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Sample records for agitation sedation scale

  1. Entropy correlates with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankur; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Trikha, Anjan; Rewari, Vimi; Chandralekha

    2014-04-01

    Sedation is routinely used in intensive care units. However due to absence of objective scoring systems like Bispectral Index and entropy our ability to regulate the degree of sedation is limited. This deficiency is further highlighted by the fact that agitation scores used in intensive care units (ICU) have no role in paralyzed patients. The present study compares entropy as a sedation scoring modality with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients in an ICU. Twenty-seven, mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients of either sex, 16-65 years of age, were studied over a period of 24 h. They received a standard sedation regimen consisting of a bolus dose of propofol 0.5 mg/kg and fentanyl 1 lg/kg followed by infusions of propofol and fentanyl ranging from 1.5 to 5 mg/kg/h and 0.5 to 2.0 lg/kg/h, respectively. Clinically relevant values of RASS for optimal ICU sedation (between 0 and -3) in non-paralyzed patients were compared to corresponding entropy values, to find if any significant correlation exists between the two. These entropy measurements were obtained using the Datex-Ohmeda-M-EntropyTM module. This module is presently not approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for monitoring sedation in ICU. A total of 527 readings were obtained. There was a statistically significant correlation between the state entropy (SE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.334, p\\0.0001]; response entropy (RE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.341, p\\0.0001]). For adequate sedation as judged by a RASS value of 0 to -3, the mean SE was 57.86 ± 16.50 and RE was 67.75 ± 15.65. The present study illustrates that entropy correlates with RASS (between scores 0 and -3) when assessing the level of sedation in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

  2. Benzodiazepines: Sedation and Agitation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety is common and frequently poses a barrier to necessary dental treatment. The increasing availability of conscious sedation in dental practice has made treatment much more accessible for anxious patients. At present, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used drugs in sedation practice and provide a pleasant experience for most, but not all, patients. An understanding of the mechanism of action of benzodiazepines should inform our practice and deepen our understanding of why and how sedation may fail. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: As an increasing number of dentists provide sedation for their patients an update on benzodiazepines is timely.

  3. Clinical monitoring scales in acute brain injury: assessment of coma, pain, agitation, and delirium.

    PubMed

    Riker, Richard R; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2014-12-01

    Serial clinical examination represents the most fundamental and basic form of neurological monitoring, and is often the first and only form of such monitoring in patients. Even in patients subjected to physiological monitoring using a range of technologies, the clinical examination remains an essential tool to follow neurological progress. Key aspects of the clinical examination have now been systematized into scoring schemes, and address consciousness, pain, agitation, and delirium (PAD). The Glasgow Coma Scale has been the traditional tool to measure consciousness, but the full outline of unresponsiveness (FOUR) score has recently been validated in a variety of settings, and at present, both represent clinically useful tools. Assessment of PAD in neurologically compromised patients present special challenges. For pain, the Numeric Rating Scale is the preferred initial approach, with either the Behavioral Pain Scale or the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool in subjects who are not able to respond. The Nociception Coma Scale-Revised may be useful in patients with severe disorders of consciousness. Conventional sedation scoring tools for critical care, such as the Richmond Area Sedation Scale (RASS) and Sedation-Agitation Scale (SAS) may provide reasonable tools in some neurocritical care patients. The use of sedative drugs and neuromuscular blockers may invalidate the use of some clinical examination tools in others. The use of sedation interruption to assess neurological status can result in physiological derangement in unstable patients (such as those with uncontrolled intracranial hypertension), and is not recommended.

  4. Communication Capacity Scale and Agitation Distress Scale to measure the severity of delirium in terminally ill cancer patients: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Morita, T; Tsunoda, J; Inoue, S; Chihara, S; Oka, K

    2001-05-01

    Although valid measurement of the severity of terminal delirium is of great importance in palliative care settings, existing instruments have considerable limitations. In order to quantify patients' communication capacity and agitated behaviour, two new operational observer-rating scales, the Communication Capacity Scale (Communication Scale) and Agitation Distress Scale (Agitation Scale), were validated. Thirty terminally ill cancer patients diagnosed with delirium were evaluated simultaneously by two palliative care physicians blinded to each other's coding using the Communication Scale and Agitation Scale. In addition, the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS), Delirium Rating Scale (DRS) and Sedation Scale were rated by one researcher. Both scales achieved high internal consistency and inter-rater reliability with Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.91 and 0.96, and Cohen's kappa values on each item of 0.72-1.00. The principal components analysis resulted in the emergence of only one component for each scale. The total score on the Communication Scale was highly associated with that of the MDAS (rho = 0.78), Sedation Scale (rho = 0.86), and cognitive items from the MDAS and DRS (rho = 0.83). The whole score on the Agitation Scale was significantly correlated with that of the DRS (rho = 0.61) and agitation items from the MDAS and DRS (rho = 0.61). In conclusion, the Communication Scale and Agitation Scale have acceptable reliability and validity to quantify patients' communication capacity and agitation symptoms of terminally ill cancer patients with delirium.

  5. Perspectives on sedation assessment in critical care.

    PubMed

    Olson, Daiwai M; Thoyre, Suzanne M; Auyong, David B

    2007-01-01

    Multiple studies have been undertaken to show that neurofunction monitors can correlate to objective sedation assessments. Showing a correlation between these 2 patient assessments tools may not be the correct approach for validation of neurofunction monitors. Two different methods of assessing 2 different modes of the patient's response to sedation should not be expected to precisely correlate unless the desire is to replace one method with the other. We provide a brief summary of several sedation scales, physiologic measures and neurofunction monitoring tools, and correlations literature for bispectral index monitoring, and the Ramsay Scale and the Sedation Agitation Scale. Neurofunction monitors provide near continuous information about a different domain of the sedation response than intermittent observational assessments. Further research should focus on contributions from this technology to the improvement of patient outcomes when neurofunction monitoring is used as a complement, not a replacement, for observational methods of sedation assessment.

  6. Granulation of core particles suitable for film coating by agitation fluidized bed III. Effect of scale, agitator rotational speed and blade shape on granule properties and development of a high accuracy scale-up theory.

    PubMed

    Hamashita, Tomohiro; Ono, Tetsuo; Ono, Masaki; Tsunenari, Yoshinobu; Aketo, Takao; Watano, Satoru

    2009-04-01

    The preparation of core particles suitable for subsequent film coating was examined using different scales of agitation fluidized beds. Specifically, the effects of agitator rotational speed and agitator blade shape in different scales of granulators on granule properties such as mass median diameter, apparent density, friability and shape factor were studied. As the agitator rotational speed was increased or when the agitator blade height and angle were large, the mass median diameter and friability of the granules decreased, while the apparent density and shape factor increased, in a manner independent of the vessel size because the granules were subjected to greater compression, shearing and rolling effects. The same core particles could not be prepared using granulators with different vessel sizes by simply adopting a conventional scale-up theory(1,2)) based on kinetic energy similarity. Here, a novel scale-up theory that takes into account agitator blade shape factors is proposed.(3)) When the two scale-up theories were compared, our new theory was capable of predicting the granule properties more accurately than the conventional theory. By adopting this novel theory, the same core particles could be prepared under different operating conditions in any scale of granulator.

  7. Measurement of agitation and aggression in adult and aged neuropsychiatric patients: review of definitions and frequently used measurement scales.

    PubMed

    Volicer, Ladislav; Citrome, Leslie; Volavka, Jan

    2017-02-09

    Agitation and aggression in adult psychiatric patients with psychoses and in persons with dementia increase the burden of disease and frequently cause hospitalization. The implementation of currently available management strategies and the development of new ones is hindered by inconsistent terminology that confuses agitation with aggression. This confusion is maintained by many rating scales that fail to distinguish between these two syndromes. We review the frequently used rating scales with a particular focus on their ability to separate agitation from aggression. Agitation and aggression are two different syndromes. For example, reactive aggression is often precipitated by rejection of care and may not be associated with agitation per se. We propose, in treatment studies of behavioral symptoms of dementia and challenging behaviors in psychoses, that outcomes should be evaluated separately for agitation and aggression. This is important for investigation of drug effectiveness since the medication may be effective against one syndrome but not the other. Separate assessments of agitation and aggression should be a general principle of trial design with particular salience for registration studies of medications proposed for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory bodies.

  8. How Do Observational Scales Correlate the Ratings of Children's Behavior during Pediatric Procedural Sedation?

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Larissa da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is little information regarding the ability of observational scales to properly assess children's behavior during procedural sedation. Aim. To evaluate the characteristics of the Houpt scales, the Ohio State University Behavioral Rating Scale (OSUBRS) and the Venham Behavior Rating Scale when applied to preschool children undergoing conscious dental sedation. Design. This study included 27 children, 4–6 years old with early childhood caries that participated in a clinical trial (NCT02284204) that investigated two sedative regimes using oral midazolam/ketamine. Dental appointments were video-recorded; five calibrated observers assessed 1,209 minutes of video recording to score the children's behavior, following the instructions of the investigated scales. Data were analyzed by descriptive analysis and Spearman correlation tests (P < 0.05). Results. The Houpt overall behavior and the Venham scale were highly correlated (rho = −0.87; P < 0.001). OSUBRS scores were better correlated with Houpt overall behavior and Venham ratings, when compared to Houpt scores in the categories for movement and crying. Conclusions. The Houpt overall behavior and the Venham scores are global scales that properly measure children's behavior during dental sedation. Continuous assessment with OSUBRS through videos has a chance to give more precise data, while the Houpt categories can easily demonstrate children's behavior during procedures. PMID:28116299

  9. Use of the Pasero Opioid-induced Sedation Scale (POSS) in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Quinlan-Colwell, Ann; Thear, Gayle; Miller-Baldwin, Emily; Smith, Andrea

    2017-02-10

    The Pasero Opioid-induced Sedation Scale (POSS) is a valid, reliable tool used to assess sedation when administering opioid medications to manage pain. The POSS is endorsed by The Joint Commission and the American Society for Pain Management Nursing to help prevent adverse opioid-related respiratory events. Although the POSS is used to assess sedation in pediatric patients at some hospitals, prior to this study, it was not formally evaluated in the pediatric population. This study used a quasi-experimental design with a convenience sample of pediatric patients admitted to a large regional medical center in southeastern North Carolina. The POSS was evaluated from three perspectives. First, the study was designed to compare the documentation of sedation when opioids were administered before (n=25) and after (n=27) implementation of the POSS to assess sedation. Second, the occurrence of respiratory adverse events before and after implementation of the POSS was compared. Third, the appropriateness of using the POSS in the pediatric population was evaluated. When the POSS was used, there was an increase in both the clarity and frequency of documentation when sedation was assessed. There was no incidence of opioid-related adverse respiratory events after implementation of the POSS. Finally, the POSS was found to be appropriate and safe to use in the pediatric population. Through a survey, the majority of registered nurses who cared for the research subjects evaluated the POSS as easy, appropriate and safe to use with pediatric patients. The nurses also noted using the POSS provided standardized communication among staff regarding patients' levels of sedation. No adverse effects, concerns, or objections were reported. Coincidentally, while it was not part of the study, frequency of documentation of assessment of pain also improved with implementation of the POSS.

  10. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti, Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  11. Risk factors for agitation in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Thiago Miranda Lopes; de Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Nosé, Paulo Maurício Garcia; de Freitas, Flavio Geraldo Resende; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of agitation in the first 7 days after intensive care unit admission, its risk factors and its associations with clinical outcomes. Methods This single-center prospective cohort study included all patients older than 18 years with a predicted stay > 48 hours within the first 24 hours of intensive care unit admission. Agitation was defined as a Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale score ≥ +2, an episode of agitation or the use of a specific medication recorded in patient charts. Results Agitation occurred in 31.8% of the 113 patients. Multivariate analysis showed that delirium [OR = 24.14; CI95% 5.15 - 113.14; p < 0.001], moderate or severe pain [OR = 5.74; CI95% 1.73 - 19.10; p = 0.004], mechanical ventilation [OR = 10.14; CI95% 2.93 - 35.10; p < 0.001], and smoking habits [OR = 4.49; CI95% 1.33 - 15.17; p = 0.015] were independent factors for agitation, while hyperlactatemia was associated with a lower risk [OR = 0.169; CI95% 0.04 - 0.77; p = 0.021]. Agitated patients had fewer mechanical ventilation-free days at day 7 (p = 0.003). Conclusion The incidence of agitation in the first 7 days after admission to the intensive care unit was high. Delirium, moderate/severe pain, mechanical ventilation, and smoking habits were independent risk factors. Agitated patients had fewer ventilator-free days in the first 7 days. PMID:28099638

  12. Risk Factors of Emergence Agitation in Adults Undergoing General Anesthesia for Nasal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Hyo-Yeol; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Choi, Seung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the incidence and the risk factors of emergence agitation in adults undergoing general anesthesia for nasal surgery. Methods We retrospectively examined 792 patients aged ≥18 years who underwent general anesthesia for elective nasal surgery between July 2012 and August 2013. Patients in the postanesthesia care unit with a Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale≥+1 at any time were considered to have emergence agitation. Results The overall incidence of emergence agitation is 22.2%. From multivariate regression analysis, the following six variables were found to be significantly associated with emergence agitation (P<0.05): younger age, recent smoking, sevoflurane anesthesia, postoperative pain on the numerical rating scale (NRS)≥5, presence of a tracheal tube, and presence of a urinary catheter. Presence of a tracheal tube was the greatest risk factor, increasing the risk of developing emergence agitation by approximately fivefold (odds ratio, 5.448; 95% confidence interval, 2.973 to 9.982). Younger age was also a strong risk factor (odds ratio, 0.975 for each 1-year increase; 95% confidence interval, 0.964 to 0.987). Current smoking, sevoflurane anesthesia, postoperative pain of NRS≥5, and the presence of a urinary catheter nearly doubled the risk of emergence agitation. Conclusion Emergence agitation following general anesthesia is a common complication in adult nasal surgery patients. To reduce the occurrence and consequences of agitation episodes, elimination of the associated risk factors is necessary, especially in at-risk patients. PMID:25729495

  13. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    SciTech Connect

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti, Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-08

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  14. Pediatric sedation.

    PubMed

    Daud, Yasmeen N; Carlson, Douglas W

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric sedation is an evolving field performed by an extensive list of specialties. Well-defined sedation systems within pediatric facilities are paramount to providing consistent, safe sedation. Pediatric sedation providers should be trained in the principles and practice of sedation, which include patient selection, pre-sedation assessment to determine risks during sedation, selection of optimal sedation medication, monitoring requirements, and post-sedation care. Training, credentialing, and continuing sedation education must be incorporated into sedation systems to verify and monitor the practice of safe sedation. Pediatric hospitalists represent a group of providers with extensive pediatric knowledge and skills who can safely provide pediatric sedation.

  15. Effect of impeller type and agitation on the performance of pilot scale ASBR and AnSBBR applied to sanitary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    de Novaes, Luciano Farias; Saratt, Bruna Luckmann; Rodrigues, José Alberto Domingues; Ratusznei, Suzana Maria; de Moraes, Deovaldo; Ribeiro, Rogers; Zaiat, Marcelo; Foresti, Eugenio

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the effect of agitation rate and impeller type in two mechanically stirred sequencing batch reactors: one containing granulated biomass (denominated ASBR) and the other immobilized biomass on polyurethane foam (denominated AnSBBR). Each configuration, with total volume of 1 m(3), treated 0.65 m(3) sanitary wastewater at ambient temperature in 8-h cycles. Three impeller types were assessed for each reactor configuration: flat-blade turbine impeller, 45 degrees -inclined-blade turbine impeller and helix impeller, as well as two agitation rates: 40 and 80 rpm, resulting in a combination of six experimental conditions. In addition, the ASBR was also operated at 20 rpm with a flat-blade turbine impeller and the AnSBBR was operated with a draft tube and helix impeller at 80 and 120 rpm. To quantify how impeller type and agitation rate relate to substrate consumption rate, results obtained during monitoring at the end of the cycle, as well as the time profiles during a cycle were analyzed. Increasing agitation rate from 40 rpm to 80 rpm in the AnSBBR improved substrate consumption rate whereas in the ASBR this increase destabilized the system, likely due to granule rupture caused by the higher agitation. The AnSBBR showed highest solids and substrate removal, highest kinetic constant and highest alkalinity production when using a helix impeller, 80 rpm, and no draft tube. The best condition for the ASBR was achieved with a flat-blade turbine impeller at 20 rpm. The presence of the draft tube in the AnSBBR did not show significant improvement in reactor efficiency. Furthermore, power consumption studies in these pilot scale reactors showed that power transfer required to improve mass transfer might be technically and economically feasible.

  16. Agitated Depression in Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Gelernter, Joel; Oslin, David; Anton, Raymond F.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression with psychomotor agitation (PMA; “agitated depression”) is a putative psychiatric phenotype that appears to associate with some forms of substance dependence. However, it is unclear whether such relationships extend across different substances and independent (I-MDE) versus substance-induced (SI-MDE) subtypes of major depressive episodes. Method We examined whether lifetime depression with (vs. without) PMA was associated with lifetime substance dependence across individuals with lifetime: (1) I-MDE only (n = 575); and (2) SI-MDE only (n = 1683). Data were pooled from several family and genetic studies of substance dependence in which participants received identical structured interviews to diagnose DSM-IV mental disorders. Results In I-MDE, PMA was significantly associated with alcohol, cocaine, opioid, other drug (hallucinogen, inhalant, speed-ball), and sedative dependence. After controlling for demographic and clinical co-factors, PMA's relationship to dependence on opioids, other drugs, and sedatives remained significant, but not its relationship to alcohol or cocaine. In SI-MDE, PMA was significantly associated with alcohol, cocaine, opioid, and other drug dependence. After adjusting for co-factors, associations remained significant for dependence on cocaine and opioids, but not alcohol or other drugs. Relationships between PMA and opioid dependence were stronger in I-MDE than SI-MDE. Depression subtype (I-MDE vs. SI-MDE) did not moderate relations between PMA and non-opioid forms of substance dependence. Conclusions Agitated depression associates with certain forms of substance dependence, particularly opioid dependence. MDE subtype did not alter most PMA-dependence associations, which suggests that the mechanisms underlying this comorbidity are complex and potentially bidirectional. PMID:21277711

  17. Reflexology: its effects on physiological anxiety signs and sedation needs.

    PubMed

    Akin Korhan, Esra; Khorshid, Leyla; Uyar, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether reflexology has an effect on the physiological signs of anxiety and level of sedation in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support, a single blinded, randomized controlled design with repeated measures was used in the intensive care unit of a university hospital in Turkey. Patients (n = 60) aged between 18 and 70 years and were hospitalized in the intensive care unit and receiving mechanically ventilated support. Participants were randomized to a control group or an intervention group. The latter received 30 minutes of reflexology therapy on their feet, hands, and ears for 5 days. Subjects had vital signs taken immediately before the intervention and at the 10th, 20th, and 30th minutes of the intervention. In the collection of the data, "American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Sedation Assessment Scale" was used. The reflexology therapy group had a significantly lower heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate than the control group. A statistically significant difference was found between the averages of the scores that the patients included in the experimental and control groups received from the agitation, anxiety, sleep, and patient-ventilator synchrony subscales of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Sedation Assessment Scale. Reflexology can serve as an effective method of decreasing the physiological signs of anxiety and the required level of sedation in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support. Nurses who have appropriate training and certification may include reflexology in routine care to reduce the physiological signs of anxiety of patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

  18. Analysis of disease-dependent sedative profiles of H(1)-antihistamines by large-scale surveillance using the visual analog scale.

    PubMed

    Izumi, N; Mizuguchi, H; Umehara, H; Ogino, S; Fukui, H

    2008-04-01

    Sedation is the most frequent side effect of H(1)-antihistamines, and, sometimes, it may be life-threatening for patients. Evaluation of the sedative properties of H(1)-antihistamines is important to improve the patients' quality of life (QOL). Therefore, we carried out a large-scale surveillance quantified through a questionnaire using visual analog scale (VAS) from 1,742 patients. The results showed that the degree of sleepiness caused by some nonsedative second-generation antihistamines, including fexofenadine, olopatadine and cetirizine, was disease dependent. In atopic dermatitis, an unexpectedly low VAS score of sleepiness was obtained for the first-generation antihistamine d-chlorpheniramine, which is similar to those obtained for bepotastine and epinastine. d-Chlorpheniramine also showed a high VAS score in efficacy. Meanwhile, fexofenadine showed a higher VAS score of sleepiness in atopic dermatitis than those obtained in the other allergic diseases including allergic rhinitis, urticaria and asthma. In asthma, a higher VAS score of sleepiness was found for olopatadine, ebastine and cetirizine, when compared with d-chlorpheniramine. On the other hand, bepotastine showed the lowest VAS score for sleepiness. Our findings suggest the existence of unknown factors influencing the sedative properties of H(1)-antihistamines. Therefore, appropriate H(1)-antihistamines may need to be selected, depending on allergic diseases, to improve patients' QOL.

  19. Reducing agitator energy consumption without sacrificing agitation

    SciTech Connect

    Golobic, R.A.; Derrickson, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    Rising energy costs and their increasing net effect on the cost of a mineral product requires that every aspect of processing-plant operations reduce consumed horsepower without sacrificing the grade of the product. This paper addresses two principles in the design and selection of axial-flow agitator propellers that contribute to significant reductions in required horsepower. The first of these involves the use of good design principles. The swirling wake generated by an agitator propeller induces losses in the pumping action. By designing an agitator of proper twist and shape one can minimize these losses. Depending upon the design chosen for comparison, these losses can be reduced by 30 to 50% without any sacrifice in pumping or without increasing the complexity of the design. The second aspect involves an appropriate selection of the agitator propeller diameter. The required horsepower can be significantly reduced by using a propeller of larger diameter while operating it at a lower revolutions per minute (RPM) with no sacrifice in the pumping. 3 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  20. [Pain, agitation and delirium in acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Funk, G-C

    2016-02-01

    Avoiding pain, agitation and delirium as well as avoiding unnecessary deep sedation is a powerful yet challenging strategy in critical care medicine. A number of interactions between cerebral function and respiratory function should be regarded in patients with respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation. A cooperative sedation strategy (i.e. patient is awake and free of pain and delirium) is feasible in many patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. Especially patients with mild acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) seem to benefit from preserved spontaneous breathing. While completely disabling spontaneous ventilation with or without neuromuscular blockade is not a standard strategy in ARDS, it might be temporarily required in patients with severe ARDS, who have substantial dyssynchrony or persistent hypoxaemia. Since pain, agitation and delirium compromise respiratory function they should also be regarded during noninvasive ventilation and during ventilator weaning. Pharmacological sedation can have favourable effects in these situations, but should not be given routinely or uncritically.

  1. Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Behnood

    assessed by expert and non-expert human examiners. Next, we consider facial expression recognition using an unsupervised learning framework. We show that different facial expressions reside on distinct subspaces if the manifold is unfolded. In particular, semi-definite embedding is used to reduce the dimensionality and unfold the manifold of facial images. Next, generalized principal component analysis is used to fit a series of subspaces to the data points and associate each data point to a subspace. Data points that belong to the same subspace are shown to belong to the same facial expression. In clinical intensive care unit practice sedative/analgesic agents are titrated to achieve a specific level of sedation. The level of sedation is currently based on clinical scoring systems. Examples include the motor activity assessment scale (MAAS), the Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS), and the modified Ramsay sedation scale (MRSS). In general, the goal of the clinician is to find the drug dose that maintains the patient at a sedation score corresponding to a moderately sedated state. In this research, we use pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to find an optimal drug dosing control policy to drive the patient to a desired MRSS score. Atrial fibrillation, a cardiac arrhythmia characterized by unsynchronized electrical activity in the atrial chambers of the heart, is a rapidly growing problem in modern societies. One treatment, referred to as catheter ablation, targets specific parts of the left atrium for radio frequency ablation using an intracardiac catheter. As a first step towards the general solution to the computer-assisted segmentation of the left atrial wall, we use shape learning and shape-based image segmentation to identify the endocardial wall of the left atrium in the delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance images. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  2. Microbial nar-GFP cell sensors reveal oxygen limitations in highly agitated and aerated laboratory-scale fermentors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jose R; Cha, Hyung J; Rao, Govind; Marten, Mark R; Bentley, William E

    2009-01-01

    Background Small-scale microbial fermentations are often assumed to be homogeneous, and oxygen limitation due to inadequate micromixing is often overlooked as a potential problem. To assess the relative degree of micromixing, and hence propensity for oxygen limitation, a new cellular oxygen sensor has been developed. The oxygen responsive E. coli nitrate reductase (nar) promoter was used to construct an oxygen reporter plasmid (pNar-GFPuv) which allows cell-based reporting of oxygen limitation. Because there are greater than 109 cells in a fermentor, one can outfit a vessel with more than 109 sensors. Our concept was tested in high density, lab-scale (5 L), fed-batch, E. coli fermentations operated with varied mixing efficiency – one verses four impellers. Results In both cases, bioreactors were maintained identically at greater than 80% dissolved oxygen (DO) during batch phase and at approximately 20% DO during fed-batch phase. Trends for glucose consumption, biomass and DO showed nearly identical behavior. However, fermentations with only one impeller showed significantly higher GFPuv expression than those with four, indicating a higher degree of fluid segregation sufficient for cellular oxygen deprivation. As the characteristic time for GFPuv expression (approx 90 min.) is much larger than that for mixing (approx 10 s), increased specific fluorescence represents an averaged effect of oxygen limitation over time and by natural extension, over space. Conclusion Thus, the pNar-GFPuv plasmid enabled bioreactor-wide oxygen sensing in that bacterial cells served as individual recirculating sensors integrating their responses over space and time. We envision cell-based oxygen sensors may find utility in a wide variety of bioprocessing applications. PMID:19146688

  3. Safety of Conscious Sedation In Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Arepally, Aravind; Oechsle, Denise; Kirkwood, Sharon; Savader, Scott J.

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: To identify rates of adverse events associated with the use of conscious sedation in interventional radiology.Methods: In a 5-month period, prospective data were collected on patients undergoing conscious sedation for interventional radiology procedures (n = 594). Adverse events were categorized as respiratory, sedative, or major adverse events. Respiratory adverse events were those that required oral airway placement, ambu bag, or jaw thrust. Sedation adverse events were unresponsiveness, oxygen saturation less than 90%, use of flumazenil/naloxone, or agitation. Major adverse events were hypotension, intubation, CPR, or cardiac arrest. The frequency of adverse events for the five most common radiology procedures were determined.Results: The five most common procedures (total n = 541) were biliary tube placement/exchange (n = 182), tunneled catheter placement (n 135), diagnostic arteriography (n = 125), vascular interventions (n = 52), and other catheter insertions (n = 46). Rates for respiratory, sedation, and major adverse events were 4.7%, 4.2%, and 2.0%, respectively. The most frequent major adverse event was hypotension (2.0%). Biliary procedures had the highest rate of total adverse events (p < .05) and respiratory adverse events (p < .05).Conclusion: The frequency of adverse events is low with the use of conscious sedation during interventional procedures. The highest rates occurred during biliary interventions.

  4. A comparison of gradual sedation levels using the Comfort-B scale and bispectral index in children on mechanical ventilation in the pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cláudia da Costa; Alves, Marta Maria Osório; El Halal, Michel Georges dos Santos; Pinheiro, Sabrina dos Santos; Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Antonacci

    2013-01-01

    Objective Compare the scores resulting from the Comfort-B scale with the bispectral index in children in an intensive care unit. Methods Eleven children between the ages of 1 month and 16 years requiring mechanical ventilation and sedation were simultaneously classified based on the bispectral index and the Comfort-B scale. Their behavior was recorded using digital photography, and the record was later evaluated by three independent evaluators. Agreement tests (Bland-Altman and Kappa) were then performed. The correlation between the two methods (Pearson correlation) was tested. Results In total, 35 observations were performed on 11 patients. Based on the Kappa coefficient, the agreement among evaluators ranged from 0.56 to 0.75 (p<0.001). There was a positive and consistent association between the bispectral index and the Comfort-B scale [r=0.424 (p=0.011) to r=0.498 (p=0.002)]. Conclusion Due to the strong correlation between the independent evaluators and the consistent correlation between the two methods, the results suggest that the Comfort-B scale is reproducible and useful in classifying the level of sedation in children requiring mechanical ventilation. PMID:24553512

  5. Use of propofol and other nonbenzodiazepine sedatives in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Angelini, G; Ketzler, J T; Coursin, D B

    2001-10-01

    Sedatives continue to be used on a routine basis in critically ill patients. Although many agents are available and some approach an ideal, none are perfect. Patients require continuous reassessment of their pain and need for sedation. Pathophysiologic abnormalities that cause agitation, confusion, or delirium must be identified and treated before unilateral administration of potent sedative agents that may mask potentially lethal insufficiencies. The routine use of standardized and validated sedation scales and monitors is needed. It is hoped that reliable objective monitors of patients' level of consciousness and comfort will be forthcoming. Each sedative agent discussed in this article seems to have a place in the ICU pharmacologic armamentarium to ensure the safe and comfortable delivery of care. Etomidate is an attractive agent for short-term use to provide the rapid onset and offset of sedation in critically ill patients who are at risk for hemodynamic instability but seem to need sedation or anesthesia to perform a procedure or manipulate the airway. Ketamine administered through intramuscular injection or intravenous infusion provides quick, intense analgesia and anesthesia and allows patients to tolerate limited but painful procedures. The risk/benefit ratio associated with the use of this neuroleptic agent must be weighed carefully. Ketamine is contraindicated in patients who lack normal intracranial compliance or who have significant myocardial ischemia. Barbiturates are reserved mainly to induce coma in patients at risk for severe CNS ischemia, which frequently is associated with refractory intracranial hypertension, or in patients with status epilepticus. When administered in high doses, these drugs have prolonged sedative and depressant effects. Judicious hemodynamic monitoring is required when barbiturate coma is induced. Haloperidol is indicated in the treatment of delirium. Patients should be monitored for extrapyramidal side effects and, when they

  6. Comparison of the Effect of Thiopental Sodium with Midazolam-ketamine on Post-tonsillectomy Agitation in Children.

    PubMed

    Toliyat, Maryam; Zangoee, Maliheh; Ahrari, Shahnaz; Zangoee, Reza

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of thiopental sodium with that of midazolam-ketamine on relieving agitation after tonsillectomy in children. In a clinical trial, 50 children aged 5-10 years, candidates for tonsillectomy, were randomly divided into two 25-member groups. In the first group, thiopental sodium 5mg/kg/IV, and in the second group combination of midazolam 0.01 mg/kg/IV and ketamine 1 mg/kg/IV were used to induce anesthesia. The level of sedation was assessed after surgery with the Ramsay scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of heart rate, arterial oxygen pressure (PO2), and duration of anesthesia. The Ramsay sedation score was significantly higher in the thiopental sodium group than in the midazolam-ketamine group (P=0.01). Thiopental sodium can be more effective than the combination of midazolam-ketamine for controlling agitation after tonsillectomy in children.

  7. The relationship between the Bispectral Index (BIS) and the Observer Alertness of Sedation Scale (OASS) scores during propofol sedation with and without ketamine: a randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Kendall, Mark C; Marcus, R-Jay; McCarthy, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    Prior studies have examined the static effect of intravenous ketamine on the BIS Index for sedation but it remains unknown if the BIS Index is a reliable method to track sedation levels in the presence of ketamine. The major objective of the current investigation was to compare the BIS Vista Index ability to track varying depths of sedation as determined by OASS scores in a standardized anesthetic regimen with and without ketamine. The study was a randomized, double blinded clinical trial. Patients undergoing breast surgery under sedation with propofol were randomized to receive ketamine (1.5 μg kg min(-1)) or saline. Infusion data was used to estimate propofol plasma concentrations (Cp). The main outcome of interest was the correlation between the BIS Vista Index with the OASS score. Twenty subjects were recruited and fifteen completed the study. Four hundred fifty-five paired data points were included in the analysis. Model performance (Nagelkerke R(2)) of the multinomial logistic regression model was 0.57 with the c-statistic of 0.87 (95 % CI 0.82-0.91). Compared to awake the odds ratio for BIS values predicting moderate sedation in the saline/propofol group 1.19 (95 % CI 1.12-1.25) but only 1.06 (95 % CI 1.02-1.1) in the ketamine/propofol group (P = 0.001). There was no difference in the odds for BIS values to predict deep sedation between groups (P = 0.14). The BIS monitor can be used to monitor sedation level even when ketamine is used with propofol as part of the sedation regimen. However, ketamine reduces the value of the BIS in predicting moderate sedation levels.

  8. Dexmedetomidine Infusion to Control Agitation due to Anticholinergic Toxidromes in Adolescents, a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ada; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2-adrenergic agonist approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the sedation of adults who are intubated on mechanical ventilation and in non-intubated adults who are undergoing surgical procedures. However, it has also recently become a commonly used sedative agent in varied clinical settings for the pediatric patient as well. We present the use of dexmedetomidine for sedation in a unique clinical scenario, the severely agitated and combative patient following the intentional misuse of anticholinergic drugs. Its applications in this situation are discussed, and previous reports in the literature are reviewed. PMID:26380573

  9. Agitation apparatus. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Beets, A.L.; Lewis, B.E. Jr.

    1982-03-12

    Agitation apparatus includes a tank with a cylindrical upper portion, a frustoconical intermediate portion, and a cylindrical lower portion, a lift tube extending from the upper portion of the tank to a point near an end cap attached to the lower portion of the tank, the lift tube being concentric with the lower portion of the tank to provide a flow passage there between, and a plurality of air supply conduits extending along the lift tube and spaced apart around its perimeter, these air supply conduits terminating adjacent the lower end of the lift tube. Air discharged from the lower ends of the air supply conduits causes liquid in the tank to flow upwardly through the lift tube and out of apertures in the upper portion thereof. Due to the unique properties of nuclear fuel dissolver solutions and the constraint placed on the amount of air that can be injected therein by conventional apparatus, there has been a need for a more effective means for agitating liquid in nuclear fuel digester tanks.

  10. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-05-05

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradigm of minimal sedation can be translated to the neuro-ICU (NICU) is unclear. In patients with ABI, sedation has 'general' indications (control of anxiety, pain, discomfort, agitation, facilitation of mechanical ventilation) and 'neuro-specific' indications (reduction of cerebral metabolic demand, improved brain tolerance to ischaemia). Sedation also is an essential therapeutic component of intracranial pressure therapy, targeted temperature management and seizure control. Given the lack of large trials which have evaluated clinically relevant endpoints, sedative selection depends on the effect of each agent on cerebral and systemic haemodynamics. Titration and withdrawal of sedation in the NICU setting has to be balanced between the risk that interrupting sedation might exacerbate brain injury (e.g. intracranial pressure elevation) and the potential benefits of enhanced neurological function and reduced complications. In this review, we provide a concise summary of cerebral physiologic effects of sedatives and analgesics, the advantages/disadvantages of each agent, the comparative effects of standard sedatives (propofol and midazolam) and the emerging role of alternative drugs (ketamine). We suggest a pragmatic approach for the use of sedation-analgesia in the NICU, focusing on some practical aspects, including optimal titration and management of sedation withdrawal according to ABI severity.

  11. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  12. Design of agitation systems in Bingham slurries by pilot simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    A method was required to determine the optimum agitator speed needed to produce overall motion of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) high-level waste slurries in remote process cell vessels. Project schedule and limited process space required an accurate determination of agitator horsepower and size without the benefit of full-scale testing. The small scale testing of unique clear rheologically similar fluid is described along with tests and scale-up procedures. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Sedation in Critically Ill Children with Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vet, Nienke J.; Kleiber, Niina; Ista, Erwin; de Hoog, Matthijs; de Wildt, Saskia N.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale of sedation in respiratory failure, sedation goals, how to assess the need for sedation as well as effectiveness of interventions in critically ill children, with validated observational sedation scales. The drugs and non-pharmacological approaches used for optimal sedation in ventilated children are reviewed, and specifically the rationale for drug selection, including short- and long-term efficacy and safety aspects of the selected drugs. The specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of sedative drugs in the critically ill child and consequences for dosing are presented. Furthermore, we discuss different sedation strategies and their adverse events, such as iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium. These principles can guide clinicians in the choice of sedative drugs in pediatric respiratory failure. PMID:27606309

  14. Augmenting sedation with hypnosis in drug-dependent patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, D. P.; Lu, G. P.; Hersh, E. V.

    1995-01-01

    The successful use of conscious sedation in patients physically dependent on centrally acting drugs is problematic for the dental anesthesiologist because of the concomitant development of tolerance to standard sedative agents. Dosage requirements necessary to adequately sedate these patients are often higher than recommended and carry an increased risk of drug overdose. The following report summarizes our experience with 18 drug-dependent patients in whom hypnosis was employed in conjunction with a standard sedation regimen. Attempts to complete various dental procedures while employing sedation alone on these patients had previously failed. All patients exhibited highly fearful or phobic behavior toward dental treatment as assessed by the Corah Dental Anxiety Scale. If an intravenous sedative regimen (midazolam or diazepam plus methohexital) was employed, hypnotic induction preceded the administration of the sedative drugs. If an intramuscular sedative regimen was employed (meperidine plus promethazine), the hypnotic induction took place after drug administration. With the combined hypno-sedative approach, treatment outcomes were judged to be good or excellent in 11 of 18 patients. Interestingly, in five of seven patients for whom the treatment outcome was rated poor or fair, the possibility of tolerance or cross-tolerance existed between a drug being abused and the sedative regimen. In contrast, this possibility existed in only 1 of 11 patients with good or excellent treatment outcomes. We conclude that hypnosis can augment the effects of sedation in this patient population. However, it is also important to choose a sedative regimen where tolerance is unlikely to exist. PMID:8934982

  15. Procedural sedation analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Sheta, Saad A

    2010-01-01

    The number of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures performed outside of the operating room has grown exponentially over the last several decades.Sedation, analgesia, or both may be needed for many of these interventional or diagnostic procedures. Individualized care is important when determining if a patient requires procedural sedation analgesia (PSA). The patient might need an anti-anxiety drug, pain medicine, immobilization, simple reassurance, or a combination of these interventions. The goals of PSA in four different multidisciplinary practices namely; emergency, dentistry, radiology and gastrointestinal endoscopy are discussed in this review article. Some procedures are painful, others painless. Therefore, goals of PSA vary widely. Sedation management can range from minimal sedation, to the extent of minimal anesthesia. Procedural sedation in emergency department (ED) usually requires combinations of multiple agents to reach desired effects of analgesia plus anxiolysis. However, in dental practice, moderate sedation analgesia (known to the dentists as conscious sedation) is usually what is required. It is usually most effective with the combined use of local anesthesia. The mainstay of success for painless imaging is absolute immobility. Immobility can be achieved by deep sedation or minimal anesthesia. On the other hand, moderate sedation, deep sedation, minimal anesthesia and conventional general anesthesia can be all utilized for management of gastrointestinal endoscopy. PMID:20668560

  16. Rethinking Critical Care: Decreasing Sedation, Increasing Delirium Monitoring, and Increasing Patient Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Rick; Adams, Kelly McCutcheon; Danesh, Valerie; Groat, Patricia M.; Haugen, Angie; Kiewel, Angi; Small, Cora; Van-Leuven, Mark; Venus, Sam; Ely, E. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Background/Methods Sedation management, delirium monitoring, and mobility programs are key features of recent evidence-based critical care guidelines and care bundles, yet implementation in the intensive care unit (ICU) remains highly variable. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s Rethinking Critical Care (IHI-RCC) program was established to reduce harm of critically ill patients by decreasing sedation, increasing monitoring and management of delirium, and increasing patient mobility. It involved one live case study and five iterations of an in-person seminar over 33 months (March 2011 to November 2013) that emphasized interdisciplinary teamwork and culture change. IHI-RCC has involved over 650 participants from 215 organizations. This report describes a convenience sample of five participating organizations chosen in advance of knowing their clinical outcomes. Results Qualitative descriptions of the changes tested at each of the five case study sites are provided, demonstrating the necessary teamwork, improved processes, and increased reliability of daily work. These sites all worked to implement the Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) and Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU (CAM-ICU) within the context of a bundled interventional care plan; they then tracked length of stay in the ICU and duration of mechanical ventilation, which are reported. Discussion Changing critical care practices requires an interdisciplinary approach addressing cultural, psychological, and practical issues. The IHI-RCC program is based on testing changes on a small scale, building highly effective interdisciplinary rounds, frequent data feedback to the frontline, and use of in-person demonstrations. Key lessons are emerging about effectively caring for critically ill patients in light of data about the harm of over-sedation, unrecognized and unaddressed delirium, and immobility. PMID:25976892

  17. Cavitation-controlled ultrasonic agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Lawrence, W.P.; Raptis, A.C.

    1989-10-01

    High-intensity ultrasound generally produces nonlinear acoustic cavitation and streaming in liquids. The ultrasonic energy required to cause cavitation and streaming in a liquid depends on the physical properties of the liquid, e.g., surface tension, viscosity, and entrained gases. Both cavitation and streaming generate acoustic noise whose signatures may be used to distinguish the stage of agitation and thus allow the process to be controlled. An ultrasonic agitator has been designed for application in a confined area with a high-temperature, high-pressure, and corrosive environment. Control of this agitator is based on the detection of noise levels and subharmonics produced during cavitation and streaming. Noise signatures of agitation in different liquids and in liquids with particles have been determined, and discussed. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Downhole gaseous liquid flow agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Kamilos, N.; Kennedy, D.D.; Lederhos, L.J. Jr.

    1989-03-14

    An apparatus is described for agitating and mixing of a gaseous phase and a liquid phase comprising: a first tube having non-blocking internal threads within the first tube to agitate a liquid phase adhering thereto with a gaseous phase passing therethrough, whereby a uniform gaseous phase and liquid phase mixture is formed; and a second tube connected to an end of the first tube having non-blocking internal threads of opposite handedness.

  19. Sedation for Pediatric Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is more difficult to achieve cooperation when conducting endoscopy in pediatric patients than adults. As a result, the sedation for a comfortable procedure is more important in pediatric patients. The sedation, however, often involves risks and side effects, and their prediction and prevention should be sought in advance. Physicians should familiarize themselves to the relevant guidelines in order to make appropriate decisions and actions regarding the preparation of the sedation, patient monitoring during endoscopy, patient recovery, and hospital discharge. Furthermore, they have to understand the characteristics of the pediatric patients and different types of endoscopy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the details of sedation in pediatric endoscopy. PMID:24749082

  20. Procedural moderate sedation with ketamine in pediatric critical care unit

    PubMed Central

    Hazwani, Tarek R.; Al-Alem, Hala

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of moderate sedation in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) settings according to moderate sedation protocol using ketamine and midazolam and to determine areas for the improvement in our clinical practice. Settings and Design: A retrospective study was conducted in the PICU. Materials and Methods: Retrospective chart review was performed for patients who had received moderate sedation between January and the end of December 2011 and who are eligible to inclusion criteria. Results: In this study, 246 moderate sedation sessions were included. 5.3% were in infant age, while 94.7% were children (1–14 years). Their gender distributed as 59.8% males and 40.2% females. The majority of them had hematology-oncology disease nature, i.e., 80.89% (n = 199). Lumbar puncture accounted for 65.3% (n = 160) of the producers; the rests were bone marrow aspiration 32.7%, endoscopy 8.2%, and colonoscopy 2.9%. Two doses of ketamine (1–1.5 mg/kg) to achieve moderate sedation during the procedure were given to 44.1% (n = 108) of the patients. One dose of midazolam was given to 77.2% (n = 190), while 1.22% (n = 3) of sessions of moderate sedation was done without any dose of midazolam. Adverse events including apnea, laryngeal spasm, hypotension, and recovery agitation were observed during moderate sedation sessions, and it has been noticed in four sessions, i.e., 1.6%, which were mild to moderate and managed conservatively. Conclusion: Moderate sedation in the PICU using ketamine and midazolam is generally safe with minimal side effects as moderate sedation sessions were conducted by pediatric intensivist in highly monitored and equipped environment. PMID:28182021

  1. A randomized, blinded comparison of chloral hydrate and midazolam sedation in children undergoing echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, D S; Jensen, R A; Poss, W B

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this prospective, randomized, and blinded study was to compare the use of chloral hydrate versus oral midazolam sedation in children undergoing echocardiography. No adverse effects (nausea, vomiting, paradoxical agitation, or significant deviations from baseline vital signs) were noted with either medication. No differences were noted in onset of sedation between the 2 groups, however, the time to complete recovery was significantly shorter with midazolam than with chloral hydrate. The children in the chloral hydrate group had a significantly deeper level of sedation and were more likely to receive a more nearly comprehensive echocardiographic evalation.

  2. Managing Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder in the Emergency Setting

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Scott L.; Citrome, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patient agitation represents a significant challenge in the emergency department (ED), a setting in which medical staff are working under pressure dealing with a diverse range of medical emergencies. The potential for escalation into aggressive behavior, putting patients, staff, and others at risk, makes it imperative to address agitated behavior rapidly and efficiently. Time constraints and limited access to specialist psychiatric support have in the past led to the strategy of “restrain and sedate,” which was believed to represent the optimal approach; however, it is increasingly recognized that more patient-centered approaches result in improved outcomes. The objective of this review is to raise awareness of best practices for the management of agitation in the ED and to consider the role of new pharmacologic interventions in this setting. Discussion The Best practices in Evaluation and Treatment of Agitation (BETA) guidelines address the complete management of agitation, including triage, diagnosis, interpersonal calming skills, and medicine choices. Since their publication in 2012, there have been further developments in pharmacologic approaches for dealing with agitation, including both new agents and new modes of delivery, which increase the options available for both patients and physicians. Newer modes of delivery that could be useful in rapidly managing agitation include inhaled, buccal/sublingual and intranasal formulations. To date, the only formulation administered via a non-intramuscular route with a specific indication for agitation associated with bipolar or schizophrenia is inhaled loxapine. Non-invasive formulations, although requiring cooperation from patients, have the potential to improve overall patient experience, thereby improving future cooperation between patients and healthcare providers. Conclusion Management of agitation in the ED should encompass a patient-centered approach, incorporating non-pharmacologic approaches

  3. Oral triazolam pretreatment for intravenous sedation.

    PubMed Central

    Stopperich, P. S.; Moore, P. A.; Finder, R. L.; McGirl, B. E.; Weyant, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    This double-blind, controlled clinical trial assessed the anxiety relief provided by oral triazolam given before intravenous sedation. Twenty-two healthy adults undergoing third-molar surgery with intravenous sedation were enrolled in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 0.25 mg of triazolam p.o. or an identically appearing placebo 45 to 60 min before venipuncture. Immediately before test drug administration, subjects completed the Corah Anxiety Scale, a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) assessing state anxiety, and the Interval Scale of Anxiety Response (ISAR). The VAS and ISAR were repeated immediately before venipuncture. Intravenous sedation medications consisted of fentanyl, midazolam, and methohexital. At 24 hr, assessments of the venipuncture and global experience were obtained. Results indicated that the characteristics of the triazolam and placebo patients were similar at baseline. With triazolam pretreatment, both the VAS and ISAR scores decreased significantly. Dose requirements for conscious sedation medications were decreased in the triazolam group. Patients rated the venipuncture experience significantly less unpleasant when pretreated with triazolam, and global ratings of the overall surgical experience favored triazolam. An oral-intravenous combination sedation technique using 0.25 mg of triazolam may have a significant therapeutic advantage for outpatient oral surgery. PMID:7943920

  4. Treating agitation with dexmedetomidine in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit frequently experience delirium, anxiety, and agitation, with a variety of treatments used. This article discusses the role of an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist, dexmedetomidine, and its clinical relevance and advantages for the agitated patient.

  5. Agitation in DWPF Precipitate Pump Pit Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.C.

    1986-01-20

    An experimental program to test the reference agitator design for DWPF Precipitate Pump Pit Tanks has been completed. It was not known whether the reference agitator design would produce uniform mixing of precipitate slurry. There was also a concern that the reference agitator would produce excessive foaming of precipitate. An alternative agitator design that produces good mixing with little or no foam buildup was identified in the tests and is recommended for use in DWPF Precipitate Pump Pit Tanks. 7 refs.

  6. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  7. 7 CFR 58.513 - Agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agitators. 58.513 Section 58.513 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....513 Agitators. Mechanical agitators shall meet the requirements of § 58.417....

  8. 7 CFR 58.513 - Agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agitators. 58.513 Section 58.513 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....513 Agitators. Mechanical agitators shall meet the requirements of § 58.417....

  9. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  10. 7 CFR 58.513 - Agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agitators. 58.513 Section 58.513 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....513 Agitators. Mechanical agitators shall meet the requirements of § 58.417....

  11. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  12. 7 CFR 58.513 - Agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agitators. 58.513 Section 58.513 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....513 Agitators. Mechanical agitators shall meet the requirements of § 58.417....

  13. 7 CFR 58.513 - Agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agitators. 58.513 Section 58.513 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....513 Agitators. Mechanical agitators shall meet the requirements of § 58.417....

  14. Pediatric Sedation: A Global Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gozal, David; Mason, Keira P.

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric sedation is a challenge which spans all continents and has grown to encompass specialties outside of anesthesia, radiology and emergency medicine. All sedatives are not universally available and local and national regulations often limit the sedation practice to specific agents and those with specific credentials. Some specialties have established certification and credentials for sedation delivery whereas most have not. Some of the relevant sedation guidelines and recommendations of specialty organizations worldwide will be explored. The challenge facing sedation care providers moving forward in the 21st century will be to determine how to apply the local, regional and national guidelines to the individual sedation practices. A greater challenge, perhaps impossible, will be to determine whether the sedation community can come together worldwide to develop standards, guidelines and recommendations for safe sedation practice. PMID:20981309

  15. The incidence of sub-optimal sedation in the ICU: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are generally sedated for prolonged periods. Over-sedation and under-sedation both have negative effects on patient safety and resource use. We conducted a systematic review of the literature in order to establish the incidence of sub-optimal sedation (both over- and under-sedation) in ICUs. Methods We searched Medline, Embase and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) online literature databases from 1988 to 15 May 2008 and hand-searched conferences. English-language studies set in the ICU, in sedated adult humans on mechanical ventilation, which reported the incidence of sub-optimal sedation, were included. All abstracts were reviewed twice by two independent reviewers, with all conflicts resolved by a third reviewer, to check that they met the review inclusion criteria. Full papers of all included studies were retrieved and were again reviewed twice against inclusion criteria. Data were doubly extracted. Study aims, design, population, comparisons made, and data on the incidence of sub-optimal, optimal, over-sedation or under-sedation were extracted. Results There was considerable variation between included studies in the definition of optimal sedation and in the scale or method used to assess sedation. Across all included studies, a substantial incidence of sub-optimal sedation was reported, with a greater tendency toward over-sedation. Conclusions Our review suggests that improvements in the consistent definition and measurement of sedation may improve the quality of care of patients within the ICU. PMID:20015357

  16. Agitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... alertness (altered consciousness) can be a sign of delirium . Delirium has a medical cause and should be checked ... PCP, or opiates) Hospitalization (older adults often have delirium while in the hospital) Overactive thyroid gland ( hyperthyroidism ) ...

  17. The use of bispectral analysis to monitor outpatient sedation.

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, N. A.

    2000-01-01

    The bispectral (BIS) index has been used to interpret partial EEG recordings to predict the level of sedation and loss of consciousness in patients undergoing general anesthesia. The author has evaluated BIS technology in determining the level of sedation in patients undergoing outpatient deep sedation. These experiences are outlined in this review article. Initially, the correlation of the BIS index with traditional subjective patient evaluation using the Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation (OAA/S) scale was performed in 25 subjects. In a second study, the recovery profile of 39 patients where the BIS was used to monitor sedation was compared with a control group where the monitor was not used. A strong positive relationship between the BIS and OAA/S readings was found in the initial subjects. From the recovery study, it appears that use of the BIS monitor may help titrate the level of sedation so that less drugs are used to maintain the desired level of sedation. A trend to earlier return of motor function in BIS-monitored patients was also demonstrated. BIS technology offers an objective, ordinal means of assessing the depth of sedation. This can be invaluable in comparing studies of techniques. The BIS index provides additional information to standard monitoring techniques that helps guide the administration of sedative-hypnotic agents. The trend to earlier return of motor function in BIS-monitored patients warrants further investigation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:11432160

  18. Mechanisms of cell damage in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1986-01-01

    Cells growing on microcarriers may be damaged by collisions of the microcarrier against another microcarrier or the reactor agitator. Bead-bead collisions are caused by small-scale turbulence, which can also cause high local shear stress on the cells. The cells are also exposed to 10-20 Hz cyclic shear stress by bead rotation.

  19. A Controlled Agitation Process for Improving Quality of Canned Green Beans during Agitation Thermal Processing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anika; Pratap Singh, Anubhav; Ramaswamy, Hosahalli S

    2016-06-01

    This work introduces the concept of a controlled agitation thermal process to reduce quality damage in liquid-particulate products during agitation thermal processing. Reciprocating agitation thermal processing (RA-TP) was used as the agitation thermal process. In order to reduce the impact of agitation, a new concept of "stopping agitations after sufficient development of cold-spot temperature" was proposed. Green beans were processed in No. 2 (307×409) cans filled with liquids of various consistency (0% to 2% CMC) at various frequencies (1 to 3 Hz) of RA-TP using a full-factorial design and heat penetration results were collected. Corresponding operator's process time to impart a 10-min process lethality (Fo ) and agitation time (AT) were calculated using heat penetration results. Accordingly, products were processed again by stopping agitations as per 3 agitation regimes, namely; full time agitation, equilibration time agitation, and partial time agitation. Processed products were photographed and tested for visual quality, color, texture, breakage of green beans, turbidity, and percentage of insoluble solids in can liquid. Results showed that stopping agitations after sufficient development of cold-spot temperatures is an effective way of reducing product damages caused by agitation (for example, breakage of beans and its leaching into liquid). Agitations till one-log temperature difference gave best color, texture and visual product quality for low-viscosity liquid-particulate mixture and extended agitations till equilibration time was best for high-viscosity products. Thus, it was shown that a controlled agitation thermal process is more effective in obtaining high product quality as compared to a regular agitation thermal process.

  20. The role of sedation tests in identifying sedative drug effects in healthy volunteers and their power to dissociate sedative-related impairments from memory dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Wezenberg, E; Sabbe, B G C; Hulstijn, W; Ruigt, G S F; Verkes, R J

    2007-08-01

    The study investigated whether four specified drugs would show similar patterns on tests considered to measure sedation. In addition, their drug-effect patterns on sedation and memory performance were compared to determine whether the sedative effects could be differentiated from the memory effects. Two double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies, each with 16 healthy volunteers, were performed, one testing lorazepam (2.5 mg) and mirtazapine (15 mg) and the other olanzapine (10 mg) and haloperidol (2.5 mg). Subjective sedation was assessed by means of visual analogue scales (VAS) and objective sedation using a simple-reaction-time (SRT) task and a choice-reaction-time (CRT) task, code substitution (symbol digit substitution test (SDST)) and the peak velocity of saccadic eye movements (SEM). A verbal memory test (VMT) was administered to evaluate memory capacity. Apart from haloperidol, all drugs proved to impair performance on all five sedation indices. Contrary to the VAS, the objective measures yielded different response profiles. Two types of drug-effect patterns emerged: one for greater impairments in response speed (SRT, SEM) and one for greater impairments in information processing (CRT, SDST). Lorazepam and olanzapine impeded memory performance, whereas mirtazapine did not. With the use of standardized scores it proved possible to differentiate between the size of the effects of the drugs on the sedation and memory tests. To accurately assess the level and nature of sedation and to differentiate sedation from memory impairments different types of sedation measures are required. Besides studying the subjective effects, it is recommended to also test psychomotor responses and information processing speed.

  1. Prescription Sedative Misuse and Abuse.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Sedatives are widely prescribed for anxiety or insomnia and include benzodiazepines, selective benzodiazepine receptor subtype agonists (z-drugs), and barbiturates. These sedatives are controlled substances due to their potential for misuse and abuse. Misuse is often self-medication (chemical coping) of psychological symptoms in ways unauthorized by the prescriber, usually as dose escalation leading to requests for early refills. Sedatives are abused for euphoric effects, which may have dangerous consequences. Some sedative overdoses can be treated with flumazenil, a reversal agent, along with supportive care. Sedative withdrawal syndrome is treated by tapering the sedative and may require hospitalization. Long-term treatment of sedative addiction requires counseling, often with the help of an addiction-treatment professional.

  2. Palliative sedation in nursing anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Palliative sedation is a technique of providing a sedative for end-of-life care to patients with intractable pain. The literature discusses the techniques and use of palliative sedation. Numerous articles have been written regarding the issues surrounding its use, but no literature has discussed the prescription or administration of palliative sedation by a nurse anesthetist. By understanding the concept and ethics involved in its use and providing nursing care that is theory based, the author argues that the involvement of nursing anesthesia is appropriate and within the scope of practice. Few other healthcare disciplines can provide the patient care and empirical knowledge that is imperative in the care of the dying patient. This article discusses the concept and ethics of palliative sedation and presents a case of providing palliative sedation to a terminally ill patient by an experienced nurse anesthetist. Palliative sedation should be understood, embraced, and utilized as an area of expertise suited for nursing anesthesia.

  3. Prescription Sedative Misuse and Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Sedatives are widely prescribed for anxiety or insomnia and include benzodiazepines, selective benzodiazepine receptor subtype agonists (z-drugs), and barbiturates. These sedatives are controlled substances due to their potential for misuse and abuse. Misuse is often self-medication (chemical coping) of psychological symptoms in ways unauthorized by the prescriber, usually as dose escalation leading to requests for early refills. Sedatives are abused for euphoric effects, which may have dangerous consequences. Some sedative overdoses can be treated with flumazenil, a reversal agent, along with supportive care. Sedative withdrawal syndrome is treated by tapering the sedative and may require hospitalization. Long-term treatment of sedative addiction requires counseling, often with the help of an addiction-treatment professional. PMID:26339207

  4. Particle Breakage in Agitated Dryers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Colin L.; Ghadiri, Mojtaba; Dennehy, Robert; Collier, Alan

    2009-06-01

    A method for predicting particle breakage in agitated dryers is described. The method utilizes an estimation of stresses and strains occurring in a dryer bed sheared by an impeller using the Distinct Element Method (DEM). An assemblage of particles is then subjected to these stresses in a shear cell to assess the extent of attrition under a range of stresses and strains. Paracetamol particles in the size range 500-600 μm are used for the experimental work. The relationship of attrition with stress and strain is then incorporated into the distribution of stress and strain in the dryer estimated by DEM. The extent of attrition for a range of conditions including the impeller speed has been analysed. The prediction shows impeller speed to have limited effect on attrition within the range of speeds tested.

  5. Emma Goldman: A Study in Female Agitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Elizabeth

    The role of the agitator in society and the special characteristics of women agitators--in particular, Emma Goldman, an American anarchist from the early twentieth century--are discussed in this paper. Specific examples of the rhetoric used by Emma Goldman in her speeches (supporting anarchism, against women's suffrage, against abortion control,…

  6. Incidence of adverse events in paediatric procedural sedation in the emergency department: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bellolio, M Fernanda; Puls, Henrique A; Anderson, Jana L; Gilani, Waqas I; Murad, M Hassan; Barrionuevo, Patricia; Erwin, Patricia J; Wang, Zhen; Hess, Erik P

    2016-01-01

    Objective and design We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the incidence of adverse events in the emergency department (ED) during procedural sedation in the paediatric population. Randomised controlled trials and observational studies from the past 10 years were included. We adhere to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Setting ED. Participants Children. Interventions Procedural sedation. Outcomes Adverse events like vomiting, agitation, hypoxia and apnoea. Meta-analysis was performed with random-effects model and reported as incidence rates with 95% CIs. Results A total of 1177 studies were retrieved for screening and 258 were selected for full-text review. 41 studies reporting on 13 883 procedural sedations in 13 876 children (≤18 years) were included. The most common adverse events (all reported per 1000 sedations) were: vomiting 55.5 (CI 45.2 to 65.8), agitation 17.9 (CI 12.2 to 23.7), hypoxia 14.8 (CI 10.2 to 19.3) and apnoea 7.1 (CI 3.2 to 11.0). The need to intervene with either bag valve mask, oral airway or positive pressure ventilation occurred in 5.0 per 1000 sedations (CI 2.3 to 7.6). The incidences of severe respiratory events were: 34 cases of laryngospasm among 8687 sedations (2.9 per 1000 sedations, CI 1.1 to 4.7; absolute rate 3.9 per 1000 sedations), 4 intubations among 9136 sedations and 0 cases of aspiration among 3326 sedations. 33 of the 34 cases of laryngospasm occurred in patients who received ketamine. Conclusions Serious adverse respiratory events are very rare in paediatric procedural sedation in the ED. Emesis and agitation are the most frequent adverse events. Hypoxia, a late indicator of respiratory depression, occurs in 1.5% of sedations. Laryngospasm, though rare, happens most frequently with ketamine. The results of this study provide quantitative risk estimates to facilitate shared decision-making, risk communication, informed consent and

  7. Intranasal Dexmedetomidine as a Sedative for Pediatric Procedural Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Birisci, Esma; Anderson, Jordan; Schroeder, Sara; Dalabih, Abdallah

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study seeks to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intranasal (IN) dexmedetomidine as a sedative medication for non-invasive procedural sedation. METHODS Subjects 6 months to 18 years of age undergoing non-invasive elective procedures were included. Dexmedetomidine (3 mcg/kg) was administered IN 40 minutes before the scheduled procedure time. The IN dexmedetomidine cohort was matched and compared to a cohort of 690 subjects who underwent sedation for similar procedures without the use of dexmedetomidine to evaluate for observed events/interventions and procedural times. RESULTS One hundred (92%) of the 109 included subjects were successfully sedated with IN dexmedetomidine. There were no significant differences in the rate of observed events/interventions in comparison to the non-dexmedetomidine cohort. However, the IN dexmedetomidine group had a longer postprocedure sleep time when compared to the non-dexmedetomidine cohort (p < 0.001), which had a significant effect on recovery time (p = 0.024). Also, the dexmedetomidine cohort had longer procedure time and total admit time (p < 0.001 and p = 0.037, respectively). CONCLUSIONS IN dexmedetomidine may be used for non-invasive pediatric procedural sedation. Subjects receiving IN dexmedetomidine had a similar rate of observed events/interventions as the subjects receiving non-dexmedetomidine sedation, with the exception of sleeping time. Also, patients sedated with IN dexmedetomidine had longer time to discharge, procedure time, and total admit time in comparison to other forms of sedation. PMID:28337075

  8. Sedation in Japanese dental schools.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Zac; Sano, Kimito; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Kanri, Tomio

    2004-01-01

    There is very little information about the practice of sedation in Japan. Despite the remarkable advances in dentistry, fear and anxiety continue to be significant deterrents for seeking dental services. Most dental procedures can fortunately be undertaken with the aid of sedation. A comprehensive survey of all the dental schools in Japan was carried out to determine what sedation practices were used in Japan. All 29 dental schools in Japan possessed a dedicated department of anesthesiology at the time of this survey. The survey attempted to determine the specific sedation methods (techniques, routes of administration, and agents used in sedation) as well as practices (monitoring, fasting, location, education, and fees involved in sedation). The results indicate that there was a broad range in sedation practices. The Japanese Dental Society of Anesthesiology may wish to examine the findings of this study and may wish to formulate guidelines appropriate for the practice of sedation in Japan. Others may also wish to compare their own practices with those of Japan. PMID:15497299

  9. Properly choose mechanical agitators for viscous liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, A.; Gates, L.E.

    1995-12-01

    High-viscosity mixing applications occur in most chemical process industries (CPI) plants. High-viscosity applications occur in the production of food, paint, drilling mud, and greases, to name a few. Mixing can occur in pipeline systems with motionless mixers, or in vessels using mechanical agitators, depending on the application and the process requirements. A wide variety of both motionless mixers and mechanical agitators is available to handle specific mixing problems and fluid types. This article gives an overview of designing the most commonly used agitator for blending applications: a top-entering agitator with a single shaft. The agitator can be equipped with multiple turbine-style impellers of different design, or with helical-ribbon or anchor-style impellers to optimize the agitator for the specific application and blending problem on hand. Although turbulent blending will be briefly discussed here also, this article will focus on blending in the laminar and transitional regimes. Also, the authors will discuss the special requirements for blending non-newtonian fluids, with and without yield stress. They first discuss the flow patterns and applicability of different impeller types and then present some design guidelines.

  10. Anxiety, sedation, and simulated driving in binge drinkers.

    PubMed

    Aston, Elizabeth R; Shannon, Erin E; Liguori, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    The current study evaluated the relationships among trait anxiety, subjective response to alcohol, and simulated driving following a simulated alcohol binge. Sixty drinkers with a binge history completed the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Alcohol Use Questionnaire, and subsequently completed a driving simulation. Participants were then administered 0.2 g/kg ethanol at 30-min intervals (cumulative dose 0.8 g/kg). Following alcohol consumption, the Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale (BAES) and visual analog scales of subjective impairment and driving confidence were administered, after which simulated driving was reassessed. Due to the emphasis on simulated driving after drinking in the current study, subjective response to alcohol (i.e., self-reported sedation, stimulation, impairment, and confidence in driving ability) was assessed once following alcohol consumption, as this is the time when drinkers tend to make decisions regarding legal driving ability. Alcohol increased driving speed, speeding tickets, and collisions. Sedation following alcohol predicted increased subjective impairment and decreased driving confidence. Subjective impairment was not predicted by sensitivity to stimulation or trait anxiety. High trait anxiety predicted low driving confidence after drinking and this relationship was mediated by sedation. Increased speed after alcohol was predicted by sedation, but not by trait anxiety or stimulation. Anxiety, combined with the sedating effects of alcohol, may indicate when consumption should cease. However, once driving is initiated, sensitivity to sedation following alcohol consumption is positively related to simulated driving speed.

  11. Anxiety, Sedation, and Simulated Driving in Binge Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Elizabeth R.; Shannon, Erin E.; Liguori, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the relationships among trait anxiety, subjective response to alcohol, and simulated driving following a simulated alcohol binge. Sixty drinkers with a binge history completed the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Alcohol Use Questionnaire, and subsequently completed a driving simulation. Participants were then administered 0.2 g/kg ethanol at 30 minute intervals (cumulative dose 0.8 g/kg). Following alcohol consumption, the Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale (BAES) and visual analog scales of subjective impairment and driving confidence were administered, after which simulated driving was re-assessed. Due to the emphasis on simulated driving after drinking in the current study, subjective response to alcohol (i.e., self-reported sedation, stimulation, impairment, and confidence in driving ability) was assessed once following alcohol consumption, as this is the time when drinkers tend to make decisions regarding legal driving ability. Alcohol increased driving speed, speeding tickets, and collisions. Sedation following alcohol predicted increased subjective impairment and decreased driving confidence. Subjective impairment was not predicted by sensitivity to stimulation or trait anxiety. High trait anxiety predicted low driving confidence after drinking and this relationship was mediated by sedation. Increased speed after alcohol was predicted by sedation, but not by trait anxiety or stimulation. Anxiety, combined with the sedating effects of alcohol, may indicate when consumption should cease. However, once driving is initiated, sensitivity to sedation following alcohol consumption is positively related to simulated driving speed. PMID:24955664

  12. Change in agitation in Alzheimer's disease in the placebo arm of a 9-week controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Devanand, D.P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Ismail, Zahinoor; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Rabins, Peter V.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Newell, Jeffery; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Placebo responses raise significant challenges for design of clinical trials. We report changes in agitation outcomes in the placebo arm of a recent trial of citalopram for agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods In the Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease (Cit AD) study, all participants and caregivers received a psychosocial intervention and 92 were assigned to placebo for 9 weeks. Outcomes included Neurobehavioral Rating Scale agitation subscale (NBRS-A), modified Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC), Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI), the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) Agitation/Aggression domain (NPI A/A) and Total (NPI-Total) and ADLs. Continuous outcomes were analyzed with mixed-effects modeling and dichotomous outcomes with logistic regression. Results Agitation outcomes improved over 9 weeks: NBRS-A mean (SD) decreased from 7.8 (3.0) at baseline to 5.4 (3.2), CMAI from 28.7 (6.7) to 26.7 (7.4), NPI A/A from 8.0 (2.4) to 4.9 (3.8), and NPI-Total from 37.3 (17.7) to 28.4 (22.1). The proportion of CGI-C agitation responders ranged from 21 to 29% and was significantly different from zero. MMSE improved from 14.4 (6.9) to 15.7 (7.2) and ADLs similarly improved. Most of the improvement was observed by 3 weeks and was sustained through 9 weeks. The major predictor of improvement in each agitation measure was a higher baseline score in that measure. Conclusions We observed significant placebo response which may be due to regression to the mean, response to a psychosocial intervention, natural course of symptoms, or nonspecific benefits of participation in a trial. PMID:26305876

  13. Post-sedation events in children sedated for dental care.

    PubMed

    Ritwik, Priyanshi; Cao, Linda T; Curran, Ronald; Musselman, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Moderate oral sedation is used in pediatric dentistry for safe delivery of dental care to children. However, there is a paucity of data on the effects of pediatric dental sedations after discharge of children from the dental office. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the incidence of adverse events occurring with meperidine and hydroxyzine versus midazolam alone 8 and 24 hours after sedation in pediatric dental patients. In this prospective study, a convenience sample of 46 healthy children presenting to a private pediatric dental practice for dental treatment needs was selected. A telephone survey of the parents of children sedated with either meperidine and hydroxyzine or midazolam alone was conducted 8 and 24 hours after the administration of sedation medications. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, frequency and proportion analysis, and Fisher exact test. Forty children were sedated with meperidine and hydroxyzine, and 6 who were sedated with midazolam. In both groups, 50% of the children slept in the car on the way home. Three children in the meperidine and hydroxyzine group vomited in the car. A significantly larger proportion of children in the meperidine and hydroxyzine group experienced prolonged sleep at home (P = .015). More children in the midazolam group exhibited irritability in the first 8 hours (P = .07). There were no statistical differences between the 2 groups with respect to incidence of pain, fever, vomiting, sleeping in the car, snoring, and difficulty in waking up. The lingering effects of orally administered sedation medications can lead to prolonged sleep, irritability, and vomiting in children after they have been discharged from the dental clinic. Most of these events occurred within the first 8 hours, but in some children the effects were seen up to 24 hours later.

  14. Post-sedation Events in Children Sedated for Dental Care

    PubMed Central

    Ritwik, Priyanshi; Cao, Linda T.; Curran, Ronald; Musselman, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Moderate oral sedation is used in pediatric dentistry for safe delivery of dental care to children. However, there is a paucity of data on the effects of pediatric dental sedations after discharge of children from the dental office. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the incidence of adverse events occurring with meperidine and hydroxyzine versus midazolam alone 8 and 24 hours after sedation in pediatric dental patients. In this prospective study, a convenience sample of 46 healthy children presenting to a private pediatric dental practice for dental treatment needs was selected. A telephone survey of the parents of children sedated with either meperidine and hydroxyzine or midazolam alone was conducted 8 and 24 hours after the administration of sedation medications. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, frequency and proportion analysis, and Fisher exact test. Forty children were sedated with meperidine and hydroxyzine, and 6 who were sedated with midazolam. In both groups, 50% of the children slept in the car on the way home. Three children in the meperidine and hydroxyzine group vomited in the car. A significantly larger proportion of children in the meperidine and hydroxyzine group experienced prolonged sleep at home (P = .015). More children in the midazolam group exhibited irritability in the first 8 hours (P = .07). There were no statistical differences between the 2 groups with respect to incidence of pain, fever, vomiting, sleeping in the car, snoring, and difficulty in waking up. The lingering effects of orally administered sedation medications can lead to prolonged sleep, irritability, and vomiting in children after they have been discharged from the dental clinic. Most of these events occurred within the first 8 hours, but in some children the effects were seen up to 24 hours later. PMID:23763560

  15. Microbial Ecology in Anaerobic Digestion at Agitated and Non-Agitated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhuoli; Cabrol, Léa; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo; Pullammanappallil, Pratap

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the distribution and dynamics of microbial community in anaerobic digestion at agitated and non-agitated condition, 454 pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA was conducted. It revealed the distinct community compositions between the two digesters and their progressive shifting over time. Methanogens and syntrophic bacteria were found much less abundant in the agitated digester, which was mainly attributed to the presence of bacterial genera Acetanaerobacterium and Ruminococcus with relatively high abundance. The characterization of the microbial community corroborated the digestion performance affected at the agitated condition, where lower methane yield and delayed methane production rate were observed. This was further verified by the accumulation of propionic acid in the agitated digester. PMID:25313520

  16. Effect of ketorolac on the prevention of emergence agitation in children after sevoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deokkyu; Doo, A Ram; Lim, Hyungsun; Son, Ji-Seon; Lee, Jun-Rae; Han, Young-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ketorolac on the incidence and severity of emergence agitation in children recovering from sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods Eighty-five children aged 3 to 7 years were randomly assigned to the control group or the ketorolac group (1 mg/kg ketorolac). The children were evaluated by the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale and a four-point agitation scale. Results The median agitation scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. The overall incidence of emergence agitation was similar in the two groups (41% in the control group vs. 32% in the ketorolac group, P = 0.526). The number of children who received rescue drugs for treatment of emergence agitation was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusions The administration of 1 mg/kg of ketorolac is not effective in decreasing the incidence and severity of emergence agitation in children aged 3 to 7 years after sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:23560190

  17. Conscious sedation for surgical procedures

    MedlinePlus

    Anesthesia - conscious ... have, what medicines you are taking, and what anesthesia or sedation you have had before. You may ... M. Intravenous anesthetics. In: Miller RD, ed. Miller's Anesthesia . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  18. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry

    PubMed Central

    AlSarheed, Maha A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. Methods: A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not focus on pediatric dentistry. Results: Twenty studies were included. The most commonly used sedatives were midazolam, followed by ketamine and sufentanil. Onset of action for IN midazolam was 5-15 minutes (min), however, IN ketamine was faster (mean 5.74 min), while both IN sufentanil (mean 20 min) and IN dexmedetomidine (mean 25 min) were slow in comparison. Midazolam was effective for modifying behavior in mild to moderately anxious children, however, for more invasive or prolonged procedures, stronger sedatives, such as IN ketamine, IN sufentanil were recommended. In addition, ketamine fared better in overall success rate (89%) when compared with IN midazolam (69%). Intranasal dexmedetomidine was only used as pre-medication amongst children. While its’ onset of action is longer when compared with IN midazolam, it produced deeper sedation at the time of separation from the parent and at the time of anesthesia induction. Conclusion: Intranasal midazolam, ketamine and sufentanil are effective and safe for conscious sedation, while intranasal midazolam, dexmedetomidine and sufentanil have proven to be effective premedications. PMID:27570849

  19. Impact of pharmaceutical care on pain and agitation in a medical intensive care unit in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Dilokpattanamongkol, Pitchaya; Tangsujaritvijit, Viratch; Suansanae, Thanarat; Suthisisang, Chuthamanee

    2017-03-29

    Background Currently, a lack of pharmaceutical care exists concerning pain and agitation in medical intensive care units (MICU) in Thailand. Pharmaceutical care focusing on analgesics/sedatives would improve clinical outcomes. Objective To investigate the impact of pharmaceutical care of pain and agitation on ICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, ventilator days and mortality. Setting The MICU of a university hospital. Method A before/after study was conducted on mechanically ventilated patients receiving analgesics/sedatives. Medical chart reviews and data collection were conducted in the retrospective group (no pharmacists involved). In the prospective group, pharmacists involved with the critical care team helped select analgesics/sedatives for individual patients. Main outcome measure ICU LOS Results In total, 90 and 66 patients were enrolled in retrospective and prospective groups, respectively. The median duration of ICU LOS was reduced from 10.00 (2.00-72.00) in the retrospective group to 6.50 days (2.00-30.00) in the prospective group (p = 0.002). The median hospital stay was reduced from 30.50 days (2.00-119.00) in the retrospective group to 17.50 days (2.00-110.00) in the prospective group (p < 0.001). Also, the median ventilator days was reduced from 14.00 days (2.00-90.00) to 8.50 days (1.00-45.00), p = 0.008. Mortality was 53.03% in the prospective group and 46.67% in the retrospective group (p = 0.432). Conclusion Pharmacist participation in a critical care team resulted in a significant reduction in the duration of ICU LOS, hospital LOS and ventilator days, but not mortality.

  20. Coal storage hopper with vibrating screen agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1984-09-11

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyor mechanism. The vibrating screen agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  1. Coal storage hopper with vibrating screen agitator

    DOEpatents

    Daw, Charles S.; Lackey, Mack E.; Sy, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyor mechanism. The vibrating screen agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  2. 75 FR 73104 - Clinical Development Programs for Sedation Products; Request for Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... purposes and not to treat an anxiety disorder or agitation? Should there be different scales for assessing... not be possible to generalize from them. If active- and placebo-controlled product trial designs are... trials? Are subjective and objective assessments of memory, recall, anxiety, agitation, delirium,...

  3. Hypnotics and Sedatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabra, Pokar M.; Koo, Howard Y.; Marton, Laurence J.

    In recent years, most large hospitals have observed a marked increase in the admission of patients suffering from drug overdose. Overdose of narcotic drugs, such as the opiates, represent less of a problem on a day-to-day basis than do overdoses of prescribed drugs, such as sedatives and hypnotics. Clinical signs and symptoms for a narcotic drug overdose are very distinct, and in the majority of cases can be easily recognized by the attending physicians without the help of a toxicology laboratory. Loomis (1) reported that the majority of fatal poisonings owed to one, or a combination, of four agents: barbiturates, carbon monoxide, ethyl alcohol, and salicylates. Berry (2) estimated that 5-5'-disubstituted barbiturates were the second commonest cause of fatal poisoning in England, and that the frequency of their use was increasing. Other nonbarbiturate hypnotics involved in coma-producing incidents include glutethimide (Doriden®), methyprylon (Noludar®), and meprobamate (3, 4). In the last five years, diazepam (Valium®) has become one of the leading misused drugs (5).

  4. Efficacy Outcome Measures for Procedural Sedation Clinical Trials in Adults: An ACTTION Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark R; McKeown, Andrew; Dexter, Franklin; Miner, James R; Sessler, Daniel I; Vargo, John; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Successful procedural sedation represents a spectrum of patient- and clinician-related goals. The absence of a gold-standard measure of the efficacy of procedural sedation has led to a variety of outcomes being used in clinical trials, with the consequent lack of consistency among measures, making comparisons among trials and meta-analyses challenging. We evaluated which existing measures have undergone psychometric analysis in a procedural sedation setting and whether the validity of any of these measures support their use across the range of procedures for which sedation is indicated. Numerous measures were found to have been used in clinical research on procedural sedation across a wide range of procedures. However, reliability and validity have been evaluated for only a limited number of sedation scales, observer-rated pain/discomfort scales, and satisfaction measures in only a few categories of procedures. Typically, studies only examined 1 or 2 aspects of scale validity. The results are likely unique to the specific clinical settings they were tested in. Certain scales, for example, those requiring motor stimulation, are unsuitable to evaluate sedation for procedures where movement is prohibited (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging scans). Further work is required to evaluate existing measures for procedures for which they were not developed. Depending on the outcomes of these efforts, it might ultimately be necessary to consider measures of sedation efficacy to be procedure specific.

  5. Flow-induced agitations create a granular fluid.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Kiri; Zanin, Alexey; Bastien, Renaud; Wandersman, Elie; van Hecke, Martin

    2010-02-19

    We fluidize a granular medium through localized stirring and probe the mechanical response of quiescent regions far away from the main flow. In these regions the material behaves like a liquid: high-density probes sink, low-density probes float at the depth given by Archimedes' law, and drag forces on moving probes scale linearly with the velocity. The fluidlike character of the material is set by agitations generated in the stirred region, suggesting a nonlocal rheology: the relation between applied stress and observed strain rate in one location depends on the strain rate in another location.

  6. An Agitation Experiment with Multiple Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Jordan L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a multifaceted agitation and mixing experiment. The relatively inexpensive apparatus includes a variable-speed stirrer motor, two polycarbonate tanks, and an instrumented torque table. Students measure torque as a function of stirrer speed, and use conductive tracer data to estimate two parameters of a flow model. The effect…

  7. Prospective pilot trial of dexmedetomidine sedation for awake diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keat; Orme, Ruari; Williams, Daryl; Segal, Reny

    2010-10-01

    Dexmedetomidine has the favorable properties of sedation, sympatholysis, analgesia, and a low risk of apnea. These properties suggest that dexmedetomidine may be useful in procedural sedation. In view of this, we conducted a pilot trial to determine the feasibility of using dexmedetomidine as a sole agent for providing sedation during awake diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy. Patients presenting for awake diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy consented to participate in a trial of dexmedetomidine sedation for the procedure. In addition to local anesthetic topicalization of the airways, dexmedetomidine was infused at 0.5 μg/kg over 10 minutes followed by an infusion of 0.2 to 0.7 μg/kg/h titrating to a Ramsay Sedation Scale score of 3. Hemodynamic parameters (heart rate, blood pressure), oxygenation status (pulse oximetry), adverse events, use of rescue sedation, and patient and proceduralist satisfaction were recorded during the trial. Five of 9 recruited patients required rescue sedation to allow the procedure to proceed. Dexmedetomidine as a sole agent at an infusion of 0.5 μg/kg over 10 minutes followed by an infusion of 0.2 to 0.7 μg/kg/h is unable to provide adequate sedation for awake diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy without the need for rescue sedation in a large proportion of patients.

  8. A Pilot Study of Ketamine versus Midazolam/Fentanyl Sedation in Children Undergoing GI Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lightdale, Jenifer R.; Mitchell, Paul D.; Fredette, Meghan E.; Mahoney, Lisa B.; Zgleszewski, Steven E.; Scharff, Lisa; Fox, Victor L.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Ketamine sedation has been found superior by physician report to traditional sedation regimens for pediatric endoscopy. Goal. To objectively compare sedation with ketamine versus midazolam/fentanyl for children undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy. Study. Patients received one of two regimens and were independently monitored using a standardized rating scale. Results. There were 2 episodes of laryngospasm during ketamine sedation. Univariate analyses showed patients sedated with ketamine (n = 17) moved more (median 25% of procedure time versus 8%, P = .03) and required similar low levels of restraint (0.83% versus 0.25%, P = .4) as patients sedated with midazolam/fentanyl (n = 20). Age-adjusted analyses suggested that patients sedated with ketamine were comparably more quiet (P = .002). Conclusions. A pilot trial of ketamine at our institution was associated with episodes of laryngospasm. In addition, children sedated with ketamine moved and required restraint similarly to patients sedated with midazolam/fentanyl. Physician perceptions may be affected by the fact that children who received ketamine were less likely to vocalize distress. PMID:21760813

  9. Isoflurane compared with midazolam for sedation in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, K. L.; Willatts, S. M.; Prys-Roberts, C.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare isoflurane with midazolam for sedation of ventilated patients. DESIGN--Randomised control study. Setting--Intensive care unit in university teaching hospital. PATIENTS--Sixty patients aged 18-76 who required mechanical ventilation. INTERVENTIONS--Sedation with either 0.1-0.6% isoflurane in an air-oxygen mixture (30 patients) or a continuous intravenous infusion of midazolam 0.01-0.20 mg/kg/h (30 patients). Sedation was assessed initially and hourly thereafter on a six point scale. Incremental intravenous doses of morphine 0.05 mg/kg were given for analgesia as required. The trial sedative was stopped when the patient was judged ready for weaning from ventilatory support or at 24 hours (whichever was earlier). END POINT--Achievement of a predetermined level of sedation for as much of the time as possible. MAIN RESULTS--Isoflurane produced satisfactory sedation for a greater proportion of time (86%) than midazolam (64%), and patients sedated with isoflurane recovered more rapidly from sedation. CONCLUSION--Isoflurane is a promising alternative technique for sedation of ventilated patients in the intensive care unit. PMID:2500195

  10. Rationale, design and methodology of a trial evaluating three strategies designed to improve sedation quality in intensive care units (DESIST study)

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Timothy S; Kydonaki, Kalliopi; Antonelli, Jean; Stephen, Jacqueline; Lee, Robert J; Everingham, Kirsty; Hanley, Janet; Uutelo, Kimmo; Peltola, Petra; Weir, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the rationale, design and methodology for a trial of three novel interventions developed to improve sedation-analgesia quality in adult intensive care units (ICUs). Participants and Setting 8 clusters, each a Scottish ICU. All mechanically ventilated sedated patients were potentially eligible for inclusion in data analysis. Design Cluster randomised design in 8 ICUs, with ICUs randomised after 45 weeks baseline data collection to implement one of four intervention combinations: a web-based educational programme (2 ICUs); education plus regular sedation quality feedback using process control charts (2 ICUs); education plus a novel sedation monitoring technology (2 ICUs); or all three interventions. ICUs measured sedation-analgesia quality, relevant drug use and clinical outcomes, during a 45-week preintervention and 45-week postintervention period separated by an 8-week implementation period. The intended sample size was >100 patients per site per study period. Main Outcome measures The primary outcome was the proportion of 12 h care periods with optimum sedation-analgesia, defined as the absence of agitation, unnecessary deep sedation, poor relaxation and poor ventilator synchronisation. Secondary outcomes were proportions of care periods with each of these four components of optimum sedation and rates of sedation-related adverse events. Sedative and analgesic drug use, and ICU and hospital outcomes were also measured. Analytic approach Multilevel generalised linear regression mixed models will explore the effects of each intervention taking clustering into account, and adjusting for age, gender and APACHE II score. Sedation-analgesia quality outcomes will be explored at ICU level and individual patient level. A process evaluation using mixed methods including quantitative description of intervention implementation, focus groups and direct observation will provide explanatory information regarding any effects observed. Conclusions The

  11. Sedation in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Flower, Oliver; Hellings, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Several different classes of sedative agents are used in the management of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). These agents are used at induction of anaesthesia, to maintain sedation, to reduce elevated intracranial pressure, to terminate seizure activity and facilitate ventilation. The intent of their use is to prevent secondary brain injury by facilitating and optimising ventilation, reducing cerebral metabolic rate and reducing intracranial pressure. There is limited evidence available as to the best choice of sedative agents in TBI, with each agent having specific advantages and disadvantages. This review discusses these agents and offers evidence-based guidance as to the appropriate context in which each agent may be used. Propofol, benzodiazepines, narcotics, barbiturates, etomidate, ketamine, and dexmedetomidine are reviewed and compared. PMID:23050154

  12. 82. VIEW OF AGITATORS FROM EAST. DRIVE AND STRUCTURAL SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. VIEW OF AGITATORS FROM EAST. DRIVE AND STRUCTURAL SUPPORT OF AGITATOR No. 1 IN FOREGROUND. HORIZONTAL AIR LINE PARALLELS AGITATORS IN RIGHT HALF OF VIEW. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  13. 83. AGITATORS No. 2, No. 3, AND No. 4 FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. AGITATORS No. 2, No. 3, AND No. 4 FROM EAST. AIR SUPPLY RUNS THROUGH BENT BRACES ON RIGHT. NOTE AGITATOR RAKE LEANING AGAINST RETAINING WALL BETWEEN AGITATOR No. 2 AND No. 3. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  14. Tramadol does not enhance sedation induced by acepromazine in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Eduardo R.; Lobo, Renan B.; Nunes, Juarez S.; Rangel, Julia P.P.; Bitti, Flavia S.

    2016-01-01

    The sedative effect of acepromazine combined with 2 doses of tramadol [3 and 5 mg/kg body weight (BW)] was compared with the sedative effect of acepromazine alone in dogs and the effects of each sedative protocol on cardiorespiratory variables were examined. This was a prospective, randomized, blinded, crossover study. Each of 6 dogs received 3 treatments at 1-week intervals. During all anesthetic episodes, dogs received 0.05 mg/kg BW acepromazine. Approximately 25 min later, dogs were given physiological saline (control) or tramadol [3 mg/kg BW (TR3) or 5 mg/kg BW (TR5)]. All drugs were administered intravenously. Variables evaluated included heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), systolic, mean, and diastolic blood pressures (SAP, MAP, and DAP), and sedation [by use of a simple descriptive scale (SDS, range: 0 to 3) and a numeric rating scale (NRS, range: 0 to 10)]. Variables were recorded 25 min after acepromazine and for 80 min after saline or tramadol. Acepromazine administration resulted in mild sedation in most dogs and decreased RR, SAP, MAP, and DAP in all treatments. Tramadol administration did not significantly increase SDS or NRS scores compared to acepromazine alone. The only exception to this rule was observed at 20 min after TR3, when NRS was higher in this group than in the control treatment. Administration of tramadol (TR3 and TR5) decreased HR. Under the conditions of this study, sedation induced by acepromazine with tramadol was similar to that of acepromazine alone. The main adverse effects of the combination were a decrease in blood pressure and HR, without clinical significance. PMID:27733788

  15. Advanced impeller geometry boosts liquid agitation

    SciTech Connect

    Fasano, J.B.; Bakker, A.; Penney, W.R. )

    1994-08-01

    A traditional agitator impeller often functions as a rather inefficient pump because of the way it produces fluid motion and pressure head. However, one can improve the amount of flow or shear generated by an impeller at constant power consumption and torque by changing its design. For example, a high-efficiency, axial-flow impeller produces more fluid motion per unit of power at constant torque than an otherwise similar pitched-blade turbine. The more-vigorous fluid motion cuts blend time and enhances heat-transfer in various flow-controlled mixing operations, such as blending of miscible fluids. For most applications, a higher degree of agitation intensity can be achieved on the same machine by substituting a high-efficiency impeller for a conventional pitched-blade unit. The high-efficiency impeller features a larger geometric pitch angle (30--60 deg) at the hub than at the tip (10--30 deg). Results from recently conducted controlled experiments indicate the beneficial effects of the high-efficiency impeller on blend time and heat-transfer coefficients in liquid-liquid mixing as well as solids suspension. This articles focuses on liquid agitation, with discussions of solids suspension set aside for a forthcoming piece in this series of articles on mixing.

  16. CFD simulation of local and global mixing time in an agitated tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liangchao; Xu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The Issue of mixing efficiency in agitated tanks has drawn serious concern in many industrial processes. The turbulence model is very critical to predicting mixing process in agitated tanks. On the basis of computational fluid dynamics(CFD) software package Fluent 6.2, the mixing characteristics in a tank agitated by dual six-blade-Rushton-turbines(6-DT) are predicted using the detached eddy simulation(DES) method. A sliding mesh(SM) approach is adopted to solve the rotation of the impeller. The simulated flow patterns and liquid velocities in the agitated tank are verified by experimental data in the literature. The simulation results indicate that the DES method can obtain more flow details than Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes(RANS) model. Local and global mixing time in the agitated tank is predicted by solving a tracer concentration scalar transport equation. The simulated results show that feeding points have great influence on mixing process and mixing time. Mixing efficiency is the highest for the feeding point at location of midway of the two impellers. Two methods are used to determine global mixing time and get close result. Dimensionless global mixing time remains unchanged with increasing of impeller speed. Parallel, merging and diverging flow pattern form in the agitated tank, respectively, by changing the impeller spacing and clearance of lower impeller from the bottom of the tank. The global mixing time is the shortest for the merging flow, followed by diverging flow, and the longest for parallel flow. The research presents helpful references for design, optimization and scale-up of agitated tanks with multi-impeller.

  17. [Helicopter transportation of a sedated, mechanically ventilated patient with cervical cord injury].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideya; Nishiwaki, Yuko; Hosoi, Kunihiko; Shiomi, Naoto; Hirata, Masashi

    2013-09-01

    We report helicopter transportation of a sedated, mechanically ventilated patient with cervical cord injury. A 20-year-old male sustained traumatic injury to the cervical spinal cord during extracurricular activities in a college. On arrival at the hospital, a halo vest was placed on the patient and tracheostomy was performed. On the 38th hospital day, he was transported a distance of 520km by helicopter to a specialized hospital in Fukuoka for medical repatriation. Cabin space was narrow. Since power supply and carrying capacity were limited, battery-driven and portable medical devices were used. In consideration for patient's psychological stress, he was sedated with propofol. RSS (Ramsay sedation scale) scores were recorded to evaluate whether the patient was adequately sedated during helicopter transportation. Prior to transport, we rehearsed the sedation using bispectral index monitoring (BIS) in the hospital to further ensure the patient's safety during the transport.

  18. Best Practices for Managing Pain, Sedation, and Delirium in the Mechanically Ventilated Patient.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Kitty M

    2016-12-01

    Nursing management of pain, agitation, and delirium in mechanically ventilated patients is a challenge in critical care. Oversedation can lead to delayed extubation, prolonged ventilator days, unnecessary neurologic testing, and complications such as weakness and delirium. Undersedation can lead to self-extubation, invasive line removal, unnecessary patient distress, and injury to self or others. Acquiring an optimal level of sedation requires the bedside nurse to be more vigilant than ever with patient assessment and medication titration. This article provides a historical perspective of the management of pain, agitation, and delirium, and disseminates information contained in revised Society for Critical Care Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines (January 2013) to promote their implementation in day-to-day nursing care.

  19. Fuel agitating device for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Scouten, D.G.

    1992-09-22

    This patent describes an agitator for fuel being conducted to an internal combustion engine. It comprises: a casing, a chamber within the casing between the fuel inlet conduit and the fuel outlet conduit, flow divider means in the chamber for dividing the chamber into a plurality of fuel flow paths on opposite sides thereof, an inner wall in the casing defining the exit portion, flange means in the casing within the chamber and spaced radially inwardly from the inner wall, and conduit means within the flange means for conducting fuel to the outlet conduit.

  20. Effect of Citalopram on Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease – The CitAD Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Drye, Lea T.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Devanand, D.P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Ismail, Zahinoor; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Rabins, Peter V.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Agitation is common, persistent, and associated with adverse consequences for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Pharmacological treatment options, including antipsychotics are not satisfactory. Objective The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy of citalopram for agitation in patients with AD. Key secondary objectives examined effects of citalopram on function, caregiver distress, safety, cognitive safety, and tolerability. Design, Setting and Participants The Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease Study (CitAD) was a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group trial that enrolled 186 patients with probable AD and clinically significant agitation from eight academic centers in the US and Canada from August 2009 to January 2013. Interventions Participants (n=186) were randomized to receive a psychosocial intervention plus either citalopram (n=94) or placebo (n=92) for 9 weeks. Dose began at 10 mg/d with planned titration to 30 mg/d over 3 weeks based on response and tolerability. Main Outcomes and Measures Primary outcome measures were the Neurobehavioral Rating Scale, agitation subscale (NBRS-A) and the modified Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (mADCS-CGIC) Other outcomes were the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), activities of daily living (ADLs), caregiver distress, cognitive safety (MMSE), and adverse events. Results Participants on citalopram showed significant improvement compared to placebo on both primary outcome measures. NBRS-A estimated treatment difference at week 9 (citalopram minus placebo) was −0.93 [95% CI: −1.80 to −0.06], p = 0.036. mADCS-CGIC results showed 40% of citalopram participants having moderate or marked improvement from baseline compared to 26% on placebo, with estimated treatment effect (odds ratio of being at or better than a given CGIC category) of 2.13 [95% CI 1.23 to 3.69], p = 0

  1. The ethical and clinical importance of measuring consciousness in continuously sedated patients.

    PubMed

    Raus, Kaspar; de Laat, Martine; Mortier, Eric; Sterckx, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    Continuous sedation at the end of life is a practice that has attracted a great deal of attention. An increasing number of guidelines on the proposed correct performance of the practice have been drafted. All of the guidelines stress the importance of using sedation in proportion to the severity of the patient's symptoms, thus to reduce the patient's consciousness no more than is absolutely necessary. As different patients can have different experiences of suffering, the amount of suffering should, ideally, be assessed subjectively; that is, via communication with the patient. Continuously sedated patients are often unable to communicate, however, making subjective methods of pain assessment unusable. For these patients, the degree of consciousness is the sole available measure. It therefore seems important to adequately measure how deeply the patient is sedated, thereby allowing sedation to be increased when it is too light and decreased when it is too heavy. This is in accordance with the idea that reducing consciousness is not an ethically neutral act. Although consciousness measuring techniques are a hot topic in anesthesiology, almost no research exists on the use of such techniques in the context of continuous sedation at the end of life. This article aims to review existing techniques to measure consciousness and to evaluate their applicability, efficiency, and invasiveness for patients who are continuously sedated until death. Techniques commonly used to assess the depth of sedation in continuously sedated patients are basic clinical assessment and sedation scales, as they are often considered reliable and non-invasive. These techniques might not be very reliable, however, since it is known that some patients are nonresponsive and yet aware. Moreover, sedation scales require stimulation of the patient (for example prodding, shaking, or providing painful stimuli), and can thus be considered invasive of one's bodily integrity or dignity. Other techniques

  2. The effect of the assignment of a pre-sedation target level on procedural sedation using propofol.

    PubMed

    Miner, James R; Huber, Darren; Nichols, Scott; Biros, Michelle

    2007-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if there is a difference in the achieved depth of sedation, the rate of respiratory depression, procedural difficulty, or patient perceived pain or recall between patients randomized to a pre-procedural target sedation level of moderate or deep procedural sedation using propofol during the reduction of fractures and dislocations in the Emergency Department (ED). This was a randomized, prospective study of adults undergoing procedural sedation (PS) with propofol for fracture or dislocation reduction in the ED between July 2003 and March 2004. Patients were randomized to a target sedation level of moderate or deep, using American Society of Anesthesiologists' definitions. Doses, vital signs, nasal end tidal CO(2) (ETCO(2)), pulse oximetry, and bispectral EEG analysis (BIS) scores were recorded. Respiratory depression was defined as a change in ETCO(2) >10, an oxygen saturation of <90% at any time, or an absent ETCO(2) waveform at any time. After the procedure, patients were asked if they perceived any pain or had any recall of the procedure. Physicians were asked to rate the difficulty of completing the reduction using a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Respiratory depression rates were compared with chi-square tests, BIS and VAS scores were compared with t tests. Seventy-five patients were enrolled, 39 randomized to the target of moderate PS and 36 to the target of deep PS. No significant complications were noted. There were 25/36 (69%) of the patients assigned to the deep sedation target group who actually achieved a deep level of sedation and 21/39 (54%) of the patients assigned to the moderate sedation target group who actually achieved a moderate level of sedation (p = 0.40). Respiratory depression was seen in 19/39 (49%) patients with the moderate PS target and 18/36 (50%) with the deep PS target (p = 0.91). The mean minimum recorded BIS score was 67.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] 62.2-73.3) for the moderate PS target

  3. Spontaneous knotting of an agitated string.

    PubMed

    Raymer, Dorian M; Smith, Douglas E

    2007-10-16

    It is well known that a jostled string tends to become knotted; yet the factors governing the "spontaneous" formation of various knots are unclear. We performed experiments in which a string was tumbled inside a box and found that complex knots often form within seconds. We used mathematical knot theory to analyze the knots. Above a critical string length, the probability P of knotting at first increased sharply with length but then saturated below 100%. This behavior differs from that of mathematical self-avoiding random walks, where P has been proven to approach 100%. Finite agitation time and jamming of the string due to its stiffness result in lower probability, but P approaches 100% with long, flexible strings. We analyzed the knots by calculating their Jones polynomials via computer analysis of digital photos of the string. Remarkably, almost all were identified as prime knots: 120 different types, having minimum crossing numbers up to 11, were observed in 3,415 trials. All prime knots with up to seven crossings were observed. The relative probability of forming a knot decreased exponentially with minimum crossing number and Möbius energy, mathematical measures of knot complexity. Based on the observation that long, stiff strings tend to form a coiled structure when confined, we propose a simple model to describe the knot formation based on random "braid moves" of the string end. Our model can qualitatively account for the observed distribution of knots and dependence on agitation time and string length.

  4. Improved performance in viscous mycelial fermentations by agitator retrofitting.

    PubMed

    Buckland, B C; Gbewonyo, K; Dimasi, D; Hunt, G; Westerfield, G; Nienow, A W

    1988-05-01

    For viscous mycelial fermentations it was demonstrated at the pilot-plant scale that the replacement of standard radial flow Rushton turbines with larger diameter axial-flow Prochem hydrofoil impellers significantly improved oxygen transfer efficiency. It was also determined that the Streptomyces broth under evaluation is highly shear thinning. Separate experiments using a Norcardia broth with similar Theological properties demonstrated that the oxygen transfer coefficient, K(L)a, can be greatly increased by use of water additions to reduce broth viscosity. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the improvement in oxygen transfer by changing agitator types is primarily due to an improvement in bulk mixing. A model is presented, based on the concepts of Bajpai and Reuss, which explains this improvement in performance in terms of enlargement of the well mixed micromixer region for viscous mycelial broths.

  5. Hydrodynamic effects on cells in agitated tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, R. S.; Papoutsakis, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanisms by which hydrodynamic forces can affect cells grown on microcarrier beads in agitated cell culture reactors were investigated by analyzing the motion of microcarriers relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other, and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. It was found that harmful effects on cell cultures that have been previously attributed to shear can be better explained as the effects of turbulence (of a size scale comparable to the microcarriers or the spacing between them) or collisions. The primary mechanisms of cell damage involve direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies, collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow, and collisions against the impeller or other solid surfaces. The implications of these analytical results for the design of tissue culture reactors are discussed.

  6. Finite element analysis of vessel nozzle for agitator supports

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.M.

    1996-12-01

    There are many industrial applications involving agitators/mixers supported by a vessel head and nozzle. The flow-induced agitator loads are often neglected or only partially considered in the vessel design stage. Inadequate supports reduce agitator drive operating life and in most cases promote vibration problems leading to fatigue failures. The vessel head and nozzle should be stiff enough to withstand the induced agitator loads. Some of the more significant design criteria are: (1) nozzle and head stiffness should be at least 1 million lb/in; (2) agitator shaft deflection should not be more than 1/32 inch per foot of shaft extension; (3) agitator support plane should not rotate more than 0.15 degree. This paper deals with a parametric finite element study of three tank sizes (4 ft., 8 ft. and 12 ft. diameter) to verify the validity and ease of compliance of these criteria in vessel design.

  7. Intravenous ketamine plus midazolam is superior to intranasal midazolam for emergency paediatric procedural sedation

    PubMed Central

    Acworth, J; Purdie, D; Clark, R

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—This study compared intranasal midazolam (INM) with a combination of intravenous ketamine and intravenous midazolam (IVKM) for sedation of children requiring minor procedures in the emergency department. Method—A single blinded randomised clinical trial was conducted in the emergency department of a major urban paediatric hospital. Subjects requiring sedation for minor procedures were randomised to receive either INM (0.4 mg/kg) or intravenous ketamine (1 mg/kg) plus intravenous midazolam (0.1 mg/kg). Physiological variables and two independent measures of sedation (Sedation Score and Visual Analogue Sedation Scale) were recorded before sedation and at regular intervals during the procedure and recovery period. Times to adequate level of sedation and to discharge were compared. Results—Fifty three patients were enrolled over a 10 month period. Sedation was sufficient to complete the procedures in all children receiving IVKM and in 24 of the 26 receiving INM. Onset of sedation was an average of 5.3 minutes quicker with IVKM than with INM (95%CI 3.2, 7.4 minutes, p<0.001). Children given INM were discharged an average of 19 minutes earlier than those given IVKM (95%CI 4, 33 minutes, p=0.02). Mean Sedation Scores and Visual Analogue Sedation Scale scores for the 30 minutes after drug administration were significantly better in children given IVKM compared with INM (2.4 and 1.8 versus 3.5 and 3.8, respectively). Both doctors and parents were more satisfied with sedation by intravenous ketamine and midazolam. Conclusions—Intravenous ketamine plus midazolam used in an appropriate setting by experienced personnel provides an excellent means of achieving sedation suitable for most non-painful minor procedures for children in the emergency department. This combination is superior to INM in terms of speed of onset and consistency of effect. INM delivered via aerosol spray has a more variable effect but may still be adequate for the completion of many of

  8. Time to response to citalopram treatment for agitation in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, Daniel; Drye, Lea T.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Devanand, D.P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Ismail, Zahinoor; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Rabins, Peter V.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Agitation is a common and significant problem in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the recent Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer’s Disease (CitAD) study, citalopram was efficacious for the treatment of AD agitation. Here we examined the time course and predictors of response to treatment. Methods Response in CitAD was defined as a modified Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (mADCS-CGIC) score of 1 or 2, or a Neurobehavioral Rating Scale agitation subscale (NBRS-A) score reduction ≥50% from baseline. “Stable early response” was defined as meeting the aforementioned criteria at both weeks 3 and 9, “late response” was response at week 9 but not at week 3, and “unstable response” was response at week 3 but not at week 9. Results In the primary analyses, citalopram was superior to placebo on both the CGIC and the NBRS-A response measures. There were little between-group differences in response rates in the first three weeks of the study (21% vs 19% on the CGIC). Citalopram patients were more likely than placebo patients to be a late responder (18% vs. 8% on CGIC, Fisher’s exact p=0.09; 31% vs. 15% on NBRS-A, Fisher’s exact p=0.02). Approximately half (45–56%) of citalopram responders at end-of-study achieved response later in the study, compared with 30–44% of placebo responders. Discussion Treatment with citalopram for agitation in AD needs to be at least nine weeks in duration to allow sufficient time for full response, and study duration is an important factor to consider in the design of clinical trials for agitation in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26238225

  9. Sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Triantafillidis, John K; Merikas, Emmanuel; Nikolakis, Dimitrios; Papalois, Apostolos E

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can successfully be performed by applying moderate (conscious) sedation. Moderate sedation, using midazolam and an opioid, is the standard method of sedation, although propofol is increasingly being used in many countries because the satisfaction of endoscopists with propofol sedation is greater compared with their satisfaction with conventional sedation. Moreover, the use of propofol is currently preferred for the endoscopic sedation of patients with advanced liver disease due to its short biologic half-life and, consequently, its low risk of inducing hepatic encephalopathy. In the future, propofol could become the preferred sedation agent, especially for routine colonoscopy. Midazolam is the benzodiazepine of choice because of its shorter duration of action and better pharmacokinetic profile compared with diazepam. Among opioids, pethidine and fentanyl are the most popular. A number of other substances have been tested in several clinical trials with promising results. Among them, newer opioids, such as remifentanil, enable a faster recovery. The controversy regarding the administration of sedation by an endoscopist or an experienced nurse, as well as the optimal staffing of endoscopy units, continues to be a matter of discussion. Safe sedation in special clinical circumstances, such as in the cases of obese, pregnant, and elderly individuals, as well as patients with chronic lung, renal or liver disease, requires modification of the dose of the drugs used for sedation. In the great majority of patients, sedation under the supervision of a properly trained endoscopist remains the standard practice worldwide. In this review, an overview of the current knowledge concerning sedation during digestive endoscopy will be provided based on the data in the current literature. PMID:23382625

  10. A pediatric FOUR score coma scale: interrater reliability and predictive validity.

    PubMed

    Czaikowski, Brianna L; Liang, Hong; Stewart, C Todd

    2014-04-01

    The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) Score is a coma scale that consists of four components (eye and motor response, brainstem reflexes, and respiration). It was originally validated among the adult population and recently in a pediatric population. To enhance clinical assessment of pediatric intensive care unit patients, including those intubated and/or sedated, at our children's hospital, we modified the FOUR Score Scale for this population. This modified scale would provide many of the same advantages as the original, such as interrater reliability, simplicity, and elimination of the verbal component that is not compatible with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), creating a more valuable neurological assessment tool for the nursing community. Our goal was to potentially provide greater information than the formally used GCS when assessing critically ill, neurologically impaired patients, including those sedated and/or intubated. Experienced pediatric intensive care unit nurses were trained as "expert raters." Two different nurses assessed each subject using the Pediatric FOUR Score Scale (PFSS), GCS, and Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale at three different time points. Data were compared with the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC) assessed by another nurse. Our hypothesis was that the PFSS and PCPC should highly correlate and the GCS and PCPC should correlate lower. Study results show that the PFSS is excellent for interrater reliability for trained nurse-rater pairs and prediction of poor outcome and in-hospital mortality, under various situations, but there were no statistically significant differences between the PFSS and the GCS. However, the PFSS does have the potential to provide greater neurological assessment in the intubated and/or sedated patient based on the outcomes of our study.

  11. Determination of a sedative protocol for use in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with neurologic abnormalities undergoing electroencephalographic examination.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Sophie; Haulena, Martin; Williams, D Colette; Dawson, John; Yandell, Brian S; Gulland, Frances M D

    2008-12-01

    Sedation in sea lions exhibiting abnormal neurologic signs may require modification of established sedatior protocols because of the likely interaction between effects of the sedative and physiologic changes in diseased animals The effects of two sedative combinations, 0.07 mg/kg medetomidine and 0.07 mg/kg medetomidine plus 0.2 mg/kg butorphanol, were compared between California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with signs of neurologic dysfunctior (n=33) and without neurologic signs (n=8). Sedation depth was scored on a scale of 0 (no effect) to 4 (profound sedation) assessed by response to auditory, tactile, and visual stimuli at the time of perceived maximal sedative effect In the medetomidine-alone group, sea lions with neurologic signs attained a median sedation score of 4 compared to a median sedation score of 1 in the clinically normal sea lions. Sea lions with and without neurologic signs giver medetomidine-butorphanol attained a median sedation score of 4. No statistically significant difference in time to induction and respiratory rate was found between the two sedation protocols in all sea lions. In the sea lions with neurologic signs, the recovery time from medetomidine-butorphanol sedation was prolonged (P < 0.01) and minimum recorded heart rates, although remaining within normal physiologic limits, were lower (P = 0.02) when compared to the sea lions administered medetomidine alone. Muscle jerks were observed in many animals given medetomidine-butorphanol and were detrimental to the diagnostic quality of the electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. Medetomidine alone at a dose rate of 0.07 mg/kg thus provides adequate and safe sedation in sea lions with neurologic signs undergoing EEG evaluation.

  12. Preoperative anxiety and propofol requirement in conscious sedation for ovum retrieval.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeong-Yeon; Kang, Inn Soo; Koong, Mi Kyoung; Yoon, Hee Jo; Jee, Young Suck; Park, Jeong Wook; Park, Mi Hyun

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the correlation among the trial number of in vitro fertilization (IVF), preoperative anxiety, and propofol requirement for conscious sedation. One hundred and twenty six Korean women undergoing oocyte retrieval were enrolled. The target-controlled infusion by the anesthesiologist was conducted with initial target propofol concentration of 2.5 microg/mL, which was manipulated until the sedation score 3 and desired clinical end point were achieved. A weak correlation was observed between visual analogue scale (VAS) anxiety and the dose of propofol required for the induction of conscious sedation (r=0.22, p=0.0192). A weak correlation was also found between VAS anxiety and the sedation time needed to reach the proper conscious sedation level for the procedure (r=0.181, p=0.0484). Multiple regression analysis showed that VAS anxiety, preoperative baseline prolactin level, and cortisol level had statistically significant effects on the propofol induction dose for target controlled conscious sedation. We concluded that the induction dose and time requirements for propofol in anesthesiologist-controlled conscious sedation be modified based on the preoperative anxiety level and the baseline blood concentration of stress hormone, cortisol and prolactin. PMID:14676445

  13. Preoperative anxiety and propofol requirement in conscious sedation for ovum retrieval.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong-Yeon; Kang, Inn Soo; Koong, Mi Kyoung; Yoon, Hee Jo; Jee, Young Suck; Park, Jeong Wook; Park, Mi Hyun

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the correlation among the trial number of in vitro fertilization (IVF), preoperative anxiety, and propofol requirement for conscious sedation. One hundred and twenty six Korean women undergoing oocyte retrieval were enrolled. The target-controlled infusion by the anesthesiologist was conducted with initial target propofol concentration of 2.5 microg/mL, which was manipulated until the sedation score 3 and desired clinical end point were achieved. A weak correlation was observed between visual analogue scale (VAS) anxiety and the dose of propofol required for the induction of conscious sedation (r=0.22, p=0.0192). A weak correlation was also found between VAS anxiety and the sedation time needed to reach the proper conscious sedation level for the procedure (r=0.181, p=0.0484). Multiple regression analysis showed that VAS anxiety, preoperative baseline prolactin level, and cortisol level had statistically significant effects on the propofol induction dose for target controlled conscious sedation. We concluded that the induction dose and time requirements for propofol in anesthesiologist-controlled conscious sedation be modified based on the preoperative anxiety level and the baseline blood concentration of stress hormone, cortisol and prolactin.

  14. Conscious Sedation for Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography: Dexmedetomidine Versus Midazolam

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Neslihan; Sahin, Sukran; Aksu, Hale; Yavascaoglu, Belgin; Gurbet, Alp; Turker, Gurkan; Kadioglu, Asli Guler

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Midazolam and dexmedetomidine, which are used for sedation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, were compared to evaluate the differences in efficacy, hemodynamics, and side effects. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients aged between 18 and 80 were randomly assigned to two groups according to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification: Group M received midazolam with an initial bolus infusion of 0.04 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.), followed by additional doses of 0.5 mg i.v. midazolam, titrated to achieve a Ramsay sedation scale score of 3–4. Group D received dexmedetomidine with an initial bolus infusion of 1 mcg/kg/hr i.v. over 10 minutes, followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2–0.7 mcg/kg/hr, titrated to achieve an RSS of 3–4. A Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) was performed prior to sedation and in the recovery room once the Modified Aldrete Score (MAS) reached 9–10. Patient heart rates, arterial pressure and pain were evaluated. Results: Patients in Group D had lower heart rates at 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 minutes following the initiation of sedation (p<0.05). There was no statistical difference in arterial pressure, RSS, MMSE or respiratory rate between the two groups. Coughing, nausea and vomiting occurred in 3 patients in Group M (12%), whereas no patient in Group D experienced these symptoms. The procedure elicited a gag response in 7 patients in Group M (28%) and in 4 patients in Group D (16%), with no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). When patient and surgeon satisfaction was compared between the two groups, Group D showed higher surgeon satisfaction scores (p<0.05). Conclusion: The use of dexmedetomidine for conscious sedation during short, invasive procedures, such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, could be a superior alternative to the use of midazolam. PMID:25610153

  15. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Travis M; Xu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases that resulted in death or permanent neurologic damage. The youngest children and those with more complicated medical backgrounds appear to be at greatest risk. To reduce complications, practitioners and regulatory bodies have supported a renewed focus on health care quality and safety. Implementation of high fidelity simulation training and improvements in patient monitoring, including end-tidal carbon dioxide, are becoming recognized as a new standard for sedated patients in dental offices and health care facilities. Safe and appropriate case selection and appropriate dosing for overweight children is also paramount. Oral sedation has been the mainstay of pediatric dental sedation; however, today practitioners are administering modern drugs in new ways with high levels of success. Employing contemporary transmucosal administration devices increases patient acceptance and sedation predictability. While recently there have been many positive developments in sedation technology, it is now thought that medications used in sedation and anesthesia may have adverse effects on the developing brain. The evidence for this is not definitive, but we suggest that practitioners recognize this developing area and counsel patients accordingly. Finally, there is a clear trend of increased use of ambulatory anesthesia services for pediatric dentistry. Today, parents and practitioners have become accustomed to children receiving general anesthesia in the outpatient setting. As a result of these changes, it is possible that dental providers will abandon the practice of personally administering large amounts of

  16. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Travis M; Xu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases that resulted in death or permanent neurologic damage. The youngest children and those with more complicated medical backgrounds appear to be at greatest risk. To reduce complications, practitioners and regulatory bodies have supported a renewed focus on health care quality and safety. Implementation of high fidelity simulation training and improvements in patient monitoring, including end-tidal carbon dioxide, are becoming recognized as a new standard for sedated patients in dental offices and health care facilities. Safe and appropriate case selection and appropriate dosing for overweight children is also paramount. Oral sedation has been the mainstay of pediatric dental sedation; however, today practitioners are administering modern drugs in new ways with high levels of success. Employing contemporary transmucosal administration devices increases patient acceptance and sedation predictability. While recently there have been many positive developments in sedation technology, it is now thought that medications used in sedation and anesthesia may have adverse effects on the developing brain. The evidence for this is not definitive, but we suggest that practitioners recognize this developing area and counsel patients accordingly. Finally, there is a clear trend of increased use of ambulatory anesthesia services for pediatric dentistry. Today, parents and practitioners have become accustomed to children receiving general anesthesia in the outpatient setting. As a result of these changes, it is possible that dental providers will abandon the practice of personally administering large amounts of

  17. Modelling gas exchange during platelet storage without agitation.

    PubMed

    Torres, R; Tormey, C A

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to create a model of oxygen distribution within platelet storage bags to evaluate implications of reduced agitation approaches. Based on our model, platelet concentration and surface area most affect internal partial pressure of oxygen, while temperature modifications have least effect, indicating primary potential approaches for optimization of platelet storage with reduced or absent agitation.

  18. Toward Solving the Sedation-Assessment Conundrum: Neurofunction Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Olson, DaiWai M; Phillips, Kyloni; Graffagnino, Carmelo

    2016-06-01

    The sedation-assessment conundrum is the struggle to balance the need for sedation against the need to awaken the patient and perform a neurologic examination. This article discusses the nuances of the sedation-assessment conundrum as well as approaches to resolve this and reduce the negative impact of abruptly stopping sedative infusions. Both oversedation and undersedation affect critically ill patients. This article discusses methods of assessing sedation and interpreting individualized patient responses to sedation. The use of neurofunction monitors and periods of sedation interruption are discussed within the context of addressing the sedation-assessment conundrum.

  19. Effect of Preferred Music on Agitation After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyun; Williams, Reg Arthur; Lee, Donghyun

    2016-04-01

    Agitation is a common behavioral problem after traumatic brain injury (TBI), which threatens the safety of patients and caregivers and disrupts the rehabilitation process. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a preferred music intervention on the reduction of agitation in TBI patients and to compare the effects of preferred music with those of classical "relaxation" music. A single group, within-subjects, randomized crossover trial design was formed, consisting of 14 agitated patients with cognitive impairment after severe TBI. Patients listened to preferred music and classical "relaxation" music, with a wash-out period in between. Patients listening to the preferred music reported a significantly greater reduction in agitation compared with the effect seen during the classical "relaxation" music intervention (p = .046). These findings provide preliminary evidence that the preferred music intervention may be effective as an environmental therapeutic approach for reducing agitation after TBI.

  20. Effects of Tween 80 on cellulase stability under agitated conditions.

    PubMed

    Okino, Shohei; Ikeo, Makoto; Ueno, Yoshiki; Taneda, Daisuke

    2013-08-01

    The mechanism of the increase in the hydrolysis rate and yield by the addition of Tween 80 to the hydrolysis reaction of filter paper was investigated under static and agitated conditions. The increase in the hydrolysis rate by addition of Tween 80 was observed under the agitated condition only. The effects of Tween 80 on the changes in the protein concentration of individual cellulase components were investigated in the absence of substrates. Agitation of the enzyme solution resulted in the drastic decrease of SDS-PAGE bands intensity of CBH2 (cellobiohydrolase 2). The addition of Tween 80 prevented this. Thus, the Tween 80 functions to stabilize instable cellulase components under the agitated condition. Moreover, addition of Tween 80 completely suppressed the decrease of CBH2 intensity by agitation at 30°C. Results suggest that Tween 80 stabilizes instable cellulase components not only during hydrolysis, but during enzyme production also.

  1. Epileptic fits under intravenous midazolam sedation.

    PubMed

    Robb, N D

    1996-09-07

    A case is presented of a patient who suffered from recurrent epileptic fits while being treated under intravenous sedation with midazolam. Those using sedation are advised to beware of the patient who gives a history of fits being provoked in the dental environment.

  2. Comparison Effect of Intravenous Ketamine with Pethidine for Analgesia and Sedation during Bone Marrow Procedures in Oncologic Children: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Abdolkarimi, Babak; Zareifar, Soheila; Golestani Eraghi, Majid; Saleh, Fazl

    2016-01-01

    Background : Children suffering from cancer always require pain relief and reduce anxiety when undergoing painful procedures. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of pethedine and ketamine administration in cancer-diagnosed children undergoing bone marrow aspiration and biopsy procedures. Subjects and Methods : A randomized, double-blinded, crossover trial was carried out on 57 children undergoing painful procedures (bone marrow aspiration/biopsy). Patients were randomly assigned in a double-blinded fashion to receive either intravenous pethedine (1 mg/kg/dose) or ketamine (1 mg/kg/dose), respectively. The effectiveness of the drug was measured utilizing three parameters; perception of procedural pain with Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale and Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), hemodynamic changes and respiration and the frequency of vomiting nausea score. Results : Additionally, hemodynamic stability and pain control were significantly better in the patients receiving ketamine (p<0.05, at 0, 15, 30 min). Nausea and vomiting were more frequent in Group K than in Group M but there were no significant differences. No serious complications were observed. Conclusion: This study showed that intravenous ketamine generated a superior clinical effect in decreased pain. Ketamine may also be recommended as a reasonable option before oncology procedures in children suffering from cancer. PMID:27928474

  3. Palliative sedation versus euthanasia: an ethical assessment.

    PubMed

    ten Have, Henk; Welie, Jos V M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the ethical debate concerning palliative sedation. Although recent guidelines articulate the differences between palliative sedation and euthanasia, the ethical controversies remain. The dominant view is that euthanasia and palliative sedation are morally distinct practices. However, ambiguous moral experiences and considerable practice variation call this view into question. When heterogeneous sedative practices are all labeled as palliative sedation, there is the risk that palliative sedation is expanded to include practices that are actually intended to bring about the patients' death. This troublesome expansion is fostered by an expansive use of the concept of intention such that this decisive ethical concept is no longer restricted to signify the aim in guiding the action. In this article, it is argued that intention should be used in a restricted way. The significance of intention is related to other ethical parameters to demarcate the practice of palliative sedation: terminality, refractory symptoms, proportionality, and separation from other end-of-life decisions. These additional parameters, although not without ethical and practical problems, together formulate a framework to ethically distinguish a more narrowly defined practice of palliative sedation from practices that are tantamount to euthanasia. Finally, the article raises the question as to what impact palliative sedation might have on the practice of palliative care itself. The increasing interest in palliative sedation may reemphasize characteristics of health care that initially encouraged the emergence of palliative care in the first place: the focus on therapy rather than care, the physical dimension rather than the whole person, the individual rather than the community, and the primacy of intervention rather than receptiveness and presence.

  4. Bispectral index does not correlate with observer assessment of alertness and sedation scores during 0.5% bupivacaine epidural anesthesia with nitrous oxide sedation.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Soo; Hur, Eun Jin; Han, Kyung Woo; Kil, Ho Yeong; Han, Tae Hyung

    2006-08-01

    The bispectral index (BIS) has been used as a measure of the degree of sedation and level of hypnosis for IV hypnotics and sedatives, potent volatile anesthetics. We evaluated the effect of increasing concentrations of nitrous oxide (N2O) on BIS and compared it with the Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation (OAA/S) scale in patients undergoing regional anesthesia. We studied 48 unpremedicated, ASA physical status I-II adult patients scheduled for lower extremity surgery under lumbar epidural anesthesia. N2O was given in oxygen to achieve measured end-tidal concentrations of 33%, 50%, and 67% N2O by a tight-fitting facemask, and each N2O concentration was maintained for 20 min. Paired measurements of BIS and OAA/S scores were obtained just before each increase in N2O concentration. Forty of the 48 subjects completed the study. Increasing N(2)O concentrations produced no changes in BIS despite a significant decrease in OAA/S scores at 50% and 67% N2O concentrations. The prediction probability for BIS and OAA/S calculated by Somers' d(x.y) were 0.60 and 0.84, respectively. Anesthesiologists should be aware that the BIS monitor may not be sensitive enough to provide an adequate measure of the depth of sedation and hypnosis when using N2O alone for sedation. It may be better to monitor sedation clinically (e.g., with the OAA/S scale) to determine the dose requirement and the adequacy of depth of sedation and hypnosis.

  5. Gender differences when using sedative music during colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Ida; Karlsson, Frida; Lundberg, Ann; Frisman, Gunilla Hollman

    2013-01-01

    Colonoscopy is a procedure often experienced as uncomfortable and worrying. Music has been reported to reduce discomfort during colonoscopy; however, no study in a Swedish setting has been found. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to analyze the effects of sedative music on patients' experience of anxiety, pain, relaxation, and well-being during colonoscopy. Prior to colonoscopy, adult patients (n = 120), aged 18-80 years, were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n = 60) who listened to sedative instrumental music with 60-80 beats per minute during the colonoscopy or a control group. After the colonoscopy, both groups completed a questionnaire on anxiety, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, and an anxiety Visual Analogue Scale. Pain, relaxation, and well-being were also measured with Visual Analogue Scales. Women in the intervention group had a lower level of anxiety during the colonoscopy than those in the control group (p = .007) and well-being was significantly higher in the intervention group, especially among men, than in the controls (p = .006 and p = .025, respectively). Men in the intervention group were more relaxed during the colonoscopy than those in the control group (p = .065). Listening to sedative music decreased anxiety among women and increased well-being among men during colonoscopy.

  6. Agitated Honeybees Exhibit Pessimistic Cognitive Biases

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Melissa; Desire, Suzanne; Gartside, Sarah E.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Whether animals experience human-like emotions is controversial and of immense societal concern [1–3]. Because animals cannot provide subjective reports of how they feel, emotional state can only be inferred using physiological, cognitive, and behavioral measures [4–8]. In humans, negative feelings are reliably correlated with pessimistic cognitive biases, defined as the increased expectation of bad outcomes [9–11]. Recently, mammals [12–16] and birds [17–20] with poor welfare have also been found to display pessimistic-like decision making, but cognitive biases have not thus far been explored in invertebrates. Here, we ask whether honeybees display a pessimistic cognitive bias when they are subjected to an anxiety-like state induced by vigorous shaking designed to simulate a predatory attack. We show for the first time that agitated bees are more likely to classify ambiguous stimuli as predicting punishment. Shaken bees also have lower levels of hemolymph dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin. In demonstrating state-dependent modulation of categorization in bees, and thereby a cognitive component of emotion, we show that the bees' response to a negatively valenced event has more in common with that of vertebrates than previously thought. This finding reinforces the use of cognitive bias as a measure of negative emotional states across species and suggests that honeybees could be regarded as exhibiting emotions. Video Abstract PMID:21636277

  7. Nanocellulose Composite Materials Synthesizes with Ultrasonic Agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Timothy; Folken, Andrew; Fritch, Byron; Bradley, Derek

    We have extended current techniques in forming nanocellulose composite solids, suspensions and aerogels to enhance the breakdown of cellulose into its molecular components. Using only mechanical processing which includes ball milling, using a simple mortar and pestle, and ultrasonic agitation, we are able to create very low concentration uniform nanocellulose suspensions in water, as well as incorporate other materials such as graphite, carbon nanotubes, and magnetic materials. Of interest is that no chemical processing is necessary, nor is the use of nanoparticles, necessary for composite formation. Using both graphite and carbon nanotubes, we are able to achieve conducting nanocellulose solids and aerogels. Standard magnetic powder can also be incorporated to create magnetic solids. The technique also allows for the creation of an extremely fine nanocellulose suspension in water. Using extremely low concentrations, less than 1% cellulose by mass, along with careful control over processing parameters, we are able to achieve highly dilute, yet homogenous nanocellulose suspensions. When air dried, these suspensions have similar hardness and strength properties to those created with more typical starting cellulose concentrations (2-10%). However, when freeze-dried, these dilute suspensions form aerogels with a new morphology with much higher surface area than those with higher starting concentrations. We are currently examining the effect of this higher surface area on the properties of nanocellulose aerogel composites and how it influences the impact of incorporating nanocellulose into other polymer materials.

  8. Comparison of Conscious Sedation and Asleep-Awake-Asleep Techniques for Awake Craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Dilmen, Ozlem Korkmaz; Akcil, Eren Fatma; Oguz, Abdulvahap; Vehid, Hayriye; Tunali, Yusuf

    2017-01-01

    Since awake craniotomy (AC) has become a standard of care for supratentorial tumour resection, especially in the motor and language cortex, determining the most appropriate anaesthetic protocol is very important. The aim of this retrospective study is to compare the effectiveness of conscious sedation (CS) to "awake-asleep-awake" (AAA) techniques for supratentorial tumour resection. Forty-two patients undergoing CS and 22 patients undergoing AAA were included in the study. The primary endpoint was to compare the CS and AAA techniques with respect to intraoperative pain and agitation in patients undergoing supratentorial tumour resection. The secondary endpoint was comparison of the other intraoperative complications. This study results show that the incidence of intraoperative agitation and seizure were lower in the AAA group than in the CS group. Intraoperative blood pressures were significantly higher in the CS group than in the AAA group during the pinning and incision, but the level of blood pressures did not need antihypertensive treatment. Otherwise, blood pressures were significantly higher in the AAA group than in the CS group during the neurological examination and the severity of hypertension needed statistically significant more antihypertensive treatment in the AAA group. As a result of hypertension, the amount of intraoperative bleeding was higher in the AAA group than in the CS group. In conclusion, the AAA technique may provide better results with respect to agitation and seizure, but intraoperative hypertension needed a vigilant follow-up especially in the wake-up period.

  9. Assessment of the effect of continuous sedation with mechanical ventilation on adrenal insufficiency in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Kang-Song; Hu, Ying-Hong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of continuous propofol sedation plus prolonged mechanical ventilation on adrenal insufficiency (AI) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Eighty-five adult patients diagnosed with moderate TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score 9-13) from October 2011 to October 2012 were included in this prospective study. The patients comprised three groups: no mechanical ventilation and sedation (n=27), mechanical ventilation alone (n=24) and mechanical ventilation plus sedation (n=34). The low-dose short Synacthen test was performed at 8:00 on the first, third, and fifth days after TBI. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors affecting the use of mechanical ventilation and sedation, and the incidence of AI. On the fifth day after injury, the mean baseline cortisol and simulated cortisol levels were significantly lower in the mechanical ventilation plus sedation group compared with the other two groups. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) score was independently associated with treatment with mechanical ventilation and sedation compared to mechanical ventilation alone. Furthermore, hypoxemia on admission and shock were associated with the development of AI. The findings showed that sedation is associated with an increased incidence of AI. Patients with TBI who are treated with continuous sedation should be monitored for AI carefully.

  10. [Palliative sedation for psycho-existential suffering].

    PubMed

    Weichselbaumer, Eva; Weixler, Dietmar

    2014-05-01

    Sedation in palliative care is generally considered as an important therapy in terminally ill patients with refractory symptoms. However the sedation of patients with intractable psycho-existential suffering is still under discussion. This paper discusses the case of a 56-year-old patient in the final phase of carcinoma of the ovaries, who required palliative sedation for refractory, mainly psycho-existential suffering. It describes the course on our ward and the difficult process of decision-making. We discuss our approach based on literature.

  11. Oral Sedation in the Dental Office.

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, Francesco R; Dym, Harry; Wolf, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    This article highlights the commonly used medications used in dentistry and oral surgery. General dentists and specialists must be knowledgeable about the pharmacology of the drugs currently available along with their risks and benefits. Enteral sedation is a useful adjunct for the treatment of anxious adult and pediatric patients. When enteral sedation is used within the standards of care, the interests of the public and the dental profession are served through a cost-effective, effective service that can be widely available. Oral sedation enables dentists to provide dental care to millions of individuals who otherwise would have unmet dental needs.

  12. Oral Sedation: A Primer on Anxiolysis for the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Mark; Gizzarelli, Gino; Chanpong, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The use of sedatives has established efficacy and safety for managing anxiety regarding dental treatment. This article will provide essential information regarding the pharmacology and therapeutic principles that govern the appropriate use of orally administered sedatives to provide mild sedation (anxiolysis). Dosages and protocols are intended for this purpose, not for providing moderate or deeper sedation levels. PMID:17900211

  13. Zaleplon (Sonata) Oral Sedation for Outpatient Third Molar Extraction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ganzberg, Steven I; Dietrich, Thomas; Valerin, Manuel; Beck, F. Michael

    2005-01-01

    Zalpelon was compared with triazolam for oral sedation in a third molar surgery model using a double-blind crossover design. Factors such as anxiolysis, amnesia, and quality of sedation were assessed. Of the 14 participants who completed the study, zaleplon sedation was found to be similar to triazolam sedation in all regards except that recovery from zaleplon was more rapid. PMID:16596911

  14. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score. PMID:27298743

  15. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy.

    PubMed

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score.

  16. 91. VIEW OF PORTLAND FILTER VACUUM RECEIVER FROM NORTHWEST. AGITATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW OF PORTLAND FILTER VACUUM RECEIVER FROM NORTHWEST. AGITATORS No. 4 AND No. 5 VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  17. 84. AGITATORS No. 3, No. 4 AND No. 5 FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. AGITATORS No. 3, No. 4 AND No. 5 FROM SOUTHEAST. OLD PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR IS SEEN THROUGH FRAMING, LOWER RIGHT. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  18. Agitation in Dementia: Relation to Core Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bloniecki, Victor; Aarsland, Dag; Cummings, Jeffrey; Blennow, Kaj; Freund-Levi, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to examine the associations of agitation with the cerebrospinal fluid dementia biomarkers total-tau (T-tau), phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) and Aβ1-42. Methods One hundred patients (mean age ± SD, 78.6 ± 7.5 years) with dementia and neuropsychiatric symptoms, of whom 67% were female, were included. Agitation was measured using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI; 46.5 ± 11.8 points). Results Total CMAI correlated with T-tau [rs (31) = 0.36, p = 0.04] and P-tau [rs (31) = 0.35, p = 0.05] in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 33) but not in the total dementia population (n = 95). Conclusions Our results suggest that tau-mediated pathology including neurofibrillary tangles and the intensity of the disease process might be associated with agitation in AD. PMID:25298777

  19. 6. VIEW OF BRINING TANK Older, redwood model. Paddles agitated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BRINING TANK Older, redwood model. Paddles agitated the skins while they soaked in brine. The skins were then hung to dry. - Sealing Plant, St. George Island, Pribilof Islands, Saint George, Aleutians West Census Area, AK

  20. Hydrodynamic effects on cell growth in agitated microcarrier bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1988-01-01

    The net growth rate of bovine embryonic kidney cells in microcarrier bioreactor is the result of a variable death rate imposed on a cell culture trying to grow at a constant intrinsic growth rate. The death rate is a function of the agitation conditions in the system, and increases at higher agitation because of increasingly energetic interactions of the cell covered microcarriers with turbulent eddies in the fluid. At very low agitation rates bead-bead bridging becomes important; the large clumps formed by bridging can interact with larger eddies than single beads, leading to a higher death rate at low agitation. The growth and death rate were correlated with a dimensionless eddy number which compares eddy forces to the buoyant force on the bead.

  1. Agitator Mixing Analysis in a HB-Line Flat Tank

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2002-07-31

    In support of the HB-Line Engineering agitator mixing project, flow pattern calculations have been made for a 45 degrees pitched three-blade agitator submerged in a flat rectangular tank. The work is intended to determine agitator speeds that provide acceptable mixing performance for various tank liquid levels based on flow rates past solids deposited on the bottom surface of the flat tank. The modeling results will help ensure the acceptable suspension of solid particles as a function of agitator speed and tank liquid level during precipitation operations. The numerical modeling and calculations have been performed using a computational fluid dynamics approach. Three-dimensional steady-state momentum and continuity equations were used as the basic equations to estimate fluid motion driven by an agitator with three 45 degrees pitched blades. Hydraulic conditions were fully turbulent (Reynolds number about 2x104). A standard two-equation turbulence model (k-e), was used to capture turbulent eddy motion. The commercial finite volume code, Fluent [7], was used to create a prototypic geometry file with a non-orthogonal mesh. Hybrid meshing was used to fill the computational region between the round-edged tank bottom and agitator regions. At high rotational speeds and low tank levels, a surface vortex can reach the agitator blades and allow air to be drawn into the solid-fluid mixing zone. This is not desirable in terms of mixing performance. The analysis results show that the lowest liquid level among the four considered, 4.5 inches, is higher than the critical liquid height for air entrainment for agitator speeds up to 600 rpm. All the analysis results demonstrate that about 600 rpm provides adequate solids mixing capability for various tank levels (12, 8.5, 7, and 4.5 inches) containing 20-micron solids with a specific gravity of 2.5.

  2. Rapid sedation induced by fentanyl combined with propofol via an intrathecal chemotherapy injection for leukemia in children.

    PubMed

    Tian, X; Yang, Y-H; Wei, H-Y; Lao, J-Q; Wang, H-P; Tian, Y-Y

    2015-04-17

    This study explored the sedative and analgesic effects of fentanyl combined with propofol via an intrathecal chemotherapy injection for acute leukemia (acute lymphocytic leukemia or acute myelocytic leukemia) among children, to relieve pain and difficulty during intrathecal injection, improve treatment compliance, increase the success rate of single puncture, and reduce procedure failure, with the aim of developing a painless procedure for children with acute leukemia. Fifty person-times received fentanyl combined with propofol via an intrathecal chemotherapy injection among the hospitalized children with leukemia. The patients' cooperation with the procedure, response to the medication, dosages of fentanyl and propofol, reaction to the procedures, wake-up time, and changes in oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate (HR), respiration, and blood pressure (BP) before, during, and after the procedures were observed. The doctors who performed the procedures assessed the quality of sedation and analgesia. In the treatment group, the patients were quiet during the lumbar puncture and intrathecal injection, showing good sedation and analgesia. HR and respiration decreased slightly. There were no changes in SpO2 and BP. No obvious respiratory depression occurred with proper dosages. Only a few patients showed stertorous respiration, which stopped soon after the procedures. In the control group, the patients were agitated, crying, and not cooperative before and during the procedures, which made the procedures very difficult. During intrathecal injection, pain obviously reduced and the success rate of single lumbar puncture increased. It is safe and effective to apply fentanyl combined with propofol for sedation and analgesia.

  3. Chem I Supplement: Some Biochemistry of Sedatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Antianxiety agents are discussed in terms of their effects on the brain and central nervous system. Formulas for some substances, commonly prescribed as sedatives, are given. Includes a discussion on the toxicity and side effects of the drugs. (SA)

  4. Pediatric oral conscious sedation: changes to come.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Reggiardo, P

    1999-11-01

    Recent media attention has focused the public's attention on issues surrounding pediatric oral conscious sedation. Under a law passed in 1998 and taking affect on Jan. 1, 2000, California dentists will be subject to certification and procedural provisions designed to ensure the educational qualification of the provider and the standards under which the procedure is performed. This article discusses the history of concern and regulation regarding sedation of children in the dental office.

  5. Delirium and sedation in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jennifer A

    2011-06-01

    Delirium is defined by a fluctuating level of attentiveness and has been associated with increased ICU mortality and poor cognitive outcomes in both general ICU and neurocritical care populations. Sedation use in the ICU can contribute to delirium. Limiting ICU sedation allows for the diagnosis of underlying acute neurological insults associated with delirium and leads to shorter mechanical ventilation time, shorter length of stay, and improved 1 year mortality rates. Identifying the underlying etiology of delirium is critical to developing treatment paradigms.

  6. Dispersal of Aspergillus fumigatus from Sewage Sludge Compost Piles Subjected to Mechanical Agitation in Open Air

    PubMed Central

    Millner, Patricia D.; Bassett, David A.; Marsh, Paul B.

    1980-01-01

    Aerosolization of the thermophilous fungal opportunist Aspergillus fumigatus from mechanically agitated compost piles was examined at a pilot-scale sewage sludge composting facility and two other selected test sites. Aerosols of A. fumigatus downwind from stationary compost piles were insignificant in comparison with those downwind from agitated piles. These aerosols were generated by a front-end loader moving and dropping compost. Aerial concentrations of the fungus at distances downwind from the point of emission were used to determine an emission rate for A. fumigatus associated with the moving operations. The maximum emission rate, 4.6 × 106A. fumigatus particles per s, was used to calculate predicted concentrations in an unobstructed plume with restrictive, neutral, and dispersive atmospheric mixing conditions up to 1 km downwind from the emission source. PMID:16345563

  7. Monitoring sedation levels by EEG spectral analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, M. J.; Preece, A. W.; Green, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time electroencephalographic power spectra were obtained for a group of 37 volunteers undergoing sedation with enflurane at different concentrations in air. In part one, 17 subjects were given 0.5%, 0.75%, and 1.0% for 4 min at each level, and recovery after 5 min was assessed by the Trieger method. There was considerable variation in subject response to the different doses, but adequate sedation was indicated by the presence of a strong alpha rhythm (9-11 Hz) and suppression of frequencies below 5 Hz. Overdose was indicated by an initial shift in the alpha frequency to a lower value (6-7 Hz) followed by the appearance of delta waves (0.5-4 Hz) and loss of alpha waves. In part two, 20 volunteers inhaled enflurane at 0.5% for 10 min to allow adequate absorption, followed by a 10-min recovery period. Equal numbers showed sedation or a failure to respond to enflurane at this concentration. In the responders, sedation was accompanied by a marked shift in the ratio of the power in two frequency bands: 1-4 Hz and 8-12 Hz. Progress of the frequency band power ratio followed closely the state of the subject into sedation, overdose, and recovery. This measure was further improved by the use of multivariate analysis, which showed good discrimination of the alert, sedated, and overdosed states of the subject. PMID:1842161

  8. Rectal Thiopental versus Intramuscular Ketamine in Pediatric Procedural Sedation and Analgesia; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Azizkhani, Reza; Esmailian, Mehrdad; shojaei, Azadeh; Golshani, Keihan

    2015-01-01

    =1, 58; F=6.58; P=0.013) was significantly higher in ketamine group. Conclusion: The findings of the present study show that Although the recovery time from sedation by ketamine is more than sodium thiopental, it’s fast-acting function without effecting on the oxygen saturation level causes that ketamine is considered as the better choice for induction of sedation in pediatric patients need laceration repair. In addition, long-term effect of ketamine provides more time for the physician to do the procedure and this issue decreases the need probability to the repeated-dose. However, effectiveness of both drugs to decrease the agitation was equal, based on the Ramsey score. PMID:26512365

  9. Usefulness of applying lidocaine in esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed under sedation with propofol

    PubMed Central

    de la Morena, Felipe; Santander, Cecilio; Esteban, Carlos; de Cuenca, Beatriz; García, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Javier; Moreno, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether topical lidocaine benefits esophagogastroduoduenoscopy (EGD) by decreasing propofol dose necessary for sedation or procedure-related complications. METHODS: The study was designed as a prospective, single centre, double blind, randomised clinical trial and was conducted in 2012 between January and May (NCT01489891). Consecutive patients undergoing EGD were randomly assigned to receive supplemental topical lidocaine (L; 50 mg in an excipient solution which was applied as a spray to the oropharynx) or placebo (P; taste excipients solution without active substance, similarly delivered) prior to the standard propofol sedation procedure. The propofol was administered as a bolus intravenous (iv) dose, with patients in the L and P groups receiving initial doses based on the patient’s American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) classification (ASA I-II: 0.50-0.60 mg/kg; ASA III-IV: 0.25-0.35 mg/kg), followed by 10-20 mg iv dose every 30-60 s at the anaesthetist’s discretion. Vital signs, anthropometric measurements, amount of propofol administered, sedation level reached, examination time, and the subjective assessments of the endoscopist’s and anaesthetist’s satisfaction (based upon a four point Likert scale) were recorded. All statistical tests were performed by the Stata statistical software suite (Release 11, 2009; StataCorp, LP, College Station, TX, United States). RESULTS: No significant differences were found between the groups treated with lidocaine or placebo in terms of total propofol dose (310.7 ± 139.2 mg/kg per minute vs 280.1 ± 87.7 mg/kg per minute, P = 0.15) or intraprocedural propofol dose (135.3 ± 151.7 mg/kg per minute vs 122.7 ± 96.5 mg/kg per minute, P = 0.58). Only when the L and P groups were analysed with the particular subgroups of female, < 65-year-old, and lower anaesthetic risk level (ASA I-II) was a statistically significant difference found (L: 336.5 ± 141.2 mg/kg per minute vs P: 284.6 ± 91.2 mg

  10. Laparoscopic Salpingo-oophorectomy in Conscious Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Bramante, Silvia; Conti, Fiorella; Rizzi, Maria; Frattari, Antonella; Spina, Tullio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Conscious sedation has traditionally been used for laparoscopic tubal ligation. General anesthesia with endotracheal intubation may be associated with side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, cough, and dizziness, whereas sedation offers the advantage of having the patient awake and breathing spontaneously. Until now, only diagnostic laparoscopy and minor surgical procedures have been performed in patients under conscious sedation. Case Description: Our report describes 5 cases of laparoscopic salpingo-oophorectomy successfully performed with the aid of conventional-diameter multifunctional instruments in patients under local anesthesia. Totally intravenous sedation was provided by the continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil, administered through a workstation that uses pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic models to titrate each drug, as well as monitoring tools for levels of conscious sedation and local anesthesia. We have labelled our current procedure with the acronym OLICS (Operative Laparoscopy in Conscious Sedation). Four of the patients had mono- or bilateral ovarian cysts and 1 patient, with the BRCA1 gene mutation and a family history of ovarian cancer, had normal ovaries. Insufflation time ranged from 19 to 25 minutes. All patients maintained spontaneous breathing throughout the surgical procedure, and no episodes of hypotension or bradycardia occurred. Optimal pain control was obtained in all cases. During the hospital stay, the patients did not need further analgesic drugs. All the women reported high or very high satisfaction and were discharged within 18 hours of the procedure. Discussion and Conclusion: Salpingo-oophorectomy in conscious sedation is safe and feasible and avoids the complications of general anesthesia. It can be offered to well-motivated patients without a history of pelvic surgery and low to normal body mass index. PMID:26175550

  11. Efficacy of oral ketamine compared to midazolam for sedation of children undergoing laceration repair

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Orit; Barkan, Shiri; Breitbart, Rachelle; Berkovitch, Sofia; Toledano, Michal; Weiser, Giora; Karadi, Natali; Nassi, Anat; Kozer, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the efficacy of oral ketamine versus oral midazolam for sedation during laceration repair at a pediatric emergency department. Methods: Children between 1 and 10 years requiring laceration repair were randomly assigned to 2 groups, treated either with oral midazolam (0.7 mg/kg) or with oral ketamine (5 mg/kg). Main outcomes measured were level of pain during local anesthesia, as assessed by the parent on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) and the number of children who required intravenous sedation. Secondary outcomes included VAS by physician, pain assessment by child, maximal sedation depth assessed by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale, time until University of Michigan Sedation Scale 2 or more, general satisfaction of a parent and treating physician, length of procedure, total sedation time, and the incidence of any adverse events. Results: Sixty-eight children were recruited of which 33 were girls. Average age was 5.08 ± 2.14 years. Thirty-seven children were treated with ketamine and 31 with midazolam. Parent-assessed VAS in ketamine treated patients was 5.07 ± 0.75 compared with 3.68 ± 0.7 in midazolam treated patients [mean difference = 1.39 95% confidence interval (CI) –0.47 to 3.26]. Twelve (32%) of the children treated with ketamine required the addition of IV sedation compared to only 2 children (6%) of the children treated with midazolam [odds ratio (adjusted for age and gender) 6.1, 95% CI: 1.2 to 30.5]. The rest of the measured variables were similar between the groups, with no statistical significance. Discussion: No difference in the level of pain was found between ketamine and midazolam treated patients. Compared with oral midazolam (0.7 mg/kg), oral ketamine (5 mg/kg) was associated with higher rates of sedation failure, and thus is not recommended as a single agent for oral sedation in children requiring laceration repair. PMID:27368000

  12. Bispectral index as a predictor of sedation depth during isoflurane or midazolam sedation in ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Sackey, P V; Radell, P J; Granath, F; Martling, C R

    2007-06-01

    Bispectral index (BIS) is used for monitoring anaesthetic depth with inhaled anaesthetic agents in the operating room but has not been evaluated as a monitor of sedation depth in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting with these agents. If BIS could predict sedation depth in ICU patients, patient disturbances could be reduced and oversedation avoided. Twenty ventilator-dependent ICU patients aged 27 to 80 years were randomised to sedation with isoflurane via the AnaConDa or intravenous midazolam. BIS (A-2000 XP, version 3.12), electromyogram activity (EMG) and Signal Quality Index were measured continuously. Hourly clinical evaluation of sedation depth according to Bloomsbury Sedation Score (Bloomsbury) was performed. The median BIS value during a 10-minute interval prior to the clinical evaluation at the bedside was compared with Bloomsbury. Nurses performing the clinical sedation scoring were blinded to the BIS values. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was measured and compared with Bloomsbury. Correlation was poor between BIS and Bloomsbury in both groups (Spearman's rho 0.012 in the isoflurane group and -0.057 in the midazolam group). Strong correlation was found between BIS and EMG (Spearman's rho 0.74). Significant correlation was found between end-tidal isoflurane concentration and Bloomsbury (Spearman's rho 0.47). In conclusion, BIS XP does not reliably predict sedation depth as measured by clinical evaluation in non-paralysed ICU patients sedated with isoflurane or midazolam. EMG contributes significantly to BIS values in isoflurane or midazolam sedated, non-paralysed ICU patients. End-tidal isoflurane concentration appeared to be a better indicator of clinical sedation depth than BIS.

  13. Computer-assisted personalized sedation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Subhas; Desilets, David; Diehl, David L; Farraye, Francis A; Kaul, Vivek; Kethu, Sripathi R; Kwon, Richard S; Mamula, Petar; Pedrosa, Marcos C; Rodriguez, Sarah A; Song, Louis-Michel Wong Kee; Tierney, William M

    2011-03-01

    The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) Technology Committee provides reviews of new or emerging endoscopic technologies that have the potential to have an impact on the practice of GI endoscopy. Evidence-based methodology is used, with a MEDLINE literature search to identify pertinent preclinical and clinical studies on the topic, and a MAUDE (Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience; U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health) database search to identify the reported complications of a given technology. Both are supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed and by scrutinizing pertinent references cited by the identified studies. Controlled clinical trials are emphasized but, in many cases, data from randomized, controlled trials are lacking. In such cases, large case series, preliminary clinical studies, and expert opinions are used. Technical data are gathered from traditional and Web-based publications, proprietary publications, and informal communications with pertinent vendors. For this review, the MEDLINE database was searched through January 2010 using the keywords "computer," "computerized," "computer-assisted," "sedation," "propofol." Reports on Emerging Technology are drafted by 1 or 2 members of the ASGE Technology Committee, reviewed and edited by the committee as a whole, and approved by the Governing Board of the ASGE. These reports are scientific reviews provided solely for educational and informational purposes. Reports on Emerging Technology are not rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment or payment for such treatment.

  14. Helically agitated mixing in dry dilute acid pretreatment enhances the bioconversion of corn stover into ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dry dilute acid pretreatment at extremely high solids loading of lignocellulose materials demonstrated promising advantages of no waste water generation, less sugar loss, and low steam consumption while maintaining high hydrolysis yield. However, the routine pretreatment reactor without mixing apparatus was found not suitable for dry pretreatment operation because of poor mixing and mass transfer. In this study, helically agitated mixing was introduced into the dry dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover and its effect on pretreatment efficiency, inhibitor generation, sugar production, and bioconversion efficiency through simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation (SSF) were evaluated. Results The overall cellulose conversion taking account of cellulose loss in pretreatment was used to evaluate the efficiency of pretreatment. The two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model on dry pretreatment was established and applied to analyze the mixing mechanism. The results showed that the pretreatment efficiency was significantly improved and the inhibitor generation was reduced by the helically agitated mixing, compared to the dry pretreatment without mixing: the ethanol titer and yield from cellulose in the SSF reached 56.20 g/L and 69.43% at the 30% solids loading and 15 FPU/DM cellulase dosage, respectively, corresponding to a 26.5% increase in ethanol titer and 17.2% increase in ethanol yield at the same fermentation conditions. Conclusions The advantage of helically agitated mixing may provide a prototype of dry dilute acid pretreatment processing for future commercial-scale production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:24387051

  15. Sedation and Monitoring in the Pediatric Patient during Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun Kee; Lightdale, Jenifer R

    2016-07-01

    Sedation is a fundamental component of pediatric gastrointestinal procedures. The 2 main types of sedation for pediatric endoscopy remain general anesthesia and procedural sedation. Although anesthesiologist-administered sedation protocols are more common, there is no ideal regimen for endoscopy in children. This article discusses specific levels of sedation for endoscopy as well as various regimens that can be used to achieve each. Risks and considerations that may be specific to performing gastrointestinal procedures in children are reviewed. Finally, potential future directions for sedation and monitoring that may change the practice of pediatric gastroenterology and ultimately patient outcomes are examined.

  16. [Echocardiographic reference ranges of sedated cats].

    PubMed

    Dümmel, C; Neu, H; Hüttig, A; Failing, K

    1996-04-01

    The aim of this study was to get echocardiographic values of sedated healthy cats of the race European short hair for further reference. After the preliminary examinations checking on the state of health (anamnesis, general and special clinical examinations, ECG, X-ray of thorax and preparation of selected laboratory parameters), 74 sedated animals and additionally 33 cats without sedation were echocardiographically measured. For sedatives we used ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine in order to minimize defending movements of the animals and to reduce the heart rate, which facilitated the echocardiographical measurements. The covariance analysis of the measured values showed a statistically significant dependence on the weight. This did not hold for the two calculated values of the fractional shortening (FS) and the quotient of left atrium and aorta (LA/Ao), where the weight-dependence of each component was compensated by the calculation of the quotient. All stated weight-dependent reference values refer to an average bodyweight of 4.0 kg. A dependence on the age did not show in the covariance analysis. Due to the sedation, the diameter of the left atrium (LA) and the diameter of the left ventricular lumen in the diastole (LVDd) as well as the fractional shortening decreased significantly.

  17. Ketamine Sedation in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Ayman E.; Baroudy, Nevine R. El; Refay, Amira S. El

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Moderate sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy has traditionally been provided by the endoscopist. Controversy has ensued over safe and efficient sedation practice as endoscopy has increased in numbers and complexity. AIM: To evaluate the safety of ketamine sedation given by non-anesthesiologist during gastrointestinal endoscopy in children. METHODS: A prospective study of 100 paediatric patients with gastrointestinal symptoms who were a candidate for upper or lower gastrointestinal endoscopy in paediatric endoscopy unit at Abo El-Reesh Paediatric Hospital, Cairo University. All children were > 2 years old and weighed > 6 kg. The analysis was performed in terms of sedation-related complications. RESULTS: A total 100 paediatric patients including 53 males and 47 females with mean age of 5.04 years were involved in the study. All children were medicated with ketamine with a mean dose of 3.77mg/kg. No complications occurred in 87% of cases. Desaturation occurred in 13% of the cases and was reversible by supplemental nasal oxygen. Desaturation was more frequent during Upper GI Endoscopy and with the intramuscular route (p value=0.049). No apnea, bradycardia, arrest or emergence reactions were recorded. CONCLUSION: Ketamine sedation found to be safe for paediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy in Egyptian children without co-morbidities. Transient Hypoxia (13%) may occur but easily reversed by nasal oxygen therapy. PMID:27703561

  18. [AWAKE CRANIOTOMY: IN SEARCH FOR OPTIMAL SEDATION].

    PubMed

    Kulikova, A S; Sel'kov, D A; Kobyakov, G L; Shmigel'skiy, A V; Lubnin, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is a "gold standard"for intraoperative brain language mapping. One of the main anesthetic challenge of awake craniotomy is providing of optimal sedation for initial stages of intervention. The goal of this study was comparison of different technics of anesthesia for awake craniotomy. Materials and methods: 162 operations were divided in 4 groups: 76 cases with propofol sedation (2-4mg/kg/h) without airway protection; 11 cases with propofol sedation (4-5 mg/kg/h) with MV via LMA; 36 cases of xenon anesthesia; and 39 cases with dexmedetomidine sedation without airway protection. Results and discussion: brain language mapping was successful in 90% of cases. There was no difference between groups in successfulness of brain mapping. However in the first group respiratory complications were more frequent. Three other technics were more safer Xenon anesthesia was associated with ultrafast awakening for mapping (5±1 min). Dexmedetomidine sedation provided high hemodynamic and respiratory stability during the procedure.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound sedation in the United Kingdom: Is life without propofol tolerable?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jennifer Anne; Irvine, Andrew James; Hopper, Andrew Derek

    2017-01-21

    There is compelling evidence to support the quality, cost effectiveness and safety profile of non-anesthesiologist-administered propofol for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). However in the United Kingdom, it is recommended that the administration and monitoring of propofol sedation for endoscopic procedures should be the responsibility of a dedicated and appropriately trained anaesthetist only. The majority of United Kingdom EUS procedures are performed with opiate and benzodiazepine sedation rather than anaesthetist led propofol lists due to anaesthetist resource availability. We sought to prospectively determine the tolerability and safety of EUS with benzodiazepine and opiate sedation in single United Kingdom centre. Two hundred consecutive patients undergoing either EUS or oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) with conscious sedation were prospectively recruited with a 1:1 enrolment ratio. Patients completed questionnaires pre and post procedure detailing anticipated and actual pain experienced on a 1-10 visual analogue scale. Demographics, procedure duration, sedation doses and willingness to repeat the procedure were also recorded. EUS procedures lasted significantly longer than OGDs (15 min vs 6 min, P < 0.0001), however, there was no difference in anticipated pain scores between the groups (EUS 3.37/10 vs OGD 3.47/10, P = 0.46). Pain scores indicated EUS was better tolerated than OGD (1.16/10 vs 1.88/10, P = 0.03) although higher doses of sedation were used for EUS procedures. There were no complications identified in either group. We feel our study demonstrates that the tolerability of EUS with opiate and benzodiazepine sedation is acceptable.

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound sedation in the United Kingdom: Is life without propofol tolerable?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jennifer Anne; Irvine, Andrew James; Hopper, Andrew Derek

    2017-01-01

    There is compelling evidence to support the quality, cost effectiveness and safety profile of non-anesthesiologist-administered propofol for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). However in the United Kingdom, it is recommended that the administration and monitoring of propofol sedation for endoscopic procedures should be the responsibility of a dedicated and appropriately trained anaesthetist only. The majority of United Kingdom EUS procedures are performed with opiate and benzodiazepine sedation rather than anaesthetist led propofol lists due to anaesthetist resource availability. We sought to prospectively determine the tolerability and safety of EUS with benzodiazepine and opiate sedation in single United Kingdom centre. Two hundred consecutive patients undergoing either EUS or oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) with conscious sedation were prospectively recruited with a 1:1 enrolment ratio. Patients completed questionnaires pre and post procedure detailing anticipated and actual pain experienced on a 1-10 visual analogue scale. Demographics, procedure duration, sedation doses and willingness to repeat the procedure were also recorded. EUS procedures lasted significantly longer than OGDs (15 min vs 6 min, P < 0.0001), however, there was no difference in anticipated pain scores between the groups (EUS 3.37/10 vs OGD 3.47/10, P = 0.46). Pain scores indicated EUS was better tolerated than OGD (1.16/10 vs 1.88/10, P = 0.03) although higher doses of sedation were used for EUS procedures. There were no complications identified in either group. We feel our study demonstrates that the tolerability of EUS with opiate and benzodiazepine sedation is acceptable. PMID:28210094

  1. Clinical recovery time from conscious sedation for dental outpatients.

    PubMed Central

    Takarada, Tohru; Kawahara, Michio; Irifune, Masahiro; Endo, Chie; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Maeoka, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Chikako; Katayama, Sotaro

    2002-01-01

    For dental outpatients undergoing conscious sedation, recovery from sedation must be sufficient to allow safe discharge home, and many researchers have defined "recovery time" as the time until the patient was permitted to return home after the end of dental treatment. But it is frequently observed that patients remain in the clinic after receiving permission to go home. The present study investigated "clinical recovery time," which is defined as the time until discharge from the clinic after a dental procedure. We analyzed data from 61 outpatients who had received dental treatment under conscious sedation at the Hiroshima University Dental Hospital between January 1998 and December 2000 (nitrous oxide-oxygen inhalation sedation [n = 35], intravenous sedation with midazolam [n = 10], intravenous sedation with propofol [n = 16]). We found that the median clinical recovery time was 40 minutes after nitrous oxide-oxygen sedation, 80 minutes after midazolam sedation, and 52 minutes after propofol sedation. The clinical recovery time was about twice as long as the recovery time described in previous studies. In a comparison of the sedation methods, clinical recovery time differed (P = .0008), being longer in the midazolam sedation group than in the nitrous oxide-oxygen sedation group (P = .018). These results suggest the need for changes in treatment planning for dental outpatients undergoing conscious sedation. PMID:12779113

  2. Effect of thermal agitation on the switching field distributions of CoPtCr-SiO2 perpendicular recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimatsu, T.; Kondo, T.; Mitsuzuka, K.; Watanabe, S.; Aoi, H.; Muraoka, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2006-04-01

    The effect of thermal agitations on the switching field distribution (SFD) of CoPtCr-SiO2 perpendicular media was investigated. Dc demagnetizing (DCD) magnetization curves and minor dc demagnetizing (M-DCD) magnetization curves were measured at applied field sweep rates of ~10 and ~108 Oe/s. We estimated the SFD from the difference between the DCD and M-DCD curves, and defined them as ΔHr/Hr (at ~10 Oe/s) and ΔHrP/HrP (at ~108 Oe/s). The values of ΔHrP/HrP were found to be 60%-70% of ΔHr/Hr. The difference between ΔHrP/HrP and ΔHr/Hr should be caused by thermal agitation of the magnetization. The influence of the distribution of the thermal agitation on SFD was calculated using the distribution of the grain volumes. It is concluded that the SFD measured at vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM) time scales is significantly influenced by thermal agitation of the magnetization, and reduction of the grain size distribution is the most effective way to reduce the SFD at VSM time scales.

  3. Application of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs to large agitators

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.E.; Anderson, T.D. ); Bethmann, H.K. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the basis for and implementation of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs for large tank-mounted agitators. This modification to the original design was intended to minimize maintenance personnel exposure to ionizing radiation and also provide for disassembly capability without damage to shafts or hubs. In addition to realizing these objectives, test confirmed that the modified couplings reduced agitator shaft end runouts approximately 65%, thereby reducing bearing loads and increasing service life, a significant enhancement for a nuclear facility. 5 refs.

  4. Application of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs to large agitators

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.E.; Anderson, T.D.; Bethmann, H.K.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the basis for and implementation of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs for large tank-mounted agitators. This modification to the original design was intended to minimize maintenance personnel exposure to ionizing radiation and also provide for disassembly capability without damage to shafts or hubs. In addition to realizing these objectives, test confirmed that the modified couplings reduced agitator shaft end runouts approximately 65%, thereby reducing bearing loads and increasing service life, a significant enhancement for a nuclear facility. 5 refs.

  5. Coal storage hopper with vibrating-screen agitator

    DOEpatents

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1982-04-27

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyer mechanism. The vibrating scrren agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  6. Local Anesthesia Versus Local Anesthesia and Conscious Sedation for Inguinal Hernioplasty: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toppin, Patrick J; Reid, Marvin; Plummer, Joseph M; Roberts, Patrick O; Harding-Goldson, Hyacinth; McFarlane, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    Background Conscious sedation is regularly used in ambulatory surgery to improve patient outcomes, in particular patient satisfaction. Reports suggest that the addition of conscious sedation to local anesthesia for inguinal hernioplasty is safe and effective in improving patient satisfaction. No previous randomized controlled trial has assessed the benefit of conscious sedation in this regard. Objective To determine whether the addition of conscious sedation to local anesthesia improves patient satisfaction with inguinal hernioplasty. Methods This trial is designed as a single-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded trial of 148 patients. Adult patients diagnosed with a reducible, unilateral inguinal hernia eligible for hernioplasty using local anesthesia will be recruited. The intervention will be the use of intravenous midazolam for conscious sedation. Normal saline will be used as placebo in the control group. The primary outcome will be patient satisfaction, measured using the validated Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale. Secondary outcomes will include intra- and postoperative pain, operative time, volumes of sedative agent and local anesthetic used, time to discharge, early and late complications, and postoperative functional status. Results To date, 171 patients have been recruited. Surgery has been performed on 149 patients, meeting the sample size requirements. Follow-up assessments are still ongoing. Trial completion is expected in August 2017. Conclusions This randomized controlled trial is the first to assess the effectiveness of conscious sedation in improving patient satisfaction with inguinal hernioplasty using local anesthesia. If the results demonstrate improved patient satisfaction with conscious sedation, this would support routine incorporation of conscious sedation in local inguinal hernioplasty and potentially influence national and international hernia surgery guidelines. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02444260; https

  7. Sedation protocols versus daily sedation interruption: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nassar Junior, Antonio Paulo; Park, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to systematically review studies that compared a mild target sedation protocol with daily sedation interruption and to perform a meta-analysis with the data presented in these studies. Methods We searched Medline, Scopus and Web of Science databases to identify randomized clinical trials comparing sedation protocols with daily sedation interruption in critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. The primary outcome was mortality in the intensive care unit. Results Seven studies were included, with a total of 892 patients. Mortality in the intensive care unit did not differ between the sedation protocol and daily sedation interruption groups (odds ratio [OR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60 - 1.10; I2 = 0%). Hospital mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay did not differ between the groups either. Sedation protocols were associated with an increase in the number of days free of mechanical ventilation (mean difference = 6.70 days; 95%CI 1.09 - 12.31 days; I2 = 87.2%) and a shorter duration of hospital length of stay (mean difference = -5.05 days, 95%CI -9.98 - -0.11 days; I2 = 69%). There were no differences in regard to accidental extubation, extubation failure and the occurrence of delirium. Conclusion Sedation protocols and daily sedation interruption do not appear to differ in regard to the majority of analyzed outcomes. The only differences found were small and had a high degree of heterogeneity. PMID:28099642

  8. [New technical developments for inhaled sedation].

    PubMed

    Meiser, A; Bomberg, H; Volk, T; Groesdonk, H V

    2017-01-31

    The circle system has been in use for more than 100 years, whereas the first clinical application of an anaesthetic reflector was reported just 15 years ago. In the circle system, all breathing gas is rebreathed after carbon dioxide absorption. A reflector, on the other hand, with the breathing gas flowing to and fro, specifically retains the anaesthetic during expiration and resupplies it during the next inspiration. A high reflection efficiency (number of molecules resupplied/number of molecules exhaled, RE 80-90%) decreases consumption. In analogy to the fresh gas flow of a circle system, pulmonary clearance ((1-RE) × minute ventilation) defines the opposition between consumption and control of the concentration.It was not until reflection systems became available that volatile anaesthetics were used routinely in some intensive care units. Their advantages, such as easy handling, and better ventilatory capabilities of intensive care versus anaesthesia ventilators, were basic preconditions for this. Apart from AnaConDa™ (Sedana Medical, Uppsala, Sweden), the new MIRUS™ system (Pall Medical, Dreieich, Germany) represents a second, more sophisticated commercially available system.Organ protective effects, excellent control of sedation, and dose-dependent deep sedation while preserving spontaneous breathing with hardly any accumulation or induction of tolerance, make volatile anaesthetics an interesting alternative, especially for patients needing deep sedation or when intravenous drugs are no longer efficacious.But obviously, the outcome is most important. We know that deep intravenous sedation increases mortality, whereas inhalational sedation could prove beneficial. We now need prospective clinical trials examining mortality, but also the psychological outcome of those most critically ill patients sedated by inhalation or intravenously.

  9. Case of Vasovagal Syncope With Asystole Associated With Propofol Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Fujii-Abe, Keiko; Uriu, Kazutaka; Kawahara, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Few cases of bradycardic complications occurring under intravenous sedation have been reported. Here, we report a case of vasovagal syncope with asystole (7.2 seconds) associated with propofol sedation. PMID:26650494

  10. Field Sedation and Anesthesia of Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Seddighi, Reza; Doherty, Thomas J

    2016-11-01

    Many surgical procedures on ruminants can be performed humanely and safely using local or regional anesthesia and physical restraint, but sedation and general anesthesia are necessary in order to perform some procedures. Although anesthesia-associated risks are greater in ruminants than monogastrics, ruminants can be anesthetized relatively safely in a field setting if the risks are understood, and adequate planning and precautions are in place. This article discusses the important features impacting sedation and anesthesia of cattle and small ruminants, and describes some commonly used drug protocols.

  11. Quality of life following third molar removal under conscious sedation

    PubMed Central

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess quality of life (QoL) and degree of satisfaction among outpatients subjected to surgical extraction of all four third molars under conscious sedation. A second objective was to describe the evolution of self-reported pain measured in a visual analogue scale (VAS) in the 7 days after extraction. Study design: Fifty patients received a questionnaire assessing social isolation, working isolation, eating and speaking ability, diet modifications, sleep impairment, changes in physical appearance, discomfort at suture removal and overall satisfaction at days 4 and 7 after surgery. Pain was recorded by patients on a 100-mm pain visual analogue scale (VAS) every day after extraction until day 7. Results: Thirty-nine patients fulfilled correctly the questionnaire. Postoperative pain values suffered small fluctuations until day 5 (range: 23 to 33 mm in a 100-mm VAS), when dicreased significantly. A positive association was observed between difficult ranked surgeries and higher postoperative pain levels. The average number of days for which the patient stopped working was 4.9. Conclusion: The removal of all third molars in a single appointment causes an important deterioration of the patient’s QoL during the first postoperative week, especially due to local pain and eating discomfort. Key words:Third molar removal, quality of life, sedation. PMID:22926461

  12. Evaluation of the SEDline to improve the safety and efficiency of conscious sedation

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Thomas D.; Rossmann, Jeffrey A.; Beach, M. Miles; Griffiths, Garth R.; Meyrat, Benjamin; Barnes, James B.; Kerns, David G.; Crump, Brad; Bookatz, Barnett; Ezzo, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Brain function monitors have improved safety and efficiency in general anesthesia; however, they have not been adequately tested for guiding conscious sedation for periodontal surgical procedures. This study evaluated the patient state index (PSI) obtained from the SEDline monitor (Sedline Inc., San Diego, CA) to determine its capacity to improve the safety and efficiency of intravenous conscious sedation during outpatient periodontal surgery. Twenty-one patients at the periodontics clinic of Baylor College of Dentistry were admitted to the study in 2009 and sedated to a moderate level using midazolam and fentanyl during periodontal surgery. The PSI monitoring was blinded from the clinician, and the following data were collected: vital signs, Ramsay sedation scale (RSS), medications administered, adverse events, PSI, electroencephalography, and the patients' perspective through visual analogue scales. The data were correlated to evaluate the PSI's ability to assess the level of sedation. Results showed that the RSS and PSI did not correlate (r = −0.25) unless high values associated with electromyographical (EMG) activity were corrected (r = −0.47). Oxygen desaturation did not correlate with the PSI (r = −0.08). Satisfaction (r = −0.57) and amnesia (r = −0.55) both increased as the average PSI decreased. In conclusion, within the limits of this study, PSI appears to correlate with amnesia, allowing a practitioner to titrate medications to that effect. It did not provide advance warning of adverse events and had inherent inaccuracies due to EMG activity during oral surgery. The PSI has the potential to increase safety and efficiency in conscious sedation but requires further development to eliminate EMG activity from confounding the score. PMID:21738291

  13. Inhaled linalool-induced sedation in mice.

    PubMed

    Linck, Viviane Moura; da Silva, Adriana Lourenço; Figueiró, Micheli; Piato, Angelo Luis; Herrmann, Ana Paula; Dupont Birck, Franciele; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Nunes, Domingos Sávio; Moreno, Paulo Roberto H; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2009-04-01

    Linalool is a monoterpene often found as a major component of essential oils obtained from aromatic plant species, many of which are used in traditional medical systems as hypno-sedatives. Psychopharmacological evaluations of linalool (i.p. and i.c.v.) revealed marked sedative and anticonvulsant central effects in various mouse models. Considering this profile and alleged effects of inhaled lavender essential oil, the purpose of this study was to examine the sedative effects of inhaled linalool in mice. Mice were placed in an inhalation chamber during 60 min, in an atmosphere saturated with 1% or 3% linalool. Immediately after inhalation, animals were evaluated regarding locomotion, barbiturate-induced sleeping time, body temperature and motor coordination (rota-rod test). The 1% and 3% linalool increased (p<0.01) pentobarbital sleeping time and reduced (p<0.01) body temperature. The 3% linalool decreased (p<0.01) locomotion. Motor coordination was not affected. Hence, linalool inhaled for 1h seems to induce sedation without significant impairment in motor abilities, a side effect shared by most psycholeptic drugs.

  14. Respiratory Monitoring for Anesthesia and Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jay A.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the theory and practice of routine respiratory monitoring during anesthesia and sedation. Oxygen monitoring and capnography methods are reviewed. The current ventilation monitoring system of choice is considered a combination of the pulse oximeter and capnography. Guidelines are provided for monitoring standards. PMID:3326430

  15. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques.

  16. Sedation/anaesthesia in paediatric radiology

    PubMed Central

    Arlachov, Y; Ganatra, R H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In this article we will give a comprehensive literature review on sedation/general anaesthesia (S/GA) and discuss the international variations in practice and options available for S/GA for imaging children. Methods The key articles were obtained primarily from PubMed, MEDLINE, ERIC, NHS Evidence and The Cochrane Library. Results Recently, paediatric radiology has seen a surge of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, some of which require children to be still and compliant for up to 1 h. It is difficult and sometimes even impossible to obtain quick and high-quality images without employing sedating techniques in certain children. As with any medical procedure, S/GA in radiological practice is not without risks and can have potentially disastrous consequences if mismanaged. In order to reduce any complications and practice safety in radiological units, it is imperative to carry out pre-sedation assessments of children, obtain parental/guardian consent, monitor them closely before, during and after the procedure and have adequate equipment, a safe environment and a well-trained personnel. Conclusion Although the S/GA techniques, sedative drugs and personnel involved vary from country to country, the ultimate goal of S/GA in radiology remains the same; namely, to provide safety and comfort for the patients. Advances in knowledge Imaging children under general anaesthesia is becoming routine and preferred by operators because it ensures patient conformity and provides a more controlled environment. PMID:22898157

  17. [Midazolam sedation in the general dental practice].

    PubMed

    Bertens, J; Abraham-Inpijn, L; Meuwissen, P J

    1994-03-01

    The general dental practitioner is occasionally confronted with patients who, on the basis of psychological--and often somatic--criteria, are difficult to treat. Medicinal sedation in combination with anxiety reduction may be deemed appropriate for such patients. In the Netherlands inhalation sedation by means of a combination of oxygen and nitrous oxide is generally used. The limitations and disadvantages of this method have directed attention towards sedation by means of midazolam, a quick-acting benzodiazepine. In view of the complications which may accompany the administration of midazolam, the general practitioner working alone or in a group practice is advised against using midazolam sedation. Such use should be reserved for a dentist working in a hospital setting, who is able to consult with a physician regarding the advisability of administering midazolam. Even then, the safety of the patient requires that the practitioners have a proper insight into the physical state of the patient, work according to a protocol and in accordance with clearly defined responsibilities, and provide adequate accommodation during and after treatment.

  18. Nitrous oxide sedation and sexual phenomena.

    PubMed

    Jastak, J T; Malamed, S F

    1980-07-01

    Nine cases of sexual phenomena that occurred with use of nitrous oxide and oxygen sedation are described. Dentists involved routinely used concentrations of nitrous oxide greater than 50% and did not have assistants in the room during dental procedures. Recommendations on the concentrations of nitrous oxide and the presence of an assistant are made.

  19. A novel system for automated propofol sedation: hybrid sedation system (HSS).

    PubMed

    Zaouter, Cedrick; Taddei, Riccardo; Wehbe, Mohamad; Arbeid, Erik; Cyr, Shantale; Giunta, Francesco; Hemmerling, Thomas M

    2017-04-01

    Closed-loop systems for propofol have been demonstrated to be safe and reliable for general anesthesia. However, no study has been conducted using a closed-loop system specifically designed for sedation in patients under spinal anesthesia. We developed an automatic anesthesia sedation system that allows for closed-loop delivery of propofol for sedation integrating a decision support system, called the hybrid sedation system (HSS). The objective of this study is to compare this system with standard practice. One hundred fifty patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to two groups: HSS-Group (N = 75), in which propofol was administered using a closed-loop system; Control Group (N = 75), in which propofol was delivered manually. The clinical performance of the propofol sedation control is defined as efficacy to maintain bispectral index (BIS) near 65. The clinical control was called 'Excellent', 'Good', 'Poor' and 'Inadequate' with BIS values within 10 %, from 11 to 20 %, 21 to 30 %, or greater than 30 % of the BIS target of 65, respectively. The controller performance was evaluated using Varvel's parameters. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation, groups were compared using t test or Chi square test, P < 0.05. Clinical performance of sedation showed 'Excellent' control in the HSS-group for a significantly longer period of time (49 vs. 26 % in the control group, P < 0.0001). 'Poor' and 'Inadequate' sedation was significantly shorter in the HSS Group compared to the Control Group (11 and 10 % vs. 20 and 18 %, respectively, P < 0.0001). The novel, closed-loop system for propofol sedation showed better maintenance of the target BIS value compared to manual administration.

  20. Magnetic shaft seals prevent hazardous leakage from wastewater agitators

    SciTech Connect

    Traino, F.A.

    1985-11-01

    The US Department of Energy's laboratory in Miamisburg, OH, operated by Monsanto Research Corporation, processes approximately 45,000 gallons per week of low-level radioactive wastewater to meet Federal Environmental Protection Agency quality standards. Preventing the spread of radioactive contamination throughout the operating area demands effective sealing of all process piping, valves, pumps, and agitators. Rotating shafts of pumps and agitators installed a the start of operations in 1947 were sealed by stuffing glands with graphite impregnated asbestos packing. These pumps proved to be unsatisfactory. In the mid-1970's, new process pumps with mechanical seals and some with magnetic drives were installed. Later, in January 1979, new agitator shaft drives with double tandem, spring-loaded mechanical seals were installed, maintenance of these pumps was costly. The agitator drive shafts were redesigned to accommodate magnetic seals of the type successfully used in blowers and vacuum/pressure pumps in other plant locations. One inherent advantage of the magnetic seal is that it operates with a face loading as much as 50% less than a conventional spring-loaded mechanical seal. The lower loading by a predetermined uniform magnetic force contributes to long face life. Other advantages include compactness, ease of assembly with only a few parts, and insensitivity to vibration. The magnetic shaft seals installed on the agitator shafts in February 1983 are still in service without any leakage or need for maintenance. Based on current operating data and a projected five-year meantime between failures, the estimated cost benefit of the magnetic seals over spring-loaded mechanical seals over spring-loaded mechanical seals will be $640 vs $2400 respectively per seal, with 60% less downtime for maintenance.

  1. Laryngospasm With Apparent Aspiration During Sedation With Nitrous Oxide.

    PubMed

    Babl, Franz E; Grindlay, Joanne; Barrett, Michael Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Nitrous oxide and oxygen mixture has become increasingly popular for the procedural sedation and analgesia of children in the emergency department. In general, nitrous oxide is regarded as a very safe agent according to large case series. We report a case of single-agent nitrous oxide sedation of a child, complicated by laryngospasm and radiographically confirmed bilateral upper lobe pulmonary opacities. Although rarely reported with parenteral sedative agents, laryngospasm and apparent aspiration has not been previously reported in isolated nitrous oxide sedation. This case highlights that, similar to other sedative agents, nitrous oxide administration also needs to be conducted by staff and in settings in which airway emergencies can be appropriately managed.

  2. An Evaluation of Intranasal Sufentanil and Dexmedetomidine for Pediatric Dental Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Hitt, James M.; Corcoran, Toby; Michienzi, Kelly; Creighton, Paul; Heard, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Conscious or moderate sedation is routinely used to facilitate the dental care of the pre- or un-cooperative child. Dexmedetomidine (DEX) has little respiratory depressant effect, possibly making it a safer option when used as an adjunct to either opioids or benzodiazepines. Unlike intranasal (IN) midazolam, IN application of DEX and sufentanil (SUF) does not appear to cause much discomfort. Further, although DEX lacks respiratory depressive effects, it is an α2-agonist that can cause hypotension and bradycardia when given in high doses or during prolonged periods of administration. The aim of this feasibility study was to prospectively assess IN DEX/SUF as a potential sedation regimen for pediatric dental procedures. After IRB approval and informed consent, children (aged 3–7 years; n = 20) from our dental clinic were recruited. All patients received 2 μg/kg (max 40 μg) of IN DEX 45 min before the procedure, followed 30 min later by 1 μg/kg (max 20 μg) of IN SUF. An independent observer rated the effects of sedation using the Ohio State University Behavior Rating Scale (OSUBRS) and University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS). The dentist and the parent also assessed the efficacy of sedation. Dental procedures were well tolerated and none were aborted. The mean OSUBRS procedure score was 2.1, the UMSS procedure score was 1.6, and all scores returned to baseline after the procedure. The average dentist rated quality of sedation was 7.6 across the 20 subjects. After discharge, parents reported one child with prolonged drowsiness and one child who vomited at home. The use of IN DEX supplemented with IN SUF provided both an effective and tolerable form of moderate sedation. Although onset and recovery are slower than with oral (PO) midazolam and transmucosal fentanyl, the quality of the sedation may be better with less risk of respiratory depression. Results from this preliminary study showed no major complications from IN delivery of these agents. PMID

  3. Pharmacological profile of essential oils derived from Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis with anti-agitation properties: focus on ligand-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Abuhamdah, Sawsan; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Dixon, Christine L; Elliot, Mark S J; Ballard, Clive; Holmes, Clive; Burns, Alistair; Perry, Elaine K; Francis, Paul T; Lees, George; Chazot, Paul L

    2008-11-01

    Both Melissa officinalis (Mo) and Lavandula angustifolia (La) essential oils have putative anti-agitation properties in humans, indicating common components with a depressant action in the central nervous system. A dual radioligand binding and electrophysiological study, focusing on a range of ligand-gated ion channels, was performed with a chemically validated essential oil derived from La, which has shown clinical benefit in treating agitation. La inhibited [35S] TBPS binding to the rat forebrain gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor channel (apparent IC50 = 0.040 +/- 0.001 mg mL(-1)), but had no effect on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) or nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A 50:50 mixture of Mo and La essential oils inhibited [3H] flunitrazepam binding, whereas the individual oils had no significant effect. Electrophysiological analyses with rat cortical primary cultures demonstrated that La reversibly inhibited GABA-induced currents in a concentration-dependent manner (0.01-1 mg mL(-1)), whereas no inhibition of NMDA- or AMPA-induced currents was noted. La elicited a significant dose-dependent reduction in both inhibitory and excitatory transmission, with a net depressant effect on neurotransmission (in contrast to the classic GABA(A) antagonist picrotoxin which evoked profound epileptiform burst firing in these cells). These properties are similar to those recently reported for Mo. The anti-agitation effects in patients and the depressant effects of La we report in neural membranes in-vitro are unlikely to reflect a sedative interaction with any of the ionotropic receptors examined here. These data suggest that components common to the two oils are worthy of focus to identify the actives underlying the neuronal depressant and anti-agitation activities reported.

  4. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in cattle sedated with xylazine

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Shozo

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effect of sedation with xylazine on the brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) of cattle to determine whether sedation causes differences in waveform configuration, peak latencies, interpeak latencies, measurement time of the average count (2000 responses), and clinical signs. There were no significant differences between the sedation and no-sedation groups in peak latency of any stimulus intensities. In the sedation group, the baselines of waveforms were comparatively stabilized. Those in the no-sedation group were unstable, however, because the measurement can be influenced by excessive muscle movement. The present findings suggest that clinically, it is useful to use a sedative when measuring BAEP in cattle to control excessive movement of the cattle without influencing the peak latencies. PMID:18505193

  5. Use of sevoflurane inhalation sedation for outpatient third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Ganzberg, S; Weaver, J; Beck, F M; McCaffrey, G

    1999-01-01

    This study attempted to determine if sevoflurane in oxygen inhaled via a nasal hood as a sole sedative agent would provide an appropriate level of deep sedation for outpatient third molar surgery. Twenty-four patients scheduled for third molar removal were randomly assigned to receive either nasal hood inhalation sevoflurane or an intravenous deep sedation using midazolam and fentanyl followed by a propofol infusion. In addition to measuring patient, surgeon, and dentist anesthesiologist subjective satisfaction with the technique, physiological parameters, amnesia, and psychomotor recovery were also assessed. No statistically significant difference was found between the sevoflurane and midazolam-fentanyl-propofol sedative groups in physiological parameters, degree of amnesia, reported quality of sedation, or patient willingness to again undergo a similar deep sedation. A trend toward earlier recovery in the sevoflurane group was identified. Sevoflurane can be successfully employed as a deep sedative rather than a general anesthetic for extraction of third molars in healthy subjects.

  6. Dexmedetomidine combined with midazolam vs. dexmedetomidine alone for sedation during spinal anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Douk-Keun; Ban, Jong-Seouk; Lee, Sang-Gon; Lee, Ji-Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Background Dexmedetomidine is a useful sedative agent for spinal anesthesia. However, it has been reported that dexmedetomidine decreases heart rate in a dose-dependent manner. In the current study, we compared the administration of a bolus dose of midazolam and bolus loading of dexmedetomidine over 10 min with the goal of identifying an additional method of sedation. Methods Ninety patients classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II who were undergoing spinal anesthesia were divided into two groups. In the midazolam and dexmedetomidine combined group (group MD), 10 min after bolus loading of 0.05 mg/kg midazolam, 0.5 µg/kg/h dexmedetomidine was continuously infused. In the dexmedetomidine group (group D), 1 µg/kg dexmedetomidine was infused over 10 min, and then 0.5 µg/kg/h dexmedetomidine was continuously infused. Results At 10 min, the sedation depth of the two groups was almost equal. In both groups, the bispectral index was within the optimal score range of 55–80 and the Ramsay Sedation Scale score was within the optimal range of 3–5. Satisfaction with sedation for both patient and surgeon did not differ between the two groups. At 10 min, heart rate was significantly lower (P < 0.010) in group D and mean blood pressure was significantly lower (P < 0.010) in group MD. The prevalence of bradycardia, hypotension, and hypoxia did not differ statistically between the two groups (P = 0.714, P = 0.089, P = 0.495, respectively). Conclusions Midazolam bolus and dexmedetomidine continuous infusion (the regimen of group MD) may be an additional sedation method for patients who have severe bradycardia. PMID:27703624

  7. Estimating the need for dental sedation. 1. The Indicator of Sedation Need (IOSN) - a novel assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, P; Bridgman, C M; Gough, L; Longman, L; Pretty, I A; Jenner, T

    2011-09-09

    While the control of pain and anxiety is fundamental to the practice of dentistry, the use of conscious sedation in dentistry is very variable among dentists. The need for conscious sedation could be considered by assessing and ranking a combination of information on patient anxiety, medical history and the complexity of the anticipated clinical treatment. By undertaking this systemtic assessment an indication of sedation need may be developed which would act as an aide to decision making and, potentially, referral management. Such a tool could also be used by commissioners who need to identify patients who need conscious sedation for dental treatment in order to plan, commission and deliver appropriate sedation services.

  8. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  9. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  10. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  11. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  12. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  13. Ultrasonic agitation method for accelerating batch leaching tests

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, R.J.; Stegemann, J.A.; Chao, C.C.

    1996-12-31

    A method has been developed which uses ultrasonic cavitation to accelerate batch leaching tests. Batch leaching tests, in which attainment of an equilibrium between the solid sample and liquid leachant is desired, usually involve particle size reduction and mixing to hasten mass transfer of soluble compounds. In the study discussed here, mixing in the form of ultrasonic cavitation was used to supply an intense level of agitation. Breaking the liquid boundary layer surrounding individual waste particles ensured a maximum concentration gradient between the solid and liquid phases and accelerated attainment of steady state concentrations. Evaluation of the acceleration technique was made through comparison of leachate quality of stabilized/solidified (S/S) residue samples tested using the Wastewater Technology Centre`s (WTC) equilibrium extraction (EE) and an ultrasonically agitated version of the same test method (UEE). The sample preparation, liquid-to-solid ratio, extraction fluid, etc., specified in the EE method were held constant for the EE and UEE samples, while the duration and method of agitation was altered for the UEE samples. To date, this evaluation has been made using five metal finishing residues, which were selected based on their elevated concentrations of regulated contaminants. The results of the evaluations are presented and suggestions are made as to the applicability of this accelerated test method.

  14. Internists' attitudes towards terminal sedation in end of life care

    PubMed Central

    Kaldjian, L; Jekel, J; Bernene, J; Rosenthal, G; Vaughan-Sarrazin, M; Duffy, T

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the frequency of support for terminal sedation among internists, determine whether support for terminal sedation is accompanied by support for physician assisted suicide (PAS), and explore characteristics of internists who support terminal sedation but not assisted suicide. Design: A statewide, anonymous postal survey. Setting: Connecticut, USA. Participants: 677 Connecticut members of the American College of Physicians. Measurements: Attitudes toward terminal sedation and assisted suicide; experience providing primary care to terminally ill patients; demographic and religious characteristics. Results: 78% of respondents believed that if a terminally ill patient has intractable pain despite aggressive analgesia, it is ethically appropriate to provide terminal sedation (diminish consciousness to halt the experience of pain). Of those who favoured terminal sedation, 38% also agreed that PAS is ethically appropriate in some circumstances. Along a three point spectrum of aggressiveness in end of life care, the plurality of respondents (47%) were in the middle, agreeing with terminal sedation but not with PAS. Compared with respondents who were less aggressive or more aggressive, physicians in this middle group were more likely to report having more experience providing primary care to terminally ill patients (p = 0.02) and attending religious services more frequently (p<0.001). Conclusions: Support for terminal sedation was widespread in this population of physicians, and most who agreed with terminal sedation did not support PAS. Most internists who support aggressive palliation appear likely to draw an ethical line between terminal sedation and assisted suicide. PMID:15467087

  15. Systematic review and meta-analysis of patient-controlled sedation versus intravenous sedation for colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Hao, Li-Xiao; Chen, Lu; Jin, Zheng; Gong, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient-controlled sedation (PCS) has been suggested as an alternative method for sedative colonoscopy. However, as any new techniques, PCS introduction as a potential alternative to traditional intravenous sedation (IVS) has brought about challenges. To evaluate the advantages and disadvantages between PCS and IVS more comprehensively, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the published literature. Methods: Several databases were searched from inception to 1 April, 2015, for trials comparing PCS with IVS for colonoscopy. The outcomes of interest included time for cecal intubation, rate of complete colonoscopy, dose of sedative drugs used, pain scores, recovery time, complications. Inconsistency was quantified using I 2 statistics. Results: In all, 12 trials were finally selected (1091 patients, with 545 in the PCS group, and 546 in the IVS group). The total propofol used, time for cecal intubation, rate of complete colonoscopy and pain score had no statistical difference between the two groups. However, PCS showed a reduction in the recovery time, incidence of oxygen desaturation and hypotension. The rates of other complications and patients’ willingness to repeat the same sedation had no statistical difference between the two groups. Conclusion: PCS is as feasible and effective as traditional IVS for colonoscopy, and there is a tendency that PCS shows its superiority in recovery time, incidence for oxygen saturation and hypotension. PMID:26884890

  16. New method of sedation in oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Giedraitis, Rimvydas; Machiulskiene, Vita; Huys, Luc W J; Kubilius, Ricardas

    2005-01-01

    Local anesthesia, the well-known method of sedation, usually is insufficient for dental implantation and the augmentation of the alveolar ridge, because the operations last for 1 to 2 hours and patients may experience fear and strain. This article examines a new complex sedation method using ketorolac, midazolam, and a local anesthetic 4% solution of articaine hydrochloride and epinephrine (Septanest) in combination with a vasoconstrictor. This method was applied to 67 patients operated on for dental implantation with screw implants or for the alveolar ridge augmentation with biocompatible materials. The control group, which consisted of 20 patients, received local anesthesia with articaine-epinephrine only. Most of the control patients were found to have experienced fear and strain during the aforementioned surgical procedures; their blood pressure and pulse rate increased, and more than half of them experienced pain. No disorders of hemodynamics or the psychoemotional status of the patients were observed during sedation with ketorolac, midazolam, and articaine-epinephrine. Furthermore, anterograde amnesia was determined for the 80% of the patients in the test group.

  17. Midazolam sedation for percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J A; Smith, B J

    1993-12-01

    Control of patient respiration is needed to safely perform percutaneous liver biopsy (PLB) and may be adversely affected by sedation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of PLB with intravenous midazolam and to evaluate patient acceptance of PLB with and without sedation. Two hundred seventeen consecutive patients underwent 301 percutaneous liver biopsies. One hundred fifty-one of the biopsies were done after the patients were sedated with intravenous midazolam immediately before the biopsy. The last 61 patients were questioned after the biopsy to evaluate the discomfort of the procedure, their memory of the procedure, and their willingness to undergo another PLB. The major complication rate was similar in the midazolam-treated (0.7%) and untreated (0.7%) groups. The midazolam-treated patients had a numerically lower mean pain score (1.5 +/- 0.4 vs 4.0 +/- 0.7) (mean +/- SEM) (P = 0.07) and significantly lower mean memory score (4.8 +/- 0.7 vs 9.9 +/- 0.1) (P < 0.01) than the untreated patients. The treated and untreated groups had similar mean willingness for repeat PLB scores (9.3 +/- 0.3 vs 9.1 +/- 0.6). We conclude that: (1) there is no increased risk of PLB with midazolam and (2) patients have less memory of the procedure with midazolam.

  18. Medetomidine-midazolam sedation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Raekallio, M; Tulamo, R M; Valtamo, T

    1998-01-01

    Seven sheep were sedated 3 times: with medetomidine (15 micrograms kg-1), with midazolam (0.1 mg kg-1) and with a combination of the drugs. All drugs were administered intravenously. Heart and respiratory rates were measured. Arterial blood samples were collected, and PaO2, PaCO2, pH, haemoglobin concentration and saturation, and base excess were determined. Systolic and mean arterial pressures were recorded before and after the treatment with medetomidine-midazolam. Midazolam increased the time of recumbency induced by medetomidine. After administration of midazolam alone, 4 of the 7 sheep were sedated and the other 3 were excited. Heart rate decreased after both medetomidine and medetomidine-midazolam. One sheep suffered a cardiac arrest after medetomidine-midazolam injection, and it required resuscitation. PaO2 and haemoglobin oxygen saturation decreased after medetomidine, and medetomidine-midazolam caused a marked hypoxaemia. PaCO2 increased after medetomidine, both alone and combined with midazolam, but arterial pH was within the reference values after all drug administrations. Systolic and mean arterial pressures decreased after medetomidine-midazolam. This study indicates that though in sheep midazolam potentiates the sedative effect of medetomidine, the combination of medetomidine and midazolam also reduces the in PaO2 and haemoglobin oxygen saturation more than medetomidine alone. The results indicate that a medetomidine-midazolam combination is unsafe for sheep at the doses studied.

  19. Dreaming and recall during sedation for colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Stait, M L; Leslie, K; Bailey, R

    2008-09-01

    Dreaming is reported by one in five patients who are interviewed on emergence from general anaesthesia, but the incidence, predictors and consequences of dreaming during procedural sedation are not known. In this prospective observational study, 200 patients presenting for elective colonoscopy under intravenous sedation were interviewed on emergence to determine the incidences of dreaming and recall. Sedation technique was left to the discretion of the anaesthetist. The incidence of dreaming was 25.5%. Patients reporting dreaming were younger than those who did not report dreaming. Doses of midazolam and fentanyl were similar between dreamers and non-dreamers, however propofol doses were higher in patients who reported dreams than those who did not. Patients reported short, simple dreams about everyday life--no dream suggested near-miss recall of the procedure. Frank recall of the procedure was reported by 4% of the patients, which was consistent with propofol doses commensurate with light general anaesthesia. The only significant predictor of recall was lower propofol dose. Satisfaction with care was generally high, however dreamers were more satisfied with their care than non-dreamers.

  20. Comparison of oral dexmedetomidine versus oral midazolam as premedication to prevent emergence agitation after sevoflurane anaesthesia in paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, M Kavya; Mehandale, Sripada G

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Sevoflurane is the most often used inhalational agent in paediatric anaesthesia, but emergence agitation (EA) remains a major concern. Oral midazolam and parenteral dexmedetomidine are known to be effective in controlling EA. We attempted to elucidate whether oral dexmedetomidine is better than midazolam in controlling EA. Methods: Prospective double-blinded study involving ninety patients aged 1–10 years, undergoing elective surgeries of <2 h of expected duration under sevoflurane general anaesthesia, randomised to receive either midazolam (Group A) or dexmedetomidine (Group B) as oral premedication was carried out to record level of sedation before induction, haemodynamic parameters and recovery time. Incidence and severity of EA, post-operative pain and requirement of rescue analgesic were assessed at 0, 5, 15, 30 and 60 min postoperatively. Results: Data were analysed applying Student's t-test and Chi-square test using SPSS software. Mask acceptance was better in Group B (97.8% vs. 73.4%, P < 0.001). Mean arterial pressure was lower in Group B (P < 0.001) though clinically not significant. More rescue analgesic was required in Group A (5.6% vs. 0%). There was no significant difference in adverse effects. Although there was a higher incidence of EA in Group A (Aono's score 3 and 4; 40% vs. 4.4%), none of them required intervention (paediatric anaesthesia emergence delirium score >10; 0 vs. 0). Conclusion: Premedication with oral dexmedetomidine provides smooth induction and recovery, reduces the EA and provides better analgesia and sedation as compared to oral midazolam. PMID:28250481

  1. A comparison of ketamine versus etomidate for procedural sedation for the reduction of large joint dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Salen, Philip; Grossman, Michelle; Grossman, Michael; Milazzo, Anthony; Stoltzfus, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Ketamine and etomidate are used for procedural sedation (PS) to facilitate the performance of painful procedures. We hypothesized that ketamine produces adequate and comparable sedation conditions for dislocated large joint reduction when compared to etomidate and results in fewer adverse events. Methods: This Institutional Review Board approved prospective trial compared a convenience sample of subjects, who were randomized to receive either ketamine or etomidate for PS to facilitate reduction of large joint dislocations. Following informed consent, subjects were assigned via a computer-generated algorithm to receive either etomidate (0.1 mg/kg) or ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) intravenously; if PS was not sufficient, subjects received repeat doses of etomidate or ketamine until adequate PS was achieved. The protocol's primary endpoint was a successful reduction of dislocated, large joints. Secondary endpoints included alteration in blood pressure, vomiting, recovery agitation, hypersalivation, laryngospasm, myoclonus, hypoxia, airway assistance with chin lift or jaw thrust, bag-valve-mask ventilation, endotracheal intubation, utilization of additional doses of ketamine or etomidate, and recovery time from sedation. Results: Total enrollment was eighty subjects, 46 in the ketamine cohort and 34 in the etomidate cohort. The two PS groups were comparable in terms of gender, age, and weight. There was no significant difference in the primary endpoint of large joint dislocation reduction between the ketamine and etomidate cohorts (46/46, 100%; 32/34, 94.1%; P – 0.1). Shoulder, hip, and ankle joints account for the majority of joint reductions in this trial. Titration of PS was necessary for almost half of each cohort as evidenced by the utilization of additional dosages of the sedative agents: ketamine (22/46, 47.8%) and etomidate (14/34, 41.2%; P – 0.56). Among secondary outcome variables, significant differences between ketamine and etomidate cohorts

  2. Effect of agitation of EDTA with 808-nm diode laser on dentin microhardness.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hakan; Yeter, Kübra Y; Karatas, Ertugrul; Yilmaz, Cenk B; Ayranci, Leyla B; Ozsu, Damla

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of agitation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with diode laser at different agitation times on root dentin microhardness. Eighty-four specimens were divided randomly into seven groups, as follows: (1) distilled water, (2) 17% EDTA, (3) EDTA with 60 s ultrasonic agitation, (4) EDTA with 10 s laser agitation, (5) EDTA with 20 s laser agitation, (6) EDTA with 30 s laser agitation, and (7) EDTA with 40 s laser agitation. All of the specimens were irrigated with 5% NaOCl and distilled water except the distilled water group. Microhardness values were calculated before and after the procedures. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests. Statistically significant differences were determined between the distilled water and other groups. Also, statistically significant differences were observed between EDTA with 40 s laser agitation and EDTA, and EDTA with 10 and 20 s laser agitations. Ultrasonic agitation of EDTA affected microhardness of root dentin similar to EDTA (p > .05). All applications decreased the microhardness of root dentin when compared with distilled water. Agitation of EDTA with diode laser for 40 s caused more reduction in microhardness of root dentin when compared with EDTA.

  3. Intention, procedure, outcome and personhood in palliative sedation and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Materstvedt, Lars Johan

    2012-03-01

    Palliative sedation at the end of life has become an important last-resort treatment strategy for managing refractory symptoms as well as a topic of controversy within palliative care. Furthermore, palliative sedation is prominent in the public debate about the possible legalisation of voluntary assisted dying (physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia). This article attempts to demonstrate that palliative sedation is fundamentally different from euthanasia when it comes to intention, procedure, outcome and the status of the person. Nonetheless, palliative sedation in its most radical form of terminal deep sedation parallels euthanasia in one respect: both end the experience of suffering. However, only the latter intentionally ends life and also has this as its goal. There is the danger that deep sedation could bring death forward in time due to particular side effects of the treatment. Still that would, if it happens, not be intended, and accordingly is defensible in view of the doctrine of double effect.

  4. [Clinical practices of analgesia for invasive procedures in critically ill sedated patients in Ile-de-France: a phone survey].

    PubMed

    Brocas, E; Adam, M; Alonso, A; Perrin-Gachadoat, D; Thierry, S; Tenaillon, A

    2005-06-01

    To assess the practice of analgesia for invasive procedures in critically ill sedated patient in Ile-de-France (French area including Paris). Observational study: phone survey using a standard questionnaire. Only one senior physician in each of 30 intensive care unit (ICU) was questioned. Baseline sedation included systematic analgesia with narcotics in all ICUs. Only 4 physicians declared using a specific pain scale for sedated patients. Only 3 ICUs used written protocols. Procedures, which were thought to be most invasive (catheterization, pleural drainage, fibroscopy) were in most cases preceded by analgesia, but this was seldom the case for less painful events (venous or arterial puncture, tracheal suctioning). Specific pain scales are still underused. In contrast with current guidelines, analgesia for invasive procedures is not systematic but depends on subjective opinions.

  5. Fospropofol disodium injection for the sedation of patients undergoing colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Levitzky, Benjamin E; Vargo, John J

    2008-08-01

    Sedation plays a central role in making colonoscopy tolerable for patients and feasible for the endoscopist to perform. The array of agents used for endoscopic sedation continues to evolve. Fospropofol (FP), a prodrug of propofol with a slower pharmacokinetic profile, is currently under evaluation for use during endoscopic procedures. Preliminary data suggests that FP dosed at 6.5 mg/kg is well tolerated by most patients with perineal paresthesias being the most commonly experienced adverse effect. This article will examine the current literature on the use of FP for the sedation of patients undergoing colonoscopy, highlighting the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, risks, and common adverse events associated with the novel sedative/hypnotic.

  6. Non-Intravenous Sedatives and Analgesics for Procedural Sedation for Imaging Procedures in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Amber; Miller, Jamie L.; Couloures, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe the method of delivery, dosage regimens, and outcomes of sedatives administered by extravascular route for imaging procedures in children. METHODS: Medline, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched using keywords “child”, “midazolam”, “ketamine”, dexmedetomidine”, “fentanyl”, “nitrous oxide”, and “imaging.” Articles evaluating the use of extravascular sedation in children for imaging procedures published in English between 1946 and March 2015 were included. Two authors independently screened each article for inclusion. Reports were excluded if they did not contain sufficient details on dosage regimens and outcomes. RESULTS: Twenty reports representing 1,412 patients ranging in age from 0.33 to 19 years of age were included for analysis. Due to discrepancies in doses and types of analyses, statistical analyses were not performed. Oral midazolam was the most common agent evaluated; other agents included intranasal (IN) ketamine, IN midazolam, IN fentanyl, IN and transmucosal dexmedetomidine, and N2O. Most agents were considered efficacious compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Most agents showed efficacy for sedation during imaging when delivered through an extra-vascular route. Selection of agents should be based on onset time, duration, patient acceptability, recovery time, and adverse events. More robust studies are necessary to determine the optimal agent and route to utilize for imaging procedures when sedation is needed. PMID:26766932

  7. A Review of Agents for Palliative Sedation/Continuous Deep Sedation: Pharmacology and Practical Applications.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, John

    2017-03-01

    Continuous deep sedation at the end of life is a specific form of palliative sedation requiring a care plan that essentially places and maintains the patient in an unresponsive state because their symptoms are refractory to any other interventions. Because this application is uncommon, many providers may lack practical experience in this specialized area and resources they can access are outdated, nonspecific, and/or not comprehensive. The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence- and experience-based reference that specifically addresses those medications and regimens and their practical applications for this very narrow, but vital, aspect of hospice care. Patient goals in a hospital and hospice environments are different, so the manner in which widely used sedatives are dosed and applied can differ greatly as well. Parameters applied in end-of-life care that are based on experience and a thorough understanding of the pharmacology of those medications will differ from those applied in an intensive care unit or other medical environments. By recognizing these different goals and applying well-founded regimens geared specifically for end-of-life sedation, we can address our patients' symptoms in a more timely and efficacious manner.

  8. Comparison of preanesthetic sedation in pediatric patients with oral and intranasal midazolam

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Purvashree Vijay; Kulkarni, Sadhana Sudhir; Parchandekar, Mukund Kachru; Sikchi, Sneha Purshottam

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Preoperative anxiety in children leading to postoperative negative changes and long-term behavioral problems needs better preanesthetic sedation. Across the world, midazolam is the most commonly used premedicant in pediatric patients. The fact that no single route has achieved universal acceptance for its administration suggests that each route has its own merits and demerits. This study compares oral midazolam syrup and intranasal midazolam spray as painless and needleless systems of drug administration for preanesthetic sedation in children. Material and Methods: With randomization, Group O (30 children): Received oral midazolam syrup 0.5 mg/kg and Group IN (30 children): Received intranasal midazolam spray 0.2 mg/kg. Every child was observed for acceptance of drug, response to drug administration, sedation scale, separation score, acceptance to mask, recovery score and side effects of drug. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test, standard error of the difference between two means and Chi-square test. Results: In Group O and IN, 15/30 children (50%) and 7/30 children (23%) accepted drug easily (P < 0.05); 4/22 children (18%) in Group O and 11/20 children (55%) in Group IN cried after drug administration (P < 0.05). In both the groups, sedation at 20 min after premedication (Group O [80%] 24/30 vs. Group IN [77%] 23/30), parental separation and acceptance to mask were comparable (P > 0.05); 12/30 children (40%) in Group IN showed transient nasal irritation. Conclusion: Oral midazolam and intranasal midazolam spray produce similar anxiolysis and sedation, but acceptance of drug and response to drug administration is better with oral route. PMID:27625485

  9. Baclofen for alcohol dependence: Relationships between baclofen and alcohol dosing and the occurrence of major sedation.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Benjamin; Labreuche, Julien; Duhamel, Alain; Deheul, Sylvie; Gautier, Sophie; Auffret, Marine; Pignon, Baptiste; Valin, Thomas; Bordet, Régis; Cottencin, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    High-dose baclofen, i.e., 300 mg/d or more, has recently emerged as a strategy for treating alcohol dependence. The impact that the co-exposure of large amounts of alcohol and baclofen has on sedation is unclear. In a prospective cohort of 253 subjects with alcohol dependence, we collected daily alcohol and baclofen doses across the first year of baclofen treatment and the monthly maximum subjective sedation experienced by each patient (0-10 visual analog scale). For each patient-month, we determined the average weekly alcohol consumption (AWAC; standard-drinks/week) and the maximum daily dose of baclofen (DDB; mg/d). The occurrence of an episode of major sedation (EMS) during a patient-month was defined as a sedation score ≥7. The relationship between the EMS occurrence and the concurrent AWAC and DDB was investigated using a generalized estimating equation model. In total, 1528 patient-months were compiled (70 with an EMS). Univariate analyses demonstrated that the rate of patient-month to EMS increased gradually with AWAC (p<0.001), from 0.9% for AWAC=0 to 9.4% for AWAC >35. There was also a significant gradual risk for EMS associated with DDB (<0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant interaction between DDB and AWAC on EMS risk (p=0.047). Each 20mg/d increase in DDB was associated with an OR of EMS in AWAC >35 of 1.22 (95%CI, 1.08-1.38) versus 1.11 (95%CI, 0.96-1.29) in AWAC=1-35, and 0.95 (95%CI, 0.76-1.19) in AWAC=0. The level of sedation observed in patients using baclofen for alcohol dependence appears to directly depend on the immediate doses of both the baclofen and the alcohol.

  10. Comparison of Oral Midazolam and Promethazine with Oral Midazolam alone for Sedating Children during Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Barzegari, Hassan; Zohrevandi, Behzad; Masoumi, Kambiz; Forouzan, Arash; Darian, Ali Asgari; Khosravi, Shaqayeq

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Both midazolam and promethazine are recommended to be used as sedatives in many studies but each have some side effects that limits their use. Combination therapy as an alternative method, may decreases these limitations. Therefore, this study aimed to compare midazolam with midazolam-promethazine regarding induction, maintenance, and recovery characteristics following pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia. Methods: Children under 7 years old who needed sedation for being CT scanned were included in this double-blind randomized clinical trial. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: one only received midazolam (0.5 mg/kg), while the other group received a combination of midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) and promethazine (1.25 mg/kg). University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS) was used to assess sedation induction. In addition to demographic data, the child’s vital signs were evaluated before prescribing the drugs and after inducing sedation (reaching UMSS level 2). The primary outcomes in the present study were onset of action after administration and duration of the drugs’ effect. Results: 107 patients were included in the study. Mean onset of action was 55.4±20.3 minutes for midazolam and 32.5±11.1 minutes for midazolam-promethazine combination (p<0.001). But duration of effect was not different between the 2 groups (p=0.36). 8 (7.5%) patients were unresponsive to the medication, all 8 of which were in the midazolam treated group (p=0.006). Also in 18 (16.8%) cases a rescue dose was prescribed, 14 (25.9%) were in the midazolam group and 4 (7.5%) were in the midazolam-promethazine group (p=0.02). Comparing systolic (p=0.20) and diastolic (p=0.34) blood pressure, heart rate (p=0.16), respiratory rate (p=0.17) and arterial oxygen saturation level (p=0.91) showed no significant difference between the 2 groups after intervention. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, it seems that using a combination of midazolam and promethazine

  11. Drugs Used for Parenteral Sedation in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Raymond A.; Gift, Helen C.

    1988-01-01

    The relative efficacy and safety of drugs and combinations used clinically in dentistry as premedicants to alleviate patient apprehension are largely unsubstantiated. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of agents used for parenteral sedation through controlled clinical trials, it is first necessary to identify which drugs, doses, and routes of administration are actually used in practice. A survey instrument was developed to characterize the drugs used clinically for anesthesia and sedation by dentists with advanced training in pain control. A random sample of 500 dentists who frequently use anesthesia and sedation in practice was selected from the Fellows of the American Dental Society of Anesthesiology. The first mailing was followed by a second mailing to nonrespondents after 30 days. The respondents report a variety of parenteral sedation techniques in combination with local anesthesia (the response categories are not mutually exclusive): nitrous oxide (64%), intravenous conscious sedation (59%), intravenous “deep” sedation (47%), and outpatient general anesthesia (27%). Drugs most commonly reported for intravenous sedation include diazepam, methohexital, midazolam, and combinations of these drugs with narcotics. A total of 82 distinct drugs and combinations was reported for intravenous sedation and anesthesia. Oral premedication and intramuscular sedation are rarely used by this group. Most general anesthesia reported is done on an outpatient basis in private practice. These results indicate that a wide variety of drugs is employed for parenteral sedation in dental practice, but the most common practice among dentists with advanced training in anesthesia is local anesthesia supplemented with intravenous sedation consisting of a benzodiazepine and an opioid or a barbiturate. PMID:3250279

  12. A prospective, randomized, double blinded comparison of intranasal dexmedetomodine vs intranasal ketamine in combination with intravenous midazolam for procedural sedation in school aged children undergoing MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: For optimum magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image quality and to ensure precise diagnosis, patients have to remain motionless. We studied the effects of intranasal dexmedetomidine and ketamine with intravenous midazolam for pre-procedural and procedural sedation in school aged children. Patients and Methods: Children were randomly allocated to one of two groups: (Group D) received intranasal dexmedetomidine 3 μg kg–1 and (Group K) received intranasal ketamine 7 mg kg–1. Sedation levels 10, 20 and 30 min after drug instillation were evaluated using a Modified Ramsay sedation scale. A 4-point score was used to evaluate patients when they were separated from their parents and their response to intravenous cannulation. Results: The two groups were comparable in terms of the child's anxiety at presentation (P = 0.245). We observed that Group K achieved faster sedation at 10 min point with P < 0.05. A comparable sedation score at 20 and 30 min were noted. The two groups were comparable regarding to the child's acceptance of nasal administration (P = 0.65). The sedation failure rate was insignificantly differ between groups (13.7% vs. 20.6% for Group D and K respectively). Heart rate and systolic blood pressure showed a significant difference between the two groups starting from the point of 20 min. Conclusion: Intranasal dexmedetomidine 3 μg kg–1 or ketamine 7 mg kg–1 can be used safely and effectively to induce a state of moderate conscious sedation and to facilitate parents’ separation and IV cannulation. Addition of midazolam in a dose not sufficient alone to produce the target sedation achieved our goal of deep level of sedation suitable for MRI procedure. PMID:25886223

  13. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1998-12-15

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers is disclosed using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer`s position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates. 4 figs.

  14. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1998-01-01

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer's position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates.

  15. Survey of Anxiety in Ordinary Workers and Doctors Regarding Sedative Use during Endoscopic Examination in the Seoul Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Ra, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Chi-Hyo; Kim, Youn-Jin; Han, Jong-In

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Sedative use is common in endoscopic examinations. The anxiety regarding sedative use may be different between doctors and nonmedical individuals. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted by a research company (DOOIT Survey), and responses were collected from 649 doctors and 1,738 individuals who perform typical jobs in nonmedical fields. In this study, these ordinary workers are considered to represent nonmedical individuals. Anxiety was measured using a 5-point Likert scale. Results The nonmedical individuals exhibited more anxiety regarding the sedative use than the doctors. Age <40 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.27; p<0.001), female sex (OR, 1.62; p=0.002), experience of an adverse event (OR, 1.79; p=0.049), and insufficient explanation (OR, 2.05; p<0.001) were the significant factors that increased the anxiety of the nonmedical individuals. The doctors who experienced a sedative-related adverse event reported increased anxiety compared with the doctors who did not report this experience (OR, 1.73; p=0.031). Conclusions Anxiety regarding sedative use during an endoscopic examination was significantly different between doctors and non-medical individuals. A younger age, female sex, an adverse event, and insufficient explanation affect the anxiety of nonmedical individuals. An adverse event also affects the anxiety of doctors. PMID:27563022

  16. Combined oral midazolam-ketamine better than midazolam alone for sedation of young children: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Thiago Anderson; Costa, Paulo Sucasas; Costa, Luciane Rezende; Jesus-França, Cristiana Marinho; Antunes, Denise Espíndola; Gomes, Hugo Sérgio Oliveira; Neto, Onofre Alves

    2013-05-01

    BACKGROUND.  There is a lack of clinical trials on paediatric dental sedation. AIM.  We investigated whether young children's behaviour improves during dental treatment with oral ketamine/midazolam compared with midazolam alone or no sedation. DESIGN.  Healthy children under 36 months of age, presenting early childhood caries were randomly assigned to receive protective stabilization plus: combined oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (MK), or oral midazolam (1.0 mg/kg) (MS), or no sedative (PS). One observer scored children's behaviour using the Ohio State University Behavior Rating Scale (OSUBRS) at determined points in a dental exam (no sedative) and treatment session. Data were analysed using nonparametric bivariate tests. RESULTS.  Forty-one children were included. In the dental exam session, the sum of OSUBRS scores was similar for the three groups (P = 0.81). In the treatment session, the MK produced more cooperative behaviour than MS and PS (P = 0.01), longer sessions (P = 0.04), and a pattern of homogeneous OSUBRS scores from the reception area (before sedative administration) to the end of the session (P = 0.06). No immediate and post-discharge side effects were observed in groups MK and MS. CONCLUSIONS.  The combination of oral midazolam and ketamine is efficacious for guiding the behaviour of children under 3 years old.

  17. Remediating agitation-induced antibody aggregation by eradicating exposed hydrophobic motifs

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rutilio H; Latypov, Ramil F; De Imus, Cyr; Carter, Jane; Wilson, Zien; Manchulenko, Kathy; Brown, Michael E; Ketchem, Randal R

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies must encompass drug product suitable attributes to be commercially marketed. An undesirable antibody characteristic is the propensity to aggregate. Although there are computational algorithms that predict the propensity of a protein to aggregate from sequence information alone, few consider the relevance of the native structure. The Spatial Aggregation Propensity (SAP) algorithm developed by Chennamsetty et. al. incorporates structural and sequence information to identify motifs that contribute to protein aggregation. We have utilized the algorithm to design variants of a highly aggregation prone IgG2. All variants were tested in a variety of high-throughput, small-scale assays to assess the utility of the method described herein. Many variants exhibited improved aggregation stability whether induced by agitation or thermal stress while still retaining bioactivity. PMID:25484048

  18. Effect of viscosity on the mixing efficiency in a self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei-Kang; Guo, Yi-Ling; Xue, Mei; Du, Jing-Ru; Li, Weicheng; Li, Yu-You

    2015-05-01

    One special self-agitation reactor, which does not require a mechanical mixer or other equipment for mixing, has been introduced. Self-agitation is affected by variation in viscosity property. To obtain and research the effect of viscosity on mixing behavior in the self-agitation reactor, Fluent® was used to create numerical simulations and to visualize the fluid flow status. The results show that when the viscosity of the liquid is 1 mPa s, the entire self-agitation results in an almost completely mixed reactor. The substrate becomes difficult to agitate, and the diffusion of the substrate and the tracer become quite after every self-agitation, as the viscosity increases. Once the viscosity is higher than 25 mPa s, the substrate and tracer could not be mixed in the entire reactor, and the reactor is recognized as the combination of several completely mixed reactors between which little exchange of liquid occurs.

  19. Impact of Psychological Interventions on Reducing Anxiety, Fear and the Need for Sedation in Children Undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Maria Pia; Giganti, Fiorenza; Rossi, Arianna; Di Feo, Daniele; Vagnoli, Laura; Calcagno, Giovanna; Defilippi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging examination frequently experience anxiety and fear before and during the scanning. The aim of the present study was to assess: i) whether and to what extent psychological interventions might reduce anxiety and fear levels; ii) whether the intervention is related to a decrease in the need for sedation. The interventions consisted of three activities: a clown show, dog interaction and live music. The emotional status (anxiety and fear) of the children was evaluated before and after the activities through a rating scale questionnaire. The results showed that the activities had high effectiveness in reducing the level of anxiety and fear and decreased the need for sedation in the experimental group compared to the control group. This approach proved to be a positive patient experience, helping to alleviate children’s anxiety and fear, decreasing the need for sedation, and was cost-effective. PMID:25918624

  20. A comparison of postoperative emergence agitation between sevoflurane and thiopental anesthesia induction in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Son, Ji-Seon; Jang, Eunjoo; Oh, Min Wook; Lee, Ji-Hye; Han, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was performed to compare the incidence of emergence agitation (EA) between inhalation and intravenous anesthesia induction in children after sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods In this prospective and double-blind study, 100 children aged 3 to 7 years were enrolled. Subjects were randomly assigned to the sevoflurane (Group S) or thiopental (Group T) anesthesia induction groups. Anesthesia was induced using 8% sevoflurane and 4-6 mg/kg thiopental in Groups S and T, respectively. Anesthesia was maintained with nitrous oxide and sevoflurane. The children were evaluated at 5 and 20 min after arrival in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) with a four-point agitation scale and the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale. The incidence of EA and administration of the rescue agent were recorded. Results The incidence of EA was significantly lower in Group T compared to Group S at 5 min after PACU arrival (3/49 patients, 6% vs. 12/47 patients, 26%, P = 0.019). However, there was no difference between the two groups at 20 min after PACU arrival (23/49 vs. 19/47 patients in Group T vs. Group S, P = 0.425). The overall incidence of EA was 60% (28/47 patients) in Group S and 41% (20/49 patients) in Group T (P = 0.102). The number of children who received propofol as a rescue agent was significantly lower in Group T (Group S: 14/47 vs. Group T: 5/49, P = 0.031). Conclusions Intravenous anesthesia induction with thiopental reduced the incidence of EA in the early PACU period compared to inhalation induction with sevoflurane in 3- to 7-year-old children undergoing sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:26257850

  1. [Patient Monitoring and Associated Devices during Endoscopic Sedation].

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hyung Keun; Myung, Dae Seong; Yoon, Soon Man; Moon, Won

    2017-01-25

    Sedation is an essential component for gastrointestinal endoscopy. It allows patients to tolerate unpleasant endoscopic procedures by relieving anxiety, discomfort, or pain. It also reduces patient's risk of physical injury during endoscopic procedures, while providing the endoscopist with an adequate setting for a detailed examination. For the safety during endoscopic sedation, patient monitoring is crucial. Minimal monitoring requirements during endoscopic sedation are periodic assessment of blood pressure and application of continuous pulse oximetry. Continuous electrocardiography is recommended in selected patients with high risk for sedation or have cardiopulmonary diseases. Continuous supplemental oxygen is also recommended for endoscopic sedation. This study describes detailed monitoring and associated devices based on the current guidelines and recommendations from gastrointestinal society of America, Europe, and Korea.

  2. Deep sedation with propofol in patients with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tofil, Nancy M; Buckmaster, Mark A; Winkler, Margaret K; Callans, Beth H; Islam, Monica P; Percy, Alan K

    2006-10-01

    Herein we present the largest retrospective case-control series of deep sedation in patients with Rett syndrome, including discussion of the unique aspects of Rett syndrome that make these patients at high risk for sedation. Twenty-one patients with Rett syndrome and 21 control patients who received propofol for deep sedation to facilitate lumbar puncture were compared. Patients with Rett syndrome required significantly less propofol than control patients when standardized for weight and the duration of the procedure (P = .004). Seven of the 21 patients with Rett syndrome compared with none of the control patients experienced a serious adverse event, most of which were due to prolonged apnea (P = .004). All adverse events were transient, and all patients returned to their baseline after the procedure was completed. Sedation of patients with Rett syndrome is associated with a relatively high rate of complications and should not be done without appropriate personnel available who recognize the risks of sedating this unique population.

  3. Deep sedation with propofol in patients with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tofil, Nancy M; Buckmaster, Mark A; Winkler, Margaret K; Callans, Beth H; Islam, Monica P; Percy, Alan K

    2006-03-01

    Herein we present the largest retrospective case-control series of deep sedation in patients with Rett syndrome, including discussion of the unique aspects of Rett syndrome that make these patients at high risk of sedation. Twenty-one patients with Rett syndrome and 21 control patients who received propofol for deep sedation to facilitate lumbar puncture were compared. Patients with Rett syndrome required significantly less propofol than control patients when standardized for weight and the duration of the procedure (P = .004). Seven of the 21 patients with Rett syndrome compared with none of the control patients experienced a serious adverse event, most of which were due to prolonged apnea (P = .004). All adverse events were transient, and all patients returned to their baseline after the procedure was completed. Sedation of patients with Rett syndrome is associated with a relatively high rate of complications and should not be done without appropriate personnel available who recognize the risks of sedating this unique population.

  4. Spider sedation induced by defensive chemicals of milliped prey*

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, James E.; Eisner, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    Wolf spiders (Lycosa spp.) show delayed induced sedation (total immobilization) of prolonged duration (in the order of days) after attacks upon millipeds (Glomeris marginata). The sedation is specifically attributable to glomerin and homoglomerin, two previously characterized quinazolinones present in the defensive secretion of Glomeris. Median sedative doses for the quinazolinones are in the range of 1-7 μg per spider, a fraction of the total (60-90 μg) present in the secretion of medium to full-grown millipeds. A sedative effect upon an invertebrate predator has not previously been demonstrated for an animal defense. Quinazolinones include the synthetic drug methaqualone (Quaalude), a potent human sedative. Images PMID:16593414

  5. State of Acute Agitation at Psychiatric Emergencies in Europe: The STAGE Study

    PubMed Central

    San, Luis; Marksteiner, Josef; Zwanzger, Peter; Figuero, María Aragüés; Romero, Francisco Toledo; Kyropoulos, Grigorios; Peixoto, Alberto Bessa; Chirita, Roxana; Boldeanu, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Background: Agitation is an array of syndromes and types of behaviors that are common in patients with psychiatric disorders. In Europe, the estimation of prevalence of agitation has been difficult due to the lack of standard studies or systematic data collection done on this syndrome. Objective: An observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study aimed to assess the prevalence of agitation episodes in psychiatric emergencies in different European countries. Method: For 1 week, all episodes of acute agitation that were attended to at the psychiatric emergency room (ER) or Acute Inpatient Unit (AIU) in the 27 participating centers were registered. The clinical characteristics and management of the agitation episode were also described. A descriptive analysis was performed. Results: A total of 334 agitation episodes out of 7295 psychiatric emergencies were recorded, giving a prevalence rate of 4.6% (95% CI: 4.12-5.08). Of them, 172 [9.4% (95% CI: 8.2-10.9)] were attended at the ER and 162 [2.8% (95% CI: 2.4-3.3)] at AIU. Only data from 165 episodes of agitation (those with a signed informed consent form) was registered and described in this report. The most common psychiatric conditions associated with agitation were schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and personality disorder. The management of agitation included from non-invasive to more coercive measures (mechanical, physical restraint or seclusion) that were unavoidable in more than half of the agitation episodes (59.5%). Conclusion: The results show that agitation is a common symptom in the clinical practice, both in emergency and inpatient psychiatric departments. Further studies are warranted to better recognize (using a standardized definition) and characterize agitation episodes. PMID:27857778

  6. Sedating the apprehensive debilitated patients for dental procedures by combining parenteral sedation and hypnosis with supplemental acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Wu, Ping-Shi; Lu, Winston I

    2012-01-01

    Treating apprehensive debilitated patients (i.e. geriatric patients, patients with cardiac, pulmonary, kidney, or liver diseases, and those with other severe systemic conditions) for dental procedures can cause unexpected medical complications such as cardiac arrest, stroke, asthma or shock, etc. Due to diminishing functional capacities of their organs, sedating those patients with sedative drugs in normal regular dosage could increase the risk of adverse events for this group of patients and can also increase the risk of liability for the clinician. The authors treated 34 apprehensive dental patients with a combination technique using parenteral sedation and hypnosis together with acupuncture. We used Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) to select the compatible sedative drugs and to individualize the dosage suitable to the patient's medical condition. Oftentimes, BDORT predetermined dosage amounts to a fraction of regular dosage that is normally recommended by manufacturer for regular healthy patients. Such a reduced dosage, though benign to patient, may be insufficient to render a patient to the sedation level for dental treatment. Nevertheless, hypnosis with acupuncture can be applied to potentiate the therapeutic effect of parenteral sedation, thereby reducing the amount of sedative agents required to alleviate patient anxiety. The results indicated that hypnosis with acupuncture and BDORT could effectively allow the reduction of the sedative dosage and may beneficially provide a safe and comfortable situation for the debilitated patients to receive the necessary treatment.

  7. Children with baby bottle tooth decay treated under general anesthesia or sedation: behavior in a follow-up visit.

    PubMed

    Peretz, B; Faibis, S; Ever-Hadani, P; Eidelman, E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the behaviors of a group of children, who were treated for baby bottle tooth decay (BBTD) under general anesthesia (GA) or under sedation in a dental school environment in a routine follow-up examination, and to assess the dental anxiety levels of the parents. Sixty-five children, who were treated for BBTD in the Pediatric Dentistry clinic of the Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Dental Medicine between 1995-1997 under GA (34 children) or sedation (31 children). The parents of these children agreed to attend our clinic for recall examination 13 months post treatment following a telephone conversation. Frankl's behavioral scale and the sitting pattern were recorded for each child. In the sedation group, Frankl's scores of the present visits were then compared to the scores recorded at the initial examination visit that were obtained from the dental records. The accompanying parents were asked to note the number of visits to the dentist in the past two years, and to complete Corah's dental anxiety scale (DAS). No difference was observed between the children in both groups. Most of the children in the GA and in the sedation groups sat alone on the dental chair, without the assistance of the parents. Parents of the sedation group showed higher scores than the GA group in the total DAS (9.35 and 8.90 respectively), however these differences were not statistically significant. It is concluded that children treated for BBTD under GA or under sedation at a very young age behave similarly in a follow-up examination nearly 13 months postoperatively.

  8. Identifying pediatric emergence delirium by using the PAED Scale: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Matthew J; Hawks, Sharon J; Taicher, Brad M; Bonta, Juliet; Brandon, Debra H

    2014-04-01

    Pediatric emergence delirium is a postoperative phenomenon characterized by aberrant cognitive and psychomotor behavior, which can place the patient and health care personnel at risk for injury. A common tool for identifying emergence delirium is the Level of Consciousness-Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (LOC-RASS), although it has not been validated for use in the pediatric population. The Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale (PAED) is a newly validated tool to measure emergence delirium in children. We chose to implement and evaluate the effectiveness and fidelity of using the PAED Scale to identify pediatric emergence delirium in one eight-bed postanesthesia care unit in comparison with the traditional LOC-RASS. The overall incidence of pediatric emergence delirium found by using the LOC-RASS with a retrospective chart review (3%) was significantly lower than the incidence found by using the LOC-RASS (7.5%) and PAED Scale (11.5%) during the implementation period. Our findings suggest that the PAED Scale may be a more sensitive measure of pediatric emergence delirium, and, in the future, we recommend that health care personnel at our facility use the PAED Scale rather than the LOC-RASS.

  9. Patient-directed music therapy reduces anxiety and sedation exposure in mechanically-ventilated patients: a research critique.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Janice G; Kwan, Xiu Xian

    2015-05-01

    This research appraisal, guided by the CASP Randomised Controlled Trial Checklist, critiques a randomised, controlled trial of patient-directed music therapy compared to either noise-cancelling headphones or usual care. This study recruited 373 alert, mechanically-ventilated patients across five intensive care units in the United States. The Music Assessment Tool, administered by a music therapist, facilitated music selection by participants in the intervention group. Anxiety was measured using the VAS-A scale. Sedation exposure was measured by both sedation frequency and by sedation intensity using a daily sedation intensity score. Context for the data was supported by an environmental scan form recording unit activity and by written comments from nurses about the patient's responses to the protocol. Patient-directed music therapy allowed a significant reduction in sedation frequency compared to noise-cancelling headphones and usual care participants. Patient-directed music therapy led to significantly lower anxiety and sedation intensity compared to usual care, but not compared to noise-cancelling headphones. This is a robust study with clear aims and a detailed description of research methods and follow-up. While no participants were lost to follow-up, not all were included in the analysis: 37% did not have the minimum of two anxiety assessments for comparison and 23% were not included in sedation analysis. While some participants utilised the intervention or active control for many hours-per-day, half the music therapy participants listened for 12min or less per day and half of the noise-cancelling headphone participants did not appear to use them. While the results suggest that patient-directed music therapy and noise-cancelling headphones may be useful and cost-effective interventions that lead to an overall improvement in anxiety and sedation exposure, these may appeal to a subset of ICU patients. The self-directed use of music therapy and noise

  10. Comparison of Propofol, Propofol-Remifentanil, and Propofol-Fentanyl Administrations with Each Other Used for the Sedation of Patients to Undergo ERCP

    PubMed Central

    Haytural, Candan; Aydınlı, Bahar; Demir, Berna; Bozkurt, Elif; Parlak, Erkan; Dişibeyaz, Selçuk; Saraç, Ahmet; Özgök, Ayşegül; Kazancı, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Using single anesthetic agent in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) may lead to inadequate analgesia and sedation. To achieve the adequate analgesia and sedation the single anesthetic agent doses must be increased which causes undesirable side effects. For avoiding high doses of single anesthetic agent nowadays combination with sedative agents is mostly a choice for analgesia and sedation for ERCP. Aim. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of propofol alone, propofol + remifentanil, and propofol + fentanyl combinations on the total dose of propofol to be administered during ERCP and on the pain scores after the process. Materials and Method. This randomized study was performed with 90 patients (ASA I-II-III) ranging between 18 and 70 years of age who underwent sedation/analgesia for elective ERCP. The patients were administered only propofol (1.5 mg/kg) in Group Ι, remifentanil (0.05 μg/kg) + propofol (1.5 mg/kg) combination in Group II, and fentanyl (1 μg/kg) + propofol (1.5 mg/kg) combination in Group III. All the patients' sedation levels were assessed with the Ramsey Sedation Scale (RSS). Their recovery was assessed with the Aldrete and Numerical Rating Scale Score (NRS) at 10 min intervals. Results. The total doses of propofol administered to the patients in the three groups in this study were as follows: 375 mg in Group I, 150 mg in Group II, and 245 mg in Group III. Conclusion. It was observed that, in the patients undergoing ERCP, administration of propofol in combination with an opioid provided effective and reliable sedation, reduced the total dose of propofol, increased the practitioner satisfaction, decreased the pain level, and provided hemodynamic stability compared to the administration of propofol alone. PMID:26576424

  11. Symptoms of agitated depression and/or akathisia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Marija Vučić; Prološčić, Joško; Blažević-Zelić, Sandra; Skarpa-Usmiani, Ivona; Peitl, Vjekoslav

    2011-03-01

    Akathisia is a syndrome characterized by the unpleasant sensation of "inner" restlessness that manifests itself in the inability of sitting still or not moving. Many types of medicaments can cause akathisia as an adverse event of their use and they include: antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiemetics, antihistamines, and psychoactive substances. We will present the case of a 50 year old patient, treated on two occasions for psychotic depression. During the second hospitalization it is possible that antipsychotic treatment combined with an antidepressant caused akathisia or there were symptoms of agitated depression and akathisia present at the same time, which is very difficult to determine in everyday clinical practice. We can conclude that in this case, as in many others, akathisia as a possible adverse effect of psychopharmacs was very hard to identify. Therefore, it is necessary to have akathisia in mind when using certain medicaments, especially when combining several that use the same enzymatic system and consequently raise levels of at least one of them.

  12. Terahertz spectroscopic study of benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Fusheng; Shen, Jingling; Wang, Xianfeng

    2011-08-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is used to the pure active ingredient of three benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics with similar molecular structure. The absorption spectra of them are studied in the range of 0.2~2.6THz. Based on the experiment, the theoretical simulation results of diazepam, nitrazepam and clonazepam are got by the Gaussian03 package of DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method in single-molecule models. The experimental results show that even if the molecular structure and medicine property of them are similar, the accurate identification of them can still be done with their characteristic absorption spectra. Theoretical simulation results are well consistent with the experimental results. It demonstrates that absorption peaks of them in THz range mainly come from intra-molecular forces and are less affected by the intermolecular interaction and crystal effects.ô

  13. Sedation and Analgesia in the Performance of Interventional Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Interventional procedures can produce pain, anxiety, and physical and mental distress. Analgesia and sedation in the interventional radiology suite are given routinely during interventional procedures and allow a safe, comfortable, and technically successful procedure to be performed. Appropriate sedation decreases patient movement, patient anxiety, pain perception, and is crucial to successfully perform percutaneous interventions. A thorough understanding of the preoperative patient assessment, intraprocedural monitoring, pharmacologic characteristics of medications, postoperative care, and treatment of complications is required for the practicing interventionalist. Complications related to sedation and analgesia can occur secondary to preexisting medical conditions, incorrect drug administration, and/or inadequate patient monitoring.1,2 PMID:22550378

  14. Oral transmucosal administration of dexmedetomidine for sedation in 4 dogs.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Anne E; Bennett, Sara L

    2015-11-01

    Injectable dexmedetomidine (DM) is widely used for sedation, restraint, anxiolysis, and analgesia in veterinary medicine. Oral transmucosal dexmedetomidine (OTM DM) has been evaluated in horses, cats, and humans, but not in dogs. In this case series, OTM DM (mean dose of 32.6 μg/kg body weight) was given in the buccal pouch to 4 aggressive dogs in a hospital setting. Two of the dogs were subsequently euthanized, and in the other 2, sedation was reversed with atipamezole. Satisfactory sedation was achieved in all cases.

  15. Oral transmucosal administration of dexmedetomidine for sedation in 4 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Anne E.; Bennett, Sara L.

    2015-01-01

    Injectable dexmedetomidine (DM) is widely used for sedation, restraint, anxiolysis, and analgesia in veterinary medicine. Oral transmucosal dexmedetomidine (OTM DM) has been evaluated in horses, cats, and humans, but not in dogs. In this case series, OTM DM (mean dose of 32.6 μg/kg body weight) was given in the buccal pouch to 4 aggressive dogs in a hospital setting. Two of the dogs were subsequently euthanized, and in the other 2, sedation was reversed with atipamezole. Satisfactory sedation was achieved in all cases. PMID:26538668

  16. Response to intravenous midazolam sedation in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Ellis, S

    1996-06-08

    The object of this study was to grade the response of patients undergoing a variety of dental procedures with the aid of intravenous midazolam sedation in general dental practice and to explore any relationships between the patients preoperative anxiety assessment and the clinician's assessment of co-operation whilst under sedation. One hundred consecutive patients aged between 18 and 58 years (mean 32 years; sd 10 years) and in ASA Class I or II were prospectively studied. Results showed that despite attempts to grade patient's behaviour it was not possible to reliably predict patient's responses under intravenous sedation. In addition to these findings, the great individual variation in sensitivity to midazolam was confirmed.

  17. Delivering supplemental oxygen during sedation via a saliva ejector.

    PubMed

    Milnes, Alan R

    2002-01-01

    Intraoperative oxygen supplementation to sedated children has been shown to prevent hemoglobin desaturations even in the presence of apnea during pediatric conscious sedation. Although many practitioners deliver supplemental oxygen via a nasal hood, this method is impractical and often unsuccessful if the child is a mouth breather, has moderate adenotonsillar hypertrophy or occasionally cries during treatment (at which time there will be mouth breathing). This paper describes a method in which the saliva ejector is used to deliver supplemental oxygen to sedated children while they are receiving dental treatment. The advantages of this method and suggestions for its successful application are also included.

  18. A Longitudinal Examination of Agitation and Resident Characteristics in the Nursing Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgio, Louis D.; Park, Nan Sook; Hardin, J. Michael; Sun, Fei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Agitation frequently accompanies cognitive decline among nursing home residents. This study used cross-sectional and longitudinal (up to 18 months) methods to examine agitation among profoundly and moderately impaired residents using both staff report and direct observation methods. Design and Methods: The study included participants (N =…

  19. The Relationship between Agitated Behavior and Cognitive Functioning in Nursing Home Residents: Preliminary Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska

    Agitation is a significant problem for nursing home residents, their families, and their caretakers. Agitation is defined as inappropriate verbal, vocal, or motor activity which is not explained by needs or confusion per se. It includes behaviors such as aimless wandering, pacing, cursing, screaming, biting, and fighting. The inappropriate nature…

  20. Behavioral Characteristics of Agitated Nursing Home Residents with Dementia at the End of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rebecca S.; Burgio, Louis D.; Fisher, Susan E.; Hardin, J. Michael; Shuster, John L., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine group differences in verbal agitation, verbal interaction, bed restraint, pain, analgesic and neuroleptic medication use, and medical comorbidity among agitated nursing home residents who died during a 6-month clinical trial compared with residents of the same gender and similar initial cognitive…

  1. System for agitating the acid in a lead-acid battery

    DOEpatents

    Weintraub, Alvin; MacCormack, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    A system and method for agitating the acid in a large lead-sulfuric acid storage battery of the calcium type. An air-lift is utilized to provide the agitation. The air fed to the air-lift is humidified prior to being delivered to the air-lift.

  2. Comparison of dexmedetomidine/fentanyl with midazolam/fentanyl combination for sedation and analgesia during tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Yu, C; Li, S; Deng, F; Yao, Y; Qian, L

    2014-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that causes minimal respiratory depression compared with alternative drugs. This study investigated whether combined dexmedetomidine/fentanyl offered better sedation and analgesia than midazolam/fentanyl in dental surgery. Sixty patients scheduled for unilateral impacted tooth extraction were randomly assigned to receive either dexmedetomidine and fentanyl (D/F) or midazolam and fentanyl (M/F). Recorded variables were patient preoperative anxiety scores, vital signs, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAAS) scores after drug administration, surgeon and patient degree of satisfaction, and the duration of analgesia after surgery. The OAAS scores were significantly lower for patients administered D/F compared to those who received M/F. The duration of analgesia after the surgical procedure was significantly longer in patients who received D/F (5.3 h) than in those who received M/F (4.1 h; P=0.017). The number of surgeons satisfied with the level of sedation/analgesia provided by D/F was significantly higher than for M/F (P=0.001). Therefore, dexmedetomidine/fentanyl appears to provide better sedation, stable haemodynamics, surgeon satisfaction, and postoperative analgesia than midazolam/fentanyl during office-based unilateral impacted tooth extraction.

  3. Relaxing music at mealtime in nursing homes: effects on agitated patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Hicks-Moore, Sandee Lynn

    2005-12-01

    Agitation in individuals with severe cognitive impairment is a significant problem that affects care and overall quality of life. Building on research conducted by Goddaer and Abraham (1994), this quasi-experimental study proposed that relaxing music played during meals would exert a calming effect and decrease agitated behaviors among nursing home residents with dementia. Thirty residents residing in a Special Care Unit participated in the 4-week study. The Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (Cohen-Mansfield, Marx, & Rosenthal, 1989) was used to gather data. Baseline data was obtained in Week 1 (no music). Music was introduced in Week 2, removed in Week 3, and reintroduced in Week 4. At the end of the 4-week study, overall reductions in the cumulative incidence of total agitated behaviors were observed. Reductions in absolute numbers of agitated behaviors were achieved during the weeks with music and a distinct pattern was observed.

  4. [Application of music therapy for managing agitated behavior in older people with dementia].

    PubMed

    Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chang, Anne M; Abbey, Jennifer

    2006-10-01

    Older people with dementia may display negative emotions, memory problems, sleep disturbance, and agitated behavior. Among these symptoms, agitated behavior has been identified by families and nursing staff as the care problem that presents the greatest challenge. Several studies have found that music therapy reduced agitated behaviors in those with dementia and recommended use of music as an effective strategy in managing this behavioral problem. Music therapy represents a lower cost, effective care approach that nursing staff can easily learn and apply to those with dementia. Furthermore, reductions in agitated behavior in dementia patients that result from music therapy can also alleviate caregiver stress and burden of care, leading to improvements in the health and quality of life of both dementia patients and their caregivers. This paper aims to introduce the principles and application of music therapy in the management of agitated behavior in those with dementia.

  5. Quetiapine reduces irritability and risk of suicide in patients with agitated depression.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Akiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2013-07-20

    Patients who suffer from agitated depression accompanied by psychomotor agitation and irritability are prone to suicidal ideation and attempts and must therefore be diagnosed and treated with utmost care. Clinically, there have been more than a few cases of suicidal attempts that seemed to have been provoked by careless prescription of antidepressant medication. In the present study, administration of quetiapine to 3 patients in the acute phase of agitated depression resulted in rapid improvement in irritability and alleviation of depression. Depression in these 3 patients was caused by chronic (persistent) anxiety and tension. During the acute phase, the patients evidenced psychomotor agitation and irritability, often experiencing a sudden, overwhelming urge to commit suicide. Findings from the present study suggest that treatment with quetiapine in patients with this type of agitated depression can quickly alleviate symptoms of anxiety and irritability and reduce the risk of suicide.

  6. Do sound levels and space contribute to agitation in nursing home residents with dementia?

    PubMed

    Joosse, Laura L

    2012-07-01

    Individuals with dementia living in nursing homes may be exposed to non-therapeutic levels of sound. There is insufficient research examining the relationship between sound levels, personal space, and agitation in people with dementia. Using an observational designed study, 53 participants from four southeastern Wisconsin nursing homes were observed; data on sound levels, space, and agitation levels were obtained. Sound was a significant predictor of agitation. The accumulation of sound predicted agitated behavior and explained 16% of the variance, F(5, 47) = 4.520, p < 0.002, and adjusted R(2) = 0.253. The findings suggest agitation may be a clue that sound in the environment is causing stress for residents with dementia.

  7. The effect of magnesium sulphate infusion on the incidence and severity of emergence agitation in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy using sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Abdulatif, M; Ahmed, A; Mukhtar, A; Badawy, S

    2013-10-01

    This randomised, controlled, double-blind study investigated the effects of intra-operative magnesium sulphate administration on the incidence of emergence agitation in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy using sevoflurane anaesthesia. Seventy children were randomly allocated to receive a 30 mg.kg(-1) bolus of intravenous magnesium sulphate after induction of anaesthesia followed by a continuous infusion of 10 mg.kg(-1).h(-1) or an equal volume of saline 0.9%. All children received titrated sevoflurane anaesthesia adjusted to maintain haemodynamic stability. The Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Score were used for the assessment of postoperative emergence agitation and pain, respectively. Emergence agitation was more common in the control group than in the magnesium group (23 (72%) and 12 (36%), respectively (p = 0.004)), with a relative risk of 0.51 (95% CI 0.31-0.84), an absolute risk reduction of 0.35 (95% CI 0.10-0.54), and number needed to treat of 3 (95% CI 2-9). Postoperative pain scores were comparable in the two groups. Magnesium sulphate reduces the incidence and severity of emergence agitation in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy using sevoflurane anaesthesia and is not associated with increased postoperative side-effects or delayed recovery.

  8. Sedative effects of dexmedetomidine, dexmedetomidine-pethidine and dexmedetomidine-butorphanol in cats.

    PubMed

    Nagore, L; Soler, C; Gil, L; Serra, I; Soler, G; Redondo, J I

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical effects of dexmedetomidine, both alone and combined with pethidine or butorphanol, in cats. A prospective randomized blind study was performed. Thirty cats were randomly assigned to three groups of 10 animals: D: dexmedetomidine (20 μg/kg IM); DP: dexmedetomidine (10 μg/kg IM) and pethidine (2.5 mg/kg IM); DB: dexmedetomidine (10 μg/kg IM) and butorphanol (0.4 mg/kg IM). Quality of sedation, analgesia, muscle relaxation and the possibility of performing some clinical procedures were compared using a multifactorial scale. Sedation, analgesia and muscle relaxation increased progressively over time and did not differ in the three protocols. The three protocols facilitated the completion of several clinical procedures. The clinical variables studied showed a similar behaviour in the three protocols and remained close to the baseline, except for a drop in heart rate in protocol D. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine, either alone or combined with pethidine or butorphanol, offers suitable sedation, analgesia and relaxation to perform various clinical procedures in cats.

  9. Assessing the sedative effect of oral vs submucosal meperidine in pediatric dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Toomarian, Lida; Salem, Katayoun; Ansari, Ghassem

    2013-01-01

    Background: The goal of this investigation was to compare the behavioral and physiological effects of three sedative drug regimens: oral meperidine (OM), submucosal meperidine (SM) and oral midazolam (M) in healthy pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: This study sample consisted of thirty children aged 24-72 months (mean = 41.1) exhibiting definitely negative behavior. Three sedative regimens including: Oral meperidine/hydroxyzine, oral midazolam/hydroxyzine and submucosal meperidine/oral hydroxyzine were administered randomly during three consecutive appointments with a crossover design. Houpt behavioral scale was employed for evaluating the sedation effect of each regimen by a calibrated independent Pediatric dentist. Physiologic parameters were also recorded including blood oxygen saturation and pulse rate. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon-signed ranked test, Mc-Nemar, GEE Logistic regression, Friedman, Fisher exact and Cochran tests for significance. Results: Overall success rates were 50%, 46.7% and 26.7% for submucosal meperidine, oral meperidine and oral midazolam, respectively (P = 0.03). The probability of achieving a success in behavior control was more in 48-72 month olds. Child's age and drug type were the two main predictors of altered behavior. Evaluating the differences between the effects of three tested regimens on recorded physiological parameters showed no significant differences. Conclusion: All three regimens were proved safe within the limits of the current study. Meperidine sedation in both routes was considered to be more effective. Although there was less sleep and more head/oral resistance in midazolam group, the difference between groups was not significant. PMID:23946732

  10. Fospropofol disodium injection for the sedation of patients undergoing colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Levitzky, Benjamin E; Vargo, John J

    2008-01-01

    Sedation plays a central role in making colonoscopy tolerable for patients and feasible for the endoscopist to perform. The array of agents used for endoscopic sedation continues to evolve. Fospropofol (FP), a prodrug of propofol with a slower pharmacokinetic profile, is currently under evaluation for use during endoscopic procedures. Preliminary data suggests that FP dosed at 6.5 mg/kg is well tolerated by most patients with perineal paresthesias being the most commonly experienced adverse effect. This article will examine the current literature on the use of FP for the sedation of patients undergoing colonoscopy, highlighting the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, risks, and common adverse events associated with the novel sedative/hypnotic. PMID:19209255

  11. Sedation and analgesia for the pediatric trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Grabinsky, Andreas; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2012-01-01

    The number of children requiring sedation and analgesia for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures has increased substantially in the last decade. Both anesthesiologist and non-anesthesiologists are involved in varying settings outside the operating room to provide safe and effective sedation and analgesia. Procedural sedation has become standard of care and its primary aim is managing acute anxiety, pain, and control of movement during painful or unpleasant procedures. There is enough evidence to suggest that poorly controlled acute pain causes suffering, worse outcome, as well as debilitating chronic pain syndromes that are often refractory to available treatment options. This article will provide strategies to provide safe and effective sedation and analgesia for pediatric trauma patients. PMID:23181210

  12. Periodic cardiovascular and ventilatory activity during midazolam sedation.

    PubMed

    Galletly, D C; Williams, T B; Robinson, B J

    1996-04-01

    We have examined the effects of sedation with midazolam 0.1 mg kg-1 and reversal with flumazenil 0.5 mg on beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) variability (HRV), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), finger photoplethysmograph amplitude (PLA) and impedence pneumography in eight volunteers. With the onset of sedation there was a small decrease in SAP and increase in HR (ns). Spectral analysis of the HR time series showed reductions in the proportion of power in the high (> 0.15 Hz) frequency "ventilatory" band consistent with midazolam causing vagolysis. During sedation, low frequency (< 0.05 Hz) oscillations of PLA, HR, SAP and ventilation were observed. These were thought to be secondary to activity of coupled cardiorespiratory neurones within the brain stem and the ventilatory periodicity appeared similar to that observed during the early stages of sleep. The diminished high frequency and increased low frequency oscillations induced by midazolam sedation were reversed by administration of flumazenil.

  13. Micro acoustic resonant chambers for heating/agitating/mixing (MARCHAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Noell, Aaron C.; Fisher, Anita M.; Takano, Nobuyuki; Grunthaner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A variety of applications require the mixing and/or heating of a slurry made from a powder/fluid mixture. One of these applications, Sub Critical Water Extraction (SCWE), is a process where water and an environmental powder sample (sieved soil, drill cuttings, etc.) are heated in a sealed chamber to temperatures greater than 200 degrees Celsius by allowing the pressure to increase, but without reaching the critical point of water. At these temperatures, the ability of water to extract organics from solid particulate increases drastically. This paper describes the modeling and experimentation on the use of an acoustic resonant chamber which is part of an amino acid detection instrument called Astrobionibbler [Noell et al. 2014, 2015]. In this instrument we use acoustics to excite a fluid- solid fines mixture in different frequency/amplitude regimes to accomplish a variety of sample processing tasks. Driving the acoustic resonant chamber at lower frequencies can create circulation patterns in the fluid and mixes the liquid and fines, while driving the chamber at higher frequencies one can agitate the fluid and powder and create a suspension. If one then drives the chamber at high amplitude at resonance heating of the slurry occurs. In the mixing and agitating cell the particle levitation force depends on the relative densities and compressibility's of the particulate and fluid and on the kinetic and potential energy densities associated with the velocity and pressure fields [Glynne-Jones, Boltryk and Hill 2012] in the cell. When heating, the piezoelectric transducer and chamber is driven at high power in resonance where the solid/fines region is modelled as an acoustic transmission line with a large loss component. In this regime, heat is pumped into the solution/fines mixture and rapidly heats the sample. We have modeled the piezoelectric transducer/chamber/ sample using Mason's equivalent circuit. In order to assess the validity of the model we have built and

  14. Balanced propofol sedation administered by nonanesthesiologists: The first Italian experience

    PubMed Central

    Repici, Alessandro; Pagano, Nico; Hassan, Cesare; Carlino, Alessandra; Rando, Giacomo; Strangio, Giuseppe; Romeo, Fabio; Zullo, Angelo; Ferrara, Elisa; Vitetta, Eva; Ferreira, Daniel de Paula Pessoa; Danese, Silvio; Arosio, Massimo; Malesci, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of a balanced approach using midazolam in combination with propofol, administered by non-anesthesiologists, in a large series of diagnostic colonoscopies. METHODS: Consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic colonoscopy were sedated with a single dose of midazolam (0.05 mg/kg) and low-dose propofol (starter bolus of 0.5 mg/kg and repeated boluses of 10 to 20 mg). Induction time and deepest level of sedation, adverse and serious adverse events, as well as recovery times, were prospectively assessed. Cecal intubation and adenoma detection rates were also collected. RESULTS: Overall, 1593 eligible patients were included. The median dose of propofol administered was 70 mg (range: 40-120 mg), and the median dose of midazolam was 2.3 mg (range: 2-4 mg). Median induction time of sedation was 3 min (range: 1-4 min), and median recovery time was 23 min (range: 10-40 min). A moderate level of sedation was achieved in 1561 (98%) patients, whilst a deep sedation occurred in 32 (2%) cases. Transient oxygen desaturation requiring further oxygen supplementation occurred in 8 (0.46%; 95% CI: 0.2%-0.8%) patients. No serious adverse event was observed. Cecal intubation and adenoma detection rates were 93.5% and 23.4% (27.8% for male and 18.5% for female, subjects), respectively. CONCLUSION: A balanced sedation protocol provided a minimalization of the dose of propofol needed to target a moderate sedation for colonoscopy, resulting in a high safety profile for non-anesthesiologist propofol sedation. PMID:21987624

  15. [Administration of intravenous sedation with midazolam by dentists is unsafe].

    PubMed

    Broers, D L M; Plat, J; de Jongh, A; Zuidgeest, T G M; Blom, H C C M; Kraaijenhagen, A E; Pieterse, C M; Bildt, M M

    2015-03-01

    In the December issue of the Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Tandheelkunde (Dutch Journal of Dentistry) in 2014, an article was devoted to the use of light sedation with midazolam by dentists. A number of dentists who are active in the area of Special Dentistry (anxiety management, care of the disabled) and a anesthesiologist offer a response to the article and argue that the administration of intravenous sedation with midazolam by dentists is unsafe.

  16. Ventilation monitoring during moderate sedation in GI patients.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Thomas J; Middleton, Austin H; Makhija, Nikhil

    2017-02-01

    Sedation in locations outside the operating room (OR) is common. Guidelines for safe patient monitoring have been updated by the American Society of Anesthesiology to include monitoring of ventilation and/or carbon dioxide (CO2). Although technologies exist to monitor these variables, the quality and/or availability of these measurements in non-OR settings is not optimal. This quality improvement project assessed the value of impedance technology for monitoring minute ventilation (MV) compared to standard end-tidal monitoring of CO2 (ETCO2). Patients undergoing GI exams with moderate sedation provided by anesthesia providers were monitored for MV with a respiratory volume monitor (ExSpiron 1Xi, Respiratory Motion, Waltham, MA) and ETCO2 via nasal cannula (NC). Calibration and baseline data were collected prior to sedation. Continuous MV and ETCO2 data were collected and averaged, providing minute values after sedation medications throughout the procedure. Stable periods of reduced MV were averaged and used in comparison to ETCO2. Data from 20 patients were evaluated. After sedation, the expected decrease in MV after sedation was observed in 18 of 20 patients (average -47.82 %), while an increase in ETCO2 was observed in just 10 of 20 patients (average -5.17 mm Hg). The correlation coefficient between changes in MV and ETCO2 in response to sedation administration was positive and not significant, r = 0.223. Ventilation monitoring may provide an element of safety for earlier and more reliable detection of reduced ventilation compared to a surrogate for hypoventilation, ETCO2, in patients undergoing sedation for GI procedures outside of the OR.

  17. Effects of sedation on auditory brainstem response in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pillion, Joseph P; Bibat, Genila; Naidu, Sakkubai

    2010-05-01

    Prolongation of the I-V interpeak latency intervals have been reported in Rett syndrome and other neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been suggested that the use of sedation may account for differences in the interpeak latency intervals when comparisons are made across diagnostic groups if sedated control groups are not used for the basis of comparison. This study examined the effects of sedation on auditory brainstem response interpeak latency intervals (i.e., I-III, III-V, and I-V) in two groups: (1) a group with Rett syndrome who were positive for mutations in the MECP2 gene and (2) a group negative for mutations in the MECP2 gene but who were severely to profoundly delayed with other causes of mental retardation. To further assess the effects of sedation, a third group of sedated and nonsedated female participants, taken from an in-house normative auditory brainstem response database was also included. An analysis of variance indicated (1) longer I-V interpeak latency intervals in the sedated participants with Rett syndrome; (2) longer III-V interpeak latency intervals in the mutation-positive participants as compared to non-Rett syndrome, mutation-negative participants; and (3) no significant effects of sedation on the I-III, III-V, or I-V interpeak latency intervals among the normative group participants, according to t tests. The findings suggest a possible biological basis for the discrepancy in the literature on auditory brain stem responses in Rett syndrome, and warrant cautious interpretation of auditory brainstem responses findings in sedated subjects with Rett syndrome, as well as in those with mental retardation and seizures.

  18. Creating a sedation service for pediatric urodynamics: our experience.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Heidi; Marai, Susan; Kim, Christina; Ferrer, Fernando

    2008-08-01

    Interpretable urodynamics studies are difficult to obtain in children, many of whom exhibit significant behavioral distress during catheterization. To address the needs of these children, researchers developed a sedation service and reviewed the literature that supported the creation of this service. This article will present the authors'experience in creating a service to meet the needs of these children as well as the initial outcomes of the sedation service.

  19. Ocular surface bacterial colonisation in sedated intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Mela, E K; Drimtzias, E G; Christofidou, M K; Filos, K S; Anastassiou, E D; Gartaganis, S P

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the time-dependent ocular surface bacterial colonisation of sedated patients hospitalised in an intensive care unit and aimed to evaluate whether proper topical antibiotic prophylaxis could prohibit corneal infection. The study lasted 12 months and included 134 patients undergoing sedation and mechanical respiratory support for various medical reasons. Patients hospitalised for less than seven days and those with pre-existing ocular surface pathology were excluded. All patients were examined on admission by inspecting the cornea for erosions. Followup examinations were performed each subsequent day. Cultures were also obtained from the conjunctival sac of both eyes on admission and every seventh day until the end of sedation. Standard laboratory techniques were used for isolation, identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of bacteria. Antibiotic treatment for prophylaxis was administered accordingly. Analysis was carried out for 70 patients. Duration of sedation ranged from seven to 122 days. Fifty-four (77%) patients were colonised by at least one bacterial species other than normal flora within seven to 42 days. Multiple bacteria were isolated from 28 patients undergoing prolonged sedation. Prevalent isolates were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Infectious keratitis was prohibited in all cases. Ocular surface of long-term sedated patients was found to be colonised by various bacterial species and their isolation was closely associated with the time period of hospitalisation. The results of this study suggest that the early identification of ocular surface bacteria colonisation and the administration of topical antibiotics for prophylaxis can prohibit corneal infection in these patients.

  20. Clinical analysis of moderate-to-deep-sedation by nonmedical sedation practitioners in 597 patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vaessen, Hermanus; Bruens, Elisabeth; Knape, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether moderate-to-deep sedation with propofol and alfentanil can be administered safely by nonmedical sedation practitioners, and the outcomes of this practice in the Netherlands. We retrospectively analyzed the occurrence of sedation-related complications in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. Patients and methods: In this study, 597 adult patients consecutively underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. The health status of the patients was screened according to a standardized protocol, and the patients were sedated by trained nonmedical sedation practitioners. Their vital signs were continuously monitored and recorded. All patients received oxygen, and the depth of sedation was continuously assessed and recorded. Mild and severe complications were recorded and analyzed. Results: All patients recovered uneventfully, and no mortality occurred. Overall, of the 597 sedated patients, 85 had mild and 4 had severe complications. Hypoxemia and upper airway obstruction, which were easily managed by trained nonmedical sedation practitioners, were the most common events. Hypotension was rare. No signs or symptoms suggestive of aspiration were reported. Conclusion: Moderate-to-deep sedation has been and continues to be a risky medical procedure. Serious complications of propofol/opioid-based sedation, especially respiratory and cardiovascular adverse events, may occur. These complications need to be recognized rapidly and appropriately managed. Our study shows that well-trained nonmedical sedation practitioners can be entrusted to take responsibility for the safe administration of moderate-to-deep sedation. PMID:27227116

  1. Agitation in nursing home residents: the role of gender and social context.

    PubMed

    Burgio, L D; Butler, F R; Roth, D L; Hardin, J M; Hsu, C C; Ung, K

    2000-12-01

    We investigated the relationship among gender of resident, staff social interaction, and agitation in 46 (31 male and 15 female) nursing home residents with clinically significant agitation. Direct observations were conducted of resident behaviors and environmental contextual events using a computer-assisted, real-time observational system. The system recorded frequency, duration, and temporal sequencing of events. Results show that female residents displayed almost three times the amount of agitation as male residents (35% vs. 13% of total observation time, respectively), although men in the study were more likely to receive psychoactive drugs for their agitation. Staff spent similar amounts of time verbally interacting and touching male and female residents. Sequential analyses were conducted to examine the likelihood of staff verbal and touch interactions both preceding and following resident agitation using Bakeman and Quera's (1995) SDIS-GSEQ program. Results suggest that staff touch and verbal interaction elicit agitation in a significant proportion of residents. Once agitation occurs, staff were likely to respond by interacting verbally, but not physically, with the resident.

  2. Comparison of Oral and Intranasal Midazolam/Ketamine Sedation in 3-6-year-old Uncooperative Dental Patients.

    PubMed

    Fallahinejad Ghajari, Masoud; Ansari, Ghassem; Soleymani, Ali Asghar; Shayeghi, Shahnaz; Fotuhi Ardakani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. There are several known sedative drugs, with midazolam and ketamine being the most commonly used drugs in children. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intranasal and oral midazolam plus ketamine in children with high levels of dental anxiety. Materials and methods. A crossover double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 23 uncooperative children aged 3-6 (negative or definitely negative by Frankel scale), who required at least two similar dental treatment visits. Cases were randomly given ketamine (10 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) through oral or intranasal routes in each visit. The sedative efficacy of the agents was assessed by an overall success rate judged by two independent pediatric dentists based on Houpt's scale for sedation. Data analysis was carried out using Wilcoxon test and paired t-test. Results. Intranasal administration was more effective in reduction of crying and movement during dental procedures compared to oral sedation (P<0.05). Overall behavior control was scored higher in nasal compared to oral routes at the time of LA injection and after 15 minutes (P<0.05). The difference was found to be statistically significant at the start and during treatment. However, the difference was no longer significant after 30 minutes, with the vital signs remaining within physiological limits. Recovery time was longer in the intranasal group (P<0.001) with a more sleepy face (P=0.004). Conclusion. . Intranasal midazolam/ketamine combination was more satisfactory and effective than the oral route when sedating uncooperative children.

  3. Comparison of Oral and Intranasal Midazolam/Ketamine Sedation in 3-6-year-old Uncooperative Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fallahinejad Ghajari, Masoud; Ansari, Ghassem; Soleymani, Ali Asghar; Shayeghi, Shahnaz; Fotuhi Ardakani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. There are several known sedative drugs, with midazolam and ketamine being the most commonly used drugs in children. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intranasal and oral midazolam plus ketamine in children with high levels of dental anxiety. Materials and methods.A crossover double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 23 uncooperative children aged 3-6 (negative or definitely negative by Frankel scale), who required at least two similar dental treatment visits. Cases were randomly given ketamine (10 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) through oral or intranasal routes in each visit. The sedative efficacy of the agents was assessed by an overall success rate judged by two independent pediatric dentists based on Houpt’s scale for sedation. Data analysis was carried out using Wilcoxon test and paired t-test. Results. Intranasal administration was more effective in reduction of crying and movement during dental procedures compared to oral sedation (P<0.05). Overall behavior control was scored higher in nasal compared to oral routes at the time of LA injection and after 15 minutes (P<0.05). The difference was found to be statistically significant at the start and during treatment. However, the difference was no longer significant after 30 minutes, with the vital signs remaining within physiological limits. Recovery time was longer in the intranasal group (P<0.001) with a more sleepy face (P=0.004). Conclusion.. Intranasal midazolam/ketamine combination was more satisfactory and effective than the oral route when sedating uncooperative children. PMID:26236429

  4. Effects of ultrasonic agitation on adhesion strength of micro electroforming Ni layer on Cu substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Du, Liqun; Xu, Zheng; Shao, Ligeng

    2016-03-01

    Micro electroforming is an important technology, which is widely used for fabricating micro metal devices in MEMS. The micro metal devices have the problem of poor adhesion strength, which has dramatically influenced the dimensional accuracy of the devices and seriously limited the development of the micro electroforming technology. In order to improve the adhesion strength, ultrasonic agitation method is applied during the micro electroforming process in this paper. To explore the effect of the ultrasonic agitation, micro electroforming experiments were carried out under ultrasonic and ultrasonic-free conditions. The effects of the ultrasonic agitation on the micro electroforming process were investigated by polarization and alternating current (a.c.) impedance methods. The real surface area of the electroforming layer was measured by cyclic voltammetry method. The compressive stress and the crystallite size of the electroforming layer were measured by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method. The adhesion strength of the electroforming layer was measured by scratch test. The experimental results show that the imposition of the ultrasonic agitation decreases the polarization overpotential and increases the charge transfer process at the electrode-electrolyte interface during the electroforming process. The ultrasonic agitation increases the crystallite size and the real surface area, and reduces the compressive stress. Then the adhesion strength is improved about 47% by the ultrasonic agitation in average. In addition, mechanisms of the ultrasonic agitation improving the adhesion strength are originally explored in this paper. The mechanisms are that the ultrasonic agitation increases the crystallite size, which reduces the compressive stress. The lower the compressive stress is, the larger the adhesion strength is. Furthermore, the ultrasonic agitation increases the real surface area, enhances the mechanical interlocking strength and consequently increases the adhesion

  5. Optimal nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer's disease: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Alonso-Búa, Begoña; de Labra, Carmen; González-Abraldes, Isabel; Maseda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with Alzheimer's disease will develop agitation at later stages of the disease, which constitutes one of the most challenging and distressing aspects of dementia. Recently, nonpharmacological therapies have become increasingly popular and have been proven to be effective in managing the behavioral symptoms (including agitation) that are common in the middle or later stages of dementia. These therapies seem to be a good alternative to pharmacological treatment to avoid unpleasant side effects. We present a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on the nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients aged 65 years and above. Of the 754 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. This review suggests that music therapy is optimal for the management of agitation in institutionalized patients with moderately severe and severe AD, particularly when the intervention includes individualized and interactive music. Bright light therapy has little and possibly no clinically significant effects with respect to observational ratings of agitation but decreases caregiver ratings of physical and verbal agitation. Therapeutic touch is effective for reducing physical nonaggressive behaviors but is not superior to simulated therapeutic touch or usual care for reducing physically aggressive and verbally agitated behaviors. Melissa oil aromatherapy and behavioral management techniques are not superior to placebo or pharmacological therapies for managing agitation in AD. Further research in clinical trials is required to confirm the effectiveness and long-term effects of nonpharmacological interventions for managing agitation in AD. These types of studies may lead to the development of future intervention protocols to improve the well-being and daily functioning of these patients, thereby avoiding residential care placement.

  6. Optimal nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer’s disease: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Alonso-Búa, Begoña; de Labra, Carmen; González-Abraldes, Isabel; Maseda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with Alzheimer’s disease will develop agitation at later stages of the disease, which constitutes one of the most challenging and distressing aspects of dementia. Recently, nonpharmacological therapies have become increasingly popular and have been proven to be effective in managing the behavioral symptoms (including agitation) that are common in the middle or later stages of dementia. These therapies seem to be a good alternative to pharmacological treatment to avoid unpleasant side effects. We present a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on the nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients aged 65 years and above. Of the 754 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. This review suggests that music therapy is optimal for the management of agitation in institutionalized patients with moderately severe and severe AD, particularly when the intervention includes individualized and interactive music. Bright light therapy has little and possibly no clinically significant effects with respect to observational ratings of agitation but decreases caregiver ratings of physical and verbal agitation. Therapeutic touch is effective for reducing physical nonaggressive behaviors but is not superior to simulated therapeutic touch or usual care for reducing physically aggressive and verbally agitated behaviors. Melissa oil aromatherapy and behavioral management techniques are not superior to placebo or pharmacological therapies for managing agitation in AD. Further research in clinical trials is required to confirm the effectiveness and long-term effects of nonpharmacological interventions for managing agitation in AD. These types of studies may lead to the development of future intervention protocols to improve the well-being and daily functioning of these patients, thereby avoiding residential care placement. PMID:26955265

  7. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... § 63.1009 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... § 63.1009 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) (c) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  11. 40 CFR 65.110 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and..., valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid...

  12. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks...

  13. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks...

  14. 40 CFR 65.110 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and..., valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... § 63.1009 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  16. 40 CFR 65.110 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and..., valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators...

  18. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks...

  19. 40 CFR 65.110 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and..., valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) (c) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  1. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1) Each agitator shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks by the methods specified in § 63.180(b) of this...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) (c) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) (c) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... § 63.1009 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  5. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators...

  6. 40 CFR 65.110 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and..., valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid...

  7. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1) Each agitator shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks by the methods specified in § 63.180(b) of this...

  8. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks...

  9. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agitators in gas and vapor service and... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... in the referencing subpart. (b) (c) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators...

  13. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1) Each agitator shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks by the methods specified in § 63.180(b) of this...

  14. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1) Each agitator shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks by the methods specified in § 63.180(b) of this...

  15. Adjunctive remifentanil infusion in deeply sedated and paralyzed ICU patients during fiberoptic bronchoscopy procedure: a prospective, randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even with an adequate pain assessment, critically ill patients under sedation experience pain during procedures in the intensive care unit (ICU). We evaluated the effects of adjunctive administration of Remifentanil, a short-acting drug, in deeply sedated patient on variation of Bispectral Index (BIS) during a fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Methods A prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 18-bed ICU. Patients needing a tracheal fibroscopy under deep sedation (midazolam (0.1 mg/kg per hour) fentanyl (4 μg/kg per hour)) and neuromuscular blocking (atracurium 0.5 mg/kg) were included in the study. A continuous monitoring of BIS, arterial pressure, and heart rate were realized before, during, and after the fiberoptic exam. An adjunctive continuous placebo or Remifentanil infusion was started just before the fiberoptic exam with a target effect-site concentration of 4 ng/ml using a Base Primea pump. Results Mean arterial pressure and heart rates were comparable between the placebo and Remifentanil groups at all times of the procedure. We did not observe differences in the variation of BIS values between the two groups during procedure. We described no change in BIS values relative to the placebo group in this population. Conclusions In deeply sedated and paralyzed patients, receiving analgesic support based on a scale score an additional administration of short-acting analgesic drug, such as Remifentanil, seems not to be necessary for acute pain control. Trial registration NCT00162591. PMID:22800647

  16. Effect of individualized music on agitation in individuals with dementia who live at home.

    PubMed

    Park, Heeok; Pringle Specht, Janet K

    2009-08-01

    This pilot study investigated the effect of individualized music on agitation in individuals with dementia who live at home. Fifteen individuals listened to their preferred music for 30 minutes prior to peak agitation time, two times per week for 2 weeks, followed by no music intervention for 2 weeks. The process was repeated once. The findings showed that mean agitation levels were significantly lower while listening to music than before listening to the music. The findings of this pilot study suggest the importance of music intervention for individuals with dementia who live at home.

  17. The effect of dexmedetomidine sedation on patient and surgeon satisfaction during retinal surgery under sub-tenon's anesthesia: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jae-Hwa; Cho, Ana; Lee, Sung Jin; Sun, Hae Jung; Cho, Ho Bum; Lee, Dong Ryun

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intraoperative dexmedetomidine sedation on patient's and surgeon's satisfaction during retinal surgery under sub-tenon's anesthesia. Methods Forty-four patients scheduled for elective retinal surgery under sub-tenon's anesthesia were enrolled in this randomized controlled trial. The patients were divided into Dexmedetomidine (n = 22) and Control (n = 22) groups. Intravenous dexmedetomidine or 0.9% saline via infusion pump were administered continuously to the dexmedetomidine or control group, respectively. Ramsay sedation scale with a target level of 3-4 was used to assess adequacy of sedation. Perioperative pain, hemodynamic and respiratory data were collected, while satisfaction from patients and surgeon were assessed post-surgery using a 5-point satisfaction scale. Results Patient and surgeon satisfaction was higher in the dexmedetomidine group (P < 0.001, P = 0.002, respectively). The pain associated with sub-tenon's anesthesia and peripheral vitrectomy was lesser in the dexmedetomidine group than in the control group (P = 0.020). There was significant reduction of heart rate in the dexmedetomidine group (P = 0.001), but only one patient needed treatment with atropine. There was no respiratory effect on both groups. Conclusions Dexmedetomidine sedation during retinal surgery improved satisfaction from both patient and surgeon without respiratory complication. It is a safe and preferable choice of sedation for retinal surgery. PMID:26495053

  18. A cost analysis of treating pediatric dental patients using general anesthesia versus conscious sedation.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. Y.; Vann, W. F.; Roberts, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study is to report a cost comparison of general anesthesia (GA) versus oral conscious sedation (CS) for pediatric dental patients. The study sample included 22 children whose parents or guardians selected GA care for their child. Selection criteria limited inclusion to healthy children (American Society of Anesthesiologists' classification I) aged 24-60 months. The subjects acted as their own comparison group to an estimation CS model. Models were developed to assess societal costs for treatment under GA and CS. Treatment rendered was equalized using the dental relative based value unit scale. PMID:11724224

  19. Hydraulic characteristics simulation of an innovative self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR).

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei-Kang; Hojo, Toshimasa; Li, Yu-You

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was conducted on a self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR) with agitation caused solely by the release of stored gas. The compound in the reactor is mixed without the use of any mechanical equipment and electricity. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation used to provide details of the flow pattern and information about the agitation process and a solid basis for design and optimization purposes. Every self-agitation cycle could be separated into the pressure energy storage process, the exergonic process and the buffer stage. The reactor is regarded as the combination of continuous stirred tank reactor and a small plug flow reactor. The liquid level and diffusion varies widely depending on the length of the U-tube. The compound transition phenomenon in the 1st chamber mainly occurs during the energy exergonic process and buffer stage. The fluid-diffusion in the 3rd and 4th chambers mainly happens after the buffer period.

  20. A meta-analytic review of the association between agitation and suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Megan L; Ringer, Fallon B; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Agitation has been implicated as an acute risk factor for suicidal behavior, yet the literature to date has not been consolidated to better understand this relationship. We conducted a meta-analysis of the association between agitation and suicidal behavior to synthesize the existing literature (k=13 studies) and point out future directions for research. Results indicated that the association between agitation and suicidal behavior is moderate (Hedge's g=0.40, p=0.007, 95% CI [0.08, 0.72]). Follow-up meta-regressions revealed that age, gender, and year of publication were not significant moderators of the magnitude of this relationship. However, there was evidence of publication bias, as shown by a funnel plot and Egger's test. These findings suggest the importance of future research that examines the nature of the association between agitation and suicidal behavior longitudinally and with novel research designs, as implications for clinical practice and suicide risk assessment may be substantial.

  1. Flocculation of colloidal sols: Diffusion-controlled vs agitation-induced flocculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A proposal for carrying out flocculation experiments in microgravity is presented. These experiments might allow a correlation between theory and experiment. First, all particles, whether single primary particles or aggregates of primary particles would not settle or cream at any agitation rate, or even in the absence of agitation. This failure to separate would keep all aggregates active, still serving as centers for diffusion-controlled flocculation. Keeping all particles suspended would allow the possibility of determining the total number of particles as a function of time from beginning to end of flocculation. Finally, the experiments would allow a definite separation diffusion-controlled and agitation-induced flocculation by studying diffusion-controlled flocculation with and without agitation.

  2. Biological activity of insulin in GMO gels and the effect of agitation.

    PubMed

    Sadhale, Y; Shah, J C

    1999-11-25

    Glyceryl monooleate (GMO)-water cubic phase gel was previously shown to protect insulin from agitation induced aggregation. However, it is not known if insulin is biologically active in the gel and what effect agitation has on insulin in the gel. Therefore, the objective was to determine the stability of insulin in cubic phase gel in terms of its biological activity in a suitable animal model such as Sprague-Dawley rats. Effect of agitation on biological activity of insulin in cubic phase GMO gel was determined by subcutaneous injections of the agitated and non-agitated gels to two groups of previously fasted rats and measuring the effect on their blood glucose levels. Two groups of rats administered with agitated insulin solution and normal saline were used as controls. The biological activity of insulin was evaluated by comparing AAC (area above the blood glucose level-time curve, in %-h), C(max) (maximum % decrease in blood glucose levels) and t(max) (time required to attain C(max), in h) values for the four groups of rats. Since cubic phase gel is highly viscous, therapeutic equivalency of insulin in the lamellar phase gel, which converts in situ into cubic phase gel, was compared to insulin solution with normal saline as the control, using AAC, C(max) and t(max) of the blood glucose profile. Insulin was biologically active in both agitated and non-agitated gels; however, upon agitation, insulin in solution totally lost its hypoglycemic activity. Agitation of insulin in the cubic phase gel was seen to have very little deleterious effect on its biological activity. Insulin in the lamellar phase gel was not only biologically active but also therapeutically equivalent to insulin solution based on AAC (327.9+/-100.8 and 431.7+/-113.3), C(max) (57. 1+/-7.0 and 70.2+/-6.5) and t(max) (2.8+/-0.7 and 4.0+/-1.7) for the lamellar phase gel and insulin solution, respectively (no significant difference, P0.05). In summary, GMO cubic phase gel protected insulin from

  3. Diazepam tolerance: effect of age, regular sedation, and alcohol.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, P J; Flanagan, R; James, I M

    1984-01-01

    The dose of intravenous diazepam required for sedation was estimated in a series of 78 patients aged 17-85 years given the drug for dental and endoscopic procedures. Multiple regression analysis showed a significant correlation (r = 0.71; p less than 0.001) between dose and age, body weight, the taking of regular sedation, and the taking of more than 40 g alcohol daily, but there were no differences in the doses required between men and women, smokers and non-smokers, inpatients and outpatients, or dental and endoscopy patients. Patients aged 80 required an average dose of 10 mg and patients aged 20 an average dose of 30 mg, and the dose required was much higher in those receiving regular sedation or having a high alcohol intake. Plasma total and free diazepam concentrations were measured in the second half of the series of patients (n = 37). Plasma concentrations required for sedation fell twofold to threefold between the ages of 20 and 80 and were significantly higher in those taking regular sedation or alcohol. Differences in the acute response to diazepam appeared to be due to differences in the sensitivity of the central nervous system (pharmacodynamic tolerance) rather than to differences in pharmacokinetic factors. PMID:6432093

  4. Pain assessment during blood collection from sedated and mechanically ventilated children

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Layra Viviane Rodrigues Pinto; Dantas, Thiago Silveira Pinto; Santana-Filho, Valter Joviniano; Azevedo-Santos, Isabela Freire; DeSantana, Josimari Melo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study assessed pain and observed physiological parameters in sedated and mechanically ventilated children during a routine procedure. Methods This observational study was performed in a pediatric intensive care unit. Thirty-five children between 1 month and 12 years of age were assessed before, during, and five minutes after an arterial blood collection for gas analysis (painful procedure). Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability scale was used to assess pain. In addition, patients' heart rate, respiratory rate, peripheral saturation of oxygen and blood pressure (diastolic and systolic) were recorded. COMFORT-B scale was applied before the pain and physiological parameter assessments to verify sedation level of the subjects. Results There was an increase in Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability score (p = 0.0001) during painful stimuli. There was an increase in heart rate (p = 0.03), respiratory rate (p = 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.006) due to pain caused by the routine procedure. Conclusions This study suggests that assessments of pain using standard scales, such as Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability score, and other physiological parameters should be consistently executed to optimize pain management in pediatric intensive care units. PMID:27096676

  5. Predictors of Nursing Home Admission among Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Psychosis and/or Agitation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Edward Alan; Schneider, Lon S.; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to identify factors that predict nursing home placement among community-dwelling Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients with psychosis or agitation in a randomized clinical trial. Methods 418 participants with AD enrolled in the CATIE-AD trial of anti-psychotic medications and having no evidence of nursing home use at baseline were followed 9 months post-random assignment using data provided by caregiver proxy. χ2 tests, t-tests and Cox proportional hazard modeling were used to examine the baseline correlates of nursing home use. Results Of outpatients with no prior nursing home use, 15.0% were placed in a nursing home in the 9 months following baseline, with the average time to placement being 122 days. Bivariate analyses indicate that those with prior outpatient mental health use at study entry were more likely to be admitted; so too were those with worse physical functioning—lower scores on the AD Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADCS-ADL), lower utility scores on the Health Utility Index (HUI)-III, and worse cognition on the Mini-Mental State Examination. Controlling for other factors, non-Hispanic white race (hazard ratio [HR]=2.16) and prior mental health use (HR=1.87) increased the likelihood of admission. Those with higher ADCS-ADL scores were less likely to be placed (HR=0.97). Conclusion Factors leading to nursing home entry among psychotic/agitated AD patients are similar to the general population, though high incidence of nursing home entry highlights the importance of accounting for such utilization in health economic studies of AD outcomes. It also highlights the importance of using information on ADLs and other characteristics to develop profiles identifying those at greater or lesser risk of nursing home entry and, in so doing inform population planning associated with AD and identification of those patients and caregivers who might benefit most from interventions to prevent eventual placement

  6. Intranasal Dexmedetomidine as a Sedative Premedication for Patients Undergoing Suspension Laryngoscopy: A Randomized Double-Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chengxiang; Zhang, Li-Ming; Zhang, Yuehong; Ying, Yanlu; Li, Ling; Xu, Lixin; Ruan, Xiangcai

    2016-01-01

    Background Intranasal dexmedetomidine, a well-tolerated and convenient treatment option, has been shown to induce a favorable perioperative anxiolysis in children. We investigate intranasal dexmedetomidine as a sedative premedication for anesthesia recovery in an adult population. Methods A prospective randomized controlled trial; 81 adult patients scheduled for elective suspension laryngoscopy received intranasal dexmedetomidine (1 μg∙kg–1) or a placebo 45–60 min before anesthetic induction. Extubation time was used as the primary outcome measure. Secondary variables included the levels of sedation (Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scale, OAA/S) and anxiety (4-point anxiety score), anesthetic and analgesic requirements, hemodynamic fluctuations, and anesthesia recovery as well as side effects. Results The levels of sedation and anxiety differed significantly between the two groups at anesthesia pre-induction (p < 0.001 and = 0.001, respectively). Repeated-measure general linear model determined no significant interaction effect between group and time on the targeted concentration of propofol (F = 1.635, p = 0.200), but a significant main effect of group existed (F = 6.880, p = 0.010). A moderate but significant decrease in the heart rate was recorded in the dexmedetomidine group at pre-induction. Episodes of tachycardia and hypertension after tracheal intubation and extubation were more frequent in the placebo group. Conclusions Intranasal dexmedetomidine as a sedative premedication induced a favorable perioperative anxiolysis without prolongation in anesthesia recovery; the hemodynamic effect was modest. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 02108171 PMID:27196121

  7. Studies on heat transfer to Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in agitated vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triveni, B.; Vishwanadham, B.; Venkateshwar, S.

    2008-09-01

    Heat transfer studies to Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids are carried out in a stirred vessel fitted with anchor/turbine impeller and a coil for heating/cooling with an objective of determining experimentally the heat transfer coefficient of few industrially important systems namely castor oil and its methyl esters, soap solution, CMC and chalk slurries. The effect of impeller geometry, speed and aeration is investigated. Generalized Reynolds and Prandtl numbers are calculated using an apparent viscosity for non-Newtonian fluids. The data is correlated using a Sieder-Tate type equation. A trend of increase in heat transfer coefficient with RPM in presence and absence of solids has been observed. Relatively high values of Nusselt numbers are obtained for non-Newtonian fluids when aeration is coupled with agitation. The contribution of natural convection to heat transfer has been accounted for by incorporating the Grashof number. The correlations developed based on these studies are applied for design of commercial scale soponification reactor. Power per unit volume resulted in reliable design of a reactor.

  8. Physiology of Arousal in OSA and Potential Impacts for Sedative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy S; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Cori, Jennifer M; Trinder, John

    2017-04-11

    Treatment options for patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) intolerant of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) are limited. Thus, new therapies are sought. Recently, there has been interest in using sedatives to delay arousal from sleep, allowing upper airway dilator muscle recruitment sufficient to re-open the airway while maintaining sleep. In this review the rationale for sedative use and prior sedative studies in OSA are presented, along with a description of six factors that may determine sedative treatment success. It is proposed that in order for a sedative to treat OSA the patient must have each of the following three traits: 1) a mild to moderately collapsible upper airway, 2) responsive and effective upper airway dilator muscles and 3) a low to moderate arousal threshold. In addition (4), proponents of sedative treatment generally believe that to be effective the sedative must increase the arousal threshold. Finally (5), sedatives may have additional utility in patients with large ventilatory responses to arousal and (6) the metric used to define sedative success needs to be considered. To date, few of these factors have been evaluated in sedative trials. Further, it is likely only a relatively small percentage of patients will have all of the required traits. If sedative treatment is successful in appropriate patients, easily measured surrogate markers for the factors that determine sedative success will be critical for implementation in the clinic. Finally, sedatives may have detrimental outcomes for some patients and prospective identification of such patients will be required.

  9. Use of seagrass meadows as an adaptation measure to climate change for reducing port agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Lin, Jue; Pau Sierra, Joan; Gracia, Vicenç; Casas-Prat, Merce; Virgili, Marc

    2014-05-01

    the obtained wave projections to identify harbours where wave oscillation is expected to have a negative effect. One of these harbours, where agitation clearly increases, is selected to study the effectiveness of sea-grass for reducing wave heights within the harbour. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out to relate wave height decrease with sea-grass parameters such as meadow surface, plant density or submergence ratio (ratio between water depth and stem length). Acknowledgments The work described in this publication was supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme through the grant to the budget of the Collaborative Project RISES-AM-, Contract FP7-ENV-2013-two-stage-603396. References Casas-Prat M, Sierra JP (2012). Trend analysis of wave direction and associated impacts on the Catalan Coast. Climatic Change 115:667-691. Casas-Prat M, Sierra JP (2013). Projected future wave climate in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 118:3548-3568. Koftis T, Prinos P, Stratigaki V (2013). Wave damping over artificial posidonia oceanica meadow: A large-scale experimental study. Coastal Engineering 73:71-83.

  10. Caring for relatives with agitation at home: a qualitative study of positive coping strategies

    PubMed Central

    Jesnick, Leah; Turner, Rebecca; Leavey, Gerard; Livingston, Gill

    2017-01-01

    Background Trials of psychological interventions for reducing agitation in people with dementia living at home have been unsuccessful. Aims To inform future interventions by identifying successful strategies of family carers with relatives with dementia and agitation living at home. Method Qualitative in-depth individual interviews were performed with 18 family carers. We used thematic analysis to identify emerging themes. Results Carers described initial surprise and then acceptance that agitation is a dementia symptom and learned to respond flexibly. Their strategies encompassed: prevention of agitation by familiar routine; reduction of agitation by addressing underlying causes and using distraction; prevention of escalation by risk enablement, not arguing; and control of their emotional responses by ensuring their relative’s safety then walking away, carving out some time for themselves and using family and services for emotional and practical help. Conclusions These strategies can be manualised and tested in future randomised controlled trials for clinical effectiveness in reducing agitation in people with dementia living at home. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:28243464

  11. Effect of agitation on ligninase activity and ligninase production by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatadri, R.; Irvine, R.L. )

    1990-09-01

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces extracellular ligninases as part of its idiophasic ligninolytic system. Agitation has been widely reported to suppress both ligninase production and lignin degradation. Results show that mechanical inactivation of ligninase is possibly the reason why ligninase accumulation is low or absent in agitated shake-flask cultures. Agitation seems to affect the catalytic activity of ligninase and has no apparent effect on either the rate of ligninase production or the physiology of P. chrysosporium. The detergents Tween 20, Tween 40, Tween 60, Tween 80, and 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesuflonate (CHAPS) are able to protect both purified ligninase and extant ligninase in culture fluids (free of biomass) against mechanical inactivation due to agitation. Addition of Tween 80 at the end of primary growth to agitated shake flasks containing either pelleted or immobilized mycelial cultures results in production and maintenance of high levels of ligninase activity over several days under conditions of high agitation. Possible mechanisms by which the detergents could protect ligninase are discussed.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) insights into agitation stress methods in biopharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ge; Bee, Jared S; Biddlecombe, James G; Chen, Quanmin; Leach, W Thomas

    2012-02-28

    Agitation of small amounts of liquid is performed routinely in biopharmaceutical process, formulation, and packaging development. Protein degradation commonly results from agitation, but the specific stress responsible or degradation mechanism is usually not well understood. Characterization of the agitation stress methods is critical to identifying protein degradation mechanisms or specific sensitivities. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to model agitation of 1 mL of fluid by four types of common laboratory agitation instruments, including a rotator, orbital shaker, magnetic stirrer and vortex mixer. Fluid stresses in the bulk liquid and near interfaces were identified, quantified and compared. The vortex mixer provides the most intense stresses overall, while the stir bar system presented locally intense shear proximal to the hydrophobic stir bar surface. The rotator provides gentler fluid stresses, but the air-water interfacial area and surface stresses are relatively high given its low rotational frequency. The orbital shaker provides intermediate-level stresses but with the advantage of a large stable platform for consistent vial-to-vial homogeneity. Selection of experimental agitation methods with targeted types and intensities of stresses can facilitate better understanding of protein degradation mechanisms and predictability for "real world" applications.

  13. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Elizabeth L.; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen–Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

  14. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Elizabeth L; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia.

  15. Practice guidelines for propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists: the Korean Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force recommendations on propofol sedation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun; Kim, Duk Kyung; Choi, Yong-Seon; Yoo, Young-Chul; Chung, Hyun Sik

    2016-12-01

    In South Korea, as in many other countries, propofol sedation is performed by practitioners across a broad range of specialties in our country. However, this has led to significant variation in propofol sedation practices, as shown in a series of reports by the Korean Society of Anesthesiologists (KSA). This has led the KSA to develop a set of evidence-based practical guidelines for propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists. Here, we provide a set of recommendations for propofol sedation, with the aim of ensuring patient safety in a variety of clinical settings. The subjects of the guidelines are patients aged ≥ 18 years who were receiving diagnostic or therapeutic procedures under propofol sedation in a variety of hospital classes. The committee developed the guidelines via a de novo method, using key questions created across 10 sub-themes for data collection as well as evidence from the literature. In addition, meta-analyses were performed for three key questions. Recommendations were made based on the available evidence, and graded according to the modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Draft guidelines were scrutinized and discussed by advisory panels, and agreement was achieved via the Delphi consensus process. The guidelines contain 33 recommendations that have been endorsed by the KSA Executive Committee. These guidelines are not a legal standard of care and are not absolute requirements; rather they are recommendations that may be adopted, modified, or rejected according to clinical considerations.

  16. Practice guidelines for propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists: the Korean Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force recommendations on propofol sedation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In South Korea, as in many other countries, propofol sedation is performed by practitioners across a broad range of specialties in our country. However, this has led to significant variation in propofol sedation practices, as shown in a series of reports by the Korean Society of Anesthesiologists (KSA). This has led the KSA to develop a set of evidence-based practical guidelines for propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists. Here, we provide a set of recommendations for propofol sedation, with the aim of ensuring patient safety in a variety of clinical settings. The subjects of the guidelines are patients aged ≥ 18 years who were receiving diagnostic or therapeutic procedures under propofol sedation in a variety of hospital classes. The committee developed the guidelines via a de novo method, using key questions created across 10 sub-themes for data collection as well as evidence from the literature. In addition, meta-analyses were performed for three key questions. Recommendations were made based on the available evidence, and graded according to the modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Draft guidelines were scrutinized and discussed by advisory panels, and agreement was achieved via the Delphi consensus process. The guidelines contain 33 recommendations that have been endorsed by the KSA Executive Committee. These guidelines are not a legal standard of care and are not absolute requirements; rather they are recommendations that may be adopted, modified, or rejected according to clinical considerations. PMID:27924193

  17. Propofol for Anesthesia and Postoperative Sedation Resulted in Fewer Inflammatory Responses than Sevoflurane Anesthesia and Midazolam Sedation after Thoracoabdominal Esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Nakanuno, Ryuichi; Yasuda, Toshimichi; Hamada, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Kawamoto, Masashi

    2015-09-01

    Responses to surgical stress can be modulated by anesthetics. We prospectively compared the effects of two different anesthetic/sedative techniques on the peak postoperative bladder temperature (BT) and the postoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) level. Twenty patients who were scheduled to undergo elective thoracoabdominal esophagectomy were allocated to receive either propofol anesthesia followed by propofol sedation (PP group, n = 10) or sevoflurane anesthesia followed by midazolam sedation (SM group, n = 10). In each case, the patient's peak bladder temperature was measured on the morning after surgery, and their serum CRP levels were assessed on postoperative days (POD) 1, 2, and 3. The patients' postoperative clinical courses were also evaluated. The peak postoperative BT (degrees C) (37.6 ± 0.4 vs. 38.2 ± 0.6, respectively; p < 0.05) and the CRP level on POD 2 (mg/dl) (14.3 ± 3.9 vs. 20.6 ± 3.9, respectively; p < 0.05) were lower in the PP group than in the SM group. The peak postoperative BT was positively correlated with the CRP level on POD 2 (R = 0.533, p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the clinical course-related parameters in both groups. Propofol anesthesia and postoperative propofol sedation resulted in a reduced peak postoperative BT and lower CRP levels on POD 2 after esophagectomy than sevoflurane anesthesia followed by midazolam sedation.

  18. Exertional rhabdomyolysis and heat stroke: Beware of volatile anesthetic sedation

    PubMed Central

    Heytens, Karel; De Bleecker, Jan; Verbrugghe, Walter; Baets, Jonathan; Heytens, Luc

    2017-01-01

    In view of the enormous popularity of mass sporting events such as half-marathons, the number of patients with exertional rhabdomyolysis or exercise-induced heat stroke admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) has increased over the last decade. Because these patients have been reported to be at risk for malignant hyperthermia during general anesthesia, the intensive care community should bear in mind that the same risk of life-threatening rhabdomyolysis is present when these patients are admitted to an ICU, and volatile anesthetic sedation is chosen as the sedative technique. As illustrated by the three case studies we elaborate upon, a thorough diagnostic work-up is needed to clarify the subsequent risk of strenuous exercise, and the anesthetic exposure to volatile agents in these patients and their families. Other contraindications for the use of volatile intensive care sedation consist of known malignant hyperthermia susceptibility, congenital myopathies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and intracranial hypertension. PMID:28224104

  19. Sedation in mechanically ventilated patients—time to stay awake?

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Fabio Tanzillo

    2016-01-01

    On June, 2016, Klompas and colleagues published an article in the Chest entitled “Associations between different sedatives and ventilator-associated events, length of stay, and mortality in patients who were mechanically ventilated”, which investigated the effects of different sedatives on ventilator-associated events (VAEs), length of stay, and mortality in patients who were mechanically ventilated. This study used data of over 9,603 patients in order to investigate patients over the age of 18 who underwent mechanical ventilation for more than 3 days over a 7-year period in a large academic medical center. The investigators found that propofol and dexmedetomidine were associated with less time to extubation compared with benzodiazepines, but dexmedetomidine was also associated with less time to extubation vs. propofol. This study raises important questions about the sedation of critically ill patients. PMID:27826584

  20. Sedative effects of intranasal oxytocin in rabbits and rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hess, L; Votava, M; Málek, J; Kurzová, A; Slíva, J

    2016-12-21

    Oxytocin is a hormone therapeutically used mainly for its peripheral effects during pregnancy in the uterus and breasts. However, additional central effects, i.e. anxiolytic effect, decreased level of social stress and increased empathy have been also observed. Hence, the aim of our study was to evaluate if nasal oxytocin can be used as anxiolytic substance in rhesus monkeys (n=20) and rabbits (n=20). Simultaneously, mean arterial blood pressure, arterial oxygen saturation of hemoglobin and pulse rate were monitored in all the evaluated animals. While rabbits lost righting reflex, monkeys developed a dose-dependent loss of aggressiveness and/or anxiety as evaluated by behavioral methods (aggressive behavior was classified as non-sedated - sedated - strongly sedated).

  1. Simple and Reproducible Two-Stage Agitation Speed Control Strategy for Enhanced Triterpene Production by Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushrooms, Ganoderma lucidum ACCC G0119 (Higher Basidiomycetes) Based on Submerged Liquid Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Feng, Na; Yang, Yan; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Jingsong; Jia, Wei; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Triterpenes are important anticancer agents produced by batch submerged liquid fermentation, with the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum ACCC G0119, which was investigated under various dissolved oxygen levels by varying agitation speeds. Three kinetic parameters were analyzed: specific mycelial growth rate (μsmg), specific glucose consumption rate (qsgc), and specific triterpene production rate (qstp). High concentration, yield, and productivity of triterpenes were achieved by developing a simple and reproducible two-stage agitation speed control strategy. At the first 40 h, agitation speed was controlled at 150 rpm to obtain the quickest peak qstp for triterpene production, subsequently agitation speed was controlled at 100 rpm to maintain high qstp for high triterpene accumulation. The maximum concentration of triterpenes reached 0.086 g/l with the yield of 6.072 g/kg and the productivity of 6.532 × 10-4 g/(l·h), which were 39.61%, 36.48%, and 49.22%, respectively, better than the best results controlled by fixed agitation speeds. Conceivably, such a triterpene fermentation production strategy would be useful for industrial large-scale production of triterpenes with G. lucidum.

  2. A Comparison of the E-BEHAVE-AD, NBRS and NPI in Quantifying Clinical Improvement in the Treatment of Agitation and Psychosis Associated with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zahinoor; Emeremni, Chetachi A; Houck, Patricia R.; Mazumdar, Sati; Rosen, Jules; Rajji, Tarek K.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Mulsant, Benoit H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to compare the Empirical Behavioral Rating Scale (E-BEHAVE AD), Neurobehavioral Rating Scale (NBRS), and Neuropsychiatric Interview (NPI) in detecting behavioral disturbance and psychotic symptoms in dementia and characterizing changes in response to treatment. Design 87 subjects in the randomized controlled trial “Continuation Pharmacotherapy for Agitation of Dementia” (CPAD) were included in this analysis. We compared the detection and changes over 12 weeks of both agitation and psychosis using these 3 instruments. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to compare the performance of the three instruments in detecting global improvement. Results The instruments were equally likely to detect agitation. The NBRS was most likely to detect psychosis. While the NPI best detected improvement in agitation, the instruments were equal for detecting improvement in psychosis. In the ROC analysis for overall clinical improvement in response to treatment, there were no differences in the areas under the correlated curves for the three instruments but they demonstrated different sensitivity and specificity at different cut-off points for target symptom reduction. The E-BEHAVE-AD performed best at a cutpoint of 30% target symptom reduction and the NBRS and NPI both performed best at 50%. Conclusion The E-BEHAVE-AD, NBRS, and NPI were more similar than different in characterizing symptoms but differed in detecting response to treatment. Differences in sensitivity and specificity may lead clinicians to prefer a specific instrument, depending on their goal and the expected magnitude of response to any specific intervention. PMID:23290205

  3. [Passion Flower (Passiflora incarnata L.)--a reliable herbal sedative].

    PubMed

    Krenn, Liselotte

    2002-01-01

    Extracts and fluid extracts from the aerial parts from Passiflora incarnata L. are widely used as components of herbal sedatives. Many pharmacological investigations confirm the sedative effects of Passiflorae herba. From some of the studies also anxiolytic effects can be deduced. As Passionflower is mainly used in combinations, clinical studies of the single drug are not available. Based on pharmacological data, the experiences of traditional use and the use in combinations Passiflora extracts are an important factor in the phytotherapy of tenseness, restlessness and irritability with difficulty in falling asleep.

  4. [Sexual hallucinations and dreams under anesthesia and sedation : medicolegal aspects].

    PubMed

    Schneemilch, C; Schiltz, K; Meinshausen, E; Hachenberg, T

    2012-03-01

    Dreams and hallucinations under sedation or anesthesia have been well known phenomena since the introduction of anesthesia. Sexual hallucinations may lead to allegations of sexual molestation or assault by medical doctors or professional nursing staff. Hallucinations under the influence of sedative or hypnotic drugs may be very vivid and as misinterpreted as being real and it is therefore often difficult to disprove the resulting false allegations. In this report the terms drug-induced dreams and hallucinations are defined and the probable mechanism described. By a historical review and case reports the medicolegal consequences are demonstrated and procedures recommended to avoid allegations of sexual assault.

  5. Computer-Assisted and Patient-Controlled Sedation Platforms.

    PubMed

    Pambianco, Daniel; Niklewski, Paul

    2016-07-01

    As the number and complexity of endoscopic procedures increase, the role of sedation has been integral in patient and physician satisfaction. This article discusses the advances of computer-assisted and patient-controlled platforms. These computer-assisted and patient-controlled platforms use different anesthetics and analgesics, all with the intent of achieving improved consistency in the level of sedation, appropriate to the needs of patients, while also improving patient safety. These systems have been around for decades; however, few are approved for use in the United States, and several still require further study before broad clinical application.

  6. Delayed egg hatching of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) pending water agitation.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Babak; Shakibi, Sanam; Foster, Woodbridge A

    2014-05-01

    Mosquito eggs laid on water surfaces typically hatch spontaneously soon after the embryos within them become fully formed first-instar larvae. However, we have found that Anopheles gambiae Giles, an important vector of malaria in Africa, exhibits delayed hatching until the water surface is agitated, a feature overlooked in most laboratory colonies. Agitation within 24 h postoviposition, before embryonation was complete, failed to stimulate delayed postembryonic hatching of isolated eggs on the following day (day 2), when < 1% had hatched spontaneously. However, 5 min of water agitation of these dormant pharate first-instar larvae on day 2 resulted in an almost immediate hatch of 63.3 versus 0% of nonagitated controls, plus another 3.9 versus 0.3%, respectively, during the following 24 h. With daily agitation, installment hatching occurred mainly during 2-6 d postoviposition. The mean cumulative hatch after 7 d of daily agitation was 83.1 versus 1.1% of nonagitated eggs. Experiments with eggs in groups demonstrated that egg density and activity of already-hatched larvae had no stimulatory effect. Eggs stored 1-4 wk at 25.5 or at 15.5 degrees C, and then agitated daily for 6 d at 25.5 degrees C, showed a gradual decline in viability. Viability was sustained longer at the lower temperature. Implications of agitation-induced egg hatching for rainy-season and dry-season ecology of An. gambiae are discussed. Suspended hatching and cool storage already are proving convenient for efficient mass rearing and accurate modeling of weather-based population dynamics.

  7. The effects of excipients on protein aggregation during agitation: an interfacial shear rheology study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Qi, Wei; Schwartz, Daniel K; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the effects of excipients in solutions of keratinocyte growth factor 2 (KGF-2) on protein aggregation during agitation as well as on interfacial shear rheology at the air-water interface. Samples were incubated with or without agitation, and in the presence or absence of the excipients heparin, sucrose, or polysorbate 80 (PS80). The effect of excipients on the extent of protein aggregation was determined by UV-visible spectroscopy and micro-flow imaging. Interfacial shear rheology was used to detect the gelation time and strength of protein gels at the air-water interface. During incubation, protein particles of size ≥1 μm and insoluble aggregates formed faster for KGF-2 solutions subjected to agitation. Addition of either heparin or sucrose promoted protein aggregation during agitation. In contrast, PS80 substantially inhibited agitation-induced KGF-2 aggregation but facilitated protein particulate formation in quiescent solutions. The combination of PS80 and heparin or sucrose completely prevented protein aggregation during both nonagitated and agitated incubations. Interfacial rheological measurements showed that KGF-2 in buffer alone formed an interfacial gel within a few minutes. In the presence of heparin, KGF-2 interfacial gels formed too quickly for gelation time to be determined. KGF-2 formed gels in about 10 min in the presence of sucrose. The presence of PS80 in the formulation inhibited gelation of KGF-2. Furthermore, the interfacial gels formed by the protein in the absence of PS80 were reversible when PS80 was added to the samples after gelation. Therefore, there is a correspondence between formulations that exhibited interfacial gelation and formulations that exhibited agitation-induced aggregation.

  8. Antiemetics With Concomitant Sedative Use in Civil Aviation Pilot Fatalities: From 2000 to 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Unclassified Unclassified 13 Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized iii CONTENTS INTRODUCTION...sedative hypnotics , and ethanol. Antiemetics and drugs with antiemetic properties such as metoclopramide, diphenhydramine (a sedating...antihistamines, ethanol, barbiturates, serotonin modulators, and/or sedative- hypnotics . Antihistamines such as diphenhydramine are commonly used. The

  9. Survey of sedation techniques used Among pediatric dentists in New York State.

    PubMed

    Allen, Stanton C; Bernat, Joseph E; Perinpanayagam, Meghan K

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate pediatric dentists in New York State who use oral sedation. Results indicated that fewer than 50% of pediatric dentists used oral sedatives in their office, but that of these dentists, more than 50% reported that their sedations are successful.

  10. [Technology of nitrous oxide/oxygen inhalation sedation and its clinical application in pediatric dentistry].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tian; Hu, Daoyong

    2014-02-01

    Dental fear is a common problem in pediatric dentistry. Therefore, sedation for pediatric patients is an essential tool for anxiety management. Nitrous oxide/oxygen inhalation sedation is a safe, convenient, effective way to calm children. The review is about the technology of nitrous oxide/oxygen inhalation sedation and its clinical application in pediatric dentistry.

  11. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  12. Intravenous Sedation for Dental Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyawaki, T.; Kohjitani, A.; Maeda, S.; Egusa, M.; Mori, T.; Higuchi, H.; Kita, F.; Shimada, M.

    2004-01-01

    The poor quality of oral health care for people with intellectual disability (ID) has been recognized, and the strong fears about dental treatment suggested as a major reason for disturbances of visits to dentists by such patients. Intravenous sedation is a useful method for relieving the anxiety and fear of such patients about dental treatment,…

  13. Sedative-hypnotic profile of novel isatin ketals.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Pontes, Luana B; Gabriel, Daniele; Mendes, Thaiana C F; Ribeiro, Núbia M; Pinto, Angelo C; Trachez, Margarete M; Sudo, Roberto T

    2007-04-01

    Isatin (1H-indol-2,3-dione) is an endogenous compound found in many tissues and fluids. Isatin and its derivatives exert pharmacological effects on the central nervous system, including anxiogenic, sedative and anticonvulsant activities. Two new groups of isatin derivatives were synthesized (nine dioxolane ketals and nine dioxane ketals) and studied for their sedative, hypnotic and anesthetic effects using pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, locomotor activity evaluation and intravenous infusion. The dioxolane ketals were more potent than dioxane ketals for inducing sedative-hypnotic states, causing up to a three-fold increase in pentobarbital hypnosis. The dioxolane ketals produced sedation, demonstrated by decreased spontaneous locomotor activity in an open field. Hypnosis and anesthesia were observed during intravenous infusion of 5'-chlorospiro-[1,3-dioxolane-2,3'-indolin]-2'-one (T3) in conscious Wistar rats. Complete recovery from hypnosis and anesthesia required 39.1+/-7.3 and 6.8+/-2.4 min, respectively. Changes in hemodynamic parameters after infusion of 5.0 mg/kg/min were minimal. These findings suggest that these new isatin derivatives represent potential candidates for the development of new drugs that act on the central nervous system and may lead to a new centrally acting anesthetic with no toxic effects on the cardiovascular or respiratory systems.

  14. Intravenous sedation in 200 geriatric patients undergoing office oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R L; Smith, P B

    1997-01-01

    Two hundred geriatric patients ranging from age 65 to 92 yr (mean age 72 yr) were evaluated for office oral surgery and intravenous sedation. Surgical time ranged from 6 to 129 min. Monitored anesthesia care was utilized for the administration of fentanyl, midazolam or diazepam, and methohexital. No serious complications were seen and no patients were hospitalized.

  15. Illinois Dental Anesthesia and Sedation Survey for 2006

    PubMed Central

    Flick, William G; Katsnelson, Alexander; Alstrom, Howard

    2007-01-01

    This is a 10-year follow-up survey of a 1996 study of all dentists in Illinois holding a permit to administer sedation or general anesthesia. The survey describes the scope of sedation and anesthesia services provided in dental offices in Illinois. A mail survey was sent to 471 dentists who were registered with the department of professional regulation to administer sedation or general anesthesia. Classification by specialty area of practice showed: 63% (84% in 1996) are oral and maxillofacial surgeons, 20% (11% in 1996) general dentists, 6% (5% in 1996) periodontists, 9% (0% in 1996) pediatric dentists, 1% (less than 1% in 1996) dentist anesthesiologists. Advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) training was reported by 90% (85% in 1996) of the respondents. The total number of sedations and general anesthetics administered for the year was 115,940. Two mortalities and two cases of long-term morbidity were reported for the 10-year period. Respondents reported that 30 patients required transfer to a hospital but suffered no long-term morbidity. Other practice characteristics were detailed. PMID:17579504

  16. Sedation of Pediatric Patients in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    sedation. These findings reflect the greater effectiveness of chloral hydrate in children under two years of age ( Katzung & Trevor, 1996). The...Analgesia, 77(6), 1141-1147. Katzung , B. G., & Trevor, A. T. (1996). Antipsychotic drugs & Lithium. In B. G. Katzung & A. J. Trevor (Eds

  17. An investigation of long-term effects of group music therapy on agitation levels of people with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ledger, Alison J; Baker, Felicity A

    2007-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the long-term effects of group music therapy on agitation manifested by nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease. A non-randomised experimental design was employed with one group receiving weekly music therapy (n = 26) and another group receiving standard nursing home care (n = 19). Agitation levels were measured five times over one year using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (Cohen-Mansfield, J. (1989). Agitation in the elderly. In N. Billig & P. V. Rabins (Eds.), Issues in geriatric psychiatry (pp. 101-113). Basel, Switzerland: Karger). Although music therapy participants showed short-term reductions in agitation, there were no significant differences between the groups in the range, frequency, and severity of agitated behaviours manifested over time. Multiple measures of treatment efficacy are necessary to better understand the long-term effects music therapy programs have on this population.

  18. The risk of shorter fasting time for pediatric deep sedation

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Mathew; Birisci, Esma; Anderson, Jordan E.; Anliker, Christina M.; Bryant, Micheal A.; Downs, Craig; Dalabih, Abdallah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Current guidelines adopted by the American Academy of Pediatrics calls for prolonged fasting times before performing pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA). PSA is increasingly provided to children outside of the operating theater by sedation trained pediatric providers and does not require airway manipulation. We investigated the safety of a shorter fasting time compared to a longer and guideline compliant fasting time. We tried to identify the association between fasting time and sedation-related complications. Methods: This is a prospective observational study that included children 2 months to 18 years of age and had an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification of I or II, who underwent deep sedation for elective procedures, performed by pediatric critical care providers. Procedures included radiologic imaging studies, electroencephalograms, auditory brainstem response, echocardiograms, Botox injections, and other minor surgical procedures. Subjects were divided into two groups depending on the length of their fasting time (4–6 h and >6 h). Complication rates were calculated and compared between the three groups. Results: In the studied group of 2487 subjects, 1007 (40.5%) had fasting time of 4–6 h and the remaining 1480 (59.5%) subjects had fasted for >6 h. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the studied complications between the two groups. Conclusions: This study found no difference in complication rate in regard to the fasting time among our subjects cohort, which included only healthy children receiving elective procedures performed by sedation trained pediatric critical care providers. This suggests that using shorter fasting time may be safe for procedures performed outside of the operating theater that does not involve high-risk patients or airway manipulation. PMID:27746560

  19. Pain and anxiety management for pediatric dental procedures using various combinations of sedative drugs: A review.

    PubMed

    Gazal, Giath; Fareed, Wamiq Musheer; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Al-Samadani, Khalid H

    2016-07-01

    For fearful and uncooperative children behavioral management techniques are used. In order to control the pain and anxiety in pedodontic patients, pharmacologic sedation, anesthesia and analgesia are commonly used. Midazolam is commonly used as an oral sedation agent in children; it has several features such as safety of use, quick onset and certain degree of amnesia that makes it a desirable sedation agent in children. This review paper discusses various aspects of oral midazolam, ketamine and their combinations in conscious sedation including, advantages of oral route of sedation, pharmacokinetics, range of oral doses, and antagonists for clinical dental treatment procedures.

  20. The Effect on Apheresis Platelet Quality During Shipment with Continued Interruption of Agitation for 24 and 48 Hours

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-26

    The Effect on Apheresis Platelet Quality During Shipment With Continued Interruption of Agitation for 24 and 48 Hours R.R. Leslie-Holt and V. W...EFFECT ON APHERESIS PLATELET QUALITY DURING SHIPMENT WITH CONTINUED INTERRUPTION OF AGITATION FOR 24 AND 48 HOURS. 6. AUTHOR(S) CAPT LESLIEHOLT RONNI...maintaining an oxidative metabolism. Key Words: Agitation, apheresis , lactate, pH, platelet , quality 4 INTRODUCTION The Armed Services Blood Program

  1. Propofol and non-propofol based sedation for outpatient colonoscopy-prospective comparison of depth of sedation using an EEG based SEDLine monitor.

    PubMed

    Goudra, Basavana; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Gouda, Gowri; Borle, Anuradha; Carlin, Augustus; Yadwad, Avantika

    2016-10-01

    Propofol is a popular anesthetic sedative employed in colonoscopy. It is known to increase the patient satisfaction and improve throughput. However, there are concerns among the clinicians with regard to the depth of sedation, as a deeper degree of sedation is known to increase the incidence of aspiration and other adverse events. So we planned to compare the depth of sedation between propofol and non-propofol based sedation in patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy, as measured by an electroencephalogram (EEG) based monitor SEDLine monitor (SedlineInc., San Diego, CA). The non-randomized prospective observational study was performed in the outpatient gastroenterology suite of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Patients included ASA class I-III aged more than 18 years scheduled for colonoscopy under Propofol or non-propofol based sedation. After an institutional review board approval, a written consent was obtained from prospective patients. Sedation (propofol or non-propofol based) was administered by either a certified nurse anesthetist under the supervision of an anesthesiologist (propofol) or a registered endoscopy nurse under the guidance of the endoscopist performing the procedure (non-propofol sedation). Depth of sedation was measured with an EEG based SEDLine monitor. The sedation providers were blinded to the patient state index-the indicator of depth of sedation. PSI (patient state index-SEDLine reading) was documented at colonoscope insertion, removal and at the return of verbal responsiveness after colonoscope withdrawal. Sedation spectrum was retrieved from the data stored on the SEDLine monitor. Patients sedated with propofol experience significantly deeper degrees of sedation at all times during the procedure. Additionally, during significant part of the procedure, they are at PSI levels associated with deep general anesthesia. The group that received propofol was more deeply sedated and had lower PSI values. Lighter

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Dexmedetomidine as a Sedative Agent for Performing Awake Intubation: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Luo-Jing; Fang, Xiang-Zhi; Gao, Ju; Zhangm, Yang; Tao, Li-Jian

    To compare the efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine with other alternative sedative agents used for performing awake intubation. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effects of dexmedetomidine with other alternative sedative agents used during awake intubation. The biomedical databases PubMed, Science Direct, and the Cochrane Library were searched for relevant RCTs with no restriction on the language of publication. The efficacy (level of sedation, success rate for intubation at the first attempt, intubation time, intubation conditions, and patient satisfaction) and safety (incidence of hypertension, hypotension, tachycardia, bradycardia, hypoxia, postsurgical memory, hoarseness, and sore throat) were assessed. Thirteen RCTs with a combined subject population of 591 patients came within the purview of this meta-analysis. Use of dexmedetomidine was associated with a higher Ramsay sedation scale score [mean difference (MD): 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.77-1.28, P < 0.00001], vocal cord movement score (MD = 0.72, 95% CI, 0.20-1.24, P = 0.007), coughing scores (MD = 0.66, 95% CI, 0.10-1.22, P = 0.02), limb movement scores (MD = 0.69, 95% CI, 0.47-0.91, P < 0.00001); increased risk of bradycardia [relative risk (RR): 3.03, 95% CI, 1.38-6.68, P = 0.006] and hypotension (RR: 2.87, 95% CI, 1.44-5.75, P = 0.003); and lower risk of hypoxia (RR: 0.32, 95% CI, 0.15-0.70; P = 0.004) and postsurgical memory (RR: 0.50, 95% CI, 0.35-0.72, P = 0.0002). As indicated by our results, dexmedetomidine appears to be an effective and well-tolerated agent for performing awake intubation. Its use was associated with better intubation conditions, preservation of airway patency, and reduced recall of intubation, as compared with the traditional sedative agents. The risk of bradycardia and hypotension was significantly higher with dexmedetomidine as compared with that with other sedatives. However, these were easily managed with

  3. Effect of agitation on removal of acetic acid from pretreated hydrolysate by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Priddy, Sarah A; Hanley, Thomas R

    2003-01-01

    The effect of agitation on the adsorption of acetic acid by activated carbon was tested utilizing an external mass transfer-diffusion model. Simulated pretreated biomass was contacted with activated carbon under prescribed conditions of temperature and agitation. Adsorption isotherm studies are presented as well as batch kinetic rate studies. Use of these data enabled the determination of isotherm constants, an external mass transfer coefficient, and an effective diffusivity for each agitation rate studied. The external film coefficient results ranged from 33.62 microm/s to a complete absence of external mass transfer resistance, and the diffusivity results ranged from 0.8625 to 10.70 microm(2)/s. The optimum combination of no external film resistance, and highest diffusivity, 10.70 microm(2)/s, occurred at 250 rpm and 25 degrees C. The results of these models and the experimental parameters suggested an efficacious method and conditions for the removal of this undesirable chemical.

  4. Stabilization of tetanus toxoid formulation containing aluminium hydroxide adjuvant against agitation.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Vipul A; Jain, Nishant K; Roy, Ipsita

    2012-02-28

    The aggregation of tetanus toxoid leads to reduced bioavailability of the vaccine and failure of immunization programmes in many parts of the globe. One of the main reasons for denaturation and aggregation of tetanus toxoid formulations is agitation of the protein during transport. We have identified that agitation leads to collapse of the gel matrix of aluminium hydroxide which is used as an adjuvant in these preparations. This results in desorption of the toxoid from the matrix, which then loses its antigenicity due to agitation-induced denaturation of the protein. We show that incorporation of some compatible osmolytes like sorbitol, glucose and arginine, but not trehalose, is able to protect the adjuvant matrix from degradation, and retain the integrity of the vaccine preparation in terms of its antigenicity.

  5. The effects of researcher-composed music at mealtime on agitation in nursing home residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shu-Yuan; Lai, Hui-Ling; Jeng, Shaw-Yeu; Tang, Chih-Wei; Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chen, Pin-Wen

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effects of music at mealtimes on agitation in 22 nursing home residents with dementia. We used a pretest-posttest research design. We played researcher-composed music to residents at each of two mealtimes daily over a consecutive 4-week period. We observed and recorded agitation 24 hours daily for the 4-week period and the following 2-week period. Results revealed a significant decline in mean agitation scores. A cumulative dose effect and a short-term linger effect were observed. Findings suggest that soothing music may be beneficial in managing agitation in nursing home residents with dementia.

  6. Comparison of mental status scales for predicting mortality on the general wards

    PubMed Central

    Zadravecz, Frank J.; Tien, Linda; Robertson-Dick, Brian J.; Yuen, Trevor C.; Twu, Nicole M.; Churpek, Matthew M.; Edelson, Dana P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Altered mental status is a significant predictor of mortality in inpatients. Several scales exist to characterize mental status, including the AVPU (Alert, responds to Voice, responds to Pain, Unresponsive) scale, which is used in many early warning scores in the general ward setting. The use of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) is not well established in this population. Objective To compare the accuracies of AVPU, GCS, and RASS for predicting inpatient mortality Design Retrospective cohort study Setting Single urban academic medical center Participants Adult inpatients on the general wards Measurements Nurses recorded GCS and RASS on consecutive adult hospitalizations. AVPU was extracted from the eye subscale of the GCS. We compared the accuracies of each scale for predicting in-hospital mortality within 24 hours of a mental status observation using area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results 295,974 paired observations of GCS and RASS were obtained from 26,873 admissions; 417 (1.6%) resulted in in-hospital death. GCS and RASS more accurately predicted mortality than AVPU (AUC 0.80 and 0.82, respectively vs. 0.73; p<0.001 for both comparisons). Simultaneous use of GCS and RASS produced an AUC of 0.85 (95% CI: 0.82-0.87; p<0.001 when compared to all three scales). Conclusions In ward patients, both GCS and RASS were significantly more accurate predictors of mortality than AVPU. In addition, combining GCS and RASS was more accurate than any scale alone. Routine tracking of GCS and/or RASS on general wards may improve accuracy of detecting clinical deterioration. PMID:26374471

  7. Hypnotic Depth and the Incidence of Emergence Agitation and Negative Postoperative Behavioral Changes

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, Debra J.; Twite, Mark D.; Zuk, Jeannie; Pan, Zhaoxing; Wallen, Brett; Friesen, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Emergence agitation (EA) and negative postoperative behavioral changes (NPOBC) are common in children, though the etiology remains unclear. We investigated whether longer times under deep hypnosis as measured by Bispectral Index™ (BIS) monitoring would positively correlate with a greater incidence of EA in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU) and a greater occurrence of NPOBC in children after discharge. Methods We enrolled 400 children, ages 1–12 years old, scheduled for dental procedures under general anesthesia. All children were induced with high concentration sevoflurane and BIS monitoring was continuous from induction through recovery in the PACU. A BIS reading <45 was considered deep hypnosis. The presence of EA was assessed in the PACU using the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale (PAED). NPOBC were assessed using the Post-Hospital Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ), completed by parents 3–5 days post-operatively. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, with a p<0.05 considered statistically significant. Results The incidence of EA was 27% (99/369) and the incidence of NPOBC was 8.8% (28/318). No significant differences in the incidence of EA or NPOBC were seen with respect to length of time under deep hypnosis as measured by a BIS value of less than 45. Conclusion Our data revealed no significant correlation between the length of time under deep hypnosis (BIS<45) and the incidence of EA or NPOBC. Within this population, these behavioral disturbances do not appear to be related to the length of time under a deep hypnotic state as measured by the BIS. PMID:19968807

  8. Flow-induced agitations create a granular fluid: effective viscosity and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Kiri; van Hecke, Martin

    2012-06-01

    We fluidize a granular medium with localized stirring in a split-bottom shear cell. We probe the mechanical response of quiescent regions far from the main flow by observing the vertical motion of cylindrical probes rising, sinking, and floating in the grains. First, we find that the probe motion suggests that the granular material behaves in a liquid-like manner: high-density probes sink and low-density probes float at the depth given by Archimedes' law. Second, we observe that the drag force on moving probes scales linearly with their velocity, which allows us to define an effective viscosity for the system. This effective viscosity is inversely proportional to the rotation rate of the disk which drives the split bottom flow. Moreover, the apparent viscosity depends on radius and mass of the probe: despite the linear dependence of the drag forces on sinking speed of the probe, the granular medium is not simply Newtonian, but exhibits a more complex rheology. The decrease of viscosity with filling height of the cell, combined with the poor correlation between local strain rate and viscosity, suggests that the fluid-like character of the material is set by agitations generated in the stirred region: the relation between applied stress and observed strain rate in one location depends on the strain rate in another location. We probe the nature of the granular fluctuations that we believe mediates these nonlocal interactions by characterizing the small and random up and down motion that the probe experiences. These Gaussian fluctuations exhibit a mix of diffusive and subdiffusive behavior at short times and saturate at a value of roughly 1/10th of a grain diameter longer times, consistent with the picture of a random walker in a potential well. The product of crossover time and effective viscosity is constant, evidencing a direct link between fluctuations and viscosity.

  9. Barbiturate Induction for the Prevention of Emergence Agitation after Pediatric Sevoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Haruna; Kimoto, Ayako; Beppu, Yuki; Yoshimura, Maki; Kojima, Toshiyuki; Fukano, Taku

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Emergence agitation (EA) is a common and troublesome problem in pediatric patients recovering from general anesthesia. The incidence of EA is reportedly higher after general anesthesia maintained with sevoflurane, a popular inhalational anesthetic agent for pediatric patients. We conducted this prospective, randomized, double-blind study to test the effect of an intravenous ultra-short–acting barbiturate, thiamylal, administered during induction of general anesthesia on the incidence and severity of EA in pediatric patients recovering from Sevoflurane anesthesia. METHODS: Fifty-four pediatric patients (1 to 6 years of age) undergoing subumbilical surgeries were randomized into 2 groups. Patients received either intravenous thiamylal 5mg/kg (Group T) or inhalational Sevoflurane 5% (Group S) as an anesthetic induction agent. Following induction, general anesthesia was maintained with Sevoflurane and nitrous oxide (N2O) in both groups. To control the intra- and post-operative pain, caudal block or ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric block was performed. The incidence and severity of EA were evaluated by using the Modified Objective Pain Scale (MOPS: 0 to 6) at 15 and 30 min after arrival in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). RESULTS: Fifteen minutes after arrival in the PACU, the incidence of EA in Group T (28%) was significantly lower than in Group S (64%; p = 0.023) and the MOPS in Group T (median 0, range 0 to 6) was significantly lower than in Group S (median 4, range 0 to 6; p = 0.005). The interval from discontinuation of Sevoflurane to emergence from anesthesia was not significantly different between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Thiamylal induction reduced the incidence and severity of EA in pediatric patients immediately after Sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:26472953

  10. Study of dissolution hydrodynamic conditions versus drug release from hypromellose matrices: the influence of agitation sequence.

    PubMed

    Asare-Addo, Kofi; Levina, Marina; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2010-12-01

    In this article, the influence of agitation in descending and ascending sequences as a systematic method development process for potentially discriminating fed and fasted states and evaluation of its effects on the drug release from swelling gel-forming hydrophilic matrix tablets were investigated. Theophylline extended release (ER) matrices containing hypromellose (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)) were evaluated in media with a pH range of 1.2-7.5, using an automated USP type III, Bio-Dis dissolution apparatus at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 dips per minute (dpm). Agitation had a profound effect on the drug release from the HPMC K100LV matrices. Drug release in pH 1.2 changed from about 40% at 5 dpm to about 80% at 30 dpm over a 60 min period alone. The matrices containing HPMC K4M, K15M and K100M however were not significantly affected by the agitation rate. The similarity factor f2 was calculated using drug release at 10 dpm as a reference. The ascending agitations of 5-30 dpm and the descending order of agitation 30-5 dpm were also evaluated. Anomalous transport was the only kinetic of release for the K4M, K15M and K100M tablet matrices. The lower viscous polymer of K100LV had some matrices exhibiting Fickian diffusion as its kinetics of release. The use of systematic change of agitation method may indicate potential fed and fasted effects on drug release from hydrophilic matrices.

  11. The influence of turbulence on aggregation of small particles in agitated vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusters, Karel Antonius

    The influence of the hydrodynamics in baffled turbine agitated vessels on the turbulent coagulation of small solid particles is studied, with focus on the dependence of the aggregate size on stirrer speed, concentration of solids, destabilizer concentration, and vessel size. The following studies are presented: aggregation theory; hydrodynamics in stirred tanks; numerical particle tracking in a turbine agitated vessel; aggregation kinetics in stirred tanks; and maximum aggregate size in stirred tanks. The application of the model to describe the aggregation process in strirred tanks to experimental conditions other than those tested and to particulate systems with different physical properties is discussed.

  12. Effect of aripiprazole lauroxil on agitation and hostility in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Citrome, Leslie; Du, Yangchun; Risinger, Robert; Stankovic, Srdjan; Claxton, Amy; Zummo, Jacqueline; Bose, Anjana; Silverman, Bernard L; Ehrich, Elliot W

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of aripiprazole lauroxil on hostility and aggressive behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Patients aged 18-70 years with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and currently experiencing an acute exacerbation or relapse were randomized to intramuscular (IM) aripiprazole lauroxil 441 mg (n=207), 882 mg (n=208), or placebo (n=207) for 12 weeks. In post-hoc analyses, hostility and aggression were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) Hostility item (P7) and a specific antihostility effect was assessed by adjusting for positive symptoms of schizophrenia, somnolence, and akathisia. The PANSS excited component score [P4 (Excitement), P7 (Hostility), G4 (Tension), G8 (Uncooperativeness), and G14 (Poor impulse control)], and the Personal and Social Performance scale disturbing and aggressive behavior domain were also assessed. Of the 147 patients who received aripiprazole lauroxil 882 mg and with a baseline PANSS Hostility item P7 more than 1, there was a significant (P<0.05) improvement versus placebo on the PANSS Hostility item P7 score by mixed-model repeated-measures at the end of the study, which remained significant when PANSS-positive symptoms and somnolence or akathisia were included as additional covariates. The proportion with PANSS Hostility item P7 more than 1 at endpoint was significantly (P<0.05) lower with aripiprazole lauroxil versus placebo (53.6, 46.1, and 66.3% for 441, 882 mg, and placebo). A significant (P<0.05) improvement was found with aripiprazole lauroxil versus placebo for change from baseline in the PANSS excited component score. The proportion of patients with aggressive behavior on the Personal and Social Performance scale was significantly (P<0.05) lower for aripiprazole lauroxil: 30.0% for 441 mg versus 44.1% for placebo (P=0.006) and 22.2% for 881 mg (P<0.001 versus placebo). Treatment with aripiprazole lauroxil resulted in decreases in agitation and hostility in patients

  13. A comparison study between ketamine and ketamine-promethazine combination for oral sedation in pediatric dental patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Tina; Redden, Ronald J.; Murphy, Scott

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the incidence of vomiting and the sedative effectiveness of ketamine to a ketamine-prornethazine combination in pediatric dental patients. Twenty-two patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists' classification I physical status who were between the ages of 21 and 43 months were randomly divided into 2 groups. The control group received 10 mg/kg of ketamine orally, whereas the experimental group received 10 mg/kg of ketamine and 1.1 mg/kg of promethazine orally. Nitrous oxide in oxygen was supplemented between 35 and 50%. Each patient received 1 or 2 quadrants of restoration by one operator. Heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were monitored and recorded during the treatment. Crying, alertness, movement, and overall general behavior were rated using the scale by Houpt et al. A dentist-anesthesiologist conducted the vital sign monitoring and behavioral assessment. Ketamine combined with promethazine eliminated the incidence of vomiting. A 2 x 2 chi-square contingency table showed a statistical difference between the 2 groups at P < .05 (control group, 27%; experimental group, 0%). Ketamine alone yielded better sedations than the combined agents as shown by the Mann-Whitney U statistical analysis (P < .05). Ketamine and a ketamine-promethazine combination are effective in the sedation of pediatric dental patients. PMID:12779109

  14. Target-Controlled Infusion of Propofol in Training Anesthesiology Residents in Colonoscopy Sedation: A Prospective Randomized Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-feng; Li, Bo; Yang, Yu-guang; Fan, Xiao-hua; Li, Jin-bao; Deng, Xiao-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Propofol is widely used in sedation for colonoscopy, but its adverse effects on cardiovascular and respiratory systems are still concerning. The present study investigated whether target controlled infusion (TCI) of propofol could provide a better sedation quality than manually controlled infusion (MCI) in training inexperienced anesthesiology residents. Material/Methods Eighteen training residents were allocated into 2 groups receiving TCI and MCI training in their first month in the endoscopy center, while receiving MCI and TCI training instead in their second month. The last 2 patients at the end of each month were included to analyze the sedation quality of TCI and MCI techniques by comparing satisfaction of endoscopist and patients based on the visual analogue scale (VAS). Heart rate (HR), mean blood pressure (MAP), SpO2, and recovery time were also compared as the secondary outcomes. Results The demographic data were similarly distributed among the TCI and MCI patients. Endoscopist’s satisfaction score in the TCI group was significantly higher than in the MCI group, 81.3±7.2 versus 74.2±9.5 (P=0.003), but the patients’ satisfaction score was similar between the 2 groups. More stable hemodynamic status was obtained in the TCI group, manifested as higher lowest MAP and lower highest MAP than in the MCI group. Lowest SpO2 in the TCI group was significantly higher than in the MCI group. Patients in the TCI group recovered earlier than in the MCI group. Conclusions TCI is a more effective and safer technique for anesthesiology residents in sedation for colonoscopy. PMID:26787637

  15. Measurement of Heart Rate Variability to Assess Pain in Sedated Critically Ill Patients: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Broucqsault-Dédrie, Céline; De Jonckheere, Julien; Jeanne, Mathieu; Nseir, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The analgesia nociception index (ANI) assesses the relative parasympathetic tone as a surrogate for antinociception/nociception balance in sedated patients. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of ANI in detecting pain in deeply sedated critically ill patients. Methods This prospective observational study was performed in two medical ICUs. All patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation and deep sedation were eligible. In all patients, heart rate and ANI were continuously recorded using the Physiodoloris® device during 5 minutes at rest (T1), during a painful stimulus (T2), and during 5 minutes after the end of the painful stimulus (T3). The chosen painful stimulus was patient turning for washstand. Pain was evaluated at T2, using the behavioral pain scale (BPS). The primary objective was to determine the effectiveness of ANI in detecting pain. Secondary objectives included the impact of norepinephrine on the effectiveness of ANI in detecting pain, and the correlation between ANI and BPS. Results Forty-one patients were included. ANI was significantly lower at T2 (Med (IQR) 69(55–78)) compared with T1 (85(67–96), p<0.0001), or T3 (81(63–89), p<0.0001). Similar results were found in the subgroups of patients with (n = 21) or without (n = 20) norepinephrine. ANI values were significantly higher in patients with norepinephrine compared with those without norepinephrine at T1, and T2. No significant correlation was found between ANI and BPS at T2. Conclusions ANI is effective in detecting pain in deeply sedated critically ill patients, including those patients treated with norepinephrine. No significant correlation was found between ANI and BPS. PMID:26808971

  16. [EEG changes during sedation with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Entholzner, E; Mielke, L; Pichlmeier, R; Weber, F; Schneck, H

    1995-05-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a naturally occurring transmitter in the mammalian brain, related to sleep regulation and possibly to energy balance in diving or hibernating animals. It has been used for almost 35 years as an intravenous agent for induction of anaesthesia and for long-term sedation. Its convincing pharmacological properties, without serious adverse effects on circulation or respiration, are compromised by its unpredictable duration of action. This is not a major problem with long-term sedation during ICU treatment. GHB has been used with good results for sedation of patients with severe brain injury, where it compares favourably with barbiturates. In animal studies, it seems to possess a protective action against hypoxia on a cellular and whole organ level. However, in some experimental animals GHB has been shown to produce seizure-like activities, and the compound is being used to produce absence-like seizures. GHB has been used in our ICU for years to provide adequate sedation for patients under controlled ventilation or for patients fighting the respirator during spontaneous respiration. No serious side effects were observed in these patients, while in some patients under haemodialysis hypernatraemia and metabolic alkalosis developed; both were reversible after discontinuation of GHB and restriction of additional sodium input (Somsanit, the commercially available GHB preparation in Germany, contains 9.2 mmol sodium/g; the daily dose averages 20-40 g GHB, i.e. 180-370 mmol sodium). PATIENTS AND METHODS. In 31 patients after major abdominal surgery, sedation was established with GHB 50 mg/kg BW injected via perfusion pump over a 20-min period. No centrally acting medication had been given for at least 2 h. A computer-based multichannel EEG system (CATEEM, MediSyst, Linden) was used, allowing for fast Fourier transformation, spectral analysis and topographical brain mapping. EEG during induction of sedation was followed after a baseline EEG (10

  17. Propofol versus midazolam/ketamine for procedural sedation in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Gottschling, Sven; Meyer, Sascha; Krenn, Thomas; Reinhard, Harald; Lothschuetz, Daniela; Nunold, Holger; Graf, Norbert

    2005-09-01

    Different pharmacologic agents have been used for sedation in children undergoing invasive procedures. The authors prospectively compared the efficacy, the occurrence of adverse effects, cardiovascular parameters, oxygen saturation and induction, and recovery time in propofol with or without morphine versus midazolam/ketamine sedation for procedural sedation in children with malignancies and hematologic disorders. Fifty children received either propofol with or without morphine or ketamine/midazolam sedation for invasive procedures. Intravenous sedation consisted of 0.1 mg midazolam/kg and 1.0 mg ketamine/kg or 2 mg propofol/kg with or without 0.1 mg morphine/kg. Incremental dosages of ketamine or propofol were given, if necessary, to achieve or to maintain adequate sedation levels. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, time to induce sedation, recovery time, and adverse effects were recorded. All invasive procedures were successfully completed, with satisfactory sedation levels in all 25 patients in the propofol group and 23 of the 25 patients in the ketamine group. In 14 of the 25 procedures in the propofol group and 4 of the 25 procedures in the ketamine group, sedation was associated with side effects, the most common being oxygen desaturation. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure after ketamine medication and a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate in the propofol group. Induction and recovery times in the propofol group were significantly shorter. Both regimens for procedural sedation are efficacious in achieving satisfactory sedation levels for invasive procedures. Propofol offers a quicker onset of sedation and a faster, smoother recovery but is associated with a higher rate of side effects. Considering the substantial rate of adverse effects, these procedural sedations should be performed only by physicians trained in advanced airway management and life support.

  18. Sedation or general anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Mayr, N Patrick; Michel, Jonathan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Tassani, Peter; Martin, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is nowadays a routine therapy for elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) and high perioperative risk. With growing experience, further development of the devices, and the expansion to "intermediate-risk" patients, there is increasing interest in performing this procedure under conscious sedation (TAVI-S) rather than the previously favoured approach of general anesthesia (TAVI-GA). The proposed benefits of TAVI-S include; reduced procedure time, shorter intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, reduced need for intraprocedural vasopressor support, and the potential to perform the procedure without the direct presence of an anesthetist for cost-saving reasons. To date, no randomized trial data exists. We reviewed 13 non-randomized studies/registries reporting data from 6,718 patients undergoing TAVI (3,227 performed under sedation). Patient selection, study methods, and endpoints have differed considerably between published studies. Reported rates of in-hospital and longer-term mortality are similar for both groups. Up to 17% of patients undergoing TAVI-S require conversion to general anesthesia during the procedure, primarily due to vascular complications, and urgent intubation is frequently associated with hemodynamic instability. Procedure related factors, including hypotension, may compound preexisting age-specific renal impairment and enhance the risk of acute kidney injury. Hypotonia of the hypopharyngeal muscles in elderly patients, intraprocedural hypercarbia, and certain anesthetic drugs, may increase the aspiration risk in sedated patients. General anesthesia and conscious sedation have both been used successfully to treat patients with severe AS undergoing TAVI with similar reported short and long-term mortality outcomes. The authors believe that the significant incidence of complications and unplanned conversion to general anesthesia during TAVI-S mandates the start-to-finish presence

  19. Thermoregulation: Physiological and Clinical Considerations during Sedation and General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Marcos; Becker, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mild hypothermia is common during deep sedation or general anesthesia and is frequently associated with patient discomfort and shivering. Greater declines in temperature can produce an even greater number of significant detrimental effects. This article reviews principles of thermoregulation and influences of anesthetic agents. An understanding of these will provide a foundation for strategies to reduce heat loss and better manage patient discomfort when it occurs. PMID:20331336

  20. Disruption of cortical integration during midazolam‐induced light sedation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Peipeng; Zhang, Han; Xu, Yachao; Jia, Wenbin; Zang, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This work examines the effect of midazolam‐induced light sedation on intrinsic functional connectivity of human brain, using a randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled, cross‐over, within‐subject design. Fourteen healthy young subjects were enrolled and midazolam (0.03 mg/kg of the participant's body mass, to a maximum of 2.5 mg) or saline were administrated with an interval of one week. Resting‐state fMRI was conducted before and after administration for each subject. We focus on two types of networks: sensory related lower‐level functional networks and higher‐order functions related ones. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify these resting‐state functional networks. We hypothesize that the sensory (visual, auditory, and sensorimotor) related networks will be intact under midazolam‐induced light sedation while the higher‐order (default mode, executive control, salience networks, etc.) networks will be functionally disconnected. It was found that the functional integrity of the lower‐level networks was maintained, while that of the higher‐level networks was significantly disrupted by light sedation. The within‐network connectivity of the two types of networks was differently affected in terms of direction and extent. These findings provide direct evidence that higher‐order cognitive functions including memory, attention, executive function, and language were impaired prior to lower‐level sensory responses during sedation. Our result also lends support to the information integration model of consciousness. Hum Brain Mapp 36:4247–4261, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26314702

  1. Use of Opioids and Sedatives at End-of-Life

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Shin Wei; Ho, Shirlynn; Kumar, Radha Krishna Lalit

    2014-01-01

    Despite their proven efficacy and safety, opioid and sedative use for palliation in patients afflicted with cancer in Singapore have been shown to be a fraction of that in other countries. This paper explores the various psychosocial and system-related factors that appear to propagate this conservative approach to care in what is largely a western-influenced care practice. A search for publications relating to sedative and opioid usage in Asia was performed on PubMed, Google, Google Scholar, World Health Organization, and Singapore's government agency websites using search terms such as “opioids,” “sedatives,” “palliation,” “end-of-life-care,” “pain management,” “palliative care,” “cancer pain,” “Asia,” “Singapore,” and “morphine.” Findings were classified into three broad groups – system-related, physician-related, and patient-related factors. A cautious medico-legal climate, shortage of physicians trained in palliative care, and lack of instruments for symptom assessment of patients at the end of life contribute to system-related barriers. Physician-related barriers include delayed access to palliative care due to late referrals, knowledge deficits in non-palliative medicine physicians, and sub-optimal care provided by palliative physicians. Patients' under-reporting of symptoms and fear of addiction, tolerance, and side effects of opioids and sedatives may lead to conservative opioid use in palliative care as well. System-related, physician-related, and patient-related factors play crucial roles in steering the management of palliative patients. Addressing and increasing the awareness of these factors may help ensure patients receive adequate relief and control of distressing symptoms. PMID:25125876

  2. Women, Scientists, Agitators: Magazine Portrayal of Rachel Carson and Theo Colborn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Julia B.

    2001-01-01

    Utilizes a theoretical framework of the media's role in reporting conflict and uncertain science, and feminism and science in a thematic analysis of magazine coverage given Rachel Carson and "the Rachel Carson of '90s," Theo Colborn. Notes that Carson and Colborn's identities as women, scientists, and agitators led critics to charge that…

  3. The effect of agitation state on polyol synthesis of silver nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirjani, Amirmostafa; Marashi, Pirooz; Fatmehsari, Davoud Haghshenas

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the effect of agitation rate on the growth mechanism of silver nanowires is evaluated during polyol process. It was found that increasing the agitation rate leads to the increase in the oxygen transfer rate which in turn enhances the oxidative etching conditions leading to the formation of a variety of nanostructures (nanoparticles, nanorods and nanowires). In light of the obtained experimental results, it can be stated that agitation is not essential for synthesizing silver nanowires by polyol method and it is possible to obtain uniform nanowires with ~200 nm diameters in the length of 20-30 microns several microns length in the stagnant condition. By setting the stirring rate at 200 rpm, it is possible to reduce the nanowires diameters to ~130 nm and the obtained nanostructures are still mono-dispersed. This paper provides complete information about the effect of agitation state on the polyol synthesis of silver nanowires which is truly useful for further studies in this case.

  4. Boiling heat transfer enhancement of nanofluids on a smooth surface with agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xin; Qi, Baojin; Wei, Jinjia; Li, Wei; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Yonghai

    2016-12-01

    The pool boiling heat transfer performance on a smooth silicon chip surface with agitation was experimentally investigated in this study. The nanofluids (Ag/alcohol) of 0.02 % volume concentration and ethyl alcohol with purification over 99.9 % were the two contrast working fluids. For each group, subcoolings of 40, 50 and 60 K were conducted under atmospheric pressure. To enhance the heat transfer performance, an agitating device was fixed above the top of the chip. The experimental results indicated that nanofluids could enhance the heat transfer performance especially in the nucleate boiling region. The heat transfer coefficient was significantly increased with nanofluids, while the critical heat flux (CHF) was nearly not changed. In the agitation Reynolds number of 20,300, the heat transfer performance of nanofluids was significantly enhanced in the convection region, and the CHF was increased by more than 25 % for all groups. This boiling phenomenon was observed for both nanofluids and alcohol groups. Meanwhile, the boiling curves of different liquid subcoolings in the nucleate region were quite similar to each other under agitation.

  5. 5-day storage of platelet concentrates in CLX containers: effect of type of agitation.

    PubMed

    Snyder, E L; Bookbinder, M; Kakaiya, R; Ferri, P; Kiraly, T

    1983-01-01

    To determine the degree of platelet damage produced by different modes of agitation during storage of concentrates for 5 days in CLX blood bags, we studied pH, platelet counts, release of LDH and beta thromboglobulin, morphology and osmotic recovery. Platelets were maintained at 20-24 degrees C on elliptical, 6-rpm circular, 2-rpm circular and flat bed agitators. At 72-120 h platelet concentrates stored on the flat bed shaker had significantly lower pH values than units stored on the elliptical or on either of the circular rotators (p less than 0.05). The percent LDH discharged was highest for the units stored on the elliptical rotator (p less than 0.05). Remaining tests of platelet function were not significantly different for concentrates stored on any of the four agitators. Flat bed shakers were unable to resuspend the platelet 'button' which formed after the final preparative centrifugation. Based on our in vitro studies, we conclude that due to problems with low pH values, flat bed shakers may not be optimal for storing platelet concentrates in CLX blood bags and that some other form of agitation should be used.

  6. Pharmacological Management of Agitation and Aggression in an Adolescent with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Findling, Robert L.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Scahill, Lawrence; Hamarman, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an "autism vignette" and then poses an evaluative question to several autism specialists, documenting their varied responses to the scenario and question posed. A 13-year-old boy with autism and severe mental retardation presented to the inpatient psychiatric unit due to a recent increase in agitation and physical aggression.…

  7. Using Simulation to Train Junior Psychiatry Residents to Work with Agitated Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigman, Daniel; Young, Meredith; Chalk, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the benefit and feasibility of introducing a new, simulation-based learning intervention for junior psychiatry residents. Method: Junior psychiatry residents were invited to participate in a new simulation-based learning intervention focusing on agitated patients. Questionnaires were used to explore the success of…

  8. Escalation of Agitative Rhetoric: A Case Study of Mattachine Midwest, 1967-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darsey, James

    This paper examines the adequacy of Bowers and Ochs' theory of social movements as applied to the escalating agitative strategies of a dissident group, the homosexual-rights organization Mattachine Midwest. The group's activities are described chronologically, in terms of the strategies employed: petition, promulgation, polarization,…

  9. Brief Report: Retrospective Case Series of Oxcarbazepine for Irritability/Agitation Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jessica F.; Sanders, Kevin B.; Benneyworth, M. Hannah; Smith, Jessica L.; DeJean, Virginia M.; McGrew, Susan G.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    We examined response to oxcarbazepine prescribed for irritability/agitation symptoms in a retrospective case series of 30 patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The average patient was 12.0 years old (range 5-21) and taking two other psychotropic medications (range 0-4). Fourteen patients (47 %) had a clinical global impression of…

  10. Effect of agitation and storage temperature on water sorption and solubility of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Argolo, Saryta; Mathias, Paula; Aguiar, Thaiane; Lima, Adriano; Santos, Sara; Foxton, Richard; Cavalcanti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of storage temperature and flask agitation on the water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL) of simplified adhesive systems. Seventy-two disc-shaped specimens were prepared according to the adhesive system (water/ethanol-based: Adper Single Bond 2; and water-based: One Coat Bond SL) and experimental conditions tested (mechanical agitation and storage temperature). Statistical analysis (3-way ANOVA, alpha=5%) found significantly greater WS and SL means for the water/ethanol-based system when compared to the water-based. Irrespective of factors studied, significant differences in WS and SL were noted between cold and room temperatures, with greater values been obtained at 1°C, and lower ones at 20°C. Agitation provided increased WS for both materials at all temperatures, but did not affect their SL. The mechanical agitation of the flask may negatively affect the dynamics of diffusion of simplified adhesive systems, even at extremely cold or warm temperatures.

  11. Effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation and CO2 stress on Phytophthora nicotianae zoospore survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan was used as a model pathogen to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation, and aeration with CO2 or breathable air on the survival of Phytophthora zoospores in water. Injecting CO2 into 2 liters of zoospore-infested water for 5 min at 110.4 ml ...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... shall comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... shall comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... shall comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... shall comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... shall comply with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section. Pumps, valves, connectors, and...

  17. Illinois Dental Anesthesia and Sedation Survey for 1996.

    PubMed

    Flick, W G; Green, J; Perkins, D

    1998-01-01

    Dentists in the state of Illinois who possess a permit to administer sedation or general anesthesia were surveyed. A 71% response rate was achieved. Of the respondents, 86% held permits for deep sedation/general anesthesia and 14% held permits for parenteral conscious sedation. By practice specialty, 84% were oral and maxillofacial surgeons, 11% were general dentists, 5% were periodontists, and fewer than 1% were dental anesthesiologists. Advanced Cardiac Life Support training was possessed by 85% of the respondents. The most common anesthesia team configuration (82%) was a single operator-anesthetist and two additional assistants. Only 4% reported use of a nurse anesthetist, and 2% used an additional MD or DDS anesthesiologist. The vast majority (97%) of the practitioners do not intubate in the office on a routine basis. Supplemental oxygen was used by 81% of the respondents whenever intravenous agents were used. A total of 151,335 anesthetics were administered during the year. One mortality occurred in a patient with an undisclosed pre-existing cardiac condition. Four other events were reported that required medical intervention or hospital evaluation; however, no permanent injuries were reported. Other practice characteristics were described.

  18. Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, Alkhafaji R.; Bao, Jianguo; Du, Jiangkun; Zheng, Dan; Luo, Ye

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • A novel method of stripping (agitation) was investigated for NH{sub 3}-N removal. • PFS coagulation followed agitation process enhanced the leachate biodegradation. • Nitrification–denitrification achieved by changing operation process in SBR treatment. • A dual filter of carbon-sand is suitable as a polishing treatment of leachate. • Combined treatment success for the complete treatment of non-biodegradable leachate. - Abstract: This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH{sub 3}-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s{sup −1} within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L{sup −1} at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD{sub 5}/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD{sub 5}, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH{sub 3}-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic–aerobic–anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD{sub 5}, suspended solid (SS), NH{sub 3}-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L{sup −1}, 22.8 mg L{sup −1}, 24.2 mg L{sup −1}, 18.4 mg L{sup −1} and 50.8 mg L{sup −1} respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated

  19. Enhancing the adhesion strength of micro electroforming layer by ultrasonic agitation method and the application.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Du, Liqun; Tao, Yousheng; Li, Qingfeng; Luo, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Micro electroforming is widely used for fabricating micro metal devices in Micro Electro Mechanism System (MEMS). However, there is the problem of poor adhesion strength between micro electroforming layer and substrate. This dramatically influences the dimensional accuracy of the device. To solve this problem, ultrasonic agitation method is applied during the micro electroforming process. To explore the effect of the ultrasonic agitation on the adhesion strength, micro electroforming experiments were carried out under different ultrasonic power (0W, 100W, 150W, 200W, 250W) and different ultrasonic frequencies (0kHz, 40kHz, 80kHz, 120kHz, 200kHz). The effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency on the micro electroforming process were investigated by polarization method and alternating current (a.c.) impedance method. The adhesion strength between the electroforming layer and the substrate was measured by scratch test. The compressive stress of the electroforming layer was measured by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method. The crystallite size of the electroforming layer was measured by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) method. The internal contact surface area of the electroforming layer was measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV) method. The experimental results indicate that the ultrasonic agitation can decrease the polarization overpotential and increase the charge transfer process. Generally, the internal contact surface area is increased and the compressive stress is reduced. And then the adhesion strength is enhanced. Due to the different depolarization effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency, the effects on strengthening the adhesion strength are different. When the ultrasonic agitation is 200W and 40kHz, the effect on strengthening the adhesion strength is the best. In order to prove the effect which the ultrasonic agitation can improve the adhesion strength of the micro devices, micro pillar arrays were fabricated under

  20. Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration.

    PubMed

    Abood, Alkhafaji R; Bao, Jianguo; Du, Jiangkun; Zheng, Dan; Luo, Ye

    2014-02-01

    This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH3-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s(-1) within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L(-1) at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD5/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD5, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH3-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic-aerobic-anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD5, suspended solid (SS), NH3-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L(-1), 22.8 mg L(-1), 24.2 mg L(-1), 18.4 mg L(-1) and 50.8 mg L(-1) respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated pollutant loading from landfill leachate.

  1. Swelling and erosion properties of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (Hypromellose) matrices--influence of agitation rate and dissolution medium composition.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Nicole; Corrigan, Owen I

    2004-07-26

    The effect of dissolution medium variables, such as medium composition, ionic strength and agitation rate, on the swelling and erosion of Hypromellose (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, HPMC) matrices of different molecular weights was examined. Swelling and erosion of HPMC polymers was determined by measuring the wet and subsequent dry weights of matrices. It was possible to describe the rate of dissolution medium uptake in terms of a square root relationship and the erosion of the polymer in terms of the cube root law. The extent of swelling increased with increasing molecular weight, and decreased with increasing agitation rate. The erosion rate was seen to increase with decrease in polymer molecular weight, with a decrease in ionic strength and with increasing agitation rate. The sensitivity of polymer erosion to the degree of agitation may influence the ability of these polymers to give reproducible, agitation-independent release, compared to more rigid non-eroding matrix materials, in the complex hydrodynamic environment of the gastrointestinal tract.

  2. Comparative evaluation of dexmedetomidine and midazolam-ketamine combination as sedative agents in pediatric dentistry: A double-blinded randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Parul Uppal; Thakur, Seema; Singhal, Parul; Chauhan, Deepak; Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Sood, Ritu; Malhotra, Yagyeshwar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pharmacological methods have been used as an adjunct to enhance child cooperativeness and facilitate dental treatment. Objective: Purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of sedation by intranasal dexmedetomidine and oral combination drug midazolam–ketamine in a group of children with uncooperative behavior requiring dental treatment. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study that included patients 3–9 years old with American Society of Anesthesiologists-I status. About 36 children presenting early childhood caries were randomly assigned to one of three groups studied: Group MK received intranasal saline and oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) with ketamine (5 mg/kg) mixed in mango juice; Group DX received intranasal dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) and oral mango juice; and Group C received intranasal saline and oral mango juice. Patients' heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were recorded before, during, and at the end of the procedure. Patients' behavior, sedation status, and wake up behavior were evaluated with modified observer assessment of alertness and sedation scale. Ease of treatment completion was evaluated according to Houpt scale. Results: Hemodynamic changes were statistically insignificant in Group MK and Group DX. About 75% patients in Group MK were successfully sedated as compared to 53.9% Group DX and none of the patients in Group C. Ease of treatment completion was better with Group MK as compared to Group DX and least with Group C. Around 50% patients in Group MK had postoperative complications. Conclusion: Oral midazolam–ketamine combination and intranasal dexmedetomidine evaluated in the present study can be used safely and effectively in uncooperative pediatric dental patients for producing conscious sedation. PMID:27307665

  3. Efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine on patient's satisfaction, comfort and sedation during awake fibre-optic intubation in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy posted for elective cervical fixation

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, Saikat; Basak, Samir; Acharjee, Amita; Chakraborty, Indrani

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Various anaesthetic drugs, in addition to airway block, are used for producing favourable intubation conditions during awake fibre-optic intubation (AFOI), but most of them cause respiratory depression and hypoxaemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) dexmedetomidine (DEX) on sedation, patient comfort and cardiovascular responses during AFOI in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Methods: This randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, prospective study was conducted on 56 adult patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) undergoing elective cervical fixation, who were randomly allocated into two groups - Group D and Group C. Group D patients received DEX infusion at a rate of 1 μg/kg for the first 10 min followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h and Group C received 0.9% normal saline infusion in the same manner. Airway blocks with lignocaine were given to all patients before undergoing AFOI. Patient's alertness, sedation and cardiorespiratory changes during the procedure were assessed by the Observer Assessment Awareness and Sedation (OAA/S) scale. On the 1st post-operative day, patient's' comfort during AFOI was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Patients of Group D had an acceptable level of sedation (OAA/S score: 20 to 17 with greater comfort and satisfaction (VAS: 40–60), compared to control group (VAS: 50–90, P < 0.001.). Moreover, haemodynamic parameters were less significantly altered in the DEX group during AFOI. Conclusions: IV DEX infusion during AFOI improves patient's tolerances with an acceptable level of sedation without significant haemodynamic instability and respiratory depression. PMID:28250482

  4. Outpatient sedation for oral surgery: a comparison of butorphanol and fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Day, O L; Nespeca, J A; Ringgold, C; Behr, D A; Evens, R P

    1988-01-01

    Third molar surgery in the oral and maxillofacial surgery office has been a predictable model for evaluating the efficacy of sedatives and analgesics. In this setting, butorphanol plus diazepam and fentanyl plus diazepam were compared for surgical effectiveness and postoperative recovery. The comparison of butorphanol to a known sedative combination was clinically very satisfactory. It appears from this data that butorphanol has a pharmacologic place in outpatient conscious sedation.

  5. Variables Influencing the Depth of Conscious Sedation in Plastic Surgery: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wonwoo; Park, Hyochun; Kim, Hoonnam

    2017-01-01

    Background Conscious sedation has been widely utilized in plastic surgery. However, inadequate research has been published evaluating adequate drug dosage and depth of sedation. In clinical practice, sedation is often inadequate or accompanied by complications when sedatives are administered according to body weight alone. The purpose of this study was to identify variables influencing the depth of sedation during conscious sedation for plastic surgery. Methods This prospective study evaluated 97 patients who underwent plastic surgical procedures under conscious sedation. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine, and glucose levels were measured. Midazolam and ketamine were administered intravenously according to a preset protocol. Bispectral index (BIS) recordings were obtained to evaluate the depth of sedation 4, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after midazolam administration. Associations between variables and the BIS were assessed using multiple regression analysis. Results Alcohol intake and female sex were positively associated with the mean BIS (P<0.01). Age was negatively associated with the mean BIS (P<0.01). Body mass index (P=0.263), creatinine clearance (P=0.832), smoking history (P=0.398), glucose (P=0.718), AST (P=0.729), and ALT (P=0.423) were not associated with the BIS. Conclusions Older patients tended to have a greater depth of sedation, whereas females and patients with greater alcohol intake had a shallower depth of sedation. Thus, precise dose adjustments of sedatives, accounting for not only weight but also age, sex, and alcohol consumption, are required to achieve safe, effective, and predictable conscious sedation. PMID:28194341

  6. Walking the line. Palliative sedation for existential distress: still a controversial issue?

    PubMed

    Schur, Sophie; Radbruch, Lukas; Masel, Eva K; Weixler, Dietmar; Watzke, Herbert H

    2015-12-01

    Adequate symptom relief is a central aspect of medical care of all patients especially in those with an incurable disease. However, as an illness progresses and the end of life approaches, physical or psychoexistential symptoms may remain uncontrollable requiring palliative sedation. Although palliative sedation has become an increasingly implemented practice in the care of terminally ill patients, sedation in the management of refractory psychological symptoms and existential distress is still a controversial issue and much debated. This case report presents a patient who received palliative sedation for the treatment of existential distress and discusses considerations that may arise from such a therapeutic approach.

  7. How to improve patient satisfaction during midazolam sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Eun Hyo; Hong, Kyoung Sup; Lee, Young; Seo, Ji Yeon; Choi, Ji Min; Chun, Jaeyoung; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the procedure-related factors that affect sedation satisfaction and to make a suggestion to improve it. METHODS We prospectively enrolled a total of 456 patients who underwent outpatient endoscopy procedures with midazolam sedation between March 2014 and August 2014. All patients completed both pre- and post-endoscopy questionnaires about sedation expectations and satisfaction. RESULTS The study cohort included 167 (36.6%) patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), 167 (36.6%) who underwent colonoscopy, and 122 (26.8%) who underwent a combined procedure (EGD and colonoscopy). Over 80% of all patients were satisfied with sedation using midazolam. In univariate and multivariate analyses, total procedure time in the EGD group, younger age (≤ 50 years), and longer colonoscopy withdrawal time in the colonoscopy group were related to decreased satisfaction with sedation. However, in active monitoring and intervention group, there was no decrease in grade of satisfaction despite longer procedure time due to more procedures during colonoscopy. Younger age (≤ 50 years), longer inter-procedure time gap, and colonoscopy withdrawal time were related to decreased satisfaction in the combined EGD and colonoscopy group. CONCLUSION Midazolam is still a safe and effective sedative for gastrointestinal endoscopy. Satisfaction with sedation depends on several factors including age (≤ 50 years) and procedure time duration. To improve patient satisfaction with sedation, active monitoring of sedation status by the endoscopist should be considered for patients who require long procedure time. PMID:28246484

  8. Review of palliative sedation and its distinction from euthanasia and lethal injection.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Palliative sedation evolved from within the practice of palliative medicine and has become adopted by other areas of medicine, such as within intensive care practice. Clinician's usually come across this practice for dying patients who are foregoing or having life support terminated. A number of intolerable and intractable symptom burdens can occur during the end of life period that may require the use of palliative sedation. Furthermore, when patients receive palliative sedation, the continued use of hydration and nutrition becomes an issue of consideration and there are contentious bioethical issues involved in using or withholding these life-sustaining provisions. A general understanding of biomedical ethics helps prevent abuse in the practice of palliative sedation. Various sedative drugs can be employed in the provision of palliative sedation that can produce any desired effect, from light sedation to complete unconsciousness. Although there are some similarities in the pharmacotherapy of palliative sedation, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and lethal injection, there is a difference in how the drugs are administered with each practice. There are some published guidelines about how palliative sedation should be practiced, but currently there is not any universally accepted standard of practice.

  9. Comparison of two intravenous sedation techniques for percutaneous radio frequency trigeminal rhizotomy. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Speedie, L J; Tung, T J; Shane, S M; Chase, G A; Brake, N; Epstein, M H

    1987-01-01

    Conscious sedation, as used in dentistry and oral surgery, has been used satisfactorily to manage patients undergoing the intense pain encountered in radio frequency trigeminal rhizotomy for tic douloureux. The pain produced by this procedure cannot be blocked by local anesthesia. General anesthesia cannot be used because of the need for sensory testing in an awake, cooperative patient. Conscious sedation using alphaprodine, hydroxyzine, methohexital, and intensive behavioral modification was compared with a neuroleptic intravenous sedation technique using droperidol, fentanyl, and thiopental. Patients managed with conscious sedation were found to be more amnestic for the pain of surgery, a difference that persisted six months later.

  10. A case of accidental aspiration of an endodontic instrument by a child treated under conscious sedation

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, R; Prasad, Vishnu; Menon, Padma A.

    2013-01-01

    Dental management of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often requires the need for pharmacological behavior management techniques such as the use of sedation. The purpose of this article is to describe a clinical case involving accidental aspiration of an Endodontic instrument during root canal therapy under sedation. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of aspiration of an Endodontic instrument and should serve to heighten the awareness with regard to aspiration during dental procedures under sedation. It also emphasizes the need for proper isolation techniques in patients treated under sedation, thereby preventing such complications. PMID:24883031

  11. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  12. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  13. Process agitator operating problems and equipment failures, F-Canyon Reprocessing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, W.S.; Starks, J.B.; Low, J.M.; Galloway, W.D.

    1988-09-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) maintains a compilation of operating problems and equipment failures that have occurred in the fuel reprocessing areas of the Savannah River Plant (SRP). At present, the data bank contains more than 200,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with the potential for injury or contamination of personnel, or for economic loss. The data bank has been used extensively for a wide variety of purposes, such as failure analyses, trend analyses, and preparation of safety analyses. Typical of the data are problems associated with the F-Canyon process agitators. This report contains a compilation of the agitator operating problems and equipment failures primarily as an aid to organizations with related equipment. Publication of these data was prompted by a number of requests for this information by other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Highly sensitive detection and stochastic analysis of magnetization agitation induced in a single layered magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu; Motoi, Keiichi; Miyajima, Hideki

    2016-03-01

    This study shows that broadband magnetic noise in a ferromagnetic wire can be detected over a wide frequency range between 500 MHz and 8 GHz using a lock-in detection technique. The magnetic noise spectrum from a 20 nm-thick single-layered Fe19Ni81 wire biased with a dc current is measured as functions of an external field and dc current. This noise is caused by thermal agitation in magnetization due to ambient temperature and Joule heating. The noise behaviors are well reproduced by a stochastic model. Thus, this paper presents a stochastic analysis of magnetic noise behaviors induced by thermal agitation using a highly sensitive technique for detecting the magnetic noise in a single layered ferromagnetic wire.

  15. Addressing the need for rapid treatment of agitation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: focus on inhaled loxapine as an alternative to injectable agents

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Agitation (excessive motor or verbal activity) can be associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania, and can further escalate into aggressive behavior and potentially lead to injuries in patients and staff. Medications used to treat agitation include antipsychotics and benzodiazepines, usually administered intramuscularly when rapid action is desired. Loxapine, a first-generation antipsychotic, has recently been reformulated into an inhaled powder that allows for direct administration to the lungs, resulting in rapid absorption into the systemic circulation. Administered via a single-use device, inhaled loxapine was tested in randomized controlled trials in agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania; doses of 5 mg and 10 mg were found to be efficacious, with an apparent dose response. In the Phase III studies, number needed to treat versus placebo for a ≥40% reduction from baseline on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale – Excited Component (PANSS-EC) at 2 hours was three for patients with bipolar disorder, and five for 5 mg and four for 10 mg for patients with schizophrenia, with effect sizes comparable to what has been observed in analogous studies of intramuscular injection of antipsychotics or lorazepam. Separation from placebo on the PANSS-EC was as early as 10 minutes postinhalation, the first time point where this was measured. Dysgeusia was the most commonly encountered spontaneously reported adverse event. Adverse events related to extrapyramidal symptoms and akathisia were relatively rare. Spirometry studies identified the potential for bronchospasm particularly in persons with asthma. Because of concerns over pulmonary safety, inhaled loxapine is restricted to use in hospitals and patients need to be prescreened for the presence of pulmonary disease, as well as monitored for signs and symptoms of bronchospasm for 1 hour postdose administration, as per a Food and Drug Administration-mandated Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy

  16. [Non-sedative antihistaminics in the treatment of chronic urticaria].

    PubMed

    Negro, J M; Sarrió, F; Miralles, J C; García Sellés, F J; López Sánchez, J D; Pagán, J a; Hernándéz, J

    1995-01-01

    Antihistamines are the drugs of choice in the symptomatic relief of chronic idiopathic urticaria; however, the usefulness of classic antihistamines has been limited by side effects. In the 1980s a new class of antihistamines has been developed that maintains effectiveness and produces less side effects (eg anticholinergic side effects, daytime sedation, etc). This review analyzes each of the new nonsedating antihistamines commercially available in Spain (astemizole, ebastine, cetirizine, loratadine and terfenadine) and evaluates its clinical efficacy and safety in the treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria.

  17. Nitrousoxide as a conscious sedative in minor oral surgical procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rakesh; Asir, Vigil Dev; Shanmugapriyan; Ebenezr, Vijay; Dakir, Abu; Balakrishnan; Jacob, Jeffin

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the most commonly used inhalation anesthetic in dentistry and is commonly used in emergency centers and ambulatory surgery centers as well. When used alone, it is incapable of producing general anesthesia reliably. However, as a single agent, it has an impressive safety and is excellent for providing minimal and moderate sedation for apprehensive minor oral surgical procedure. In this article, action of N2O in overcoming the anxiety and pain of the patient during the minor oral surgery and its advantages and disadvantages, have been reviewed. PMID:26015724

  18. Flumazenil reversal of midazolam sedation for dental procedures.

    PubMed

    el-Attar, A; Adu-Gyamfi, Y; Tawfique, K

    1992-06-01

    The efficacy of flumazenil in the reversal of midazolam sedation was assessed in double-blind placebo controlled study. Thirty patients undergoing oral surgical procedures were included. Flumazenil administration was followed by immediate rise of the CNS functions scores to almost the baseline awake values. Compared to control group, patients were significantly more oriented and had better comprehension up to 15 minutes, more alert for 30 minutes and had better memory function up to 60 minutes. Peripheral oxygen saturation was significantly higher up to 15 minutes. Flumazenil allows better utilization and higher turn over rate where space and nursing resources are scarce.

  19. Midazolam sedation for the reduction of Colles' fractures.

    PubMed

    Grant, A; Hoddinott, C; Evans, R

    1993-08-01

    The treatment of Colles' fractures in the elderly comprises a heavy workload for both accident and orthopaedic departments. The initial management has important clinical and financial implications for patient and hospital. The demand is variable and the ability to respond must also be flexible. The choice of anaesthetic technique is therefore most important. In our experience, intravenous sedation with midazolam (a water soluble benzodiazepine) has proven to be safe and effective in providing good conditions for anatomical reduction of Colles' fractures on an outpatient basis.

  20. Effects of Tween 20 and Tween 80 on the stability of Albutropin during agitation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Danny K; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F; Manning, Mark Cornell

    2005-06-01

    The objectives of this work were to determine the effects of nonionic surfactants (Tween 20 and Tween 80) on agitation-induced aggregation of the recombinant fusion protein, Albutropintrade mark (human growth hormone genetically fused to human albumin), and to characterize the binding interactions between the surfactants and the protein. Knowing the binding stoichiometry would allow a rational choice of surfactant concentration to protect the protein from surface-induced aggregation. Fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) were employed to study Albutropin surfactant binding. Albutropin was agitated at 25 +/- 2 degrees C to induce aggregation, and samples were taken during a 96-h incubation. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC-HPLC) (HPLC, high-performance liquid chromatography) was used to detect and quantify the extent of protein aggregation. The effect of surfactants on the protein's free energy of unfolding was determined using guanidine HCl as a denaturant. Tween 20 and Tween 80 had saturable binding to Albutropin with a molar binding stoichiometry of 10:1 and 9:1 (surfactant:protein), respectively. Binding of the surfactants to Albutropin increased the free energy of unfolding by over 1 and 0.6 kcal/mol, respectively. In protein samples that were agitated in the absence of surfactant, soluble aggregates were detected within 24 h, and there was almost complete loss of monomer to soluble aggregates by the end of the 96-h experiment. At the molar binding stoichiometry, Tween 20 and Tween 80 prevented the formation of soluble aggregates, even though the concentrations of surfactants were well below their critical micelle concentrations (CMC). Tween 20 and Tween 80 protected Albutropin against agitation-induced aggregation, even at concentrations below the CMC. Equilibrium unfolding data indicate that Tween confer protection by increasing the free energy of unfolding of Albutropin.

  1. The effect of metoclopramide and hydroxyzine in sedation of infants undergoing dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Ram, D; Mamber, E; Chosack, A; Fuks, A B

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the administration of 5 mg of the anti-emetic drug metoclopramide (MTP) would improve the effectiveness of 3.7 mg/kg of hydroxyzine (HYZ) in dental treatment of young patients. Thirty uncooperative children, with a mean age of twenty-nine months, and needing at least two restorative visits, participated in this study. The patients were assigned randomly to receive either 3.7 mg/kg HYZ or the same drug in conjunction with MTP; alternate regimens were administered at the two appointments. All the children received 50 percent nitrous oxide, and were restrained in a Papoose Board with a head holder. The following parameters were evaluated at baseline (before initiation of treatment), and at five-minute intervals throughout the procedure: degree of alertness, crying and movement. Evaluation of the overall behavior at each session was performed by one investigator, who was blind to the drug regimen the child had received, utilizing a separate rating scale. The results were submitted to statistical analysis. No differences were observed in the behavior of the children receiving both regimens. Successful sedation, as assessed by lack or minimal crying and/or movement was observed in all the treatment visits, with both regimens (mean score 4.4 for HYZ + MTP and 4.6 for HYZ). In the few occasions, however, where the restorative sessions were longer (45 to 60 minutes), more children fell asleep after receiving protocol A (pramin + hydroxyzine), suggesting a possible trend to improve effectiveness in these situations. No adverse effects were observed, and all the treatments were successfully completed. Although no significant differences could be observed in treatments lasting up to a half hour, the addition of MTP could help in sedations lasting longer than a half hour.

  2. Agitation and delirium at the end of life: "We couldn't manage him".

    PubMed

    Breitbart, William; Alici, Yesne

    2008-12-24

    Delirium is the most common neuropsychiatric complication experienced by patients with advanced illness, occurring in up to 85% of patients in the last weeks of life. Using the case of Mr L, a 59-year-old man with metastatic lung cancer who developed an agitated delirium in the last week of life, we review the evaluation and management of delirium near the end of life. Although some studies have identified agitation as a central feature of delirium in 13% to 46% of patients, other studies have found up to 80% of patients near the end of life develop a hypoactive, nonagitated delirium. Both the agitated (hyperactive) and nonagitated (hypoactive) forms of delirium are harbingers of impending death and are associated with increased morbidity in patients who are terminally ill, causing distress for patients, family members, and staff. Delirium is a sign of significant physiological disturbance, usually involving multiple causes, including infection, organ failure, and medication adverse effects. Often these causes of delirium are not reversible in the dying patient, and this influences the outcomes of its management. Delirium can also significantly interfere with the recognition and control of other physical and psychological symptoms, such as pain. Unfortunately, delirium is often misdiagnosed or unrecognized and thus inappropriately treated or untreated in terminally ill patients. To manage delirium in terminally ill patients, clinicians must be able to diagnose it accurately, undertake appropriate assessment of underlying causes, and understand the benefits and risks of the available pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions.

  3. Pumping Characteristics of a Helical Screw Agitator with a Draught Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Youn-Jea

    In the use of helical type agitator, the mixing process is usually restricted to the laminar flow regime. Common examples of laminar mixing are found where the fluid has a very high viscosity, i.e., pseudoplastic fluids. It can be indicated that a helical type agitator is sufficiently suited to the creeping flow mixing. The pumping characteristic of a Helical Screw Agitator with a draught tube (HSA) is required to evaluate its capacity for the optimal configuration of the mixing chamber. It could be executed by changing some parameters such as the number of helix, the angular velocity and the rotating direction and so on. In this study, the numerical simulation was carried out with the Eulerian multiphase mixture model and the moving mesh approximation. Some of the optimum design parameters have been developed with the aid of numerical data from the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. Using the commercial code, Fluent, the pumping characteristics in the HSA are investigated from the rheological properties, and the results are graphically depicted.

  4. Comparison of Intravenous Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam for Bispectral Index-Guided Sedation During Spinal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Lee, Dongchul; Jung, Wol Seon; Cho, Noo Ree; Kwak, Hyun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the high frequency of hypotension during spinal anesthesia with proper sedation, no previous report has compared the hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine and midazolam sedation during spinal anesthesia. We compared the effects of bispectral index (BIS)-guided intravenous sedation using midazolam or dexmedetomidine on hemodynamics and recovery profiles in patients who underwent spinal anesthesia. Material/Methods One hundred and sixteen adult patients were randomly assigned to receive either midazolam (midazolam group; n=58) or dexmedetomidine (dexmedetomidine group; n=58) during spinal anesthesia. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures; heart rates; peripheral oxygen saturations; and bispectral index scores were recorded during surgery, and Ramsay sedation scores and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay were monitored. Results Hypotension occurred more frequently in the midazolam group (P<0.001) and bradycardia occurred more frequently in the dexmedetomidine group (P<0.001). Mean Ramsay sedation score was significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group after arrival in the PACU (P=0.025) and PACU stay was significantly longer in the dexmedetomidine group (P=0.003). Conclusions BIS-guided dexmedetomidine sedation can attenuate intraoperative hypotension, but induces more bradycardia, prolongs PACU stay, and delays recovery from sedation in patients during and after spinal anesthesia as compared with midazolam sedation. PMID:27701366

  5. Effects of sedation on echocardiographic variables of left atrial and left ventricular function in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jessica L; Schober, Karsten E; Fuentes, Virginia Luis; Bonagura, John D

    2012-10-01

    Although sedation is frequently used to facilitate patient compliance in feline echocardiography, the effects of sedative drugs on echocardiographic variables have been poorly documented. This study investigated the effects of two sedation protocols on echocardiographic indices in healthy cats, with special emphasis on the assessment of left atrial size and function, as well as left ventricular diastolic performance. Seven cats underwent echocardiography (transthoracic two-dimensional, spectral Doppler, color flow Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging) before and after sedation with both acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg IM) and butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg IM), or acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg IM), butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (1.5 mg/kg IV). Heart rate increased significantly following acepromazine/butorphanol/ketamine (mean±SD of increase, 40±26 beats/min) and non-invasive systolic blood pressure decreased significantly following acepromazine/butorphanol (mean±SD of decrease, 12±19 mmHg). The majority of echocardiographic variables were not significantly different after sedation compared with baseline values. Both sedation protocols resulted in mildly decreased left ventricular end-diastolic dimension and mildly increased left ventricular end-diastolic wall thickness. This study therefore failed to demonstrate clinically meaningful effects of these sedation protocols on echocardiographic measurements, suggesting that sedation with acepromazine, butorphanol and/or ketamine can be used to facilitate echocardiography in healthy cats.

  6. Physician Responses to an Educational Intervention on Improving Their Long-Term Prescribing of Sedatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleath, Betsy; Collins, Ted

    1997-01-01

    A Medicaid retrospective therapeutic intervention was designed to notify physicians about their patients' long-term use of sedatives and suggest to them that they reevaluate the patient's need for sedative hypnotic medication. Physicians' responses and follow-up actions are reported. Practice implications and the need for physician education are…

  7. [Nursing management of ventilation and sedation in patients suffering from septic shock].

    PubMed

    Bridey, Céline; Mathieu, Soulène; Steiger, Magali; Trari, Vanessa; Lavoivre, Christine; Ducrocq, Nicolas; Levy, Bruno; Gérard, Alain; Augros, Johann

    2012-06-01

    A significant number of intubated, ventilated and sedated patients suffering from septic shock develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The supervision by a multidisciplinary team optimises both the management of ventilation and the sedation analgesia of the patient. The nursing supervision and care related to this pathology are specific.

  8. Comparison of Intravenous Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam for Bispectral Index-Guided Sedation During Spinal Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jo, Youn Yi; Lee, Dongchul; Jung, Wol Seon; Cho, Noo Ree; Kwak, Hyun Jeong

    2016-10-04

    BACKGROUND Despite the high frequency of hypotension during spinal anesthesia with proper sedation, no previous report has compared the hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine and midazolam sedation during spinal anesthesia. We compared the effects of bispectral index (BIS)-guided intravenous sedation using midazolam or dexmedetomidine on hemodynamics and recovery profiles in patients who underwent spinal anesthesia. MATERIAL AND METHODS One hundred and sixteen adult patients were randomly assigned to receive either midazolam (midazolam group; n=58) or dexmedetomidine (dexmedetomidine group; n=58) during spinal anesthesia. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures; heart rates; peripheral oxygen saturations; and bispectral index scores were recorded during surgery, and Ramsay sedation scores and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay were monitored. RESULTS Hypotension occurred more frequently in the midazolam group (P<0.001) and bradycardia occurred more frequently in the dexmedetomidine group (P<0.001). Mean Ramsay sedation score was significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group after arrival in the PACU (P=0.025) and PACU stay was significantly longer in the dexmedetomidine group (P=0.003). CONCLUSIONS BIS-guided dexmedetomidine sedation can attenuate intraoperative hypotension, but induces more bradycardia, prolongs PACU stay, and delays recovery from sedation in patients during and after spinal anesthesia as compared with midazolam sedation.

  9. Union Agitators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honawar, Vaishali

    2006-01-01

    A decade has passed since a few union leaders formed the network known as Teacher Union Reform Network (TURN) to search for innovative ways to enhance education. Selling their message has not always been easy. Created in 1995, TURN was the brain child of Adam Urbanski, the president of the Rochester (N.Y.) Teachers Association for the past 25…

  10. Pleiotrophin differentially regulates the rewarding and sedative effects of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Pérez-García, Carmen; Ferrer-Alcón, Marcel; Uribarri, María; Sánchez-Alonso, María G; Ramos, María P; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2014-12-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a cytokine with important roles in dopaminergic neurons. We found that an acute ethanol (2.0 g/kg, i.p.) administration causes a significant up-regulation of PTN mRNA and protein levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex, suggesting that endogenous PTN could modulate behavioural responses to ethanol. To test this hypothesis, we studied the behavioural effects of ethanol in PTN knockout (PTN(-/-) ) mice and in mice with cortex- and hippocampus-specific transgenic PTN over-expression (PTN-Tg). Ethanol (1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) induced an enhanced conditioned place preference in PTN(-/-) compared to wild type mice, suggesting that PTN prevents ethanol rewarding effects. Accordingly, the conditioning effects of ethanol were completely abolished in PTN-Tg mice. The ataxic effects induced by ethanol (2.0 g/kg) were not affected by the genotype. However, the sedative effects of ethanol (3.6 g/kg) tested in a loss of righting reflex paradigm were significantly reduced in PTN-Tg mice, suggesting that up-regulation of PTN levels prevents the sedative effects of ethanol. These results indicate that PTN may be a novel genetic factor of importance in alcohol use disorders, and that potentiation of the PTN signalling pathway may be a promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of these disorders.

  11. Intranasal Midazolam Sedation in a Pediatric Emergency Dental Clinic.

    PubMed

    Peerbhay, Fathima; Elsheikhomer, Ahmed Mahgoub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness and recovery times of 0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg intranasal midazolam (INM) administered with a mucosal atomizer device (MAD) in a pediatric emergency dental hospital clinic. One hundred eighteen children aged from 4 to 6 years were randomly administered either 0.3 or 0.5 mg/kg INM via an MAD in a triple-blinded randomized controlled trial. Sedation was achieved to some degree in 100% of the sample. The pulse rate and oxygen saturation were within the normal range in 99% of the patients. A burning sensation was reported in 9% of children. The recovery time of the 0.5 mg/kg group was statistically longer than that of the 0.3 mg/kg group (16.5 vs 18.8 minutes) but the difference was not clinically significant. The findings of this study show that 0.3 or 0.5 mg/kg doses of INM resulted in safe and effective sedation. The 0.5 mg/kg dose was more effective than the 0.3 mg/kg dose in reducing anxiety.

  12. Upper airway obstruction during midazolam sedation: modification by nasal CPAP.

    PubMed

    Nozaki-Taguchi, N; Isono, S; Nishino, T; Numai, T; Taguchi, N

    1995-08-01

    We examined the depressant effect of midazolam on respiration in 21 healthy women undergoing lower abdominal surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Airway gas flow, airway pressure, and the sound of snoring were recorded together with arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). After spinal anaesthesia was established, subjects were deeply sedated with pentazocine 15 mg followed by incremental doses of midazolam 1 mg i.v. up to 0.1 mg.kg-1. When SpO2 decreased to < 90% or snoring and/or apnoea was observed, continuous positive airway pressure applied through the nose (nasal CPAP) was increased until the respiratory deterioration was reversed. While one patient remained free of respiratory events, the other 20 patients were successfully treated with nasal CPAP restoring normal SpO2 (95.5 +/- 1.7%) without snoring. Stepwise reduction of nasal CPAP determined the minimally effective CPAP to prevent snoring to be 5.1 +/- 2.1 cm H2O. Further reduction of nasal CPAP induced snoring in 15 patients and obstructive apnoea in five patients with the latter accompanied by a severe reduction of SpO2 (87.4 +/- 6.1%). Patients with apnoea were older than those who snored (P < 0.05. We conclude that upper airway obstruction contributes considerably to decreases in SpO2 during midazolam sedation for spinal anaesthesia.

  13. IV ATP potentiates midazolam sedation as assessed by bispectral index.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Satoru; Fukunaga, Atsuo; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    In this study, by measuring bispectral index (BIS), we tested the hypothesis that intravenous adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) infusion would deepen the level of midazolam-induced sedation. Ten healthy volunteers underwent 2 experiments with at least 2 weeks' interval: immediately after intravenous bolus administration of midazolam (0.04 mg/kg), they received continuous infusion of either ATP infusion (100 μg/kg/min) or placebo (saline) for 40 minutes in a double-blind, randomized, crossover manner. Changes in BIS values and responsiveness to verbal command as well as cardiorespiratory variables were observed throughout the study periods. Administration of midazolam alone reduced BIS value from control: 97 ± 1 to 68 ± 18 at 25 minutes, which was accompanied by significant cardiopulmonary depressant effects, while maintaining responsiveness to verbal command (consciousness) throughout the study period. Coadministration of ATP with midazolam further reduced BIS value to 51 ± 13, associated with complete loss of consciousness without adverse effect on the cardiorespiratory systems. We conclude that the addition of ATP infusion to midazolam significantly enhances midazolam sedation without disturbing cardiorespiratory functions.

  14. Intranasal Midazolam Sedation in a Pediatric Emergency Dental Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Peerbhay, Fathima; Elsheikhomer, Ahmed Mahgoub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness and recovery times of 0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg intranasal midazolam (INM) administered with a mucosal atomizer device (MAD) in a pediatric emergency dental hospital clinic. One hundred eighteen children aged from 4 to 6 years were randomly administered either 0.3 or 0.5 mg/kg INM via an MAD in a triple-blinded randomized controlled trial. Sedation was achieved to some degree in 100% of the sample. The pulse rate and oxygen saturation were within the normal range in 99% of the patients. A burning sensation was reported in 9% of children. The recovery time of the 0.5 mg/kg group was statistically longer than that of the 0.3 mg/kg group (16.5 vs 18.8 minutes) but the difference was not clinically significant. The findings of this study show that 0.3 or 0.5 mg/kg doses of INM resulted in safe and effective sedation. The 0.5 mg/kg dose was more effective than the 0.3 mg/kg dose in reducing anxiety. PMID:27585415

  15. SEDATION IN COLONOSCOPY BY USING THREE DIFFERENT PROPOFOL INFUSION METHODS AND ANALYSIS OF PLASMA CONCENTRATION LEVELS: A PROSPECTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    de CARVALHO, Paulo Henrique Boaventura; OTOCH, José Pinhata; KHAN, Mohamad Ali; SAKAI, Paulo; GUEDES, Hugo Gonçalo; ARTIFON, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The propofolemia becomes directly linked to the clinical effects of this anesthetic and is the focus for studies comparing propofol clinical use, in different administration methods routinely used in endoscopy units where sedation is widely administered to patients. Aim: To evaluate the effects of three different regimens of intravenous propofol infusion in colonoscopies. Methods: A total of 50 patients that underwent colonoscopies were consecutively assigned to three groups: 1) intermittent bolus infusion; 2) continuous manually controlled infusion; 3) continuous automatic infusion. Patients were monitored with Bispectral IndexTM (BIS) and propofol serum levels were collected at three different timepoints. The development of an original dilution of propofol and an inventive capnography catheter were necessary. Results: Regarding clinical outcomes, statistical differences in agitation (higher in group 1, p=0.001) and initial blood pressure (p=0.008) were found. As for propofol serum levels, findings were similar in consumption per minute (p=0.748) and over time (p=0.830). In terms of cost analysis, group 1 cost was R$7.00 (approximately US$2,25); group2, R$17.50 (approximately US$5,64); and group 3, R$112.70 (approximately US$36,35, p<0.001). Capnography was able to predict 100% of the oxygen saturation drop (below 90%). Conclusion: The use of propofol bolus administration for colonoscopies, through continuous manually controlled infusion or automatic infusion are similar regarding propofolemia and the clinical outcomes evaluated. The use of an innovative capnography catheter is liable and low-cost solution for the early detection of airway obstruction. PMID:28076483

  16. Palliative sedation to relieve psycho-existential suffering of terminally ill cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya

    2004-11-01

    To clarify the prevalence and the characteristics of patients who received palliative sedation therapy for psycho-existential suffering, a questionnaire was sent to 105 responsible physicians at all certified palliative care units in Japan. The participants were requested to report the number of patients who received continuous deep sedation for refractory psycho-existential suffering during the past year, and to provide details of the 2 most recent patients. A total of 81 physicians returned questionnaires (response rate, 80%). Twenty-nine physicians (36%) reported clinical experience in continuous deep sedation for psycho-existential suffering. The overall prevalence of continuous deep sedation was calculated as 1.0% (90 cases/8,661 total patient deaths), and a total of 46 patient histories were collected. Performance status just before sedation was 3 or 4 in 96%, and predicted survival was 3 weeks or less in 94%. The suffering requiring sedation was feeling of meaninglessness/worthlessness (61%), burden on others/dependency/inability to take care of oneself (48%), death anxiety/fear/panic (33%), wish to control the time of death by oneself (24%), and isolation/lack of social support (22%). Before sedation, intermittent sedation and specialized psychiatric, psychological, and/or religious care had been performed in 94% and 59%, respectively; 89% of 26 depressed patients had received antidepressant medications. All competent patients (n=37) expressed explicit requests for sedation, and family consent was obtained in all cases where family members were available (n=45). Palliative sedation for psycho-existential suffering was performed in exceptional cases in specialized palliative care units in Japan. The patient condition was generally very poor, and the suffering was refractory to intermittent sedation and specialized psychiatric, psychological, and/or religious care. Sedation was performed on the basis of patient and family consent. These findings suggest that

  17. Sedation shared decision-making in ambulatory venous access device placement: Effects on patient choice, satisfaction and recovery time.

    PubMed

    Chittle, Melissa D; Oklu, Rahmi; Pino, Richard M; He, Ping; Sheridan, Robert M; Martino, Joanne; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-08-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the impact of shared decision-making when selecting a sedation option, from no sedation (local anesthetic), minimal sedation (anxiolysis with a benzodiazepine) or moderate sedation (benzodiazepine and opiate), for venous access device placement (port-a-cath and tunneled catheters) on patient choice, satisfaction and recovery time. This is an IRB-approved, HIPPA-compliant, retrospective study of 198 patients (18-85 years old, 60% female) presenting to an ambulatory vascular interventional radiology department for venous access device placement between 22 October 2014 and 7 October 2015. Patients were educated about sedation options and given the choice of undergoing the procedure with no sedation (local anesthetic only), or minimal or moderate sedation. Satisfaction was assessed through three survey questions. No sedation was selected by 53/198 (27%), minimal sedation by 71/198 (36%) and moderate sedation by 74/198 (37%). All subjects would recommend the option to another patient and valued the opportunity to select a sedation option. Post-procedure recovery time differences were statistically significant (p<0.0001) with median recovery times of 0 minutes for no sedation, 38 minutes for minimal sedation and 64 minutes for moderate sedation. In conclusion, patient sedation preference for venous access device placement is variable, signifying there is a role for shared decision-making as it empowers the patient to select the option most aligned with his or her goals. The procedure is well-tolerated, associated with high satisfaction, and the impact on departmental flow is notable because patients choosing no or minimal sedation results in a decreased post-procedure recovery time burden.

  18. Non-Parenteral Medications for Procedural Sedation in Children- A Narrative: Review Article.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Razieh; Ferdosian, Farzad; Shajari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Procedural sedation may be needed in many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in children. To make pediatric procedural sedation as safe as possible, protocols should be developed by institutions. Response to sedation in children is highly variable, while some become deeply sedated after minimal doses, others may need much higher doses. Child developmental status, clinical circumstances and condition of patient should be considered and then pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for sedation be selected. Drug of choice and administration route depend on the condition of the child, type of procedure, and predicted pain degree. The drugs might be administered parenteral (intravenous or intramuscular) or non parenteral including oral, rectal, sublingual, aerosolized buccal and intranasal. The use of intravenous medication such propofol, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, or etomidate may be restricted in use by pediatric anesthesiologist or pediatric critical care specialists or pediatric emergency medicine specialists. In this review article we discuss on non-parenteral medications that can be used by non- anesthesiologist.

  19. Non-Parenteral Medications for Procedural Sedation in Children- A Narrative: Review Article

    PubMed Central

    FALLAH, Razieh; FERDOSIAN, Farzad; SHAJARI, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Procedural sedation may be needed in many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in children. To make pediatric procedural sedation as safe as possible, protocols should be developed by institutions. Response to sedation in children is highly variable, while some become deeply sedated after minimal doses, others may need much higher doses. Child developmental status, clinical circumstances and condition of patient should be considered and then pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for sedation be selected. Drug of choice and administration route depend on the condition of the child, type of procedure, and predicted pain degree. The drugs might be administered parenteral (intravenous or intramuscular) or non parenteral including oral, rectal, sublingual, aerosolized buccal and intranasal. The use of intravenous medication such propofol, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, or etomidate may be restricted in use by pediatric anesthesiologist or pediatric critical care specialists or pediatric emergency medicine specialists. In this review article we discuss on non-parenteral medications that can be used by non- anesthesiologist. PMID:26401146

  20. Dexmedetomidine versus midazolam for sedation during endoscopy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, FAN; SUN, HAO-RUI; ZHENG, ZE-BING; LIAO, REN; LIU, JIN

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing endoscopy frequently require sedation, which commonly includes the administration of midazolam or dexmedetomidine. Previous meta-analyses have mainly focused on comparing the effects of these two drugs in intensive care unit patients. In the present study, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the sedative and clinical effectiveness of these two drugs in patients undergoing endoscopy were searched in a number of databases. The meta-analysis showed that dexmedetomidine demonstrated a significantly lower rate of respiratory depression and adverse events compared with those presented upon midazolam administration. A significant difference was also observed in the sedation potency of the sedatives. The current controlled data suggest that dexmedetomidine may be an alternative to midazolam in the sedation for endoscopy. However, more high-quality and well-designed studies are required to further evaluate this conclusion. PMID:27284342

  1. Conscious midazolam sedation in third molar surgery--aspects of post-operative patient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bremerich, A; Hierl, T

    1995-09-01

    This study was conducted on 426 patients undergoing third molar surgery to evaluate their opinion on surgery and the follow-up period concerning postoperative behaviour, pain, and complaints. Two groups were formed as patients had to choose between local anaesthesia only or additional conscious sedation by means of intravenous midazolam (0.1 mg/kg). Women and younger patients preferred conscious sedation. Surgery was described as significantly less distressing by the sedated group. No difference in the evaluation of the follow-up period between both groups existed. Patients of the midazolam group took more analgesics, tended to stay longer in bed and reported on protracted cooling. Non-sedated persons older than 30 years complained about a slower decrease in postoperative pain. According to these findings, sensitive, cautious patients tend to prefer conscious sedation which is reflected in their behaviour. No relationship between the evaluation of surgery itself and the follow-up period could be found.

  2. Some Problems of Industrial Scale-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    Scientific ideas of the biological laboratory are turned into economic realities in industry only after several problems are solved. Economics of scale, agitation, heat transfer, sterilization of medium and air, product recovery, waste disposal, and future developments are discussed using aerobic respiration as the example in the scale-up…

  3. A Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam for Conscious Sedation During Oocyte Retrieval in An In Vitro Fertilization Program

    PubMed Central

    Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali; Selim, Mohamed Fouad

    2017-01-01

    Background: Various sedative and analgesic techniques have been used for pain relief during oocyte retrieval which is the most painful part of in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures. Aim: This study aimed at comparing dexmedetomidine and midazolam for conscious sedation in women undergoing transvaginal oocyte retrieval during an IVF program. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized double-blinded comparative study. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two patients undergoing oocyte retrieval in their first IVF cycle were randomly allocated into two equal groups. The intervention started with giving fentanyl1 mcg/kg intravenous (IV) followed by paracervical block in both groups. Then, subjects in group (D) received dexmedetomidine at a loading dose of 1 μg/kg IV over 10 min followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h infusion until Ramsay Sedation Scale (RSS) reached 3–4. Patients in group (M) received a loading dose of midazolam 0.06 mg/kg IV over 10 min followed by 0.5 mg incremental doses until RSS reached 3–4. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS program version 19 and EP 16 program. Results: Visual analog scale scores significantly decreased in group D than group M at 5 and 10 min during the procedure (P = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively), and at 20 min during postanesthesia care unit (PACU) time (P = 0.04). Intraoperative rescue sedation by propofol and postoperative rescue analgesia by acetaminophen showed a highly significant decrease (P < 0.01) in group D compared with group M. Furthermore, the time of PACU stay was significantly less (P < 0.01) in group D (49.03 ± 12.8 min) compared to group M (62.5 ± 18.34 min). Although significant bradycardia was noted in group D (23% of patients) during the procedure (P = 0.02), no cases were reported in group M. Patient satisfaction was significantly higher in group D (P < 0.1). Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine is an effective analgesic alternative to midazolam during oocyte retrieval for IVF. It offered not only

  4. Feeding response of sport fish after electrical immobilization, chemical sedation, or both

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Fredricks, Kim T.; Ambrose, Ryan D.; Jackan, Leanna M.; Wise, Jeremy K.

    2012-01-01

    Fishery managers frequently capture wild fish for a variety of fishery management activities. Though some activities can be accomplished without immobilizing the fish, others are accomplished more readily, humanely, and safely (for both the handler and the fish) when fish are immobilized by physical (e.g., electrical immobilization) or chemical sedation. A concern regarding the use of chemical sedatives is that chemical residues may remain in the fillet tissue after the fish recovers from sedation. If those residues are harmful to humans, there is some risk that a postsedated fish released to public waters may be caught and consumed by an angler. To characterize this risk, a series of four trials were conducted. Three trials assessed feeding activity after hatchery-reared fish were electrically immobilized, chemically sedated, or both, and one trial assessed the likelihood of an angler catching a wild fish that had been electrically immobilized and chemically sedated. Results from the first trial indicated that the feeding activity of laboratory habituated fish was variable among and within species after electrical immobilization, chemical sedation, or both. Results from the second trial indicated that the resumption of feeding activity was rapid after being mildly sedated for 45 min. Results from the third trial indicated that the feeding activity of outdoor, hatchery-reared fish was relatively aggressive after fish had been chemically sedated. Results from the fourth trial indicated that the probability of capturing wild fish in a more natural environment by angling after fish had been electrically immobilized and chemically sedated is not likely, i.e., in a group of five fish caught, 3 out of 100 times one would be a fish that had been sedated.

  5. Long-term sedative use among community-dwelling adults: a population-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Deirdre; Gladstone, Emilie J.; Smolina, Kate; Morgan, Steven G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like sedatives (z-drugs) presents substantial risks to people of all ages. We sought to assess trends in long-term sedative use among community-dwelling adults in British Columbia. Methods: Using population-based linked administrative databases, we examined longitudinal trends in age-standardized rates of sedative use among different age groups of community-dwelling adults (age ≥ 18 yr), from 2004 to 2013. For each calendar year, we classified adults as nonusers, short-term users, or long-term users of sedatives based on their patterns of sedative dispensation. For calendar year 2013, we applied cross-sectional analysis and estimated logistic regression models to identify health and socioeconomic risk factors associated with long-term sedative use. Results: More than half (53.4%) of long-term users of sedatives in British Columbia are between ages 18 and 64 years (young and middle-aged adults). From 2004 to 2013, long-term sedative use remained stable among adults more than 65 years of age (older adults) and increased slightly among young and middle-aged adults. Although the use of benzodiazepines decreased during the study period, the trend was offset by equal or greater increases in long-term use of z-drugs. Being an older adult, sick, poor and single were associated with increased odds of long-term sedative use. Interpretation: Despite efforts to stem such patterns of medication use, long-term use of sedatives increased in British Columbia between 2004 and 2013. This increase was driven largely by increased use among middle-aged adults. Future deprescribing efforts that target adults of all ages may help curb this trend.

  6. Effects of viewing a preferred nature image and hearing preferred music on engagement, agitation, and mental status in persons with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Eggert, Julia; Vincent, Ellen; Parker, Veronica; Daily, Shaundra B; Pham, Hiep; Watson, Alison Turner; Summey, Hollie; Roy, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the described exploratory study was to test proactive strategies for enhancing engagement and cognitive ability while diminishing dementia-related disordered behaviors of those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Study participants resided in an Memory Care unit of an assisted living community. Method: The researchers measured the effects of exposure to music and nature images on engagement using the Individualized Dementia Engagement and Activities Scale tool, on cognitive ability using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, and on agitation using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory. Result: The within-subject study design revealed that use of both music and nature images hold promise for reducing undesirable behaviors and improving engagement of residents. Conclusion: The authors suggest caregivers for those with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias can effectively use nature images and music to improve engagement and reduce disordered behaviors, thus potentially enhancing quality of life for the care recipient as well as the caregiver while possibly reducing the costs of medications used to control dementia-related undesirable behaviors. PMID:26770801

  7. Toward an understanding of the effects of agitation and aeration on growth and laccases production by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Gómez-Cruz, Cristina; Galindo, Enrique; Serrano-Carreón, Leobardo

    2014-05-10

    Mycelial growth and laccase production by Pleurotus ostreatus CP50 cultured in a 10-L mechanically agitated bioreactor were assessed through a 2(3) factorial experimental design. The main effects and interactions of three factors (agitation, aeration and copper induction) over five responses (μ, αLacc, βLacc, maximal volumetric laccase activity and maximal biomass concentration) were analyzed. P. ostreatus growth was significantly improved when culturing was conducted with high agitation (5.9kW/m(3)s) and aeration flow (0.5vvm) rates. Under the experimental conditions evaluated, no evidence of hydrodynamic stress affecting fungal growth was observed. However, the high agitation and aeration conditions were detrimental for the growth-associated laccase production constant (αLacc), leading to a very complex optimization of the process. The maximal laccase volumetric activity (1.2 and 3.8U/ml for non-induced and copper-induced cultures, respectively) was observed when the culturing was performed at a low agitation rate (0.9kW/m(3)s) and a high aeration flow rate (0.5vvm). Laccase proteolysis may explain the complex interactions observed between agitation and aeration and the effects of these factors on the laccase volumetric activity observed in the cultures.

  8. The associations between OPRM 1 and COMT genotypes and postoperative pain, opioid use, and opioid-induced sedation.

    PubMed

    Henker, Richard A; Lewis, Allison; Dai, Feng; Lariviere, William R; Meng, Li; Gruen, Gary S; Sereika, Susan M; Pape, Hans; Tarkin, Ivan S; Gowda, Indira; Conley, Yvette P

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies have associated mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) genotype with pain and analgesia responses in postoperative and patient populations. This study investigates the role of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and OPRM1 genotypes in acute postoperative pain scores, opioid use, and opioid-induced sedation after surgical procedures for orthopedic trauma in an otherwise healthy patient population. Verbal pain/sedation scores, opioid use, and physiologic responses in the immediate postoperative period were examined for association with genetic variants in Caucasians genotyped for OPRM1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) A118G and C17T and COMT SNPs. The OPRM1 A118G genotype was associated with patients' postoperative Numerical Pain scale (NPS) ratings at 15 min in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) (p = .01) and patients' sedation scores at 15 min in the PACU (p = .02). COMT genotype (rs4818) was associated with opioid consumption in the first 45 min in the PACU (p = .04). NPS ratings at 45 min were also higher in the group of patients with A/A genotype of rs4680 than in patients with the other two genotypes at this SNP (p = .03). Our haplotype trend analysis identified a COMT haplotype "GCGG" significantly associated with NPS at 15 min (p = .0013), amount of opioids consumed in the first 45 min (p = .0024), and heart rate at 45 min in the PACU (p = .017). The results indicate that genetic variations in COMT contribute to the acute postoperative pain and analgesia responses and physiologic responses in this group of otherwise healthy postoperative orthopedic trauma patients.

  9. Success rate of IR midazolam sedation in combination with C-CLAD in pediatric dental patients—a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Baniel, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the success rate of intra-rectal (IR) midazolam in combination with nitrous oxide/oxygen (N2O) sedation in young uncooperative dental patients when the local anesthesia is delivered by a computerized controlled local anesthetic delivery (C-CLAD). Study Design. This observational study consisted of 219 uncooperative children (age: 4.3 ± 1.69 y) who received IR midazolam (0.4 mg/kg) and N2O to complete their dental treatment. Measured variables included: child’s pain disruptive behavior during delivery of anesthesia by C-CLAD (CHEOP Scale), child behavior during treatment (Houpt scale), dental procedure performed, and side effects that appeared during treatment. Results. There was a high level of cooperation (mean score: 6.69 ± 2.1) during administration of local anesthesia. Good-to-excellent behavior was shown by 87% of the children during treatment. Planned treatment was completed by 184 (92%) patients. No statistically significant changes were noticed in the oxygen saturation levels before and after treatment. Children with side effects included 3 (1.3%) with nistagmus, 5 (2.3%) with diplopia, and 18 (8.2%) with hiccups. Three consecutive sedations decreased the overall behavior score by 5.7% compared to the first appointment (p < .05). Conclusions. IR midazolam-N2O sedation in combination with C-CLAD is very effective for delivery of dental treatment to young uncooperative children. PMID:24688838

  10. Success rate of IR midazolam sedation in combination with C-CLAD in pediatric dental patients-a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Malka; Baniel, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the success rate of intra-rectal (IR) midazolam in combination with nitrous oxide/oxygen (N2O) sedation in young uncooperative dental patients when the local anesthesia is delivered by a computerized controlled local anesthetic delivery (C-CLAD). Study Design. This observational study consisted of 219 uncooperative children (age: 4.3 ± 1.69 y) who received IR midazolam (0.4 mg/kg) and N2O to complete their dental treatment. Measured variables included: child's pain disruptive behavior during delivery of anesthesia by C-CLAD (CHEOP Scale), child behavior during treatment (Houpt scale), dental procedure performed, and side effects that appeared during treatment. Results. There was a high level of cooperation (mean score: 6.69 ± 2.1) during administration of local anesthesia. Good-to-excellent behavior was shown by 87% of the children during treatment. Planned treatment was completed by 184 (92%) patients. No statistically significant changes were noticed in the oxygen saturation levels before and after treatment. Children with side effects included 3 (1.3%) with nistagmus, 5 (2.3%) with diplopia, and 18 (8.2%) with hiccups. Three consecutive sedations decreased the overall behavior score by 5.7% compared to the first appointment (p < .05). Conclusions. IR midazolam-N2O sedation in combination with C-CLAD is very effective for delivery of dental treatment to young uncooperative children.

  11. Randomized controlled study of the safety and efficacy of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for digestive tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cai-Xia; Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jia-Ni; Yu, Xin; Yang, Feng; Sun, Si-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. METHODS Enrolled patients were divided randomly into an experimental group (inhalation of nitrous oxide) and a control group (inhalation of pure oxygen) and heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, and the occurrence of complications were monitored and recorded. All patients and physicians completed satisfaction questionnaires about the examination and scored the process using a visual analog scale. RESULTS There was no significant difference in heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, ECG changes, or complication rate between the two groups of patients (P > 0.05). However, patient and physician satisfaction were both significantly higher in the nitrous oxide compared with the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Nitrous oxide-sedation is a safe and effective option for patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. PMID:28028373

  12. Characterization of agitation environments in 250 ml spinner vessel, 3 L, and 20 L reactor vessels used for animal cell microcarrier culture.

    PubMed

    Venkat, R V; Chalmers, J J

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3-D PTV) was used to characterize the flow fields in the impeller region of three microcarrier reactor vessels. Three typical cell culture bioreactors were chosen: 250 ml small-scale spinner vessels, 3 L bench-scale reactor, and 20 L medium-scale reactor. Conditions studied correspond to the actual operating conditions in industrial setting and were determined based on the current scale-up paradigm: the Kolmogorov eddy length criterion. In this paper we present characterization of hydrodynamics on the basis of flow structures produced because of agitation. Flow structures were determined from 3-D mean velocity results obtained using 3-D PTV. Although the impellers used in 3 L and 20 L reactors were almost identical, the flow structures produced in the two reactors differed considerably. Results indicate that near geometric scale up does not necessarily amount to scale-up of flow patterns and indicates that intensity as well as distribution of energy may vary considerably during such a scale-up.

  13. Dexmedetomidine Sedation With and Without Midazolam for Third Molar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Megann K.; Prior, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-four patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Intraoperatively, one group received a continuous intravenous infusion of dexmedetomidine alone, whereas the other received a continuous dexmedetomidine infusion plus a small dose of midazolam. Early measurements of patient anxiety and psychomotor performance were lower in patients who had received midazolam. This difference was not seen later in the appointment. An amnesic effect was observed in those patients who received midazolam. This effect, however, did not translate into increased patient satisfaction in the group receiving midazolam. Our findings suggest a prolonged discharge time for patients who had been given midazolam that may be clinically significant. Overall, dexmedetomidine showed an unpredictable sedative response and may be less practical than more common alternatives for oral surgery procedures. PMID:24697819

  14. Revision of loop colostomy under regional anaesthesia and sedation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oriana; Thong, Sze Ying; Chia, Claramae Shulyn; Teo, Melissa Ching Ching

    2015-05-01

    Patients presenting for emergency abdominal procedures often have medical issues that cause both general anaesthesia and central neuraxial blockade to pose significant risks. Regional anaesthetic techniques are often used adjunctively for abdominal procedures under general anaesthesia, but there is limited published data on procedures done under peripheral nerve or plexus blocks. We herein report the case of a patient with recent pulmonary embolism and supraventricular tachycardia who required colostomy refashioning. Ultrasonography-guided regional anaesthesia was administered using a combination of ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric, rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks. This was supplemented with propofol and dexmedetomidine sedation as well as intermittent fentanyl and ketamine boluses to cover for visceral stimulation. We discuss the anatomical rationale for the choice of blocks and compare the anaesthetic conduct with similar cases that were previously reported.

  15. Sedative-Hypnotic Drug Withdrawal Syndrome: Recognition And Treatment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cynthia; Olmedo, Ruben E

    2017-03-01

    Sedative-hypnotic drugs include gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic agents such as benzodiazepines, barbiturates, gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid [GHB], gamma-Butyrolactone [GBL], baclofen, and ethanol. Chronic use of these substances can cause tolerance, and abrupt cessation or a reduction in the quantity of the drug can precipitate a life-threatening withdrawal syndrome. Benzodiazepines, phenobarbital, propofol, and other GABA agonists or analogues can effectively control symptoms of withdrawal from GABAergic agents. Managing withdrawal symptoms requires a patient-specific approach that takes into account the physiologic pathways of the particular drugs used as well as the patient's age and comorbidities. Adjunctive therapies include alpha agonists, beta blockers, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics. Newer pharmacological therapies offer promise in managing withdrawal symptoms.

  16. Revision of loop colostomy under regional anaesthesia and sedation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Oriana; Thong, Sze Ying; Chia, Claramae Shulyn; Teo, Melissa Ching Ching

    2015-01-01

    Patients presenting for emergency abdominal procedures often have medical issues that cause both general anaesthesia and central neuraxial blockade to pose significant risks. Regional anaesthetic techniques are often used adjunctively for abdominal procedures under general anaesthesia, but there is limited published data on procedures done under peripheral nerve or plexus blocks. We herein report the case of a patient with recent pulmonary embolism and supraventricular tachycardia who required colostomy refashioning. Ultrasonography-guided regional anaesthesia was administered using a combination of ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric, rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks. This was supplemented with propofol and dexmedetomidine sedation as well as intermittent fentanyl and ketamine boluses to cover for visceral stimulation. We discuss the anatomical rationale for the choice of blocks and compare the anaesthetic conduct with similar cases that were previously reported. PMID:26034327

  17. Stainless steel crown aspiration during sedation in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Adewumi, A; Kays, David W

    2008-01-01

    Foreign body aspiration (FBA) causes death in more than 300 children every year in the United States. Morbidity and mortality are increased in children due to narrow airways and immature protective mechanisms. Factors to consider in pediatric dentistry are: (1) the patient's age and behavior; (2) presence and extent of disability; (3) local anesthesia; (4) body positioning; and (5) loose teeth. FBA requires prompt recognition and early treatment to minimize potentially serious and sometimes fatal consequences. The purpose of this case report was to describe the aspiration of a stainless steel crown in a 5-year-old boy during conscious sedation. It also discusses how a prompt and accurate diagnosis, early referral, and immediate treatment helped prevent serious complications.

  18. Methods for determining enzymatic activity comprising heating and agitation of closed volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David Neil; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Reed, David William; Jensen, Jill Renee

    2016-03-15

    Methods for determining thermophilic enzymatic activity include heating a substrate solution in a plurality of closed volumes to a predetermined reaction temperature. Without opening the closed volumes, at least one enzyme is added, substantially simultaneously, to the closed volumes. At the predetermined reaction temperature, the closed volumes are agitated and then the activity of the at least one enzyme is determined. The methods are conducive for characterizing enzymes of high-temperature reactions, with insoluble substrates, with substrates and enzymes that do not readily intermix, and with low volumes of substrate and enzyme. Systems for characterizing the enzymes are also disclosed.

  19. Treatment of post-electroconvulsive therapy delirium and agitation with donepezil.

    PubMed

    Logan, Christopher J; Stewart, Jonathan T

    2007-03-01

    Delirium and agitation are commonly encountered after administration of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Management is generally fairly straightforward, although some patients may have a severe, prolonged, or refractory course. We recently cared for a 65-year-old man who consistently developed severe and very prolonged post-ECT delirium that did not respond to typical pharmacological agents; the duration of delirium was dramatically shortened by the addition of donepezil. Cholinesterase inhibitors may have a place in mitigating severe and prolonged post-ECT delirium.

  20. Persistent genital arousal disorder: confluent patient history of agitated depression, paroxetine cessation, and a tarlov cyst.

    PubMed

    Eibye, Simone; Jensen, Hans Mørch

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a woman suffering from persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) after paroxetine cessation. She was admitted to a psychiatric department and diagnosed with agitated depression. Physical investigation showed no gynaecological or neurological explanation; however, a pelvic MRI scan revealed a Tarlov cyst. Size and placement of the cyst could not explain the patient's symptoms; thus neurosurgical approach would not be helpful. Her depression was treated with antidepressant with little effect. Electroconvulsive therapy improved the patient's symptoms though they did not fully resolve. More awareness of PGAD and thorough interdisciplinary conferences are necessary to insure an unequivocal treatment strategy.

  1. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder: Confluent Patient History of Agitated Depression, Paroxetine Cessation, and a Tarlov Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Hans Mørch

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a woman suffering from persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) after paroxetine cessation. She was admitted to a psychiatric department and diagnosed with agitated depression. Physical investigation showed no gynaecological or neurological explanation; however, a pelvic MRI scan revealed a Tarlov cyst. Size and placement of the cyst could not explain the patient's symptoms; thus neurosurgical approach would not be helpful. Her depression was treated with antidepressant with little effect. Electroconvulsive therapy improved the patient's symptoms though they did not fully resolve. More awareness of PGAD and thorough interdisciplinary conferences are necessary to insure an unequivocal treatment strategy. PMID:25525548

  2. High Patient Satisfaction with Deep Sedation for Catheter Ablation of Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Münkler, Paula; Attanasio, Philipp; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Huemer, Martin; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Wutzler, Alexander

    2017-02-27

    Patients' satisfaction with invasive procedures largely relies on periprocedural perception of pain and discomfort. The necessity for intraprocedural sedation during catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias for technical reasons is widely accepted, but data on patients' experience of pain and satisfaction with the procedural sedation are scarce. We have assessed patients' pain and discomfort during and after the procedure using a standardized questionnaire. One-hundred seventeen patients who underwent catheter ablation answered a standardized questionnaire on periprocedural perception of pain and discomfort after different anesthetic protocols with propofol/midazolam with and without additional piritramide and ketamine/midazolam. Patients report a high level of satisfaction with periprocedural sedation with 83% judging sedation as good or very good. The majority of patients was unconscious of the whole procedure and did not recollect experiencing pain. Procedural pain was reported by 7.7% of the patients and 16% reported adverse effects, e.g. postprocedural nausea and episodes of headache. The results of our study show, that deep sedation during catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias is generally well tolerated and patients are satisfied with the procedure. Yet, a number of patients reports pain or adverse events. Therefore, studies comparing different sedation strategies should be conducted in order to optimize sedation and analgesia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. [Do we need a more precise definition of what sedation is?].

    PubMed

    Sanz Rubiales, Álvaro; Barón Duarte, Francisco; del Valle Rivero, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Palliative sedation in defined as the deliberate reduction in the level of consciousness of the patient by administering the appropriate drugs in order to avoid intense suffering caused by one or more refractory symptoms; sedation in the patient who is in his last days or hours of life is assumed to be continuous and as deep as needed. Clinical experience shows specific situations where it is likely that there is some confusion of terms. We could erroneously understand as palliative sedation the cases of symptomatic treatment of hyperactive delirium in a patient in its last days (a situation that sometimes is presented as the first cause of palliative sedation) or those in which it is carried out a progressive increase in the palliative treatment that often have a sedative effect, parallel to the increased severity of symptoms because of disease progression in severe ill patients. In both scenarios, sedating drugs are used to relieve end-of-life clinical complications and suffering but the circumstances of the patient, the goal of these treatments, and the way they are used do not match the definition of sedation.

  4. The Efficacy of Two Intravenous Sedative Drugs in Management of Uncooperative Children for Dental Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kaviani, Nasser; Ashrafi, Sanaz; Jabbarifar, Seyed Ebrahim; Ghaffari, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Some children do not show an appropriate cooperation with their dentist. A number of them cannot be managed by local anesthesia and the usual techniques used to control behaviors, so further steps are required to control their pain and anxiety. Pharmaceutical control is recommended through sedation or general anesthesia. Purpose This study was aimed to evaluate two groups of drugs in intravenous sedation method. Materials and Method In this clinical trial intervention study, patients were randomly divided into two groups of 18 and 20 and each group received either intravenous midazolam-ketamine or midazolam-fentanyl. During the procedure, 0.25mg midazolam was administered to both groups if needed. The scores of intraoperative sedation and operation conditions were evaluated and recorded by dental sedation teacher groups (DSTG) system in the 10th, 20th, 30th and 40th minutes of the operation. The results were analyzed by SPSS (version 16) using independent T-test, Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney and Pearson Chi-Square tests as appropriated. Results There was no significant difference between the two groups in sedation period (p= 0.55), recovery time (p= 0.18), Frankl score (p= 0.83(, score of intraoperative sedation and operating conditions (p> 0.05), and sedation complications (p= 0.612). In addition, no complication occurred in recovery. Conclusion There was no significant difference between the two drug groups; both were appropriate in controlling children’s behavior. PMID:26106632

  5. Graph theoretical analysis of sedation's effect on whole brain functional system in school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen; Alcauter, Sarael; Jin, Ke; Peng, Zi-Wen; Gao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The neurophysiological mechanism underlying sedation, especially in school-aged children, remains largely unknown. The recently emerged resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) technique, capable of delineating brain's functional interaction pattern among distributed brain areas, proves to be a unique and powerful tool to study sedation-induced brain reorganization. Based on a relatively large school-aged children population (n=28, 10.3±2.6 years, range 7-15 years) and leveraging rsfMRI and graph theoretical analysis, this study aims to delineate sedation-induced changes in brain's information transferring property from a whole brain system perspective. Our results show a global deterioration in brain's efficiency properties (p=0.0085 and 0.0018, for global and local efficiency, respectively) with a locally graded distribution featuring significant disruptions of key consciousness-related regions. Moreover, our results also indicate a redistribution of brain's information-processing hubs characterized by a right and posterior shift as consistent with the reduced level of consciousness during sedation. Overall, our findings inform a sedation-induced functional reorganization pattern in school-aged children that greatly improve our understanding of sedation's effect in children and may potentially serve as reference for future sedation-related experimental studies and clinical applications.

  6. Randomized perturbed posturography: methodology and effects of midazolam sedation.

    PubMed

    Ledin, T; Gupta, A; Larsen, L E; Odkvist, L M

    1993-05-01

    To study quiescent stance without applying external disturbances is not a theoretically appealing way to unveil the dynamic properties of human equilibrium. Methods to disturb equilibrium range from standing on foam surface, attaching vibrators to the calves to interfere with somatosensation, and exposure to body-position tracking environments, as in dynamic posturography (EquiTest). The EquiTest apparatus was modified by a menu-driven software to allow arbitrary movements of the support surface and visual surround, and force data were recorded for subsequent analysis. The support surface was randomly moved in the antero-posterior direction. First equilibrium was studied on the stable support surface, then low (RMS 1.3 cm) and high (RMS 2.6 cm) amplitude movements were used. Vision was either present or absent at all test amplitudes. Equilibrium was evaluated by the confidence (61%) ellipse sway area and average sway velocity during 45 s. Eleven healthy subjects aged 23-36 years (mean 29) were sedated with a short acting sedative, midazolam 0.1 mg/kg. Randomized perturbed posturography was conducted at baseline, and at about 60, 120 and 180 min after injection. Psychomotor tests were conducted at baseline, and at 30, 90, 150 and 210 min. Large interindividual variations were found. One subject could not be tested at all at 60 min due to sleepiness, whereas some subjects felt nearly full awake at 30 min. Sway areas were larger at 60 min, but not subsequently. At 60 min, sway velocities with open eyes were higher, just as when vision was absent and low amplitude movements were used. Later no effects could be shown.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Medication development for agitation and aggression in Alzheimer disease: review and discussion of recent randomized clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Soto, Maria; Andrieu, Sandrine; Nourhashemi, Fati; Ousset, Pierre Jean; Ballard, Clive; Robert, Philippe; Vellas, Bruno; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Rosenberg, Paul B

    2014-09-16

    ABSTRACT Background: The management of disruptive neuropsychiatric symptom (NPS) such as agitation and aggression (A/A) is a major priority in caring for people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Few effective pharmacological or non-pharmacological options are available. Results of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of drugs for A/A have been disappointing. This may result from the absence of biological efficacy for medications tested in treating A/A. It may also be related to methodological issues such as the choice of outcomes. The aim of this review was to highlight key methodological issues pertaining to RCTs of current and emerging medications for the treatment of A/A in AD. Methods: We searched PubMed/Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov for RCTs comparing medications with either placebo or other drugs in the treatment of A/A in AD, between January 2008 and December 2013. Results: We identified a total of 18 RCTs; of these, 11 were completed and 7 ongoing. Of the ongoing RCTs, only one is in Phase III. Seven of 10 completed RCTs with reported results did not report greater benefit from drug than placebo. Each of the completed RCTs used a different definition of "clinically significant A/A." There was considerable heterogeneity in study design. The primary endpoints were largely proxy-based but a variety of scales were used. The definition of caregiver and scales used to assess caregiver outcomes were similarly heterogeneous. Placebo response was notable in all trials. Conclusions: This review highlights a great heterogeneity in RCTs design of drugs for A/A in AD and some key methodological issues such as definition of A/A, choice of outcome measures and caregiver participation that could be addressed by an expert consensus to optimize future trials design.

  8. Average recovery time from a standardized intravenous sedation protocol and standardized discharge criteria in the general dental practice setting.

    PubMed Central

    Lepere, A. J.; Slack-Smith, L. M.

    2002-01-01

    Intravenous sedation has been used in dentistry for many years because of its perceived advantages over general anesthesia, including shorter recovery times. However, there is limited literature available on recovery from intravenous dental sedation, particularly in the private general practice setting. The aim of this study was to describe the recovery times when sedation was conducted in private dental practice and to consider this in relation to age, weight, procedure type, and procedure time. The data were extracted from the intravenous sedation records available with 1 general anesthesia-trained dental practitioner who provides ambulatory sedation services to a number of private general dental practices in the Perth, Western Australia Metropolitan Area. Standardized intravenous sedation techniques as well as clear standardized discharge criteria were utilized. The sedatives used were fentanyl, midazolam, and propofol. Results from 85 patients produced an average recovery time of 19 minutes. Recovery time was not associated with the type or length of dental procedures performed. PMID:15384295

  9. Nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates among rural and urban women with protective orders.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jennifer; Logan, T K

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors for lifetime nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates among a sample of rural and urban women with recent partner violence victimization (n=756). Nearly one third of the sample (32.8%) reported ever using illicit sedative-hypnotics or opiates. Nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates was significantly associated with lifetime cumulative exposure to interpersonal victimization, rural Appalachian residency, past-year use of other substances and other substance-related problems, and lifetime unmet health care needs. Findings have implications for substance abuse prevention and treatment and victim advocacy programs.

  10. Shear and mixing effects on cells in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1987-01-01

    Tissue cells are known to be sensitive to mechanical stresses imposed on them by agitation in bioreactors. The amount of agitation provided in a microcarrier or suspension bioreactor should be only enough to provide effective homogeneity. Three distinct flow regions can be identified in the reactor: bulk turbulent flow, bulk laminar flow and boundary-layer flows. Possible mechanisms of cell damage are examined by analyzing the motion of microcarriers or free cells relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. The primary mechanisms of cell damage appear to result from: (1) direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies; (2) collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow; and (3) collisions against the impeller or other stationary surfaces. If the smallest eddies of turbulent flow are of the same size as the microcarrier beads, they may cause high shear stresses on the cells. Eddies the size of the average interbead spacing may cause bead-bead collisions which damage cells. The severity of the collisions increases when the eddies are also of the same size as the beads. Impeller collisions occur when beads cannot avoid the impeller leading edge as it advances through the liquid. The implications of the results of this analysis on the design and operation of tissue culture reactors are discussed.

  11. [Current treatment of depression and agitation in the elderly -- clinical use of trazodone].

    PubMed

    Osváth, Péter

    2013-09-01

    Due to their increasing frequency, mental disorders among the elderly have special importance in the clinical practice. In this article we summarize the characteristics, diagnostic problems and modern treatments of mental disorders (especially depression) in old age. As this period of life means special somatic and psychic features in people's condition, it may be difficult to find the most effective and well-tolerated treatment, especially in case of comorbid dementia or agitated behaviour. In this article we review the therapeutic experience with the SARI antidepressant trazodone. Clinical studies and everyday practice indicate that trazodone due to its special multifunctional receptorprofile can be particularly effective in the treatment of depression accompanied by severe insomnia and anxiety. Due to its special anxiolytic and sleep normalising effect and well-tolerated side effect profile trazodone is found to be clinically useful not only in the treatment of depression in the elderly, but also in the case of serious comorbidity with dementia or agitated behaviour. We also illustrate the possibilities of using trazodone in the everyday practice with the presentation of two case reports. Furthermore we review the viewpoints of complex therapy which facilitates the successful treatment of depression in the elderly and the restoration of quality of life.

  12. Experimental study on agitated drying characteristics of sewage sludge under the effects of different additive agents.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenyi; Su, Yaxin

    2014-07-01

    Drying experiments of dewatered sewage sludge (DSS) were conducted on a agitated paddle dryer, and the effects of additive agents, i.e., CaO, pulverized coal (PC), heavy oil (HO), and dried sludge ("DS" through back mixing) on the agitated drying characteristics of DSS were investigated. The results indicated that CaO can significantly increase the drying rate of DSS. The drying rate at CaO/DSS (mass ratio)=1/100 was 135% higher than that of CaO/DSS=0. Pulverized coal has no obvious effect on drying rate, but the increase of PC/DSS can promote breaking up of sludge lump. Heavy oil was found to be slightly effective in improving the drying rate of DSS in the examined experimental range of HO/DSS=0-1/20. It is also found that HO can reduce the torque of the dryer shaft, due to its lubrication effect. Back mixing of DS was found to be effective in alleviating the unfavorable effect of the lumpy phase by improving the mixing effect of the paddle dryer. There was a marked increase of drying rate with an increase of the DS/DSS in the experimental range of DS/DSS=0-1/3.

  13. Properties of a calicivirus isolated from cats dying in an agitated state.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Ohe, K; Fukuyama, M; Furuhata, K; Kishikawa, S; Sakai, S; Kiuchi, A; Hara, M; Watanabe, T; Ishikawa, Y; Taneno, A

    In June 1993, two of five pet cats kept in Yokohama city in Japan suddenly became agitated and died. Feline calicivirus (FCV) was isolated from them. One strain (FCV-S) was isolated from the spinal cord, lung and tonsil of cat 1, another (FCV-B) from the ileum, medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord of cat 2, and a third (FCV-SAKURA) from the oral cavity of one of the three surviving cats which showed no clinical signs. These three strains were equally resistant to pH 3.0 and serologically similar to each other, but distinct from strain F9. A genetic analysis, using a 208 base pair fragment from region E of the capsid, showed that FCV-Ari had a 70.4 per cent nucleotide and 77.3 per cent amino acid homology and FCV-F9 had a 68.6 per cent nucleotide and 73.9 per cent amino acid homology with the three strains, indicating that these two strains were genetically distinct from the three new isolates. Unvaccinated cats and cats which had been vaccinated against FCV-F9 developed watery diarrhoea but did not become agitated after the administration of FCV-S. The FCV-S strain did not induce signs of excitability after it was administered orally to specific pathogen-free cats.

  14. Hyperactivity with Agitative-Like Behavior in a Mouse Tauopathy Model.

    PubMed

    Jul, Pia; Volbracht, Christiane; de Jong, Inge E M; Helboe, Lone; Elvang, Anders Brandt; Pedersen, Jan Torleif

    2016-01-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), are characterized by formation of neurofibrillary tangles consisting of hyperphosphorylated tau. In addition to memory loss, patients experience behavioral symptoms such as agitation, aggression, depression, and insomnia. We explored the behavioral phenotype of a mouse model (rTg4510) carrying the human tau P301L mutation found in a familial form of FTD. We tested these mice in locomotor activity assays as well as in the Morris water maze to access spatial memory. In addition to cognitive impairments, rTg4510 mice exhibited a hyperactivity phenotype which correlated with progression of tau pathology and was dependent on P301L tau transgene expression. The hyperactive phenotype was characterized by significantly increased locomotor activity in a novel and in a simulated home cage environment together with a disturbed day/night cycle. The P301L-tau-dependent hyperactivity and agitative-like phenotype suggests that these mice may form a correlate to some of the behavioral disturbances observed in advanced AD and FTD.

  15. Rapid Tranquilization for Psychiatric Patients with Psychomotor Agitation: What is Known About it?

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Clayton Gonçalves; Del Grossi Moura, Mariana; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Motta, Rogério Heládio Lopes; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane

    2017-03-09

    Rapid tranquilization is an intervention used in control of agitation or aggression in patients with mental disorders. This study synthesized the available evidence regarding efficacy and safety of drugs used for rapid tranquilization in psychiatric patients with psychomotor agitation. It is an overview study of systematic reviews and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) identified in the database MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and LILACS until April 2015. A team of reviewers, in pairs and independently, identified eligible studies and assessed methodological quality using AMSTAR. Data were extracted from four studies (61 RCT, 8021 participants). The association of haloperidol with promethazine (H + P) promoted tranquilization and presented better safety profile, with moderate quality evidence. Olanzapine demonstrated benefit towards tranquilization and good safety profile, but needed additional administration to keep tranquilization. There was no benefit in the use of haloperidol alone or associated to another psychotropic to most outcomes evaluated. The evidence was of low quality to most of the interventions. H + P was considered a good option for rapid tranquilization, however, more RCT are necessary to confirm the efficacy and safety of the available interventions.

  16. Effects of agitation on particle-size distribution and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated spruce and giant reed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixing is an energy demanding process which has been previously shown to affect enzymatic hydrolysis. Concentrated biomass slurries are associated with high and non-Newtonian viscosities and mixing in these systems is a complex task. Poor mixing can lead to mass and/or heat transfer problems as well as inhomogeneous enzyme distribution, both of which can cause possible yield reduction. Furthermore the stirring energy dissipation may impact the particle size which in turn may affect the enzymatic hydrolysis. The objective of the current work was to specifically quantify the effects of mixing on particle-size distribution (PSD) and relate this to changes in the enzymatic hydrolysis. Two rather different materials were investigated, namely pretreated Norway spruce and giant reed. Results Changes in glucan hydrolysis and PSD were measured as a function of agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis at fiber loadings of 7 or 13% water-insoluble solids (WIS). Enzymatic conversion of pretreated spruce was strongly affected by agitation rates at the higher WIS content. However, at low WIS content the agitation had almost no effect on hydrolysis. There was some effect of agitation on the hydrolysis of giant reed at high WIS loading, but it was smaller than that for spruce, and there was no measurable effect at low WIS loading. In the case of spruce, intense agitation clearly affected the PSD and resulted in a reduced mean particle size, whereas for giant reed the decrease in particle size was mainly driven by enzymatic action. However, the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis was not increased after size reduction by agitation. Conclusions The impact of agitation on the enzymatic hydrolysis clearly depends not only on feedstock but also on the solids loading. Agitation was found to affect the PSD differently for the examined pretreated materials spruce and giant reed. The fact that the reduced mean particle diameter could not explain the enhanced hydrolysis rates found for

  17. Effect of Agitation on Acidogenesis Stage of Two-Stage Anaerobic Digestion of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) into Biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisakti, B.; Irvan; Adipasah, H.; Taslim; Turmuzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    The acidogenesis stage in two-stage anaerobic digestion of palm oil mill effluent (POME) was studied in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). This research investigated the effect of agitation rate on the growth of microorganisms, the degradation of organic substances, and volatile fatty acids (VFA) production and composition. Initially, the suitable loading up was determined by varying the HRT 6.7, 5.0, and 4.0 days in a 2 L CSTR with agitation rate 50 rpm, pH 6.0 ± 0.2, at room temperature. Next, effect of agitation on the process was determined by varying agitation rate at 25, 50, 100, and 200 rpm. Analysis of total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS), total suspended solids (TSS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and volatile fatty acids (VFA) were conducted in order to study the growth of microorganisms and their abilities in converting organic compound to produce VFA. The highest growth of microorganisms was achieved at HRT 4.0 day with microorganism concentration was 20.62 mg VSS/L and COD reduction was 15.7%. The highest production of total VFA achieved was 5,766.61 mg/L mg/L at agitation rate 200 rpm, with concentration of acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid were 1,889.23; 1,161.43; and 2,725.95 mg/L, respectively. While degradation VS and COD were 16.61 and 38.79%.

  18. The Interactive Relationship between Pain, Psychosis, and Agitation in People with Dementia: Results from a Cluster-Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Habiger, Torstein F.; Flo, Elisabeth; Achterberg, Wilco P.; Husebo, Bettina S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in people with dementia, and pain is thought to be an important underlying factor. Pain has previously been associated with agitation, and pain treatment has been shown to ameliorate agitated behaviour. So far, the association between pain and psychosis and the effect of pain treatment on psychotic symptoms is unclear. Furthermore, the impact of opioid treatment on psychosis is not established. Aim. To investigate the efficacy of a stepwise protocol for treating pain (SPTP) on psychosis and agitation measured with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Nursing Home version, and to explore the impact of opioid analgesics on psychosis. Method. Secondary analyses are from a cluster-randomised controlled trial including 352 patients with advanced dementia and agitation from 18 nursing homes in Western Norway. The intervention group received pain treatment according to SPTP. Results. Pain was associated with disinhibition (adjusted OR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.10–1.34) and irritability (adjusted OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.01–1.21) at baseline. Pain treatment reduced agitation (p < 0.001, df = 1; 300) and aberrant motor behaviour (p = 0.017, df = 1; 300). Psychosis was reduced in people with at least one symptom at baseline (p = 0.034, df = 1; 135). The use of opioid analgesics did not increase psychotic symptoms. Study Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01021696), Norwegian Medicines Agency, EudraCT (EudraCTnr: 2008-007490-20). PMID:27247487

  19. A partially blinded randomised controlled trial of patient-maintained propofol sedation and operator controlled midazolam sedation in third molar extractions.

    PubMed

    Leitch, J A; Anderson, K; Gambhir, S; Millar, K; Robb, N D; McHugh, S; Kenny, G N C

    2004-09-01

    Patient-maintained sedation using propofol has recently been shown to be effective for dental surgery. We compared this new technique to the established technique of operator administered midazolam. The two groups were compared before, during and after sedation. The two primary outcomes were time until discharge and oxygen saturation. Vital signs, anxiety and psychomotor skills were also compared. State anxiety was reduced to a greater extent in the propofol group (mean difference 10 (SD 4) mm; p = 0.010. Propofol patients recovered quicker (mean difference 7 (SD 1.4) min; p = 0.001). Propofol patients had a smaller reduction in arterial oxygen saturation (mean difference 0.8 (SD 0.3)%; p = 0.030), and a reduced increase in heart rate (mean difference 9 (SD 2) beats.min(-1); p < 0.001). Both techniques were well tolerated and safe. Propofol sedation offered superior anxiolysis, quicker recovery, less amnesia and less depression of simple psychomotor function.

  20. Propofol infusion for sedation in the intensive care unit: preliminary report.

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, R M; Lalor, J M; Lumley, J; Royston, D; Morgan, M

    1987-01-01

    Propofol (2,6,di-isopropylphenol) was given by continuous intravenous infusion to provide sedation after cardiac surgery in 30 patients and its effects compared with those of midazolam given to a further 30 patients. Propofol infusion allowed rapid and accurate control of the level of sedation, which was satisfactory for longer than with midazolam. Patients given propofol recovered significantly more rapidly from their sedation once they had fulfilled the criteria for weaning from artificial ventilation and as a result spent a significantly shorter time attached to a ventilator. There were no serious complications in either group. Both medical and nursing staff considered the propofol infusion to be superior to midazolam in these patients. These findings suggest that propofol is a suitable replacement for etomidate and alphaxalone-alphadolone for sedating patients receiving intensive care. PMID:3101895

  1. Donepezil in the treatment of opioid-induced sedation: report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Slatkin, N E; Rhiner, M; Bolton, T M

    2001-05-01

    Donepezil, an oral acetylcholinesterase inhibitor approved for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, was given to 6 cancer pain patients having sedation related to the analgesic use of opioids. Each patient was taking more than 200 mg of oral morphine equivalents per day, and several were receiving complex analgesic regimens consisting of multiple adjuvant medications. Sedation improved at least moderately in 5 of the patients and mildly in 1 after they began taking donepezil. Patients reported a decrease in episodes of spontaneous sleeping during the day, fewer myoclonic twitches, improved daily function and greater social interaction. Several also reported improved sleep at night. Analgesia was not compromised by the use of donepezil, and in some cases it appeared improved. Donepezil may be a valuable alternative to psychostimulants in the treatment of opioid-induced sedation. A prospective controlled trial comparing the treatment effects of psychostimulants and donepezil on patients having opioid-induced sedation is underway.

  2. Oral chloral hydrate vs. intranasal midazolam for sedation during computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Razieh; Nakhaei, Mohammad Hosein Ataee; Behdad, Shekofah; Moghaddam, Reza Nafisi; Shamszadeh, Ali

    2013-02-01

    We conducted this single blind randomized clinical trial to compare the efficacy and safety of oral chloral hydrate and intranasal midazolam for induction of sedation for computerized tomography scan of brain in children. Participants aged 1-10 years (n=60) were randomized to receive 100 mg/kg chloral hydrate orally with intra nasal normal saline OR intranasal midazolam 0.2 mg/kg with oral normal saline. Adequate sedation (Ramsay sedation score of four) was obtained and CT scan completed successfully in 76.7% of chloral hydrate group and in 40% of midazolam group (P=0.004). No significant difference was seen for side effects frequency between the two drugs (10% in chloral hydrate, 3.3% in midazolam group; P=0.34). We conclude that oral chloral hydrate can be considered as a safe and effective drug for sedation in children undergoing CT scan of brain.

  3. Dutasteride reduces alcohol's sedative effects in men in a human laboratory setting and reduces drinking in the natural environment

    PubMed Central

    Covault, Jonathan; Pond, Timothy; Feinn, Richard; Arias, Albert J.; Oncken, Cheryl; Kranzler, Henry R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Preclinical studies support the hypothesis that endogenous neuroactive steroids mediate some effects of alcohol. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the effect of dutasteride inhibition of 5α-reduced neuroactive steroid production on subjective responses to alcohol in adult men. Methods Using a within-subject factorial design, 70 men completed four randomly ordered monthly sessions in which pretreatment with 4 mg dutasteride or placebo was paired with a moderate dose of alcohol (0.8 g/kg) or placebo beverage. The pharmacologic effect of dutasteride was measured by an assay of serum androstanediol glucuronide. Self-reports of alcohol effects were obtained at 40-min intervals following alcohol administration using the Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale (BAES) and the Alcohol Sensation Scale (SS). We used linear mixed models to examine the effects of dutasteride and alcohol on BAES and SS responses and the interaction of dutasteride with the GABRA2 alcohol dependence-associated polymorphism rs279858. We also examined whether exposure to dutasteride influenced drinking in the weeks following each laboratory session. Results A single 4-mg dose of dutasteride produced a 70 % reduction in androstanediol glucuronide. Dutasteride pretreatment reduced alcohol effects on the BAES sedation and SS anesthesia scales. There was no interaction of dutasteride with rs279858. Heavy drinkers had fewer heavy drinking days during the 2 weeks following the dutasteride sessions and fewer total drinks in the first week after dutasteride. Conclusions These results provide evidence that neuroactive steroids mediate some of the sedative effects of alcohol in adult men and that dutasteride may reduce drinking, presumably through its effects on neuroactive steroid concentrations. PMID:24557088

  4. Sedative effect of galphimine B, a nor-seco-triterpenoid from Galphimia glauca.

    PubMed

    Tortoriello, J; Ortega, A

    1993-10-01

    Galphimia glauca Cav. (Malpighiaceae) is used in Mexican traditional medicine as a sedative in the treatment of mental disorders. Sedative properties of a methanolic extract of the aerial parts of this plant have been established in animal trials and an active compound, named galphimine B, has already been isolated. This compound was submitted to neuropharmacological testing, where it was shown that galphimine B had no significant effect as an anticonvulsant, while it exhibited a strong depressant activity on the nervous system.

  5. Sleep/sedation in children undergoing EEG testing: a comparison of chloral hydrate and music therapy.

    PubMed

    Loewy, Joanne; Hallan, Cathrine; Friedman, Eliezer; Martinez, Christine

    2005-10-01

    This study included a total of 60 pediatric patients ranging from 1 month through 5 years of age. The effects of chloral hydrate and music therapy were evaluated and compared as means of safe and effective ways to achieve sleep/sedation in infants and toddlers undergoing EEG testing. The results of the study indicate that music therapy may be a cost-effective, risk-free alternative to pharmacological sedation.

  6. Early sedation and clinical outcomes of mechanically ventilated patients: a prospective multicenter cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sedation overuse is frequent and possibly associated with poor outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU) patients. However, the association of early oversedation with clinical outcomes has not been thoroughly evaluated. The aim of this study was to assess the association of early sedation strategies with outcomes of critically ill adult patients under mechanical ventilation (MV). Methods A secondary analysis of a multicenter prospective cohort conducted in 45 Brazilian ICUs, including adult patients requiring ventilatory support and sedation in the first 48 hours of ICU admissions, was performed. Sedation depth was evaluated after 48 hours of MV. Multivariate analysis was used to identify variables associated with hospital mortality. Results A total of 322 patients were evaluated. Overall, ICU and hospital mortality rates were 30.4% and 38.8%, respectively. Deep sedation was observed in 113 patients (35.1%). Longer duration of ventilatory support was observed (7 (4 to 10) versus 5 (3 to 9) days, P = 0.041) and more tracheostomies were performed in the deep sedation group (38.9% versus 22%, P = 0.001) despite similar PaO2/FiO2 ratios and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) severity. In a multivariate analysis, age (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.02; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00 to 1.03), Charlson Comorbidity Index >2 (OR 2.06; 95% CI, 1.44 to 2.94), Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 (SAPS 3) score (OR 1.02; CI 95%, 1.00 to 1.04), severe ARDS (OR 1.44; CI 95%, 1.09 to 1.91) and deep sedation (OR 2.36; CI 95%, 1.31 to 4.25) were independently associated with increased hospital mortality. Conclusions Early deep sedation is associated with adverse outcomes and constitutes an independent predictor of hospital mortality in mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:25047960

  7. Trends in Continuous Deep Sedation until Death between 2007 and 2013: A Repeated Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joachim; Rietjens, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background Continuous deep sedation until death is a highly debated medical practice, particularly regarding its potential to hasten death and its proper use in end-of-life care. A thorough analysis of important trends in this practice is needed to identify potentially problematic developments. This study aims to examine trends in the prevalence and practice characteristics of continuous deep sedation until death in Flanders, Belgium between 2007 and 2013, and to study variation on physicians’ degree of palliative training. Methods Population-based death certificate study in 2007 and 2013 in Flanders, Belgium. Reporting physicians received questionnaires about medical practices preceding the patient’s death. Patient characteristics, clinical characteristics (drugs used, duration, artificial nutrition/hydration, intention and consent), and palliative care training of attending physician were recorded. We posed the following question regarding continuous deep sedation: ‘Was the patient continuously and deeply sedated or kept in a coma until death by the use of one or more drugs’. Results After the initial rise of continuous deep sedation to 14.5% in 2007 (95%CI 13.1%-15.9%), its use decreased to 12.0% in 2013 (95%CI 10.9%-13.2%). Compared with 2007, in 2013 opioids were less often used as sole drug and the decision to use continuous deep sedation was more often preceded by patient request. Compared to non-experts, palliative care experts more often used benzodiazepines and less often opioids, withheld artificial nutrition/hydration more often and performed sedation more often after a request from or with the consent of the patient or family. Conclusion Worldwide, this study is the first to show a decrease in the prevalence of continuous deep sedation. Despite positive changes in performance and decision-making towards more compliance with due care requirements, there is still room for improvement in the use of recommended drugs and in the involvement of

  8. Current methods of sedation in dental patients - a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; López-Jiménez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Objetive The main objective of this systematic literature review is to identify the safest and most effective sedative drugs so as to ensure successful sedation with as few complications as possible. Study Design A systematic literature review of the PubMed MEDLINE database was carried out using the key words “conscious sedation,” “drugs,” and “dentistry.” A total of 1,827 scientific articles were found, and these were narrowed down to 473 articles after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. These 473 studies were then individually assessed for their suitability for inclusion in this literature review. Results A total of 21 studies were selected due to their rigorous study design and conduciveness to further, more exhaustive analysis. The selected studies included a total of 1,0003 patients classified as ASA I or II. Midazolam was the drug most frequently used for successful sedation in dental surgical procedures. Ketamine also proved very useful when administered intranasally, although some side effects were observed when delivered via other routes of administration. Both propofol and nitrous oxide (N2O) are also effective sedative drugs. Conclusions Midazolam is the drug most commonly used to induce moderate sedation in dental surgical procedures, and it is also very safe. Other sedative drugs like ketamine, dexmedetomidine and propofol have also been proven safe and effective; however, further comparative clinical studies are needed to better demonstrate which of these are the safest and most effective. Key words:Conscious sedation, drugs, dentistry. PMID:27475684

  9. A simple collapse, agitation and pathological crying in a young woman? - Atypical onset of a basilar thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Etgen, Thorleif; Milankovic-Eberl, Dragana; Rieder, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background A collapse and agitation in a young person comprises many differential diagnoses, but usually does not include a life-threatening basilar thrombosis. Methods and Results We report the case of a 19-year old woman who presented mainly with a collapse and agitation. CT and CT-angiography yielded distal basilar thrombosis which was successfully treated by intraarterial thrombolysis. MRI confirmed multiple small ischemic lesions in the vertebrobasilar territory. The patient improved quickly and returned to her normal daily activities of life after a few months. Conclusions Posterior circulation ischemia should be included among the possible differential diagnoses of any acute onset of an agitated or confusional state. Conflicts of interest/Disclosures None to declare. Ethics Written informed consent of the patient has been obtained. PMID:25422712

  10. Paradoxical severe agitation induced by add-on high-doses quetiapine in schizo-affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Fond, Guillaume; MacGregor, Alexandra; Ducasse, Deborah; Brittner, Marie

    2014-05-15

    We report the case of a 35-year-old patient suffering from schizo-affective disorder since the age of 19 years, treated by a combination of first-generation antipsychotics, zuclopenthixol (100 mg/day) and lithium (1200 mg/day) (serum lithium=0.85 mEq/l). This patient had no associated personality disorder (particularly no antisocial disorder) and no substance abuse disorder. Within the 48 h following the gradual introduction of quetiapine (up to 600 mg/day), the patient presented severe agitation without an environmental explanation, contrasting with the absence of a history of aggressiveness or personality disorder. The diagnoses of manic shift and akathisia were dismissed. The withdrawal and the gradual reintroduction of quetiapine 2 weeks later, which led to another severe agitation, enabled us to attribute the agitation specifically to quetiapine.

  11. Effects of agitation speed on the ex vivo expansion of cord blood hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in stirred suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Jing, Qiang; Cai, Haibo; Du, Zheng; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-song

    2013-04-01

    The mononuclear cells were cultivated in stirred flasks at different agitation speeds of 30 rpm, 45 rpm, 60 rpm and 80 rpm. At the agitation speed of 30 rpm, total cells achieved higher expansion folds and the CFC density increased. When at higher agitation speed of 60 rpm or 80 rpm, the number of cells dropped rapidly and characteristics of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) were not maintained. Moreover, the culture duration of 6-9 days was better for HSPCs ex vivo expansion. These data indicated that HSPCs should be cultured at relatively low agitation speed and for a short-term period when cultured in stirred suspension system.

  12. Dexmedetomidine Injection during Strabismus Surgery Reduces Emergence Agitation without Increasing the Oculocardiac Reflex in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ah-Young; Baik, Ji-Seok; Kim, Jin Hee; Hwang, Jung- Won; Jeon, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dexmedetomidine is known to reduce the incidence of emergence agitation, which is a common complication after inhalational anesthesia like sevoflurane or desflurane in children. However, the dose of dexmedetomidine used for this purpose is reported variously and the most effective dose is not known. In this study, we tried to find the most effective dose of dexmedetomidine to reduce the incidence of emergence agitation in children undergoing strabismus surgery without the complications like oculocardiac reflex (OCR) or postoperative vomiting. Methods We randomized 103 pediatric patients aged 2–6 years and undergoing elective strabismus surgery into four groups. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane and maintained with desflurane. At the start of induction, dexmedetomidine, delivered at 0.25, 0.5, or 1 μg/kg, or saline was infused intravenously in the D0.25, D0.5, D1 groups, respectively. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of emergence agitation and the secondary outcome measure was the incidence of intraoperative OCR, postoperative vomiting, and desaturation events. Results The incidence of emergence agitation was 60, 48, 44, and 21% (P = 0.005) and the incidence of intraoperative OCR was 36, 36, 36, and 37% (P = 0.988) in the control, D0.25, D0.5, and D1 groups, respectively. And, postoperative vomiting rate and desaturation events were low in the all groups. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine decreased the incidence of emergence agitation without increasing intraoperative oculocardiac reflex. Dexmedetomidine delivered at 1 μg/kg was more effective at reducing emergence agitation than lower doses in children undergoing strabismus surgery under desflurane anesthesia. Trial Registration Clinical Research Information Service KCT0000141 PMID:27617832

  13. The Role of Inhaled Loxapine in the Treatment of Acute Agitation in Patients with Psychiatric Disorders: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    de Berardis, Domenico; Fornaro, Michele; Orsolini, Laura; Iasevoli, Felice; Tomasetti, Carmine; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Serroni, Nicola; Valchera, Alessandro; Carano, Alessandro; Vellante, Federica; Marini, Stefano; Piersanti, Monica; Perna, Giampaolo; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Loxapine is a first generation antipsychotic, belonging to the dibenzoxazepine class. Recently, loxapine has been reformulated at a lower dose, producing an inhaled powder that can be directly administered to the lungs to treat the agitation associated with psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Thus, the aim of this narrative and clinical mini-review was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of inhaled loxapine in the treatment of acute agitation in patients with psychiatric disorders. The efficacy of inhaled loxapine has been evaluated in one Phase II trial on patients with schizophrenia, and in two Phase III trials in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Moreover, there are two published case series on patients with borderline personality disorder and dual diagnosis patients. Inhaled loxapine has proven to be effective and generally well tolerated when administered to agitated patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Two case series have suggested that inhaled loxapine may also be useful to treat agitation in patients with borderline personality disorder and with dual diagnosis, but further studies are needed to clarify this point. However, the administration of inhaled loxapine requires at least some kind of patient collaboration, and is not recommended in the treatment of severe agitation in totally uncooperative patients. Moreover, the drug-related risk of bronchospasm must always be kept in mind when planning to use inhaled loxapine, leading to a careful patient assessment prior to, and after, administration. Also, the higher costs of inhaled loxapine, when compared to oral and intramuscular medications, should be taken into account when selecting it for the treatment of agitation. PMID:28208695

  14. Electroless deposition of nickel-boron coatings using low frequency ultrasonic agitation: Effect of ultrasonic frequency on the coatings.

    PubMed

    Bonin, L; Bains, N; Vitry, V; Cobley, A J

    2017-01-30

    The effect of ultrasound on the properties of Nickel-Boron (NiB) coatings was investigated. NiB coatings were fabricated by electroless deposition using either ultrasonic or mechanical agitation. The deposition of Ni occurred in an aqueous bath containing a reducible metal salt (nickel chloride), reducing agent (sodium borohydride), complexing agent (ethylenediamine) and stabilizer (lead tungstate). Due to the instability of the borohydride in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline media, pH was controlled at pH 12±1 in order to avoid destabilizing the bath. Deposition was performed in three different configurations: one with a classical mechanical agitation at 300rpm and the other two employing ultrasound at a frequency of either 20 or 35kHz. The microstructures of the electroless coatings were characterized by a combination of optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The chemistry of the coatings was determined by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometry) after dissolution in aqua regia. The mechanical properties of the coatings were established by a combination of roughness measurements, Vickers microhardness and pin-on-disk tribology tests. Lastly, the corrosion properties were analysed by potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that low frequency ultrasonic agitation could be used to produce coatings from an alkaline NiB bath and that the thickness of coatings obtained could be increased by over 50% compared to those produced using mechanical agitation. Although ultrasonic agitation produced a smoother coating and some alteration of the deposit morphology was observed, the mechanical and corrosion properties were very similar to those found when using mechanical agitation.

  15. Continuous sedation until death as physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia: a conceptual analysis.

    PubMed

    Lipuma, Samuel H

    2013-04-01

    A distinction is commonly drawn between continuous sedation until death and physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia. Only the latter is found to involve killing, whereas the former eludes such characterization. I argue that continuous sedation until death is equivalent to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia in that both involve killing. This is established by first defining and clarifying palliative sedation therapies in general and continuous sedation until death in particular. A case study analysis and a look at current practices are provided. This is followed by a defense of arguments in favor of definitions of death centering on higher brain (neocortical) functioning rather than on whole brain or cardiopulmonary functioning. It is then shown that continuous sedation until death simulates higher brain definitions of death by eliminating consciousness. Appeals to reversibility and double effect fail to establish any distinguishing characteristics between the simulation of death that occurs in continuous sedation until death and the death that occurs as a result of physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia. Concluding remarks clarify the moral ramifications of these findings.

  16. Use of nitrous oxide and oxygen for conscious sedation to manage pain and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ryding, Helen A; Murphy, H Joseph

    2007-10-01

    A 13-item survey of dentist's views about approaches to pain and anxiety management was distributed in Atlantic Canada. Respondents indicated that about 50% had training in conscious-sedation techniques and 20% had learned to administer intravenous (IV) sedation. Sixty-nine percent of those responding had used oral sedatives to help manage fearful patients. Forty-six percent had referred anxious adult patients to specialists or other dentists, and 78% had made similar referrals for anxious children. Seventeen percent reported using conscious sedation, but they typically treated more than 20 anxious patients per year. Most (80%) believed that nitrous oxide and oxygen (N2O/O2) conscious sedation should be included in the treatments that a licensed practitioner can provide, and they were evenly divided in their opinion about the need for a separate licence for its use. However, only half of respondents believed that IV sedation should be included among a general practitioner"s treatment options, and over 70% said that this treatment should be subject to a separate licence. The implications of these findings for curriculum are discussed.

  17. Fish sedation, analgesia, anesthesia, and euthanasia: considerations, methods, and types of drugs.

    PubMed

    Neiffer, Donald L; Stamper, M Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Fish display robust neuroendocrine and physiologic stress responses to noxious stimuli. Many anesthetic, sedative, or analgesic drugs used in other vertebrates reduce stress in fish, decrease handling trauma, minimize movement and physiologic changes in response to nociceptive stimuli, and can be used for euthanasia. But extrapolating from limited published anesthetic and sedative data to all fish species is potentially harmful because of marked anatomic, physiologic, and behavioral variations; instead, a stepwise approach to anesthetizing or sedating unfamiliar species or using unproven drugs for familiar species is advisable. Additionally, knowledge of how water quality influences anesthesia or sedation helps limit complications. The most common method of drug administration is through immersion, a technique analogous to gaseous inhalant anesthesia in terrestrial animals, but the use of injectable anesthetic and sedative agents (primarily intramuscularly, but also intravenously) is increasing. Regardless of the route of administration, routine preprocedural preparation is appropriate, to stage both the animals and the supplies for induction, maintenance, and recovery. Anesthetic and sedation monitoring and resuscitation are similar to those for other vertebrates. Euthanasia is most commonly performed using an overdose of an immersion drug but injectable agents are also effective. Analgesia is an area in need of significant research as only a few studies exist and they provide some contrasting results. However, fish have mu and kappa opiate receptors throughout the brain, making it reasonable to expect some effect of at least opioid treatments in fish experiencing noxious stimuli.

  18. Reasons for continuous sedation until death in cancer patients: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Robijn, L; Chambaere, K; Raus, K; Rietjens, J; Deliens, L

    2017-01-01

    End-of-life sedation, though increasingly prevalent and widespread, remains a highly debated medical practice in the context of palliative medicine. This qualitative study aims to look more specifically at how health care workers justify their use of continuous sedation until death and which factors they report as playing a part in the decision-making process. In-depth interviews were held with 28 physicians and 22 nurses of 27 cancer patients in Belgium who had received continuous sedation until death in hospitals, palliative care units or at home. Our findings indicate that medical decision-making for continuous sedation is not only based on clinical indications but also related to morally complex issues such as the social context and the personal characteristics and preferences of individual patient and their relatives. The complex role of non-clinical factors in palliative sedation decision-making needs to be further studied to assess which medically or ethically relevant arguments are underlying daily clinical practice. Finally, our findings suggest that in some cases continuous sedation was resorted to as an alternative option at the end of life when euthanasia, a legally regulated option in Belgium, was no longer practically possible.

  19. Maximum cumulative doses of sedation medications for in-office use.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Mark; Goodchild, Jason H

    2007-01-01

    The AGD acknowledges that dentists may need an additional permit to perform the procedure described in this article. Many states require dental practitioners to have additional or advanced training in order to perform enteral sedation. In some states, practitioners must have an i.v./conscious sedation permit before they are allowed to titrate (dose) oral medication. The ADA does not believe that oral medication can be titrated (dosed) without an i.v. sedation license. The AGD has adopted and published a white paper on sedation issues, which appeared in the September-October 2006 issue of General Dentistry. The AGD encourages continuing education in sedation modalities for general dentists. Oral conscious sedation (OCS) is an increasingly common practice in dentistry and is at the forefront of evolving state regulations. At the center of the OCS controversy is the oral titration of medications. Most medications available for OCS are used in an "off-label" manner and have no determined maximum recommended dosage for that purpose. This article proposes cumulative maximum dosing guidelines for in-office OCS, with an emphasis on triazolam.

  20. Review on sedation for gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in children by non-anesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Orel, Rok; Brecelj, Jernej; Dias, Jorge Amil; Romano, Claudio; Barros, Fernanda; Thomson, Mike; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present evidence and formulate recommendations for sedation in pediatric gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy by non-anesthesiologists. METHODS: The databases MEDLINE, Cochrane and EMBASE were searched for the following keywords “endoscopy, GI”, “endoscopy, digestive system” AND “sedation”, “conscious sedation”, “moderate sedation”, “deep sedation” and “hypnotics and sedatives” for publications in English restricted to the pediatric age. We searched additional information published between January 2011 and January 2014. Searches for (upper) GI endoscopy sedation in pediatrics and sedation guidelines by non-anesthesiologists for the adult population were performed. RESULTS: From the available studies three sedation protocols are highlighted. Propofol, which seems to offer the best balance between efficacy and safety is rarely used by non-anesthesiologists mainly because of legal restrictions. Ketamine and a combination of a benzodiazepine and an opioid are more frequently used. Data regarding other sedatives, anesthetics and adjuvant medications used for pediatric GI endoscopy are also presented. CONCLUSION: General anesthesia by a multidisciplinary team led by an anesthesiologist is preferred. The creation of sedation teams led by non-anesthesiologists and a careful selection of anesthetic drugs may offer an alternative, but should be in line with national legislation and institutional regulations. PMID:26240691

  1. Randomised double blind trial of morphine versus diamorphine for sedation of preterm neonates

    PubMed Central

    Wood, C; Rushforth, J; Hartley, R; Dean, H; Wild, J; Levene, M

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To compare the safety and effectiveness of morphine and diamorphine for the sedation of ventilated preterm neonates in a double blind, randomised trial.
METHODS—Eighty eight babies were allocated to receive either morphine (n = 44) or diamorphine (n = 44) by bolus infusion (200 or 120mcg/kg, respectively, over two hours), followed by maintenance infusion (25 or 15 mcg/kg/h, respectively) during the initial phase of their respiratory disease. Serial monitoring of physiological, behavioural, and biochemical variables over the first 24 hours of the infusions was performed. Longer term outcomes were also monitored.
RESULTS—Morphine, but not diamorphine, was associated with a mean (SEM) decrease in mean arterial blood pressure of 2.2 (1.0) mm Hg (p = 0.05) over the initial loading infusion. Physiological (blood pressure variability) and behavioural measures of sedation (clinical assessment and sedation scoring) indicated that the two drug regimens were equally effective after 24 hours, but the sedative effects of diamorphine were evident more quickly than those of morphine. Both regimens significantly reduced plasma adrenaline concentrations over the first 24 hours of the infusions. No significant differences in mortality, ventilator days, chronic lung disease or intracranial lesions were noted.
CONCLUSIONS—Both drug regimens reduce the stress response to ventilation in preterm neonates. However, diamorphine's more rapid onset of sedation and morphine's hypotensive tendency suggest that diamorphine is preferable for the sedation of mechanically ventilated preterm neonates.

 PMID:9797622

  2. A randomised, controlled, crossover trial of oral midazolam and nitrous oxide for paediatric dental sedation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K E; Welbury, R R; Girdler, N M

    2002-09-01

    A randomised, controlled, crossover trial was designed to assess the safety and effectiveness of oral midazolam sedation for orthodontic extractions. Forty-six ASA physical status I children aged 10-16 years were recruited. Each child required two treatment sessions. Sedation with either oral midazolam 0.5 mg.kg-1 or nitrous oxide in oxygen was used at the first visit, the alternative being used at the second visit. Blood pressure, heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation, and sedation and behavioural scores were recorded every 5 min. Anxiety levels and postoperative satisfaction were also recorded. Blood pressure, heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation in both groups were similar and within acceptable clinical limits. The median [range] lowest arterial oxygen saturation levels for subjects in the midazolam and nitrous oxide groups were 95 [90-100]% and 98 [93-100]%, respectively. The median [range] time to the maximum level of sedation in the midazolam group was 20 [5-65] min compared with 5 [5-10] min in the nitrous oxide group (p < 0.001). The median [range] duration of treatment was similar in both groups (midazolam group: 10 [5-30] min, nitrous oxide group: 10 [5-25] min). Seventy-four per cent of subjects were prepared to have oral midazolam sedation again, 54% preferring it. Oral midazolam appears to be a safe and acceptable form of sedation for 10-16-year-old paediatric dental patients.

  3. Safe Sedation and Hypnosis using Dexmedetomidine for Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery in a Prone Position

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, an imidazoline compound, is a highly selective α2-adrenoceptor agonist with sympatholytic, sedative, amnestic, and analgesic properties. In order to minimize the patients' pain and anxiety during minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) when compared to conventional surgery under general anesthesia, an adequate conscious sedation (CS) or monitored anesthetic care (MAC) should be provided. Commonly used intravenous sedatives and hypnotics, such as midazolam and propofol, are not suitable for operations in a prone position due to undesired respiratory depression. Dexmedetomidine converges on an endogenous non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep-promoting pathway to exert its sedative effects. The great merit of dexmedetomidine for CS or MAC is the ability of the operator to recognize nerve damage during percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy, a representative MISS. However, there are 2 shortcomings for dexmedetomidine in MISS: hypotension/bradycardia and delayed emergence. Its hypotension/bradycardiac effects can be prevented by ketamine intraoperatively. Using atipamezole (an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) might allow doctors to control the rate of recovery from procedural sedation in the future. MAC, with other analgesics such as ketorolac and opioids, creates ideal conditions for MISS. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine provides a favorable surgical condition in patients receiving MISS in a prone position due to its unique properties of conscious sedation followed by unconscious hypnosis with analgesia. However, no respiratory depression occurs based on the dexmedetomidine-related endogenous sleep pathways involves the inhibition of the locus coeruleus in the pons, which facilitates VLPO firing in the anterior hypothalamus. PMID:25317279

  4. Characterization of a continuous agitated cell reactor for oxygen dependent biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Toftgaard Pedersen, Asbjørn; de Carvalho, Teresa Melo; Sutherland, Euan; Rehn, Gustav; Ashe, Robert; Woodley, John M

    2017-02-10

    Biocatalytic oxidation reactions employing molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor are difficult to conduct in a continuous flow reactor because of the requirement for high oxygen transfer rates. In this paper, the oxidation of glucose to glucono-1,5-lactone by glucose oxidase was used as a model reaction to study a novel continuous agitated cell reactor (ACR). The ACR consists of ten cells interconnected by small channels. An agitator is placed in each cell, which mixes the content of the cell when the reactor body is shaken by lateral movement. Based on tracer experiments, a hydrodynamic model for the ACR was developed. The model consisted of ten tanks-in-series with back-mixing occurring within and between each cell. The back-mixing was a necessary addition to the model in order to explain the observed phenomenon that the ACR behaved as two continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) at low flow rates, while it at high flow rates behaved as the expected ten CSTRs in series. The performance of the ACR was evaluated by comparing the steady state conversion at varying residence times with the conversion observed in a stirred batch reactor of comparable size. It was found that the ACR could more than double the overall reaction rate, which was solely due to an increased oxygen transfer rate in the ACR caused by the intense mixing as a result of the spring agitators. The volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient, kL a, was estimated to be 344 h(-1) in the 100 mL ACR, opposed to only 104 h(-1) in a batch reactor of comparable working volume. Interestingly, the large deviation from plug flow behavior seen in the tracer experiments was found to have little influence on the conversion in the ACR, since both a plug flow reactor (PFR) model and the backflow cell model described the data sufficiently well. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;9999: 1-9. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Successful treatment for psychomotor agitation in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder with trazodone-risperidone combination: a case report.

    PubMed

    Narita, Zui; Takano, Harumasa; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki

    2017-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a relapsing disease that typically affects the spinal cord and optic nerves. So far, a few studies have reported pharmacologic treatment for psychiatric symptoms in patients with NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD). However, no literature has described psychomotor agitation associated with the disease and its treatment. We report an 84-year-old woman with NMOSD whose psychomotor agitation was effectively treated with a combination of trazodone and risperidone. Our observation suggests the ability of augmentation of antipsychotic drugs with antidepressants to ameliorate psychotic symptoms associated with NMOSD.

  6. Efficacy of Memantine for Agitation in Alzheimer’s Dementia: A Randomised Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Chris; Crugel, Monica; Maidment, Ian; Auestad, Bjorn Henrik; Coulton, Simon; Treloar, Adrian; Ballard, Clive; Boustani, Malaz; Katona, Cornelius; Livingston, Gill

    2012-01-01

    Background Agitation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is common and associated with poor patient life-quality and carer distress. The best evidence-based pharmacological treatments are antipsychotics which have limited benefits with increased morbidity and mortality. There are no memantine trials in clinically significant agitation but post-hoc analyses in other populations found reduced agitation. We tested the primary hypothesis, memantine is superior to placebo for clinically significant agitation, in patients with moderate-to-severe AD. Methods and Findings We recruited 153 participants with AD and clinically significant agitation from care-homes or hospitals for a double-blind randomised-controlled trial and 149 people started the trial of memantine versus placebo. The primary outcome was 6 weeks mixed model autoregressive analysis of Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). Secondary outcomes were: 12 weeks CMAI; 6 and 12 weeks Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPI), Clinical Global Impression Change (CGI-C), Standardised Mini Mental State Examination, Severe Impairment Battery. Using a mixed effects model we found no significant differences in the primary outcome, 6 weeks CMAI, between memantine and placebo (memantine lower −3.0; −8.3 to 2.2, p = 0.26); or 12 weeks CMAI; or CGI-C or adverse events at 6 or 12 weeks. NPI mean difference favoured memantine at weeks 6 (−6.9; −12.2 to −1.6; p = 0.012) and 12 (−9.6; −15.0 to −4.3 p = 0.0005). Memantine was significantly better than placebo for cognition. The main study limitation is that it still remains to be determined whether memantine has a role in milder agitation in AD. Conclusions Memantine did not improve significant agitation in people with in moderate-to-severe AD. Future studies are urgently needed to test other pharmacological candidates in this group and memantine for neuropsychiatric symptoms. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00371059 Trial Registration International

  7. The Effects of Nutrient Concentration, Addition of Thickeners, and Agitation Speed on Liquid Fermentation of Steinernema feltiae

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Luis G.; Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Hazir, Selcuk; Jackson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematode production in liquid fermentation still requires improvements to maximize efficiency, yield, and nematode quality. Therefore, this study was aimed at developing a more suitable liquid medium for mass production of Steinernema feltiae, by assessing the effects of nutrient concentration, thickeners (primarily agar), and agitation speed on infective juvenile (IJ) yield. Base medium (BM) contained yeast extract (2.3%), egg yolk (1.25%), NaCl (0.5%), and corn oil (4%). All media were inoculated with Xenorhabdus bovienii, and 2 d later, with 2-d-old S. feltiae juveniles. For the nutrient concentration experiment, we evaluated the base medium versus a modified base medium containing all the components, but with 3× concentrations of yeast extract (6.9%), egg yolk (3.75%), and corn oil (12%). The nematodes and bacteria were cultured in 150-ml Erlenmeyer flasks containing 50 ml of liquid medium at (25°C) and 180 rpm on a rotary shaker incubator. To assess the effect of thickeners, IJs were inoculated in BM with agar (0.2%), carrageen (0.2%), and carboxymethyl cellulose (0.2% and 0.5%). The addition of 3× more nutrients relative to the BM resulted in a significantly lower yield of nematodes. For agar and agitation speed experiments, five levels of agar in the BM (0%, 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, and 0.8% agar) and two agitation speeds (180 and 280 rpm) were evaluated for production. Increasing agitation speed from 180 to 280 rpm and higher levels of agar in the medium (> 0.2%) significantly increased the yield of bacteria. At the lower agitation speed, media amended with 0.4% and 0.6% agar produced higher nematode yields compared to media without agar. Media with 0.2% and 0.8% agar resulted in intermediate levels of nematode production. At the higher agitation speed, media supplemented with 0.8% agar resulted in the lowest yield of nematodes when compared to the other media tested. Results indicated that increasing nutrient concentration levels was

  8. Successful treatment for psychomotor agitation in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder with trazodone–risperidone combination: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Zui; Takano, Harumasa; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki

    2017-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a relapsing disease that typically affects the spinal cord and optic nerves. So far, a few studies have reported pharmacologic treatment for psychiatric symptoms in patients with NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD). However, no literature has described psychomotor agitation associated with the disease and its treatment. We report an 84-year-old woman with NMOSD whose psychomotor agitation was effectively treated with a combination of trazodone and risperidone. Our observation suggests the ability of augmentation of antipsychotic drugs with antidepressants to ameliorate psychotic symptoms associated with NMOSD. PMID:28331329

  9. Echocardiographic reference values in healthy cats sedated with ketamine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Fox, P R; Bond, B R; Peterson, M E

    1985-07-01

    An M-mode echocardiographic examination was performed in a consistent manner in 30 clinically healthy cats under light ketamine hydrochloride sedation. There was a significant linear relationship between increasing body size and increasing cardiac dimensions for several echocardiographic values. Positive correlation existed between body weight and body surface area with aortic root, left ventricular caudal wall thickness (LVCW), interventricular septal thickness (IVS), IVS/LVCW, and mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (Vcf); there was a negative correlation between body weight and body surface area with left ventricular ejection time (LVET). Body surface area also correlated positively with percentage of ventricular minor axis dimensional change (% delta D). Positive correlations were recorded between left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD) and left ventricular endsystolic dimension (LVESD), LVESD and LVET, LVCW and IVS, LVET (calculated by LVCW motion) and LVET (calculated by aortic valve motion), % delta D and Vcf, heart rate and Vcf, and Vcf (calculated using aortic valve motion to compute LVET) and Vcf (using LVCW motion to compute LVET). There were negative correlations between LVEDD and % delta D, LVEDD and Vcf, LVESD and Vcf, LVET and Vcf, LVET and heart rate, LVET and % delta D. Significant differences were recorded between means of echocardiographic reference values generated in this and other studies, except for LVESD.

  10. Assessment of Electromagnetic Stirrer Agitated Liquid Metal Flows by Dynamic Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ščepanskis, Mihails; Sarma, Mārtiņš; Vontobel, Peter; Trtik, Pavel; Thomsen, Knud; Jakovičs, Andris; Beinerts, Toms

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents qualitative and quantitative characterization of two-phase liquid metal flows agitated by the stirrer on rotating permanent magnets. The stirrer was designed to fulfill various eddy flows, which may have different rates of solid particle entrapment from the liquid surface and their homogenization. The flow was characterized by visualization of the tailored tracer particles by means of dynamic neutron radiography, an experimental method well suited for liquid metal flows due to low opacity of some metals for neutrons. The rather high temporal resolution of the image acquisition (32 Hz image acquisition rate) allows for the quantitative investigation of the flows up to 30 cm/s using neutron particle image velocimetry. In situ visualization of the two-phase liquid metal flow is also demonstrated.

  11. Assessment of Electromagnetic Stirrer Agitated Liquid Metal Flows by Dynamic Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ščepanskis, Mihails; Sarma, Mārtiņš; Vontobel, Peter; Trtik, Pavel; Thomsen, Knud; Jakovičs, Andris; Beinerts, Toms

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents qualitative and quantitative characterization of two-phase liquid metal flows agitated by the stirrer on rotating permanent magnets. The stirrer was designed to fulfill various eddy flows, which may have different rates of solid particle entrapment from the liquid surface and their homogenization. The flow was characterized by visualization of the tailored tracer particles by means of dynamic neutron radiography, an experimental method well suited for liquid metal flows due to low opacity of some metals for neutrons. The rather high temporal resolution of the image acquisition (32 Hz image acquisition rate) allows for the quantitative investigation of the flows up to 30 cm/s using neutron particle image velocimetry. In situ visualization of the two-phase liquid metal flow is also demonstrated.

  12. Genetic transformation of Platymonas ( Tetraselmis) subcordiformis (Prasinophyceae, Chlorophyta) using particle bombardment and glass-bead agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yulin; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Jinfeng; Li, Fuchao; Chen, Yingjie; Zheng, Guoting; Qin, Song

    2012-05-01

    Platymonas ( Tetraselmis) subcordiformis is a unicellular marine green alga. It was found to be very sensitive to the herbicide Basta through a sensitivity test indicating it could be employed as a selective agent. The bar gene is a practicable and selectable marker gene. The vector containing the expression cassette of the bar gene was transferred to P. subcordiformis by both particle bombardment and glass-bead agitation and transformants were then selected using Basta. Finally, Southern blotting analysis indicated that the bar gene had been successfully integrated into the nuclear genome of P. subcordiformis using both of the transgenic techniques, with the transformation efficiency of the glass-bead method being slightly higher than that of particle bombardment. This is the first report on stable transformation of P. subcordiformis, and will improve fundamental research and enlarge application of this alga.

  13. Reactor concepts for atomic layer deposition on agitated particles: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Longrie, Delphine Deduytsche, Davy; Detavernier, Christophe

    2014-01-15

    The number of possible applications for nanoparticles has strongly increased in the last decade. For many applications, nanoparticles with different surface and bulk properties are necessary. A popular surface modification technique is coating the particle surface with a nanometer thick layer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is known as a reliable method for depositing ultrathin and conformal coatings. In this article, agitation or fluidization of the particles is necessary for performing ALD on (nano)particles. The principles of gas fluidization of particles will be outlined, and a classification of the gas fluidization behavior of particles based on their size and density will be given. Following different reactor concepts that have been designed to conformally coat (nano)particles with ALD will be described, and a concise overview will be presented of the work that has been performed with each of them ending with a concept reactor for performing spatial ALD on fluidized particles.

  14. Theoretical estimate of the effect of thermal agitation on ribosome motion generated by stochastic microswimming.

    PubMed

    González-García, José S

    2016-11-04

    The effect of thermal agitation on ribosome motion is evaluated through the Péclet number, assuming that the ribosome is self-propelled along the mRNA during protein synthesis by a swimming stroke consisting of a cycle of stochastically-generated ribosome configurations involving its two subunits. The ribosome velocity probability distribution function is obtained, giving an approximately normal distribution. Its mean and variance together with an estimate of the in vivo free diffusion coefficient of the ribosome and using only configuration changes of small size, give a Péclet number similar to motor proteins and microorganisms. These results suggest the feasibility of the stochastic microswimming hypothesis to explain ribosome motion.

  15. Reducing fischer-tropsch catalyst attrition losses in high agitation reaction systems

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2001-01-01

    A method for reducing catalyst attrition losses in hydrocarbon synthesis processes conducted in high agitation reaction systems; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst; a catalyst produced by such method; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support; and a catalyst support produced by such method. The inventive method of reducing catalyst attrition losses comprises the step of reacting a synthesis gas in a high agitation reaction system in the presence of a catalyst. In one aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support including an amount of titanium effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support which has been treated, after calcination, with an acidic, aqueous solution. The acidic aqueous solution preferably has a pH of not more than about 5. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support wherein the cobalt has been applied to the .gamma.-alumina support by totally aqueous, incipient wetness-type impregnation. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support with an amount of a lanthana promoter effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support produced from boehmite having a crystallite size, in the 021 plane, in the range of from about 30 to about 55 .ANG.ngstrons. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst comprises the step of treating a .gamma.-alumina support, after calcination of and before adding catalytic material to the support, with an acidic solution effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support comprises the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina with an acidic, aqueous

  16. Nonthermal microwave effects revisited: on the importance of internal temperature monitoring and agitation in microwave chemistry.

    PubMed

    Herrero, M Antonia; Kremsner, Jennifer M; Kappe, C Oliver

    2008-01-04

    The concept of nonthermal microwave effects has received considerable attention in recent years and is the subject of intense debate in the scientific community. Nonthermal microwave effects have been postulated to result from a direct stabilizing interaction of the electric field with specific (polar) molecules in the reaction medium that is not related to a macroscopic temperature effect. In order to probe the existence of nonthermal microwave effects, four synthetic transformations (Diels-Alder cycloaddition, alkylation of triphenylphosphine and 1,2,4-triazole, direct amide bond formation) were reevaluated under both microwave dielectric heating and conventional thermal heating. In all four cases, previous studies have claimed the existence of nonthermal microwave effects in these reactions. Experimentally, significant differences in conversion and/or product distribution comparing the conventionally and microwave-heated experiments performed at the same measured reaction temperature were found. The current reevaluation of these reactions was performed in a dedicated reactor setup that allowed accurate internal reaction temperature measurements using a multiple fiber-optic probe system. Using this technology, the importance of efficient stirring and internal temperature measurement in microwave-heated reactions was made evident. Inefficient agitation leads to temperature gradients within the reaction mixture due to field inhomogeneities in the microwave cavity. Using external infrared temperature sensors in some cases results in significant inaccuracies in the temperature measurement. Applying the fiber-optic probe temperature monitoring device, a critical reevaluation of all four reactions has provided no evidence for the existence of nonthermal microwave effects. Ensuring efficient agitation of the reaction mixture via magnetic stirring, no significant differences in terms of conversion and selectivity between experiments performed under microwave or oil bath

  17. Conscious Sedation Efficacy of 0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg Oral Midazolam for Three to Six Year-Old Uncooperative Children Undergoing Dental Treatment: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghajari, Masoud Fallahinejad; Ansari, Ghassem; Hasanbeygi, Leila; Shayeghi, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Midazolam with variable dosages has been used to induce sedation in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two dosages of oral midazolam for conscious sedation of children undergoing dental treatment. Materials and Methods: In this randomized crossover double blind clinical trial, 20 healthy children (ASA I) aged three to six years with definitely negative Frankl behavioral rating scale were evaluated. Half of the children received 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam plus 1mg/kg hydroxyzine (A) orally in the first session and 0.3mg/kg oral midazolam plus 1mg/kg hydroxyzine (B) in the next session. The other half received the drugs on a reverse order. Sedation degree by Houpt sedation rating scale, heart rate and level of SpO2 were assessed at the beginning and after 15 and 30 minutes. The data were analyzed using SPSS 19 and Wilcoxon Signed Rank and McNemar's tests. Results: The results showed that although administration of 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam was slightly superior to 0.3mg/kg oral midazolam in terms of sedation efficacy, the differences were not significant (P>0.05). The difference in treatment success was not significant either (P>0.05). Heart rate, oxygen saturation (SpO2) and respiratory rate were within the normal range and did not show a significant change (P>0.05). Conclusions: The overall success rate of the two drug combinations namely 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam plus hydroxyzine and 0.3mg/kg oral midazolam plus hydroxyzine was not significantly different for management of pediatric patients. PMID:27928238

  18. Bispectral Index in Evaluating Effects of Sedation Depth on Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yu-Lun; Ni, Yung-Lun; Wang, Tsai-Yu; Lin, Ting-Yu; Li, Hsueh-Yu; White, David P.; Lin, Jr-Rung; Kuo, Han-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of sedation depth on drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE). Methods: Ninety patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and 18 snorers underwent polysomnography and DISE under bispectral index (BIS)-guided propofol infusion at two different sedation levels: BIS 65–75 (light sedation) and 50–60 (deep sedation). Results: For the patients with OSA, the percentages of velopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx obstructions under light sedation were 77.8%, 63.3%, 30%, and 33.3%, respectively. Sedation depth was associated with the severity of velopharynx and oropharynx obstruction, oropharynx obstruction pattern, tongue base obstruction, epiglottis anteroposterior prolapse and folding, and arytenoid prolapse. In comparison, OSA severity was associated with the severity of velopharynx obstruction, severity of oropharynx obstruction, and arytenoid prolapse (odds ratio (95% confidence interval); 14.3 (4.7–43.4), 11.7 (4.2–32.9), and 13.2 (2.8–62.3), respectively). A good agreement was noted between similar DISE findings at different times and different observers (kappa value 0.6 to 1, respectively). A high percentage of arytenoid prolapse (46.7% among the patients with OSA under light sedation) was noted. Conclusions: Greater sedative depth increased upper airway collapsibility under DISE assessment. DISE under BIS-guided propofol infusion, and especially a level of 65–75, offers an objective and reproducible method to evaluate upper airway collapsibility. Some findings were induced by drug sedation and need careful interpretation. Specific arytenoid prolapse patterns were noted for which further investigations are warranted. Clinical Trials Registration: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT01100554 Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 965. Citation: Lo YL, Ni YL, Wang TY, Lin TY, Li HY, White DP, Lin JR, Kuo HP. Bispectral index in evaluating effects of sedation depth on drug

  19. Evaluation of sedative effects of single and repeated doses of 50 mg and 150 mg tolperisone hydrochloride. Results of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dulin, J; Kovács, L; Ramm, S; Horvath, F; Ebeling, L; Kohnen, R

    1998-07-01

    Sedative effects of single and repeated doses of 50 mg and 150 mg tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydocalm), a centrally active muscle-relaxing agent, were evaluated in a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial. A total of 72 healthy young adults balanced by sex were randomized to receive 50 mg or 150 mg tolperisone hydrochloride or placebo t.i.d. for a period of 8 days. Control examinations were performed in the mornings of days 1 and 8 before intake of the morning dose and at 1.5, 4 and 6 hours postdose. The psychomotoric test battery used in this trial revealed no sedative effects of tolperisone hydrochloride in the given doses at any control examination. Subjective mood ratings quantified by the Welzel Colored Scales were not impaired either. The lack of differences in sedative potentials of tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo was confirmed by tests on differences and by tests on equivalence using 95% CI. The present study substantiates clinical experience and previous clinical trials demonstrating that tolperisone hydrochloride, though being a centrally active muscle relaxant, does not cause any sedation and does not impair reaction times.

  20. Dexmedetomidine for sedation in pediatric patients who received more than 20 sessions of radiation therapy: two cases report

    PubMed Central

    Song, Myung-Hee; Lee, Il-Jung; Lee, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective α2-adrenoceptor agonist that demonstrates anxiolytic and analgesic properties without inducing respiratory compromise, which makes it a suitable agent for procedural sedation and imaging studies. In our current case reports, intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion was used to provide sedation to 2 pediatric patients over more than 20 sessions of radiation therapy. On both occasions, dexmedetomidine provided adequate sedation without respiratory depression. However, the required dosage increased with repeated radiation therapy sessions. PMID:27924206