect. Back mixing of DS was found to be effective in alleviating the unfavorable effect of the lumpy phase by improving the mixing effect of the paddle dryer. There was a marked increase of drying rate with an increase of the DS/DSS in the experimental range of DS/DSS=0-1/3.

  12. Properties of a calicivirus isolated from cats dying in an agitated state.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Ohe, K; Fukuyama, M; Furuhata, K; Kishikawa, S; Sakai, S; Kiuchi, A; Hara, M; Watanabe, T; Ishikawa, Y; Taneno, A

    In June 1993, two of five pet cats kept in Yokohama city in Japan suddenly became agitated and died. Feline calicivirus (FCV) was isolated from them. One strain (FCV-S) was isolated from the spinal cord, lung and tonsil of cat 1, another (FCV-B) from the ileum, medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord of cat 2, and a third (FCV-SAKURA) from the oral cavity of one of the three surviving cats which showed no clinical signs. These three strains were equally resistant to pH 3.0 and serologically similar to each other, but distinct from strain F9. A genetic analysis, using a 208 base pair fragment from region E of the capsid, showed that FCV-Ari had a 70.4 per cent nucleotide and 77.3 per cent amino acid homology and FCV-F9 had a 68.6 per cent nucleotide and 73.9 per cent amino acid homology with the three strains, indicating that these two strains were genetically distinct from the three new isolates. Unvaccinated cats and cats which had been vaccinated against FCV-F9 developed watery diarrhoea but did not become agitated after the administration of FCV-S. The FCV-S strain did not induce signs of excitability after it was administered orally to specific pathogen-free cats.

  13. Clinical monitoring scales in acute brain injury: assessment of coma, pain, agitation, and delirium.

    PubMed

    Riker, Richard R; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2014-12-01

    Serial clinical examination represents the most fundamental and basic form of neurological monitoring, and is often the first and only form of such monitoring in patients. Even in patients subjected to physiological monitoring using a range of technologies, the clinical examination remains an essential tool to follow neurological progress. Key aspects of the clinical examination have now been systematized into scoring schemes, and address consciousness, pain, agitation, and delirium (PAD). The Glasgow Coma Scale has been the traditional tool to measure consciousness, but the full outline of unresponsiveness (FOUR) score has recently been validated in a variety of settings, and at present, both represent clinically useful tools. Assessment of PAD in neurologically compromised patients present special challenges. For pain, the Numeric Rating Scale is the preferred initial approach, with either the Behavioral Pain Scale or the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool in subjects who are not able to respond. The Nociception Coma Scale-Revised may be useful in patients with severe disorders of consciousness. Conventional sedation scoring tools for critical care, such as the Richmond Area Sedation Scale (RASS) and Sedation-Agitation Scale (SAS) may provide reasonable tools in some neurocritical care patients. The use of sedative drugs and neuromuscular blockers may invalidate the use of some clinical examination tools in others. The use of sedation interruption to assess neurological status can result in physiological derangement in unstable patients (such as those with uncontrolled intracranial hypertension), and is not recommended.

  14. Hyperactivity with Agitative-Like Behavior in a Mouse Tauopathy Model.

    PubMed

    Jul, Pia; Volbracht, Christiane; de Jong, Inge E M; Helboe, Lone; Elvang, Anders Brandt; Pedersen, Jan Torleif

    2016-01-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), are characterized by formation of neurofibrillary tangles consisting of hyperphosphorylated tau. In addition to memory loss, patients experience behavioral symptoms such as agitation, aggression, depression, and insomnia. We explored the behavioral phenotype of a mouse model (rTg4510) carrying the human tau P301L mutation found in a familial form of FTD. We tested these mice in locomotor activity assays as well as in the Morris water maze to access spatial memory. In addition to cognitive impairments, rTg4510 mice exhibited a hyperactivity phenotype which correlated with progression of tau pathology and was dependent on P301L tau transgene expression. The hyperactive phenotype was characterized by significantly increased locomotor activity in a novel and in a simulated home cage environment together with a disturbed day/night cycle. The P301L-tau-dependent hyperactivity and agitative-like phenotype suggests that these mice may form a correlate to some of the behavioral disturbances observed in advanced AD and FTD.

  15. Rapid Tranquilization for Psychiatric Patients with Psychomotor Agitation: What is Known About it?

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Clayton Gonçalves; Del Grossi Moura, Mariana; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Motta, Rogério Heládio Lopes; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane

    2017-03-09

    Rapid tranquilization is an intervention used in control of agitation or aggression in patients with mental disorders. This study synthesized the available evidence regarding efficacy and safety of drugs used for rapid tranquilization in psychiatric patients with psychomotor agitation. It is an overview study of systematic reviews and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) identified in the database MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and LILACS until April 2015. A team of reviewers, in pairs and independently, identified eligible studies and assessed methodological quality using AMSTAR. Data were extracted from four studies (61 RCT, 8021 participants). The association of haloperidol with promethazine (H + P) promoted tranquilization and presented better safety profile, with moderate quality evidence. Olanzapine demonstrated benefit towards tranquilization and good safety profile, but needed additional administration to keep tranquilization. There was no benefit in the use of haloperidol alone or associated to another psychotropic to most outcomes evaluated. The evidence was of low quality to most of the interventions. H + P was considered a good option for rapid tranquilization, however, more RCT are necessary to confirm the efficacy and safety of the available interventions.

  16. Effects of agitation on particle-size distribution and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated spruce and giant reed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixing is an energy demanding process which has been previously shown to affect enzymatic hydrolysis. Concentrated biomass slurries are associated with high and non-Newtonian viscosities and mixing in these systems is a complex task. Poor mixing can lead to mass and/or heat transfer problems as well as inhomogeneous enzyme distribution, both of which can cause possible yield reduction. Furthermore the stirring energy dissipation may impact the particle size which in turn may affect the enzymatic hydrolysis. The objective of the current work was to specifically quantify the effects of mixing on particle-size distribution (PSD) and relate this to changes in the enzymatic hydrolysis. Two rather different materials were investigated, namely pretreated Norway spruce and giant reed. Results Changes in glucan hydrolysis and PSD were measured as a function of agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis at fiber loadings of 7 or 13% water-insoluble solids (WIS). Enzymatic conversion of pretreated spruce was strongly affected by agitation rates at the higher WIS content. However, at low WIS content the agitation had almost no effect on hydrolysis. There was some effect of agitation on the hydrolysis of giant reed at high WIS loading, but it was smaller than that for spruce, and there was no measurable effect at low WIS loading. In the case of spruce, intense agitation clearly affected the PSD and resulted in a reduced mean particle size, whereas for giant reed the decrease in particle size was mainly driven by enzymatic action. However, the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis was not increased after size reduction by agitation. Conclusions The impact of agitation on the enzymatic hydrolysis clearly depends not only on feedstock but also on the solids loading. Agitation was found to affect the PSD differently for the examined pretreated materials spruce and giant reed. The fact that the reduced mean particle diameter could not explain the enhanced hydrolysis rates found for

  17. Effect of Agitation on Acidogenesis Stage of Two-Stage Anaerobic Digestion of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) into Biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisakti, B.; Irvan; Adipasah, H.; Taslim; Turmuzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    The acidogenesis stage in two-stage anaerobic digestion of palm oil mill effluent (POME) was studied in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). This research investigated the effect of agitation rate on the growth of microorganisms, the degradation of organic substances, and volatile fatty acids (VFA) production and composition. Initially, the suitable loading up was determined by varying the HRT 6.7, 5.0, and 4.0 days in a 2 L CSTR with agitation rate 50 rpm, pH 6.0 ± 0.2, at room temperature. Next, effect of agitation on the process was determined by varying agitation rate at 25, 50, 100, and 200 rpm. Analysis of total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS), total suspended solids (TSS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and volatile fatty acids (VFA) were conducted in order to study the growth of microorganisms and their abilities in converting organic compound to produce VFA. The highest growth of microorganisms was achieved at HRT 4.0 day with microorganism concentration was 20.62 mg VSS/L and COD reduction was 15.7%. The highest production of total VFA achieved was 5,766.61 mg/L mg/L at agitation rate 200 rpm, with concentration of acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid were 1,889.23; 1,161.43; and 2,725.95 mg/L, respectively. While degradation VS and COD were 16.61 and 38.79%.

  18. The Interactive Relationship between Pain, Psychosis, and Agitation in People with Dementia: Results from a Cluster-Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Habiger, Torstein F.; Flo, Elisabeth; Achterberg, Wilco P.; Husebo, Bettina S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in people with dementia, and pain is thought to be an important underlying factor. Pain has previously been associated with agitation, and pain treatment has been shown to ameliorate agitated behaviour. So far, the association between pain and psychosis and the effect of pain treatment on psychotic symptoms is unclear. Furthermore, the impact of opioid treatment on psychosis is not established. Aim. To investigate the efficacy of a stepwise protocol for treating pain (SPTP) on psychosis and agitation measured with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Nursing Home version, and to explore the impact of opioid analgesics on psychosis. Method. Secondary analyses are from a cluster-randomised controlled trial including 352 patients with advanced dementia and agitation from 18 nursing homes in Western Norway. The intervention group received pain treatment according to SPTP. Results. Pain was associated with disinhibition (adjusted OR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.10–1.34) and irritability (adjusted OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.01–1.21) at baseline. Pain treatment reduced agitation (p < 0.001, df = 1; 300) and aberrant motor behaviour (p = 0.017, df = 1; 300). Psychosis was reduced in people with at least one symptom at baseline (p = 0.034, df = 1; 135). The use of opioid analgesics did not increase psychotic symptoms. Study Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01021696), Norwegian Medicines Agency, EudraCT (EudraCTnr: 2008-007490-20). PMID:27247487

  19. The Mediterranean salinity crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsue, K.J.

    1988-08-01

    That the Mediterranean Sea underwent a salinity crisis during the Miocene (Messinian) is proven by the 1970 JOIDES deep sea drilling expedition. Subsequent work by ocean drilling and by studies on land have recorded the history of this crisis. Based upon the deep desiccated-basin model, the use of event-stratigraphy, calibrated by strontium-isotope dating and magnetostratigraphy, has enabled them to decipher the following events between 6.0 and 5.1 Ma: (1) deposition of marine diatom-rich sediments in a partially restricted basin, (2) first desiccation of the Mediterranean when Calcare di base was deposited at a time of isolation from the Atlantic because of a glacial eustatic drop of sea level, (3) influx of marine waters through southern Spanish basins to furnish brines for the deposition of the main salt, (4) Intra-Messinian desiccation, as evidenced by the erosional unconformity above the lower evaporite, (5) Intra-Messinian denudation, when reefs grew on Cyprus and marine sediments were deposited in basins, (6) frequency isolations due to oscillating sea level, when the upper evaporite was deposited, (7) Lago mare, formation of freshwater and brackish lakes due to influx of Paratethys water, (8) opening of the Gibraltar and Pliocene inundation of the Mediterranean.

  20. A simple collapse, agitation and pathological crying in a young woman? - Atypical onset of a basilar thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Etgen, Thorleif; Milankovic-Eberl, Dragana; Rieder, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background A collapse and agitation in a young person comprises many differential diagnoses, but usually does not include a life-threatening basilar thrombosis. Methods and Results We report the case of a 19-year old woman who presented mainly with a collapse and agitation. CT and CT-angiography yielded distal basilar thrombosis which was successfully treated by intraarterial thrombolysis. MRI confirmed multiple small ischemic lesions in the vertebrobasilar territory. The patient improved quickly and returned to her normal daily activities of life after a few months. Conclusions Posterior circulation ischemia should be included among the possible differential diagnoses of any acute onset of an agitated or confusional state. Conflicts of interest/Disclosures None to declare. Ethics Written informed consent of the patient has been obtained. PMID:25422712

  1. Effects of agitation speed on the ex vivo expansion of cord blood hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in stirred suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Jing, Qiang; Cai, Haibo; Du, Zheng; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-song

    2013-04-01

    The mononuclear cells were cultivated in stirred flasks at different agitation speeds of 30 rpm, 45 rpm, 60 rpm and 80 rpm. At the agitation speed of 30 rpm, total cells achieved higher expansion folds and the CFC density increased. When at higher agitation speed of 60 rpm or 80 rpm, the number of cells dropped rapidly and characteristics of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) were not maintained. Moreover, the culture duration of 6-9 days was better for HSPCs ex vivo expansion. These data indicated that HSPCs should be cultured at relatively low agitation speed and for a short-term period when cultured in stirred suspension system.

  2. The Role of Inhaled Loxapine in the Treatment of Acute Agitation in Patients with Psychiatric Disorders: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    de Berardis, Domenico; Fornaro, Michele; Orsolini, Laura; Iasevoli, Felice; Tomasetti, Carmine; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Serroni, Nicola; Valchera, Alessandro; Carano, Alessandro; Vellante, Federica; Marini, Stefano; Piersanti, Monica; Perna, Giampaolo; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Loxapine is a first generation antipsychotic, belonging to the dibenzoxazepine class. Recently, loxapine has been reformulated at a lower dose, producing an inhaled powder that can be directly administered to the lungs to treat the agitation associated with psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Thus, the aim of this narrative and clinical mini-review was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of inhaled loxapine in the treatment of acute agitation in patients with psychiatric disorders. The efficacy of inhaled loxapine has been evaluated in one Phase II trial on patients with schizophrenia, and in two Phase III trials in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Moreover, there are two published case series on patients with borderline personality disorder and dual diagnosis patients. Inhaled loxapine has proven to be effective and generally well tolerated when administered to agitated patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Two case series have suggested that inhaled loxapine may also be useful to treat agitation in patients with borderline personality disorder and with dual diagnosis, but further studies are needed to clarify this point. However, the administration of inhaled loxapine requires at least some kind of patient collaboration, and is not recommended in the treatment of severe agitation in totally uncooperative patients. Moreover, the drug-related risk of bronchospasm must always be kept in mind when planning to use inhaled loxapine, leading to a careful patient assessment prior to, and after, administration. Also, the higher costs of inhaled loxapine, when compared to oral and intramuscular medications, should be taken into account when selecting it for the treatment of agitation. PMID:28208695

  3. Electroless deposition of nickel-boron coatings using low frequency ultrasonic agitation: Effect of ultrasonic frequency on the coatings.

    PubMed

    Bonin, L; Bains, N; Vitry, V; Cobley, A J

    2017-01-30

    The effect of ultrasound on the properties of Nickel-Boron (NiB) coatings was investigated. NiB coatings were fabricated by electroless deposition using either ultrasonic or mechanical agitation. The deposition of Ni occurred in an aqueous bath containing a reducible metal salt (nickel chloride), reducing agent (sodium borohydride), complexing agent (ethylenediamine) and stabilizer (lead tungstate). Due to the instability of the borohydride in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline media, pH was controlled at pH 12±1 in order to avoid destabilizing the bath. Deposition was performed in three different configurations: one with a classical mechanical agitation at 300rpm and the other two employing ultrasound at a frequency of either 20 or 35kHz. The microstructures of the electroless coatings were characterized by a combination of optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The chemistry of the coatings was determined by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometry) after dissolution in aqua regia. The mechanical properties of the coatings were established by a combination of roughness measurements, Vickers microhardness and pin-on-disk tribology tests. Lastly, the corrosion properties were analysed by potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that low frequency ultrasonic agitation could be used to produce coatings from an alkaline NiB bath and that the thickness of coatings obtained could be increased by over 50% compared to those produced using mechanical agitation. Although ultrasonic agitation produced a smoother coating and some alteration of the deposit morphology was observed, the mechanical and corrosion properties were very similar to those found when using mechanical agitation.

  4. Incompatibility of Contrast Medium and Trisodium Citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Delcour, Christian Bruninx, Guy

    2013-02-15

    To test the compatibility of trisodium citrate, a catheter lock solution, with iodinated contrast medium. Iohexol, iobitridol, iodixanol, ioxaglate, ioxithalamate, iomeprol, and iopromide were tested. In all tests, 2 ml of contrast medium were mixed with 2 ml of trisodium citrate solution. Iodixanol and ioxaglate provoked a highly viscous gluelike precipitation when mixed with trisodium citrate. A brief transient precipitate was observed with iohexol, iomeprol, and ioxithalamate. Permanent precipitation occurred with iobitridol and iopromide. One must be aware of the potential for precipitation when contrast medium is mixed with trisodium citrate solution. Before trisodium citrate solution is injected, the catheter should be thoroughly flushed with saline if a contrast medium has previously been injected through it.

  5. Characterization of a continuous agitated cell reactor for oxygen dependent biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Toftgaard Pedersen, Asbjørn; de Carvalho, Teresa Melo; Sutherland, Euan; Rehn, Gustav; Ashe, Robert; Woodley, John M

    2017-02-10

    Biocatalytic oxidation reactions employing molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor are difficult to conduct in a continuous flow reactor because of the requirement for high oxygen transfer rates. In this paper, the oxidation of glucose to glucono-1,5-lactone by glucose oxidase was used as a model reaction to study a novel continuous agitated cell reactor (ACR). The ACR consists of ten cells interconnected by small channels. An agitator is placed in each cell, which mixes the content of the cell when the reactor body is shaken by lateral movement. Based on tracer experiments, a hydrodynamic model for the ACR was developed. The model consisted of ten tanks-in-series with back-mixing occurring within and between each cell. The back-mixing was a necessary addition to the model in order to explain the observed phenomenon that the ACR behaved as two continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) at low flow rates, while it at high flow rates behaved as the expected ten CSTRs in series. The performance of the ACR was evaluated by comparing the steady state conversion at varying residence times with the conversion observed in a stirred batch reactor of comparable size. It was found that the ACR could more than double the overall reaction rate, which was solely due to an increased oxygen transfer rate in the ACR caused by the intense mixing as a result of the spring agitators. The volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient, kL a, was estimated to be 344 h(-1) in the 100 mL ACR, opposed to only 104 h(-1) in a batch reactor of comparable working volume. Interestingly, the large deviation from plug flow behavior seen in the tracer experiments was found to have little influence on the conversion in the ACR, since both a plug flow reactor (PFR) model and the backflow cell model described the data sufficiently well. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;9999: 1-9. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Isohaline Salinity Budget of the North Atlantic Salinity Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, F.; Bachman, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study (SPURS) field experiment was designed as a multi-scale investigation of the processes that give rise to the North Atlantic subtropical salinity maximum. The choice of control volume influences the processes that dominate budgets of ocean properties. In this study we analyze the salinity budget of the North Atlantic subtropical salinity maximum region for control volumes bounded by isohaline surfaces. We provide closed budgets based on output from a high-resolution numerical simulation, and partial budgets based on climatological analyses of observations. With this choice of control volume, advection is eliminated from the instantaneous volume integrated salt budget, and time mean advection eliminated from the budget evaluated from time-averaged data. In this way, the role of irreversible mixing processes in the maintenance and variability of the salinity maximum are more readily revealed. By carrying out the analysis with near instantaneous and time-filtered model output, the role of mesoscale eddies in stirring and mixing for this region is determined. We find that the small-scale mixing acting on enhanced gradients generated by the mesoscale eddies is approximately equal to that acting on the large-scale gradients estimated from climatological mean conditions. The isohaline salinity budgets can be related to water mass transformation rates associated with surface forcing and mixing processes in a straightforward manner. We find that the surface net evaporation in the North Atlantic salinity maximum region accounts for a transformation of 7 Sv of water into the salinity maximum in the simulation, whereas the estimate based on climatological observations is 10 Sv.

  7. Successful treatment for psychomotor agitation in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder with trazodone-risperidone combination: a case report.

    PubMed

    Narita, Zui; Takano, Harumasa; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki

    2017-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a relapsing disease that typically affects the spinal cord and optic nerves. So far, a few studies have reported pharmacologic treatment for psychiatric symptoms in patients with NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD). However, no literature has described psychomotor agitation associated with the disease and its treatment. We report an 84-year-old woman with NMOSD whose psychomotor agitation was effectively treated with a combination of trazodone and risperidone. Our observation suggests the ability of augmentation of antipsychotic drugs with antidepressants to ameliorate psychotic symptoms associated with NMOSD.

  8. Efficacy of Memantine for Agitation in Alzheimer’s Dementia: A Randomised Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Chris; Crugel, Monica; Maidment, Ian; Auestad, Bjorn Henrik; Coulton, Simon; Treloar, Adrian; Ballard, Clive; Boustani, Malaz; Katona, Cornelius; Livingston, Gill

    2012-01-01

    Background Agitation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is common and associated with poor patient life-quality and carer distress. The best evidence-based pharmacological treatments are antipsychotics which have limited benefits with increased morbidity and mortality. There are no memantine trials in clinically significant agitation but post-hoc analyses in other populations found reduced agitation. We tested the primary hypothesis, memantine is superior to placebo for clinically significant agitation, in patients with moderate-to-severe AD. Methods and Findings We recruited 153 participants with AD and clinically significant agitation from care-homes or hospitals for a double-blind randomised-controlled trial and 149 people started the trial of memantine versus placebo. The primary outcome was 6 weeks mixed model autoregressive analysis of Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). Secondary outcomes were: 12 weeks CMAI; 6 and 12 weeks Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPI), Clinical Global Impression Change (CGI-C), Standardised Mini Mental State Examination, Severe Impairment Battery. Using a mixed effects model we found no significant differences in the primary outcome, 6 weeks CMAI, between memantine and placebo (memantine lower −3.0; −8.3 to 2.2, p = 0.26); or 12 weeks CMAI; or CGI-C or adverse events at 6 or 12 weeks. NPI mean difference favoured memantine at weeks 6 (−6.9; −12.2 to −1.6; p = 0.012) and 12 (−9.6; −15.0 to −4.3 p = 0.0005). Memantine was significantly better than placebo for cognition. The main study limitation is that it still remains to be determined whether memantine has a role in milder agitation in AD. Conclusions Memantine did not improve significant agitation in people with in moderate-to-severe AD. Future studies are urgently needed to test other pharmacological candidates in this group and memantine for neuropsychiatric symptoms. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00371059 Trial Registration International

  9. The Effects of Nutrient Concentration, Addition of Thickeners, and Agitation Speed on Liquid Fermentation of Steinernema feltiae

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Luis G.; Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Hazir, Selcuk; Jackson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematode production in liquid fermentation still requires improvements to maximize efficiency, yield, and nematode quality. Therefore, this study was aimed at developing a more suitable liquid medium for mass production of Steinernema feltiae, by assessing the effects of nutrient concentration, thickeners (primarily agar), and agitation speed on infective juvenile (IJ) yield. Base medium (BM) contained yeast extract (2.3%), egg yolk (1.25%), NaCl (0.5%), and corn oil (4%). All media were inoculated with Xenorhabdus bovienii, and 2 d later, with 2-d-old S. feltiae juveniles. For the nutrient concentration experiment, we evaluated the base medium versus a modified base medium containing all the components, but with 3× concentrations of yeast extract (6.9%), egg yolk (3.75%), and corn oil (12%). The nematodes and bacteria were cultured in 150-ml Erlenmeyer flasks containing 50 ml of liquid medium at (25°C) and 180 rpm on a rotary shaker incubator. To assess the effect of thickeners, IJs were inoculated in BM with agar (0.2%), carrageen (0.2%), and carboxymethyl cellulose (0.2% and 0.5%). The addition of 3× more nutrients relative to the BM resulted in a significantly lower yield of nematodes. For agar and agitation speed experiments, five levels of agar in the BM (0%, 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, and 0.8% agar) and two agitation speeds (180 and 280 rpm) were evaluated for production. Increasing agitation speed from 180 to 280 rpm and higher levels of agar in the medium (> 0.2%) significantly increased the yield of bacteria. At the lower agitation speed, media amended with 0.4% and 0.6% agar produced higher nematode yields compared to media without agar. Media with 0.2% and 0.8% agar resulted in intermediate levels of nematode production. At the higher agitation speed, media supplemented with 0.8% agar resulted in the lowest yield of nematodes when compared to the other media tested. Results indicated that increasing nutrient concentration levels was

  10. Successful treatment for psychomotor agitation in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder with trazodone–risperidone combination: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Zui; Takano, Harumasa; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki

    2017-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a relapsing disease that typically affects the spinal cord and optic nerves. So far, a few studies have reported pharmacologic treatment for psychiatric symptoms in patients with NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD). However, no literature has described psychomotor agitation associated with the disease and its treatment. We report an 84-year-old woman with NMOSD whose psychomotor agitation was effectively treated with a combination of trazodone and risperidone. Our observation suggests the ability of augmentation of antipsychotic drugs with antidepressants to ameliorate psychotic symptoms associated with NMOSD. PMID:28331329

  11. Assessment of Electromagnetic Stirrer Agitated Liquid Metal Flows by Dynamic Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ščepanskis, Mihails; Sarma, Mārtiņš; Vontobel, Peter; Trtik, Pavel; Thomsen, Knud; Jakovičs, Andris; Beinerts, Toms

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents qualitative and quantitative characterization of two-phase liquid metal flows agitated by the stirrer on rotating permanent magnets. The stirrer was designed to fulfill various eddy flows, which may have different rates of solid particle entrapment from the liquid surface and their homogenization. The flow was characterized by visualization of the tailored tracer particles by means of dynamic neutron radiography, an experimental method well suited for liquid metal flows due to low opacity of some metals for neutrons. The rather high temporal resolution of the image acquisition (32 Hz image acquisition rate) allows for the quantitative investigation of the flows up to 30 cm/s using neutron particle image velocimetry. In situ visualization of the two-phase liquid metal flow is also demonstrated.

  12. Assessment of Electromagnetic Stirrer Agitated Liquid Metal Flows by Dynamic Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ščepanskis, Mihails; Sarma, Mārtiņš; Vontobel, Peter; Trtik, Pavel; Thomsen, Knud; Jakovičs, Andris; Beinerts, Toms

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents qualitative and quantitative characterization of two-phase liquid metal flows agitated by the stirrer on rotating permanent magnets. The stirrer was designed to fulfill various eddy flows, which may have different rates of solid particle entrapment from the liquid surface and their homogenization. The flow was characterized by visualization of the tailored tracer particles by means of dynamic neutron radiography, an experimental method well suited for liquid metal flows due to low opacity of some metals for neutrons. The rather high temporal resolution of the image acquisition (32 Hz image acquisition rate) allows for the quantitative investigation of the flows up to 30 cm/s using neutron particle image velocimetry. In situ visualization of the two-phase liquid metal flow is also demonstrated.

  13. Remediating agitation-induced antibody aggregation by eradicating exposed hydrophobic motifs

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rutilio H; Latypov, Ramil F; De Imus, Cyr; Carter, Jane; Wilson, Zien; Manchulenko, Kathy; Brown, Michael E; Ketchem, Randal R

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies must encompass drug product suitable attributes to be commercially marketed. An undesirable antibody characteristic is the propensity to aggregate. Although there are computational algorithms that predict the propensity of a protein to aggregate from sequence information alone, few consider the relevance of the native structure. The Spatial Aggregation Propensity (SAP) algorithm developed by Chennamsetty et. al. incorporates structural and sequence information to identify motifs that contribute to protein aggregation. We have utilized the algorithm to design variants of a highly aggregation prone IgG2. All variants were tested in a variety of high-throughput, small-scale assays to assess the utility of the method described herein. Many variants exhibited improved aggregation stability whether induced by agitation or thermal stress while still retaining bioactivity. PMID:25484048

  14. Genetic transformation of Platymonas ( Tetraselmis) subcordiformis (Prasinophyceae, Chlorophyta) using particle bombardment and glass-bead agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yulin; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Jinfeng; Li, Fuchao; Chen, Yingjie; Zheng, Guoting; Qin, Song

    2012-05-01

    Platymonas ( Tetraselmis) subcordiformis is a unicellular marine green alga. It was found to be very sensitive to the herbicide Basta through a sensitivity test indicating it could be employed as a selective agent. The bar gene is a practicable and selectable marker gene. The vector containing the expression cassette of the bar gene was transferred to P. subcordiformis by both particle bombardment and glass-bead agitation and transformants were then selected using Basta. Finally, Southern blotting analysis indicated that the bar gene had been successfully integrated into the nuclear genome of P. subcordiformis using both of the transgenic techniques, with the transformation efficiency of the glass-bead method being slightly higher than that of particle bombardment. This is the first report on stable transformation of P. subcordiformis, and will improve fundamental research and enlarge application of this alga.

  15. Reactor concepts for atomic layer deposition on agitated particles: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Longrie, Delphine Deduytsche, Davy; Detavernier, Christophe

    2014-01-15

    The number of possible applications for nanoparticles has strongly increased in the last decade. For many applications, nanoparticles with different surface and bulk properties are necessary. A popular surface modification technique is coating the particle surface with a nanometer thick layer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is known as a reliable method for depositing ultrathin and conformal coatings. In this article, agitation or fluidization of the particles is necessary for performing ALD on (nano)particles. The principles of gas fluidization of particles will be outlined, and a classification of the gas fluidization behavior of particles based on their size and density will be given. Following different reactor concepts that have been designed to conformally coat (nano)particles with ALD will be described, and a concise overview will be presented of the work that has been performed with each of them ending with a concept reactor for performing spatial ALD on fluidized particles.

  16. Theoretical estimate of the effect of thermal agitation on ribosome motion generated by stochastic microswimming.

    PubMed

    González-García, José S

    2016-11-04

    The effect of thermal agitation on ribosome motion is evaluated through the Péclet number, assuming that the ribosome is self-propelled along the mRNA during protein synthesis by a swimming stroke consisting of a cycle of stochastically-generated ribosome configurations involving its two subunits. The ribosome velocity probability distribution function is obtained, giving an approximately normal distribution. Its mean and variance together with an estimate of the in vivo free diffusion coefficient of the ribosome and using only configuration changes of small size, give a Péclet number similar to motor proteins and microorganisms. These results suggest the feasibility of the stochastic microswimming hypothesis to explain ribosome motion.

  17. TEP on the tide in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus): effects of progressively changing salinity and prior acclimation to intermediate or cycling salinity.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chris M; Grosell, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Transepithelial potentials (TEP) were measured in killifish, acclimated to freshwater (FW), seawater (SW), 33% S: W or cycling salinities relevant to tidal cycles in an estuary, and subsequently subjected to salinity changes in progressive or random order. Random compared to progressive salinity changes in an upward or downward direction in FW- and SW-acclimated fish, respectively, did not greatly influence responses to salinity change. Fish acclimated to SW or 33% SW as well as those acclimated to cycling salinities behaved similarly (TEP more positive than +15 mV in 100% SW, decreasing to approximately 0 mV at 20-40% SW, and more negative than -30 mV in FW). In contrast, FW-acclimated fish displayed a less pronounced TEP response to salinity (0 mV in FW through 20% SW, increasing thereafter to values more positive than +10 mV at 100% SW). We conclude that when evaluated under estuarine tidal conditions, the killifish gill exhibits adaptive electrical characteristics, opposing Na(+) loss at low salinity and favouring Na(+) extrusion at high salinity, changes explained at least in part by the Cl(-) to Na(+) permeability ratio. Thus animals living in the estuaries can move to lower and higher salinities for short periods with little physiological disturbance, but this ability is lost after acclimation to FW.

  18. Reducing fischer-tropsch catalyst attrition losses in high agitation reaction systems

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2001-01-01

    A method for reducing catalyst attrition losses in hydrocarbon synthesis processes conducted in high agitation reaction systems; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst; a catalyst produced by such method; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support; and a catalyst support produced by such method. The inventive method of reducing catalyst attrition losses comprises the step of reacting a synthesis gas in a high agitation reaction system in the presence of a catalyst. In one aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support including an amount of titanium effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support which has been treated, after calcination, with an acidic, aqueous solution. The acidic aqueous solution preferably has a pH of not more than about 5. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support wherein the cobalt has been applied to the .gamma.-alumina support by totally aqueous, incipient wetness-type impregnation. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support with an amount of a lanthana promoter effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support produced from boehmite having a crystallite size, in the 021 plane, in the range of from about 30 to about 55 .ANG.ngstrons. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst comprises the step of treating a .gamma.-alumina support, after calcination of and before adding catalytic material to the support, with an acidic solution effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support comprises the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina with an acidic, aqueous

  19. A comparison of postoperative emergence agitation between sevoflurane and thiopental anesthesia induction in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Son, Ji-Seon; Jang, Eunjoo; Oh, Min Wook; Lee, Ji-Hye; Han, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was performed to compare the incidence of emergence agitation (EA) between inhalation and intravenous anesthesia induction in children after sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods In this prospective and double-blind study, 100 children aged 3 to 7 years were enrolled. Subjects were randomly assigned to the sevoflurane (Group S) or thiopental (Group T) anesthesia induction groups. Anesthesia was induced using 8% sevoflurane and 4-6 mg/kg thiopental in Groups S and T, respectively. Anesthesia was maintained with nitrous oxide and sevoflurane. The children were evaluated at 5 and 20 min after arrival in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) with a four-point agitation scale and the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale. The incidence of EA and administration of the rescue agent were recorded. Results The incidence of EA was significantly lower in Group T compared to Group S at 5 min after PACU arrival (3/49 patients, 6% vs. 12/47 patients, 26%, P = 0.019). However, there was no difference between the two groups at 20 min after PACU arrival (23/49 vs. 19/47 patients in Group T vs. Group S, P = 0.425). The overall incidence of EA was 60% (28/47 patients) in Group S and 41% (20/49 patients) in Group T (P = 0.102). The number of children who received propofol as a rescue agent was significantly lower in Group T (Group S: 14/47 vs. Group T: 5/49, P = 0.031). Conclusions Intravenous anesthesia induction with thiopental reduced the incidence of EA in the early PACU period compared to inhalation induction with sevoflurane in 3- to 7-year-old children undergoing sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:26257850

  20. Impact of pharmaceutical care on pain and agitation in a medical intensive care unit in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Dilokpattanamongkol, Pitchaya; Tangsujaritvijit, Viratch; Suansanae, Thanarat; Suthisisang, Chuthamanee

    2017-03-29

    Background Currently, a lack of pharmaceutical care exists concerning pain and agitation in medical intensive care units (MICU) in Thailand. Pharmaceutical care focusing on analgesics/sedatives would improve clinical outcomes. Objective To investigate the impact of pharmaceutical care of pain and agitation on ICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, ventilator days and mortality. Setting The MICU of a university hospital. Method A before/after study was conducted on mechanically ventilated patients receiving analgesics/sedatives. Medical chart reviews and data collection were conducted in the retrospective group (no pharmacists involved). In the prospective group, pharmacists involved with the critical care team helped select analgesics/sedatives for individual patients. Main outcome measure ICU LOS Results In total, 90 and 66 patients were enrolled in retrospective and prospective groups, respectively. The median duration of ICU LOS was reduced from 10.00 (2.00-72.00) in the retrospective group to 6.50 days (2.00-30.00) in the prospective group (p = 0.002). The median hospital stay was reduced from 30.50 days (2.00-119.00) in the retrospective group to 17.50 days (2.00-110.00) in the prospective group (p < 0.001). Also, the median ventilator days was reduced from 14.00 days (2.00-90.00) to 8.50 days (1.00-45.00), p = 0.008. Mortality was 53.03% in the prospective group and 46.67% in the retrospective group (p = 0.432). Conclusion Pharmacist participation in a critical care team resulted in a significant reduction in the duration of ICU LOS, hospital LOS and ventilator days, but not mortality.

  1. Entropy correlates with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankur; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Trikha, Anjan; Rewari, Vimi; Chandralekha

    2014-04-01

    Sedation is routinely used in intensive care units. However due to absence of objective scoring systems like Bispectral Index and entropy our ability to regulate the degree of sedation is limited. This deficiency is further highlighted by the fact that agitation scores used in intensive care units (ICU) have no role in paralyzed patients. The present study compares entropy as a sedation scoring modality with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients in an ICU. Twenty-seven, mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients of either sex, 16-65 years of age, were studied over a period of 24 h. They received a standard sedation regimen consisting of a bolus dose of propofol 0.5 mg/kg and fentanyl 1 lg/kg followed by infusions of propofol and fentanyl ranging from 1.5 to 5 mg/kg/h and 0.5 to 2.0 lg/kg/h, respectively. Clinically relevant values of RASS for optimal ICU sedation (between 0 and -3) in non-paralyzed patients were compared to corresponding entropy values, to find if any significant correlation exists between the two. These entropy measurements were obtained using the Datex-Ohmeda-M-EntropyTM module. This module is presently not approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for monitoring sedation in ICU. A total of 527 readings were obtained. There was a statistically significant correlation between the state entropy (SE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.334, p\\0.0001]; response entropy (RE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.341, p\\0.0001]). For adequate sedation as judged by a RASS value of 0 to -3, the mean SE was 57.86 ± 16.50 and RE was 67.75 ± 15.65. The present study illustrates that entropy correlates with RASS (between scores 0 and -3) when assessing the level of sedation in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

  2. Nonthermal microwave effects revisited: on the importance of internal temperature monitoring and agitation in microwave chemistry.

    PubMed

    Herrero, M Antonia; Kremsner, Jennifer M; Kappe, C Oliver

    2008-01-04

    The concept of nonthermal microwave effects has received considerable attention in recent years and is the subject of intense debate in the scientific community. Nonthermal microwave effects have been postulated to result from a direct stabilizing interaction of the electric field with specific (polar) molecules in the reaction medium that is not related to a macroscopic temperature effect. In order to probe the existence of nonthermal microwave effects, four synthetic transformations (Diels-Alder cycloaddition, alkylation of triphenylphosphine and 1,2,4-triazole, direct amide bond formation) were reevaluated under both microwave dielectric heating and conventional thermal heating. In all four cases, previous studies have claimed the existence of nonthermal microwave effects in these reactions. Experimentally, significant differences in conversion and/or product distribution comparing the conventionally and microwave-heated experiments performed at the same measured reaction temperature were found. The current reevaluation of these reactions was performed in a dedicated reactor setup that allowed accurate internal reaction temperature measurements using a multiple fiber-optic probe system. Using this technology, the importance of efficient stirring and internal temperature measurement in microwave-heated reactions was made evident. Inefficient agitation leads to temperature gradients within the reaction mixture due to field inhomogeneities in the microwave cavity. Using external infrared temperature sensors in some cases results in significant inaccuracies in the temperature measurement. Applying the fiber-optic probe temperature monitoring device, a critical reevaluation of all four reactions has provided no evidence for the existence of nonthermal microwave effects. Ensuring efficient agitation of the reaction mixture via magnetic stirring, no significant differences in terms of conversion and selectivity between experiments performed under microwave or oil bath

  3. CT Mapping of the Distribution of Saline During Radiofrequency Ablation with Perfusion Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillams, A.R. Lees, W.R.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. During radiofrequency (RF) ablation, adjunctive saline increases the size of the ablation zone and therefore electrodes that simultaneously deliver current and saline have been developed, but the addition of saline also results in an irregular ablation zone. Our aim was to study the distribution of saline during RF ablation. Methods. Four patients were treated: 3 with liver metastases and 1 with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Two different perfusion electrodes were used: a high-perfusion-rate, straight electrode (Berchtold, Germany) and a low-perfusion-rate, expandable electrode (RITA Medical Systems, USA). The saline perfusate was doped with non-ionic contrast medium to render it visible on CT and the electrical conductivity was measured. CT scans were obtained of each electrode position prior to ablation and repeated after ablation. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed 18-24 hr later to demonstrate the ablation zone. All treatments were carried out according to the manufacturer's recommended protocol. Results. The addition of a small quantity of non-ionic contrast did not alter the electrical conductivity of the saline. Contrast-doped saline extravasated beyond the tumor in all 3 patients with metastases but was limited in the patient with HCC. In some areas where saline had extravasated there was reduced enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT consistent with tissue ablation. One patient treated with the high-perfusion-rate system sustained a jejunal perforation requiring surgery. Conclusion. Saline can extravasate beyond the tumor and with the high-perfusion-rate system this resulted in an undesirable extension of the ablation zone and a complication.

  4. Effect of thermal agitation on the switching field distributions of CoPtCr-SiO2 perpendicular recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimatsu, T.; Kondo, T.; Mitsuzuka, K.; Watanabe, S.; Aoi, H.; Muraoka, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2006-04-01

    The effect of thermal agitations on the switching field distribution (SFD) of CoPtCr-SiO2 perpendicular media was investigated. Dc demagnetizing (DCD) magnetization curves and minor dc demagnetizing (M-DCD) magnetization curves were measured at applied field sweep rates of ~10 and ~108 Oe/s. We estimated the SFD from the difference between the DCD and M-DCD curves, and defined them as ΔHr/Hr (at ~10 Oe/s) and ΔHrP/HrP (at ~108 Oe/s). The values of ΔHrP/HrP were found to be 60%-70% of ΔHr/Hr. The difference between ΔHrP/HrP and ΔHr/Hr should be caused by thermal agitation of the magnetization. The influence of the distribution of the thermal agitation on SFD was calculated using the distribution of the grain volumes. It is concluded that the SFD measured at vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM) time scales is significantly influenced by thermal agitation of the magnetization, and reduction of the grain size distribution is the most effective way to reduce the SFD at VSM time scales.

  5. Music therapy: A nonpharmacological approach to the care of agitation and depressive symptoms for nursing home residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Ray, Kendra D; Mittelman, Mary S

    2015-10-29

    Depression, agitation, and wandering are common behaviors associated with dementia and frequently observed among nursing home residents. Even with pharmacological treatment, behaviors often persist, hindering quality of life for elders, their family, and paid caregivers. This study examined the use of music therapy for treatment of these symptoms among 132 people with moderate to severe dementia in nursing homes. Participants were evaluated for depressive symptoms, agitation, and wandering to determine their predominate behavior. There were two assessments, two weeks apart, prior to intervention, followed by a two-week intervention, and two follow-up assessments, also two weeks apart. A repeated measures ANOVA determined that after two weeks of music therapy, symptoms of depression and agitation were significantly reduced; there was no change for wandering. Multivariate analyses confirmed a relationship between music therapy and change in neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with dementia. Results suggest widespread use of music therapy in long-term care settings may be effective in reducing symptoms of depression and agitation.

  6. How to Radicalize Graduate Students: Take These Simple Steps to Intimidate, Alienate, and Agitate Your Own Flock of Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffen, Heather

    2011-01-01

    As the recession, budget cuts, endowment losses, and Republican governors gut university funding, campuses across the country have become host to occupations, union actions, and demonstrations. One can take steps to intimidate, alienate, and agitate a flock of graduate students. The author discusses steps that offer simple ways to rile up and…

  7. The effects of nutrient concentration, addition of thickeners, and agitation speed on liquid fermentation of Steinernema feltiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Therefore, this study was aimed at developing a more suitable liquid media for mass production of Steinernema feltiae, by assessing the effects of nutrient concentration, media viscosity, and agitation speed on infective juvenile (IJ) yield. For all the experiments, the base medium contained yeast ...

  8. Drivers of long-term ocean salinity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durack, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has highlighted near-surface salinity pattern amplification (PA) and depth-integrated halosteric (salinity-driven) sea-level changes in long-term change estimates from observations and climate model simulations. These suggest that fresh ocean regions are becoming fresher, and salty regions saltier in part to a response to evaporation minus precipitation (E-P; water cycle) changes driven by a warming Earth. While near-surface salinity changes relate to the climatological mean (fresh becoming fresher, salty becoming saltier), subsurface salinity changes have also been recorded. Similar to the near-surface, these changes represent a complex three-dimensional structure that is different in each ocean basin. Like near-surface changes, subsurface salinity changes also share a strong correspondence with the subsurface climatological mean. When integrated through the depth of observed data coverage (0-2000 m), these show a clear basin halosteric contrast - a freshening Pacific and an enhancing Atlantic salinity a fingerprint of change that has been successfully attributed to anthropogenic climate change in previous studies. As long-term observational insights are limited, model simulations provide a novel method to assess and validate observed change estimates, and attribute the drivers of long-term change. Using the CMIP (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 & 5) 20C3M/historical (20th century), SRES/RCP (future 21st century) and pre-industrial (piControl; unforced) simulations, these basin salinity change contrasts are investigated and their relationship to simulated E-P (water cycle) changes is diagnosed. The intrinsic variability of both modelled salinity and E-P change fields is investigated to ascertain an envelope of unforced (piControl) climate variability, an estimate currently unavailable for long-term observational estimates due to poor measurement coverage. These unforced distributions are compared to those of weakly- (20C3M

  9. Communication Capacity Scale and Agitation Distress Scale to measure the severity of delirium in terminally ill cancer patients: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Morita, T; Tsunoda, J; Inoue, S; Chihara, S; Oka, K

    2001-05-01

    Although valid measurement of the severity of terminal delirium is of great importance in palliative care settings, existing instruments have considerable limitations. In order to quantify patients' communication capacity and agitated behaviour, two new operational observer-rating scales, the Communication Capacity Scale (Communication Scale) and Agitation Distress Scale (Agitation Scale), were validated. Thirty terminally ill cancer patients diagnosed with delirium were evaluated simultaneously by two palliative care physicians blinded to each other's coding using the Communication Scale and Agitation Scale. In addition, the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS), Delirium Rating Scale (DRS) and Sedation Scale were rated by one researcher. Both scales achieved high internal consistency and inter-rater reliability with Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.91 and 0.96, and Cohen's kappa values on each item of 0.72-1.00. The principal components analysis resulted in the emergence of only one component for each scale. The total score on the Communication Scale was highly associated with that of the MDAS (rho = 0.78), Sedation Scale (rho = 0.86), and cognitive items from the MDAS and DRS (rho = 0.83). The whole score on the Agitation Scale was significantly correlated with that of the DRS (rho = 0.61) and agitation items from the MDAS and DRS (rho = 0.61). In conclusion, the Communication Scale and Agitation Scale have acceptable reliability and validity to quantify patients' communication capacity and agitation symptoms of terminally ill cancer patients with delirium.

  10. 40 CFR 230.25 - Salinity gradients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Salinity gradients. 230.25 Section 230... Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.25 Salinity gradients. (a) Salinity... fresh or salt water may change existing salinity gradients. For example, partial blocking of...

  11. 40 CFR 230.25 - Salinity gradients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Salinity gradients. 230.25 Section 230... Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.25 Salinity gradients. (a) Salinity... fresh or salt water may change existing salinity gradients. For example, partial blocking of...

  12. 40 CFR 230.25 - Salinity gradients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Salinity gradients. 230.25 Section 230... Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.25 Salinity gradients. (a) Salinity... fresh or salt water may change existing salinity gradients. For example, partial blocking of...

  13. 40 CFR 230.25 - Salinity gradients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Salinity gradients. 230.25 Section 230... Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.25 Salinity gradients. (a) Salinity... fresh or salt water may change existing salinity gradients. For example, partial blocking of...

  14. Salinity is Reduced Below the Evaporation Front During Soil Salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, M.; Carrera, J.; Olivella, S.; Massana, J.; Saaltink, M. W.; Ayora, C.; Lloret, A.

    2009-04-01

    Nearly 50% of irrigated lands in arid and semi-arid regimes have salinization problems. Salinization is generally caused by salts carried to the soil surface by capillary rising water and occurs under very dry conditions, when vapor fluxes become the main water flux mechanism. Despite its global importance, actual salinization mechanisms are only poorly understood. Soil salinization is generally studied by means of water and salt balances without entering on small scale processes. This may suffice for explaining large scale behavior but hardly for designing remediation practices. The objective of this work is to study the solute transport under evaporation conditions. We have performed laboratory experiments and modelled them. We have built open sand columns initially saturated with an epsomite (MgSO4•7H2O) solution. Evaporation was driven by an infrared lamp and proceeded until the overall saturation fell down to 0.32. Results imply that water vapor flows not only upwards above the evaporation front, but also downwards beneath this front, where it condensates. Condensation causes the dilution of the solution. That is, concentrations fall below the initial values. The experiments have been modelled with the program Retraso-CodeBright, which couples non isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport. Reproducing the observations required modifying the standard retention and relative permeability functions to include oven dry conditions. The model reproduces the observed concentration, water content and temperature profiles along the column and confirms the existence of condensation and decrease of salt concentration below the evaporation front. The model also allows us to distinguish the relevance between the advective and diffusive vapor fluxes, showing that the latter is, by far, the largest. The mechanism displays positives feedbacks, as condensation will be most intense in areas of highest salinity, thus diluting saline water that may have infiltrated.

  15. The plasma membrane transport systems and adaptation to salinity.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mohamed Magdy F

    2014-11-15

    Salt stress represents one of the environmental challenges that drastically affect plant growth and yield. Evidence suggests that glycophytes and halophytes have a salt tolerance mechanisms working at the cellular level, and the plasma membrane (PM) is believed to be one facet of the cellular mechanisms. The responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in contrasting species/cultivars were discussed. The review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances describing the crucial roles that the PM transport systems have in plant adaptation to salt. Several lines of evidence were presented to demonstrate the correlation between the PM transport proteins and adaptation of plants to high salinity. How alterations in these transport systems of the PM allow plants to cope with the salt stress was also addressed. Although inconsistencies exist in some of the information related to the responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in different species/cultivars, their key roles in adaptation of plants to high salinity is obvious and evident, and cannot be precluded. Despite the promising results, detailed investigations at the cellular/molecular level are needed in some issues of the PM transport systems in response to salinity to further evaluate their implication in salt tolerance.

  16. The Contrastive Analysis Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardhaugh, Ronald

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the strong contrastive analysis hypothesis, which claims predictive powers for contrastive analysis, and the weak hypothesis, which claims only that contrastive analysis can help account for observed difficulties in second language learning. The strong hypothesis is found untenable, and difficulties with the weak hypothesis are discussed…

  17. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  18. Use of seagrass meadows as an adaptation measure to climate change for reducing port agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Lin, Jue; Pau Sierra, Joan; Gracia, Vicenç; Casas-Prat, Merce; Virgili, Marc

    2014-05-01

    One of the best-known consequences of the greenhouse effect and the resulting global warming is sea-level rise. However, sea level rise is not the only process of concern to coastal communities. The greenhouse effect and the complex interactions in atmospheric processes is expected to produce changes in near-surface wind and pressure patterns, which in turn can affect the pattern of another important coastal driver: the wave field. Changes in wave conditions can affect the wave pattern within harbours as shown by Casas-Prat and Sierra (2012), increasing port agitation and, as a consequence, reducing the safety and comfort of the users, decreasing operation performance or even generating port inactivity. This effect will be enhanced by an increase in mean sea level. To avoid costly structural measure there are "green" options such as sea-grass that can attenuate wave energy (Koftis et al., 2013), since their roots induce sea bottom roughness and their stems and leaves increase the drag coefficient. The combined effect of vegetation is, thus, to create drag forces that dissipate part of the energy from incoming waves. Casas-Prat and Sierra (2013) showed that wave patterns may change in the future in certain areas of the Catalan Coast (northwestern Mediterranean) and as a consequence port agitation could be affected by changes in wave height or direction as well in those areas. The suggested "green" measures can help to prevent potential negative effects on port operations. The adaptive approach, depending on the downscaled climatic projections, would combine vegetation (as for example the existence of a sea-grass meadow in the vicinity of the harbour entrance) with some structural reinforcement if required. In this paper, the wave projections of Casas-Prat and Sierra (2013) are used together with a Boussinesq-type model to study wave propagation in several harbours of the Catalan Coast. This analysis of harbour oscillations is carried out for present conditions and

  19. Predictors of Nursing Home Admission among Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Psychosis and/or Agitation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Edward Alan; Schneider, Lon S.; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to identify factors that predict nursing home placement among community-dwelling Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients with psychosis or agitation in a randomized clinical trial. Methods 418 participants with AD enrolled in the CATIE-AD trial of anti-psychotic medications and having no evidence of nursing home use at baseline were followed 9 months post-random assignment using data provided by caregiver proxy. χ2 tests, t-tests and Cox proportional hazard modeling were used to examine the baseline correlates of nursing home use. Results Of outpatients with no prior nursing home use, 15.0% were placed in a nursing home in the 9 months following baseline, with the average time to placement being 122 days. Bivariate analyses indicate that those with prior outpatient mental health use at study entry were more likely to be admitted; so too were those with worse physical functioning—lower scores on the AD Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADCS-ADL), lower utility scores on the Health Utility Index (HUI)-III, and worse cognition on the Mini-Mental State Examination. Controlling for other factors, non-Hispanic white race (hazard ratio [HR]=2.16) and prior mental health use (HR=1.87) increased the likelihood of admission. Those with higher ADCS-ADL scores were less likely to be placed (HR=0.97). Conclusion Factors leading to nursing home entry among psychotic/agitated AD patients are similar to the general population, though high incidence of nursing home entry highlights the importance of accounting for such utilization in health economic studies of AD outcomes. It also highlights the importance of using information on ADLs and other characteristics to develop profiles identifying those at greater or lesser risk of nursing home entry and, in so doing inform population planning associated with AD and identification of those patients and caregivers who might benefit most from interventions to prevent eventual placement

  20. Plant responses to heterogeneous salinity: growth of the halophyte Atriplex nummularia is determined by the root-weighted mean salinity of the root zone.

    PubMed

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Barrett-Lennard, Edward G; Colmer, Timothy D

    2012-11-01

    Soil salinity is generally spatially heterogeneous, but our understanding of halophyte physiology under such conditions is limited. The growth and physiology of the dicotyledonous halophyte Atriplex nummularia was evaluated in split-root experiments to test whether growth is determined by: (i) the lowest; (ii) the highest; or (iii) the mean salinity of the root zone. In two experiments, plants were grown with uniform salinities or horizontally heterogeneous salinities (10-450 mM NaCl in the low-salt side and 670 mM in the high-salt side, or 10 mM NaCl in the low-salt side and 500-1500 mM in the high-salt side). The combined data showed that growth and gas exchange parameters responded most closely to the root-weighted mean salinity rather than to the lowest, mean, or highest salinity in the root zone. In contrast, midday shoot water potentials were determined by the lowest salinity in the root zone, consistent with most water being taken from the least negative water potential source. With uniform salinity, maximum shoot growth was at 120-230 mM NaCl; ~90% of maximum growth occurred at 10 mM and 450 mM NaCl. Exposure of part of the roots to 1500 mM NaCl resulted in an enhanced (+40%) root growth on the low-salt side, which lowered root-weighted mean salinity and enabled the maintenance of shoot growth. Atriplex nummularia grew even with extreme salinity in part of the roots, as long as the root-weighted mean salinity of the root zone was within the 10-450 mM range.

  1. [Contrast sonography of the urinary tract in children].

    PubMed

    Schneider, K; Jablonski, C; Fendel, H

    1986-02-01

    In 14 healthy children contrast sonography of the bladder was performed with various solutions prior to voiding cystourethrography. The solutions were introduced into the bladder via a bladder catheter. The contrast effects which occurred with iothalamate injections in the urine-filled bladder, with urine injections in the iothalamate-filled bladder, with injections of 0.9% saline solution, and with air injections into the iothalamate-filled bladder were sonographically demonstrated. In echogenicity and duration the intravesical air contrast was superior to all mixture contrasts in the bladder resulting from injections of the respective fluids.

  2. Effects of Hypotonic Saline Loading in Hydrated Dog: Evidence for a Saline-induced Limit on Distal Tubular Sodium Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Richard M.; Abramson, Ruth G.; Kahn, Thomas; Levitt, Marvin F.

    1967-01-01

    We performed studies on dogs under hydrated conditions, utilizing the rate of free water formation (CH2O) as an index of the rate of distal tubular sodium transport. Since CH2O could be progressively increased with no evidence of a maximal rate during loading with hypotonic (2.5%) mannitol, it was concluded that there is no limit on distal tubular sodium transport during mannitol loading. In contrast, during hypotonic (0.45%) saline loading CH2O rose initially, but as urine flow (V) exceeded 25% of the filtered load CH2O attained maximal levels (up to 20% of the filtered load) and remained stable as V increased to 50% of the filtered load. It was concluded that saline loading progressively inhibits proximal sodium reabsorption. Initially, the distal tubule absorbes a large fraction of the proximal rejectate and sodium excretion rises slightly. Eventually, an alteration in distal sodium transport appears which culminates in a maximal rate or transport limit. This distal transport limit provoked by saline loading could not be characterized by a classical Tm as seen with glucose and does not seem to be consequent to high rates of flow through the distal tubule. Regardless of the precise nature of this limit, the major increment in sodium excretion develops during saline loading only after saline alters the capacity of the distal tubule to transport sodium. PMID:6027084

  3. Removal of copper powder from aqueous solution by cementation using an agitated vessel.

    PubMed

    Amin, N K; El-Ashtouky, E-S Z; Abdelwahab, O

    2014-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the removal of copper powder from aqueous solution by cementation on a stationary disc placed inside an agitated vessel. The influence of several parameters on the rate of cementation, such as initial copper sulphate concentration, impeller rotational speed, presence of surfactant (Triton X-100), distance between the disc and the impeller, type of blade turbine and presence of baffles, has been investigated. The rate of cementation was found to increase with increasing impeller rotational speed and initial copper sulphate concentration. On the other hand, the rate decreases with increasing distance between the disc and the impeller. The rate of cementation was inhibited in solutions containing Triton X-100. Performance of a four-blade 90 degree turbine with regard to the rate of copper cementation was superior to the performance of a four-blade 45 degree pitched turbine. The present data can be correlated in terms of mass transfer coefficient of cementation as Sh = 0.905 Sc0.33 Re0.89 (d/l)0.41 (four-blade 90 degree turbine); Sh = 0.815 Sc0.33Re0.79 (d/l)0.47 (four-blade 45 degree pitched turbine), for the conditions 2035 < Sc < 2810 and 35,000 < Re < 179,000.

  4. Critical review and meta-analysis of serial agitated dilutions in experimental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Linde, K; Jonas, W B; Melchart, D; Worku, F; Wagner, H; Eitel, F

    1994-07-01

    1. We conducted an overview and quantitative meta-analysis of all experimental literature on the protective effects of serial agitated dilutions (SADs) of toxin preparations. 2. Articles were systematically collected and evaluated for scientific quality using pre-defined methodological criteria and then independently analysed for validity. 3. We found 105 publications exploring the effects of SAD preparations in toxicological systems. 4. The quality of evidence in these studies was low with only 43% achieving one half of the maximum possible quality score and only 31% reported in a fashion that permitted reevaluation of the data. 5. Very few studies were independently replicated using comparable models. 6. Among the high quality studies, positive effects were reported 50% more often than negative effects. 7. Four of 5 outcomes meeting quality and comparability criteria for meta-analysis showed positive effects from SAD preparations. 8. Average percent protection over controls in these preparations was 19.7 (95%Cl 6.2-33.2). 9. Further research with special attention to methodological detail and independent replication should be done.

  5. Recovery of Copper from Effluents by Cementation on Aluminum in a Multirotating Cylinder-Agitated Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, M. H.; El-Ashtoukhy, E.-S. Z.; Bassyouni, M.

    2016-02-01

    Recovery of copper from synthetic waste solution using cementation technique in a new agitated vessel employing multirotating aluminum cylinders impeller was investigated. Parameters studied are cylinder diameter, rotation speed, initial copper ion concentrations, and effect of surfactants. Solution analysis and scanning electron microscopy were employed to investigate the kinetic and mechanism of the process. The rate of recovery was found to be at its maximum value at the operating conditions of 350 rpm rotation speed, 5000 ppm initial CuSO4 concentration, and 1.2 cm cylinder diameter. All data were correlated by the dimensionless equation: {Sh} = 1.16 {Sc}^{0.33} {Re}^{0.63} ( {{d_{{c}} }/L} )^{0.54}, with an average deviation of ±8.5 pct and a standard deviation of 5.88 pct. Presence of nonylphenol ethoxylate surfactant in the solution decreased the rate of recovery by an amount ranging from 2.94 to 38.57 pct depending on the operating conditions. The present geometry gave higher rates of recovery compared to both the single rotating cylinder and rotating disc reactor.

  6. Stabilization of bovine insulin against agitation-induced aggregation using RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ravinder; Roy, Ipsita

    2013-08-16

    Stabilization of monomeric insulin is a primary requirement for preserving the efficacy of the final formulation. Degraded and/or aggregated protein as well as the presence of any of the conventional excipients can result in immunogenic or anaphylactic reactions, and reduced bioavailability of the protein drug. The aim of this work was to select novel RNA-based stabilizers of bovine insulin which would recognize and bind to the monomeric protein and help retain its bioactivity. RNA aptamers were selected by an in vitro selection method. They were screened for their ability to inhibit insulin fibrillation using agitation as a stress condition. The in vitro activity of insulin was determined by phosphorylation of downstream proteins in the cell. In vivo bioactivity was determined in a diabetic rat model. RNA aptamers, which bound to insulin with very low dissociation constants and high specificity, were selected. These sequences were aligned and consensus regions were found. The RNA sequences had no effect on the signalling cascade initiated by insulin. The bioactivity of insulin, as measured by its ability to lower plasma glucose level in a diabetic rat model, also remained unchanged. RNA aptamers are a novel class of protein stabilizers which have the ability to disrupt protein-protein interactions and hence inhibit protein aggregation. Their non-toxic and non-immunogenic nature makes such formulations safe for use.

  7. Successful child psychotherapy of attention deficit/hyperactive disorder: an agitated depression explanation.

    PubMed

    Seitler, Burton Norman

    2008-09-01

    Science tries to explain phenomena in ways that are demonstrable and replicable to develop logical, coherent, parsimonious, and predictive theoretical systems. Yet hyperactive children are given stimulants to "calm" them down, despite the fact that science would predict stimulants would increase hyperactivity. Bradley (1937, 1950) observed that half of the behavior-problem children to whom he administered a stimulant for one week became subdued. He called this finding paradoxical, speculating that inhibitory centers of the central nervous system were stimulated. While Bradley's assertion of a paradoxical reverse effect in children may be an empirical observation, it is not an explanation. The Attention Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) is inferred to exist from hyperactive behavior, which in turn, is inferred to be neurological in origin, a circular argument. An inevitable consequence of the belief in the hypothetical neurological etiology of ADHD is that children are typically given stimulants. Using the case of a seven-year old child, described as experiencing ADHD, who was treated successfully without medication as an illustration, the author provides an alternative, more parsimonious explanation of the etiology, suggesting that ADHD is related to agitated depression.

  8. Drying process optimization for an API solvate using heat transfer model of an agitated filter dryer.

    PubMed

    Nere, Nandkishor K; Allen, Kimberley C; Marek, James C; Bordawekar, Shailendra V

    2012-10-01

    Drying an early stage active pharmaceutical ingredient candidate required excessively long cycle times in a pilot plant agitated filter dryer. The key to faster drying is to ensure sufficient heat transfer and minimize mass transfer limitations. Designing the right mixing protocol is of utmost importance to achieve efficient heat transfer. To this order, a composite model was developed for the removal of bound solvent that incorporates models for heat transfer and desolvation kinetics. The proposed heat transfer model differs from previously reported models in two respects: it accounts for the effects of a gas gap between the vessel wall and solids on the overall heat transfer coefficient, and headspace pressure on the mean free path length of the inert gas and thereby on the heat transfer between the vessel wall and the first layer of solids. A computational methodology was developed incorporating the effects of mixing and headspace pressure to simulate the drying profile using a modified model framework within the Dynochem software. A dryer operational protocol was designed based on the desolvation kinetics, thermal stability studies of wet and dry cake, and the understanding gained through model simulations, resulting in a multifold reduction in drying time.

  9. Studies on heat transfer to Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in agitated vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triveni, B.; Vishwanadham, B.; Venkateshwar, S.

    2008-09-01

    Heat transfer studies to Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids are carried out in a stirred vessel fitted with anchor/turbine impeller and a coil for heating/cooling with an objective of determining experimentally the heat transfer coefficient of few industrially important systems namely castor oil and its methyl esters, soap solution, CMC and chalk slurries. The effect of impeller geometry, speed and aeration is investigated. Generalized Reynolds and Prandtl numbers are calculated using an apparent viscosity for non-Newtonian fluids. The data is correlated using a Sieder-Tate type equation. A trend of increase in heat transfer coefficient with RPM in presence and absence of solids has been observed. Relatively high values of Nusselt numbers are obtained for non-Newtonian fluids when aeration is coupled with agitation. The contribution of natural convection to heat transfer has been accounted for by incorporating the Grashof number. The correlations developed based on these studies are applied for design of commercial scale soponification reactor. Power per unit volume resulted in reliable design of a reactor.

  10. Phosphorus recovery from urine with different magnesium resources in an air-agitated reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Zhengyi; Mu, Jing; Zang, Haixing; Liu, Li

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) recovery through struvite formation from urine has gained increasing attention as an approach to alleviate the potential shortage of P. The concentration of magnesium (Mg) is lower than those of ammonium and ortho-phosphate in urine, so the cost of adding Mg is a major economic constraint for P recovery. This study aims at evaluating the potential of seawater and bittern as Mg resources to recover P from urine in an air-agitated reactor. Results indicate that effects of seawater and bittern on P recovery from urine are comparable to that of magnesium chloride, with an average crystal size of around 34 μm under an Mg/P molar ratio of 1.3. The average crystal size of the struvite crystals obtained from high P concentration urine with different Mg resources showed no significant difference, whereas larger crystal size was obtained from low P concentration urine with bittern as Mg resource. Analysis of mainly rod-like crystals produced in the reactor indicates the presence of pure struvite (>98.0% by weight) with small amounts of calcium (<1.39% by weight). Bittern is recommended as a suitable Mg resource for P recovery because of its high Mg content and the convenience it offers in terms of transportation and storage.

  11. Mechanical agitation induces counterintuitive aggregation of pre-dispersed carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ricardo M F; Buzaglo, Matat; Regev, Oren; Furó, István; Marques, Eduardo F

    2017-05-01

    Mechanical agitation is commonly used to fragment and disperse insoluble materials in liquids. However, here we show that when pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes pre-dispersed in water are subject to vortex-shaking for very short periods (typically 10-60s, power density ∼0.002WmL(-1)), re-aggregation counterintuitively occurs. The initial dispersions are produced using surfactants as dispersants and powerful tip sonication (∼1WmL(-1)) followed by centrifugation. Detailed imaging by light and electron microscopies shows that the vortex-induced aggregates consist of loose networks (1-10(2)μm in size) of intertwined tubes and thin bundles. The average aggregate size increases with vortexing time in an apparently logarithmic manner and depends on the dispersant used, initial concentration of nanotubes and size distribution of bundles. The aggregation is, nonetheless, reversible: if the vortex-shaken dispersions are mildly bath-sonicated (∼0.03WmL(-1)), the flocs break down and re-dispersal occurs. Molecular insight for the mechanism behind this surprising phenomenon is put forth.

  12. Soil disturbance as a driver of increased stream salinity in a semiarid watershed undergoing energy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Clark, Melanie L.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Holloway, JoAnn M.; McDougal, Robert R.

    2015-05-01

    Salinization is a global threat to the quality of streams and rivers, but it can have many causes. Oil and gas development were investigated as one of several potential causes of changes in the salinity of Muddy Creek, which drains 2470 km2 of mostly public land in Wyoming, U.S.A. Stream discharge and salinity vary with seasonal snowmelt and define a primary salinity-discharge relationship. Salinity, measured by specific conductance, increased substantially in 2009 and was 53-71% higher at low discharge and 33-34% higher at high discharge for the years 2009-2012 compared to 2005-2008. Short-term processes (e.g., flushing of efflorescent salts) cause within-year deviations from the primary relation but do not obscure the overall increase in salinity. Dissolved elements associated with increased salinity include calcium, magnesium, and sulfate, a composition that points to native soil salts derived from marine shales as a likely source. Potential causes of the salinity increase were evaluated for consistency by using measured patterns in stream chemistry, slope of the salinity-discharge relationship, and inter-annual timing of the salinity increase. Potential causes that were inconsistent with one or more of those criteria included effects from precipitation, evapotranspiration, reservoirs, grazing, irrigation return flow, groundwater discharge, discharge of energy co-produced waters, and stream habitat restoration. In contrast, surface disturbance of naturally salt-rich soil by oil and gas development activities, such as pipeline, road, and well pad construction, is a reasonable candidate for explaining the salinity increase. As development continues to expand in semiarid lands worldwide, the potential for soil disturbance to increase stream salinity should be considered, particularly where soils host substantial quantities of native salts.

  13. The salinity signature of the cross-shelf exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean: Satellite observations

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Raul A; Piola, Alberto R; Fenco, Harold; Matano, Ricardo P; Combes, Vincent; Chao, Yi; James, Corinne; Palma, Elbio D; Saraceno, Martin; Strub, P Ted

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-derived sea surface salinity (SSS) data from Aquarius and SMOS are used to study the shelf-open ocean exchanges in the western South Atlantic near 35°S. Away from the tropics, these exchanges cause the largest SSS variability throughout the South Atlantic. The data reveal a well-defined seasonal pattern of SSS during the analyzed period and of the location of the export of low-salinity shelf waters. In spring and summer, low-salinity waters over the shelf expand offshore and are transferred to the open ocean primarily southeast of the river mouth (from 36°S to 37°30′S). In contrast, in fall and winter, low-salinity waters extend along a coastal plume and the export path to the open ocean distributes along the offshore edge of the plume. The strong seasonal SSS pattern is modulated by the seasonality of the along-shelf component of the wind stress over the shelf. However, the combined analysis of SSS, satellite-derived sea surface elevation and surface velocity data suggest that the precise location of the export of shelf waters depends on offshore circulation patterns, such as the location of the Brazil Malvinas Confluence and mesoscale eddies and meanders of the Brazil Current. The satellite data indicate that in summer, mixtures of low-salinity shelf waters are swiftly driven toward the ocean interior along the axis of the Brazil/Malvinas Confluence. In winter, episodic wind reversals force the low-salinity coastal plume offshore where they mix with tropical waters within the Brazil Current and create a warmer variety of low-salinity waters in the open ocean. Key Points Satellite salinity sensors capture low-salinity detrainment events from shelves SW Atlantic low-salinity detrainments cause highest basin-scale variability In summer low-salinity detrainments cause extended low-salinity anomalies PMID:26213672

  14. Soil disturbance as a driver of increased stream salinity in a semiarid watershed undergoing energy development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Clark, Melanie L.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Holloway, JoAnn M.; Mcdougal, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Salinization is a global threat to the quality of streams and rivers, but it can have many causes. Oil and gas development were investigated as one of several potential causes of changes in the salinity of Muddy Creek, which drains 2470 km2 of mostly public land in Wyoming, U.S.A. Stream discharge and salinity vary with seasonal snowmelt and define a primary salinity-discharge relationship. Salinity, measured by specific conductance, increased substantially in 2009 and was 53-71% higher at low discharge and 33-34% higher at high discharge for the years 2009-2012 compared to 2005-2008. Short-term processes (e.g., flushing of efflorescent salts) cause within-year deviations from the primary relation but do not obscure the overall increase in salinity. Dissolved elements associated with increased salinity include calcium, magnesium, and sulfate, a composition that points to native soil salts derived from marine shales as a likely source. Potential causes of the salinity increase were evaluated for consistency by using measured patterns in stream chemistry, slope of the salinity-discharge relationship, and inter-annual timing of the salinity increase. Potential causes that were inconsistent with one or more of those criteria included effects from precipitation, evapotranspiration, reservoirs, grazing, irrigation return flow, groundwater discharge, discharge of energy co-produced waters, and stream habitat restoration. In contrast, surface disturbance of naturally salt-rich soil by oil and gas development activities, such as pipeline, road, and well pad construction, is a reasonable candidate for explaining the salinity increase. As development continues to expand in semiarid lands worldwide, the potential for soil disturbance to increase stream salinity should be considered, particularly where soils host substantial quantities of native salts.

  15. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein: A delicate sentinel elevated in drug-free acutely agitated patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shujuan; Tan, Yunlong; Yao, Shangwu; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Xiong, Jing

    2016-12-30

    Increased levels of high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) have been reported in schizophrenia, but to date, no study is designed to examine serum hsCRP in acutely agitated patients with schizophrenia, an extreme state that requires immediate diagnosis and medical treatment. Serum hsCRP levels were assessed in 32 clinically acutely agitated patients and 42 healthy control subjects matched for demographic properties. Further, serum hsCRP levels in acutely agitated patients were compared with control subjects and with the levels after the patients were treated with anti-psychiatric medications. Meanwhile, the influence of clinical subtypes, family history, and gender, as well as the levels of white blood cell (WBC) counts were also considered. In results, serum hsCRP levels were significantly higher in acutely agitated patients with schizophrenia than in healthy subjects. The elevation of serum hsCRP in patients was not affected by gender, family history (P>0.05), and clinical classification of schizophrenia (P>0.05). However, the elevation of hsCRP was suppressed by the medical treatment for schizophrenia with acute agitation (P<0.05). In addition, WBC counts, another inflammation-related indicator, were also increased significantly in acutely agitated patients compared with healthy subjects, consistent with the elevation of serum hsCRP. In conclusion, hsCRP is an important indicator of immune alterations in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and has potential to be developed into a sensitive marker for the acute agitation in schizophrenia.

  16. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  17. Mycelial bacteria of saline soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2008-10-01

    The actinomycetal complexes of saline soils comprise the representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, the number of which are hundreds and thousands of CFU/g soil. Complexes of mycelial bacteria in saline soils are poorer in terms of number (by 1-3 orders of magnitude) and taxonomic composition than the complexes of the zonal soil types. A specific feature of the actinomycetal complexes of saline soils is the predominance of halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes that well grow at pH 8-9 and concentrations of NaCl close to 5%. Actinomycetes in saline soils grow actively, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m in 1 gram of soil. The haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes grow fast and inhibit the formation of spores at pH 9 and high concentrations of salts (Na2SO4 and MgCl2, 5%) as compared to their behavior on a neutral medium with a salt concentration of 0.02%. They are characterized by the maximal radial growth rate of colonies on an alkaline medium with 5% NaCl.

  18. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  19. Low resistivity, low contrast pays

    SciTech Connect

    Sneider, R.M.; Kulha, J.T. |

    1996-08-01

    Major hydrocarbon accumulations have been produced over the past 40 years in low resistivity, low contrast (LRLC) sands in the Gulf of Mexico Basin (GOM). LRLC reservoirs were commonly considered wet, tight, misidentified as a shale or overlooked, but are being re-evaluated now in other world basins, including Latin America. Seismic response, drill cuttings, cores, log response, petrophysical models, and production testing provide an integrated LRLC evaluation. Causes of LRLC pay in the GOM include: laminated clean sands with shales; silts or shaly sands; clay-coated sands; glauconitic sands; sands with interstitial dispersed clay; sands with disseminated pyrite or other conductive minerals; clay-lined burrows; clay clasts; altered volcanic/feldspathic framework grains; and very fine-grained sand with very saline water. LRLC depositional systems include: deepwater fans, with levee-channel complexes; delta front and toe deposits; shingle turbidites; and alluvial and deltaic channel fills. Geological and petrophysical models developed in the GOM for evaluation of LRLC pay are applicable in Latin America. An Archie clean sand or Waxman-Smits shaly sand model are commonly used to evaluate LRLC anomalies. Often, shaly sand models are not necessarily suited for LRLC evaluation. The Archie lithology exponent (m) and saturation exponent (n) for many LRLC reservoirs range from 1.4 to 1.85, and 1.2 to 1.8, respectively. In thinly laminated LRLC reservoirs, net sand distribution is identified with high resolution logging tools, rock examination and interval testing.

  20. Agitation Rate and Time for Complete Dissolution in BCS Biowaivers Based on Investigation of a BCS Biowaiver for Dexketoprofen Tablets.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Gordon, John; Gwaza, Luther; Mangas-Sanjuan, V; Álvarez, Covadonga; Torrado, Juan J

    2015-09-08

    The objective of the present work is to investigate the validity of the existing requirements for BCS biowaivers of immediate release products containing a class I drug in relation to the agitation rate (50 or 75 rpm in the paddle apparatus) and the time limit for complete dissolution (30 min) in the current biowaivers in vitro dissolution tests. Further, the possibility of extensions will be examined since it has been proposed that the time limit for complete dissolution should be revised to 60 min, and also, if cone formation occurs with apparatus 2 at 50 rpm, then a higher agitation rate is acceptable to eliminate it. The development of four generic dexketoprofen immediate release tablets is described. Dexketoprofen is the eutomer of ketoprofen. According to the BCS, dexketoprofen is a class I drug. Three out of the four products failed to show bioequivalence for Cmax in the initial bioequivalence study conducted with the product despite similar but nonrapid dissolution profiles at 50 rpm in the paddle apparatus, or similar and very rapid dissolution profiles at 75 rpm. In conclusion, these data indicate that BCS biowaivers for class I drugs should be granted only when dissolution with the paddle apparatus is complete in 30 min at 50 rpm. The time limit for complete dissolution should not be extended to 60 min. Furthermore, the agitation rate should not be increased to 75 rpm, even in the case of a coning effect.

  1. The Closing Group: Therapeutic recreation for nursing home residents with dementia and accompanying agitation and/or anxiety.

    PubMed

    Putman, Laraine; Wang, Jen-Ting

    2007-01-01

    Long-term care residents who have a dementia diagnosis could account for as much 50% of a nursing home's population. Often residents with dementia experience a distressing behavioral symptom that affects the resident experiencing the symptom(s), other nursing home residents, visitors, and staff. The Closing Group intervention was developed as a nonpharmacological alternative that aims to reduce agitation and anxiety, increase socialization, decrease restraint use, and decrease antipsychotic drug use for selected residents with a dementia diagnosis. The program was based on an understanding of the contributing factors to agitation and anxiety, the nursing home environment as it relates to behavior, and the offering of resident-driven recreational activities. The purpose of this 2-year study was, with use of multiple measures, to examine the extent to which the Closing Group intervention has met its goals. A sample of 16 long-term care residents was offered attendance at the group. Findings in the area of reducing agitation and anxiety were encouraging to the extent that further study with larger samples is needed.

  2. Ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Atkinson, Nathan S. S.; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) plays an important role in imaging of the mediastinum and abdominal organs. Since the introduction of US contrast agents (UCA) for transabdominal US, attempts have been made to apply contrast-enhanced US techniques also to EUS. Since 2003, specific contrast-enhanced imaging was possible using EUS. Important studies have been published regarding contrast-enhanced EUS and the characterization of focal pancreatic lesions, lymph nodes, and subepithelial tumors. In this manuscript, we describe the relevant UCA, their application, and specific image acquisition as well as the principles of image tissue characterization using contrast-enhanced EUS. Safety issues, potential future developments, and EUS-specific issues are reviewed. PMID:27824024

  3. Do Bartonella Infections Cause Agitation, Panic Disorder, and Treatment-Resistant Depression?

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, James L.; Burkland, Glenn A.; Langhoff, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Bartonella is an emerging infection found in cities, suburbs, and rural locations. Routine national labs offer testing for only 2 species, but at least 9 have been discovered as human infections within the last 15 years. Some authors discuss Bartonella cases having atypical presentations, with serious morbidity considered uncharacteristic of more routine Bartonella infections. Some atypical findings include distortion of vision, abdominal pain, severe liver and spleen tissue abnormalities, thrombocytopenic purpura, bone infection, arthritis, abscesses, heart tissue and heart valve problems. While some articles discuss Bartonella as a cause of neurologic illnesses, psychiatric illnesses have received limited attention. Case reports usually do not focus on psychiatric symptoms and typically only as incidental comorbid findings. In this article, we discuss patients exhibiting new-onset agitation, panic attacks, and treatment-resistant depression, all of which may be attributed to Bartonella. Methods Three patients receiving care in an outpatient clinical setting developed acute onset personality changes and agitation, depression, and panic attacks. They were retrospectively examined for evidence of Bartonella infections. The medical and psychiatric treatment progress of each patient was tracked until both were significantly resolved and the Bartonella was cured. Results The patients generally seemed to require higher dosing of antidepressants, benzodiazepines, or antipsychotics in order to function normally. Doses were reduced following antibiotic treatment and as the presumed signs of Bartonella infection remitted. All patients improved significantly following treatment and returned to their previously healthy or near-normal baseline mental health status. Discussion New Bartonella species are emerging as human infections. Most do not have antibody or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic testing at this time. Manual differential examinations are of

  4. Hypnotic Depth and the Incidence of Emergence Agitation and Negative Postoperative Behavioral Changes

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, Debra J.; Twite, Mark D.; Zuk, Jeannie; Pan, Zhaoxing; Wallen, Brett; Friesen, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Emergence agitation (EA) and negative postoperative behavioral changes (NPOBC) are common in children, though the etiology remains unclear. We investigated whether longer times under deep hypnosis as measured by Bispectral Index™ (BIS) monitoring would positively correlate with a greater incidence of EA in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU) and a greater occurrence of NPOBC in children after discharge. Methods We enrolled 400 children, ages 1–12 years old, scheduled for dental procedures under general anesthesia. All children were induced with high concentration sevoflurane and BIS monitoring was continuous from induction through recovery in the PACU. A BIS reading <45 was considered deep hypnosis. The presence of EA was assessed in the PACU using the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale (PAED). NPOBC were assessed using the Post-Hospital Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ), completed by parents 3–5 days post-operatively. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, with a p<0.05 considered statistically significant. Results The incidence of EA was 27% (99/369) and the incidence of NPOBC was 8.8% (28/318). No significant differences in the incidence of EA or NPOBC were seen with respect to length of time under deep hypnosis as measured by a BIS value of less than 45. Conclusion Our data revealed no significant correlation between the length of time under deep hypnosis (BIS<45) and the incidence of EA or NPOBC. Within this population, these behavioral disturbances do not appear to be related to the length of time under a deep hypnotic state as measured by the BIS. PMID:19968807

  5. Flow-induced agitations create a granular fluid: effective viscosity and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Kiri; van Hecke, Martin

    2012-06-01

    We fluidize a granular medium with localized stirring in a split-bottom shear cell. We probe the mechanical response of quiescent regions far from the main flow by observing the vertical motion of cylindrical probes rising, sinking, and floating in the grains. First, we find that the probe motion suggests that the granular material behaves in a liquid-like manner: high-density probes sink and low-density probes float at the depth given by Archimedes' law. Second, we observe that the drag force on moving probes scales linearly with their velocity, which allows us to define an effective viscosity for the system. This effective viscosity is inversely proportional to the rotation rate of the disk which drives the split bottom flow. Moreover, the apparent viscosity depends on radius and mass of the probe: despite the linear dependence of the drag forces on sinking speed of the probe, the granular medium is not simply Newtonian, but exhibits a more complex rheology. The decrease of viscosity with filling height of the cell, combined with the poor correlation between local strain rate and viscosity, suggests that the fluid-like character of the material is set by agitations generated in the stirred region: the relation between applied stress and observed strain rate in one location depends on the strain rate in another location. We probe the nature of the granular fluctuations that we believe mediates these nonlocal interactions by characterizing the small and random up and down motion that the probe experiences. These Gaussian fluctuations exhibit a mix of diffusive and subdiffusive behavior at short times and saturate at a value of roughly 1/10th of a grain diameter longer times, consistent with the picture of a random walker in a potential well. The product of crossover time and effective viscosity is constant, evidencing a direct link between fluctuations and viscosity.

  6. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti, Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  7. Effect of ketamine combined with butorphanol on emergence agitation of postoperative patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang; Liu, Shuncui; Chen, Zhenyi; Lin, Shaoli

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the effect of ketamine combined with butorphanol on emergence agitation (EA) in postoperative gastric cancer patients. Materials and methods A total of 150 patients with gastric cancer were included and divided into group B (1 mg butorphanol before anesthesia induction, n=50), group K (1 mg/kg ketamine, n=50), and group C (1 mg butorphanol combined with 1 mg/kg ketamine, n=50). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) at the end of operation, just before extubation (T0) and at 0 minute (T1), 5 minutes (T2), and 30 minutes (T3) after extubation were compared. Statistical analysis of recovery time, extubation time, time in postanesthesia care unit, and EA incidence and adverse reactions were performed. Results There were no differences among groups with respect to MAP and HR at T0 and T1 (P>0.05). Compared with patients in group C, significant reduction of MAP and HR were observed in groups K and B at T2 and T3 (P<0.05), while no differences were found between group K and group B (P>0.05). Recovery time, extubation time, time in postanesthesia care unit, and incidence of EA in group C were significantly less than those in groups K and B (P<0.05), but no differences were observed between group K and group B (P>0.05). Total incidence of adverse reactions were significantly increased in group K compared to those in groups C and B (P<0.05). Conclusion Injection of ketamine combined with butorphanol before anesthesia induction was more effective than injection of ketamine or butorphanol separately in the prevention of EA. PMID:27217761

  8. Effects of physical agitation on yield of greenhouse-grown soybean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Agronomic and horticultural crop species experience reductions in growth and harvestable yield after exposure to physical agitation (also known as mechanical stress), as by wind or rain. A greenhouse study was conducted to test the influence of mechanical stress on soybean yield and to determine if exposure to mechanical stress during discrete growth periods has differential effects on seed yield. A modified rotatory shaker was used to apply seismic (i.e., shaking) stress. Brief, periodic episodes of seismic stress reduced stem length, total seed dry weight, and seed number of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Lodging resistance was greater for plants stressed during vegetative growth or throughout vegetative and reproductive growth than during reproductive growth only. Seed dry weight yield was reduced regardless of the timing or duration of stress application, but was lowest when applied during reproductive development. Seismic stress applied during reproductive growth stages R1 to R2 (Days 3 to 4) was as detrimental to seed dry weight accumulation as was stress applied during growth stages R1 to R6 (Days 39 to 42). Seed dry weight per plant was highly correlated with seed number per plant, and seed number was correlated with the seed number of two- and three-seeded pods. Dry weight per 100 seeds was unaffected by seismic-stress treatment. Growth and yield reductions resulting from treatments applied only during the vegetative stage imply that long-term mechanical effects were induced, from which the plants did not fully recover. It is unclear which yield-controlling physiological processes were affected by mechanical stress. Both transient and long-term effects on yield-controlling processes remain to be elucidated.

  9. Barbiturate Induction for the Prevention of Emergence Agitation after Pediatric Sevoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Haruna; Kimoto, Ayako; Beppu, Yuki; Yoshimura, Maki; Kojima, Toshiyuki; Fukano, Taku

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Emergence agitation (EA) is a common and troublesome problem in pediatric patients recovering from general anesthesia. The incidence of EA is reportedly higher after general anesthesia maintained with sevoflurane, a popular inhalational anesthetic agent for pediatric patients. We conducted this prospective, randomized, double-blind study to test the effect of an intravenous ultra-short–acting barbiturate, thiamylal, administered during induction of general anesthesia on the incidence and severity of EA in pediatric patients recovering from Sevoflurane anesthesia. METHODS: Fifty-four pediatric patients (1 to 6 years of age) undergoing subumbilical surgeries were randomized into 2 groups. Patients received either intravenous thiamylal 5mg/kg (Group T) or inhalational Sevoflurane 5% (Group S) as an anesthetic induction agent. Following induction, general anesthesia was maintained with Sevoflurane and nitrous oxide (N2O) in both groups. To control the intra- and post-operative pain, caudal block or ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric block was performed. The incidence and severity of EA were evaluated by using the Modified Objective Pain Scale (MOPS: 0 to 6) at 15 and 30 min after arrival in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). RESULTS: Fifteen minutes after arrival in the PACU, the incidence of EA in Group T (28%) was significantly lower than in Group S (64%; p = 0.023) and the MOPS in Group T (median 0, range 0 to 6) was significantly lower than in Group S (median 4, range 0 to 6; p = 0.005). The interval from discontinuation of Sevoflurane to emergence from anesthesia was not significantly different between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Thiamylal induction reduced the incidence and severity of EA in pediatric patients immediately after Sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:26472953

  10. Patterns of fungal diversity and composition along a salinity gradient.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Devon J; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2011-03-01

    Estuarine salinity gradients are known to influence plant, bacterial and archaeal community structure. We sequenced 18S rRNA genes to investigate patterns in sediment fungal diversity (richness and evenness of taxa) and composition (taxonomic and phylogenetic) along an estuarine salinity gradient. We sampled three marshes--a salt, brackish and freshwater marsh--in Rhode Island. To compare the relative effect of the salinity gradient with that of plants, we sampled fungi in plots with Spartina patens and in plots from which plants were removed 2 years prior to sampling. The fungal sediment community was unique compared with previously sampled fungal communities; we detected more Ascomycota (78%), fewer Basidiomycota (6%) and more fungi from basal lineages (16%) (Chytridiomycota, Glomeromycota and four additional groups) than typically found in soil. Across marshes, fungal composition changed substantially, whereas fungal diversity differed only at the finest level of genetic resolution, and was highest in the intermediate, brackish marsh. In contrast, the presence of plants had a highly significant effect on fungal diversity at all levels of genetic resolution, but less of an effect on fungal composition. These results suggest that salinity (or other covarying parameters) selects for a distinctive fungal composition, and plants provide additional niches upon which taxa within these communities can specialize and coexist. Given the number of sequences from basal fungal lineages, the study also suggests that further sampling of estuarine sediments may help in understanding early fungal evolution.

  11. Functional tradeoffs underpin salinity-driven divergence in microbial community composition.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Chris L; Larsson, John; Yooseph, Shibu; Ininbergs, Karolina; Goll, Johannes; Asplund-Samuelsson, Johannes; McCrow, John P; Celepli, Narin; Allen, Lisa Zeigler; Ekman, Martin; Lucas, Andrew J; Hagström, Åke; Thiagarajan, Mathangi; Brindefalk, Björn; Richter, Alexander R; Andersson, Anders F; Tenney, Aaron; Lundin, Daniel; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Nylander, Johan A A; Brami, Daniel; Badger, Jonathan H; Allen, Andrew E; Rusch, Douglas B; Hoffman, Jeff; Norrby, Erling; Friedman, Robert; Pinhassi, Jarone; Venter, J Craig; Bergman, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial community composition and functional potential change subtly across gradients in the surface ocean. In contrast, while there are significant phylogenetic divergences between communities from freshwater and marine habitats, the underlying mechanisms to this phylogenetic structuring yet remain unknown. We hypothesized that the functional potential of natural bacterial communities is linked to this striking divide between microbiomes. To test this hypothesis, metagenomic sequencing of microbial communities along a 1,800 km transect in the Baltic Sea area, encompassing a continuous natural salinity gradient from limnic to fully marine conditions, was explored. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that salinity is the main determinant of dramatic changes in microbial community composition, but also of large scale changes in core metabolic functions of bacteria. Strikingly, genetically and metabolically different pathways for key metabolic processes, such as respiration, biosynthesis of quinones and isoprenoids, glycolysis and osmolyte transport, were differentially abundant at high and low salinities. These shifts in functional capacities were observed at multiple taxonomic levels and within dominant bacterial phyla, while bacteria, such as SAR11, were able to adapt to the entire salinity gradient. We propose that the large differences in central metabolism required at high and low salinities dictate the striking divide between freshwater and marine microbiomes, and that the ability to inhabit different salinity regimes evolved early during bacterial phylogenetic differentiation. These findings significantly advance our understanding of microbial distributions and stress the need to incorporate salinity in future climate change models that predict increased levels of precipitation and a reduction in salinity.

  12. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  13. The Aquarius Salinity Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank; Hilburn, Kyle; Lagerloef, Gary; Le Vine, David

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this presentation gives an overview over the Aquarius salinity retrieval algorithm. The instrument calibration [2] converts Aquarius radiometer counts into antenna temperatures (TA). The salinity retrieval algorithm converts those TA into brightness temperatures (TB) at a flat ocean surface. As a first step, contributions arising from the intrusion of solar, lunar and galactic radiation are subtracted. The antenna pattern correction (APC) removes the effects of cross-polarization contamination and spillover. The Aquarius radiometer measures the 3rd Stokes parameter in addition to vertical (v) and horizontal (h) polarizations, which allows for an easy removal of ionospheric Faraday rotation. The atmospheric absorption at L-band is almost entirely due to molecular oxygen, which can be calculated based on auxiliary input fields from numerical weather prediction models and then successively removed from the TB. The final step in the TA to TB conversion is the correction for the roughness of the sea surface due to wind, which is addressed in more detail in section 3. The TB of the flat ocean surface can now be matched to a salinity value using a surface emission model that is based on a model for the dielectric constant of sea water [3], [4] and an auxiliary field for the sea surface temperature. In the current processing only v-pol TB are used for this last step.

  14. Influence of apheresis container size on the maintenance of platelet in vitro storage properties after a 30-h interruption of agitation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stephen J; Skripchenko, Andrey; Seetharaman, Shalini; Myrup, Andrew; Kurtz, James; Thomas-Montgomery, Dedeene; Awatefe, Helen; Moroff, Gary

    2010-08-01

    We have previously conducted studies investigating maintenance of apheresis platelet in vitro quality measures during storage under simulated shipping conditions in which agitation was interrupted. This study examines the effect of increasing bag surface area on the preservation of in vitro platelet properties during storage with continuous agitation and with a 30 h interruption of agitation. Apheresis platelets were collected in 100% plasma with the Amicus separator to provide two identical platelet products, each with approximately 4-5 x 10(11) platelets. After collection, the volume was divided equally between 1.0 and 1.3 L PL2410 containers. In an initial study, both products were continuously agitated. In a second study, both products were subjected to a single 30-h period of interrupted agitation between Days 2 and 3 of storage by placement in a standard shipping box at room temperature. In each study, units were assayed during storage for standard in vitro platelet quality measures. Platelets stored in the 1.3 L container maintained slightly greater mean pH during 7 day storage with either continuous agitation (n=6) or with a 30-h interruption of agitation (n=12) than those of similarly treated identical platelets stored in the 1.0 L container. Most noteworthy, in experiments with products stored in the 1.0 L container in which there was a large decrease in pH to levels <6.7 or <6.3 on days 5 or 7, respectively, the pH in the matched product stored in the 1.3 L container was substantially greater (0.17+/-06 and 0.37+/-0.09 pH units greater, n=4, respectively). Other measures showed either small differences or comparability of platelet in vitro parameters with storage in the two containers after an interruption of agitation.

  15. 1064-nm Nd:YAG and 980-nm Diode Laser EDTA Agitation on the Retention of an Epoxy-Based Sealer to Root Dentin.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Helena Suleiman de; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Rached-Júnior, Fuad Jacob; Oliveira, Ligia Teixeira de; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa; Raucci-Neto, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Root canal irrigants are used to minimize the negative effects of smear layer on endodontic sealer retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of agitation of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with ultrasonic, 1064-nm Nd:YAG and 980-nm diode laser on the retention of an epoxy-based sealer to the root canal walls. Forty single-rooted bovine teeth were instrumented with ProTaper rotary system and divided into four groups according to the final irrigation protocol (n = 10): (1) 17% EDTA (control); (2) 17% EDTA with 50-s ultrasonic agitation; (3) 17% EDTA with 50-s diode laser (2-W) agitation; and (4) 17% EDTA with 50-s Nd:YAG (1.5-W) laser agitation. After endodontic filling with gutta-percha F5 master cone and Sealer 26, the roots were sectioned at the cervical, middle, and apical root thirds to obtain 1.5-mm slices. Push-out tests were performed using a universal testing machine at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). Apical root thirds had significant higher retention values than cervical and middle thirds (p < 0.05). EDTA with 1064-nm Nd:YAG or 980-nm diode laser presented the highest retention values and was significantly different from EDTA with ultrasonic agitation and EDTA only (p < 0.05). Adhesive failures were predominant to EDTA only group. Mixed failures were predominant to all agitation groups. 1064-nm Nd:YAG and 980-nm diode laser EDTA agitation enhanced the retention of the epoxy-based sealer to the root canal walls compared with that due to EDTA only or EDTA with ultrasonic agitation.

  16. Phase-contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W; Wilkins, S W

    1998-01-01

    For the past 100 years, the paradigm for radiography has been premised on absorption as the sole means of contrast formation and on ray optics as the basis for image interpretation. A new conceptual approach to radiography has been developed that includes phase (ie, refractive) contrast and requires wave optics for proper treatment. This new approach greatly increases the amount of information that can be obtained with radiographic techniques and is particularly well suited to the imaging of soft tissue and of very small features in biologic samples. A key feature of the present technique of phase-contrast radiography is the use of a microfocus x-ray source about an order of magnitude (< or = 20 microm) smaller than that used in conventional radiography. Phase-contrast radiography offers a number of improvements over conventional radiography in a clinical setting, especially in soft-tissue imaging. These improvements include increased contrast resulting in improved visualization of anatomic detail, reduced absorbed dose to the patient, inherent image magnification and high spatial resolution, use of harder x rays, and relative ease of implementation. More technologically advanced detectors are currently being developed and commercialized, which will help fully realize the considerable potential of phase-contrast imaging.

  17. Optimization of aeration and agitation rate for lipid and gamma linolenic acid production by Cunninghamella bainieri 2A1 in submerged fermentation using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Saad, Normah; Abdeshahian, Peyman; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2014-01-01

    The locally isolated filamentous fungus Cunninghamella bainieri 2A1 was cultivated in a 5 L bioreactor to produce lipid and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). The optimization was carried out using response surface methodology based on a central composite design. A statistical model, second-order polynomial model, was adjusted to the experimental data to evaluate the effect of key operating variables, including aeration rate and agitation speed on lipid production. Process analysis showed that linear and quadratic effect of agitation intensity significantly influenced lipid production process (P < 0.01). The quadratic model also indicated that the interaction between aeration rate and agitation speed had a highly significant effect on lipid production (P < 0.01). Experimental results showed that a lipid content of 38.71% was produced in optimum conditions using an airflow rate and agitation speed of 0.32 vvm and 599 rpm, respectively. Similar results revealed that 0.058(g/g) gamma-linolenic acid was produced in optimum conditions where 1.0 vvm aeration rate and 441.45 rpm agitation rate were used. The regression model confirmed that aeration and agitation were of prime importance for optimum production of lipid in the bioreactor.

  18. Effects of individualized versus classical "relaxation" music on the frequency of agitation in elderly persons with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Gerdner, L A

    2000-03-01

    Confusion and agitation in elderly patients are crucial problems. This study tested Gerdner's mid-range theory of individualized music intervention for agitation. An experimental repeated measures pretest-posttest crossover design compared the immediate and residual effects of individualized music to classical "relaxation" music relative to baseline on the frequency of agitated behaviors in elderly persons with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders (ADRD). Thirty-nine subjects were recruited from six long-term-care facilities in Iowa. The sample consisted of 30 women and 9 men (mean age 82 years) with severe cognitive impairment. Baseline data were collected for 3 weeks. Findings from the Modified Hartsock Music Preference Questionnaire guided the selection of individualized music. Group A (n = 16) received individualized music for 6 weeks followed by a 2-week "washout" period and 6 weeks of classical "relaxation" music. Group B (n = 23) received the same protocol but in reverse order. Music interventions were presented for 30 minutes, two times per week. The Modified Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory measured the dependent variable. A repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc test showed a significant reduction in agitation during and following individualized music compared to classical music. This study expands science by testing and supporting a theoretically based intervention for agitation in persons with ADRD.

  19. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: An investigation into the underlying sources of contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunlade, Olumide Beard, Paul

    2015-01-15

    . Conclusions: It is concluded that gadolinium based contrast agents, iron oxide particles, and single walled carbon nanotubes have little intrinsic merit as thermoacoustic contrast agents. Simple electrolytes such as saline which yield high contrast based on ionic conductivity provide much higher dielectric contrast per unit solute concentration and are likely to be significantly more effective as contrast agents.

  20. Impact of soil salinity on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi biodiversity and microflora biomass associated with Tamarix articulata Vahll rhizosphere in arid and semi-arid Algerian areas.

    PubMed

    Bencherif, Karima; Boutekrabt, Ammar; Fontaine, Joël; Laruelle, Fréderic; Dalpè, Yolande; Sahraoui, Anissa Lounès-Hadj

    2015-11-15

    Soil salinization is an increasingly important problem in many parts of the world, particularly under arid and semi-arid areas. Unfortunately, the knowledge about restoration of salt affected ecosystems using mycorrhizae is limited. The current study aims to investigate the impact of salinity on the microbial richness of the halophytic plant Tamarix articulata rhizosphere. Soil samples were collected from natural sites with increasing salinity (1.82-4.95 ds.m(-1)). Six arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species were isolated from the different saline soils and identified as Septoglomus constrictum, Funneliformis mosseae, Funneliformis geosporum, Funneliformis coronatum, Rhizophagus fasciculatus, and Gigaspora gigantea. The number of AMF spores increased with soil salinity. Total root colonization rate decreased from 65 to 16% but remained possible with soil salinity. Microbial biomass in T. articulata rhizosphere was affected by salinity. The phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) C16:1ω5 as well as i15:0, a15:0, i16:0, i17:0, a17:0, cy17:0, C18:1ω7 and cy19:0 increased in high saline soils suggesting that AMF and bacterial biomasses increased with salinity. In contrast, ergosterol amount was negatively correlated with soil salinity indicating that ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungal biomasses were reduced with salinity. Our findings highlight the adaptation of arbuscular and bacterial communities to natural soil salinity and thus the potential use of mycorrhizal T. articulata trees as an approach to restore moderately saline disturbed arid lands.

  1. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    SciTech Connect

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti, Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-08

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  2. Effect of aripiprazole lauroxil on agitation and hostility in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Citrome, Leslie; Du, Yangchun; Risinger, Robert; Stankovic, Srdjan; Claxton, Amy; Zummo, Jacqueline; Bose, Anjana; Silverman, Bernard L; Ehrich, Elliot W

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of aripiprazole lauroxil on hostility and aggressive behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Patients aged 18-70 years with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and currently experiencing an acute exacerbation or relapse were randomized to intramuscular (IM) aripiprazole lauroxil 441 mg (n=207), 882 mg (n=208), or placebo (n=207) for 12 weeks. In post-hoc analyses, hostility and aggression were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) Hostility item (P7) and a specific antihostility effect was assessed by adjusting for positive symptoms of schizophrenia, somnolence, and akathisia. The PANSS excited component score [P4 (Excitement), P7 (Hostility), G4 (Tension), G8 (Uncooperativeness), and G14 (Poor impulse control)], and the Personal and Social Performance scale disturbing and aggressive behavior domain were also assessed. Of the 147 patients who received aripiprazole lauroxil 882 mg and with a baseline PANSS Hostility item P7 more than 1, there was a significant (P<0.05) improvement versus placebo on the PANSS Hostility item P7 score by mixed-model repeated-measures at the end of the study, which remained significant when PANSS-positive symptoms and somnolence or akathisia were included as additional covariates. The proportion with PANSS Hostility item P7 more than 1 at endpoint was significantly (P<0.05) lower with aripiprazole lauroxil versus placebo (53.6, 46.1, and 66.3% for 441, 882 mg, and placebo). A significant (P<0.05) improvement was found with aripiprazole lauroxil versus placebo for change from baseline in the PANSS excited component score. The proportion of patients with aggressive behavior on the Personal and Social Performance scale was significantly (P<0.05) lower for aripiprazole lauroxil: 30.0% for 441 mg versus 44.1% for placebo (P=0.006) and 22.2% for 881 mg (P<0.001 versus placebo). Treatment with aripiprazole lauroxil resulted in decreases in agitation and hostility in patients

  3. Hydrogeologic processes in saline systems: Playas, sabkhas, and saline lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yechieli, Y.; Wood, W.W.

    2002-01-01

    Pans, playas, sabkhas, salinas, saline lakes, and salt flats are hydrologically similar, varying only in their boundary conditions. Thus, in evaluating geochemical processes in these systems, a generic water and solute mass-balance approach can be utilized. A conceptual model of a coastal sabkha near the Arabian Gulf is used as an example to illustrate the various water and solute fluxes. Analysis of this model suggests that upward flux of ground water from underlying formations could be a major source of solutes in the sabkha, but contribute only a small volume of the water. Local rainfall is the main source of water in the modeled sabkha system with a surprisingly large recharge-to-rainfall ratio of more than 50%. The contribution of seawater to the solute budget depends on the ratio of the width of the supratidal zone to the total width and is generally confined to a narrow zone near the shoreline of a typical coastal sabkha. Because of a short residence time of water, steady-state flow is expected within a short time (50,000 years). The solute composition of the brine in a closed saline system depends largely on the original composition of the input water. The high total ion content in the brine limits the efficiency of water-rock interaction and absorption. Because most natural systems are hydrologically open, the chemistry of the brines and the associated evaporite deposits may be significantly different than that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. Seasonal changes in temperature of the unsaturated zone cause precipitation of minerals in saline systems undergoing evaporation. Thus, during the hot dry season months, minerals exhibit retrograde solubility so that gypsum, anhydrite and calcite precipitate. Evaporation near the surface is also a major process that causes mineral precipitation in the upper portion of the unsaturated zone (e.g. halite and carnallite), provided that the relative humidity of the atmosphere is less than the activity of water

  4. Effects of non-uniform root zone salinity on water use, Na+ recirculation, and Na+ and H+ flux in cotton.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangqiang; Luo, Zhen; Dong, Hezhong; Eneji, A Egrinya; Li, Weijiang

    2012-03-01

    A new split-root system was established through grafting to study cotton response to non-uniform salinity. Each root half was treated with either uniform (100/100 mM) or non-uniform NaCl concentrations (0/200 and 50/150 mM). In contrast to uniform control, non-uniform salinity treatment improved plant growth and water use, with more water absorbed from the non- and low salinity side. Non-uniform treatments decreased Na(+) concentrations in leaves. The [Na(+)] in the '0' side roots of the 0/200 treatment was significantly higher than that in either side of the 0/0 control, but greatly decreased when the '0' side phloem was girdled, suggesting that the increased [Na(+)] in the '0' side roots was possibly due to transportation of foliar Na(+) to roots through phloem. Plants under non-uniform salinity extruded more Na(+) from the root than those under uniform salinity. Root Na(+) efflux in the low salinity side was greatly enhanced by the higher salinity side. NaCl-induced Na(+) efflux and H(+) influx were inhibited by amiloride and sodium orthovanadate, suggesting that root Na(+) extrusion was probably due to active Na(+)/H(+) antiport across the plasma membrane. Improved plant growth under non-uniform salinity was thus attributed to increased water use, reduced leaf Na(+) concentration, transport of excessive foliar Na(+) to the low salinity side, and enhanced Na(+) efflux from the low salinity root.

  5. Psychophysical contrast calibration

    PubMed Central

    To, Long; Woods, Russell L; Goldstein, Robert B; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Electronic displays and computer systems offer numerous advantages for clinical vision testing. Laboratory and clinical measurements of various functions and in particular of (letter) contrast sensitivity require accurately calibrated display contrast. In the laboratory this is achieved using expensive light meters. We developed and evaluated a novel method that uses only psychophysical responses of a person with normal vision to calibrate the luminance contrast of displays for experimental and clinical applications. Our method combines psychophysical techniques (1) for detection (and thus elimination or reduction) of display saturating nonlinearities; (2) for luminance (gamma function) estimation and linearization without use of a photometer; and (3) to measure without a photometer the luminance ratios of the display’s three color channels that are used in a bit-stealing procedure to expand the luminance resolution of the display. Using a photometer we verified that the calibration achieved with this procedure is accurate for both LCD and CRT displays enabling testing of letter contrast sensitivity to 0.5%. Our visual calibration procedure enables clinical, internet and home implementation and calibration verification of electronic contrast testing. PMID:23643843

  6. Spring climate and salinity in the San Francisco Bay Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cayan, Daniel R.; Peterson, David H.

    1993-01-01

    Salinity in the San Francisco Bay Estuary almost always experiences its yearly maximum during late summer, but climate variability produces marked interannual variations. The atmospheric circulation pattern impacts the estuary primarily through variations of runoff from rainfall and snowmelt from the Sierra Nevada and, secondarily, through variations in the near-surface salinity in the coastal ocean. While winter precipitation is the primary influence upon salinity in the estuary, spring climate variations also contribute importantly to salinity fluctuations. Spring atmospheric circulation influences both the magnitude and the timing of freshwater flows, through anomalies of precipitation and temperature. To help discriminate between the effects of these two influences, the record is divided into subsets according to whether spring conditions in the region are cool and wet, warm and wet, cool and dry, or warm and dry. Warm springs promote early snowmelt-driven flows, and cool springs result in delayed flows. In addition to effects of winter and spring climate variability operating on the watershed, there are more subtle effects that are transmitted into the estuary from the coastal ocean. These influences are most pronounced in cool and dry springs with high surface salinity (SS) in the coastal ocean versus cool and wet springs with low SS in the coastal ocean. A transect of SS records at stations from the mouth to the head of the bay suggests that the coastal ocean anomaly signal is attenuated from the mouth to the interior of the estuary. In contrast, a delayed, postsummer signal caused by winter and spring runoff variations from the upstream watershed are most pronounced at the head of the estuary and attenuate toward the mouth.

  7. Management scenarios for the Jordan River salinity crisis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farber, E.; Vengosh, A.; Gavrieli, I.; Marie, A.; Bullen, T.D.; Mayer, B.; Holtzman, R.; Segal, M.; Shavit, U.

    2005-01-01

    Recent geochemical and hydrological findings show that the water quality of the base flow of the Lower Jordan River, between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, is dependent upon the ratio between surface water flow and groundwater discharge. Using water quality data, mass-balance calculations, and actual flow-rate measurements, possible management scenarios for the Lower Jordan River and their potential affects on its salinity are investigated. The predicted scenarios reveal that implementation of some elements of the Israel-Jordan peace treaty will have negative effects on the Jordan River water salinity. It is predicted that removal of sewage effluents dumped into the river (???13 MCM/a) will significantly reduce the river water's flow and increase the relative proportion of the saline groundwater flux into the river. Under this scenario, the Cl content of the river at its southern point (Abdalla Bridge) will rise to almost 7000 mg/L during the summer. In contrast, removal of all the saline water (16.5 MCM/a) that is artificially discharged into the Lower Jordan River will significantly reduce its Cl concentration, to levels of 650-2600 and 3000-3500 mg/L in the northern and southern areas of the Lower Jordan River, respectively. However, because the removal of either the sewage effluents or the saline water will decrease the river's discharge to a level that could potentially cause river desiccation during the summer months, other water sources must be allocated to preserve in-stream flow needs and hence the river's ecosystem. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Isotopic evolution of saline lakes in the low-latitude and polar regions

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske

    2009-01-01

    Isotopic fractionations associated with two primary processes (evaporation and freezing of water) are discussed, which are responsible for the formation and evolution of saline lakes in deserts from both low-latitude and the Polar regions. In an evaporative system, atmospheric parameters (humidity and isotopic composition of water vapor) have strong influence on the isotopic behavior of saline lakes, and in a freezing system, salinity build-up largely controls the extent of freezing and associated isotope fractionation. In both systems, salinity has a direct impact on the isotopic evolution of saline lakes. It is proposed that a steady-state terminal lake model with short-term hydrologic and environmental perturbations can serve as a useful framework for investigating both evaporative and freezing processes of perennial saline lakes. Through re-assessment of own work and literature data for saline lakes, it was demonstrated that effective uses of the isotope activity compositions of brines and salinity-chemistry data could reveal dynamic changes and evolution in the isotopic compositions of saline lakes in response to hydrologic and environmental changes. The residence time of isotopic water molecules in lakes determines the nature of responses in the isotopic compositions following perturbations in the water and isotope balances (e.g., dilution by inflow, water deficit by increased evaporation, and/ or reduction in inflow). The isotopic profiles of some saline lakes from the Polar regions show that they switched the two contrasting modes of operation between evaporative and freezing systems, in response to climate and hydrological changes in the past.

  9. Isotopic Evolution of Saline Lakes in the Low-Latitude and Polar Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske

    2009-01-01

    Isotopic fractionations associated with two primary processes (evaporation and freezing of water) are discussed, which are responsible for the formation and evolution of saline lakes in deserts from both low-latitude and the Polar regions. In an evaporative system, atmospheric parameters (humidity and isotopic composition of water vapor) have strong influence on the isotopic behavior of saline lakes, and in a freezing system, salinity build-up largely controls the extent of freezing and associated isotope fractionation. In both systems, salinity has a direct impact on the isotopic evolution of saline lakes. It is proposed that a steady-state 'terminal lake' model with short-term hydrologic and environmental perturbations can serve as a useful framework for investigating both evaporative and freezing processes of perennial saline lakes. Through re-assessment of own work and literature data for saline lakes, it was demonstrated that effective uses of the isotope activity compositions of brines and salinity-chemistry data could reveal dynamic changes and evolution in the isotopic compositions of saline lakes in response to hydrologic and environmental changes. The residence time of isotopic water molecules in lakes determines the nature of responses in the isotopic compositions following perturbations in the water and isotope balances (e.g., dilution by inflow, water deficit by increased evaporation, and/or reduction in inflow). The isotopic profiles of some saline lakes from the Polar regions show that they switched the two contrasting modes of operation between evaporative and freezing systems, in response to climate and hydrological changes in the past.

  10. Salinity as a structuring factor for the composition and performance of bacterioplankton degrading riverine DOC.

    PubMed

    Langenheder, Silke; Kisand, Veljo; Wikner, Johan; Tranvik, Lars J

    2003-07-01

    Abstract The impact of salinity on the composition and functional performance (biomass production, growth efficiency and growth rates) of bacterial communities was investigated using batch cultures growing on dissolved organic carbon from a river draining into the Northern Baltic Sea. The cultures were adjusted to riverine or estuarine salinity levels and inoculated with bacteria from these two environments. Bacterial growth efficiencies differed in response to salinity and the origin of the inoculum. When salinity was adjusted to correspond to the salinity at the site where the inoculum was retrieved, growth efficiency was relatively high (11.5+/-2.6%). However, when bacteria were confronted with a shift in salinity, growth efficiency was lower (7.5+/-2.0%) and more of the utilized carbon was respired. In contrast, growth rates were higher when bacteria were exposed to a change in salinity. The composition of the bacterial communities developing in the batch cultures differed, as shown by 16S rDNA DGGE, depending on the origin of the inoculum and salinity. Reverse and direct DNA-DNA hybridization revealed salinity optima in the growth of specific bacterial strains as well as broader phylogenetic groups. Strains belonging to the alpha- and beta-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and gamma-Proteobacteria other than the genus Pseudomonas showed higher relative abundance under freshwater conditions, whereas strains of the genus Pseudomonas and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group were favored by estuarine conditions. Generally, our results demonstrate functional changes associated with changes in community composition. We suggest that even moderate changes in salinity affect bacterial community composition, which subsequently leads to altered growth characteristics.

  11. Aquatic insects in a multistress environment: cross-tolerance to salinity and desiccation.

    PubMed

    Pallarés, Susana; Botella-Cruz, María; Arribas, Paula; Millán, Andrés; Velasco, Josefa

    2017-04-01

    Exposing organisms to a particular stressor may enhance tolerance to a subsequent stress, when protective mechanisms against the two stressors are shared. Such cross-tolerance is a common adaptive response in dynamic multivariate environments and often indicates potential co-evolution of stress traits. Many aquatic insects in inland saline waters from Mediterranean-climate regions are sequentially challenged with salinity and desiccation stress. Thus, cross-tolerance to these physiologically similar stressors could have been positively selected in insects of these regions. We used adults of the saline water beetles Enochrus jesusarribasi (Hydrophilidae) and Nebrioporus baeticus (Dytiscidae) to test cross-tolerance responses to desiccation and salinity. In independent laboratory experiments, we evaluated the effects of (i) salinity stress on the subsequent resistance to desiccation and (ii) desiccation stress (rapid and slow dehydration) on the subsequent tolerance to salinity. Survival, water loss and haemolymph osmolality were measured. Exposure to stressful salinity improved water control under subsequent desiccation stress in both species, with a clear cross-tolerance (enhanced performance) in N. baeticus In contrast, general negative effects on performance were found under the inverse stress sequence. The rapid and slow dehydration produced different water loss and haemolymph osmolality dynamics that were reflected in different survival patterns. Our finding of cross-tolerance to salinity and desiccation in ecologically similar species from distant lineages, together with parallel responses between salinity and thermal stress previously found in several aquatic taxa, highlights the central role of adaption to salinity and co-occurring stressors in arid inland waters, having important implications for the species' persistence under climate change.

  12. Solution-dispersed CuO nanoparticles anode buffer layer: Effect of ultrasonic agitation duration on photovoltaic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, Nasehah Syamin; Yap, Chi Chin; Yahaya, Muhammad; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Jumali, Mohammad Hafizuddin Haji

    2016-11-01

    The performance of inverted type hybrid organic solar cell based on poly(3-hexyltheopene):[6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) can be improved by adding an anode buffer layer of copper oxide (CuO). CuO that serves as an electron blocking layer which could effectively reduce the charge recombination at the photoactive layer (P3HT:PCBM)/silver (Ag) interfaces. At the same time, Cuo anode buffer layer could accelerate the holes collection from the photoactive layer to the top electrode. In this study we investigated the effects of ultrasonic agitation duration in preparation of solution-dispersed CuO anode buffer layer on the performance of the devices with a configuration of fluorine tin oxide (FTO)/zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays/P3HT:PCBM/ CuO/Ag. Different durations of ultrasonic agitation (0, 5, 15 and 25 min) were used for CuO nanoparticles solution dispersion to obtain the optimum particle size distribution of CuO. It was found that the smallest average particle size of CuO was obtained by applying the ultrasonic agitation for longest duration of 25 min. The highest power conversion efficiency of 1.22% was recorded from the device incorporating with CuO anode buffer layer with the smallest average particle size. It is believed that CuO anode buffer layer with the smallest average particle size had the least agglomerates, thus leading to better film formation and contact surface area.

  13. Changes in QTc Interval in the Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease (CitAD) Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Spragg, David; Devanand, D. P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Pollock, Bruce G.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Rabins, Peter V.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2014-01-01

    Background A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety communication in August 2011 warned that citalopram was associated with a dose dependent risk of QT prolongation and recommended dose restriction in patients over the age of 60 but did not provide data for this age group. Methods CitAD was a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial for agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Participants were assigned to citalopram (target dose of 30 mg/day) or placebo in a 1∶1 ratio. 186 people, 181 of whom were over the age of 60, having probable AD with clinically significant agitation were recruited from September 2009 to January 2013. After the FDA safety communication about citalopram, ECG was added to the required study procedures before enrollment and repeated at week 3 to monitor change in QTc interval. Forty-eight participants were enrolled after enhanced monitoring began. Results Citalopram treatment was associated with a larger increase in QTc interval than placebo (difference in week 3 QTc adjusting for baseline QTc: 18.1 ms [95% CI: 6.1, 30.1]; p = 0.004). More participants in the citalopram group had an increase ≥30 ms from baseline to week 3 (7 in citalopram versus 1 in placebo; Fisher's exact p = 0.046), but only slightly more in the citalopram group met a gender-specific threshold for prolonged QTc (450 ms for males; 470 ms for females) at any point during follow-up (3 in citalopram versus 1 in placebo, Fisher's exact p = 0.611). One of the citalopram participants who developed prolonged QTc also displayed ventricular bigeminy. No participants in either group had a cardiovascular-related death. Conclusion Citalopram at 30 mg/day was associated with improvement in agitation in patients with AD but was also associated with QT prolongation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00898807 PMID:24914549

  14. Dependence of penicillium chrysogenum growth, morphology, vacuolation, and productivity in fed-batch fermentations on impeller type and agitation intensity

    PubMed

    J sten P; Paul; Nienow; Thomas

    1998-09-20

    The influence of the agitation conditions on the growth, morphology, vacuolation, and productivity of Penicillium chrysogenum has been examined in 6 L fed-batch fermentations. A standard Rushton turbine, a four-bladed paddle, and a six-bladed pitched blade impeller were compared. Power inputs per unit volume of liquid, P/VL, ranged from 0.35 to 7.4 kW/m3. The same fermentation protocol was used in each fermentation, including holding the dissolved oxygen concentration above 40% air saturation by gas blending. The mean projected area (for all dispersed types, including clumps) and the clump roughness were used to characterize the morphology. Consideration of clumps was vital as these were the predominant morphological form. For a given impeller, the batch-phase specific growth rates and the overall biomass concentrations increased with agitation intensity. Higher fragmentation at higher speeds was assumed to have promoted growth through increased formation of new growing tips. The mean projected area increased during the rapid growth phase followed by a sharp decrease to a relatively constant value dependent on the agitation conditions. The higher the speed, the lower the projected area for a given impeller type. The proportion by volume of hyphal vacuoles and empty regions decreased with speed, possibly due to fragmentation in the vacuolated regions. The specific penicillin production rate was generally higher with lower impeller speed for a given impeller type. The highest value of penicillin production as well as its rate was obtained using the Rushton turbine impeller at the lowest speed. At given P/VL, changes in morphology, specific growth rate, and specific penicillin production rate depended on impeller geometry. The morphological data could be correlated with either tip speed or the "energy dissipation/circulation function," but a reasonable correlation of the specific growth rate and specific production rate was only possible with the latter. Copyright

  15. Insights into Kinetics of Agitation-Induced Aggregation of Hen Lysozyme under Heat and Acidic Conditions from Various Spectroscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Ali; Fahy, Christine; Chevillot-Biraud, Alexandre; Rholam, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and amyloid formation are an underlying pathological hallmark in a number of prevalent diseases of protein aggregation ranging from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases to systemic lysozyme amyloidosis. In this context, we have used complementary spectroscopic methods to undertake a systematic study of the self-assembly of hen egg-white lysozyme under agitation during a prolonged heating in acidic pH. The kinetics of lysozyme aggregation, monitored by Thioflavin T fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide, is described by a sigmoid curve typical of a nucleation-dependent polymerization process. Nevertheless, we observe significant differences between the values deduced for the kinetic parameters (lag time and aggregation rate). The fibrillation process of lysozyme, as assessed by the attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is accompanied by an increase in the β-sheet conformation at the expense of the α-helical conformation but the time-dependent variation of the content of these secondary structures does not evolve as a gradual transition. Moreover, the tryptophan fluorescence-monitored kinetics of lysozyme aggregation is described by three phases in which the temporal decrease of the tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield is of quasilinear nature. Finally, the generated lysozyme fibrils exhibit a typical amyloid morphology with various lengths (observed by atomic force microscopy) and contain exclusively the full-length protein (analyzed by highly performance liquid chromatography). Compared to the data obtained by other groups for the formation of lysozyme fibrils in acidic pH without agitation, this work provides new insights into the structural changes (local, secondary, oligomeric/fibrillar structures) undergone by the lysozyme during the agitation-induced formation of fibrils. PMID:26571264

  16. Effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine with intravenous anesthesia on postoperative emergence agitation/delirium in pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun-Li; Pei, Yu-Ping; Wei, Jing-Qiu; Zhang, Yue-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Postoperative emergence agitation/delirium (POED) is a common complication in pediatric surgery patients, which increases the risk of developing postoperative airway obstruction and respiratory depression. This study aims to investigate the safety and efficacy of intraoperative infusion of dexmedetomidine (DEX) and its effects on POED in pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy. Sixty patients scheduled for tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy, aged 2 to 8 years, were randomly allocated into 2 groups (n = 30). Pediatric patients in the group DEX received intravenous (IV) DEX 1 μg/kg over 10 minutes, followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h continuous infusion, and the same volume of 0.9% saline was administrated in the group control. Anesthesia was maintained with target-controlled infusion (TCI) of propofol and remifentanyl. Intraoperative heart rate (HR), noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP), blood oxygen saturation (SPO2), recovery time, and extubation time were recorded. Pain level was evaluated using the objective pain score (OPS), pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium (PAED) scale and Cole 5-point scale (CPS) was used to evaluate POED when patients at 0, 5, 15 minutes, and then at intervals of 15 minutes for 60 minutes after parents arrival at postanesthesia care unit (PACU). The results showed that intraoperative HR was significantly lower in group DEX (P <0.05), mean diastolic and systolic NIBP was not statistically different between groups. Time to wake and time to extubation were lengthened in group DEX as compared with group control (P <0.05). OPS and CPS were lower in group DEX at 15, 30, and 45 minutes time points (P <0.05); however, there were no significantly differences in the PAED score at different time points in the PACU. The present data suggested that intraoperative infusion of dexmedetomidine combined with intravenous anesthetics can provide satisfactory intraoperative conditions for pediatric

  17. Influence of intergrain interactions and thermal agitation on microwave-assisted magnetization switching behavior of granular magnetic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Nobuaki; Kitakami, Osamu; Shimatsu, Takehito

    2017-02-01

    Microwave-assisted magnetization switching (MAS) in a granular magnetic film is examined by computer simulation. Contrary to the macrospin calculation and the experiments on single magnetic dots reported so far, in which the switching field linearly decreases with increasing rf frequency and then sharply increases at the critical frequency, the granular film exhibits considerably broad MAS behavior against the rf frequency. This broad MAS behavior is mainly caused by the dispersion of magnetic properties and thermal agitation. On the other hand, intergrain dipolar and exchange interactions enhance the MAS effect in the granular film and suppress the MAS broadening.

  18. Increased temperatures combined with lowered salinities differentially impact oyster size class growth and mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Rybovich, Molly; Hall, Steven G.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the timing and interaction of seasonal high temperatures and low salinities as predicted by climate change models could dramatically alter oyster population dynamics. Little is known explicitly about how low salinity and high temperature combinations affect spat (<25mm), seed (25–75mm), andmarket (>75mm) oyster growth and mortality. Using field and laboratory studies, this project quantified the combined effects of extremely low salinities (<5) and high temperatures (>30°C) on growth and survival of spat, seed, andmarket-sized oysters. In 2012 and 2013, hatchery-produced oysters were placed in open and closed cages at three sites in Breton Sound, LA, along a salinity gradient that typically ranged from 5 to 20. Growth and mortality were recorded monthly. Regardless of size class, oysters at the lowest salinity site (annualmean = 4.8) experienced significantly highermortality and lower growth than oysters located in higher salinity sites (annual means = 11.1 and 13.0, respectively); furthermore, all oysters in open cages at the two higher salinity sites experienced higher mortality than in closed cages, likely due to predation. To explicitly examine oyster responses to extreme low salinity and high temperature combinations, a series of laboratory studies were conducted. Oysters were placed in 18 tanks in a fully crossed temperature (25°C, 32°C) by salinity (1, 5, and 15) study with three replicates, and repeated at least twice for each oyster size class. Regardless of temperature, seed and market oysters held in low salinity tanks (salinity 1) experienced 100% mortality within 7 days. In contrast, at salinity 5, temperature significantly affected mortality; oysters in all size classes experienced greater than 50%mortality at 32°C and less than 40%mortality at 25°C. At the highest salinity tested (15), only market-sized oysters held at 32°C experienced significant mortality (>60%). These studies demonstrate that high water temperatures (>30°C) and

  19. Phonation in Tonal Contrasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Jianjing

    2013-01-01

    Phonation is used in many tonal languages, but how it should be incorporated into tonal systems is not well understood. The purpose of this dissertation thus is to examine the role of phonation in tonal contrasts, and to investigate how phonation and pitch interact in the tonal space. This dissertation presents close studies of tonal contrasts…

  20. Simultaneous blur contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Shernaaz M.; Webster, Michael A.; Taylor, John; Jaikumar, Jaikishan; Verma, Richa

    2001-06-01

    How well-focused an image appears can be strongly influenced by the surroundings context. A blurred surround can cause a central image to appear too sharp, while sharped surrounds can induce blur. We examined some spatial properties and stimulus selectivities of this 'simultaneous blur contrast.' Observers adjusted the focus of a central test image by a 2AFC staircase procedure that varied the slope of the image amplitude spectrum. The test were surrounded by 8 identical images with biased spectra, that were presented concurrently with the test for 0.5 sec on a uniform gray background. Contrast effects were comparable in magnitude for image sizes ranging from 1-deg to 4-deg in visual angle, but were stronger for test that were viwe4 in the periphery rather than fixated directly. Consistent biases were found for different types of grayscale images, including natural images, filtered noise, and simple edges. However, effects were weaker when surrounds and tests were drawn from different images, or differed in contrast-polarity or color, and thus do not depend on blur or on average spatial- frequency content per se. These induction effects may in part reflect a manifestation of selective contrast gain control

  1. Contrasting Views on Censorship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riel, Arthur R., Jr.

    This paper asserts that public demands for book censorship are but one aspect of a deep public dissatisfaction with the educational establishment, and develops the thesis that the cause of this dissatisfaction is the contrast in world views and religions of those in the educational establishment and the censors. The educational establishment…

  2. Porewater salinity reveals past lake-level changes in Lake Van, the Earth's largest soda lake.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S; Livingstone, David M; Kwiecien, Olga; Randlett, Marie-Ève; Stockhecke, Mona; Unwin, Katie; Anselmetti, Flavio S; Beer, Jürg; Haug, Gerald H; Schubert, Carsten J; Sturm, Mike; Kipfer, Rolf

    2017-03-22

    In closed-basin lakes, sediment porewater salinity can potentially be used as a conservative tracer to reconstruct past fluctuations in lake level. However, until now, porewater salinity profiles did not allow quantitative estimates of past lake-level changes because, in contrast to the oceans, significant salinity changes (e.g., local concentration minima and maxima) had never been observed in lacustrine sediments. Here we show that the salinity measured in the sediment pore water of Lake Van (Turkey) allows straightforward reconstruction of two major transgressions and a major regression that occurred during the last 250 ka. We observed strong changes in the vertical salinity profiles of the pore water of the uppermost 100 m of the sediments in Lake Van. As the salinity balance of Lake Van is almost at steady-state, these salinity changes indicate major lake-level changes in the past. In line with previous studies on lake terraces and with seismic and sedimentological surveys, we identify two major transgressions of up to +105 m with respect to the current lake level at about 135 ka BP and 248 ka BP starting at the onset of the two previous interglacials (MIS5e and MIS7), and a major regression of about -200 m at about 30 ka BP during the last ice age.

  3. Population and life-stage specific sensitivities to temperature and salinity stress in barnacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrolahi, Ali; Havenhand, Jonathan; Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Pansch, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Temperature and salinity shape the distribution and genetic structure of marine communities. Future warming and freshening will exert an additional stress to coastal marine systems. The extent to which organisms respond to these shifts will, however, be mediated by the tolerances of all life-stages and populations of species and their potential to adapt. We investigated nauplius and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) improvisus from the Swedish west coast with respect to temperature (12, 20, and 28 °C) and salinity (5, 15, and 30) tolerances. Warming accelerated larval development and increased overall survival and subsequent settlement success. Nauplii developed and metamorphosed best at intermediate salinity. This was also observed in cypris larvae when the preceding nauplii stages had been reared at a salinity of 30. Direct comparisons of the present findings with those on a population from the more brackish Baltic Sea demonstrate contrasting patterns. We conclude that i) B. improvisus larvae within the Baltic region will be favoured by near-future seawater warming and freshening, that ii) salinity tolerances of larvae from the two different populations reflect salinities in their native habitats, but are nonetheless suboptimal and that iii) this species is generally highly plastic with regard to salinity.

  4. Population and life-stage specific sensitivities to temperature and salinity stress in barnacles

    PubMed Central

    Nasrolahi, Ali; Havenhand, Jonathan; Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Pansch, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and salinity shape the distribution and genetic structure of marine communities. Future warming and freshening will exert an additional stress to coastal marine systems. The extent to which organisms respond to these shifts will, however, be mediated by the tolerances of all life-stages and populations of species and their potential to adapt. We investigated nauplius and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) improvisus from the Swedish west coast with respect to temperature (12, 20, and 28 °C) and salinity (5, 15, and 30) tolerances. Warming accelerated larval development and increased overall survival and subsequent settlement success. Nauplii developed and metamorphosed best at intermediate salinity. This was also observed in cypris larvae when the preceding nauplii stages had been reared at a salinity of 30. Direct comparisons of the present findings with those on a population from the more brackish Baltic Sea demonstrate contrasting patterns. We conclude that i) B. improvisus larvae within the Baltic region will be favoured by near-future seawater warming and freshening, that ii) salinity tolerances of larvae from the two different populations reflect salinities in their native habitats, but are nonetheless suboptimal and that iii) this species is generally highly plastic with regard to salinity. PMID:27582433

  5. Saline-water resources of Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winslow, Allen George; Kister, Lester Ray

    1956-01-01

    Most of the aquifers in Texas contain saline water in some parts, and a few are capable of producing large quantities of saline water. Of the early Paleozoic formations, the Hickory sandstone member of the Riley formation of Cambrian age and the Ellenburger group of Ordovician age are potential sources of small to moderate supplies of saline water in parts of central and west-central Texas.

  6. Estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation on the ecology of the Chesapeake Bay are discussed. The sources of fresh water, the variations in salinity, and the circulation patterns created by temperature and salinity changes are analyzed. The application of remote sensors for long term observation of water temperatures is described. The sources of sediment and the biological effects resulting from increased sediments and siltation are identified.

  7. Effects of salinity build-up on biomass characteristics and trace organic chemical removal: implications on the development of high retention membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenhai; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nghiem, Long D

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of salinity build-up on the performance of membrane bioreactor (MBR), specifically in terms of the removal and fate of trace organic chemicals (TrOCs), nutrient removal, and biomass characteristics. Stepwise increase of the influent salinity, simulating salinity build-up in high retention MBRs, adversely affected the metabolic activity in the bioreactor, thereby reducing organic and nutrient removal. The removal of hydrophilic TrOCs by MBR decreased due to salinity build-up. By contrast, with the exception of 17α-ethynylestradiol, the removal of all hydrophobic TrOCs was not affected at high salinity. Moreover, salinity build-up had negligible impact on the residual accumulation of TrOCs in the sludge phase except for a few hydrophilic compounds. Additionally, the response of the biomass to salinity stress also dramatically enhanced the release of both soluble microbial products (SMP) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), leading to severe membrane fouling.

  8. Influences of Salinity Variations on Pore-water Flow in Salt Marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Jin, G.; Xin, P.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    Salt marshes are important wetlands at the ocean-land interface with various ecological functions, serving as essential habitats for intertidal fauna, affecting the productivity of coastal waters through nutrient exchange, moderating the greenhouse gas emission and global warming. They are influenced by various physical and biogeochemical processes, among which the pore-water flow and associated solute transport processes play an important role in determining the material exchange between marsh soils and coastal water. Previous studies have examined such processes under the solo or combined effects of tidal fluctuation, evapotranspiration, stratigraphy, inland freshwater input, and topography. However, these investigations have neglected the spatial and temporal salinity variations in surface water and pore-water, which commonly exist in salt marshes due to the impacts of tidal inundation, precipitation and evapotranspiration. The density contrast between the surface water and pore-water may lead to significant modifications of the pore-water flow. Based on results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations, we will demonstrate that: (1) under upward salinity gradients, flow instabilities in the form of fingers occur once the salinity contrast reaches a certain level, whereas under downward salinity gradients the system is stable; (2) because of the strong tidally-induced advective process occurring near the creek, both the number and size of fingers change gradually from the near-creek zone to the marsh interior; and (3) both upward and downward salinity gradients enhance the exchange between the surface water and pore-water in the marsh sediments. Keywords: Salt marshes; density effect; salinity gradient; pore-water flow; fingers. Instabilities under upward salinity gradient Stable system under downward salinity gradient

  9. Soil Salinity Mapping Using Multitemporal Landsat Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azabdaftari, A.; Sunar, F.

    2016-06-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most important problems affecting many areas of the world. Saline soils present in agricultural areas reduce the annual yields of most crops. This research deals with the soil salinity mapping of Seyhan plate of Adana district in Turkey from the years 2009 to 2010, using remote sensing technology. In the analysis, multitemporal data acquired from LANDSAT 7-ETM+ satellite in four different dates (19 April 2009, 12 October 2009, 21 March 2010, 31 October 2010) are used. As a first step, preprocessing of Landsat images is applied. Several salinity indices such as NDSI (Normalized Difference Salinity Index), BI (Brightness Index) and SI (Salinity Index) are used besides some vegetation indices such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), RVI (Ratio Vegetation Index), SAVI (Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index) and EVI (Enhamced Vegetation Index) for the soil salinity mapping of the study area. The field's electrical conductivity (EC) measurements done in 2009 and 2010, are used as a ground truth data for the correlation analysis with the original band values and different index image bands values. In the correlation analysis, two regression models, the simple linear regression (SLR) and multiple linear regression (MLR) are considered. According to the highest correlation obtained, the 21st March, 2010 dataset is chosen for production of the soil salinity map in the area. Finally, the efficiency of the remote sensing technology in the soil salinity mapping is outlined.

  10. The glass is not yet half empty: agitation but not Varroa treatment causes cognitive bias in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Schlüns, Helge; Welling, Helena; Federici, Julian René; Lewejohann, Lars

    2017-03-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prone to judge an ambiguous stimulus negatively if they had been agitated through shaking which simulates a predator attack. Such a cognitive bias has been suggested to reflect an internal emotional state analogous to humans who judge more pessimistically when they do not feel well. In order to test cognitive bias experimentally, an animal is conditioned to respond to two different stimuli, where one is punished while the other is rewarded. Subsequently a third, ambiguous stimulus is presented and it is measured whether the subject responds as if it expects a reward or a punishment. Generally, it is assumed that negative experiences lower future expectations, rendering the animals more pessimistic. Here we tested whether a most likely negatively experienced formic acid treatment against the parasitic mite Varroa destructor also affects future expectations of honey bees. We applied an olfactory learning paradigm (i.e., conditioned proboscis extension response) using two odorants and blends of these odorants as the ambiguous stimuli. Unlike agitating honey bees, exposure to formic acid did not significantly change the response to the ambiguous stimuli in comparison with untreated bees. Overall evidence suggests that the commonest treatment against one of the most harmful bee pests has no detrimental effects on cognitive bias in honey bees.

  11. The effect of additives and mechanical agitation in surface modification of acrylic fibres by cutinase and esterase.

    PubMed

    Matamá, Teresa; Vaz, Filipe; Gübitz, Georg M; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2006-01-01

    The surface of an acrylic fibre containing about 7% of vinyl acetate was modified using Fusarium solani pisi cutinase and a commercial esterase, Texazym PES. The effect of acrylic solvents and stabilising polyols on cutinase operational stability was studied. The half-life time of cutinase increased by 3.5-fold with the addition of 15% N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) and by 3-fold with 1M glycerol. The impact of additives and mechanical agitation in the protein adsorption and in the hydrolysis of vinyl acetate from acrylic fabric was investigated. The hydroxyl groups produced on the surface of the fibre were able to react specifically with Remazol Brilliant Blue R (cotton reactive dye) and to increase the colour of the acrylic-treated fabric. The best staining level was obtained with a high level of mechanical agitation and with the addition of 1% DMA. Under these conditions, the raise in the acrylic fabric colour depth was 30% for cutinase and 25% for Texazym. The crystallinity degree, determined by X-ray diffraction, was not significantly changed between control samples and samples treated with cutinase. The results showed that the outcome of the application of these enzymes depends closely on the reaction media conditions.

  12. Comparison of the Effect of Thiopental Sodium with Midazolam-ketamine on Post-tonsillectomy Agitation in Children.

    PubMed

    Toliyat, Maryam; Zangoee, Maliheh; Ahrari, Shahnaz; Zangoee, Reza

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of thiopental sodium with that of midazolam-ketamine on relieving agitation after tonsillectomy in children. In a clinical trial, 50 children aged 5-10 years, candidates for tonsillectomy, were randomly divided into two 25-member groups. In the first group, thiopental sodium 5mg/kg/IV, and in the second group combination of midazolam 0.01 mg/kg/IV and ketamine 1 mg/kg/IV were used to induce anesthesia. The level of sedation was assessed after surgery with the Ramsay scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of heart rate, arterial oxygen pressure (PO2), and duration of anesthesia. The Ramsay sedation score was significantly higher in the thiopental sodium group than in the midazolam-ketamine group (P=0.01). Thiopental sodium can be more effective than the combination of midazolam-ketamine for controlling agitation after tonsillectomy in children.

  13. Soil salinity detection from satellite image analysis: an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Md Manjur; Islam, Md Tazmul; Jamil, Raihan

    2016-02-01

    This paper attempts to detect soil salinity from satellite image analysis using remote sensing and geographic information system. Salinity intrusion is a common problem for the coastal regions of the world. Traditional salinity detection techniques by field survey and sampling are time-consuming and expensive. Remote sensing and geographic information system offer economic and efficient salinity detection, monitoring, and mapping. To predict soil salinity, an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data was used to develop a multiple regression equation. The correlations between different indices and field data of soil salinity were calculated to find out the highly correlated indices. The best regression model was selected considering the high R (2) value, low P value, and low Akaike's Information Criterion. About 20% variation was observed between the field data and predicted EC from the satellite image analysis. The precision of this salinity detection technique depends on the accuracy and uniform distribution of field data.

  14. Progress in Treatment Development for Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Alzheimer’s Disease: Focus on Agitation and Aggression. A Report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Soto, M.; Abushakra, S.; Cummings, J.; Siffert, J.; Robert, P.; Vellas, B.; Lyketsos, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The management of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as agitation and aggression is a major priority in caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Agitation and aggression (A/A) are among the most disruptive symptoms, and given their impact, they are increasingly an important target for development of effective treatments. Considerable progress has been made in the last years with a growing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of drugs for NPS. The limited benefits reported in some RCTs may be accounted for by the absence of a biological link of the tested molecule to NPS and also by key methodological issues. In recent RCTs of A/A, a great heterogeneity design was found. Designing trials for dementia populations with NPS presents many challenges, including identification of appropriate participants for such trials, engagement and compliance of patients and caregivers in the trials and the choice of optimal outcome measures to demonstrate treatment effectiveness. The EU/US -CTAD Task Force, an international collaboration of investigators from academia, industry, non-profit foundations, and regulatory agencies met in Philadelphia on November 19, 2014 to address some of these challenges. Despite potential heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and neurobiology, agitation and aggression seems to be accepted as an entity for drug development. The field appears to be reaching a consensus in using both agitation and aggression (or other NPS)-specific quantitative measures plus a global rating of change for agitation outcomes based on clinician judgment as the main outcomes. PMID:26413494

  15. Chromatography: concepts and contrasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    As the author states in the Preface, this text attempts to provide a unified approach to chromatography (hence the title) by way of contrasting similarities and differences between gas chromatography (GC), column liquid chromatography (LC), and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). This book is also said to be pitched at an elementary level, suitable for most newcomers to the field (e.g., advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in the academic world, as well as bench-level chemists in industry).

  16. Dispersive Transport of Angiographic Contrast During Antegrade Arterial Injection

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qing; Lieber, Baruch B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Angiography is commonly used during endovascular procedures to navigate catheters into a target artery and for evaluation of the arterial luminal geometry. X-ray attenuating contrast material is injected into the arteries and transported into pathologies such as aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. Images of the transported contrast are used to guide therapeutic decisions. Experience and intuition of the interventionalist are often serving as guide for the injection force, and hence, the speed and volume of the bolus. Forceful injections of small boluses can evoke local turbulence and dispersive mixing in the zone immediately distal to the catheter tip. Turbulence by its nature acts as a strong agitating mechanism such that the bolus of contrast quickly mixes with the flowing blood to occupy the entire lumen so the artery can be visualized. The aims of the present study are (a) to determine the distance from catheter tip beyond which contrast can consider to be fully mixed with the blood during antegrade injection and (b) to determine the thickness of the boundary layer in which contrast concentration is poor, which can contribute to underestimation of vascular diameter using this method. Methods We performed in silico experiments to describe blood and angiographic contrast transport in a straight artery model. The conditions investigated are derived from clinical contrast injection rates typically found in cerebral angiography. Results A recirculation flow exists in the mixing zone distal to the catheter tip issuing the contrast and convective mixing rather than diffusion is dominating the rapid mixing process. In the vicinity of the arterial wall in the mass transfer boundary layer, however, transport is dominated by molecular diffusion. For lower molecule diffusion coefficient, the mass transfer boundary layer contains a lower concentration of contrast than for a higher molecular diffusion coefficient. Conclusions These findings imply that contrast

  17. Metabolic fingerprinting of the responses to salinity in the invasive ground beetle Merizodus soledadinus at the Kerguelen Islands.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, K; Laparie, M; Bical, R; Larvor, V; Bouchereau, A; Siaussat, D; Renault, D

    2013-01-01

    Salinity is an abiotic factor that may impact survival and fitness of terrestrial insects in coastal environments. Meanwhile, some terrestrial arthropods can survive in hypersaline environments, and counterbalance osmotic stress by intra- and extracellular buildups of organic osmolytes. The ground beetle Merizodus soledadinus originates from South America and it is distributed in forests and riparian zones, where salinity levels are considerably low. This species has been introduced at the Kerguelen Islands a century ago, where it colonized coastal areas (tide drift lines), and must thus withstand salinity variations due to tide, spray, and organic matter deposited therein. In the present study, we addressed the physiological plasticity of M. soledadinus to saline conditions, by monitoring body water content and survival in adults experimentally subjected to different salinities. We also investigated possible metabolic adjustments involved at three contrasted salinity levels (0‰, 35‰, 70‰) at 4 and 8°C. We hypothesized that this invasive ground beetle can withstand a broad range of salinity conditions thanks to the plastic accumulation of compatible solutes. The study revealed a progressive drop in body water content in individuals exposed to 35‰ and 70‰, as opposed to the controls. Metabolic fingerprints showed compatible solute (erythritol, alanine, glycine and proline) accumulation at medium and high salinity conditions (35‰ and 70‰). We concluded that the osmo-induced accumulation of amino acids and polyols was likely to modulate the ground beetles' body water balance on medium saline substrates, thus enhancing their survival ability.

  18. Salinity-induced changes in the morphology and major mineral nutrient composition of purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) accessions.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Amirul; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Rafii, M Y; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Aslani, Farzad; Hakim, M A

    2016-04-18

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of varied salinity regimes on the morphological traits (plant height, number of leaves, number of flowers, fresh and dry weight) and major mineral composition of 13 selected purslane accessions. Most of the morphological traits measured were reduced at varied salinity levels (0.0, 8, 16, 24 and 32 dS m(-1)), but plant height was found to increase in Ac1 at 16 dS m(-1) salinity, and Ac13 was the most affected accession. The highest reductions in the number of leaves and number of flowers were recorded in Ac13 at 32 dS m(-1) salinity compared to the control. The highest fresh and dry weight reductions were noted in Ac8 and Ac6, respectively, at 32 dS m(-1) salinity, whereas the highest increase in both fresh and dry weight was recorded in Ac9 at 24 dS m(-1) salinity compared to the control. In contrast, at lower salinity levels, all of the measured mineral levels were found to increase and later decrease with increasing salinity, but the performance of different accessions was different depending on the salinity level. A dendrogram was also constructed by UPGMA based on the morphological traits and mineral compositions, in which the 13 accessions were grouped into 5 clusters, indicating greater diversity among them. A three-dimensional principal component analysis also confirmed the output of grouping from cluster analysis.

  19. Indirect and direct effects of salinity on the quantity and quality of total amino acids in Ulva ohnoi (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Angell, Alex R; Mata, Leonardo; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2015-06-01

    Salinity can affect the quantity and quality of total amino acids (TAAs) in seaweeds indirectly by altering growth rates and thereby diluting or concentrating the amino acid content of the biomass, or directly by altering the synthesis of specific amino acids and osmolytes. This study attempted to partition the indirect and direct effects of salinity on the quantity and quality of TAAs in the green seaweed Ulva ohnoi by culturing it under a range of salinities without nutrient limitation. Both the quantity and quality of TAAs varied across the salinity treatments. Quantity was most strongly related to the growth rate of the seaweed and was highest in the slowest growing seaweed. In contrast, the quality of TAAs (individual amino acids as a proportion of total content) was most strongly related to salinity for all amino acids, although this varied substantially among individual amino acids. Increases in salinity were positively correlated with the proportion of proline (46% increase), tyrosine (36% increase), and histidine (26% increase), whereas there was a negative correlation with alanine (29% decrease). The proportion of methionine, with strong links to the synthesis of the osmolyte dimethylsulfoniopropionate, did not correlate linearly with salinity and instead was moderately higher at the optimal salinities for growth. These results show that salinity simultaneously affects the quantity and quality of TAAs in seaweed through both indirect and direct mechanisms, with growth rates playing the overarching role in determining the quantity of TAAs.

  20. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  1. Combined effects of cadmium and salinity on juvenile Takifugu obscurus: cadmium moderates salinity tolerance; salinity decreases the toxicity of cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Xin; Gu, Lei; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus, a species of anadromous fish, experiences several salinity changes in its lifetime. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal that can potentially induce oxidative stress in fish. The present study aimed to detect the combined effects of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 mg L−1) and salinity (0, 15 and 30 ppt) on juvenile T. obscurus. Results showed the juveniles could survive well under different salinities; however, with Cd exposure, the survival rates significantly decreased at 0 and 30 ppt. At 15 ppt, tolerance to Cd increased. Cd exposure clearly induced oxidative stress, and the responses among different tissues were qualitatively similar. Salinity acted as a protective factor which could reduce the reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, salinity could enhance the antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione. Na+/K+–ATPase activity significantly decreased under Cd exposure in gill, kidney and intestine. These findings indicated that Cd could moderate the adaptability of juvenile T. obscurus to high salinity and low salinity played a protective role upon Cd exposure. Thus, the role of salinity should be considered when evaluating the effect of heavy metals on anadromous and estuarine fishes. PMID:27487764

  2. Aquarius Instrument and Salinity Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius has been designed to map the surface salinity field of the global ocean from space a parameter important for understanding ocean circulation and its relationship to climate and the global water cycle. Salinity is measured remotely from space by measuring the thermal emission from the ocean surface. This is done at the low frequency end of the microwave spectrum (e.g. 1.4 GHz) where the emission is sufficiently sensitive to changes in salinity to be detected with sophisticated radiometers. The goal is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean by providing maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. These are challenging requirements that have led to some unique features of the instrument. These include: a) The addition of a co-located scatterometer to help provide a correction for roughness; b) The addition of a polarimetric channel (third Stokes parameter) to the radiometer to help correct for Faraday rotation; c) Asun-synchronous orbit with a 6 pm ascending equatorial crossing to minimize Faraday rotation and with the antennas looking away from the sun toward the nighttime side to minimize contamination by radiation from the sun; and d) An antenna designed to limit side lobes in the direction of rays from the sun. In addition, achieving the accuracy goal of 0.2 psu requires averaging over one month and to do this requires a highly stable radiometer. Aquarius has three separate radiometers that image in pushbroom fashion with the three antenna beams looking across track. The antenna is a 2.5-m diameter, offset parabolic reflector with three feed horns and the three beams are arranged to image with the boresight aligned to look across track, roughly perpendicular to the spacecraft heading and pointing away from the Sun. The three beams point at angles of theta = 25.8 deg., 33.8 deg. and 40.3 deg. with respect to the spacecraft

  3. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm(2) object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  4. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, D.; Hofmann, T.; Kananizadeh, N.; Beeram, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Wimer, S.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Herzinger, C. M.; Kasputis, T.; Pfaunmiller, E.; Nguyen, A.; Korlacki, R.; Pannier, A.; Li, Y.; Schubert, E.; Hage, D.; Schubert, M.

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  5. Mechanisms of high salinity tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra

    2007-01-01

    Among abiotic stresses, high salinity stress is the most severe environmental stress, which impairs crop production on at least 20% of irrigated land worldwide. In response to high salinity stress, various genes get upregulated, the products of which are involved either directly or indirectly in plant protection. Some of the genes encoding osmolytes, ion channels, receptors, components of calcium signaling, and some other regulatory signaling factors or enzymes are able to confer salinity-tolerant phenotypes when transferred to sensitive plants. Overall, the susceptibility or tolerance to high salinity stress in plants is a coordinated action of multiple stress responsive genes, which also cross talk with other components of stress signal transduction pathways. High salinity exerts its negative impact mainly by disrupting the ionic and osmotic equilibrium of the cell. In saline soils, high levels of sodium ions lead to plant growth inhibition and even death; therefore, mechanisms of salinity tolerance involve sequestration of Na(+) and Cl(-) in vacuoles of the cells, blocking of Na(+) entry into the cell, Na(+) exclusion from the transpiration stream, and some other mechanisms that help in salinity tolerance. Understanding these mechanisms of stress tolerance, along with a plethora of genes involved in the stress signaling network, is important to improve high salinity stress tolerance in crops plants. This chapter first describes the adverse effect of salinity stress and general pathway for the plant stress response, followed by roles of various ion pumps, calcium, SOS pathways, ABA, transcription factors, mitogen-activated protein kinases, glycine betaine, proline, reactive oxygen species, and DEAD-box helicases in salinity stress tolerance. The cross-tolerance between stresses is also mentioned.

  6. Modelling density-dependent flow and solute transport at the Lake Tutchewop saline disposal complex, Victoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Craig T.; Narayan, Kumar A.

    1998-05-01

    Intercepted saline groundwaters and drainage effluent from irrigation are commonly stored in both natural and artificial saline disposal basins throughout the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia. Their continued use as wastewater evaporation sites requires an understanding of existing groundwater dynamics. The useful of individual basins, their sustainability and possible environmental impacts remain largely unknown. In this work, the movement of salt to the underlying groundwater system from Lake Tutchewop, a saline disposal complex in north-central Victoria, was modelled in cross-section. Due to the salinity contrast between the hypersaline basin waters and the regional groundwater, it was necessary to simulate density-dependent flow behaviour. Under certain conditions, these density-stratified systems may become unstable leading to the onset of convective behaviour, which greatly increases the movement of salt from the basin to the groundwater system. Modelled concentration profiles in the aquifer system and calculated seepage rates from the basin show that Lake Tutchewop is stable under its present operating regime. The downward movement of salt is mainly controlled by diffusion and dispersion. The calibrated model was used to assess the impact of several management scenarios using time-dependent boundary conditions for lake salinity and water levels. The influence of heterogeneous basin linings on ensuing salt flux rates is examined, and results show that increased solute transport will occur under such conditions. A sensitivity analysis performed on governing variables showed that salt fluxes were most sensitive to lake salinity levels. A solute Rayleigh number defined in terms of basin salinity and hydrogeologic parameters is seen to be an effective tool for predicting the long term behaviour of such saline disposal basins. The models and concepts developed in this work may find application in the design and management of saline disposal complexes.

  7. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Salinity II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Presented is a science activity in which the student investigates methods of calibration of a simple conductivity meter via a hands-on inquiry technique. Conductivity is mathematically compared to salinity using a point slope formula and graphical techniques. Sample solutions of unknown salinity are provided so that the students can sharpen their…

  8. Propagated fixed-bed mixed-acid fermentation: Part I: Effect of volatile solid loading rate and agitation at high pH.

    PubMed

    Golub, Kristina W; Forrest, Andrea K; Mercy, Kevin L; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-11-01

    Countercurrent fermentation is a high performing process design for mixed-acid fermentation. However, there are high operating costs associated with moving solids, which is an integral component of this configuration. This study investigated the effect of volatile solid loading rate (VSLR) and agitation in propagated fixed-bed fermentation, a configuration which may be more commercially viable. To evaluate the role of agitation on fixed-bed configuration performance, continuous mixing was compared with periodic mixing. VSLR was also varied and not found to affect acid yields. However, increased VSLR and liquid retention time did result in higher conversions, productivity, acid concentrations, but lower selectivities. Agitation was demonstrated to be important for this fermentor configuration, the periodically-mixed fermentation had the lowest conversion and yields. Operating at a high pH (∼9) contributed to the high selectivity to acetic acid, which might be industrially desirable but at the cost of lower yield compared to a neutral pH.

  9. Extending electromagnetic methods to map coastal pore water salinities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, Wm. J.; Kruse, S.; Swarzenski, P.

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of mapping pore water salinity based on surface electromagnetic (EM) methods over land and shallow marine water is examined in a coastal wetland on Tampa Bay, Florida. Forward models predict that useful information on seabed conductivity can be obtained through <1.5 m of saline water, using floating EM-31 and EM-34 instruments from Geonics Ltd. The EM-31 functioned as predicted when compared against resistivity soundings and pore water samples and proved valuable for profiling in otherwise inaccessible terrain due to its relatively small size. Experiments with the EM-34 in marine water, however, did not reproduce the theoretical instrument response. The most effective technique for predicting pore water conductivities based on EM data entailed (1) computing formation factors from resistivity surveys and pore water samples at representative sites and (2) combining these formation factors with onshore and offshore EM-31 readings for broader spatial coverage. This method proved successful for imaging zones of elevated pore water conductivities/ salinities associated with mangrove forests, presumably caused by salt water exclusion by mangrove roots. These zones extend 5 to 10 m seaward from mangrove trunks fringing Tampa Bay. Modeling indicates that EM-31 measurements lack the resolution necessary to image the subtle pore water conductivity variations expected in association with diffuse submarine ground water discharge of fresher water in the marine water of Tampa Bay. The technique has potential for locating high-contrast zones and other pore water salinity anomalies in areas not accessible to conventional marine- or land-based resistivity arrays and hence may be useful for studies of coastal-wetland ecosystems. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  10. High Contrast CRT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    form brown sulfides or sulfates. By con- trast, No. 1720 glass does not acquire a brown coloration . How- ever, preliminary tests with 1723 glass show...TR-77-2639-F NL -mmo mhhmhul IIII,. BwII ---- i 11111--- IIIIIN III i 8’ II.I25 .11111 I .6 MCROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU Of...High Contrast Displays Two- Color CRT Laminar Flow Electron Gun Thin Film Phosphor Color Penetration Tube 2% AS~iTACT (ConIlm. a" Pove.. 0fdo if

  11. Contrast and depth perception: effects of texture contrast and area contrast.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Shigeru; Kitagawa, Norimichi; Akutsu, Hiromi

    2007-01-01

    Many objects in natural scenes have textures on their surfaces. Contrast of the texture surfaces (the texture contrast) reduces when the viewing distance increases. Similarly, contrast between the surfaces of the objects and the background (the area contrast) reduces when the viewing distance increases. The texture contrast and the area contrast were defined by the contrast between random dots, and by the contrast between the average luminance of the dot pattern and the luminance of the background, respectively. To examine how these two types of contrast influence depth perception, we ran two experiments. In both experiments two areas of random-dot patterns were presented against a uniform background, and participants rated relative depth between the two areas. We found that the rated depth of the patterned areas increased with increases in texture contrast. Furthermore, the effect of the texture contrast on depth judgment increased when the area contrast became low.

  12. Response of Stream Biodiversity to Increasing Salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, C. P.; Vander Laan, J. J.; Olson, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We used a large data set of macroinvertebrate samples collected from streams in both reference-quality (n = 68) and degraded (n = 401) watersheds in the state of Nevada, USA to assess relationships between stream biodiversity and salinity. We used specific electrical conductance (EC)(μS/cm) as a measure of salinity, and applied a previously developed EC model to estimate natural, baseflow salinity at each stream. We used the difference between observed and predicted salinity (EC-Diff) as a measure of salinization associated with watershed degradation. Observed levels of EC varied between 22 and 994 μS/cm across reference sites and 22 to 3,256 uS/cm across non-reference sites. EC-Diff was as high as 2,743 μS/cm. We used a measure of local biodiversity completeness (ratio of observed to expected number of taxa) to assess ecological response to salinity. This O/E index decreased nearly linearly up to about 25% biodiversity loss, which occurred at EC-Diff of about 300 μS/cm. Too few sites had EC-Diff greater than 300 μS/cm to draw reliable inferences regarding biodiversity response to greater levels of salinization. EC-Diff increased with % agricultural land use, mine density, and % urban land use in the watersheds implying that human activities have been largely responsible for increased salinization in Nevada streams and rivers. Comparison of biological responses to EC and other stressors indicates that increased salinization may be the primary stressor causing biodiversity loss in these streams and that more stringent salinity water quality standards may be needed to protect aquatic life.

  13. Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

    2005-11-23

    Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

  14. Effect of contrast media on urinary cytopathology specimens

    PubMed Central

    Frees, Sebastian; Bidnur, Samir; Metcalfe, Michael; Raven, Peter; Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Moskalev, Igor; Fazli, Ladan; So, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Urological dogma dictates that washings collected from the urinary tract for cytological assessment must be performed without interference from contrast agents that may alter cellular integrity and diagnostic interpretation. In practice, the initial contrast used to outline the upper tracts is commonly discarded with subsequent saline washings sent for cytology. We hypothesize that contrast washings do not affect the morphology of urothelial carcinoma cells or the integrity of cytology interpretation. Methods: Samples obtained from (1) human bladder cell lines; (2) urine from a human xenograft bladder cancer model using UC-3 cells; and (3) patients with urothelial carcinoma were subjected to various experimental solutions (water, saline, urine, and dilutions of contrast media) for different exposure times. After exposure to various different solutions, samples underwent cytological analysis to assess morphologic and degenerative changes. Results: No cytological differences were seen when cells were exposed to ionic, hyperosmolar, or non-ionic low-osmolar contrast agents for any exposures up to five minutes. Cells exposed to mixtures of contrast agents and urine also demonstrated no evidence of degenerative change. Cells exposed to water for greater than one minute demonstrated significant hydropic degeneration impacting cytological interpretation. At 40 minutes or later, all reagents caused severe degeneration when evaluating urine samples from the mouse bladder cancer model and from patients undergoing urothelial carcinoma. Conclusions: Commonly used contrast agents have no effect on urinary cytology up to five minutes. Contrast washings of the urinary tract should not be discarded and can be sent for cytological diagnosis if fixed within this time period. PMID:27878040

  15. On Establishing Underlying Tonal Contrast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Phonological field work is largely about establishing contrast in comparable environments. The notion of phonological contrast, however, can be confusing, particularly in its application to tone analysis. Does it mean phonemic contrast in the structuralist sense, or does it mean underlying contrast in the generative sense? Many linguists, in…

  16. Effect of Underground Saline Water on the Growth Characteristic of Tamarix austromongolica in Halomorphic Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwama, Kenji; Kobayashi, Koji; Kaneki, Ryoichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Odani, Hiromichi

    It is important to evaluate the salt tolerance of native plants in order to utilize them for improving halomorphic soil in arid regions. Tamarix austromongolica, a dominant species in Inner Mongolia, China, has the property of salt absorption and expected soil desalinization. The effect of salt concentration in groundwater on the growth of stock diameter and shoot length were evaluated by cultivation experiments, growing the plants from cuttings for two years. Though the plants grew well in 1% salt concentration of groundwater, the evapotranspiration in the second year was reduced because of the growth of the root system. The growth of the plants and evapotranspiration were reduced with increasing groundwater salinity of 3 to 5%, but most plants did not die. In contrast, the plants which were supplied with groundwater of 7% salt concentration in the second year started to die in about a month, and two thirds of them died within five months. Thus the results showed that the tolerant limit of salinity of the plants in groundwater was 7%, and the growth was constrained with groundwater salinity of 3 to 5% concentration. The plants that survived with 7% salinity in the second year, however, were grown in groundwater salt concentration of 3% to 5% in the first year. This result indicated that saline stress might have changed the characteristic of salinity tolerance of the plant.

  17. Salinity effect on nutritional value, chemical composition and bioactive compounds content of Cichorium spinosum L.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Spyridon A; Levizou, Efi; Ntatsi, Georgia; Fernandes, Ângela; Petrotos, Konstantinos; Akoumianakis, Konstantinos; Barros, Lillian; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2017-01-01

    Soil salinization is an increasing problem for many areas throughout the world that renders prohibitive vegetables and crop production in general. In the present study, Cichorium spinosum L. plants were grown under saline conditions in order to evaluate chemical composition and bioactive compounds content of their leaves. Salinity increase resulted in significant changes of macro and micro-nutrients content (nutritional value, sugars, fatty acids, minerals, ascorbic acid and tocopherols), whereas the concentration of phenolic compounds was not significantly affected. Chicoric and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid were the most abundant phenolic acids. In contrast, antioxidant activity and mineral composition were beneficially affected by mid-to-high and high salinity levels. In conclusion, C. spinosum can be cultivated under saline conditions without compromising the quality of the final product, especially in semi-arid areas where irrigation water is scarce and/or of low quality due to high content of NaCl (coastal areas or areas where underground water is saline).

  18. Contrasting Martian Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this interesting view of martian topography just below the 'West Spur' portion of the 'Columbia Hills' on sol 208 (Aug. 2, 2004). The view is looking southwest. The rover's wheel tracks show the contrast between soft martian soil and the harder 'Clovis' rock outcrop, which scientists are now studying.

    The angle of the horizon indicates the tilt of the rover to be about 20 degrees. On the horizon is a small peak informally named 'Grissom Hill,' about 15 kilometers (9.3 miles) away. To the right of the peak is the edge of a 2-kilometer-wide (1.2-mile-wide) crater. A few weeks ago, Spirit stopped to conduct scientific studies of rocks in 'Hank's Hollow,' located on the right side of the image approximately one-third of the way down from the top. This photo was taken with Spirit's right rear hazard-avoidance camera.

  19. Salinity Effects on Superhydrophobic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochanda, F. O.; Samaha, M. A.; Vahedi Tafreshi, H.; Tepper, G. C.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2011-11-01

    Experiments are carried out to investigate the effect of NaCl concentrations on degree of hydrophobicity and longevity of polystyrene fibrous coating. A rheological study using salt water as a test fluid is performed to observe the generated drag reduction from the coating with increasing salt concentration compared to deionized water. Contact-angle measurements of droplets of solutions on the surface are used to validate the results from the rheometer. In situ noninvasive optical spectroscopy system is used to measure the time-dependent loss of entrapped air within the submerged fibrous coating. water for comparison. The superhydrophobic coating used is made of polystyrene fibers that are deposited using DC-biased AC-electrospinning. Such fabrication methods are far less expensive than ordered-microstructured fabrications, bringing the technology closer to large-scale submerged bodies such as submarines and ships. The present study sheds some light on how properties of a superhydrophobic coating could be influenced by water salinity. Financial support from DARPA, contract number W91CRB-10-1-0003, is acknowledged.

  20. Accumulation of dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans in agar cultures and in stationary and agitated liquid cultures of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill.

    PubMed

    Szopa, Agnieszka; Kokotkiewicz, Adam; Marzec-Wróblewska, Urszula; Bucinski, Adam; Luczkiewicz, Maria; Ekiert, Halina

    2016-05-01

    Schisandra chinensis plant in vitro cultures were maintained on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 3 mg/l 6-benzyladenine (BA) and 1 mg/l 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) in an agar system and also in two different liquid systems: stationary and agitated. Liquid cultures were grown in batch (30 and 60 days) and fed-batch modes. In the methanolic extracts from lyophilized biomasses and in the media, quantification of fourteen dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans identified based on co-chromatography with authentic standards using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and/or liquid chromatography with diode array detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-ESI-MS) methods. For comparison purposes, phytochemical analyses were performed of lignans in the leaves and fruits of the parent plant. The main lignans detected in the biomass extracts from all the tested systems were schisandrin (max. 65.62 mg/100 g dry weight (DW)), angeloyl-/tigloylgomisin Q (max. 49.73 mg/100 g DW), deoxyschisandrin (max. 43.65 mg/100 g DW), and gomisin A (max. 34.36 mg/100 g DW). The highest total amounts of lignans in the two tested stationary systems were found in extracts from the biomass harvested after 30 days of batch cultivation: 237.86 mg/100 g DW and 274.65 mg/100 g DW, respectively. In the agitated culture, the total content reached a maximum value of 244.80 mg/100 g DW after 60 days of the fed-batch mode of cultivation. The lignans were not detected in the media. This is the first report which documents the potential usefulness of S. chinensis shoot cultures cultivated in liquid systems for practical purposes.

  1. Effect of Mechanical Agitation on Cationic Liposome Transport across an Unstirred Water Layer in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yusuke; Iwasaki, Ayu; Matsuoka, Kenta; Fujita, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    To develop an effective oral delivery system for plasmid DNA (pDNA) using cationic liposomes, it is necessary to clarify the characteristics of uptake and transport of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes into the intestinal epithelium. In particular, evaluation of the involvement of an unstirred water layer (UWL), which is a considerable permeability barrier, in cationic liposome transport is very important. Here, we investigated the effects of a UWL on the transfection efficiency of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes into a Caco-2 cell monolayer. When Caco-2 cells were transfected with cationic liposome/pDNA complexes in shaking cultures to reduce the thickness of the UWL, gene expression was significantly higher in Caco-2 cells compared with static cultures. We also found that this enhancement of gene expression by shaking was not attributable to activation of transcription factors such as activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). In addition, the increase in gene expression by mechanical agitation was observed at all charge ratios (1.5, 2.3, 3.1, 4.5) of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes. Transport experiments using Transwells demonstrated that mechanical agitation increased the uptake of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes by Caco-2 cells, whereas transport of the complexes across a Caco-2 cell monolayer did not occurr. Moreover, the augmentation of the gene expression of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes by shaking was observed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These results indicate that a UWL greatly affects the uptake and transfection efficiency of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes into an epithelial monolayer in vitro.

  2. Tandem air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction as an efficient method for determination of acidic drugs in complicated matrices.

    PubMed

    Bazregar, Mohammad; Rajabi, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Asghari, Alireza; Hemmati, Maryam

    2016-04-21

    A rapid and simple microextraction method with a high sample clean-up, termed as tandem air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction (TAALLME), is described. This method is based upon the tandem implementation of the air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME), and this approach improves the applicability of the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) methods in complicated matrices. With very simple tools, the three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs diclofenac, ibuprofen, and mefenamic acid were efficiently extracted, with an overall extraction time of 7 min. By performing the first AALLME, these acidic analytes, contained in an aqueous sample solution (donor phase, 8.0 mL), were extracted into the organic solvent (1,2-dichloroethane, 37 μL), and their simple back-extraction into the aqueous acceptor solution (pH, 10.01, 51 μL) was obtained in 2 min by a second implementation of AALLME. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for optimization of the experimental parameters. The pH values 2.94 and 10.01 were obtained for the donor and acceptor phases, respectively, and the volumes 99.5 and 51 μL were obtained for the organic solvent and the acceptor phase, respectively, as the optimal extraction conditions. Under the optimized conditions, tandem AALLME-HPLC-UV provided a good linearity in the range of 0.5-4000 ng mL(-1), limits of detection (0.1-0.3 ng mL(-1)), extraction repeatabilities (relative standard deviations (RSDs) below 7.7%, n = 5), and the enrichment factors (EFs) of 80-104. Finally, the applicability of the proposed method was evaluated by the extraction and determination of the drugs under study in the wastewater and human plasma samples.

  3. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Elizabeth L.; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen–Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

  4. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Elizabeth L; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia.

  5. Osmo and ionic regulation of black tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon Fabricius 1798) juveniles exposed to K(+) deficient inland saline water at different salinities.

    PubMed

    Tantulo, Uras; Fotedar, Ravi

    2007-02-01

    An 11-day trial was conducted to investigate the osmoregulatory capacity (OC) and regulation of K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) of Penaeus monodon juveniles when exposed to K(+) deficient inland saline water (ISW) of four different salinities (5, 15, 25 and 35 ppt). The survival of juveniles showed a positive linear relationship (R(2) ranging from 0.72 to 0.98) with salinity. At the end of the trial, juveniles were able to survive only in 5 ppt of ISW and showed no changes in OC when transferred from ocean water (OW) to ISW. Further, the OC of juveniles in 5 ppt of ISW was significantly different (P<0.05) from the OC of juveniles exposed to 15, 25 and 35 ppt and exhibited strong serum K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) regulation monitored over 16 h. In contrast, at 35 ppt, significant decrease (P<0.05) in serum K(+) and Mg(2+) concentrations and accumulation of serum Na(+) concentration occurred after 16 h of exposure to ISW. At higher salinity, an increase in serum Na(+) concentration leads to an increase in the serum osmolality of the juveniles, which in turn causes decrease in the OC of the juveniles. The results of this study suggest that K(+) deficiency in ISW has a negative effect on survival, OC and the ability of P. monodon juveniles to regulate serum Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) concentrations. These effects are compounded as salinity increases.

  6. [Ecophysiological adaptability of tropical water organisms to salinity changes].

    PubMed

    Chung, K S

    2001-03-01

    Physiological response of tropical organisms to salinity changes was studied for some marine, estuarine and freshwater fishes (Astyanax bimaculatus, Petenia karussii, Cyprinodon dearborni, and Oreochromis mossambicus), marine and freshwater crustaceans (Penaeus brasiliensis, Penaeus schmitti and Macrobrachium carcinus), and marine bivalves (Perna perna, Crassostrea rhizophorae, and Arca zebra) collected from Northeast Venezuela. They were acclimated for four weeks at various salinities, and (1) placed at high salinities to determine mean lethal salinity, (2) tested by increasing salinity 5@1000 per day to define upper lethal salinity tolerance limit, or (3) observed in a saline gradient tank to determine salinity preference. Acclimation level was the most significant factor. This phenomenon is important for tropical aquatic organisms in shallow waters, where they can adapt to high salinity during the dry season and cannot lose their acclimation level at low salinity during abrupt rain. For saline adaptation of tropical organisms, this behavior will contribute to their proliferation and distribution in fluctuating salinity environments.

  7. Does bicarbonate prevent contrast-induced nephropathy in cardiovascular patients undergoing contrast imaging?

    PubMed

    Dabare, Dilan; Banihani, Mohammed; Gibbs, Paul; Grewal, Perbinder

    2013-12-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiovascular surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether administering sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) prevents contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in cardiovascular patients undergoing contrast imaging. In total, 266 papers were found using the reported search, 16 of which represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. CIN is thought to occur as a result of ischaemic or oxidative injury to the kidney. It is postulated that NaHCO3attenuates this renal damage by alkanizing renal tubular fluid thus reducing the generation of contrast-induced free radicals, which damage the kidney. Of the 16 trials, 15 recruited patients with various degrees of renal dysfunction at baseline. The benefit of using NaHCO3 was demonstrated at all stages of chronic kidney disease. Apart from four studies, 12 studies used low toxicity, low-osmolar contrast. Merten et al. published the first trial of NaHCO3 vs (saline) NaCl in preventing CIN, demonstrated a significantly lower rate in the NaHCO3 group and advocated its widespread use. Subsequent trials using the same regimen have collaborated these results. However, more recently, Gomes et al. concluded that NaHCO3 is not superior to saline-based hydration. Similarly, Brar et al. randomized 323 patients with moderate-to-severe renal insufficiency to receive either an NaHCO3 or an NaCl infusion and observed no difference in CIN rates. Two studies investigated the effects of rapid urine alkanization with bolus injections of NaHCO3 prior to contrast and found significant reductions in CIN rates compared with NaCl-treated groups. One study observed that NaCl is superior to NaHCO3, while all other studies showed a beneficial effect or no difference between NaCl- and NaHCO3-based hydration. The most recent meta

  8. Sea-surface salinity: the missing measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Erich F.; Koblinsky, Chester

    2003-04-01

    Even the youngest child knows that the sea is salty. Yet, routine, global information about the degree of saltiness and the distribution of the salinity is not available. Indeed, the sea surface salinity measurement is a key missing measurement in global change research. Salinity influences circulation and links the ocean to global change and the water-cycle. Space-based remote sensing of important global change ocean parameters such as sea-surface temperature and water-cycle parameters such as precipitation have been available to the research community but a space-based global sensing of salinity has been missing. In July 2002, the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) announced that the Aquarius mission, focused on the global measurement of sea surface salinity, is one of the missions approved under its ESSP-3 program. Aquarius will begin a risk-reduction phase during 2003. Aquarius will carry a multi-beam 1.4 GHz (L-band) radiometer used for retrieving salinity. It also will carry a 1.2 GHz (L-band) scatterometer used for measuring surface roughness. Aquarius is tentatively scheduled for a 2006 launch into an 8-day Sun-synchronous orbit. Aquarius key science data product will be a monthly, global surface salinity map at 100 km resolution with an accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units. Aquarius will have a 3 year operational period. Among other things, global salinity data will permit estimates of sea surface density, or buoyancy, that drives the ocean's three-dimensional circulation.

  9. Analysis of central opioid receptor subtype antagonism of hypotonic and hypertonic saline intake in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, R J; Glass, M J; Koch, J E

    1995-01-01

    Intake of either hypotonic or hypertonic saline solutions is modulated in part by the endogenous opioid system. Morphine and selective mu and delta opioid agonists increase saline intake, while general opioid antagonists reduce saline intake in rats. The present study evaluated whether intracerebroventricular administration of general (naltrexone) and selective mu (beta-funaltrexamine, 5-20 micrograms), mu, (naloxonazine, 50 micrograms), kappa (nor-binaltorphamine, 5-20 micrograms), delta (naltrindole, 20 micrograms), or delta 1 (DALCE, 40 micrograms) opioid receptor subtype antagonists altered water intake and either hypotonic (0.6%) or hypertonic (1.7%) saline intake in water-deprived (24 h) rats over a 3-h time course in a two-bottle choice test. Whereas peripheral naltrexone (0.5-2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced water intake and hypertonic saline intake, central naltrexone (1-50 micrograms) significantly reduced water intake and hypotonic saline intake. Water intake was significantly reduced following mu and kappa receptor antagonism, but not following mu 1, delta, or delta 1 receptor antagonism. In contrast, neither hypotonic nor hypertonic saline intake was significantly altered by any selective antagonist. These data are discussed in terms of opioid receptor subtype control over saline intake relative to the animal's hydrational state and the roles of palatability and/or salt appetite.

  10. Composition and distribution of planktonic ciliates from ponds of different salinity in the solar saltwork of Sfax, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elloumi, Jannet; Carrias, Jean-François; Ayadi, Habib; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Boukhris, Mekki; Bouaïn, Abderrahmen

    2006-03-01

    The planktonic ciliated protozoa of 14 ponds of increasing salinity were investigated in the saline of Sfax, Tunisia. Taxa of the classes of Spirotrichea and Heterotrichea were the numerous ciliates. Abundance of the community ranged from 0.0 to 11.8 × 10 4 ciliates per litre. Values decrease significantly with salinity gradient, as species richness does. Based on the range of salinity over which ciliate taxa appeared, we distinguished three groups of ciliates. The first group is mainly composed of oligotrichs and choreotrichs that are commonly found in marine coastal waters. Small ciliates belonging to the order Prostomatida were found in a large range of salinity values, but their densities also decreased with salt concentration. In contrast, large-size species of heterotrichous ciliates were found in ponds with high salinity values only. In these ponds, the presence of prey appeared as an important factor in controlling the abundances of these halotolerant ciliates. Our data also suggest that Fabrea salina, a common halophile ciliate, acts as a competitor of the brine shrimp Artemia salina in the saline of Sfax. Salinity, prey availability, and the presence of competitors seem to be the main factors for the distribution of ciliate taxa in this hypersaline environment.

  11. Stability of Balloon-Retention Gastrostomy Tubes with Different Concentrations of Contrast Material: In Vitro Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lopera, Jorge E.; Alvarez, Alex; Trimmer, Clayton; Josephs, Shellie; Anderson, Matthew; Dolmatch, Bart

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of two balloon-retention-type gastrostomy tubes when the balloons are inflated with two types of contrast materials at different concentrations. Two commonly used balloon-retention-type tubes (MIC and Tri-Funnel) were inflated to the manufacturer's recommended volumes (4 and 20 cm{sup 3}, respectively) with normal saline or normal saline plus different concentrations of contrast material. Five tubes of each brand were inflated with normal saline and 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% contrast material dilutions, using either nonionic hyperosmolar contrast, or nonionic iso-osmolar contrast. The tubes were submerged in a glass basin containing a solution with a pH of 4. Every week the tubes were visually inspected to determine the integrity of the balloons, and the diameter of the balloons was measured with a caliper. The tests were repeated every week for a total of 12 weeks. The MIC balloons deflated slightly faster over time than the Tri-Funnel balloons. The Tri-Funnel balloons remained relatively stable over the study period for the different concentrations of contrast materials. The deflation rates of the MIC balloons were proportionally related to the concentration of saline and inversely related to the concentration of the contrast material. At high contrast material concentrations, solidification of the balloons was observed. In conclusion, this in vitro study confirms that the use of diluted amounts of nonionic contrast materials is safe for inflating the balloons of two types of balloon-retention feeding tubes. High concentrations of contrast could result in solidification of the balloons and should be avoided.

  12. Stability of balloon-retention gastrostomy tubes with different concentrations of contrast material: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lopera, Jorge E; Alvarez, Alex; Trimmer, Clayton; Josephs, Shellie; Anderson, Matthew; Dolmatch, Bart

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of two balloon-retention-type gastrostomy tubes when the balloons are inflated with two types of contrast materials at different concentrations. Two commonly used balloon-retention-type tubes (MIC and Tri-Funnel) were inflated to the manufacturer's recommended volumes (4 and 20 cm(3), respectively) with normal saline or normal saline plus different concentrations of contrast material. Five tubes of each brand were inflated with normal saline and 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% contrast material dilutions, using either nonionic hyperosmolar contrast, or nonionic iso-osmolar contrast. The tubes were submerged in a glass basin containing a solution with a pH of 4. Every week the tubes were visually inspected to determine the integrity of the balloons, and the diameter of the balloons was measured with a caliper. The tests were repeated every week for a total of 12 weeks. The MIC balloons deflated slightly faster over time than the Tri-Funnel balloons. The Tri-Funnel balloons remained relatively stable over the study period for the different concentrations of contrast materials. The deflation rates of the MIC balloons were proportionally related to the concentration of saline and inversely related to the concentration of the contrast material. At high contrast material concentrations, solidification of the balloons was observed. In conclusion, this in vitro study confirms that the use of diluted amounts of nonionic contrast materials is safe for inflating the balloons of two types of balloon-retention feeding tubes. High concentrations of contrast could result in solidification of the balloons and should be avoided.

  13. Smear layer removal efficacy of combination of herbal extracts in two different ratios either alone or supplemented with sonic agitation: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Naveen; Gyanani, Hitesh; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the combination of two natural extracts in varying ratios for removal of smear layer either alone or supplemented with sonic agitation. Materials and Methods: Fifty extracted single-rooted teeth were collected, disinfected and decoronated below the cementoenamel junction to obtain standardized root length of 10 mm. Root canals were instrumented using rotary files at working length 1 mm short of the apex. Specimens were divided into six groups according to the irrigation protocol as follows: Group A – Distilled water, Group B – 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, Group C – Herbal extracts in 1:1 ratio, Group D – Herbal extracts in 1:1 ratio supplemented with sonic agitation, Group E – Herbal extracts in 2:1 ratio, Group F – Herbal extracts in 2:1 ratio supplemented with sonic agitation. Specimens were longitudinally sectioned and evaluated under scanning electron microscope for smear layer removal efficacy. Obtained scores were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and post-hoc test. Results: Among all, Group B showed the best results followed by Group F. Remaining other groups showed inferior outcome (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The combination of two extracts in 2:1 ratio was slightly better than 1:1 ratio and the smear layer removal efficacy was further improved when accompanied with sonic agitation. PMID:26430300

  14. Rages or Temper Tantrums? The Behavioral Organization, Temporal Characteristics, and Clinical Significance of Angry-Agitated Outbursts in Child Psychiatry Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potegal, Michael; Carlson, Gabrielle; Margulies, David; Gutkovitch, Zinoviy; Wall, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Angry, agitated outbursts (AAOs) are a common precipitant of children's psychiatric hospitalization. In the hospital, AAOs present both management and diagnostic challenges, e.g., while they have recently been described as manic "rages", older studies suggest that they may be exacerbated temper tantrums. Factor analyses of 109 AAOs had by 46…

  15. Influence of milk pretreatment on production of free fatty acids and volatile compounds in hard cheeses: heat treatment and mechanical agitation.

    PubMed

    Vélez, M A; Perotti, M C; Wolf, I V; Hynes, E R; Zalazar, C A

    2010-10-01

    This work aimed to identify technological steps that can increase fat hydrolysis and volatile compounds production in hard cheeses; these biochemical events have been related with improved piquant taste and development of genuine flavor during cheese ripening. For that purpose, 2 different pretreatments of cheese milk were tested: heat treatment and mechanical agitation. Both factors were assayed at 2 levels: milk was either batch pasteurized or nonthermally treated, and mechanical agitation was either applied or not applied. For all combinations, hard cheeses (Reggianito type) were produced in a pilot plant and ripened for 90 d. In all cheeses the degree of lipolysis, assessed by gas chromatography, increased similarly during ripening. However, the proportion of short-chain fatty acids was higher in the cheeses made with unpasteurized milk, suggesting a higher activity of lipases with positional specificity toward the sn-3 position of the triglyceride, among which milk lipoprotein lipase is found. Similar results were found for most of the volatile compounds, determined by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography flame-ionization detector/mass spectrometry, which constitute the groups of ketones, alcohols, esters, and the group of acids. On the contrary, no effect of mechanical agitation was observed, although some interactions between factors were found. In the conditions of the study, results suggest that heat treatment had a higher effect on cheese lipolysis and volatile compounds production than partial destabilization of the fat emulsion produced by the agitation method applied.

  16. Impact of aeration and agitation on metabolic heat and protease secretion of Aspergillus tamarii in a real-time biological reaction calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Balaji; Mahadevan, Surianarayanan; Dhilipkumar, Sathish Sundar; Rajkumar, Suseela; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-06-01

    The effects of aeration and agitation on metabolic heat, alkaline protease production and morphology for Aspergillus tamarii MTCC5152 are reported in this manuscript. Measurement of metabolic heat has been attempted by the continuous and dynamic heat balance method in a biological real-time reaction calorimeter. At lower agitation intensities, growth-related processes were dominating. As a result the protease activity and the product heat yields were lower than those for 350 and 450 rpm. Although biomass growth was necessary to obtain maximum protease yield, agitation seemed to play a vital role in the protease production process. Energy dissipation per circulation function of the process is also deduced from power input. At optimal conditions, 350 rpm and 1 vvm, the gassed power required was 0.133 W. Pellet morphology and protease production were studied under different aeration and agitation intensities of A. tamarii. Pellet structure was considerably influenced by DO, a higher DO level resulted in denser pellets (1,018.4 kg/m(3)) leading to higher protease activity. Coupling of hydrodynamics and bio-reaction highlighted the complex relationship between energy dissipation, substrate uptake rate and fungal physiology. This study emphasised the potential of biocalorimetry as a reliable monitoring and robust control tool for aerobic fermentation of A. tamarii, using agricultural by-products.

  17. Contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible.

  18. Anammox Coupled With Nitrification Impacts a Saline, High Ammonia Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, L. A.; Landkamer, L.; Peterson, D. M.; Metzler, D.

    2007-05-01

    High amounts of ammonia (130 to 2200 mg-N/l) in a saline environment (TDS = 10-20 g/l) are present in a groundwater plume adjacent to the Colorado River near Moab, Utah. Ammonia levels sufficient to affect aquatic life have been observed in limited sections of the river adjacent to the site, which has prompted interim treatment efforts. Microcosm studies were performed to assess the potential for microbial transformations of ammonia in the hyporheic zone sediment and the effect of ground/river-water mixing on transformations. Experiments were conducted using sub-riverbed sediment and mixtures of groundwater (290 mg-N/L ammonia) and river water (100%, 50% and 10% plume water) in anaerobic and aerobic environments. Aqueous NH4+, NO2-, NO3-, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were monitored over 38 days. Interestingly, the ammonia concentration decreased in all microcosms (29% to 100%) with the highest removal occurring in the oxic microcosms. Total nitrogen removal ranged from 27% to 83%. Three lines of evidence suggest that anammox occurred in the anaerobic microcosms: 1) NH4+ concentrations decreased, 2) little change in DOC occurred and 3) DIC decreased. DIC should increase if denitrification were the dominant process. It is possible that small amounts of O2 diffused into the microcosms, driving some nitrification that supplied NO2- for anammox. In the aerobic microcosms, denitrification or anammox occurred in addition to nitrification because nitrate did not accumulate in general. Again, we believe anammox occurred because of DOC and DIC trends. In the aerobic 10% groundwater microcosm, NO3- accumulated once the ammonia concentration became low and the nitrate level stabilized after the ammonia was gone. This also indicated that anammox was the dominant process because denitrification should not stop due to ammonia depletion. The aerobic microcosms were only agitated twice per week, which would allow the sediments to become

  19. Aquarius Observations of Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows changes in global sea surface salinity, as measured by NASA’s Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D spacecraft, from December 2011 through December 2012. Red repr...

  20. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  1. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  2. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  3. Comparison of calcium hydroxide removal by self-adjusting file, EndoVac, and CanalBrush agitation techniques: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Türker, Sevinç Aktemur; Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Koçak, Sibel; Sağlam, Baran Can

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study comparatively evaluated the efficacy of self-adjusting file (SAF), Endovac, and CanalBrush irrigant agitation protocols in removing calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) from the root canals. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human mandibular canine teeth were instrumented with ProTaper rotary instruments to size #40 and dressed with Ca(OH)2. The roots were randomly assigned to four groups according to irrigant agitation protocol used (n = 15). In Group 1: Conventional syringe irrigation (no activation, control); Group 2: Rotary brush agitation (CanalBrush); Group 3: Apical negative pressure irrigation (EndoVac system); and Group 4: Sonic agitation (SAF) were used. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) evaluation was done for assessment of Ca(OH)2 removal in the coronal and apical thirds. Statistical analysis was performed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: There were statistically significant differences among the groups (P = 0.218). A statistically significant difference was seen between the test groups in Ca(OH)2 removal from the apical third of the canal (P < 0.05). In the coronal third, there was no difference between the groups (P > 0.05). The most efficient Ca(OH)2 removal in apical third was recorded in Group 3 (EndoVac) and Group 4 (SAF) (P < 0.05). In Group 4 (sonic agitation), there was no significantly difference between Ca(OH)2 removal in coronal and apical thirds. Conclusions: SAF and EndoVac showed significantly better performance than CanalBrush and conventional syringe irrigation in removing Ca(OH)2 from apical third of the root canals. PMID:24082574

  4. Effect of impeller type and agitation on the performance of pilot scale ASBR and AnSBBR applied to sanitary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    de Novaes, Luciano Farias; Saratt, Bruna Luckmann; Rodrigues, José Alberto Domingues; Ratusznei, Suzana Maria; de Moraes, Deovaldo; Ribeiro, Rogers; Zaiat, Marcelo; Foresti, Eugenio

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the effect of agitation rate and impeller type in two mechanically stirred sequencing batch reactors: one containing granulated biomass (denominated ASBR) and the other immobilized biomass on polyurethane foam (denominated AnSBBR). Each configuration, with total volume of 1 m(3), treated 0.65 m(3) sanitary wastewater at ambient temperature in 8-h cycles. Three impeller types were assessed for each reactor configuration: flat-blade turbine impeller, 45 degrees -inclined-blade turbine impeller and helix impeller, as well as two agitation rates: 40 and 80 rpm, resulting in a combination of six experimental conditions. In addition, the ASBR was also operated at 20 rpm with a flat-blade turbine impeller and the AnSBBR was operated with a draft tube and helix impeller at 80 and 120 rpm. To quantify how impeller type and agitation rate relate to substrate consumption rate, results obtained during monitoring at the end of the cycle, as well as the time profiles during a cycle were analyzed. Increasing agitation rate from 40 rpm to 80 rpm in the AnSBBR improved substrate consumption rate whereas in the ASBR this increase destabilized the system, likely due to granule rupture caused by the higher agitation. The AnSBBR showed highest solids and substrate removal, highest kinetic constant and highest alkalinity production when using a helix impeller, 80 rpm, and no draft tube. The best condition for the ASBR was achieved with a flat-blade turbine impeller at 20 rpm. The presence of the draft tube in the AnSBBR did not show significant improvement in reactor efficiency. Furthermore, power consumption studies in these pilot scale reactors showed that power transfer required to improve mass transfer might be technically and economically feasible.

  5. Recognition memory reveals just how CONTRASTIVE contrastive accenting really is

    PubMed Central

    Fraundorf, Scott H.; Watson, Duane G.; Benjamin, Aaron S.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of pitch accenting on memory were investigated in three experiments. Participants listened to short recorded discourses that contained contrast sets with two items (e.g. British scientists and French scientists); a continuation specified one item from the set. Pitch accenting on the critical word in the continuation was manipulated between non-contrastive (H* in the ToBI system) and contrastive (L+H*). On subsequent recognition memory tests, the L+H* accent increased hits to correct statements and correct rejections of the contrast item (Experiments 1–3), but did not impair memory for other parts of the discourse (Experiment 2). L+H* also did not facilitate correct rejections of lures not in the contrast set (Experiment 3), indicating that contrastive accents do not simply strengthen the representation of the target item. These results suggest comprehenders use pitch accenting to encode and update information about multiple elements in a contrast set. PMID:20835405

  6. [Investigation and canonical correspondence analysis of salinity contents in secondary salinization greenhouse soils in Shanghai suburb].

    PubMed

    Tang, Dong; Mao, Liang; Zhi, Yue-e; Zhang, Jin-Zhong; Zhou, Pei; Chai, Xiao-Tong

    2014-12-01

    The salinity characteristics of greenhouse soils with cropping obstacles in Shanghai suburb were investigated and analyzed. The salinity contents of the salinization greenhouse soils showed a trend of first increasing and then decreasing with the increasing cropping duration. The salinized soils mainly included slightly salted, mildly salted and salted soils, which accounted for 17.39%, 56.52% and 13.04%, respectively. Among them, the degree of salinity in greenhouse soil planted with asparagus in Chongming County was the highest. Among the salt ions in greenhouse soils, the cations were mainly Ca2+ and Na+, while the anions were mainly NO3- and SO4(2-). The degree of salinity was mainly influenced by fertilization mode, cropping duration, crop type and management level, which led to the great variation in the salinity contents and salt ions. Canonical correspondence analysis found that the contents of Ca2+, Mg2+ and NO3- in greenhouse soils were greatly affected by cropping duration, and the degree of salinity would be enhanced and attenuated with long-term application of single fertilizer and mixed application of chemical fertilizer and organic manure, respectively. The greenhouse soils in Shanghai suburb could be classified as four patterns influenced by the relationship between salinity ions and samples, and the most soils were influenced by Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3- and Cl-, which required to be primarily controlled.

  7. Contrastive Analysis and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Charles A.

    Contrastive analysis is basic to all linguistics since only by this approach can a general theory of language (language universals) be constructed and only with at least implicit contrastive analysis can a particular language be fully characterized. Two kinds of contrastive analysis have been basic to diachronic linguistics: the comparison of…

  8. Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T; Cozad, D.B.; Lee, G.

    2010-01-01

    Innovative strategies for effective basin-scale salinity management have been developed in the Hunter River Basin of Australia and more recently in the San Joaquin River Basin of California. In both instances web-based stakeholder information dissemination has been a key to achieving a high level of stakeholder involvement and the formulation of effective decision support salinity management tools. A common element to implementation of salinity management strategies in both river basins has been the concept of river assimilative capacity for controlling export salt loading and the potential for trading of the right to discharge salt load to the river - the Hunter River in Australia and the San Joaquin River in California. Both rivers provide basin drainage and the means of exporting salt to the ocean. The paper compares and contrasts the use of monitoring, modeling and information dissemination in the two basins to achieve environmental compliance and sustain irrigated agriculture in an equitable and socially and politically acceptable manner.

  9. Silver behaviour along the salinity gradient of the Gironde Estuary.

    PubMed

    Lanceleur, Laurent; Schäfer, Jörg; Blanc, Gérard; Coynel, Alexandra; Bossy, Cécile; Baudrimont, Magalie; Glé, Corine; Larrose, Aurélie; Renault, Sophie; Strady, Emilie

    2013-03-01

    Dissolved and particulate Ag concentrations (Ag(D) and Ag(P), respectively) were measured in surface water and suspended particulate matter (SPM) along the salinity gradient of the Gironde Estuary, South West France, during three cruises (2008-2009) covering contrasting hydrological conditions, i.e. two cruises during intermediate and one during high freshwater discharge (~740 and ~2,300 m(3)/s). Silver distribution reflected non-conservative behaviour with 60-70 % of Ag(P) in freshwater particles being desorbed by chlorocomplexation. The amount of Ag(P) desorbed was similar to the so-called reactive, potentially bioavailable Ag(P) fraction (60 ± 4 %) extracted from river SPM by 1 M HCl. Both Ag(P) (0.22 ± 0.05 mg/kg) and Ag(P)/Th(P) (0.025-0.028) in the residual fraction of fluvial and estuarine SPM were similar to those in SPM from the estuary mouth and in coastal sediments from the shelf off the Gironde Estuary, indicating that chlorocomplexation desorbs the reactive Ag(P). The data show that desorption of reactive Ag(P) mainly occurs inside the estuary during low and intermediate discharge, whereas expulsion of partially Ag(P)-depleted SPM (Ag(P)/Th(P) ~0.040) during the flood implies ongoing desorption in the coastal ocean, e.g. in the nearby oyster production areas (Marennes-Oléron Bay). The highest Ag(D) levels (6-8 ng/L) occurred in the mid-salinity range (15-20) of the Gironde Estuary and were decoupled from freshwater discharge. In the maximum turbidity zone, Ag(D) were at minimum, showing that high SPM concentrations (a) induce Ag(D) adsorption in estuarine freshwater and (b) counterbalance Ag(P) desorption in the low salinity range (1-3). Accordingly, Ag behaviour in turbid estuaries appears to be controlled by the balance between salinity and SPM levels. The first estimates of daily Ag(D) net fluxes for the Gironde Estuary (Boyle's method) showed relatively stable theoretical Ag(D) at zero salinity (Ag (D) (0) = 25-30 ng/L) for the contrasting

  10. Salinity Measurements During the Gulf Stream Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Koblinsky, C.; Howden, S.; Goodberlet, M.

    2000-01-01

    The salinity of the open ocean is important for understanding ocean circulation, for understanding energy exchange with the atmosphere and for improving models to predict weather and climate. Passive microwave sensors at L-band (1.4 GHz) operating from aircraft have demonstrated that salinity can be measured with sufficient accuracy (1 psu) to be scientifically meaningful in coastal waters. However, measuring salinity in the open ocean presents unresolved issues largely because of the much greater accuracy (approx. 0.1 psu) required to be scientifically viable. In the summer of 1999 a series of measurements called, The Gulf Stream Experiment, were conducted as part of research at the Goddard Space Flight Center to test the potential for passive microwave remote sensing of salinity in the open ocean. The measurements consisted of a compliment of airborne microwave instruments (radiometers and scatterometer) and ships and drifters for surface truth. The study area was a 200 km by 100 km rectangle about 250 km east of Delaware Bay between the continental shelf waters and north wall of the Gulf Stream. The primary passive instruments were the ESTAR radiometer (L-band, H-pol) and the SLFMR radiometer (L-band, V-pol). In addition, the compliment of instruments on the aircraft included a C-band radiometer (ACMR), an ocean wave scatterometer (ROWS) and an infrared radiometer. A GPS backscatter experiment was also part of the package. These instruments were mounted on the NASA P-3 Orion aircraft. Surface salinity measurements were provided by the RN Cape Henlopen and MN Oleander (thermosalinographs) plus salinity and temperature sensors on three surface drifters deployed from the RN Cape Henopen. The primary experiment period was August 26-September 2, 1999. During this period the salinity field within the study area consisted of a gradient on the order of 2-3 psu in the vicinity of the shelf break and a warm core ring with a gradient of 1-2 psu. Detailed maps were made

  11. Endoscopy imaging intelligent contrast improvement.

    PubMed

    Sheraizin, S; Sheraizin, V

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a medical endoscopy video contrast improvement method that provides intelligent automatic adaptive contrast control. The method fundamentals are video data clustering and video data histogram modification. The video data clustering allows an effective use the low noise two channel contrast enhancement processing. The histogram analysis permitted to determine the video exposure type for simple and complicated contrast distribution. We determined the needed gamma value for automatic local area contrast improvement for the following exposure types: dark, normal, light, dark light, dark normal etc. The experimental results of medical endoscopy video processing allow defining the automatic gamma control range from 0.5 to 2.0.

  12. Ocean acidification alters temperature and salinity preferences in larval fish.

    PubMed

    Pistevos, Jennifer C A; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Rossi, Tullio; Connell, Sean D

    2017-02-01

    Ocean acidification alters the way in which animals perceive and respond to their world by affecting a variety of senses such as audition, olfaction, vision and pH sensing. Marine species rely on other senses as well, but we know little of how these might be affected by ocean acidification. We tested whether ocean acidification can alter the preference for physicochemical cues used for dispersal between ocean and estuarine environments. We experimentally assessed the behavioural response of a larval fish (Lates calcarifer) to elevated temperature and reduced salinity, including estuarine water of multiple cues for detecting settlement habitat. Larval fish raised under elevated CO2 concentrations were attracted by warmer water, but temperature had no effect on fish raised in contemporary CO2 concentrations. In contrast, contemporary larvae were deterred by lower salinity water, where CO2-treated fish showed no such response. Natural estuarine water-of higher temperature, lower salinity, and containing estuarine olfactory cues-was only preferred by fish treated under forecasted high CO2 conditions. We show for the first time that attraction by larval fish towards physicochemical cues can be altered by ocean acidification. Such alterations to perception and evaluation of environmental cues during the critical process of dispersal can potentially have implications for ensuing recruitment and population replenishment. Our study not only shows that freshwater species that spend part of their life cycle in the ocean might also be affected by ocean acidification, but that behavioural responses towards key physicochemical cues can also be negated through elevated CO2 from human emissions.

  13. The salinity signature of the cross-shelf exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean: Satellite observations.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Raul A; Piola, Alberto R; Fenco, Harold; Matano, Ricardo P; Combes, Vincent; Chao, Yi; James, Corinne; Palma, Elbio D; Saraceno, Martin; Strub, P Ted

    2014-11-01

    Satellite-derived sea surface salinity (SSS) data from Aquarius and SMOS are used to study the shelf-open ocean exchanges in the western South Atlantic near 35°S. Away from the tropics, these exchanges cause the largest SSS variability throughout the South Atlantic. The data reveal a well-defined seasonal pattern of SSS during the analyzed period and of the location of the export of low-salinity shelf waters. In spring and summer, low-salinity waters over the shelf expand offshore and are transferred to the open ocean primarily southeast of the river mouth (from 36°S to 37°30'S). In contrast, in fall and winter, low-salinity waters extend along a coastal plume and the export path to the open ocean distributes along the offshore edge of the plume. The strong seasonal SSS pattern is modulated by the seasonality of the along-shelf component of the wind stress over the shelf. However, the combined analysis of SSS, satellite-derived sea surface elevation and surface velocity data suggest that the precise location of the export of shelf waters depends on offshore circulation patterns, such as the location of the Brazil Malvinas Confluence and mesoscale eddies and meanders of the Brazil Current. The satellite data indicate that in summer, mixtures of low-salinity shelf waters are swiftly driven toward the ocean interior along the axis of the Brazil/Malvinas Confluence. In winter, episodic wind reversals force the low-salinity coastal plume offshore where they mix with tropical waters within the Brazil Current and create a warmer variety of low-salinity waters in the open ocean.

  14. Evidence for high salinity of Early Cretaceous sea water from the Chesapeake Bay crater.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Ward E; Doughten, Michael W; Coplen, Tyler B; Hunt, Andrew G; Bullen, Thomas D

    2013-11-14

    High-salinity groundwater more than 1,000 metres deep in the Atlantic coastal plain of the USA has been documented in several locations, most recently within the 35-million-year-old Chesapeake Bay impact crater. Suggestions for the origin of increased salinity in the crater have included evaporite dissolution, osmosis and evaporation from heating associated with the bolide impact. Here we present chemical, isotopic and physical evidence that together indicate that groundwater in the Chesapeake crater is remnant Early Cretaceous North Atlantic (ECNA) sea water. We find that the sea water is probably 100-145 million years old and that it has an average salinity of about 70 per mil, which is twice that of modern sea water and consistent with the nearly closed ECNA basin. Previous evidence for temperature and salinity levels of ancient oceans have been estimated indirectly from geochemical, isotopic and palaeontological analyses of solid materials in deep sediment cores. In contrast, our study identifies ancient sea water in situ and provides a direct estimate of its age and salinity. Moreover, we suggest that it is likely that remnants of ECNA sea water persist in deep sediments at many locations along the Atlantic margin.

  15. Evidence for high salinity of Early Cretaceous sea water from the Chesapeake Bay crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.; Doughten, Michael W.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Bullen, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    High salinity groundwater more than 1000 metres deep in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the United States has been documented in several locations1,2, most recently within the 35 million-year-old Chesapeake Bay impact crater3,4,5. Suggestions for the origin of increased salinity in the crater have included evaporite dissolution6, osmosis6, and evaporation from heating7 associated with the bolide impact. Here we present chemical, isotopic and physical evidence that together indicate that groundwater in the Chesapeake crater is remnant Early Cretaceous North Atlantic (ECNA) seawater. We find that the seawater is likely 100-145 million years old and that it has an average salinity of about 70 per mil, which is twice that of modern seawater and consistent with the nearly closed ECNA basin8. Previous evidence for temperature and salinity levels of ancient oceans have been estimated indirectly from geochemical, isotopic and paleontological analyses of solid materials in deep sediment cores. In contrast, our study identifies ancient seawater in situ and provides a direct estimate of its age and salinity. Moreover, we suggest that it is likely that remnants of ECNA seawater persist in deep sediments at many locations along the Atlantic margin.

  16. Evidence for high salinity of Early Cretaceous sea water from the Chesapeake Bay crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Ward E.; Doughten, Michael W.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Bullen, Thomas D.

    2013-11-01

    High-salinity groundwater more than 1,000 metres deep in the Atlantic coastal plain of the USA has been documented in several locations, most recently within the 35-million-year-old Chesapeake Bay impact crater. Suggestions for the origin of increased salinity in the crater have included evaporite dissolution, osmosis and evaporation from heating associated with the bolide impact. Here we present chemical, isotopic and physical evidence that together indicate that groundwater in the Chesapeake crater is remnant Early Cretaceous North Atlantic (ECNA) sea water. We find that the sea water is probably 100-145 million years old and that it has an average salinity of about 70 per mil, which is twice that of modern sea water and consistent with the nearly closed ECNA basin. Previous evidence for temperature and salinity levels of ancient oceans have been estimated indirectly from geochemical, isotopic and palaeontological analyses of solid materials in deep sediment cores. In contrast, our study identifies ancient sea water in situ and provides a direct estimate of its age and salinity. Moreover, we suggest that it is likely that remnants of ECNA sea water persist in deep sediments at many locations along the Atlantic margin.

  17. Responses of prophenoloxidase system and related defence parameters of Litopenaeus vannamei to low salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Luqing; Xie, Peng; Hu, Fawen

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of low salinity (26 and 21) on the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system and related defence parameters in the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. The results showed that low salinity induced a significant increase of dopamine (DA) concentration in haemolymph at 6 h of the experiment; on the other hand, total haemocyte count (THC), differential haemocyte count (DHC) and PO activity decreased over time to the lowest level at 24 h and remained low thereafter. Serine Protease (SP) and Proteinase Inhibitor (PI) activity in the two lower salinity treatments decreased to the lowest level at 12 and 24 h, respectively, and both recovered to the control level at 72 h. In contrast, α2- macroglobulin (α2M) activity in the two lower salinity treatments peaked at 24 h and then decreased to the control level at 72 h. Therefore, it may be concluded that stress-induced DA plays an important temporary role in neurotransmission and causes immune response in L. vannamei in adapting to salinity changes.

  18. Impact of topography on groundwater salinization due to ocean surge inundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xuan; Yang, Jie; Graf, Thomas; Koneshloo, Mohammad; O'Neal, Michael A.; Michael, Holly A.

    2016-08-01

    Sea-level rise and increases in the frequency and intensity of ocean surges caused by climate change are likely to exacerbate adverse effects on low-lying coastal areas. The landward flow of water during ocean surges introduces salt to surficial coastal aquifers and threatens groundwater resources. Coastal topographic features (e.g., ponds, dunes, barrier islands, and channels) likely have a strong impact on overwash and salinization processes, but are generally highly simplified in modeling studies. To understand topographic impacts on groundwater salinization, we modeled a theoretical overwash event and variable-density groundwater flow and salt transport in 3-D using the fully coupled surface and subsurface numerical simulator, HydroGeoSphere. The model simulates the coastal aquifer as an integrated system considering overland flow, coupled surface and subsurface exchange, variably saturated flow, and variable-density groundwater flow. To represent various coastal landscape types, we simulated both synthetic fields and real-world coastal topography from Delaware, USA. The groundwater salinization assessment suggested that the topographic connectivity promoting overland flow controls the volume of aquifer that is salinized. In contrast, the amount of water that can be stored in surface depressions determines the amount of seawater that infiltrates the subsurface and the time for seawater to flush from the aquifer. Our study suggests that topography has a significant impact on groundwater salinization due to ocean surge overwash, with important implications for coastal land management and groundwater vulnerability assessment.

  19. Impact of vibration and agitation speed on dissolution of USP prednisone tablets RS and various IR tablet formulations.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Nicole; Lange, Sigrid; Klein, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Dissolution testing is an in vitro procedure which is widely used in quality control (QC) of solid oral dosage forms and, given that real biorelevant test conditions are applied, can also be used as a predictive tool for the in vivo performance of such formulations. However, if a dissolution method is intended to be used for such purposes, it has to deliver results that are only determined by the quality of the test product, but not by other variables. In the recent past, more and more questions were arising on how to address the effects of vibration on dissolution test results. The present study was performed to screen for the correlation of prednisone dissolution of USP Prednisone Tablets RS with vibration caused by a commercially available vibration source as well as to investigate how drug release from a range of immediate release formulations containing class 1-4 drugs of the biopharmaceutical classification scheme is affected by vibration when performing dissolution experiments at different agitation rates. Results of the present study show that the dissolution process of oral drug formulations can be affected by vibration. However, it also becomes clear that the degree of which a certain level of vibration impacts dissolution is strongly dependent on several factors such as drug properties, formulation parameters, and the design of the dissolution method. To ensure the establishment of robust and predictive dissolution test methods, the impact of variation should thus be considered in method design and validation.

  20. Mushroom polysaccharides and lipids synthesized in liquid agitated and static cultures. Part I: screening various mushroom species.

    PubMed

    Diamantopoulou, Panagiota; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Kapoti, Maria; Komaitis, Michael; Aggelis, George; Philippoussis, Antonios

    2012-06-01

    The effect of four synthetic media containing glucose (initial concentration 30 g l(-1)) on mycelial growth, exopolysaccharides (EPS) and cellular lipids production was examined in 11 mushroom species after 12 and 16 days of culture in static- and shake-flasks. Fatty acid analysis of cellular lipids produced was also performed. Agitation had a positive effect on biomass production, glucose consumption and lipid biosynthesis. Media that favoured the production of biomass were not suitable for EPS biosynthesis and vice versa. Biomass values varied from ~1.0 g l(-1) (Lentinula edodes) to ~19 g l(-1) (Pleurotus ostreatus), while the highest EPS quantity achieved ranged between 1.6 and 1.8 g l(-1) (for Ganoderma lucidum and L. edodes, respectively). Quantities of total cellular lipids varied between 2.5 and 18.5 % w/w, in dry mycelial mass for the fungi tested. Lipid in dry weight values were influenced by the medium composition. Cellular lipids presented noticeable quantities of poly-unsaturated fatty acids like linoleic acid. Compared to most of the mushrooms tested, lipids of Volvariella volvacea were more saturated. The ability of several mushroom species of our study to produce in notable quantities the above-mentioned added-value compounds renders these fungi worthy for further investigations.

  1. Storage of platelets on flatbed agitators in polyvinyl chloride blood bags plasticized with tri(2-ethylhexyl) trimellitate.

    PubMed

    Champion, A B; Chong, C; Carmen, R A

    1987-01-01

    Data are presented showing that platelets in polyvinyl chloride blood bags plasticized with tri(2-ethylhexyl) trimellitate can be stored on flatbed agitators (shakers) without the pH falling below 6.0. The lowest pH seen after 7 days of storage in 46 units with platelet yields ranging from 3.6 to 13.3 X 10(10) per unit was 6.43. These bags have a O2 transmission rate of 13.3 mumol per hour per bag. Platelet bags with a O2 transmission rate of 7.9 mumol per hour per bag experience a pH fall after 5 days of storage on the shaker in units whose platelet yield on average exceeds 10 X 10(10). Platelets can be stored on first-generation shakers (70 cycles/min, stroke = 1 inch) without an attempt at manual resuspension of the platelet button. The count after 30 minutes on the shaker averaged 89 +/- 15 percent of the expected count, indicating that resuspension was nearly complete after a relatively short period. Red cells, but not platelets, settled out during storage on the shaker.

  2. An efficient approach for phosphorus recovery from wastewater using series-coupled air-agitated crystallization reactors.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongliang; Lu, Xiwu; Peng, Yonghong; Zou, Haiming; Shi, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Homogeneous nucleation of hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystallization in high levels of supersaturation solution has a negative effect on phosphorus recovery efficiency because of the poor settleability of the generated HAP microcrystalline. In this study, a new high-performance approach for phosphorus recovery from anaerobic supernatant using three series-coupled air-agitated crystallization reactors was developed and characterized. During 30-day operation, the proposed process showed a high recovery efficiency (∼95.82%) and low microcrystalline ratio (∼3.11%). Particle size analysis showed that the microcrystalline size was successively increased (from 5.81 to 26.32 μm) with the sequence of series-coupled reactors, confirming the conjectural mechanism that a multistage-induced crystallization system provided an appropriate condition for the growth, aggregation, and precipitation of crystallized products. Furthermore, the new process showed a broad spectrum of handling ability for different concentrations of phosphorus-containing solution in the range of 5-350 mg L(-1), and the obtained results of phosphorus conversion ratio and recovery efficiency were more than 92% and 80%, respectively. Overall, these results showed that the new process exhibited an excellent ability of efficient phosphorus recovery as well as wide application scope, and might be used as an effective approach for phosphorus removal and recovery from wastewater.

  3. Smoking-Related Correlates of Psychomotor Restlessness and Agitation in a Community Sample of Daily Cigarette Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jordan A.; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Psychomotor restlessness and agitation (PMA) is a putatively important, yet understudied, psychopathologic correlate of smoking. The scant smoking research on PMA previously conducted has been narrow in scope and conducted among psychiatric patients. To examine the generalizability and relevance of PMA to smoking, this cross-sectional study investigated associations between PMA and a variety of smoking processes in a community sample. Methods Participants in this study were non-treatment-seeking smokers (N = 254, ≥10 cig/day, M age = 44 years) from the community without an active mood disorder. At baseline, they completed a PMA symptom checklist, a composite depressive symptom index, and a battery of smoking questionnaires. Results Linear regression models adjusting for depressive symptoms and demographics indicated that PMA level was positively associated with severity of nicotine withdrawal symptoms during prior quit attempts (β = .18, p < .05), anticipated likelihood of withdrawal in a future quit attempt (β = .19, p < .05), motivation to smoke for negative reinforcement (β = .14, p < .05), and smoking expectancies for negative reinforcement (β = .17, p < .05), negative consequences (β = .22, p < .01), and positive reinforcement (β = .14, p < .05). PMA was not significantly associated with smoking chronicity, frequency, or dependence severity. Conclusion and Scientific Significance Smokers with elevated PMA appear to experience greater smoking-induced affect modulation and nicotine withdrawal than the average smoker, regardless of other depressive symptoms. Given that PMA differentiates a qualitatively unique profile of smoking characteristics, PMA warrants consideration in tobacco addiction research and practice. PMID:25864606

  4. Leaf gas films delay salt entry and enhance underwater photosynthesis and internal aeration of Melilotus siculus submerged in saline water.

    PubMed

    Teakle, Natasha Lea; Colmer, Timothy David; Pedersen, Ole

    2014-10-01

    A combination of flooding and salinity is detrimental to most plants. We studied tolerance of complete submergence in saline water for Melilotus siculus, an annual legume with superhydrophobic leaf surfaces that retain gas films when under water. M. siculus survived complete submergence of 1 week at low salinity (up to 50 mol m(-3) NaCl), but did not recover following de-submergence from 100 mol m(-3) NaCl. The leaf gas films protected against direct salt ingress into the leaves when submerged in saline water, enabling underwater photosynthesis even after 3 d of complete submergence. By contrast, leaves with the gas films experimentally removed suffered from substantial Na(+) and Cl(-) intrusion and lost the capacity for underwater photosynthesis. Similarly, plants in saline water and without gas films lost more K(+) than those with intact gas films. This study has demonstrated that leaf gas films reduce Na(+) and Cl(-) ingress into leaves when submerged by saline water - the thin gas layer physically separates the floodwater from the leaf surface. This feature aids survival of plants exposed to short-term saline submergence, as well as the previously recognized beneficial effects of gas exchange under water.

  5. Evaluating salinity sources of groundwater and implications for sustainable reverse osmosis desalination in coastal North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, David S.; Schwartz, Haylee G.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Vengosh, Avner

    2011-08-01

    The natural and pumping-induced controls on groundwater salinization in the coastal aquifers of North Carolina, USA, and the implications for the performance of a reverse osmosis (RO) desalination plant have been investigated. Since installation of the well field in the Yorktown aquifer in Kill Devil Hills of Dare County during the late 1980s, the groundwater level has declined and salinity of groundwater has increased from ˜1,000 to ˜2,500 mg/L. Geochemical and boron isotope analyses suggest that the salinity increase is derived from an upflow of underlying saline groundwater and not from modern seawater intrusion. In the groundwater of four wells supplying the plant, elevated boron and arsenic concentrations were observed (1.3-1.4 mg/L and 8-53 μg/L, respectively). Major ions are effectively rejected by the RO membrane (96-99% removal), while boron and arsenic are not removed as effectively (16-42% and 54-75%, respectively). In coming decades, the expected rise of salinity will be associated with higher boron content in the groundwater and consequently also in the RO-produced water. In contrast, there is no expectation of an increase in the arsenic content of the salinized groundwater due to the lack of increase of arsenic with depth and salinity in Yorktown aquifer groundwater.

  6. Transcriptome analyses reveal genotype- and developmental stage-specific molecular responses to drought and salinity stresses in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rohini; Shankar, Rama; Thakkar, Bijal; Kudapa, Himabindu; Krishnamurthy, Lakshmanan; Mantri, Nitin; Varshney, Rajeev K; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-13

    Drought and salinity are the major factors that limit chickpea production worldwide. We performed whole transcriptome analyses of chickpea genotypes to investigate the molecular basis of drought and salinity stress response/adaptation. Phenotypic analyses confirmed the contrasting responses of the chickpea genotypes to drought or salinity stress. RNA-seq of the roots of drought and salinity related genotypes was carried out under control and stress conditions at vegetative and/or reproductive stages. Comparative analysis of the transcriptomes revealed divergent gene expression in the chickpea genotypes at different developmental stages. We identified a total of 4954 and 5545 genes exclusively regulated in drought-tolerant and salinity-tolerant genotypes, respectively. A significant fraction (~47%) of the transcription factor encoding genes showed differential expression under stress. The key enzymes involved in metabolic pathways, such as carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, lipid metabolism, generation of precursor metabolites/energy, protein modification, redox homeostasis and cell wall component biogenesis, were affected by drought and/or salinity stresses. Interestingly, transcript isoforms showed expression specificity across the chickpea genotypes and/or developmental stages as illustrated by the AP2-EREBP family members. Our findings provide insights into the transcriptome dynamics and components of regulatory network associated with drought and salinity stress responses in chickpea.

  7. "SPURS" in the North Atlantic Salinity Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Raymond

    2014-05-01

    The North Atlantic Salinity Maximum is the world's saltiest open ocean salinity maximum and was the focus of the recent Salinity Processes Upper-ocean Regional Study (SPURS) program. SPURS was a joint venture between US, French, Irish, and Spanish investigators. Three US and two EU cruises were involved from August, 1012 - October, 2013 as well as surface moorings, glider, drifter and float deployments. Shipboard operations included underway meteorological and oceanic data, hydrographic surveys and turbulence profiling. The goal is to improve our understanding of how the salinity maximum is maintained and how it may be changing. It is formed by an excess of evaporation over precipitation and the wind-driven convergence of the subtropical gyre. Such salty areas are getting saltier with global warming (a record high SSS was observed in SPURS) and it is imperative to determine the relative roles of surface water fluxes and oceanic processes in such trends. The combination of accurate surface flux estimates with new assessments of vertical and horizontal mixing in the ocean will help elucidate the utility of ocean salinity in quantifying the changing global water cycle.

  8. Biomarker-based salinity reconstruction immediately prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis (Sorbas Basin, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayser, Jan Peter; Martins, Cesar; Flecker, Rachel; Pancost, Rich D.

    2014-05-01

    The salinity crisis which occurred in the Mediterranean at the end of the Miocene (5.97 to 5.33 Ma) was a time of large-scale environmental change and thick evaporite deposits formed both in the deep basins and on the surrounding margins. Late Miocene successions in the Sorbas Basin, south east Spain preserve sediments that were deposited immediately prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) and during the initial phase of gypsum precipitation (Sierro et al., 2001). Salinity changes are indicated by evaporite formation and fluctuations in faunal assemblages, but these provide threshold measurements only e.g. gypsum forms at a salinity of 130 psu. By analysing the lipid biomarker composition by GC and HPLC-MS after Soxhlet extraction of pre-MSC sediments we aim to reconstruct granular changes in salinity leading up to initial gypsum precipitation. The pre-MSC sediments comprise regular alternations of marine marls and terrigenous clays with interspersed diatomites. This lithological cyclicity is climatically forced by orbitally-driven changes in insolation (Krijgsman et al., 1999) such that specific lithologies are thought to accumulate during precession minima (homogeneous marls) and maxima (laminated marls). By targeting these lithologies for salinity reconstruction we can evaluate the orbital control on quantified environmental change. The reconstruction of the salinity is predominantly based on the ACE proxy introduced by Turich and Freeman (2011). The GDGT-based proxy can show differences over a wide range of salinity, because Archaea can survive over a much larger salinity range than haptophyte algae or other plankton and can therefore also record the salinity signal over a wider range. This makes it suitable for the broad salinity ranges leading up to the MSC e.g. ~35 to 130 psu. Turich et al. (2011) already have published 10 low resolution salinity values for pre-MSC sediments from Torrente Vaccarizzo and Serra Pirciata on Sicily. Our high resolution

  9. Faithful contrastive features in learning.

    PubMed

    Tesar, Bruce

    2006-09-10

    This article pursues the idea of inferring aspects of phonological underlying forms directly from surface contrasts by looking at optimality theoretic linguistic systems (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004). The main result proves that linguistic systems satisfying certain conditions have the faithful contrastive feature property: Whenever 2 distinct morphemes contrast on the surface in a particular environment, at least 1 of the underlying features on which the 2 differ must be realized faithfully on the surface. A learning procedure exploiting the faithful contrastive feature property, contrast analysis, can set the underlying values of some features, even where featural minimal pairs do not exist, but is nevertheless fundamentally limited in what it can set. This work suggests that observation of surface contrasts between pairs of words can contribute to the learning of underlying forms, while still supporting the view that interaction with the phonological mapping will be necessary to fully determine underlying forms.

  10. Polymeric gastrointestinal MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Tilcock, C; Unger, E C; Ahkong, Q F; Fritz, T; Koenig, S H; Brown, R D

    1991-01-01

    Combining either paramagnetic (gadolinium chelates) or superparamagnetic (ferrite) contrast agents with polymers such as polyethylene glycol or cellulose, or with simple sugars such as dextrose, results in mixtures that exhibit improved T1 and/or T2 relaxivity compared with that of the contrast agent alone. It is suggested that the addition of such inexpensive and nontoxic polymers or saccharides may improve the effectiveness and decrease the cost of enteric contrast agents.

  11. Electromagnetic simulations for salinity index error estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Andrzej; Szypłowska, Agnieszka; Kafarski, Marcin; Nakonieczna, Anna; Skierucha, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Soil salinity index (SI) is a measure of salt concentration in soil water. The salinity index is calculated as a partial derivative of the soil bulk electrical conductivity (EC) with respect to the bulk dielectric permittivity (DP). The paper focused on the impact of different sensitivity zones for measured both EC and DP on the salinity index determination accuracy. For this purpose, a set of finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations was prepared. The simulations were carried out on the model of a reflectometric probe consisting of three parallel rods inserted into a modelled material of simulated DP and EC. The combinations of stratified distributions of DP and EC were tested. An experimental verification of the simulation results on selected cases was performed. The results showed that the electromagnetic simulations can provide useful data to improve accuracy of the determination of soil SI.

  12. Phase contrast MR angiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, C L

    1995-08-01

    Phase contrast MR methods encode information from macroscopic motion into the phase of the MR signal. Phase contrast methods can be applied with small and large fields-of-view, can give quantitative measures of velocity, and provide excellent suppression of signals from stationary tissue. Unlike time-of-flight methods, phase contrast methods directly measure flow and thus are not hindered by the artifactual appearance of tissue having short T1. Phase contrast angiograms can be two-dimensional (thin slice or projectile), three-dimensional, and/or time resolved and have applications throughout the body.

  13. Fuzzy-Contextual Contrast Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Anil; Verma, Om; Khanna, Chintan

    2017-02-08

    This paper presents contrast enhancement algorithms based on fuzzy contextual information of the images. We introduce fuzzy similarity index and fuzzy contrast factor to capture the neighborhood characteristics of a pixel. A new histogram, using fuzzy contrast factor of each pixel is developed, and termed as the fuzzy dissimilarity histogram (FDH). A cumulative distribution function (CDF) is formed with normalized values of FDH and used as a transfer function to obtain the contrast enhanced image. The algorithm gives good contrast enhancement and preserves the natural characteristic of the image. In order to develop a contextual intensity transfer function, we introduce a fuzzy membership function based on fuzzy similarity index and coefficient of variation of the image. The contextual intensity transfer function is designed using the fuzzy membership function to achieve final contrast enhanced image. The overall algorithm is referred as the fuzzy contextual contrast-enhancement (FCCE) algorithm. The proposed algorithms are compared with conventional and state-of-art contrast enhancement algorithms. The quantitative and visual assessment of the results is performed. The results of quantitative measures are statistically analyzed using t-test. The exhaustive experimentation and analysis show the proposed algorithm efficiently enhances contrast and yields in natural visual quality images.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  16. Salinity surveys using an airborne microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.; Droppleman, J. D.; Evans, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Barnes PRT-5 infrared radiometer and L-band channel of the multifrequency microwave radiometer are used to survey the distribution of surface water temperature and salinity. These remote sensors were flown repetitively in November 1971 over the outflow of the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico. Data reduction parameters were determined through the use of flight data obtained over a known water area. With these parameters, the measured infrared and microwave radiances were analyzed in terms of the surface temperature and salinity.

  17. Control of agitation and aeration rates in the production of surfactin in foam overflowing fed-batch culture with industrial fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shulin; Zhao, Shengming; Lu, Zhaoxin; Gao, Yuqi; Lv, Fengxia; Bie, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens fmb50 produces a high yield of surfactin, a lipopeptide-type biosurfactant that has been widely studied and has potential applications in many fields. A foam overflowing culture has been successfully used in the combined production-enrichment fermentation of surfactin. In this study, the agitation and aeration rates were found to have relationships with foam formation and surfactin enrichment. A maximum surfactin concentration of 4.7g/l of foam was obtained after 21h of culture with an agitation rate of 150rpm and an aeration rate of 1vvm in fed-batch culture. By controlling the foam overflow rate (fout) of a fed-batch culture, surfactin concentration in the foam was continuously maintained above 4g/l.

  18. Effects of cooling rate, saturation temperature, and agitation on the metastable zone width of DL-malic acid-water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye; Leng, Yixin; Huang, Chunxiang; Yue, Mingxuan; Tan, Qian

    2015-09-01

    A study of metastable zone width (MSZW) and nucleation parameters for a cooling crystallization of DL-malic acid-water system is described in this paper. Experimental determination of the MSZW was performed using a laser method in order to carry out the estimation of nucleation parameters. Measured MSZWs can be affected by a variety of parameters, such as cooling rate, saturation temperature, agitation rate, and so on. In this work, the MSZWs were found to decrease with an increase of saturation temperature, and levels of agitation, while it increased with an increase of cooling rate. Two classical theoretical approaches, Nyvlt's approach and self-consistent Nyvlt-like approach were used to analyze the experimental data on MSZWs.

  19. Development of a new type of high pressure calorimetric cell, mechanically agitated and equipped with a dynamic pressure control system: Application to the characterization of gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Plantier, F. Missima, D.; Torré, J.-P.; Marlin, L.

    2013-12-15

    A novel prototype of calorimetric cell has been developed allowing experiments under pressure with an in situ agitation system and a dynamic control of the pressure inside the cell. The use of such a system opens a wide range of potential practical applications for determining properties of complex fluids in both pressurized and agitated conditions. The technical details of this prototype and its calibration procedure are described, and an application devoted to the determination of phase equilibrium and phase change enthalpy of gas hydrates is presented. Our results, obtained with a good precision and reproducibility, were found in fairly good agreement with those found in literature, illustrate the various interests to use this novel apparatus.

  20. Influence of agitation, inoculum density, pH, and strain on the growth parameters of Escherichia coli O157:H7--relevance to risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M E; Tamplin, M L; Phillips, J G; Marmer, B S

    2003-06-15

    Foods may differ in at least two key variables from broth culture systems typically used to measure growth kinetics of enteropathogens: initial population density of the pathogen and agitation of the culture. The present study used nine Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains isolated from beef and associated with human illness. Initial kinetic experiments with one E. coli O157:H7 strain in brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth at pH 5.5 were performed in a 2 x 2 x 3 factorial design, testing the effects of a low (ca. 1-10 colony-forming units [CFU]/ml) or high (ca. 1000 CFU/ml) initial population density, culture agitation or no culture agitation, and incubation temperatures of 10, 19, and 37 degrees C. Kinetic data were modeled using simple linear regression and the Baranyi model. Both model forms provided good statistical fit to the data (adjusted r(2)>0.95). Significant effects of agitation and initial population density were identified at 10 degrees C but not at 19 or 37 degrees C. Similar growth patterns were observed for two additional strains tested under the same experimental design. The lag, slope, and maximum population density (MPD) parameters were significantly different by treatment. Further tests were conducted in a 96-well microtiter plate system to determine the effect of initial population density and low pH (4.6-5.5) on the growth of E. coli O157:H7 strains in BHI at 10, 19, and 37 degrees C. Strain variability was more apparent at the boundary conditions of growth of low pH and low temperature. This study demonstrates the need for growth models that are specific to food products and environments for plausible extrapolation to risk assessment models.

  1. Mathematical modeling of mixer pump performance for agitation of radioactive slurries in one-million-gallon underground storage tanks at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.; Eyler, L.L.; Dodge, R.E.

    1993-04-01

    The objective of this work is to analyze the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) feed preparation tank mixing pump agitation design. This was accomplished by (1) reviewing mixing pump characteristics, (2) performing computer modeling of jet mixing and particulate material transport, (3) evaluating the propensity of the tank and mixing pump design to maintain particulate material in the tank in a uniformly mixed state, and (4) identifying important design parameters required to ensure optimum homogeneity and solids content during batch transfers.

  2. A Comparison of the E-BEHAVE-AD, NBRS and NPI in Quantifying Clinical Improvement in the Treatment of Agitation and Psychosis Associated with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zahinoor; Emeremni, Chetachi A; Houck, Patricia R.; Mazumdar, Sati; Rosen, Jules; Rajji, Tarek K.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Mulsant, Benoit H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to compare the Empirical Behavioral Rating Scale (E-BEHAVE AD), Neurobehavioral Rating Scale (NBRS), and Neuropsychiatric Interview (NPI) in detecting behavioral disturbance and psychotic symptoms in dementia and characterizing changes in response to treatment. Design 87 subjects in the randomized controlled trial “Continuation Pharmacotherapy for Agitation of Dementia” (CPAD) were included in this analysis. We compared the detection and changes over 12 weeks of both agitation and psychosis using these 3 instruments. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to compare the performance of the three instruments in detecting global improvement. Results The instruments were equally likely to detect agitation. The NBRS was most likely to detect psychosis. While the NPI best detected improvement in agitation, the instruments were equal for detecting improvement in psychosis. In the ROC analysis for overall clinical improvement in response to treatment, there were no differences in the areas under the correlated curves for the three instruments but they demonstrated different sensitivity and specificity at different cut-off points for target symptom reduction. The E-BEHAVE-AD performed best at a cutpoint of 30% target symptom reduction and the NBRS and NPI both performed best at 50%. Conclusion The E-BEHAVE-AD, NBRS, and NPI were more similar than different in characterizing symptoms but differed in detecting response to treatment. Differences in sensitivity and specificity may lead clinicians to prefer a specific instrument, depending on their goal and the expected magnitude of response to any specific intervention. PMID:23290205

  3. Faithful Contrastive Features in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesar, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    This article pursues the idea of inferring aspects of phonological underlying forms directly from surface contrasts by looking at optimality theoretic linguistic systems (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004). The main result proves that linguistic systems satisfying certain conditions have the faithful contrastive feature property: Whenever 2…

  4. Comparison of air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction and ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons determination in hookah water.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Maryam; Bazregar, Mohammad; Daneshfar, Ali; Asghari, Alireza

    2015-07-01

    In this work, two disperser-free microextraction methods, namely, air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction and ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction are compared for the determination of a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous samples, followed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The effects of various experimental parameters upon the extraction efficiencies of both methods are investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the enrichment factors and limits of detection were found to be in the ranges of 327-773 and 0.015-0.05 ng/mL for air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction and 406-670 and 0.015-0.05 ng/mL for ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction, respectively. The linear dynamic ranges and extraction recoveries were obtained to be in the range of 0.05-120 ng/mL (R(2) ≥ 0.995) and 33-77% for air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction and 0.05-110 ng/mL (R(2) ≥ 0.994) and 41-67% for ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction, respectively. To investigate this common view among some people that smoking hookah is healthy due to the passage of smoke through the hookah water, samples of both the hookah water and hookah smoke were analyzed.

  5. Effect of period, water temperature and agitation on loss of water-soluble carbohydrates and protein from grass hay: implications for equine feeding management.

    PubMed

    Longland, A C; Barfoot, C; Harris, P A

    2014-01-18

    The effects of different water-soaking treatments on removal of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC), WSC constituents and protein from four UK hays were determined. Hays were soaked in water for up to 16 hours at mean temperatures of 8°C, 16°C, in hot tap water (initially 49°C) or agitated and rinsed in clean water at 16°C. Initial hay WSC contents ranged from 154 to 216 g/kg dry matter. Losses of WSC from hays after 16 hours soaking at 8°C, 16°C, 16°C plus agitation and 49°C averaged 28, 46, 49 and 44 per cent, respectively. Corresponding percentage losses of fructan were 16, 37, 39 and 33. Percentage losses of sucrose averaged 55 (8°C), 86 (16°C), 91 (16°C+agitation) and 82 (initial temperature 49°C), those of glucose were 60, 85, 75 and 75, and of fructose were 41, 52, 54 and 46. Hay crude protein contents were not significantly changed by any of the soaking treatments. Soaking at 8°C generally resulted in reduced losses of WSC compared to when soaked at the higher temperatures. Thus, in cold weather using warmer water to soak hays may effect greater WSC loss, although very prolonged soaking at warm temperatures might encourage the proliferation of unwanted micro-organisms in the soak liquor.

  6. Measurement of visual contrast sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Marko, A. R.

    1985-04-01

    This invention involves measurement of the visual contrast sensitivity (modulation transfer) function of a human subject by means of linear or circular spatial frequency pattern on a cathode ray tube whose contrast is automatically decreasing or increasing depending on the subject pressing or releasing a hand-switch button. The threshold of detection of the pattern modulation is found by the subject by adjusting the contrast to values which vary about the subject's threshold thereby determining the threshold and also providing by the magnitude of the contrast fluctuations between reversals some estimate of the variability of the subject's absolute threshold. The invention also involves the slow automatic sweeping of the spatial frequency of the pattern over the spatial frequencies after preset time intervals or after threshold has been defined at each frequency by a selected number of subject-determined threshold crossings; i.e., contrast reversals.

  7. Comparison of oral dexmedetomidine versus oral midazolam as premedication to prevent emergence agitation after sevoflurane anaesthesia in paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, M Kavya; Mehandale, Sripada G

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Sevoflurane is the most often used inhalational agent in paediatric anaesthesia, but emergence agitation (EA) remains a major concern. Oral midazolam and parenteral dexmedetomidine are known to be effective in controlling EA. We attempted to elucidate whether oral dexmedetomidine is better than midazolam in controlling EA. Methods: Prospective double-blinded study involving ninety patients aged 1–10 years, undergoing elective surgeries of <2 h of expected duration under sevoflurane general anaesthesia, randomised to receive either midazolam (Group A) or dexmedetomidine (Group B) as oral premedication was carried out to record level of sedation before induction, haemodynamic parameters and recovery time. Incidence and severity of EA, post-operative pain and requirement of rescue analgesic were assessed at 0, 5, 15, 30 and 60 min postoperatively. Results: Data were analysed applying Student's t-test and Chi-square test using SPSS software. Mask acceptance was better in Group B (97.8% vs. 73.4%, P < 0.001). Mean arterial pressure was lower in Group B (P < 0.001) though clinically not significant. More rescue analgesic was required in Group A (5.6% vs. 0%). There was no significant difference in adverse effects. Although there was a higher incidence of EA in Group A (Aono's score 3 and 4; 40% vs. 4.4%), none of them required intervention (paediatric anaesthesia emergence delirium score >10; 0 vs. 0). Conclusion: Premedication with oral dexmedetomidine provides smooth induction and recovery, reduces the EA and provides better analgesia and sedation as compared to oral midazolam. PMID:28250481

  8. Improvement of the agitation granulation method to prepare granules containing a high content of a very hygroscopic drug.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Nobuaki; Ishikawa, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Koichi

    2006-11-01

    This study describes a new approach to the preparation of a granulate with a high content of a very hygroscopic powder or drug, using the agitation granulation method, and the development of a tablet formulation using these granulates. A Chinese medicine extract, Hatimi-zio-gan, was used as the model of a very hygroscopic drug. Among the several excipients tested, only porous calcium silicate could be used to prepare granules, with a mixing ratio (extract to porous calcium silicate) from 2:1 to 20:1. With other excipients, very large lumps were formed during the granulation process. The best mixing ratio of extract to porous calcium silicate was 6:1. For preparation of the granules, water could be added to the mixed powder within a range of 1- to 4-times the amount of porous calcium silicate. From these results, it was concluded that the ability of porous calcium silicate to hold large amounts of water in its numerous pores may allow for the preparation of granulates with a high content of very hygroscopic drugs. Starch with partial alpha-links, carboxymethyl starch sodium salt and crospovidone were used for selection of the disintegration agent. When crospovidone was used as a disintegration agent, tablets containing about 70% of the Chinese medicine extract disintegrated in less than 7 min, with good dissolution rates. The same process was applied to extracts of Hotyu-ekki-to, Syo-seiryu-to, Boi-ogi-to and Bohu-tusyo-san. The absorption of paeoniflorin, a characteristic monoterpene glucoside contained in Hatimi-zio-gan extract, was evaluated in beagle dogs after oral administration of the Hatimi-zio-gan tablets prepared in this study. The values of C(max) and AUC obtained after administration of the tablets prepared in this study were significantly greater than those obtained for commercial tablets.

  9. Medication development for agitation and aggression in Alzheimer disease: review and discussion of recent randomized clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Soto, Maria; Andrieu, Sandrine; Nourhashemi, Fati; Ousset, Pierre Jean; Ballard, Clive; Robert, Philippe; Vellas, Bruno; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Rosenberg, Paul B

    2014-09-16

    ABSTRACT Background: The management of disruptive neuropsychiatric symptom (NPS) such as agitation and aggression (A/A) is a major priority in caring for people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Few effective pharmacological or non-pharmacological options are available. Results of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of drugs for A/A have been disappointing. This may result from the absence of biological efficacy for medications tested in treating A/A. It may also be related to methodological issues such as the choice of outcomes. The aim of this review was to highlight key methodological issues pertaining to RCTs of current and emerging medications for the treatment of A/A in AD. Methods: We searched PubMed/Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov for RCTs comparing medications with either placebo or other drugs in the treatment of A/A in AD, between January 2008 and December 2013. Results: We identified a total of 18 RCTs; of these, 11 were completed and 7 ongoing. Of the ongoing RCTs, only one is in Phase III. Seven of 10 completed RCTs with reported results did not report greater benefit from drug than placebo. Each of the completed RCTs used a different definition of "clinically significant A/A." There was considerable heterogeneity in study design. The primary endpoints were largely proxy-based but a variety of scales were used. The definition of caregiver and scales used to assess caregiver outcomes were similarly heterogeneous. Placebo response was notable in all trials. Conclusions: This review highlights a great heterogeneity in RCTs design of drugs for A/A in AD and some key methodological issues such as definition of A/A, choice of outcome measures and caregiver participation that could be addressed by an expert consensus to optimize future trials design.

  10. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Salinity I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Presented is a unit designed for curriculum infusion and which relies on the hands-on discovery method as an instructive device. The student is introduced to the theory of a functioning salt water conductivity meter. The student explores the resistance of salt water as salinity increases and he treats the data which he has gathered,…

  11. Metagenomes from the Saline Desert of Kutch

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, A. S.; Joshi, M. N.; Bhargava, P.; Ayachit, G. N.; Shaikh, I. M.; Saiyed, Z. M.; Saxena, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    We provide the first report on the metagenomic approach for unveiling the microbial diversity in the saline desert of Kutch. High-throughput metagenomic sequencing of environmental DNA isolated from soil collected from seven locations in Kutch was performed on an Ion Torrent platform. PMID:24831151

  12. Evaluation of lettuce genotypes for salinity tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce is one of the most commonly used salad vegetables and considered to be a relatively salt sensitive crop. Salinity is a major constraint to crop production in all important lettuce districts of the U.S., and the water quality problem is exacerbated by the climate change. In order to identify ...

  13. Salinity Tolerance Turfgrass: History and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Kamal; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor

    2013-01-01

    Land and water resources are becoming scarce and are insufficient to sustain the burgeoning population. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic stresses affecting agricultural productions across the world. Cultivation of salt-tolerant turfgrass species may be promising option under such conditions where poor quality water can also be used for these crops. Coastal lands in developing countries can be used to grow such crops, and seawater can be used for irrigation of purposes. These plants can be grown using land and water unsuitable for conventional crops and can provide food, fuel, fodder, fibber, resin, essential oils, and pharmaceutical products and can be used for landscape reintegration. There are a number of potential turfgrass species that may be appropriate at various salinity levels of seawater. The goal of this review is to create greater awareness of salt-tolerant turfgrasses, their current and potential uses, and their potential use in developing countries. The future for irrigating turf may rely on the use of moderate- to high-salinity water and, in order to ensure that the turf system is sustainable, will rely on the use of salt-tolerant grasses and an improved knowledge of the effects of salinity on turfgrasses. PMID:24222734

  14. Salinity and Temperature Effects on Physiological Responses of Vibrio fischeri from Diverse Ecological Niches

    PubMed Central

    Soto, W.; Gutierrez, J.; Remmenga, M. D.; Nishiguchi, M. K.

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri is a bioluminescent bacterial symbiont of sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) and monocentrid fishes (Actinopterygii: Monocentridae). V. fischeri exhibit competitive dominance within the allopatrically distributed squid genus Euprymna, which have led to the evolution of V. fischeri host specialists. In contrast, the host genus Sepiola contains sympatric species that is thought to have given rise to V. fischeri that have evolved as host generalists. Given that these ecological lifestyles may have a direct effect upon the growth spectrum and survival limits in contrasting environments, optimal growth ranges were obtained for numerous V. fischeri isolates from both free-living and host environments. Upper and lower limits of growth were observed in sodium chloride concentrations ranging from 0.0% to 9.0%. Sepiola symbiotic isolates possessed the least variation in growth throughout the entire salinity gradient, whereas isolates from Euprymna were the least uniform at <2.0% NaCl. V. fischeri fish symbionts (CG101 and MJ101) and all free-living strains were the most dissimilar at >5.0% NaCl. Growth kinetics of symbiotic V. fischeri strains were also measured under a range of salinity and temperature combinations. Symbiotic V. fischeri ES114 and ET101 exhibited a synergistic effect for salinity and temperature, where significant differences in growth rates due to salinity existed only at low temperatures. Thus, abiotic factors such as temperature and salinity have differential effects between free-living and symbiotic strains of V. fischeri, which may alter colonization efficiency prior to infection. PMID:18587609

  15. Author and Agitator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Jan

    1978-01-01

    Many schools now bring professional writers in to work with or talk to children, often with impressive results. But what do the writers themselves make of these visits? Here a children's books author pens a wry portrait of a typical classroom encounter. (Editor/RK)

  16. Counselors, Not Political Agitators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapela, Victor J.

    1974-01-01

    This article centers around the relationship of counselors to the social order and political system of this country. The author questions the basic premise that social alienation is a natural outcome of the American system. A response by Harold J. Adams follows. (Author)

  17. Benzodiazepines: Sedation and Agitation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety is common and frequently poses a barrier to necessary dental treatment. The increasing availability of conscious sedation in dental practice has made treatment much more accessible for anxious patients. At present, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used drugs in sedation practice and provide a pleasant experience for most, but not all, patients. An understanding of the mechanism of action of benzodiazepines should inform our practice and deepen our understanding of why and how sedation may fail. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: As an increasing number of dentists provide sedation for their patients an update on benzodiazepines is timely.

  18. The new numbers contrast sensitivity chart for contrast sensitivity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Khambhiphant, Bharkbhum; Tulvatana, Wasee; Busayarat, Mathu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and assess the agreement between the 3 newly made numbers contrast sensitivity charts and the MARS contrast sensitivity chart (MARS) in contrast sensitivity measurement. Methods We developed 3 numbers contrast sensitivity charts for right, left and both eyes. Two hundred subjects were assigned to read numbers 0-9 for determining the degree of difficulty. Selected seven numbers were randomly arranged and the contrast of each number was decreased by the constant factor of 0.04 log units in the units as in the MARS. We assigned 112 subjects with visual acuity range from 20/480 to 20/20 to test once with the new chart and then with MARS Chart monocularly and binocularly by random order. Bland-Altman analysis for comparing two charts was performed. Results Bland-Altman analysis between 2 charts showed the mean differences were 0.04, 0.03, 0.04 log CS and the 95% limit of agreement (LOA) of the bias were (+0.26, −0.19), (+0.26, −0.20), (+0.25, −0.17) log CS for right, left and binocular. The Bland-Altman plot indicates a good concordance in 3 charts. Conclusions These charts show reasonable agreement and can be used interchangeably with the MARS. It is helpful for Thai people who can only read numbers in doing the test. We can use them in routinely contrast sensitivity measurement.

  19. Contrasting Rhetorics/Contrasting Cultures: Why Contrastive Rhetoric Needs a Better Conceptualization of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Dwight

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with an underdeveloped notion in the EAP sub-discipline of contrastive rhetoric: culture. It argues that a better conceptualization of contrastive rhetoric needs to include a better conceptualization of culture. After engaging with the complex question "What is culture?" the paper moves on to consider four sets of current issues…

  20. Salinity Trends in the Upper Colorado River Basin Upstream From the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit, Colorado, 1986-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leib, Kenneth J.; Bauch, Nancy J.

    2008-01-01

    In 1974, the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act was passed into law. This law was enacted to address concerns regarding the salinity content of the Colorado River. The law authorized various construction projects in selected areas or 'units' of the Colorado River Basin intended to reduce the salinity load in the Colorado River. One such area was the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit in western Colorado. The U. S. Geological Survey has done extensive studies and research in the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit that provide information to aid the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the Natural Resources Conservation Service in determining where salinity-control work may provide the best results, and to what extent salinity-control work was effective in reducing salinity concentrations and loads in the Colorado River. Previous studies have indicated that salinity concentrations and loads have been decreasing downstream from the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit, and that the decreases are likely the result of salinity control work in these areas. Several of these reports; however, also document decreasing salinity loads upstream from the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit. This finding was important because only a small amount of salinity-control work was being done in areas upstream from the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit at the time the findings were reported (late 1990?s). As a result of those previous findings, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey to investigate salinity trends in selected areas bracketing the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit and regions upstream from the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit. The results of the study indicate that salinity loads were decreasing upstream from the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit from 1986 through 2003, but the rates of decrease have slowed during the last 10 years. The average rate of decrease in salinity load upstream from the Grand Valley

  1. Effects of acute temperature or salinity stress on the immune response in sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyu; Yang, Hongsheng; Gao, Fei; Liu, Guangbin

    2008-12-01

    Invertebrates are increasingly raised in mariculture, where it is important to monitor immune function and to minimize stresses that could suppress immunity. The activities of phagocytosis, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and lysozyme (LSZ) were measured to evaluate the immune capacities of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus, to acute temperature changes (from 12 degrees C to 0 degrees C, 8 degrees C, 16 degrees C, 24 degrees C, and 32 degrees C for 72 h) and salinity changes (from 30 per thousand to 20 per thousand, 25 per thousand, and 35 per thousand for 72 h) in the laboratory. Phagocytosis was significantly affected by temperature increases in 3 h, and by salinity (25 per thousand and 35 per thousand) changes in 1 h. SOD activities decreased significantly in 0.5 h to 6 h samples at 24 degrees C. At 32 degrees C, SOD activities decreased significantly in 0.5 h and 1 h exposures, and obviously increased for 12 h exposure. CAT activities decreased significantly at 24 degrees C for 0.5 h exposure, and increased significantly at 32 degrees C in 3 h to 12 h exposures. Activities of MPO increased significantly at 0 degrees C in 0.5 h to 6 h exposures and at 8 degrees C for 1 h. By contrast, activities of MPO decreased significantly in 24 degrees C and 32 degrees C treatments. In elevated-temperature treatments, activities of LSZ increased significantly except at 32 degrees C for 6 h to 12 h exposures. SOD activity was significantly affected by salinity change. CAT activity decreased significantly after only 1 h exposure to salinity of 20 per thousand. Activities of MPO and LSZ showed that A. japonicus tolerates limited salinity stress. High-temperature stress had a much greater effect on the immune capacities of A. japonicus than did low-temperature and salinity stresses.

  2. Potassium retention in leaf mesophyll as an element of salinity tissue tolerance in halophytes.

    PubMed

    Percey, William J; Shabala, Lana; Wu, Qi; Su, Nana; Breadmore, Michael C; Guijt, Rosanne M; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    Soil salinity remains a major threat to global food security, and the progress in crop breeding for salinity stress tolerance may be achieved only by pyramiding key traits mediating plant adaptive responses to high amounts of dissolved salts in the rhizosphere. This task may be facilitated by studying natural variation in salinity tolerance among plant species and, specifically, exploring mechanisms of salinity tolerance in halophytes. The aim of this work was to establish the causal link between mesophyll ion transport activity and plant salt tolerance in a range of evolutionary contrasting halophyte and glycophyte species. Plants were grown under saline conditions in a glasshouse, followed by assessing their growth and photosynthetic performance. In a parallel set of experiments, net K(+) and H(+) transport across leaf mesophyll and their modulation by light were studied in control and salt-treated mesophyll segments using vibrating non-invasive ion selective microelectrode (the MIFE) technique. The reported results show that mesophyll cells in glycophyte species loses 2-6 fold more K(+) compared with their halophyte counterparts. This decline was reflected in a reduced maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, chlorophyll content and growth observed in the glasshouse experiments. In addition to reduced K(+) efflux, the more tolerant species also exhibited reduced H(+) efflux, which is interpreted as an energy-saving strategy allowing more resources to be redirected towards plant growth. It is concluded that the ability of mesophyll to retain K(+) without a need to activate plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is an essential component of salinity tolerance in halophytes and halophytic crop plants.

  3. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  4. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Yvana Lopes Pinheiro; Costa, Rita Zanlorensi Visneck; Pinho, Kátia Elisa Prus; Ferreira, Ricardo Rabello; Schuindt, Sueliton Miyamoto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography. PMID:25987746

  5. Climate change and soil salinity: The case of coastal Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Susmita; Hossain, Md Moqbul; Huq, Mainul; Wheeler, David

    2015-12-01

    This paper estimates location-specific soil salinity in coastal Bangladesh for 2050. The analysis was conducted in two stages: First, changes in soil salinity for the period 2001-2009 were assessed using information recorded at 41 soil monitoring stations by the Soil Research Development Institute. Using these data, a spatial econometric model was estimated linking soil salinity with the salinity of nearby rivers, land elevation, temperature, and rainfall. Second, future soil salinity for 69 coastal sub-districts was projected from climate-induced changes in river salinity and projections of rainfall and temperature based on time trends for 20 Bangladesh Meteorological Department weather stations in the coastal region. The findings indicate that climate change poses a major soil salinization risk in coastal Bangladesh. Across 41 monitoring stations, the annual median projected change in soil salinity is 39 % by 2050. Above the median, 25 % of all stations have projected changes of 51 % or higher.

  6. Dose Reduction Study in Vaginal Balloon Packing Filled With Contrast for HDR Brachytherapy Treatment;HDR; Uterine cervix cancer; Vaginal balloon packing; Contrast; Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Amarjit S.; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Biagioli, Matthew C.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Vaginal balloon packing is a means to displace organs at risk during high dose rate brachytherapy of the uterine cervix. We tested the hypothesis that contrast-filled vaginal balloon packing reduces radiation dose to organs at risk, such as the bladder and rectum, in comparison to water- or air-filled balloons. Methods and Materials: In a phantom study, semispherical vaginal packing balloons were filled with air, saline solution, and contrast agents. A high dose rate iridium-192 source was placed on the anterior surface of the balloon, and the diode detector was placed on the posterior surface. Dose ratios were taken with each material in the balloon. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, by use of the MC computer program DOSXYZnrc, were performed to study dose reduction vs. balloon size and contrast material, including commercially available iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents. Results: Measured dose ratios on the phantom with the balloon radius of 3.4 cm were 0.922 {+-} 0.002 for contrast/saline solution and 0.808 {+-} 0.001 for contrast/air. The corresponding ratios by MC simulations were 0.895 {+-} 0.010 and 0.781 {+-} 0.010. The iodine concentration in the contrast was 23.3% by weight. The dose reduction of contrast-filled balloon ranges from 6% to 15% compared with water-filled balloon and 11% to 26% compared with air-filled balloon, with a balloon size range between 1.4 and 3.8 cm, and iodine concentration in contrast of 24.9%. The dose reduction was proportional to the contrast agent concentration. The gadolinium-based contrast agents showed less dose reduction because of much lower concentrations in their solutions. Conclusions: The dose to the posterior wall of the bladder and the anterior wall of the rectum can be reduced if the vaginal balloon is filled with contrast agent in comparison to vaginal balloons filled with saline solution or air.

  7. A theory of behavioral contrast.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Peter R

    2014-11-01

    The reinforcers that maintain target instrumental responses also reinforce other responses that compete with them for expression. This competition, and its imbalance at points of transition between different schedules of reinforcement, causes behavioral contrast. The imbalance is caused by differences in the rates at which different responses come under the control of component stimuli. A model for this theory of behavioral contrast is constructed by expanding the coupling coefficient of MPR (Killeen, 1994). The coupling coefficient gives the degree of association of a reinforcer with the target response (as opposed to other competing responses). Competing responses, often identified as interim or adjunctive or superstitious behavior, are intrinsic to reinforcement schedules, especially interval schedules. In addition to that base-rate of competition, additional competing responses may spill over from the prior component, causing initial contrast; and they may be modulated by conditioned reinforcement or punishment from stimuli associated with subsequent component change, causing terminal contrast. A formalization of these hypotheses employed (a) a hysteresis model of off-target responses giving rise to initial contrast, and (b) a competing traces model of the suppression or enhancement of ongoing competitive responses by signals of following-schedule transition. The theory was applied to transient contrast, the following schedule effect, and the component duration effect.

  8. The floral repressor BROTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (BFT) modulates flowering initiation under high salinity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Park, Chung-Mo; Seo, Pil Joon

    2011-09-01

    Floral transition is coordinately regulated by both endogenous and exogenous cues to ensure reproductive success under fluctuating environmental conditions. Abiotic stress conditions, including drought and high salinity, also have considerable influence on this developmental process. However, the signaling components and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of floral transition by environmental factors have not yet been defined. In this work, we show that the Arabidopsis BROTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (BFT) gene, which encodes a member of the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)/TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1) family, regulates floral transition under conditions of high salinity. The BFT gene was transcriptionally induced by high salinity in an abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent manner. Transgenic plants overexpressing the BFT gene (35S:BFT) and BFT-deficient mutant (bft-2) plants were phenotypically indistinguishable from Col-0 plants in seed germination and seedling growth under high salinity. In contrast, although the floral transition was delayed significantly in Col-0 plants under high salinity, that of the bft-2 mutant was not affected by high salinity. We also observed that expression of the APETALA1 (AP1) gene was suppressed to a lesser degree in the bft-2 mutant than in Col-0 plants. Taken together, our observations suggest that BFT mediates salt stress-responsive flowering, providing an adaptive strategy that ensures reproductive success under unfavorable stress conditions.

  9. Effects of salinity on seed germination and early seedling growth of the Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Torquemada, Yolanda; Sánchez-Lizaso, José Luis

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the low tolerance of Posidonia oceanica mature shoots to salinity variability but there is no information about the response of its seeds and seedlings to this impact. In the present study, two independent experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of salinity variation on germination, development and survival of P. oceanica seeds and seedlings under laboratory-controlled conditions. Maximum P. oceanica seed germination occurred at the control salinity (37), while mortality was lowest for this treatment. However, no significant differences were detected with other salinity levels (39-49). In contrast, salinity appears to play an important role in seedling development. The number of blades, the length of the primary root and the maximum length of leaves of seedlings were significantly reduced with increased salinities. The results observed in the present study are consistent with those obtained for mature P. oceanica shoots, and suggest that hypersalinities, such as those associated with brine discharge of a desalination plant, may limit P. oceanica seedling recruitment, affecting the expansion and recovery of Posidonia meadows.

  10. Decadal trends of the upper ocean salinity in the tropical Indo-Pacific since mid-1990s.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Zhang, Yuhong; Feng, Ming; Wang, Tianyu; Zhang, Ningning; Wijffels, Susan

    2015-11-02

    A contrasting trend pattern of sea surface salinity (SSS) between the western tropical Pacific (WTP) and the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean (SETIO) is observed during 2004-2013, with significant salinity increase in the WTP and freshening in the SETIO. In this study, we show that increased precipitation around the Maritime Continent (MC), decreased precipitation in the western-central tropical Pacific, and ocean advection processes contribute to the salinity trends in the region. From a longer historical record, these salinity trends started in the mid-1990s, a few years before the Global Warming Hiatus from 1998 to present. The salinity trends are associated a strengthening trend of the Walker Circulation over the tropical Indo-Pacific, which have reversed the long-term salinity changes in the tropical Indo-Pacific as a consequence of global warming. Understanding decadal variations of SSS in the tropical Indo-Pacific will better inform on how the tropical hydrological cycle will be affected by the natural variability and a warming climate.

  11. Suicidality and symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation in patients experiencing manic episodes with depressive symptoms: a naturalistic study

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, Jonas; Weiller, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with a bipolar I disorder (BD-I) manic episode meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), criteria for “with mixed features” have a high incidence of suicide attempts and of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (AIA) symptoms. The aim of this analysis was to explore the relationship between suicidality and AIA symptoms in patients with BD-I experiencing mania with depressive symptoms, using data from a previous naturalistic study. Patients and methods Psychiatrists completed an online questionnaire about their adult patients who had a current BD-I manic episode. Questions covered the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier, the severity of AIA symptoms, the frequency and controllability of suicidal ideation, and the number of suicide attempts. Results Of 1,035 patients with BD-I mania who were included in the analyses, 348 (33.6%) met the criteria for the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier (three or more depressive symptoms). These patients were further stratified according to the severity of their AIA symptoms: “mild AIA” (zero or one AIA symptom above a severity threshold; 105 patients) or “severe AIA” (all three AIA symptoms above a severity threshold; 167 patients). A greater incidence of suicidal ideation was observed in the severe AIA group (71.9%) than in the mild AIA group (47.6%). Twice as many patients had easily controlled suicidal ideation than difficult-to-control suicidal ideation in both subgroups. The mean number of suicide attempts was higher in the severe AIA group than in the mild AIA group, during the current episode (0.84 vs 0.34 attempts, respectively; P<0.05) and over the patient’s lifetime (1.56 vs 1.04 attempts, respectively). Conclusion The high risk of suicide among BD-I mania patients with depressive symptoms is further increased when they experience severe AIA symptoms. Recognizing AIA symptoms in BD-I mania could provide a means of identifying

  12. 78 FR 23784 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council (Council) was established by the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of 1974...

  13. 75 FR 25877 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council (Council) was established by the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control ] Act of 1974...

  14. 75 FR 66389 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council (Council) was established by the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of 1974 (Pub....

  15. 76 FR 61382 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. ] SUMMARY: The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council (Council) was established by the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of 1974 (Pub....

  16. 77 FR 23508 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council (Council) was established by the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of 1974 (Pub....

  17. 78 FR 70574 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ....20350010.REG0000, RR04084000] Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council (Council) was established by the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of 1974 (Pub....

  18. 75 FR 27360 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council (Council) was established by the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of 1974 (Pub....

  19. 77 FR 61784 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council (Council) was established by the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of 1974 (Pub....

  20. Sea Surface Salinity: The Next Remote Sensing Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Swift, Calvin T.; LeVine, David M.

    1995-01-01

    A brief history of salinity remote sensing is presented. The role of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the far north Atlantic and the influence of salinity variations on upper ocean dynamics in the tropics are described. An assessment of the present state of the technology of the SSS satellite remote sensing is given.

  1. Dolomite from reflux of moderate salinity brine, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    Dolomite from the Eocene of Enewetak Atoll provides a model for prediction of dolomite reservoirs. Others have noted dolomite below about 1200 meters at the base of permeable slope strata, and that dolomite postdates compaction, formed from fluids with {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr higher than the host strata, and that dolomite stable isotope values argue for precipitation from cool seawater or warm evaporated seawater. Dolomite contains cloudy cores, rich in primary fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion ice melting ranges from -2.4 to -4.4{degrees}C (higher salinity than seawater; 44 to 85 ppt). Ratios of clear rim/cloudy core compared to new {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and stable isotope data yield no correlation indicative of differences between clear rims and cloudy cores. Dolomite {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr are 0.70750 to 0.70873, but fluid inclusion {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr are 0.70957 to 0.71198, indicating inclusions best preserve end-member compositions for the dolomitizing fluid. Thus, dolomite precipitated from a young fluid that, surprisingly, may have interacted with some unknown source of radiogenic Sr. For fluid inclusions, Na/K is similar to seawater indicating components were derived from seawater evaporation and not from dissolution of an evaporate, Na/Sr and Ca/Mg are similar to seawater modified by rock/water interaction, and Cl/SO{sub 4} suggests removal of SO{sub 4} from pore fluids. The only viable explanation for the Enewetak dolomite is that young fluids evaporated to salinities slightly above seawater in Enewetak lagoon. The density contrast allowed for reflux deep into the atoll, discharging through permeable slope strata. This model could predict distributions of dolomite in any platform with slight restriction and appropriate climate.

  2. Dolomite from reflux of moderate salinity brine, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.H. )

    1996-01-01

    Dolomite from the Eocene of Enewetak Atoll provides a model for prediction of dolomite reservoirs. Others have noted dolomite below about 1200 meters at the base of permeable slope strata, and that dolomite postdates compaction, formed from fluids with [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr higher than the host strata, and that dolomite stable isotope values argue for precipitation from cool seawater or warm evaporated seawater. Dolomite contains cloudy cores, rich in primary fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion ice melting ranges from -2.4 to -4.4[degrees]C (higher salinity than seawater; 44 to 85 ppt). Ratios of clear rim/cloudy core compared to new [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr and stable isotope data yield no correlation indicative of differences between clear rims and cloudy cores. Dolomite [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr are 0.70750 to 0.70873, but fluid inclusion [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr are 0.70957 to 0.71198, indicating inclusions best preserve end-member compositions for the dolomitizing fluid. Thus, dolomite precipitated from a young fluid that, surprisingly, may have interacted with some unknown source of radiogenic Sr. For fluid inclusions, Na/K is similar to seawater indicating components were derived from seawater evaporation and not from dissolution of an evaporate, Na/Sr and Ca/Mg are similar to seawater modified by rock/water interaction, and Cl/SO[sub 4] suggests removal of SO[sub 4] from pore fluids. The only viable explanation for the Enewetak dolomite is that young fluids evaporated to salinities slightly above seawater in Enewetak lagoon. The density contrast allowed for reflux deep into the atoll, discharging through permeable slope strata. This model could predict distributions of dolomite in any platform with slight restriction and appropriate climate.

  3. Effects of salinity variations on pore water flow in salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengji; Jin, Guangqiu; Xin, Pei; Kong, Jun; Li, Ling

    2015-06-01

    Spatial and temporal salinity variations in surface water and pore water commonly exist in salt marshes under the combined influence of tidal inundation, precipitation, evapotranspiration, and inland freshwater input. Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations were conducted to investigate how density gradients associated with salinity variations affect pore water flow in the salt marsh system. The results showed that upward salinity (density) gradients could lead to flow instability and the formation of salt fingers. These fingers, varying in size with the distance from the creek, modified significantly the pore water flow field, especially in the marsh interior. While the flow instability enhanced local salt transport and mixing considerably, the net effect was small, causing only a slight increase in the overall mass exchange across the marsh surface. In contrast, downward salinity gradients exerted less influence on the pore water flow in the marsh soil and slightly weakened the surface water and groundwater exchange across the marsh surface. Numerical simulations revealed similar density effects on pore water flow at the field scale under realistic conditions. These findings have important implications for studies of marsh soil conditions concerning plant growth as well as nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal marine system.

  4. An Arabidopsis senescence-associated protein SAG29 regulates cell viability under high salinity.

    PubMed

    Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Jung-Min; Kang, Seok Ki; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Park, Chung-Mo

    2011-01-01

    The plasma membrane is an important cellular organ that perceives incoming developmental and environmental signals and integrates these signals into cellular regulatory mechanisms. It also acts as a barrier against unfavorable extracellular factors to maintain cell viability. Despite its importance for cell viability, molecular components determining cell viability and underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we show that a plasma membrane-localized MtN3 protein SAG29 regulates cell viability under high salinity in Arabidopsis. The SAG29 gene is expressed primarily in senescing plant tissues. It is induced by osmotic stresses via an abscisic acid-dependent pathway. Whereas the SAG29-overexpressing transgenic plants (35S:SAG29) exhibited an accelerated senescence and were hypersensitive to salt stress, the SAG29-deficient mutants were less sensitive to high salinity. Consistent with this, the 35S:SAG29 transgenic plants showed reduced cell viability in the roots under normal growth condition. In contrast, cell viability in the SAG29-deficient mutant roots was indistinguishable from that in the roots of control plants. Notably, the mutant roots exhibited enhanced cell viability under high salinity. Our observations indicate that the senescence-associated SAG29 protein is associated with cell viability under high salinity and other osmotic stress conditions. We propose that the SAG29 protein may serve as a molecular link that integrates environmental stress responses into senescing process.

  5. Elevated CO2 reduces stomatal and metabolic limitations on photosynthesis caused by salinity in Hordeum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Usue; Robredo, Anabel; Lacuesta, Maite; Mena-Petite, Amaia; Muñoz-Rueda, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    The future environment may be altered by high concentrations of salt in the soil and elevated [CO(2)] in the atmosphere. These have opposite effects on photosynthesis. Generally, salt stress inhibits photosynthesis by stomatal and non-stomatal mechanisms; in contrast, elevated [CO(2)] stimulates photosynthesis by increasing CO(2) availability in the Rubisco carboxylating site and by reducing photorespiration. However, few studies have focused on the interactive effects of these factors on photosynthesis. To elucidate this knowledge gap, we grew the barley plant, Hordeum vulgare (cv. Iranis), with and without salt stress at either ambient or elevated atmospheric [CO(2)] (350 or 700 μmol mol(-1) CO(2), respectively). We measured growth, several photosynthetic and fluorescence parameters, and carbohydrate content. Under saline conditions, the photosynthetic rate decreased, mostly because of stomatal limitations. Increasing salinity progressively increased metabolic (photochemical and biochemical) limitation; this included an increase in non-photochemical quenching and a reduction in the PSII quantum yield. When salinity was combined with elevated CO(2), the rate of CO(2) diffusion to the carboxylating site increased, despite lower stomatal and internal conductance. The greater CO(2) availability increased the electron sink capacity, which alleviated the salt-induced metabolic limitations on the photosynthetic rate. Consequently, elevated CO(2) partially mitigated the saline effects on photosynthesis by maintaining favorable biochemistry and photochemistry in barley leaves.

  6. Biodiversity of the genus Fusarium in saline soil habitats.

    PubMed

    Mandeel, Qaher A

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium species assemblage and diversity were investigated in eight different contrasting extreme saline soil habitats of the hot arid desert environment of Bahrain. Saline habitats are located towards the central-southern part of Bahrain and featured by high electrical conductivity, slightly alkaline sandy soil, poor in nutrient sources and water holding capacity and mainly dominated by a salt-tolerant flora. Quantification of data for the recovery of Fusarium species was based on morphological characters and counts by a series of ten fold dilutions plate method and direct soil plating, using two selective media supplemented with different NaCl concentrations. A total of 68 isolates, fluctuated between 1 and 23 per soil sample, were recovered among all habitats mostly at 0 and 5% NaCl concentrations, while no recovery was achieved at 20 and 25%. Grouping of these isolates has resulted in only five species (F. solani, F. oxysporum, F. chlamydosporum, F. equiseti and F. compactum), all of which were previously reported from the arid terrestrial habitats of Bahrain. F. solani was the most predominant species, based on relative density, frequency of occurrence and dominance values, followed by F. oxysporum, a finding consistent with other similar arid Sahara ecosystems. Evaluation of data, supported by analysis of diversity indices and community coefficients, revealed that desert mountain habitat followed by burial mounds habitat were highly homogeneous coupled with maximum species richness, diversity indices and evenness, whereas soil habitats like cliffs, coastal and Al-Lowzy pit were the poorest. Moreover, in vitro tests showed that among other fusaria, F. solani exhibited the highest tolerance to increase NaCl concentrations (25%) and temperature (28.3 mm linear growth at 35 degrees C). At 10% NaCl concentrations, significant reduction in linear growth extensions suppressed all species accompanied by massive thick-walled, drought-resistant chlamydospores

  7. Distribution of acI-Actinorhodopsin genes in Baltic Sea salinity gradients indicates adaptation of facultative freshwater photoheterotrophs to brackish waters.

    PubMed

    Salka, Ivette; Wurzbacher, Christian; Garcia, Sarahi L; Labrenz, Matthias; Jürgens, Klaus; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on Actinobacteria rhodopsin gene (actR) diversity and spatial distribution is scarce. The Baltic Sea is characterized by strong salinity gradients leading to the coexistence of marine and freshwater bacteria and hence is an ideal study area to elucidate the dispersion and phylogenetic affiliation of actR in dependence on salinity. ActR DGGE fingerprints in summer 2008 revealed between 3 and 19 distinct bands within a salinity range of 2.4-27 PSU. Environmental actR clone sequences were obtained from stations distributed along the whole salinity gradient. Overall, 20 different actR sequence groups (operational taxonomic units) were found, with up to 11 different ones per station. Phylogenetically, the actR sequences were predominantly (80%) affiliated with freshwater acI-Actinobacteria whose 16S rRNA gene accounted for 2-33% of total 16S rRNA genes in both the Bothnian Sea and central Baltic Sea. However, at salinities above 14 PSU, acI-16S rRNA gene accounted for less than 1%. In contrast, the diversity of actR remained high. Changes in actR gene diversity were significantly correlated with salinity, oxygen, silica or abundance of Synechococcus sp. Our results demonstrate a wide distribution of freshwater actR along the Baltic Sea salinity gradient indicating that some freshwater Actinobacteria might have adapted to higher salinities.

  8. Effect of salinity on methylation of mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, J.E.; Bartha, R.

    1980-09-01

    Monomethyl and dimethylmercury are potent neurotoxins subject to biomagnification in food webs. This fact was tragically demonstrated by the Minamata and Niigata poisoning incidents in Japan in which 168 persons who ate seafood from mercury polluted waters were poisoned, 52 fatally. Shortly after these two incidents, work conducted in freshwater environments demonstrated the microbial conversion of inorganic and phenylmercury compounds to mono- and di-methylmercury. Consideration of some fragmentary evidence from the literature, however, indicates that the rate and the significance of microbial methylation of mercury in freshwater and saltwater environments may not be the same. A demonstrated relationship between mercury methylation rates and water salinity would greatly influence our thinking about mercury pollution effects in marine versus freshwater environments. Since we were unable to locate published reports on this subject, we are investigating the influence of salinity on the rate of mercury methylation in an estuarine sediment.

  9. Contaminated soils salinity, a threat for phytoextraction?

    PubMed

    Sirguey, Catherine; Ouvrard, Stéphanie

    2013-04-01

    Phytoremediation, given the right choice of plant, may be theoretically applicable to multi-contamination. Laboratory and some field trials have proven successful, but this ideal technique is in all cases dependent on plant growth ability on (generally) low-fertility soil or media. While contaminant concentration has often been proposed as an explanation for plant growth limitation, other factors, commonly occurring in industrial soils, such as salinity, should be considered. The present work highlights the fact that besides contaminants (trace elements and PAH), soil salinity may strongly affect germination and growth of the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens. Elevated concentrations of nitrate proved highly toxic for seed germination. At the growth stage the salt effect (sulfate) seemed less significant and the limited biomass production observed could be attributed mostly to organic contamination.

  10. Morphological and structural plasticity of grassland species in response to a gradient in saline-sodic soils.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Song, Y; Li, G; Drake, P L; Zheng, W; Li, Z; Zhou, D

    2015-11-01

    The abundance and distribution of species can be ascribed to both environmental heterogeneity and stress tolerance, with the latter measure sometimes associated with phenotypic plasticity. Although phenotypic plasticity varies predictably in response to common forms of stress, we lack a mechanistic understanding of the response of species to high saline-sodic soils. We compared the phenotypic plasticity of three pairs of high and low saline-sodic tolerant congeners from the families Poaceae (Leymus chinensis versus L. secalinus), Fabaceae (Lespedeza davurica versus L. bicolor) and Asteraceae (Artemisia mongolica versus A. sieversiana) in a controlled pot experiment in the Songnen grassland, China. The low tolerant species, L. secalinus and A. sieversiana exhibited higher plasticity in response to soil salinity and sodicity than their paired congeners. Highly tolerant species, L. chinensis and A. mongolica, had higher values for several important morphological traits, such as shoot length and total biomass under the high saline-sodic soil treatment than their paired congeners. In contrast, congeners from the family Fabaceae, L. davurica and L. bicolor, did not exhibit significantly different plasticity in response to soil salinity and sodicity. All species held a constant reproductive effort in response to saline-sodic soil stress. The different responses between low and high tolerant species offer an explanation for the distribution patterns of these species in the Songnen grassland. Highly tolerant species showed less morphological plasticity over a range of saline-sodic conditions than their paired congeners, which may manifest as an inability to compete with co-occurring species in locations where saline-sodic soils are absent.

  11. Comparison of SMOS measurements of sea surface salinity during SPURS using a high-resolution, vertical profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walesby, Kieran; Sutherland, Graigory; Ten Doeschate, Anneke; Reverdin, Gilles; Font, Jordi; Ward, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite was launched in 2009 and, for the first time, provides measurements of sea surface salinity on a global scale. Ocean salinity is a key parameter for climate change, being closely associated with the global hydrological cycle and an important driver in determining overall ocean circulation. This makes the advent of satellite measurements of salinity a significant advance. During the Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study (SPURS) field experiments, in September 2012 and March 2013, a variety of in-situ platforms were deployed with the purpose of validating the salinity observations from SMOS. One of these platforms was the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler, a microstructure profiler which provides high-resolution profiles of salinity, temperature and turbulence right up to the surface. This last capability is crucial. Most oceanic microstructure profilers operate when travelling downwards, and are therefore unable to accurately observe the layer of the ocean immediately below the surface. It is this top layer, approximately 1 cm in thickness, which satellites observe. In contrast, ASIP is upwardly-rising, allowing it to sample the same part of the water column as satellites, such as SMOS. This is important since large thermal and haline stratifications can develop close to the surface, particularly under conditions of strong evaporation. Although sea surface salinity in the open ocean is largely determined by the balance between evaporation and precipitation, the effects of various vertical mixing processes also contribute. ASIP is extremely well-suited to understanding the impact of these on differences between ASIP and SMOS, and some results are also presented here which demonstrate the important effect of such processes.

  12. Microwave Radiometric Measurement of Sea Surface Salinity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    potential problems of polution and urban water sup- plies. Although salinity can be measured from a surface vessel, economic consider- ations advocate...Washington, DC 20350 Commander Naval Sea System Commandaa ComAinder ATTN: Mr. C. Smith, NAVSEA 63R* Nval Air Development Center "’-’. "Washington, DC...20362 ATTN: Mr. R. Bollard, Code 2062% .’* Warminster, PA 18974 • .’.Commander CNaval Sea System CommandCoimCander Headquarters Naval Air Systems

  13. Environmental isotope hydrology of salinized experimental catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. V.; Arad, A.; Johnston, C. D.

    1987-10-01

    Deuterium, oxygen-18, tritium and chloride concentrations were used in three salinized experimental catchments to gain insight into the mechanism of solute concentration and flow processes in the saturated and unsaturated zones. The three experimental catchments were studied because of their location in different rainfall regions, their status with respect to clearing of native vegetation and with respect to secondary salinization. Two uncleared catchments have average annual rainfalls of approximately 820 and 1220 mm, respectively. The third cleared catchment has an annual rainfall of 650-750 mm. This catchment was in an advanced state of secondary salinization and displayed large areas of saline groundwater discharge with halite encrustation at the ground surface. The stable isotope compositions of the solution phase in solute bulge profiles in the unsaturated zone showed a close agreement with the amount-weighted mean isotopic composition of rainfall and only surficial evidence of isotopic enrichment due to evaporation. Evaporation from the soil surface plays a minor role as a mechanism of solute concentration in the unsaturated zone. The dominant process of solute concentration in the unsaturated zone was ion exclusion during uptake of water by tree roots which was evidently a solute but not isotope fractionating process. Tritium analyses of unsaturated zone water and grondwater indicated movement of recent recharge to 7-10 m depth at the low rainfall site but over the full depth of the 15 m unsaturated zone at the higher rainfall site. The variability in δ18O and δ2H values of groundwaters was used in association with chloride concentrations to provide information on mixing characteristics of groundwaters within the catchments.

  14. Injection of adjuvant but not acidic saline into craniofacial muscle evokes nociceptive behaviors and neuropeptide expression.

    PubMed

    Ambalavanar, R; Yallampalli, C; Yallampalli, U; Dessem, D

    2007-11-09

    Craniofacial muscle pain including muscular temporomandibular disorders accounts for a substantial portion of all pain perceived in the head and neck region. In spite of its high clinical prevalence, the mechanisms of chronic craniofacial muscle pain are not well understood. Injection of acidic saline into rodent hindlimb muscles produces pathologies which resemble muscular pathologies in chronic pain patients. Here we investigated whether analogous transformations occur following repeated injections of acidic saline into the rat masseter muscle. Injection of acidic saline (pH 4) into the masseter muscle transiently lowered i.m. pH to levels comparable to those reported for rodent hindlimb muscles. Nevertheless, repeated unilateral or bilateral injections of acidic saline (pH 4) into the masseter muscle failed to alter nociceptive behavioral responses as occurs in the hindlimb. Changing the pH of injected saline to pH 3.0 or 5.0 also did not evoke nocifensive behavior. Acid sensing ion channel 3 receptors, which are implicated in transformations following acidification of hindlimb muscles, were found on trigeminal ganglion muscle afferent neurons via combined neuronal tracing and immunocytochemistry. In contrast to the acidic saline, injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the masseter muscle induced mechanical allodynia for 3 weeks, thermal hyperalgesia for 1 week and an increase in the number of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive muscle afferent neurons in the trigeminal ganglion. Although pH may alter CGRP release in primary afferent neurons, the number of CGRP-muscle afferent neurons did not change following i.m. injection of acidic saline. Further, there was no change in ganglionic iCGRP levels at 1, 4 or 12 days after i.m. injection of acidic saline. While these findings extend our earlier reports that CFA-induced muscle inflammation results in behavioral and neuropeptide changes they further suggest that i.m. acidification in

  15. Incorporation of salinity in Water Availability Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Lee, Chihun

    2011-10-01

    SummaryNatural salt pollution from geologic formations in the upper watersheds of several large river basins in the Southwestern United States severely constrains the use of otherwise available major water supply sources. The Water Rights Analysis Package modeling system has been routinely applied in Texas since the late 1990s in regional and statewide planning studies and administration of the state's water rights permit system, but without consideration of water quality. The modeling system was recently expanded to incorporate salinity considerations in assessments of river/reservoir system capabilities for supplying water for environmental, municipal, agricultural, and industrial needs. Salinity loads and concentrations are tracked through systems of river reaches and reservoirs to develop concentration frequency statistics that augment flow frequency and water supply reliability metrics at pertinent locations for alternative water management strategies. Flexible generalized capabilities are developed for using limited observed salinity data to model highly variable concentrations imposed upon complex river regulation infrastructure and institutional water allocation/management practices.

  16. Contrasting coloration in terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Here I survey, collate and synthesize contrasting coloration in 5000 species of terrestrial mammals focusing on black and white pelage. After briefly reviewing alternative functional hypotheses for coloration in mammals, I examine nine colour patterns and combinations on different areas of the body and for each mammalian taxon to try to identify the most likely evolutionary drivers of contrasting coloration. Aposematism and perhaps conspecific signalling are the most consistent explanations for black and white pelage in mammals; background matching may explain white pelage. Evidence for contrasting coloration is being involved in crypsis through pattern blending, disruptive coloration or serving other functions, such as signalling dominance, lures, reducing eye glare or in temperature regulation has barely moved beyond anecdotal stages of investigation. Sexual dichromatism is limited in this taxon and its basis is unclear. Astonishingly, the functional significance of pelage coloration in most large charismatic black and white mammals that were new to science 150 years ago still remains a mystery. PMID:18990666

  17. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  18. Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Symptoms of Severe Agitation and Aggression: Consensus Statement on Treatment Options, Clinical Trials Methodology, and Policy

    PubMed Central

    Salzman, C; Jeste, D; Meyer, RE; Cohen-Mansfield, J; Cummings, J; Grossberg, G; Jarvik, L; Kraemer, H; Lebowitz, B; Maslow, K; Pollock, B; Raskind, M; Schultz, S; Wang, P; Zito, JM; Zubenko, GS

    2009-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs have been used off-label in clinical practice for treatment of serious dementia-associated agitation and aggression. Following reports of cerebrovascular adverse events associated with the use of atypical antipsychotic in elderly patients with dementia, the FDA issued black box warnings for several atypical antipsychotics, titled “Cerebrovascular Adverse Events, including Stroke, in Elderly Patients with Dementia.” Subsequently, the FDA initiated a meta-analysis of safety data from 17 registration trials across six antipsychotic drugs (five atypical antipsychotics and haloperidol). In 2005, the Agency issued a black box warning regarding increased risk of mortality associated with the use of atypical antipsychotic drugs in this patient population. Geriatric mental health experts participating in a 2006 consensus conference reviewed evidence on the safety and efficacy of antipsychotics, as well as nonpharmacologic approaches, in treating dementia-related symptoms of agitation and aggression. They concluded that, while problems in clinical trials design may have been one of the contributors to the failure to find a signal of drug efficacy, the findings related to drug safety should be taken seriously by clinicians in assessing the potential risks and benefits of treatment in a frail population, and in advising families about treatment. Information provided to patients and family members should be documented in the patient’s chart. Drugs should be used only when non-pharmacologic approaches have failed to adequately control behavioral disruption. Participants also agreed that that there is a need for an FDA-approved medication for the treatment of severe, persistent or recurrent dementia-related symptoms of agitation and aggression (even in the absence of psychosis), that are unresponsive to nonpharmacologic intervention. The authors have outlined methodological enhancements to better evaluate treatment approaches in future

  19. Quantitative comparison of calcium hydroxide removal by EndoActivator, ultrasonic and ProTaper file agitation techniques: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Khaleel, Huda Yasir; Al-Ashaw, Ahmed Jawad; Yang, Yan; Pang, Ai-hui; Ma, Jing-zhi

    2013-02-01

    Calcium hydroxide (CH) dressing residues can compromise endodontic sealing. This study aimed to evaluate the amount of remaining CH in root canals after mechanical removal by four groups of irrigation techniques including needle irrigation only, ProTaper file, EndoActivator, and ultrasonic file. Fifteen extracted single-rooted teeth were collected and used for all four groups. The samples were firstly prepared by ProTaper rotary instruments, and then sectioned longitudinally through the long axis of the root canals, followed by final reassembling by wires. CH was kept in the canals for 7 days setting. The removal procedure began with 5 mL of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) followed by 1 mL of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and a final irrigation with 5 mL of 2.5% NaOCl solution for all groups. No additional agitation of the irrigant was performed in group 1, while agitation for 20 s between irrigants was done with F2 ProTaper rotary file in group 2, EndoActivator with tip size 25/.04 in group 3 and by an ultrasonic file 25/.02 in group 4. The total activation time was 60 s. The roots were then disassembled and captured by digital camera. The ratio of CH coated surface area to the surface area of the whole canal as well as each third of the canal was calculated. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA using post hoc Tukey test. Results showed that none of the four techniques could remove all CH. No significant difference was found between EndoActivator and ultrasonic techniques. However, they both removed significantly more CH than ProTaper and needle irrigation (P=0.0001). In conclusion, the sonic and ultrasonic agitation techniques were more effective in removing intracanal medicaments than the ProTaper rotary file and needle irrigation in all thirds of the canal.

  20. Addressing the need for rapid treatment of agitation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: focus on inhaled loxapine as an alternative to injectable agents

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Agitation (excessive motor or verbal activity) can be associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania, and can further escalate into aggressive behavior and potentially lead to injuries in patients and staff. Medications used to treat agitation include antipsychotics and benzodiazepines, usually administered intramuscularly when rapid action is desired. Loxapine, a first-generation antipsychotic, has recently been reformulated into an inhaled powder that allows for direct administration to the lungs, resulting in rapid absorption into the systemic circulation. Administered via a single-use device, inhaled loxapine was tested in randomized controlled trials in agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania; doses of 5 mg and 10 mg were found to be efficacious, with an apparent dose response. In the Phase III studies, number needed to treat versus placebo for a ≥40% reduction from baseline on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale – Excited Component (PANSS-EC) at 2 hours was three for patients with bipolar disorder, and five for 5 mg and four for 10 mg for patients with schizophrenia, with effect sizes comparable to what has been observed in analogous studies of intramuscular injection of antipsychotics or lorazepam. Separation from placebo on the PANSS-EC was as early as 10 minutes postinhalation, the first time point where this was measured. Dysgeusia was the most commonly encountered spontaneously reported adverse event. Adverse events related to extrapyramidal symptoms and akathisia were relatively rare. Spirometry studies identified the potential for bronchospasm particularly in persons with asthma. Because of concerns over pulmonary safety, inhaled loxapine is restricted to use in hospitals and patients need to be prescreened for the presence of pulmonary disease, as well as monitored for signs and symptoms of bronchospasm for 1 hour postdose administration, as per a Food and Drug Administration-mandated Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy