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Sample records for agitation speed temperature

  1. Palm-based diacylglycerol fat dry fractionation: effect of crystallisation temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed on physical and chemical properties of fractions.

    PubMed

    Ab Latip, Razam; Lee, Yee-Ying; Tang, Teck-Kim; Phuah, Eng-Tong; Lee, Choon-Min; Tan, Chin-Ping; Lai, Oi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Fractionation which separates the olein (liquid) and stearin (solid) fractions of oil is used to modify the physicochemical properties of fats in order to extend its applications. Studies showed that the properties of fractionated end products can be affected by fractionation processing conditions. In the present study, dry fractionation of palm-based diacylglycerol (PDAG) was performed at different: cooling rates (0.05, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0°C/min), end-crystallisation temperatures (30, 35, 40, 45 and 50°C) and agitation speeds (30, 50, 70, 90 and 110 rpm) to determine the effect of these parameters on the properties and yield of the solid and liquid portions. To determine the physicochemical properties of olein and stearin fraction: Iodine value (IV), fatty acid composition (FAC), acylglycerol composition, slip melting point (SMP), solid fat content (SFC), thermal behaviour tests were carried out. Fractionation of PDAG fat changes the chemical composition of liquid and solid fractions. In terms of FAC, the major fatty acid in olein and stearin fractions were oleic (C18:1) and palmitic (C16:0) respectively. Acylglycerol composition showed that olein and stearin fractions is concentrated with TAG and DAG respectively. Crystallization temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed does not affect the IV, SFC, melting and cooling properties of the stearin fraction. The stearin fraction was only affected by cooling rate which changes its SMP. On the other hand, olein fraction was affected by crystallization temperature and cooling rate but not agitation speed which caused changes in IV, SMP, SFC, melting and crystallization behavior. Increase in both the crystallization temperature and cooling rate caused a reduction of IV, increment of the SFC, SMP, melting and crystallization behaviour of olein fraction and vice versa. The fractionated stearin part melted above 65°C while the olein melted at 40°C. SMP in olein fraction also reduced to a range of 26 to

  2. Palm-based diacylglycerol fat dry fractionation: effect of crystallisation temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed on physical and chemical properties of fractions

    PubMed Central

    Ab Latip, Razam; Lee, Yee-Ying; Tang, Teck-Kim; Phuah, Eng-Tong; Lee, Choon-Min; Tan, Chin-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Fractionation which separates the olein (liquid) and stearin (solid) fractions of oil is used to modify the physicochemical properties of fats in order to extend its applications. Studies showed that the properties of fractionated end products can be affected by fractionation processing conditions. In the present study, dry fractionation of palm-based diacylglycerol (PDAG) was performed at different: cooling rates (0.05, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0°C/min), end-crystallisation temperatures (30, 35, 40, 45 and 50°C) and agitation speeds (30, 50, 70, 90 and 110 rpm) to determine the effect of these parameters on the properties and yield of the solid and liquid portions. To determine the physicochemical properties of olein and stearin fraction: Iodine value (IV), fatty acid composition (FAC), acylglycerol composition, slip melting point (SMP), solid fat content (SFC), thermal behaviour tests were carried out. Fractionation of PDAG fat changes the chemical composition of liquid and solid fractions. In terms of FAC, the major fatty acid in olein and stearin fractions were oleic (C18:1) and palmitic (C16:0) respectively. Acylglycerol composition showed that olein and stearin fractions is concentrated with TAG and DAG respectively. Crystallization temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed does not affect the IV, SFC, melting and cooling properties of the stearin fraction. The stearin fraction was only affected by cooling rate which changes its SMP. On the other hand, olein fraction was affected by crystallization temperature and cooling rate but not agitation speed which caused changes in IV, SMP, SFC, melting and crystallization behavior. Increase in both the crystallization temperature and cooling rate caused a reduction of IV, increment of the SFC, SMP, melting and crystallization behaviour of olein fraction and vice versa. The fractionated stearin part melted above 65°C while the olein melted at 40°C. SMP in olein fraction also reduced to a range of 26 to

  3. Palm-based diacylglycerol fat dry fractionation: effect of crystallisation temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed on physical and chemical properties of fractions.

    PubMed

    Ab Latip, Razam; Lee, Yee-Ying; Tang, Teck-Kim; Phuah, Eng-Tong; Lee, Choon-Min; Tan, Chin-Ping; Lai, Oi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Fractionation which separates the olein (liquid) and stearin (solid) fractions of oil is used to modify the physicochemical properties of fats in order to extend its applications. Studies showed that the properties of fractionated end products can be affected by fractionation processing conditions. In the present study, dry fractionation of palm-based diacylglycerol (PDAG) was performed at different: cooling rates (0.05, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0°C/min), end-crystallisation temperatures (30, 35, 40, 45 and 50°C) and agitation speeds (30, 50, 70, 90 and 110 rpm) to determine the effect of these parameters on the properties and yield of the solid and liquid portions. To determine the physicochemical properties of olein and stearin fraction: Iodine value (IV), fatty acid composition (FAC), acylglycerol composition, slip melting point (SMP), solid fat content (SFC), thermal behaviour tests were carried out. Fractionation of PDAG fat changes the chemical composition of liquid and solid fractions. In terms of FAC, the major fatty acid in olein and stearin fractions were oleic (C18:1) and palmitic (C16:0) respectively. Acylglycerol composition showed that olein and stearin fractions is concentrated with TAG and DAG respectively. Crystallization temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed does not affect the IV, SFC, melting and cooling properties of the stearin fraction. The stearin fraction was only affected by cooling rate which changes its SMP. On the other hand, olein fraction was affected by crystallization temperature and cooling rate but not agitation speed which caused changes in IV, SMP, SFC, melting and crystallization behavior. Increase in both the crystallization temperature and cooling rate caused a reduction of IV, increment of the SFC, SMP, melting and crystallization behaviour of olein fraction and vice versa. The fractionated stearin part melted above 65°C while the olein melted at 40°C. SMP in olein fraction also reduced to a range of 26 to

  4. Enhanced riboflavin production by recombinant Bacillus subtilis RF1 through the optimization of agitation speed.

    PubMed

    Man, Zai-wei; Rao, Zhi-ming; Cheng, Yi-peng; Yang, Tao-wei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Mei-juan; Xu, Zheng-hong

    2014-02-01

    Dissolved oxygen is one of the most important bioprocess parameters that could affect cell growth and product formation, and it is easy to control by changing agitation speed. In this work, the effects of agitation speed on the performance of riboflavin production by recombinant Bacillus subtilis RF1 was investigated in fed-batch fermentation. The lower agitation speed (600 rpm) was beneficial for cell growth and riboflavin biosynthesis in the initial phase of fermentation process. While, during the later phase, higher agitation speed (900 rpm) was favor for cell growth and riboflavin biosynthesis. Thus, a two-stage agitation speed control strategy was proposed based on kinetic analysis, in which the agitation speed was controlled at 600 rpm in the first 26 h and then switched to 900 rpm to maintain high μ for cell growth and high q(p) for riboflavin production during the entire fermentation process. However, it was observed that a sharp increase of agitation speed resulted in an adverse effect on cell growth and riboflavin synthesis within a short time. To avoid this phenomenon, a multi-stage agitation speed control strategy was set up based on the two-stage control strategy, the maximum concentration of riboflavin reached 9.4 g l(-1) in 48 h with the yield of 0.051 g g(-1) by applying this strategy, which were 20.5 and 21.4% over the best results controlled by constant agitation speeds. PMID:24068533

  5. Agitation of amyloid proteins to speed aggregation measured by ThT fluorescence: a call for standardization.

    PubMed

    Batzli, Kiersten M; Love, Brian J

    2015-03-01

    This retrospective study of protein aggregation measured by Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay in published literature has assessed protein sensitivity to denaturing conditions that include elevated temperatures, fluctuations in pH, and concentration and, in particular, agitation to induce amyloid structure formation. The dynamic tracking of fluorescence shows a sigmoidal evolution as aggregates form; the resulting kinetics of association have been analyzed to explore the range of aggregation behavior which occurs based on environmental parameters. Comparisons between the experimental results of different groups have been historically difficult due to subtleties of experimental procedures including denaturing temperature, protein type and concentration, formulation differences, and how agitation is achieved. While it is clear that agitation has a strong influence on the driving force for aggregation, the use of magnetic stirring bar or shaker table rotational speed is insufficient to characterize the degree of turbulence produced during shear. The pathway forward in resolving dependence of aggregate formation on shear may require alternative methodologies or better standardization of the experimental protocols.

  6. EFFECTS OF MECHANICAL AGITATION AND OF TEMPERATURE UPON COMPLEMENT.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-02-01

    1. Under certain conditions, mechanical agitation destroys the complementary activity of guinea pig serum. It is most injurious when carried out constantly at a temperature of 37 degrees C., but it is extremely insignificant at 10 degrees C. After the first few hours at 37 degrees C., the destruction of complement proceeded much more rapidly, and after six hours it was almost complete. On the other hand, within one hour shaking had almost no destructive effect on complement, even at 37 degrees C. From this we may conclude that the several shakings which are necessary for fixation experiments during incubation do not modify perceptibly the outcome of the reactions. 2. The rate of destruction of the complement of guinea pig serum at temperatures above 45 degrees C. is progressively greater as it approaches 55 degrees C., at which temperature the activity is reduced in thirty minutes to one-thirtieth to one-fortieth of the original strength of the unheated serum; but it is not completely destroyed, as is commonly assumed. The velocity of destruction of guinea pig complement when exposed to 55 degrees C. for various lengths of time is found to be quite irregular, and not proportional to the length of time. This irregularity, however, presents a certain rhythm, a period of greater destruction alternating with one of less destruction.

  7. The Effects of Nutrient Concentration, Addition of Thickeners, and Agitation Speed on Liquid Fermentation of Steinernema feltiae.

    PubMed

    Leite, Luis G; Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Hazir, Selcuk; Jackson, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    Entomopathogenic nematode production in liquid fermentation still requires improvements to maximize efficiency, yield, and nematode quality. Therefore, this study was aimed at developing a more suitable liquid medium for mass production of Steinernema feltiae, by assessing the effects of nutrient concentration, thickeners (primarily agar), and agitation speed on infective juvenile (IJ) yield. Base medium (BM) contained yeast extract (2.3%), egg yolk (1.25%), NaCl (0.5%), and corn oil (4%). All media were inoculated with Xenorhabdus bovienii, and 2 d later, with 2-d-old S. feltiae juveniles. For the nutrient concentration experiment, we evaluated the base medium versus a modified base medium containing all the components, but with 3× concentrations of yeast extract (6.9%), egg yolk (3.75%), and corn oil (12%). The nematodes and bacteria were cultured in 150-ml Erlenmeyer flasks containing 50 ml of liquid medium at (25°C) and 180 rpm on a rotary shaker incubator. To assess the effect of thickeners, IJs were inoculated in BM with agar (0.2%), carrageen (0.2%), and carboxymethyl cellulose (0.2% and 0.5%). The addition of 3× more nutrients relative to the BM resulted in a significantly lower yield of nematodes. For agar and agitation speed experiments, five levels of agar in the BM (0%, 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, and 0.8% agar) and two agitation speeds (180 and 280 rpm) were evaluated for production. Increasing agitation speed from 180 to 280 rpm and higher levels of agar in the medium (> 0.2%) significantly increased the yield of bacteria. At the lower agitation speed, media amended with 0.4% and 0.6% agar produced higher nematode yields compared to media without agar. Media with 0.2% and 0.8% agar resulted in intermediate levels of nematode production. At the higher agitation speed, media supplemented with 0.8% agar resulted in the lowest yield of nematodes when compared to the other media tested. Results indicated that increasing nutrient concentration levels was

  8. The Effects of Nutrient Concentration, Addition of Thickeners, and Agitation Speed on Liquid Fermentation of Steinernema feltiae

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Luis G.; Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Hazir, Selcuk; Jackson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematode production in liquid fermentation still requires improvements to maximize efficiency, yield, and nematode quality. Therefore, this study was aimed at developing a more suitable liquid medium for mass production of Steinernema feltiae, by assessing the effects of nutrient concentration, thickeners (primarily agar), and agitation speed on infective juvenile (IJ) yield. Base medium (BM) contained yeast extract (2.3%), egg yolk (1.25%), NaCl (0.5%), and corn oil (4%). All media were inoculated with Xenorhabdus bovienii, and 2 d later, with 2-d-old S. feltiae juveniles. For the nutrient concentration experiment, we evaluated the base medium versus a modified base medium containing all the components, but with 3× concentrations of yeast extract (6.9%), egg yolk (3.75%), and corn oil (12%). The nematodes and bacteria were cultured in 150-ml Erlenmeyer flasks containing 50 ml of liquid medium at (25°C) and 180 rpm on a rotary shaker incubator. To assess the effect of thickeners, IJs were inoculated in BM with agar (0.2%), carrageen (0.2%), and carboxymethyl cellulose (0.2% and 0.5%). The addition of 3× more nutrients relative to the BM resulted in a significantly lower yield of nematodes. For agar and agitation speed experiments, five levels of agar in the BM (0%, 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, and 0.8% agar) and two agitation speeds (180 and 280 rpm) were evaluated for production. Increasing agitation speed from 180 to 280 rpm and higher levels of agar in the medium (> 0.2%) significantly increased the yield of bacteria. At the lower agitation speed, media amended with 0.4% and 0.6% agar produced higher nematode yields compared to media without agar. Media with 0.2% and 0.8% agar resulted in intermediate levels of nematode production. At the higher agitation speed, media supplemented with 0.8% agar resulted in the lowest yield of nematodes when compared to the other media tested. Results indicated that increasing nutrient concentration levels was

  9. The effects of nutrient concentration, addition of thickeners, and agitation speed on liquid fermentation of Steinernema feltiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Therefore, this study was aimed at developing a more suitable liquid media for mass production of Steinernema feltiae, by assessing the effects of nutrient concentration, media viscosity, and agitation speed on infective juvenile (IJ) yield. For all the experiments, the base medium contained yeast ...

  10. Effects of Agitation and Storage Temperature on Measurements of Hydration Status

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Heather M; Eberman, Lindsey E; Yeargin, Susan W; Niemann, Andrew J; Mata, Heather L; Dziedzicki, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypohydration can have significant implications on normal physiological functions of the body. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the impact of agitation, storage temperature, and storage time on urine osmolality compared to the criterion control. Patients and Methods: We used a descriptive diagnostic validity test design. To investigate agitation, we recruited 75 healthy individuals (males = 41, females = 34; mean age = 22 ± 5 years; mean self-reported height = 172 ± 23 cm and mass = 77 ± 17 kg) who provided one or more samples (total = 81). The independent variables were agitation (vortex, hand shaken, no agitation) and temperature (room temperature, freezer, and refrigerator) type. Participants completed informed consent, a health questionnaire and were asked to provide a urine sample, which was split and labeled according to agitation type or storage temperature. Urine osmolality was used to determine hydration status at two time points (within 2 hours [control], 48 hours). We used t-tests to determine the difference between each condition and the control and calculated percent error for each condition. Results: No significant differences for no agitation (t79 = -0.079, P = 0.937), hand shaken (t79 = 1.395, P = 0.167) or vortex mixed (t79 = -0.753, P = 0.453) were identified when compared to the criterion control. No significant differences for room temperature (t82 = -0.720, P = 0.474), refrigerator (t82 = -2.697, P = 0.008) or freezer (t82 = 2.576, P = 0.012) were identified when compared to the criterion control. Conclusions: Our findings suggest agitation of urine specimen is not necessary and samples do not require refrigeration or freezing if assessed within 48 hours. Analysis within two hours of collection is not necessary and samples can be stored for up to 48 hours without impacting the hydration status of the sample. PMID:26715967

  11. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  12. Effect of agitation speed on the morphology of Aspergillus niger HFD5A-1 hyphae and its pectinase production in submerged fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Darah; Weloosamy, Haritharan; Lim, Sheh-Hong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of agitation speed on pectinase production and morphological changing of Aspergillus niger (A. niger) HFD5A-1 in submerged fermentation. METHODS: A. niger HFM5A-1 was isolated from a rotted pomelo. The inoculum preparation was performed by adding 5.0 mL of sterile distilled water containing 0.1% Tween 80 to a sporulated culture. Cultivation was carried out with inoculated 1 × 107 spores/mL suspension and incubated at 30 °C with different agitation speed for 6 d. The samples were withdrawn after 6 d cultivation time and were assayed for pectinase activity and fungal growth determination. The culture broth was filtered through filter paper (Whatman No. 1, London) to separate the fungal mycelium. The cell-free culture filtrate containing the crude enzyme was then assayed for pectinase activity. The biomass was dried at 80 °C until constant weight. The fungal cell dry weight was then expressed as g/L. The 6 d old fungal mycelia were harvested from various agitation speed, 0, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 rpm. The morphological changing of samples was then viewed under the light microscope and scanning electron microscope. RESULTS: In the present study, agitation speed was found to influence pectinase production in a batch cultivation system. However, higher agitation speeds than the optimal speed (150 rpm) reduced pectinase production which due to shear forces and also collision among the suspended fungal cells in the cultivation medium. Enzyme activity increased with the increasing of agitation speed up to 150 rpm, where it achieved its maximal pectinase activity of 1.559 U/mL. There were significant different (Duncan, P < 0.05) of the pectinase production with the agitation speed at static, 50, 100, 200 and 250 rpm. At the static condition, a well growth mycelial mat was observed on the surface of the cultivation medium and sporulation occurred all over the fungal mycelial mat. However with the increased in agitation speed, the

  13. Dewaxing process using agitated heat exchanger to chill solvent-oil and wax slurry to wax filtration temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhurst, Th.E.

    1984-04-10

    In an improved process for dewaxing waxy hydrocarbon oils, wherein said waxy oil is cooled in an indirect chilling zone to a temperature greater than the wax separation temperature whereby wax is precipitated to form a wax-oil-solvent slurry, cooling the slurry to the wax separation temperature in an indirect chilling zone thereby precipitating a further portion of wax from said waxy oil and separating said precipitated wax from the wax-oil-solvent slurry in solid-liquid separation means, the improvement comprises using as the indirect chilling zone an indirect heat exchanger means operated at a high level of agitation. Expressed in terms of Impeller Reynolds Number the agitation is on the order of about 1,000 to 1,000,000. Alternatively, the direct chilling zone is totally replaced by the high agitation indirect heat exchanger means.

  14. Effects of soil temperature and agitation on the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi; Du, Xiaoming; Li, Huiying; Xu, Zhu; Wang, Qunhui; Meng, Xiaoguang; Li, Fasheng

    2012-04-15

    Mechanical soil aeration is an effective and low cost ex-situ remediation technique suitable for large sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds. However, this technique is still in the testing and development phase. To understand the effectiveness of this remediation technique and the main factors influencing its efficacy, an abandoned typical chlor-alkali chemical industry site was remediated using this technology on a pilot-scale. The results showed that this technology is effective for the remediation of volatile organic compounds, with a removal efficiency of greater than 99%. During the experiment, a better result was observed in the first 120 h than the last 120 h. Both temperature and agitation affected the remediation. Higher environmental or soil temperatures resulted in more rapid attenuation of 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA). Agitation had an obvious effect during the first 120 h. A preliminary dynamic characteristic study showed that the volatilization process can be described by a function similar to y=a+be((-kt)). Temperature (both environmental and soil temperature) had a greater effect on the reaction rate constant and the half-life of 1,2-DCA compared with agitation. This study aims to improve the remediation of contaminated sites, especially large areas contaminated by volatile organic contaminants.

  15. Improvement of oxygen transfer coefficient during Penicillium canescens culture. Influence of turbine design, agitation speed, and air flow rate on xylanase production.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, A; Strodiot, L; Thonart, P

    1998-01-01

    To improve xylanase productivity from Penicillium canescens 10-10c culture, an optimization of oxygen supply is required. Because the strain is sensitive to shear forces, leading to lower xylanase productivity as to morphological alteration, vigorous mixing is not desired. The influence of turbine design, agitation speed, and air flow rate on K1a (global mass transfer coefficient, h(-1)) and enzyme production is discussed. K1a values increased with agitation speed and air flow rate, whatever the impeller, in our assay conditions. Agitation had more influence on K1a values than air flow, when a disk-mounted blade's impeller (DT) is used; an opposite result was obtained with a hub-mounted pitched blade's impeller (PBT). Xylanase production appeared as a function of specific power (W/m3), and an optimum was found in 20 and 100 L STRs fitted with DT impellers. On the other hand, the use of a hub-mounted pitched blade impeller (PBT8), instead of a disk-mounted blade impeller (DT4), reduced the lag time of hemicellulase production and increased xylanase productivity 1.3-fold. PMID:18576019

  16. Simple and Reproducible Two-Stage Agitation Speed Control Strategy for Enhanced Triterpene Production by Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushrooms, Ganoderma lucidum ACCC G0119 (Higher Basidiomycetes) Based on Submerged Liquid Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Feng, Na; Yang, Yan; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Jingsong; Jia, Wei; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Triterpenes are important anticancer agents produced by batch submerged liquid fermentation, with the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum ACCC G0119, which was investigated under various dissolved oxygen levels by varying agitation speeds. Three kinetic parameters were analyzed: specific mycelial growth rate (μsmg), specific glucose consumption rate (qsgc), and specific triterpene production rate (qstp). High concentration, yield, and productivity of triterpenes were achieved by developing a simple and reproducible two-stage agitation speed control strategy. At the first 40 h, agitation speed was controlled at 150 rpm to obtain the quickest peak qstp for triterpene production, subsequently agitation speed was controlled at 100 rpm to maintain high qstp for high triterpene accumulation. The maximum concentration of triterpenes reached 0.086 g/l with the yield of 6.072 g/kg and the productivity of 6.532 × 10-4 g/(l·h), which were 39.61%, 36.48%, and 49.22%, respectively, better than the best results controlled by fixed agitation speeds. Conceivably, such a triterpene fermentation production strategy would be useful for industrial large-scale production of triterpenes with G. lucidum. PMID:26854102

  17. Impact of vibration and agitation speed on dissolution of USP prednisone tablets RS and various IR tablet formulations.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Nicole; Lange, Sigrid; Klein, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Dissolution testing is an in vitro procedure which is widely used in quality control (QC) of solid oral dosage forms and, given that real biorelevant test conditions are applied, can also be used as a predictive tool for the in vivo performance of such formulations. However, if a dissolution method is intended to be used for such purposes, it has to deliver results that are only determined by the quality of the test product, but not by other variables. In the recent past, more and more questions were arising on how to address the effects of vibration on dissolution test results. The present study was performed to screen for the correlation of prednisone dissolution of USP Prednisone Tablets RS with vibration caused by a commercially available vibration source as well as to investigate how drug release from a range of immediate release formulations containing class 1-4 drugs of the biopharmaceutical classification scheme is affected by vibration when performing dissolution experiments at different agitation rates. Results of the present study show that the dissolution process of oral drug formulations can be affected by vibration. However, it also becomes clear that the degree of which a certain level of vibration impacts dissolution is strongly dependent on several factors such as drug properties, formulation parameters, and the design of the dissolution method. To ensure the establishment of robust and predictive dissolution test methods, the impact of variation should thus be considered in method design and validation.

  18. An investigation of agitation speed as a factor affecting the quantity and monomer distribution of alginate from Azotobacter vinelandii ATCC(®) 9046.

    PubMed

    Kıvılcımdan Moral, C; Sanin, F D

    2012-03-01

    Alginate is a copolymer of β-D: -mannuronic and α-L: -guluronic acids. Distribution of these monomers in the alginate structure is one of the important characteristics that affect the commercial value of the polymer. In the present work, the effect of agitation speed in the range of 200-700 rpm on alginate production by Azotobacter vinelandii ATCC(®) 9046 was investigated at a dissolved oxygen tension of 5% of air saturation. Experiments were conducted in a fermentor operated in batch mode for 72 h while the production of biomass and alginate, the consumption of substrate and the change in culture broth viscosity and monomer distribution of the polymer were monitored. Results showed that the growth rate of the bacteria increased from 0.165 to 0.239 h(-1) by the increase of mixing speed from 200 to 400 rpm. On the other hand, alginate production was found to be the most efficient at 400 rpm with the highest value of 4.51 g/l achieved at the end of fermentation. The viscosity of culture broth showed similar trends to alginate production. Viscosity was recorded as 24.61 cP at 400 rpm while it was only 4.26 cP at 700 rpm. The MM- and GG-block contents were almost equal in most of the culture times at 400 rpm. On the other hand, GG-blocks dominated at both low and high mixing speeds. Knowing that GG-blocks make rigid and protective gels with divalent cations, due to the higher GG-block content, the gel formation potential is higher at 200 rpm as well at 700 rpm, which might originate from the unfavorable environmental conditions that the bacteria were exposed to. PMID:22009058

  19. A Controlled Agitation Process for Improving Quality of Canned Green Beans during Agitation Thermal Processing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anika; Pratap Singh, Anubhav; Ramaswamy, Hosahalli S

    2016-06-01

    This work introduces the concept of a controlled agitation thermal process to reduce quality damage in liquid-particulate products during agitation thermal processing. Reciprocating agitation thermal processing (RA-TP) was used as the agitation thermal process. In order to reduce the impact of agitation, a new concept of "stopping agitations after sufficient development of cold-spot temperature" was proposed. Green beans were processed in No. 2 (307×409) cans filled with liquids of various consistency (0% to 2% CMC) at various frequencies (1 to 3 Hz) of RA-TP using a full-factorial design and heat penetration results were collected. Corresponding operator's process time to impart a 10-min process lethality (Fo ) and agitation time (AT) were calculated using heat penetration results. Accordingly, products were processed again by stopping agitations as per 3 agitation regimes, namely; full time agitation, equilibration time agitation, and partial time agitation. Processed products were photographed and tested for visual quality, color, texture, breakage of green beans, turbidity, and percentage of insoluble solids in can liquid. Results showed that stopping agitations after sufficient development of cold-spot temperatures is an effective way of reducing product damages caused by agitation (for example, breakage of beans and its leaching into liquid). Agitations till one-log temperature difference gave best color, texture and visual product quality for low-viscosity liquid-particulate mixture and extended agitations till equilibration time was best for high-viscosity products. Thus, it was shown that a controlled agitation thermal process is more effective in obtaining high product quality as compared to a regular agitation thermal process.

  20. A Controlled Agitation Process for Improving Quality of Canned Green Beans during Agitation Thermal Processing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anika; Pratap Singh, Anubhav; Ramaswamy, Hosahalli S

    2016-06-01

    This work introduces the concept of a controlled agitation thermal process to reduce quality damage in liquid-particulate products during agitation thermal processing. Reciprocating agitation thermal processing (RA-TP) was used as the agitation thermal process. In order to reduce the impact of agitation, a new concept of "stopping agitations after sufficient development of cold-spot temperature" was proposed. Green beans were processed in No. 2 (307×409) cans filled with liquids of various consistency (0% to 2% CMC) at various frequencies (1 to 3 Hz) of RA-TP using a full-factorial design and heat penetration results were collected. Corresponding operator's process time to impart a 10-min process lethality (Fo ) and agitation time (AT) were calculated using heat penetration results. Accordingly, products were processed again by stopping agitations as per 3 agitation regimes, namely; full time agitation, equilibration time agitation, and partial time agitation. Processed products were photographed and tested for visual quality, color, texture, breakage of green beans, turbidity, and percentage of insoluble solids in can liquid. Results showed that stopping agitations after sufficient development of cold-spot temperatures is an effective way of reducing product damages caused by agitation (for example, breakage of beans and its leaching into liquid). Agitations till one-log temperature difference gave best color, texture and visual product quality for low-viscosity liquid-particulate mixture and extended agitations till equilibration time was best for high-viscosity products. Thus, it was shown that a controlled agitation thermal process is more effective in obtaining high product quality as compared to a regular agitation thermal process. PMID:27096606

  1. Effects of cooling rate, saturation temperature, and agitation on the metastable zone width of DL-malic acid-water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye; Leng, Yixin; Huang, Chunxiang; Yue, Mingxuan; Tan, Qian

    2015-09-01

    A study of metastable zone width (MSZW) and nucleation parameters for a cooling crystallization of DL-malic acid-water system is described in this paper. Experimental determination of the MSZW was performed using a laser method in order to carry out the estimation of nucleation parameters. Measured MSZWs can be affected by a variety of parameters, such as cooling rate, saturation temperature, agitation rate, and so on. In this work, the MSZWs were found to decrease with an increase of saturation temperature, and levels of agitation, while it increased with an increase of cooling rate. Two classical theoretical approaches, Nyvlt's approach and self-consistent Nyvlt-like approach were used to analyze the experimental data on MSZWs.

  2. An Agitation Experiment with Multiple Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Jordan L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a multifaceted agitation and mixing experiment. The relatively inexpensive apparatus includes a variable-speed stirrer motor, two polycarbonate tanks, and an instrumented torque table. Students measure torque as a function of stirrer speed, and use conductive tracer data to estimate two parameters of a flow model. The effect…

  3. Implementation of Temperature Sequential Controller on Variable Speed Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Z. X.; Barsoum, N. N.

    2008-10-01

    There are many pump and motor installations with quite extensive speed variation, such as Sago conveyor, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) and water pumping system. A common solution for these applications is to run several fixed speed motors in parallel, with flow control accomplish by turning the motors on and off. This type of control method causes high in-rush current, and adds a risk of damage caused by pressure transients. This paper explains the design and implementation of a temperature speed control system for use in industrial and commercial sectors. Advanced temperature speed control can be achieved by using ABB ACS800 variable speed drive-direct torque sequential control macro, programmable logic controller and temperature transmitter. The principle of direct torque sequential control macro (DTC-SC) is based on the control of torque and flux utilizing the stator flux field orientation over seven preset constant speed. As a result of continuous comparison of ambient temperature to the references temperatures; electromagnetic torque response is particularly fast to the motor state and it is able maintain constant speeds. Experimental tests have been carried out by using ABB ACS800-U1-0003-2, to validate the effectiveness and dynamic respond of ABB ACS800 against temperature variation, loads, and mechanical shocks.

  4. High-temperature MAS-NMR at high spinning speeds.

    PubMed

    Kirchhain, Holger; Holzinger, Julian; Mainka, Adrian; Spörhase, Andreas; Venkatachalam, Sabarinathan; Wixforth, Achim; van Wüllen, Leo

    2016-09-01

    A low cost version to enable high temperature MAS NMR experiments at temperatures of up to 700°C and spinning speeds of up to 10kHz is presented. The method relies on inductive heating using a metal coated rotor insert. The metal coating is accomplished via a two step process involving physical vapor deposition and galvanization.

  5. Speed Of Screen Film Systems According To Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, Romain

    1984-06-01

    The speed of radiographic screen film systems may strongly vary according to the ambient temperature. Temperature dependence of the conversion efficiency of the phosphors of the screen is hereby a major parameter. Data are presented for several commercial screen film systems. The phenomenon is of ter overlooked in normalisation sheets for sensitometric characteristics evaluation.

  6. A precise method of earth-based measuring infrared radiant temperature of high-speed flying target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaofei; Sheng, Jie

    2014-11-01

    The apparent temperature of high-speed flying target is an important parameter when checking the design of heat protection system. This paper analyzes the characteristics of high-speed flying target measured by earth-based staring infrared imaging system, and found out three facts made the measured image blur, the first is energy spread described by Point Spread Function, the second is the phenomenon of target smearing, and the third is atmospheric agitation and turbulence. Also the energy reflected by the target from sun and earth to infrared measuring system should be considered. Thus the method dealt with static or low-speed target isn't adapt to high-speed target, this paper proposed an effective method dealing with High-speed flying target in infrared image. The first step is computing the luminance reflected by target with information of target's pose and surface structure, the second step is extracting the target from the infrared image then computing the emission intensity with parameters of calibration, the third step is computing the luminance of target by subtract the energy of background and energy reflected from the target, after computing the atmospheric trans, the apparent temperature is finally found.

  7. Method of reducing temperature in high-speed photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, E. D.; Slater, H. A.

    1984-01-01

    A continuing problem in high-speed motion picture photography is adequate lighting and the associated temperature rise. Large temperature rises can damage subject matter and make recording of the desired images impossible. The problem is more severe in macrophotography because of bellows extension and the necessary increase in light. This report covers one approach to reducing the initial temperature rise: the use of filters and heat-absorbing materials. The accompanying figures provide the starting point for selecting distance as a function of light intensity and determining the associated temperature rise. Using these figures will allow the photographer greater freedom in meeting different photographic situations.

  8. Increasing accuracy of high temperature and speed processes micropyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boronenko, M. P.; Gulyaev, P. Yu; Seregin, A. E.; Bebiya, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    The correction factor introduction in the method of measuring the brightness temperature of individual hot particles moving at speeds of 100-1140m/s with diameter above the diffraction limit of the OES, can solve the problem of the moving objects brightness pyrometry, increasing accuracy of at least 2.5%.

  9. Temperature distribution in an aircraft tire at low ground speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. L.; Tanner, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to define temperature profiles of 22 x 5.5, type 7, bias ply aircraft tires subjected to freely rolling, yawed rolling, and light braking conditions. Temperatures along the inner wall of freely rolling tires were greater than those near the outer surface. The effect of increasing tire deflection was to increase the temperature within the shoulder and sidewall areas of the tire carcass. The effect of cornering and braking was to increase the treat temperature. For taxi operations at fixed yaw angles, temperature profiles were not symmetric. Increasing the ground speed produced only moderate increases in tread temperature, whereas temperatures in the carcass shoulder and sidewall were essentially unaffected.

  10. Agitations and Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shann, Steve

    2010-01-01

    As educators, we write about how we teach and how our students learn, but often there are some things missing from these accounts. These "somethings" are the animations and agitations that attend most deep learning. These are not easy to describe, particularly because they are often only visible in passing moments. I argue that story-telling is…

  11. [Sultopride and agitation].

    PubMed

    Blondel, F

    1982-12-01

    Sultopride, presented in this paper, was tried in five patients with psychomotor agitation and aggressiveness but with a variable underlying structure, from severe neurosis (borderline?) to chronic decompensated psychosis. These manifestations had failed to respond to the other neuroleptics used. Results with sultopride were excellent. This drug deserves a good position among sedative agents with no significant effect on vigilance used in aggressiveness.

  12. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O; Wilson, Michael A; Schaller, Emily L

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  13. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  14. High temperature VSCF (Variable Speed Constant Frequency) generator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maphet, Thomas Allen; McCabria, Jack Lee; Kouba, Carroll Charles; Mitchell, James Thomas; Kwiecinski, James Robert

    1989-04-01

    The high temperature VSCF generator program was designed to develop a generating system capable of withstanding constantly high oil-in temperatures of 200 C in an ambient environment of 200 C. This is a requirement due to anticipated new fighter aircraft designs that will not be capable of cooling the oil to 100 C as in today's designs due to size restrictions of the heat exchanger and/or extended operation of the aircraft at supersonic speeds. The generator uses composite material to withstand the constant use of 200 C inlet oil.

  15. Monitoring Temperature and Fan Speed Using Ganglia and Winbond Chips

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, Cattie; /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    Effective monitoring is essential to keep a large group of machines, like the ones at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), up and running. SLAC currently uses Ganglia Monitoring System to observe about 2000 machines, analyzing metrics like CPU usage and I/O rate. However, metrics essential to machine hardware health, such as temperature and fan speed, are not being monitored. Many machines have a Winbond w83782d chip which monitors three temperatures, two of which come from dual CPUs, and returns the information when the sensor command is invoked. Ganglia also provides a feature, gmetric, that allows the users to monitor their own metrics and incorporate them into the monitoring system. The programming language Perl is chosen to implement a script that invokes the sensors command, extracts the temperature and fan speed information, and calls gmetric with the appropriate arguments. Two machines were used to test the script; the two CPUs on each machine run at about 65 Celsius, which is well within the operating temperature range (The maximum safe temperature range is 77-82 Celsius for the Pentium III processors being used). Installing the script on all machines with a Winbond w83782d chip allows the SLAC Scientific Computing and Computing Services group (SCCS) to better evaluate current cooling methods.

  16. Agitation apparatus. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Beets, A.L.; Lewis, B.E. Jr.

    1982-03-12

    Agitation apparatus includes a tank with a cylindrical upper portion, a frustoconical intermediate portion, and a cylindrical lower portion, a lift tube extending from the upper portion of the tank to a point near an end cap attached to the lower portion of the tank, the lift tube being concentric with the lower portion of the tank to provide a flow passage there between, and a plurality of air supply conduits extending along the lift tube and spaced apart around its perimeter, these air supply conduits terminating adjacent the lower end of the lift tube. Air discharged from the lower ends of the air supply conduits causes liquid in the tank to flow upwardly through the lift tube and out of apertures in the upper portion thereof. Due to the unique properties of nuclear fuel dissolver solutions and the constraint placed on the amount of air that can be injected therein by conventional apparatus, there has been a need for a more effective means for agitating liquid in nuclear fuel digester tanks.

  17. High-Speed, High-Temperature Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Kumar, Arun; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2002-01-01

    Finger seals have significantly lower leakage rates than conventional labyrinth seals used in gas turbine engines and are expected to decrease specific fuel consumption by over 1 percent and to decrease direct operating cost by over 0.5 percent. Their compliant design accommodates shaft growth and motion due to thermal and dynamic loads with minimal wear. The cost to fabricate these finger seals is estimated to be about half the cost to fabricate brush seals. A finger seal has been tested in NASA's High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig at operating conditions up to 1200 F, 1200 ft/s, and 75 psid. Static, performance and endurance test results are presented. While seal leakage and wear performance are acceptable, further design improvements are needed to reduce the seal power loss.

  18. Effect of placement agitation and placement time on the shear bond strength of 3 self-etching adhesives.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Lina Maria; Sergent, Robert S; Burgess, John O; Mercante, D E

    2006-01-01

    This study measured the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 self-etching bonding agents to enamel and dentin with and without agitation at 3 different application times. The null hypotheses tested were that agitation and application time have no effect on bond strength. Occlusal surfaces of 180 recently extracted caries-free human molars were wet ground with 600 grit wet-dry silica carbide abrasive paper to obtain a flat enamel surface. The teeth were divided into 18 groups of 10 teeth. Three self-etching bonding agents, Clearfil SE BOND (Kuraray America), Xeno III (Dentsply) and AdheSE (Ivoclar-Vivadent) were applied using application times of 10, 20 or 30 seconds with or without agitation, thinned with a gentle stream of air and cured for 10 seconds, according to manufacturers' directions. Z100 (3M ESPE) composite, A2 shade, was placed over the cured adhesive and cured for 40 seconds. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature until testing. The samples were tested in shear to failure with a 1-mm/minute crosshead speed. After enamel shear bond strength testing, the teeth were again ground with 400 and 600-grit wet-dry SiC paper to obtain a flat dentin surface. The protocol used for preparing the enamel bond test samples was repeated, and the teeth were stored until testing in distilled water at room temperature. The samples were again tested in shear at a 1-mm/minute crosshead speed. Values were converted to MPa and data analyzed for intergroup differences using ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. Agitation did not improve enamel SBS for any of the materials tested, but there was a significant difference in enamel SBS among materials: Clearfil SE Bond shear bond strength was greater than Xeno III, which was greater than AdheSE. At 10 seconds application time on dentin, agitation improved the Clearfil SE Bond SBS and, at 20 seconds application time on dentin, agitation significantly improved SBS to dentin for all systems tested. Agitation had no affect

  19. Mechanical Agitation For Aqueous Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    Cleaning basket placed in aqueous cleaning solution mechanically agitated by air spring. Compressed air at oscillating pressure supplied to air spring to produce repeated vertical motion of cleaning basket.

  20. Downhole gaseous liquid flow agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Kamilos, N.; Kennedy, D.D.; Lederhos, L.J. Jr.

    1989-03-14

    An apparatus is described for agitating and mixing of a gaseous phase and a liquid phase comprising: a first tube having non-blocking internal threads within the first tube to agitate a liquid phase adhering thereto with a gaseous phase passing therethrough, whereby a uniform gaseous phase and liquid phase mixture is formed; and a second tube connected to an end of the first tube having non-blocking internal threads of opposite handedness.

  1. Variation of the average 'freezing-in' temperature of oxygen ions with solar wind speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Vogt, C.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the average oxygen ionization equilibrium as a function of speed of the solar wind are presented. At low solar wind speeds they indicate a coronal temperature at the freezing-in point of (1.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the 6th K. At speeds above 450 km/sec the apparent temperature starts to rise rapidly. This rise is tentatively interpreted in terms of a lack of thermodynamic equilibrium in the source region.

  2. The temperature of unheated bodies in a high-speed gas stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E; Weise, W

    1941-01-01

    The present report deals with temperature measurements on cylinders of 0.2 to 3 millimeters diameter in longitudinal and transverse air flow at speeds of 100 to 300 meters per second. Within the explored test range, that is, the probable laminar boundary layer region, the temperature of the cylinders in axial flow is practically independent of the speed and in good agreement with Pohlhausen's theoretical values; Whereas, in transverse flow, cylinders of certain diameter manifest a close relationship with speed, the ratio of the temperature above the air of the body to the adiabatic stagnation temperature decreases with rising speed and then rises again from a Mach number of 0.6. The importance of this "specific temperature" of the body for heat-transfer studies at high speed is discussed.

  3. Effects of agitation on the microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Porphyridium cruentum.

    PubMed

    Sobczuk, T Mazzuca; Camacho, F García; Grima, E Molina; Chisti, Yusuf

    2006-03-01

    The effect of mechanical agitation on the microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Porphyridium cruentum was investigated in aerated continuous cultures with and without the added shear protectant Pluronic F68. Damage to cells was quantified through a decrease in the steady state concentration of the biomass in the photobioreactor. For a given aeration rate, the steady state biomass concentration rose with increasing rate of mechanical agitation until an upper limit on agitation speed was reached. This maximum tolerable agitation speed depended on the microalgal species. Further increase in agitation speed caused a decline in the steady state concentration of the biomass. An impeller tip speed of >1.56 m s(-1) damaged P. tricornutum in aerated culture. In contrast, the damage threshold tip speed for P. cruentum was between 2.45 and 2.89 m s(-1). Mechanical agitation was not the direct cause of cell damage. Damage occurred because of the rupture of small gas bubbles at the surface of the culture, but mechanical agitation was instrumental in generating the bubbles that ultimately damaged the cells. Pluronic F68 protected the cells against damage and increased the steady state concentration of the biomass relative to operation without the additive. The protective effect of Pluronic was concentration-dependent over the concentration range of 0.01-0.10% w/v.

  4. Sound speed as a proxy variable to temperature in Fram Strait.

    PubMed

    Dushaw, Brian D; Sagen, Hanne; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka

    2016-07-01

    The application of ocean acoustic tomography in Fram Strait requires a careful assessment of the accuracy to which estimates of sound speed from tomography can be converted to estimates of temperature. The Fram Strait environment is turbulent, with warm, salty, northward-flowing North Atlantic water interacting with cold, fresh, southward-flowing Arctic water. The nature of this environment suggests that salinity could play an important role with respect to sound speed. The properties of sound speed with respect to temperature and salinity in this environment were examined using climatological and in situ glider data. In cold water, a factor of about 4.5 m s(-1) °C(-1) can be used to scale between sound speed and temperature. In situ data obtained by gliders were used to determine the ambiguities between temperature, salinity, and sound speed. Tomography provides a depth-averaging measurement. While errors in the sound speed-temperature conversion at particular depths may be 0.2 °C or larger, particularly within 50 m of the surface, such errors are suppressed when the depth is averaged. Using a simple scale factor to compute temperature from sound speed introduced an error of about 20 m °C for depth-averaged temperature, a value less than formal uncertainties estimated from acoustic tomography. PMID:27475184

  5. Speed of sound as a function of temperature for ultrasonic propagation in soybean oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, P. A.; Silva, R. M. B.; Morais, G. C.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Félix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound has been used for characterization of liquid in several productive sectors and research. This work presents the studied about the behavior of the speed of sound in soybean oil with increasing temperature. The pulse echo technique allowed observing that the speed of sound decreases linearly with increasing temperature in the range 20 to 50 °C at 1 MHz. As result, a characteristic function capable to reproduce the speed of sound behavior in soybean oil, as a function of temperature was established, with the respective measurement uncertainty.

  6. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  7. Scale-up of high shear granulation based on agitation power.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshinobu; Okamoto, Takumi; Watano, Satoru

    2005-12-01

    Scale-up of wet granulation in a vertical high shear mixer was conducted. Pharmaceutical excipient mixtures composed of lactose, cornstarch and micro-crystalline cellulose, and hydroxypropylecellulose as a binder were mixed together and then granulated with purified water under various operating conditions and vessel scales. Torque of agitator shaft was continuously measured and then agitation power per unit vessel volume was calculated. The agitation power per unit vessel volume showed a good correlation with physical properties of obtained granules, such as mass median diameter, strength and compressibility. This implied that the scale-up characteristics could be well analyzed by means of the agitation power per unit vessel volume. In addition, the effects of agitator tip speed and Froude number on the agitation power per unit vessel volume were investigated. The results showed that the agitation power per unit vessel volume was well characterized by the tip speed rather than the Froude number. This meant that the granule growth mainly progressed by the shear stress from the agitator blade. Dynamic characteristics of high shear granulation were also discussed here. PMID:16327186

  8. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  9. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  10. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  11. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  12. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  13. Effects of Temperature and Forming Speed on Plastic Bending of Adhesively Bonded Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Michihiro; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fusahito

    This paper deals with the temperature and rate-dependent elasto-viscoplasticity behaviour of a highly ductile acrylic adhesive and its effect on plastic bending of adhesively bonded sheet metals. Tensile lap shear tests of aluminium single-lap joints were performed at various temperature of 10-40°C at several tensile speeds. Based on the experimental results, a new constitutive model of temperature and rate-dependent elasto-viscoplasticity of the adhesive is presented. From V-bending experiments and the corresponding numerical simulation, it was found that the gull-wing bend is suppressed by high-speed forming at a lower temperature.

  14. Reduction of temperature rise in high-speed photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1988-01-01

    Information is provided on filtration with glass and infrared absorbing and reflecting filters. Glass and infrared filtration is a simple and effective method to reduce the radiation heat transfer associated with continuous high intensity tungsten lamps. The results of a filtration experiment are explained. The figures provide starting points for quantifying the effectiveness of various filters and associated light intensities. The combination of a spectrally selective reflector (hot or cold mirror) based on multilayer thin film principles and heat absorbing or infrared opaque glass results in the maximum reduction in temperature rise with a minimum of incident light loss. Use is recommended of a voltage regulator to further control temperature rise and incident light values.

  15. Reduction of temperature rise in high-speed photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1987-01-01

    Information is provided on filtration with glass and infrared absorbing and reflecting filters. Glass and infrared filtration is a simple and effective method to reduce the radiation heat transfer associated with continuous high intensity tungsten lamps. The results of a filtration experiment are explained. The figures provide starting points for quantifying the effectiveness of various filters and associated light intensities. The combination of a spectrally selective reflector (hot or cold mirror) based on multilayer thin film principles and heat absorbing or infrared opaque glass results in the maximum reduction in temperature rise with a minimum of incident light loss. Use is recommended of a voltage regulator to further control temperature rise and incident light values.

  16. Agitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... or acute mental status change in the older patient. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 28. Prager LM, Ivkovic A. Emergency psychiatry. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum JF, Fava M, Wilens ...

  17. The effects of agitation and aeration on the production of gluconic acid by Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Dronawat, S.N.; Svihla, C.K.; Hanley, T.R.

    1995-12-31

    The effects of agitation and aeration in the production of gluconic acid by Aspergillus niger from a glucose medium were investigated. Experiments were conducted at aeration rates of 5.0 and 10.0 L/min. Four different agitation speeds were investigated for each aeration rate. Gluconic acid concentration and biomass concentration were analyzed, and the rate of consumption of substrate by A. niger was noted. The main purpose of this work was to find the optimal conditions of agitation and aeration for the growth of A. niger and production of gluconic acid in submerged culture in a batch fermentor at a bench-top scale. The oxygen-transfer rates at different agitation and aeration rates were calculated. The gluconic acid concentration and rate of growth of A. niger increased with increase in the agitation and aeration rates.

  18. A general protocol for temperature calibration of MAS NMR probes at arbitrary spinning speeds.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xudong; Stark, Ruth E

    2010-01-01

    A protocol using (207)Pb NMR of solid lead nitrate was developed to determine the temperature of magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probes over a range of nominal set temperatures and spinning speeds. Using BioMAS and FastMAS probes with typical sample spinning rates of 8 and 35 kHz, respectively, empirical equations were devised to predict the respective sample temperatures. These procedures provide a straightforward recipe for temperature calibration of any MAS probe. PMID:21036557

  19. A General Protocol for Temperature Calibration of MAS NMR Probes at Arbitrary Spinning Speeds

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xudong; Stark, Ruth E.

    2010-01-01

    A protocol using 207Pb NMR of solid lead nitrate was developed to determine the temperature of magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probes over a range of nominal set temperatures and spinning speeds. Using BioMAS and fastMAS probes with typical sample spinning rates of 8 and 35 kHz, respectively, empirical equations were devised to predict the respective sample temperatures. These procedures provide a straightforward recipe for temperature calibration of any MAS probe. PMID:21036557

  20. Wall temperature control of low-speed body drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, J. C.; Ash, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of thermal means to control drag under turbulent boundary layer conditions is examined. Numerical calculations are presented for both skin friction and (unseparated) pressure drag for turbulent boundary-layer flows over a fuselage-like body with wall heat transfer. In addition, thermal control of separation on a bluff body is investigated. It is shown that a total drag reduction of up to 20 percent can be achieved for wall heating with a wall-to-total-freestream temperature ratio of 2. For streamlined slender bodies, partial wall heating of the forebody can produce almost the same order of total drag reduction as the full body heating case. For bluff bodies, the separation delay from partial wall cooling of the afterbody is approximately the same as for the fully cooled body.

  1. Skin friction measurements in high temperature high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schetz, J. A.; Diller, Thomas E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to measure skin friction along the chamber walls of supersonic combustors. A direct force measurement device was used to simultaneously measure an axial and transverse component of the small tangential shear force passing over a non-intrusive floating element. The floating head is mounted to a stiff cantilever beam arrangement with deflection due to the flow on the order of 0.00254 mm (0.0001 in.). This allowed the instrument to be a non-nulling type. A second gauge was designed with active cooling of the floating sensor head to eliminate non-uniform temperature effects between the sensor head and the surrounding wall. Samples of measurements made in combustor test facilities at NASA Langley Research Center and at the General Applied Science Laboratory (GASL) are presented. Skin friction coefficients between 0.001 - 0.005 were measured dependent on the facility and measurement location. Analysis of the measurement uncertainties indicate an accuracy to within +/- 10-15 percent of the streamwise component.

  2. Effect of rotation speed on the temperature of starter alternator machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hamdy; Harmand, Souad

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a study on the effect of rotation speed on the temperature distribution of starter alternator machine. The effect of the outer conditions of the machine on its temperature is also studied. The numerical solution of the thermal model of the machine is solved by using a nodal approach during a numerical code (SAME). This code is established at our laboratory and is written by MATLAB. The results show that when the rotation speed of the machine increases, the temperature of the machine increases. They also show that increasing the rotation speed of the machine more than five times increases the power loss from the machine three times and the maximum temperature difference of the machine about 40 %.

  3. High temperature measurement using very high shutter speed to avoid image saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Zhen; Zhang, Yang

    2014-04-11

    This paper explores the adaptation of the two-colour principle to develop a high-speed colour temperature correlation system, which is able to cover a range of temperature that is challenging to achieve before. A colour digital camera has built in RGB filters. It is possible to measure the temperature from the ratio of intensity of the green and red pixels using the two-colour principle based on the expansion of the Plank’s radiation law. In this study, experiments were carried out using a temperature calibrated tungsten ribbon lamp which can be tuned to vary from 1300 to 2200°C. Using very high shutter speed and small aperture, the high-speed camera successfully captured the tungsten ribbon without image saturation at the full temperature scale. Tests have been carried out at different temperature and camera settings. The sensitivity and errors have been analysed, and experiment results demonstrate the potential of using very high shutter speed is available for measuring the temperature even beyond 2200°C.

  4. Accuracy limitations on Brillouin lidar measurements of temperature and sound speed in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Fry, E S; Emery, Y; Quan, X; Katz, J W

    1997-09-20

    There are five mutually dependent variables relevant to Brillouin lidar measurements of temperature and sound speed in the ocean; they are (1) the Brillouin shift, (2) the sound speed, (3) the index of refraction, (4) the temperature, and (5) the salinity. We use three well-known relations to analyze rigorously the interdependence of these five variables. Clearly, a Brillouin shift measurement does not provide a stand-alone determination of temperature or sound speed; one more variable or one more relation must be known. The use of mean values of salinity that have been obtained by an analysis of a large set of historical in situ data is considered for this additional relation. PMID:18259560

  5. Speed of sound in nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagermann, Axel; Zarnecki, John C.

    2005-09-01

    Speed of sound measurements in nitrogen by Younglove and McCarty [J. Chem. Thermodynam. 12, 1121-1128 (1980)] are revisited and an empirical polynomial equation for the speed of sound is derived. The polynomial coefficients differ from those given by Wong and Wu [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 650-651 (1997)] with the result that discrepancies between predicted and measured values at low temperatures are reduced. The maximal error over the complete temperature and pressure range from 80 to 350 K and 0.031 to 0.709 MPa is reduced from 5.38% to 0.78%.

  6. The Effects of Engine Speed and Mixture Temperature on the Knocking Characteristics of Several Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1940-01-01

    Six 100-octane and two 87-octane aviation engine fuels were tested in a modified C.F.R. variable-compression engine at 1,500, 2,000 and 2,500 rpm. The mixture temperature was raised from 50 to 300 F in approximately 50 degree steps and, at each temperature, the compression ratio was adjusted to give incipient knock as shown by a cathode ray indicator. The results are presented in tabular form. The results are analyzed on the assumption that the conditions which determine whether a given fuel will knock are the maximum values of density and temperature reached by the burning gases. A maximum permissible density factor, proportional to the maximum density of the burning gases just prior to incipient knock, and the temperature of the burning gases at that time were computed for each of the test conditions. Values of the density factors were plotted against the corresponding end-gas temperatures for the three engine speeds and also against engine speed for several and end-gas temperatures. The maximum permissible density factor varied only slightly with engine speed but decreased rapidly with an increase in the end-gas temperature. The effect of changing the mixture temperature was different for fuels of different types. The results emphasize the desirability of determining the anti knock values of fuels over a wide range of engine and intake-air conditions rather that at a single set of conditions.

  7. Temperature prediction in high speed bone grinding using motor PWM signal.

    PubMed

    Tai, Bruce L; Zhang, Lihui; Wang, Anthony C; Sullivan, Stephen; Wang, Guangjun; Shih, Albert J

    2013-10-01

    This research explores the feasibility of using motor electrical feedback to estimate temperature rise during a surgical bone grinding procedure. High-speed bone grinding is often used during skull base neurosurgery to remove cranial bone and approach skull base tumors through the nasal corridor. Grinding-induced heat could propagate and potentially injure surrounding nerves and arteries, and therefore, predicting the temperature in the grinding region would benefit neurosurgeons during the operation. High-speed electric motors are controlled by pulse-width-modulation (PWM) to alter the current input and thus maintain the rotational speed. Assuming full mechanical to thermal power conversion in the grinding process, PWM can be used as feedback for heat generation and temperature prediction. In this study, the conversion model was established from experiments under a variety of grinding conditions and an inverse heat transfer method to determine heat flux. Given a constant rotational speed, the heat conversion was represented by a linear function, and could predict temperature from the experimental data with less than 20% errors. Such results support the advance of this technology for practical application.

  8. Effect of Extruder Screw Speed, Temperature, and Enzyme Levels on Sugar Recovery from Different Biomasses

    PubMed Central

    Karunanithy, Chinnadurai; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan; Gibbons, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Biofuels from biomass have the potential to reduce the dependency on fossil fuels. An efficient pretreatment method is required to accomplish the target of the Energy Act 2005. Extrusion could be a viable continuous pretreatment method to be explored. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the influence of screw speed and barrel temperature on sugar recovery from the selected warm season grasses and to select a suitable enzyme combination and dose for enzymatic hydrolysis. The ground, moisture-balanced biomasses were pretreated using a single screw extruder at various screw speeds (100, 150, and 200 rpm) and barrel temperatures (50, 75, 100, 150, and 200°C). Cellulase or multienzyme with β-glucosidase was varied from 1 : 1 to 1 : 4 during enzymatic hydrolysis to accomplish the second objective. Screw speed, barrel temperature, and their interaction had a significant influence on sugar recovery from the selected biomasses. A maximum of 28.2, 66.2, and 49.2% of combined sugar recoverywasachieved for switchgrass, big bluestem, prairie cord grass when pretreated at a screw speed of 200, 200, and 150 rpm and at a barrel temperature of 75, 150, and 100°C, respectively, using cellulase and β-glucosidase at a ratio of 1 :  4. Extrusion pretreatment of these biomasses used only 28–37% of the rated extruder power. PMID:25969784

  9. Formulation of ternary complexes of glyburide with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and other solubilizing agents and their effect on release behavior of glyburide in aqueous and buffered media at different agitation speeds.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sachin Kumar; Srinivasan, K K; Singare, Dhananjay S; Gowthamarajan, K; Prakash, Dev

    2012-11-01

    Glyburide, a sulfonylurea derivative, widely used as hypoglycaemic agent. In the present study, an attempt has been made to investigate the most effective third component which can be used with hydroxylpropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCd) to form a ternary complex with glyburide in order to enhance its dissolution rate, as well as reduce the amount of HPβCd used for formulating the binary complex with glyburide. Moreover, the objective of this study was also to develop a discriminatory dissolution media in order to discriminate the effect of the different solubilizing agents used for formulating the ternary complex system. Sodium lauryl sulphate, Poloxamer-188, Polyvinylpyrrolidone K-30, lactose and L-arginine were used to formulate ternary system along with HPβCd and glyburide. The ternary system formulated with glyburide:HPβCd:L-arginine in a proportion of 1:1:0.5 has shown the fastest dissolution rate when compared to other solubilizing agents. Unbuffered aqueous media with stirring speed 50 rpm has produced the most discriminatory dissolution profiles. The DSC thermograms and the powder X-ray analysis revealed the decrease in crystallinity of the drug. This was an indication of amorphous solid dispersion or molecular encapsulation of the drug into the cyclodextrin cavity. PMID:22283512

  10. Effect of Initial Mixture Temperature on Flame Speed of Methane-Air, Propane-Air, and Ethylene-Air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L

    1952-01-01

    Flame speeds based on the outer edge of the shadow cast by the laminar Bunsen cone were determined as functions of composition for methane-air mixtures at initial mixture temperatures ranging from -132 degrees to 342 degrees c and for propane-air and ethylene-air mixtures at initial mixture temperatures ranging from -73 degrees to 344 degrees c. The data showed that maximum flame speed increased with temperature at an increasing rate. The percentage change in flame speed with change in initial temperature for the three fuels followed the decreasing order, methane, propane, and ethylene. Empirical equations were determined for maximum flame speed as a function of initial temperature over the temperature range covered for each fuel. The observed effect of temperature on flame speed for each of the fuels was reasonably well predicted by either the thermal theory as presented by Semenov or the square-root law of Tanford and Pease.

  11. Technique to Measure the Coronal Electron Temperature and Radial Flow Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginald, N. L.; Davila, J. M.; St Cyr, O. C.

    2011-12-01

    During the March 2006 total solar eclipse we conducted an imaging experiment using the Imaging Spectrograph of Coronal Electrons (ISCORE) to determine the coronal electron temperature and its radial flow speed in the low solar corona. This technique required taking images of the solar eclipse through four broadband filters centered at 385.0, 398.7, 410.0 and 423.3 nm. The K-coronal temperature is determined from intensity ratios from the 385.0 and 410.0 nm filters, and the K-coronal radial flow speed is determined from intensity ratios from the 398.7 and 423.3 nm filters. The theoretical model for this technique assumes a symmetric corona devoid of any features like streamers that might alter the coronal symmetry. The model also requires an isothermal temperature and a uniform outflow speed all along the line of sight. We will call this the Constant Parameter Thomson Scattering Model (CPTSM). The latter assumption may sound unreasonable but in the symmetric corona with rapid fall of the electron density with height in the solar corona, the major contributions to the K-coronal intensity along a given line of sight comes from the plasma properties in the vicinity of the plane of the sky. But the pressing question is how is the derived plasma properties by ISCORE compare with the nature of the true corona. For this we turn to the CORHEL model by Predictive Science Inc. which used magnetogram data to create a realistic model of the solar corona that are made available through the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at GSFC. That team has consistently produced the expected coronal image days prior to many total eclipses where the major coronal features from their model matched actual coronal image on the day of the eclipse. Using the CORHEL model data we have calculated the K-coronal intensities at 385.0, 398.7, 410.0 and 423.3 nm using the electron density, plasma temperature (assumed to be electron temperature) and the flow speeds of the plasma along the line

  12. Linear dependence of surface expansion speed on initial plasma temperature in warm dense matter

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, Woosuk; Albright, Brian James; Bradley, Paul Andrew; Vold, Erik Lehman; Boettger, Jonathan Carl; Fernández, Juan Carlos

    2016-07-12

    Recent progress in laser-driven quasi-monoenergetic ion beams enabled the production of uniformly heated warm dense matter. Matter heated rapidly with this technique is under extreme temperatures and pressures, and promptly expands outward. While the expansion speed of an ideal plasma is known to have a square-root dependence on temperature, computer simulations presented here show a linear dependence of expansion speed on initial plasma temperature in the warm dense matter regime. The expansion of uniformly heated 1–100 eV solid density gold foils was modeled with the RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code, and the average surface expansion speed was found to increase linearly withmore » temperature. The origin of this linear dependence is explained by comparing predictions from the SESAME equation-of-state tables with those from the ideal gas equation-of-state. In conclusion, these simulations offer useful insight into the expansion of warm dense matter and motivate the application of optical shadowgraphy for temperature measurement.« less

  13. Linear dependence of surface expansion speed on initial plasma temperature in warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    Recent progress in laser-driven quasi-monoenergetic ion beams enabled the production of uniformly heated warm dense matter. Matter heated rapidly with this technique is under extreme temperatures and pressures, and promptly expands outward. While the expansion speed of an ideal plasma is known to have a square-root dependence on temperature, computer simulations presented here show a linear dependence of expansion speed on initial plasma temperature in the warm dense matter regime. The expansion of uniformly heated 1–100 eV solid density gold foils was modeled with the RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code, and the average surface expansion speed was found to increase linearly with temperature. The origin of this linear dependence is explained by comparing predictions from the SESAME equation-of-state tables with those from the ideal gas equation-of-state. These simulations offer useful insight into the expansion of warm dense matter and motivate the application of optical shadowgraphy for temperature measurement.

  14. Linear dependence of surface expansion speed on initial plasma temperature in warm dense matter

    PubMed Central

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in laser-driven quasi-monoenergetic ion beams enabled the production of uniformly heated warm dense matter. Matter heated rapidly with this technique is under extreme temperatures and pressures, and promptly expands outward. While the expansion speed of an ideal plasma is known to have a square-root dependence on temperature, computer simulations presented here show a linear dependence of expansion speed on initial plasma temperature in the warm dense matter regime. The expansion of uniformly heated 1–100 eV solid density gold foils was modeled with the RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code, and the average surface expansion speed was found to increase linearly with temperature. The origin of this linear dependence is explained by comparing predictions from the SESAME equation-of-state tables with those from the ideal gas equation-of-state. These simulations offer useful insight into the expansion of warm dense matter and motivate the application of optical shadowgraphy for temperature measurement. PMID:27405664

  15. Demonstration, Testing and Qualification of a High Temperature, High Speed Magnetic Thrust Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    The gas turbine industry has a continued interest in improving engine performance and reducing net operating and maintenance costs. These goals are being realized because of advancements in aeroelasticity, materials, and computational tools such as CFD and engine simulations. These advancements aid in increasing engine thrust-to-weight ratios, specific fuel consumption, pressure ratios, and overall reliability through higher speed, higher temperature, and more efficient engine operation. Currently, rolling element bearing and squeeze film dampers are used to support rotors in gas turbine engines. Present ball bearing configurations are limited in speed (<2 million DN) and temperature (<5OO F) and require both cooling air and an elaborate lubrication system. Also, ball bearings require extensive preventative maintenance in order to assure their safe operation. Since these bearings are at their operational limits, new technologies must be found in order to take advantage of other advances. Magnetic bearings are well suited to operate at extreme temperatures and higher rotational speeds and are a promising solution to the problems that conventional rolling element bearings present. Magnetic bearing technology is being developed worldwide and is considered an enabling technology for new engine designs. Using magnetic bearings, turbine and compressor spools can be radically redesigned to be significantly larger and stiffer with better damping and higher rotational speeds. These advances, a direct result of magnetic bearing technology, will allow significant increases in engine power and efficiency. Also, magnetic bearings allow for real-time, in-situ health monitoring of the system, lower maintenance costs and down time.

  16. Anxiety and Agitation in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Judith Ann; Dabbs, Annette Devito; Hoffman, Leslie; Milbrandt, Eric; Happ, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    During an ethnography conducted in an intensive care unit (ICU), we found that anxiety and agitation occurred frequently, and were important considerations in the care of 30 patients weaning from prolonged mechanical ventilation. We conducted a secondary analysis to (a) describe characteristics of anxiety and agitation experienced by mechanically ventilated patients; (b) explore how clinicians recognize and interpret anxiety and agitation and (c) describe strategies and interventions used to manage anxiety and agitation with mechanically ventilated patients. We constructed the Anxiety-Agitation in Mechanical Ventilation Model to illustrate the multidimensional features of symptom recognition and management. Patients’ ability to interact with the environment served as a basis for identification and management of anxiety or agitation. Clinicians’ attributions about anxiety or agitation and “knowing the patient” contributed to their assessment of patient responses. Clinicians chose strategies to overcome either the stimulus or patient’s appraisal of risk of the stimulus. This article contributes to the body of knowledge about symptom recognition and management in the ICU by providing a comprehensive model to guide future research and practice. PMID:21908706

  17. High-speed surface temperature measurements on plasma facing materials for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, M.; Kobayashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    For the lifetime evaluation of plasma facing materials in fusion experimental machines, it is essential to investigate their surface behavior and their temperature responses during an off-normal event such as the plasma disruptions. An infrared thermometer with a sampling speed as fast as 1{times}10{sup {minus}6} s/data, namely, the high-speed infrared thermometer (HSIR), has been developed by the National Research Laboratory of Metrology in Japan. To evaluate an applicability of the newly developed HSIR on the surface temperature measurement of plasma facing materials, high heat flux beam irradiation experiments have been performed with three different materials under the surface heat fluxes up to 170 MW/m{sup 2} for 0.04 s in a hydrogen ion beam test facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. As for the results, HSIR can be applicable for measuring the surface temperature responses of the armor tile materials with a little modification. It is also confirmed that surface temperatures measured with the HSIR thermometer show good agreement with the analytical results for stainless steel and carbon based materials at a temperature range of up to 2500{degree}C. However, for aluminum the HSIR could measure the temperature of the high dense vapor cloud which was produced during the heating due to lower melting temperature. Based on the result, a multichannel arrayed HSIR thermometer has been designed and fabricated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Managing agitated behaviour in older people.

    PubMed

    King, Camille

    2012-09-01

    Older people diagnosed with dementia can have complex needs, especially when they exhibit agitated behaviour. Patients with agitated behaviour challenge the delivery of health care. Often the behaviour is a symptom of unmet needs in this population (Dewing 2010). It is important for nurses to understand the underlying causes and apply evidence-based interventions in their nursing practice to promote health, safety and the highest quality of life possible. This article defines and classifies agitated behaviours, discusses implications for their management and then presents evidence-based interventions nurses can use. The interventions are categorised according to each of the five senses.

  19. Crystallization speed of salbutamol as a function of relative humidity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Narygina, Olga; Resch, Christian; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2015-07-15

    Spray dried salbutamol sulphate and salbutamol base particles are amorphous as a result of spray drying. As there is always the risk of recrystallization of amorphous material, the aim of this work is the evaluation of the temperature and humidity dependent recrystallization of spray dried salbutamol sulphate and base. Therefore in-situ Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD) studies of the crystallization process at various temperature (25 and 35 °C) and humidity (60%, 70%, 80%, 90% relative humidity) conditions were performed. It was shown that the crystallization speed of salbutamol sulphate and base is a non-linear function of both temperature and relative humidity. The higher the relative humidity the higher is the crystallization speed. At 60% relative humidity salbutamol base as well as salbutamol sulphate were found to be amorphous even after 12 h, however samples changed optically. At 70% and 90% RH recrystallization of salbutamol base is completed after 3 h and 30 min and recrystallization of salbutamol sulphate after 4h and 1h, respectively. Higher temperature (35 °C) also leads to increased crystallization speeds at all tested values of relative humidity.

  20. Photogrammetric measurement of recession rates of low temperature ablators subjected to high speed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaway, David W.

    2011-12-01

    This research advances a technique to simulate high temperature/high speed effects in a high speed/low temperature environment and to capture recession of the test article in three-dimensions. A method of fabricating dry ice test articles was developed, and the AFIT Mach 3 pressure-vacuum wind tunnel was used in combination with the dry ice test articles to collect three-dimensional ablation data for models of different shapes at stagnation pressures ranging from approximately 0.4 atm to 3 atm and stagnation temperatures equivalent to room temperature. High speed Schlieren photography was used for visualization, and the three dimensional shape change was quantified with sub-millimeter accuracy using laser dot photogrammetry. Experimental results for multiple shapes were compared to those computed using a computational model called ACFD. The ACFD model employed a finite-volume approach to solving the (3-D) Navier-Stokes equations with the gas assumed to be at equilibrium while employing an implicit solver accounting for the material response. By and large, the computational approach was validated for the conditions tested herein. Measurement of ablation rates at the stagnation point yielded approximate values of convective heat transfer rate when conduction through the solid is assumed negligible. The results of this analysis compared favorably to a variety of extensions of the Fay-Riddell correlation given in the literature. Paths for further research were selected and discussed.

  1. Voluntary running in deer mice: speed, distance, energy costs and temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore; Rezende, Enrico L; Gomes, Fernando R

    2004-10-01

    The energetics of terrestrial locomotion are of considerable interest to ecologists and physiologists, but nearly all of our current knowledge comes from animals undergoing forced exercise. To explore patterns of energy use and behavior during voluntary exercise, we developed methods allowing nearly continuous measurements of metabolic rates in freely behaving small mammals, with high temporal resolution over periods of several days. We used this approach to examine relationships between ambient temperature (Ta), locomotor behavior and energy costs in the deer mouse, a small mammal that routinely encounters a large range of temperatures in its natural habitat. We tested for individual consistency in running behavior and metabolic traits, and determined how locomotor costs vary with speed and Ta. Because of the importance of thermoregulatory costs in small mammals, we checked for substitution of exercise heat for thermostatic heat production at Ta below the thermal neutral zone and determined the fraction of the daily energy budget comprising exercise costs. Locomotor behavior was highly variable among individuals but had high repeatability, at least over short intervals. We found few temperature-related changes in speed or distance run, but Ta strongly affected energy costs. Partial substitution of exercise heat for thermogenic heat occurred at low Ta. This reduced energy expenditure during low-temperature running by 23-37%, but running costs comprised a fairly minor fraction of the energy budget, so the daily energy savings via substitution were much smaller. Deer mice did not adjust running speed to maximize metabolic economy, as they seldom used the high speeds that provide the lowest cost of transport. The highest voluntary speeds (4-5 km h(-1)) were almost always below the predicted maximal aerobic speed, and were much less than the species' maximal sprint speed. Maximum voluntarily attained rates of oxygen consumption (VO2) were highest at low Ta, but rarely

  2. Dynamics of thermographic skin temperature response during squat exercise at two different speeds.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Damiano; Ludwig, Nicola; Trecroci, Athos; Gargano, Marco; Michielon, Giovanni; Caumo, Andrea; Alberti, Giampietro

    2016-07-01

    Low intensity resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation has been shown to create blood flow restriction within muscles that may affect thermoregulation through the skin. We aimed to investigate the influence of two speeds of exercise execution on skin temperature dynamics using infrared thermography. Thirteen active males performed randomly two sessions of squat exercise (normal speed, 1s eccentric/1s concentric phase, 1s; slow speed, 5s eccentric/5s concentric phase, 5s), using ~50% of 1 maximal repetition. Thermal images of ST above muscles quadriceps were recorded at a rate of 0.05Hz before the exercise (to determine basal ST) and for 480s following the initiation of the exercise (to determine the nonsteady-state time course of ST). Results showed that ST changed more slowly during the 5s exercise (p=0.002), whereas the delta (with respect to basal) excursions were similar for the two exercises (p>0.05). In summary, our data provided a detailed nonsteady-state portrait of ST changes following squat exercises executed at two different speeds. These results lay the basis for further investigations entailing the joint use of infrared thermography and Doppler flowmetry to study the events taking place both at the skin and the muscle level during exercises executed at slow speed. PMID:27264889

  3. A high-speed, four-wavelength infrared pyrometer for low temperature shock physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, A.; Boboridis, K.; Payton, J. R.; Obst, A. W.

    2004-01-01

    In addition to the standard problems associated with contactless temperature measurements, pyrometry in shock physics experiments has many additional concerns. These include background temperatures which are often higher than the substrate temperature, non-uniform sample temperature due to hotspots and ejecta, fast sample motion up to several km s{sup -1}, fast-changing sample emissivity at shock breakout, and very short measurement times. We have designed a four channel, high speed near-infrared (NIR) pyrometer for measurements in the 400 to 1000K blackbody temperature regime. The front end optics are specific to each experiment, utilizing preferably reflective optics in order to mitigate spectral dispersion. Next-generation instruments under development are also discussed.

  4. Quantification and control of the spatiotemporal gradients of air speed and air temperature in an incubator.

    PubMed

    Van Brecht, A; Aerts, J M; Degraeve, P; Berckmans, D

    2003-11-01

    Around the optimal incubator air temperature only small spatiotemporal deviations are allowed. However, air speed and air temperature are not uniformly distributed in the total volume of the incubator due to obstruction of the eggs and egg trays. The objectives of this research were (1) to quantify the spatiotemporal gradients in temperature and velocity and (2) to develop and validate a control algorithm to increase the uniformity in temperature during the entire incubation process. To improve the uniformity of air temperature, the airflow pattern and the air quality need to be controlled more optimally. These data show that the air temperature between the eggs at a certain position in a large incubator is the result of (1) the mean air temperature of the incubator; (2) the exchange of heat between the egg and its micro-environment, which is affected by the air speed at that certain position; (3) the time-variable heat production of the embryo; and (4) the heat influx or efflux as a result from the movement of hot or cold air in the incubator toward that position, which is affected by the airflow pattern. This implies that the airflow pattern needs to be controlled in a more optimal way. To maximize the uniformity of air temperature, an active and adaptive control of the three-dimensional (3-D) airflow pattern has been developed and tested. It was found to improve the spatiotemporal temperature distribution. The chance of having a temperature reading in the interval from 37.5 to 38.1 degrees C increased by 3% compared to normal operating conditions.

  5. Robust control of speed and temperature in a power plant gas turbine.

    PubMed

    Najimi, Ebrahim; Ramezani, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, an H(∞) robust controller has been designed for an identified model of MONTAZER GHAEM power plant gas turbine (GE9001E). In design phase, a linear model (ARX model) which is obtained using real data has been applied. Since the turbine has been used in a combined cycle power plant, its speed and also the exhaust gas temperature should be adjusted simultaneously by controlling fuel signals and compressor inlet guide vane (IGV) position. Considering the limitations on the system inputs, the aim of the control is to maintain the turbine speed and the exhaust gas temperature within desired interval under uncertainties and load demand disturbances. Simulation results of applying the proposed robust controller on the nonlinear model of the system (NARX model), fairly fulfilled the predefined aims. Simulations also show the improvement in the performance compared to MPC and PID controllers for the same conditions.

  6. High-speed two-camera imaging pyrometer for mapping fireball temperatures.

    PubMed

    Densmore, John M; Homan, Barrie E; Biss, Matthew M; McNesby, Kevin L

    2011-11-20

    A high-speed imaging pyrometer was developed to investigate the behavior of flames and explosive events. The instrument consists of two monochrome high-speed Phantom v7.3 m cameras made by Vision Research Inc. arranged so that one lens assembly collects light for both cameras. The cameras are filtered at 700 or 900 nm with a 10 nm bandpass. The high irradiance produced by blackbody emission combined with variable shutter time and f-stop produces properly exposed images. The wavelengths were chosen with the expected temperatures in mind, and also to avoid any molecular or atomic gas phase emission. Temperatures measured using this pyrometer of exploded TNT charges are presented. PMID:22108886

  7. Speed of Sound versus Temperature Using PVC Pipes Open at Both Ends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the speed of sound in air as a function of temperature using a simple and inexpensive apparatus. For this experiment it is essential that the appropriate end corrections be taken into account. In a recent paper the end corrections for 2-in i.d. (5.04-cm) PVC pipes open at both ends were investigated. The air column…

  8. High-resolution daily gridded datasets of air temperature and wind speed for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckmann, S.; Krähenmann, S.; Bissolli, P.

    2015-08-01

    New high-resolution datasets for near surface daily air temperature (minimum, maximum and mean) and daily mean wind speed for Europe (the CORDEX domain) are provided for the period 2001-2010 for the purpose of regional model validation in the framework of DecReg, a sub-project of the German MiKlip project, which aims to develop decadal climate predictions. The main input data sources are hourly SYNOP observations, partly supplemented by station data from the ECA&D dataset (http://www.ecad.eu). These data are quality tested to eliminate erroneous data and various kinds of inhomogeneities. Grids in a resolution of 0.044° (5 km) are derived by spatial interpolation of these station data into the CORDEX area. For temperature interpolation a modified version of a regression kriging method developed by Krähenmann et al. (2011) is used. At first, predictor fields of altitude, continentality and zonal mean temperature are chosen for a regression applied to monthly station data. The residuals of the monthly regression and the deviations of the daily data from the monthly averages are interpolated using simple kriging in a second and third step. For wind speed a new method based on the concept used for temperature was developed, involving predictor fields of exposure, roughness length, coastal distance and ERA Interim reanalysis wind speed at 850 hPa. Interpolation uncertainty is estimated by means of the kriging variance and regression uncertainties. Furthermore, to assess the quality of the final daily grid data, cross validation is performed. Explained variance ranges from 70 to 90 % for monthly temperature and from 50 to 60 % for monthly wind speed. The resulting RMSE for the final daily grid data amounts to 1-2 °C and 1-1.5 m s-1 (depending on season and parameter) for daily temperature parameters and daily mean wind speed, respectively. The datasets presented in this article are published at http://dx.doi.org/10.5676/DWD_CDC/DECREG0110v1.

  9. High-resolution daily gridded data sets of air temperature and wind speed for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckmann, Sven; Krähenmann, Stefan; Bissolli, Peter

    2016-10-01

    New high-resolution data sets for near-surface daily air temperature (minimum, maximum and mean) and daily mean wind speed for Europe (the CORDEX domain) are provided for the period 2001-2010 for the purpose of regional model validation in the framework of DecReg, a sub-project of the German MiKlip project, which aims to develop decadal climate predictions. The main input data sources are SYNOP observations, partly supplemented by station data from the ECA&D data set (http://www.ecad.eu). These data are quality tested to eliminate erroneous data. By spatial interpolation of these station observations, grid data in a resolution of 0.044° (≈ 5km) on a rotated grid with virtual North Pole at 39.25° N, 162° W are derived. For temperature interpolation a modified version of a regression kriging method developed by Krähenmann et al.(2011) is used. At first, predictor fields of altitude, continentality and zonal mean temperature are used for a regression applied to monthly station data. The residuals of the monthly regression and the deviations of the daily data from the monthly averages are interpolated using simple kriging in a second and third step. For wind speed a new method based on the concept used for temperature was developed, involving predictor fields of exposure, roughness length, coastal distance and ERA-Interim reanalysis wind speed at 850 hPa. Interpolation uncertainty is estimated by means of the kriging variance and regression uncertainties. Furthermore, to assess the quality of the final daily grid data, cross validation is performed. Variance explained by the regression ranges from 70 to 90 % for monthly temperature and from 50 to 60 % for monthly wind speed. The resulting RMSE for the final daily grid data amounts to 1-2 K and 1-1.5 ms-1 (depending on season and parameter) for daily temperature parameters

  10. High Resolution Mapping of Wind Speed Using Active Distributed Temperature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayde, C.; Thomas, C. K.; Wagner, J.; Selker, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel approach to continuously measure wind speed simultaneously at thousands of locations using actively heated fiber optics with a distributed temperature sensing system (DTS). Analogous to a hot-wire anemometer, this approach is based on the principal of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface: The temperature difference between the heated surface and ambient air is a function of the convective cooling of the air flowing past the surface. By knowing the thermal properties of the heated surface, the heating input, and ambient temperature, wind speed can be calculated. In our case, the heated surface consists of a thin stainless steel tube that can exceed several km in length. A fiber optic is enclosed within the stainless steel tube to report the heated tube temperature, which in this case was sampled every 0.125 m. Ambient temperature were measured by an independent fiber optic cable located proximally to the stainless steel tube. We will present the theoretical bases of measuring wind speed using heated fiber optic as well as validation of this method in the field. In the field testing, more than 5000 simultaneous wind speed measurements were obtained every 5.5 second at 3 elevations (2m, 1m, and 0.5 m) every 0.125 m along a 230 m transects located across a shallow gulley in Nunn, CO. This method, which provides both air temperature and wind speed spanning four orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1 - 1,000m) opens up many important opportunities for testing basic theories in micro-meteorology regarding spatial scales of turbulent length scales as a function of distance from the earth, development of internal boundary layers, applicability of Taylors hypothesis, etc. The equipment employed, including the heating system, which is available to all US scientists, was provided by CTEMPs.org thanks to the generous grant support from the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1129003. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or

  11. [Sultopride in the treatment of agitation].

    PubMed

    Mohy, Y

    1983-04-28

    Sultopride was given to 5 patients with chronic psychosis and 5 with agitation or a psychiatric emergency. Initial dosages were from 3 to 6 vials/day in acute conditions and from 3 to 6 tablets/day in chronic diseases. Sultopride was effective in 70% of patients, with a 100% efficiency rate in acute conditions. Results on agitation were very satisfactory considering the severity of most of the conditions included in the study. On the whole, tolerance was very good.

  12. Monoamine oxidase and agitation in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Uzun, Suzana; Podobnik, Josip; Kozumplik, Oliver; Vlatkovic, Suzana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-08-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia or conduct disorder display a lifelong pattern of antisocial, aggressive and violent behavior and agitation. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme involved in the degradation of various monoamine neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and therefore has a role in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and pathological behaviors. Platelet MAO-B activity has been associated with psychopathy- and aggression-related personality traits, while variants of the MAOA and MAOB genes have been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, including aggressiveness, antisocial problems and violent delinquency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of platelet MAO-B activity, MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism and MAOA uVNTR polymorphism with severe agitation in 363 subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. The results demonstrated significant association of severe agitation and smoking, but not diagnosis or age, with platelet MAO-B activity. Higher platelet MAO-B activity was found in subjects with severe agitation compared to non-agitated subjects. Platelet MAO-B activity was not associated with MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism. These results suggested the association between increased platelet MAO-B activity and severe agitation. No significant association was found between severe agitation and MAOA uVNTR or MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism, revealing that these individual polymorphisms in MAO genes are not related to severe agitation in subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. As our study included 363 homogenous Caucasian male subjects, our data showing this negative genetic association will be a useful addition to future meta-analyses. PMID:26851573

  13. A Method for Calculating Transient Surface Temperatures and Surface Heating Rates for High-Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Robert D.; Gong, Leslie

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a method that can calculate transient aerodynamic heating and transient surface temperatures at supersonic and hypersonic speeds. This method can rapidly calculate temperature and heating rate time-histories for complete flight trajectories. Semi-empirical theories are used to calculate laminar and turbulent heat transfer coefficients and a procedure for estimating boundary-layer transition is included. Results from this method are compared with flight data from the X-15 research vehicle, YF-12 airplane, and the Space Shuttle Orbiter. These comparisons show that the calculated values are in good agreement with the measured flight data.

  14. Temperature Distribution in Teeth and Blanks of Ultra-High-Speed Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozaki, Yasuyoshi; Matsumoto, Susumu; Fukutomi, Masatoshi

    Currently in industries, high-speed turbo machineries such as compressors and steam or gas turbines are required to have increased power capacities. Due to this, a large gear size is required which leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. As the result of nonuniform temperature distribution, nonuniform thermal distortion occurs. Change in load distribution due to this thermal distortion is considered to be closely related to scoring and pitting failures. In order to ensure reliability of high-speed gear units, it is necessary to improve the following techniques. (1) The method of predicting the temperature rise of gears and thermal distortion. (2) Tooth correction against thermal distortion. In this paper, a three-dimensional model for calculating the temperature of teeth surfaces and blanks is presented. This model includes the effects of convective cooling by lubricating oil and the change in load distribution due to mechanical deformation. The calculated results of gear teeth temperature and bending stress are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. It is confirmed that the analytical method is practical and useful.

  15. Performance of High-Speed PWM Control Chips at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard; Overton, Eric

    2001-01-01

    The operation of power electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated in many NASA space missions such as planetary exploration and deep space probes. In addition to surviving the space hostile environment, electronics capable of low temperature operation would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing development and launch costs. As part of the NASA Glenn Low Temperature Electronics Program, several commercial high-speed Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) chips have been characterized in terms of their performance as a function of temperature in the range of 25 to -196 C (liquid nitrogen). These chips ranged in their electrical characteristics, modes of control, packaging options, and applications. The experimental procedures along with the experimental data obtained on the investigated chips are presented and discussed.

  16. PULPAL TEMPERATURE INCREASE WITH HIGH-SPEED HANDPIECE, ER:YAG LASER AND ULTRASOUND TIPS

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Fernanda Brandão; Camargo, Fernanda Pelogia; Zamboni, Sandra Costa; Pereira, Sarina Maciel Braga; Teixeira, Symone Cristina; Nogueira, Lafayette

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intrapulpal temperature increase produced by high-speed handpiece, Er:YAG laser and CVDentus ultrasound tips during cavity preparation. Thirty bovine mandibular incisors with an enamel/dentin thickness of 4 mm at buccal surface had their roots amputated and were allocated to the following groups (n=10): Group I- high-speed handpiece; Group II- noncontact Er:YAG laser (250 mJ/4Hz); and Group III- CVDentus ultrasouns tips. All devices were used with water cooling. Class V cavities were prepared to a depth of 3.5 mm, measured with a periodontal probe. A type T thermocouple was placed inside the pulp chamber to determine the temperature increase (°C), which was recorded by a data acquisition system ADS 2000 IP (Lynx Technology) linked to a notebook computer. Data were analyzed statistically by oneway ANOVA and Tukey's test (p=0.05). The mean temperature rises were: 1.10°C (±0.56) for Group I, 0.84°C (±0.55) for Group II, and 3.00°C (± 1.34) for Group III. There were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) between Groups I and II, but both of them differed significantly from Group III (p<0.05). In conclusion, the use of Er:YAG laser and high-speed handpiece for cavity preparation resulted in similar temperature increase. Although ultrasound tips generated significantly higher intrapulpal temperature increase, it remained below the critical value of 5.5°C and may be considered safe for use. PMID:19089220

  17. High-speed Imaging of Global Surface Temperature Distributions on Hypersonic Ballistic-Range Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA-Ames ballistic range provides a unique capability for aerothermodynamic testing of configurations in hypersonic, real-gas, free-flight environments. The facility can closely simulate conditions at any point along practically any trajectory of interest experienced by a spacecraft entering an atmosphere. Sub-scale models of blunt atmospheric entry vehicles are accelerated by a two-stage light-gas gun to speeds as high as 20 times the speed of sound to fly ballistic trajectories through an 24 m long vacuum-rated test section. The test-section pressure (effective altitude), the launch velocity of the model (flight Mach number), and the test-section working gas (planetary atmosphere) are independently variable. The model travels at hypersonic speeds through a quiescent test gas, creating a strong bow-shock wave and real-gas effects that closely match conditions achieved during actual atmospheric entry. The challenge with ballistic range experiments is to obtain quantitative surface measurements from a model traveling at hypersonic speeds. The models are relatively small (less than 3.8 cm in diameter), which limits the spatial resolution possible with surface mounted sensors. Furthermore, since the model is in flight, surface-mounted sensors require some form of on-board telemetry, which must survive the massive acceleration loads experienced during launch (up to 500,000 gravities). Finally, the model and any on-board instrumentation will be destroyed at the terminal wall of the range. For these reasons, optical measurement techniques are the most practical means of acquiring data. High-speed thermal imaging has been employed in the Ames ballistic range to measure global surface temperature distributions and to visualize the onset of transition to turbulent-flow on the forward regions of hypersonic blunt bodies. Both visible wavelength and infrared high-speed cameras are in use. The visible wavelength cameras are intensified CCD imagers capable of integration

  18. The agitative mixing and shearing of the CWM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Rongzeng; Sun Zongyue; Huangfu Jinghua

    1998-12-31

    Agitation has different operating purposes for different steps during the CWM preparation process. At present, the theoretical research of the agitation is still immature, especially for the non-Newtonian fluid. Based on the findings of agitation in other industries, the CWM agitative process is discussed in the paper.

  19. High-speed three-dimensional plasma temperature determination of axially symmetric free-burning arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, B.; Kozakov, R.; Gött, G.; Ekkert, K.; Bachmann, J.-P.; Marques, J.-L.; Schöpp, H.; Uhrlandt, D.; Schein, J.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we introduce an experimental technique that allows for high-speed, three-dimensional determination of electron density and temperature in axially symmetric free-burning arcs. Optical filters with narrow spectral bands of 487.5-488.5 nm and 689-699 nm are utilized to gain two-dimensional spectral information of a free-burning argon tungsten inert gas arc. A setup of mirrors allows one to image identical arc sections of the two spectral bands onto a single camera chip. Two-different Abel inversion algorithms have been developed to reconstruct the original radial distribution of emission coefficients detected with each spectral window and to confirm the results. With the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium we calculate emission coefficients as a function of temperature by application of the Saha equation, the ideal gas law, the quasineutral gas condition and the NIST compilation of spectral lines. Ratios of calculated emission coefficients are compared with measured ones yielding local plasma temperatures. In the case of axial symmetry the three-dimensional plasma temperature distributions have been determined at dc currents of 100, 125, 150 and 200 A yielding temperatures up to 20000 K in the hot cathode region. These measurements have been validated by four different techniques utilizing a high-resolution spectrometer at different positions in the plasma. Plasma temperatures show good agreement throughout the different methods. Additionally spatially resolved transient plasma temperatures have been measured of a dc pulsed process employing a high-speed frame rate of 33000 frames per second showing the modulation of the arc isothermals with time and providing information about the sensitivity of the experimental approach.

  20. Mechanisms of temperature-dependent swimming: the importance of physics, physiology and body size in determining protist swimming speed.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Oliver S; Petchey, Owen L; Humphries, Stuart

    2010-12-15

    Body temperatures and thus physiological rates of poikilothermic organisms are determined by environmental temperature. The power an organism has available for swimming is largely dependent on physiological rates and thus body temperature. However, retarding forces such as drag are contingent on the temperature-dependent physical properties of water and on an organism's size. Consequently, the swimming ability of poikilotherms is highly temperature dependent. The importance of the temperature-dependent physical properties of water (e.g. viscosity) in determining swimming speed is poorly understood. Here we propose a semi-mechanistic model to describe how biological rates, size and the physics of the environment contribute to the temperature dependency of microbial swimming speed. Data on the swimming speed and size of a predatory protist and its protist prey were collected and used to test our model. Data were collected by manipulating both the temperature and the viscosity (independently of temperature) of the organism's environment. Protists were either cultured in their test environment (for several generations) or rapidly exposed to their test environment to assess their ability to adapt or acclimate to treatments. Both biological rates and the physics of the environment were predicted to and observed to contribute to the swimming speed of protists. Body size was not temperature dependent, and protists expressed some ability to acclimate to changes in either temperature or viscosity. Overall, using our parameter estimates and novel model, we are able to suggest that 30 to 40% (depending on species) of the response in swimming speed associated with a reduction in temperature from 20 to 5°C is due to viscosity. Because encounter rates between protist predators and their prey are determined by swimming speed, temperature- and viscosity-dependent swimming speeds are likely to result in temperature- and viscosity-dependent trophic interactions.

  1. Temperature and humidity control during cooling and dehumidifying by compressor and evaporator fan speed variation

    SciTech Connect

    Krakow, K.I.; Lin, S.; Zeng, Z.S.

    1995-08-01

    The accurate control of temperature and relative humidity during cooling and dehumidifying air-conditioning processes may be achieved by compressor and evaporator fan speed variation. Proportional-integral-differential (PID) control methods are shown to be suitable for attaining compressor and evaporator fan speeds such that the sensible and latent components of the refrigeration system capacity equal the sensible and latent components of the system load. The feasibility of the control method has been verified experimentally. A numerical model of an environmental control system, including refrigeration, space, and PID control subsystems, has been developed. The model is suitable for determining system response to variations of PID coefficient values and to variations of system loads.

  2. [Effect of agitation on hyaluronic acid produced by Streptococcus zooepidemicus by using computational fluid dynamics].

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaohua; Duan, Xujie; Tan, Wensong; Zhang, Xu

    2009-11-01

    Agitation plays an important role in the hyaluronic acid (HA) fermentation process. However, views about the effect of agitation on HA production remain controversial. We investigated the effect of agitation on cell growth and HA synthesis during HA fermentation process by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology. The results showed that the biomass and HA yield changed a little with the increase of impeller speed, but the HA molecular weight firstly increased and then decreased. The results of phase agitation control strategy demonstrated that the influence of agitation on the HA molecular weight mainly exhibited at the stage of HA synthesis. Moreover, the CFD simulation results indicated that when impeller speed increased, the mixing time reduced while the shear rate increased significantly. The removal of anchor could moderate the contradiction between the mixing time and shear rate, and finally the HA molecular weight increased by 23.9%. The results of this work could provide guidelines for optimizing the HA fermentation, as well as the bioreactor design and scaling up. PMID:20222466

  3. Microbial ecology in anaerobic digestion at agitated and non-agitated conditions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhuoli; Cabrol, Léa; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo; Pullammanappallil, Pratap

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the distribution and dynamics of microbial community in anaerobic digestion at agitated and non-agitated condition, 454 pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA was conducted. It revealed the distinct community compositions between the two digesters and their progressive shifting over time. Methanogens and syntrophic bacteria were found much less abundant in the agitated digester, which was mainly attributed to the presence of bacterial genera Acetanaerobacterium and Ruminococcus with relatively high abundance. The characterization of the microbial community corroborated the digestion performance affected at the agitated condition, where lower methane yield and delayed methane production rate were observed. This was further verified by the accumulation of propionic acid in the agitated digester.

  4. Microbial Ecology in Anaerobic Digestion at Agitated and Non-Agitated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhuoli; Cabrol, Léa; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo; Pullammanappallil, Pratap

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the distribution and dynamics of microbial community in anaerobic digestion at agitated and non-agitated condition, 454 pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA was conducted. It revealed the distinct community compositions between the two digesters and their progressive shifting over time. Methanogens and syntrophic bacteria were found much less abundant in the agitated digester, which was mainly attributed to the presence of bacterial genera Acetanaerobacterium and Ruminococcus with relatively high abundance. The characterization of the microbial community corroborated the digestion performance affected at the agitated condition, where lower methane yield and delayed methane production rate were observed. This was further verified by the accumulation of propionic acid in the agitated digester. PMID:25313520

  5. High speed Infrared imaging method for observation of the fast varying temperature phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Reza; Alavi, Kambiz; Yuan, Baohong

    With new improvements in high-end commercial R&D camera technologies many challenges have been overcome for exploring the high-speed IR camera imaging. The core benefits of this technology is the ability to capture fast varying phenomena without image blur, acquire enough data to properly characterize dynamic energy, and increase the dynamic range without compromising the number of frames per second. This study presents a noninvasive method for determining the intensity field of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Device (HIFU) beam using Infrared imaging. High speed Infrared camera was placed above the tissue-mimicking material that was heated by HIFU with no other sensors present in the HIFU axial beam. A MATLAB simulation code used to perform a finite-element solution to the pressure wave propagation and heat equations within the phantom and temperature rise to the phantom was computed. Three different power levels of HIFU transducers were tested and the predicted temperature increase values were within about 25% of IR measurements. The fundamental theory and methods developed in this research can be used to detect fast varying temperature phenomena in combination with the infrared filters.

  6. High-speed, room-temperature quantum cascade detectors at 4.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuhong; Zhai, Shenqiang; Wang, Fengjiao; Liu, Junqi; Liu, Fengqi; Liu, Shuman; Zhang, Jinchuan; Zhuo, Ning; Wang, Lijun; Wang, ZhanGuo

    2016-03-01

    We present high-speed, room-temperature operated 4.3 μm quantum cascade detectors. The devices are processed as square mesas with 50 Ω coplanar access line and air-bridge connector. The high frequency features are explored using microwave rectification technique and a RLC circuit model. The -3 dB cutoff frequency is experimentally 9 GHz and 4 GHz for 20×20 μm2 and 50×50 μm2 detectors, respectively. The equivalent circuit analysis shows that a second order filter feature governs the devices. Higher cutoff frequency can be achieved by eliminate the parasitics further.

  7. Coal storage hopper with vibrating screen agitator

    DOEpatents

    Daw, Charles S.; Lackey, Mack E.; Sy, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyor mechanism. The vibrating screen agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  8. Should We Believe Atmospheric Temperatures Measured by Entry Accelerometers Traveling at "Slow" Near-Sonic Speeds?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's Accelerometer instrument measured an unexpected and large temperature inversion between 10 and 20 kilometer altitude. Other instruments have failed to detect similar temperature inversions. I test whether this inversion is real or not by examining what changes have to be made to the assumptions in the accelerometer data processing to obtain a more "expected" temperature profile. Changes in derived temperature of up to 30K, or 15%, are necessary, which correspond to changes in derived density of up to 25% and changes in derived pressure of up to 10%. If the drag coefficient is changed to satisfy this, then instead of decreasing from 1.6 to 1.4 from 20 kilometers to 10 kilometers, the drag coefficient must increase from 1.6 to 1.8 instead. If winds are invoked, then speeds of 60 meters per second are necessary, four times greater than those predicted. Refinements to the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium modify the temperature profile by an order of magnitude less than the desired amount. Unrealistically large instrument drifts of 0.5-1.0 meters per square second are needed to adjust the temperature profile as desired. However, rotational contributions to the accelerations may have the necessary magnitude and direction to make this correction. Determining whether this hypothesis is true will require further study of the rigid body equations of motion, with detailed knowledge of the positions of all six accelerometers. The paradox concerning this inversion is not yet resolved. It is important to resolve it because the paradox has some startling implications. At one extreme, are temperature profiles derived from accelerometers inherently inaccurate by 20K or more? At the other extreme, are RS temperature profiles inaccurate by this same amount?

  9. Multigrid Solution of the Navier-Stokes Equations at Low Speeds with Large Temperature Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, Peter M.

    2002-01-01

    Multigrid methods for the Navier-Stokes equations at low speeds and large temperature variations are investigated. The compressible equations with time-derivative preconditioning and preconditioned flux-difference splitting of the inviscid terms are used. Three implicit smoothers have been incorporated into a common multigrid procedure. Both full coarsening and semi-coarsening with directional fine-grid defect correction have been studied. The resulting methods have been tested on four 2D laminar problems over a range of Reynolds numbers on both uniform and highly stretched grids. Two of the three methods show efficient and robust performance over the entire range of conditions. In addition none of the methods have any difficulty with the large temperature variations.

  10. Outdoor temperature, precipitation, and wind speed affect physical activity levels in children: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Nicholas M.; Myer, Gregory D.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Woo, Jessica G.; Khoury, Philip R.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Daniels, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate effects of local weather conditions on physical activity in early childhood. Methods Longitudinal prospective cohort study of 372 children, 3 years old at enrollment, drawn from a major US metropolitan community. Accelerometer-measured (RT3) physical activity was collected every 4 months over 5 years and matched with daily weather measures: day length, heating/cooling degrees (degrees mean temperature < 65°F or ≥ 65°F, respectively), wind, and precipitation. Mixed regression analyses, adjusted for repeated measures, were used to test the relationship between weather and physical activity. Results Precipitation and wind speed were negatively associated with total physical activity and moderate-vigorous physical activity (P<0.0001). Heating and cooling degrees were negatively associated with total physical activity and moderate-vigorous physical activity and positively associated with inactivity (all P<0.0001), independent of age, sex, race, BMI, day length, wind, and precipitation. For every 10 additional heating degrees there was a five-minute daily reduction in moderate-vigorous physical activity. For every additional 10 cooling degrees there was a 17-minute reduction in moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Inclement weather (higher/lower temperature, greater wind speed, more rain/snow) is associated with less physical activity in young children. These deleterious effects should be considered when planning physical activity research, interventions, and policies. PMID:25423667

  11. Bivariate ensemble model output statistics approach for joint forecasting of wind speed and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Sándor; Möller, Annette

    2016-06-01

    Forecast ensembles are typically employed to account for prediction uncertainties in numerical weather prediction models. However, ensembles often exhibit biases and dispersion errors, thus they require statistical post-processing to improve their predictive performance. Two popular univariate post-processing models are the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and the ensemble model output statistics (EMOS). In the last few years, increased interest has emerged in developing multivariate post-processing models, incorporating dependencies between weather quantities, such as for example a bivariate distribution for wind vectors or even a more general setting allowing to combine any types of weather variables. In line with a recently proposed approach to model temperature and wind speed jointly by a bivariate BMA model, this paper introduces an EMOS model for these weather quantities based on a bivariate truncated normal distribution. The bivariate EMOS model is applied to temperature and wind speed forecasts of the 8-member University of Washington mesoscale ensemble and the 11-member ALADIN-HUNEPS ensemble of the Hungarian Meteorological Service and its predictive performance is compared to the performance of the bivariate BMA model and a multivariate Gaussian copula approach, post-processing the margins with univariate EMOS. While the predictive skills of the compared methods are similar, the bivariate EMOS model requires considerably lower computation times than the bivariate BMA method.

  12. Silicone Oil- and Agitation-Induced Aggregation of a Monoclonal Antibody in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Thirumangalathu, Renuka; Krishnan, Sampathkumar; Ricci, Margaret Speed; Brems, David N.; Randolph, Theodore W.; Carpenter, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Silicone oil, which is used as a lubricant or coating in devices such as syringes, needles and pharmaceutical containers, has been implicated in aggregation and particulation of proteins and antibodies. Aggregation of therapeutic protein products induced by silicone oil can pose a challenge to their development and commercialization. To systematically characterize the role of silicone oil on protein aggregation, the effects of agitation, temperature, pH and ionic strength on silicone oil-induced loss of monomeric anti-streptavidin IgG 1 antibody were examined. Additionally, the influences of excipients polysorbate20 and sucrose on protein aggregation were investigated. In the absence of agitation, protein absorbed to silicone oil with approximately monolayer coverage, however silicone oil did not stimulate aggregation during isothermal incubation unless samples were also agitated. A synergistic stimulation of aggregation by a combination of agitation and silicone oil was observed. Solution conditions which reduced colloidal stability of the antibody, as assessed by determination of osmotic second virial coefficients, accelerated aggregation during agitation with silicone oil. Polysorbate20 completely inhibited silicone oil-induced monomer loss during agitation. A formulation strategy optimizing colloidal stability of the antibody as well as incorporation of surfactants such as polysorbate20 is proposed to reduce silicone oil-induced aggregation of therapeutic protein products. PMID:19360857

  13. Effects of chamber temperature and pressure on the characteristics of high speed diesel jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittiwong, W.; Pianthong, K.; Seehanam, W.; Milton, B. E.; Takayama, K.

    2012-05-01

    This study is an investigation into the effects of temperature and pressure within a test chamber on the dynamic characteristics of injected supersonic diesel fuel jets. These jets were generated by the impact of a projectile driven by a horizontal single stage powder gun. A high speed video camera and a shadowgraph optical system were used to capture their dynamic characteristics. The test chamber had controlled air conditions of temperature and pressure up to 150 °C and 8.2 bar, respectively. It was found experimentally that, at the highest temperature, a maximum jet velocity of around 1,500 m/s was obtained. At this temperature, a narrow pointed jet appeared while at the highest pressure, a thick, blunt headed jet was obtained. Strong shock waves were generated in both cases at the jet head. For analytical prediction, equations of jet tip velocity and penetration from the work of Dent and of Hiroyasu were employed to describe the dynamic characteristics of the experiments at a standard condition of 1 bar, 30 °C. These analytical predictions show reasonable agreement to the experimental results, the experimental trend differing in slope because of the effect of the pressure, density fluctuation of the injection and the shock wave phenomena occurring during the jet generation process.

  14. LDA measurements and turbulence spectral analysis in an agitated vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysela, Bohuš; Konfršt, Jiří; Chára, Zdeněk

    2013-04-01

    During the last years considerable improvement of the derivation of turbulence power spectrum from Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) has been achieved. The irregularly sampled LDA data is proposed to approximate by several methods e.g. Lomb-Scargle method, which estimates amplitude and phase of spectral lines from missing data, methods based on the reconstruction of the auto-correlation function (referred to as correlation slotting technique), methods based on the reconstruction of the time series using interpolation between the uneven sampling and subsequent resampling etc. These different methods were used on the LDA data measured in an agitated vessel and the results of the power spectrum calculations were compared. The measurements were performed in the mixing vessel with flat bottom. The vessel was equipped with four baffles and agitated with a six-blade pitched blade impeller. Three values of the impeller speed (Reynolds number) were tested. Long time series of the axial velocity component were measured in selected points. In each point the time series were analyzed and evaluated in a form of power spectrum.

  15. Optical Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Air Over the Temperature Range 300-650 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Using laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), the speed of sound in room air (1 atm) is measured over the temperature range 300-650 K. Since the LITA apparatus maintains a fixed sound wavelength as temperature is varied, this temperature range simultaneously corresponds to a sound frequency range of 10-15 MHz. The data are compared to a published model and typically agree within 0.1%-0.4% at each of 21 temperatures.

  16. Infrared imaging spectrometer for measurement of temperature in high-speed events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Mark Franklin

    Munition development has always been driven by the necessity of delivering enough explosives to a targeted object to destroy it. Targets that are protected by steel reinforced concrete housings have become increasingly more difficult to destroy. Improvements must be made in munitions engineering design to either deliver more payload to the target or to make the weapon more potent. In most cases, due to aircraft weight limitations, the delivery of more payload is not an option. Therefore, improving the destructive power of a weapon of a given payload requires the use of more powerful explosives. However, when the potency of an explosive is increased, its sensitivity to premature detonation also increases. The characteristics of the metal casing containing the explosive contribute significantly to the weapon's detonation sensitivity. Casing experience significant heating during weapon penetration. This heating can cause the weapon to detonate before it reaches its target location. In the past, computer codes used to model detonating weapons have not taken heating into account in their performance predictions. Consequently, the theoretical models and the actual field tests are not in agreement. New models, that include temperature information, are currently being developed which are based on work done in the area of computational fluid dynamics. In this research, a remotely located, high-speed, infrared (IR) camera is used to obtain detailed measurements of the passive radiation from an object in an energetic environment. This radiation information is used to determine both the emissivity and the temperature of the surface of an object. However, before the temperature or emissivity was determined, the functional form of the emissivity was calculated to be an Mth degree polynomial with respect to wavelength dependence. With the advent of large, high-speed, IR detector arrays, it has now become possible to realize IR imaging spectrometers that have very high spatial

  17. Low-speed flowfield characterization by infrared measurements of surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartenberg, E.; Roberts, A. S., Jr.; Mcree, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program was aimed at identifying areas in low speed aerodynamic research where infrared imaging systems can make significant contributions. Implementing a new technique, a long electrically heated wire was placed across a laminar jet. By measuring the temperature distribution along the wire with the IR imaging camera, the flow behavior was identified. Furthermore, using Nusselt number correlations, the velocity distribution could be deduced. The same approach was used to survey wakes behind cylinders in a wind-tunnel. This method is suited to investigate flows with position dependent velocities, e.g., boundary layers, confined flows, jets, wakes, and shear layers. It was found that the IR imaging camera cannot accurately track high gradient temperature fields. A correlation procedure was devised to account for this limitation. Other wind-tunnel experiments included tracking the development of the laminar boundary layer over a warmed flat plate by measuring the chordwise temperature distribution. This technique was applied also to the flow downstream from a rearward facing step. Finally, the IR imaging system was used to study boundary layer behavior over an airfoil at angles of attack from zero up to separation. The results were confirmed with tufts observable both visually and with the IR imaging camera.

  18. Effect of temperature on maximum swimming speed and cost of transport in juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Claireaux, Guy; Couturier, Christine; Groison, Anne-Laure

    2006-09-01

    This study is an attempt to gain an integrated understanding of the interactions between temperature, locomotion activity and metabolism in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). To our knowledge this study is among the few that have investigated the influence of the seasonal changes in water temperature on swimming performance in fish. Using a Brett-type swim-tunnel respirometer the relationship between oxygen consumption and swimming speed was determined in fish acclimatised to 7, 11, 14, 18, 22, 26 and 30 degrees C. The corresponding maximum swimming speed (U(max)), optimal swimming speed (U(opt)), active (AMR) and standard (SMR) metabolic rates as well as aerobic metabolic scope (MS) were calculated. Using simple mathematical functions, these parameters were modelled as a function of water temperature and swimming speed. Both SMR and AMR were positively related to water temperature up to 24 degrees C. Above 24 degrees C SMR and AMR levelled off and MS tended to decrease. We found a tight relationship between AMR and U(max) and observed that raising the temperature increased AMR and increased swimming ability. However, although fish swam faster at high temperature, the net cost of transport (COT(net)) at a given speed was not influence by the elevation of the water temperature. Although U(opt) doubled between 7 degrees C and 30 degrees C (from 0.3 to 0.6 m s(-1)), metabolic rate at U(opt) represented a relatively constant fraction of the animal active metabolic rate (40-45%). A proposed model integrates the effects of water temperature on the interaction between metabolism and swimming performance. In particular the controlling effect of temperature on AMR is shown to be the key factor limiting maximal swimming speed of sea bass.

  19. Power consumption in gas-inducing-type mechanically agitated contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, K.; Mundale, V.D.; Patwardhan, A.W.; Joshi, J.B.

    1996-05-01

    Power consumption was measured in 0.57, 1.0, and 1.5 m i.d. gas inducing type of mechanically agitated contactors (GIMAC) using single and multiple impellers. The ratio of impeller diameter to vessel diameter was varied in the range of 0.13 < D/T < 0.59. The effect of liquid submergence from the top and impeller clearance from the vessel bottom was investigated in detail. In the case of multiple impeller systems, six different designs were investigated. The designs included pitched blade downflow turbine (PBTD), pitched blade upflow turbine (PBTU), downflow propeller (PD), upflow propeller (PU), straight bladed turbine (SBT) and disc turbine (DT). The effect of interimpeller clearance was studied for the multiple impeller system. The effect of impeller speed was studied in the range of 0.13 < N < 13.5 rotations/s. A mathematical model has been developed for power consumption before and after the onset of gas induction.

  20. Do Past Experiences Predict Agitation in Nursing Home Residents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Marx, Marcia S.

    1989-01-01

    Examined relationships between agitated behavior and past personality in 408 nursing home residents. Agitated and nonaggressive behaviors were correlated with past stressful events, and physically aggressive behavior was correlated with the lack thereof; no relationships were found between agitated behavior and history of a mental disorder or past…

  1. Measuring the temperature dependent thermal diffusivity of geomaterials using high-speed differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Aulock, Felix W.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Heat diffusion in the Earth's crust is critical to fundamental geological processes, such as the cooling of magma, heat dissipation during and following transient heating events (e.g. during frictional heating along faults), and to the timescales of contact metamorphosis. The complex composition and multiphase nature of geomaterials prohibits the accurate modeling of thermal diffusivities and measurements over a range of temperatures are sparse due to the specialized nature of the equipment and lack of instrument availability. We present a novel method to measure the thermal diffusivity of geomaterials such as minerals and rocks with high precision and accuracy using a commercially available differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). A DSC 404 F1 Pegasus® equipped with a Netzsch high-speed furnace was used to apply a step-heating program to corundum single crystal standards of varying thicknesses. The standards were cylindrical discs of 0.25-1 mm thickness with 5.2-6 mm diameter. Heating between each 50 °C temperature interval was conducted at a rate of 100 °C/min over the temperature range 150-1050 °C. Such large heating rates induces temperature disequilibrium in the samples used. However, isothermal segments of 2 minutes were used during which the temperature variably equilibrated with the furnace between the heating segments and thus the directly-measured heat-flow relaxed to a constant value before the next heating step was applied. A finite-difference 2D conductive heat transfer model was used in cylindrical geometry for which the measured furnace temperature was directly applied as the boundary condition on the sample-cylinder surfaces. The model temperature was averaged over the sample volume per unit time and converted to heat-flow using the well constrained thermal properties for corundum single crystals. By adjusting the thermal diffusivity in the model solution and comparing the resultant heat-flow with the measured values, we obtain a model

  2. Real-time monitoring of changes of adsorbed and crystalline water contents in tablet formulation powder containing theophylline anhydrate at various temperatures during agitated granulation by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Makoto; Kanai, Yoshinori; Hattori, Yusuke

    2014-09-01

    Real-time monitoring of adsorbed water content (FW) and hydrate formation of theophylline anhydrate (THA) in tablet formulation during agitated granulation was investigated by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. As the wet-granulation process of THA tablet formulation involves change in pseudo-polymorphs between THA and theophylline monohydrate (THM), the pharmaceutical properties of THA tablet depend on the degree of hydration during granulation. After mixing of the powder materials (4 g) containing THA, and excipients and the addition of 600 μL of binding water, the powder was kneaded at 27°C, 40°C, and 50°C and then dried. The mixing, granulating, and drying processes were monitored using NIR. The calibration models to predict THM and total water contents during granulation in THA tablet formulation were obtained by partial least-squares regression. The FW in the formulation was determined by subtracting THM from the water content. The results of the THA formulation powder bed during granulation by NIR monitoring indicated that the transformation pathway of the THA powder was THA ⇒ THM ⇒ THA at 27°C and 40°C, but that at 50°C was THA ⇒ THA ⇒ THA. The pharmaceutical properties, such as tablet porosity, hardness, tablet disintegration time, and dissolution rate of the final THA tablet products, were affected by the degree of crystalline transformation during granulation.

  3. Temperature and Light Control of Three phase Induction Motor Speed Drive by PIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoum, Nader

    2010-06-01

    PIC is a family of Harvard architecture microcontrollers made by Microchip Technology, derived from the PIC1640 originally developed by General Instrument's Microelectronics Division. The name PIC initially referred to "Peripheral Interface Controller". PICs are popular with the developers and the hobbyists due to their low cost, wide availability, large user base, extensive collection of application notes, free development tools, and serial programming (and re-programming with flash memory) capability. In modern days, PIC microcontrollers are used in the industrial world to control many types of equipment, ranging from consumer to specialized devices. They have replaced older types of controllers, including microprocessors. Also, there is a growing need for off-line support of a computer's main processor. The demand is going to grow with more equipment uses more intelligence. In the engineering field for instance, PIC has brought a very positive impact in designing an automation control system and controlling industrial machineries. Accordingly, this paper shows the change in the motor speed by the use of PIC in accordance to the light and level of temperature. The project focuses on programming the PIC by embedded software that detects the temperature and light signals and send it to 3 phase induction motor of 240 volt. A theoretical analysis and the practical approach in achieving this work goal have proved that PIC plays an important role in the field of electronics control.

  4. A high speed data acquisition and analysis system for transonic velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1988-01-01

    The high speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. The data acquisition and data reduction process has been combined within DDAS. DDAS receives input from hot wires and anemometers, amplifies and filters the signals with computer controlled modules, and converts the analog signals to digital with real-time simultaneous digitization followed by digital recording on disk or tape. Automatic acquisition (either from a computer link to an existing wind tunnel acquisition system, or from data acquisition facilities within DDAS) collects necessary calibration and environment data. The generation of hot wire sensitivities is done in DDAS, as is the application of sensitivities to the hot wire data to generate turbulence quantities. The presentation of the raw and processed data, in terms of root mean square values of velocity, density and temperature, and the processing of the spectral data is accomplished on demand in near-real-time- with DDAS. A comprehensive description of the interface to the DDAS and of the internal mechanisms will be prosented. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAS will be provided.

  5. MHD-IPS analysis of relationship among solar wind density, temperature, and flow speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Keiji; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Fujiki, Ken'ichi

    2016-08-01

    The solar wind properties near the Sun are a decisive factor of properties in the rest of heliosphere. As such, determining realistic plasma density and temperature near the Sun is very important in models for solar wind, specifically magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models. We had developed a tomographic analysis to reconstruct three-dimensional solar wind structures that satisfy line-of-sight-integrated solar wind speed derived from the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observation data and nonlinear MHD equations simultaneously. In this study, we report a new type of our IPS-MHD tomography that seeks three-dimensional MHD solution of solar wind, matching additionally near-Earth and/or Ulysses in situ measurement data for each Carrington rotation period. In this new method, parameterized relation functions of plasma density and temperature at 50 Rs are optimized through an iterative forward model minimizing discrepancy with the in situ measurements. Satisfying three constraints, the derived 50 Rs maps of plasma quantities provide realistic observation-based information on the state of solar wind near the Sun that cannot be well determined otherwise. The optimized plasma quantities exhibit long-term variations over the solar cycles 21 to 24. The differences in plasma quantities derived from the optimized and original IPS-MHD tomography exhibit correlations with the source-surface magnetic field strength, which can in future give new quantitative constrains and requirements to models of coronal heating and acceleration.

  6. Delayed egg hatching of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) pending water agitation.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Babak; Shakibi, Sanam; Foster, Woodbridge A

    2014-05-01

    Mosquito eggs laid on water surfaces typically hatch spontaneously soon after the embryos within them become fully formed first-instar larvae. However, we have found that Anopheles gambiae Giles, an important vector of malaria in Africa, exhibits delayed hatching until the water surface is agitated, a feature overlooked in most laboratory colonies. Agitation within 24 h postoviposition, before embryonation was complete, failed to stimulate delayed postembryonic hatching of isolated eggs on the following day (day 2), when < 1% had hatched spontaneously. However, 5 min of water agitation of these dormant pharate first-instar larvae on day 2 resulted in an almost immediate hatch of 63.3 versus 0% of nonagitated controls, plus another 3.9 versus 0.3%, respectively, during the following 24 h. With daily agitation, installment hatching occurred mainly during 2-6 d postoviposition. The mean cumulative hatch after 7 d of daily agitation was 83.1 versus 1.1% of nonagitated eggs. Experiments with eggs in groups demonstrated that egg density and activity of already-hatched larvae had no stimulatory effect. Eggs stored 1-4 wk at 25.5 or at 15.5 degrees C, and then agitated daily for 6 d at 25.5 degrees C, showed a gradual decline in viability. Viability was sustained longer at the lower temperature. Implications of agitation-induced egg hatching for rainy-season and dry-season ecology of An. gambiae are discussed. Suspended hatching and cool storage already are proving convenient for efficient mass rearing and accurate modeling of weather-based population dynamics.

  7. Temperature imaging with speed of ultrasonic transmission tomography for medical treatment control: A physical model-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhe-Qi; Yuan, Jie; Stephen, Z. Pinter; Oliver, D. Kripfgans; Wang, Xue-Ding; Paul, L. Carson; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Hyperthermia is a promising method to enhance chemo and radiation therapy of breast cancer. In the process of hyperthermia, temperature monitoring is of great importance to assure the effectiveness of treatment. The transmission speed of ultrasound in biomedical tissue changes with temperature. However, when mapping the speed of sound directly to temperature in each pixel as desired for using all speeds of ultrasound data, temperature bipolar edge enhancement artifacts occur near the boundary of two tissues with different speeds of ultrasound. After the analysis of the reasons for causing these artifacts, an optimized method is introduced to rebuild the temperature field image by using the continuity constraint as the judgment criterion. The significant smoothness of the rebuilding image in the transitional area shows that our proposed method can build a more precise temperature image for controlling the medical thermal treatment. Project supported in part by DoD/BCRP Idea Award, BC095397P1, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61201425), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20131280), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Provincial Higher Education Institutions, China, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of United States (Grant Nos. R01AR060350, R01CA91713, and R01AR055179).

  8. High Speed, High Temperature, Fault Tolerant Operation of a Combination Magnetic-Hydrostatic Bearing Rotor Support System for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark; Montague, Gerald; Provenza, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Closed loop operation of a single, high temperature magnetic radial bearing to 30,000 RPM (2.25 million DN) and 540 C (1000 F) is discussed. Also, high temperature, fault tolerant operation for the three axis system is examined. A novel, hydrostatic backup bearing system was employed to attain high speed, high temperature, lubrication free support of the entire rotor system. The hydrostatic bearings were made of a high lubricity material and acted as journal-type backup bearings. New, high temperature displacement sensors were successfully employed to monitor shaft position throughout the entire temperature range and are described in this paper. Control of the system was accomplished through a stand alone, high speed computer controller and it was used to run both the fault-tolerant PID and active vibration control algorithms.

  9. The proton temperature and the total hourly variance of the magnetic field components in different solar wind speed regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Chuan-Yi; Freeman, John W.; Lopez, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison has been made between the predictions of the theory for radial variations of both Alfvenic fluctuations and solar wind proton temperatures proposed by Tu (1987, 1988) and the statistical results of hourly averaged plasma and magnetic field data observed by Helios 1 and 2 from launch through 1980 for different solar wind speed regimes. The comparison shows that for speed ranges between 500-800 km/s, the radial variation of the proton temperature between 0.3 and 1 AU can be explained by heating from the cascade energy which is determined by the radial variation of the total variance of magnetic field vector.

  10. A wave tank study of the dependence of X band cross sections on wind speed and water temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Mary Ruth; Keller, William C.; Plant, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying the water temperature, wind speed, and wind stress on the values of backscatter were investigated using measurements of normalized radar cross sections of wind-generated waves, made at X band for both vertical and horizontal polarization for incidence angles 10, 28, 48, and 68 deg. The experiment was conducted using the Naval Research Laboratory wind-wave tank. Measurements made for a wide range of wind speeds and water temperatures are compared with results of backscattering models currently in use.

  11. A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Temperature Gradients on the Deformation and Burst Speeds of Rotating Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilterdink, P I; Holms, A G; Manson, S S

    1952-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation were to evaluate the influence of temperature gradients and to test the validity of a recently developed method of calculating plastic flow in disks by comparing the calculated results with experimental observations. Short-time spin tests on parallel-sided, 10-inch-diameter disks were conducted under conditions that subject the disks to a range of temperatures from 70 to 1440 F. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results was good over the range of temperature conditions investigated. Temperature gradients produced little reduction in the burst speed of the disks which had a high ductility..

  12. Maximization of beta-galactosidase production: a simultaneous investigation of agitation and aeration effects.

    PubMed

    Alves, Fernanda Germano; Filho, Francisco Maugeri; de Medeiros Burkert, Janaína Fernandes; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the agitation and aeration effects in the maximization of the beta-galactosidase production from Kluyveromyces marxianus CCT 7082 were investigated simultaneously, in relation to the volumetric enzyme activity and the productivity, as well as the analysis of the lactose consumption and production of glucose, and galactose of this process. Agitation and aeration effects were studied in a 2 L batch stirred reactor. A central composite design (2(2) trials plus three central points) was carried out. Agitation speed varied from 200 to 500 rpm and aeration rate from 0.5 to 1.5 vvm. It has been shown in this study that the volumetric enzyme production was strongly influenced by mixing conditions, while aeration was shown to be less significant. Linear models for activity and productivity due to agitation and aeration were obtained. The favorable condition was 500 rpm and 1.5 vvm, which lead to the best production of 17 U mL(-1) for enzymatic activity, 1.2 U mL(-1) h(-1) for productivity in 14 h of process, a cellular concentration of 11 mg mL(-1), and a 167.2 h(-1) volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient. PMID:19517069

  13. Worldwide influence of Lamb Weather Types on Temperature, Precipitation and Wind Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, Nicola; Torralba, Veronica; Bretonnière, Pierre-Antoine; Gonzalez-Reviriego, Nube; Peña-Angulo, Dhais; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco Javier

    2016-04-01

    One of the main objectives of synoptic climatology is the detection of large-scale atmospheric drivers determining local climate variability. Especially in the extra-tropical regions, synoptic circulation plays an important role in driving local climate; for example, it is known that Atlantic weather fronts are responsible of a high amount of winter precipitation in Europe. In this research, the Weather Type catalogue developed by Lamb to classify the continuum of the atmospheric circulation in 10-26 classes was obtained individually at each grid point of the mean sea level pressure Era-Interim dataset (spatial resolution 0.7°), spanning the whole world. Although the analysis was performed globally, Tropical and Polar regions were excluded, the former because the Coriolis effect is weak at 0-23° N-S (nullifying the vorticity index), and the latter due to the spatial distortion of the Lamb grid at very high latitudes. Each resulting Weather Type was related to the local observed average daily 2-m Temperature, Precipitation and 10-m Wind speed anomalies from Era-Interim during last 30 years (1985-2014) to identify the Weather Types that behave as climate drivers at seasonal and yearly time scale. While some countries and regions have already been analysed in detail individually at higher spatial and/or temporal resolutions, this study provides a global view, filling the existing gap in literature, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere (South Africa, South America, Australia) and over oceans, providing a bigger picture of the influence of Weather Types on climate.

  14. Spontaneous knotting of an agitated string.

    PubMed

    Raymer, Dorian M; Smith, Douglas E

    2007-10-16

    It is well known that a jostled string tends to become knotted; yet the factors governing the "spontaneous" formation of various knots are unclear. We performed experiments in which a string was tumbled inside a box and found that complex knots often form within seconds. We used mathematical knot theory to analyze the knots. Above a critical string length, the probability P of knotting at first increased sharply with length but then saturated below 100%. This behavior differs from that of mathematical self-avoiding random walks, where P has been proven to approach 100%. Finite agitation time and jamming of the string due to its stiffness result in lower probability, but P approaches 100% with long, flexible strings. We analyzed the knots by calculating their Jones polynomials via computer analysis of digital photos of the string. Remarkably, almost all were identified as prime knots: 120 different types, having minimum crossing numbers up to 11, were observed in 3,415 trials. All prime knots with up to seven crossings were observed. The relative probability of forming a knot decreased exponentially with minimum crossing number and Möbius energy, mathematical measures of knot complexity. Based on the observation that long, stiff strings tend to form a coiled structure when confined, we propose a simple model to describe the knot formation based on random "braid moves" of the string end. Our model can qualitatively account for the observed distribution of knots and dependence on agitation time and string length.

  15. Effect of temperature on leg kinematics in sprinting tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi): high speed may limit hydraulic joint actuation

    PubMed Central

    Booster, N. A.; Su, F. Y.; Adolph, S. C.; Ahn, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tarantulas extend the femur–patella (proximal) and tibia–metatarsal (distal) joints of their legs hydraulically. Because these two hydraulically actuated joints are positioned in series, hemolymph flow within each leg is expected to mechanically couple the movement of the joints. In the current study, we tested two hypotheses: (1) at lower temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints within a leg will be less coupled because of increased hemolymph viscosity slowing hemolymph flow; and (2) at higher temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints will be less coupled because the higher stride frequencies limit the time available for hemolymph flow. We elicited maximal running speeds at four ecologically relevant temperatures (15, 24, 31 and 40°C) in Texas Brown tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi). The spiders increased sprint speed 2.5-fold over the temperature range by changing their stride frequency but not stride length. The coefficient of determination for linear regression (R2) of the proximal and distal joint angles was used as the measure of the degree of coupling between the two joints. This coupling coefficient between the proximal and distal joint angles, for both forelegs and hind­legs, was significantly lowest at the highest temperature at which the animals ran the fastest with the highest stride frequencies. The coordination of multiple, in-series hydraulically actuated joints may be limited by operating speed. PMID:25833132

  16. Enhancement of USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for High-Speed High-Temperature Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.

    2009-01-01

    Large temperature and pressure fluctuations have a profound effect on turbulence development in transonic and supersonic jets. For high-speed, high-temperature jet flows, standard turbulence models lack the ability to predict the observed mixing rate of a shear layer. Several proposals to address this deficiency have been advanced in the literature to modify the turbulence transport equations in a variety of ways. In the present study, some of the most proven and simple modifications to two-equation turbulence models have been selected and implemented in NASA's USM3D tetrahedral Navier-Stokes flow solver. The modifications include the addition of compressibility correction and pressure dilatation terms in the turbulence transport equations for high-speed flows, and the addition of a simple modification to the Boussinesq's closure model coefficient for high-temperature jets. The efficacy of the extended models is demonstrated by comparison with experimental data for two supersonic axisymmetric jet test cases at design pressure ratio.

  17. Changes in body surface temperature during speed endurance work-out in highly-trained male sprinters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, Paweł; Straburzyńska-Lupa, Anna; Kusy, Krzysztof; Kantanista, Adam; Zieliński, Jacek

    2016-09-01

    The mechanism of thermoregulatory adaptation to exercise cannot yet be fully explained, however, infrared thermography (IRT) seems to have potential for monitoring physiological changes during exercise and training. It is a non-contact and easy to use technology to measure heat radiation from the body surface. The objective of the study was to examine the temperature changes over time on lower limbs in sprinters during speed endurance training session. Eight sprinters, specialized in distances 100 m and 200 m, aged 21-29 years, members of the Polish national team, were evaluated during an outdoor speed endurance work-out. Their track session comprised of warm-up, specific drills for sprinting technique, and speed endurance exercise. The surface temperature of lower limbs was measured and thermal images were taken using infrared camera after each part of the session. The speed endurance training session brought about specific time course of body surface (legs) temperature. The warm-up induced a significant decline in surface temperature by ∼2.5 °C, measured both on the front and back of lower limbs (p < 0.001), followed by a temperature stabilization until the end of the session. No significant asymmetry between the front and back sides of legs was observed. Body surface temperature may help identify an individual optimal time to terminate warm up and start the main part of the training session. It may also be useful for the assessment of muscle activity symmetry in cyclical activities, such as sprint running. This is of particular relevance when a training session is performed outdoors in changeable weather conditions.

  18. [Increased risk of suicide in patients with agitated depression].

    PubMed

    Kenchadze, V G; Chkoniia, E D; Sikharulidze, G G

    2009-12-01

    In our study we aimed to verify the clinical features of agitated depression, which intensify suicidal trends leading to completed suicide. From 477 patients with agitated depression we selected 126, who presented high risk of suicide and studded them by using Mood Anxiety Inventory. On the bases of the structural-dynamic analyses we determine seven clinical variations of agitated-depression with prominent affective, cognitive, psychomotor, somato-algetic and behavioral symptoms. The most dangerous types with regards of suicidal behavior appeared to be senestopathic and algetic types and agitated depression with depersonalization and derealization. PMID:20090153

  19. Thermal analysis and temperature characteristics of a braking resistor for high-speed trains for changes in the braking current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Dong; Kang, Hyun-Il; Shim, Jae-Myung

    2015-09-01

    Electric brake systems are used in high-speed trains to brake trains by converting the kinetic energy of a railway vehicle to electric energy. The electric brake system consists of a regenerative braking system and a dynamic braking system. When the electric energy generated during the dynamic braking process is changed to heat through the braking resistor, the braking resistor can overheat; thus, failures can occur to the motor block. In this paper, a braking resistor for a high-speed train was used to perform thermal analyses and tests, and the results were analyzed. The analyzed data were used to estimate the dependence of the brake currents and the temperature rises on speed changes up to 300 km/h, at which a test could not be performed.

  20. Optimization of Aeration and Agitation Rate for Lipid and Gamma Linolenic Acid Production by Cunninghamella bainieri 2A1 in Submerged Fermentation Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Normah; Abdeshahian, Peyman; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar

    2014-01-01

    The locally isolated filamentous fungus Cunninghamella bainieri 2A1 was cultivated in a 5 L bioreactor to produce lipid and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). The optimization was carried out using response surface methodology based on a central composite design. A statistical model, second-order polynomial model, was adjusted to the experimental data to evaluate the effect of key operating variables, including aeration rate and agitation speed on lipid production. Process analysis showed that linear and quadratic effect of agitation intensity significantly influenced lipid production process (P < 0.01). The quadratic model also indicated that the interaction between aeration rate and agitation speed had a highly significant effect on lipid production (P < 0.01). Experimental results showed that a lipid content of 38.71% was produced in optimum conditions using an airflow rate and agitation speed of 0.32 vvm and 599 rpm, respectively. Similar results revealed that 0.058 (g/g) gamma-linolenic acid was produced in optimum conditions where 1.0 vvm aeration rate and 441.45 rpm agitation rate were used. The regression model confirmed that aeration and agitation were of prime importance for optimum production of lipid in the bioreactor. PMID:25610901

  1. Dependence of mycelial morphology on impeller type and agitation intensity.

    PubMed

    Jüsten, P; Paul, G C; Nienow, A W; Thomas, C R

    1996-12-20

    The influence of the agitation conditions on the morphology of Penicillium chrysogenum (freely dispersed and aggregated forms) was examined using radial (Rushton turbines and paddles), axial (pitched blades, propeller, and Prochem Maxflow T), and counterflow impellers (Intermig). Culture broth was taken from a continuous fermentation at steady state and was agitated for 30 min in an ungassed vessel of 1.4-L working volume. The power inputs per unit volume of liquid in the tank, P/V(L), ranged from 0.6 to 6 kW/m(3). Image analysis was used to measure mycelial morphology. To characterize the intensity of the damage caused by different impellers, the mean total hyphal length (freely dispersed form) and the mean projected area (all dispersed types, i.e., also including aggregates) were used. [In this study, breakage of aggregates was taken into account quantitatively for the first time.]At 1.4-L scale and a given P/V(L), changes in the morphology depended significantly on the impeller geometry. However, the morphological data (obtained with different geometries and various P/V(L)) could be correlated on the basis of equal tip speed and two other, less simple, mixing parameters. One is based on the specific energy dissipation rate in the impeller region, which is simply related to P/V(L) and particular impeller geometrical parameters. The other which is developed in this study is based on a combination of the specific energy dissipation rate in the impeller swept volume and the frequency of mycelial circulation through that volume. For convenience, the function arising from this concept is called the "energy dissipation/circulation" function.To test the broader validity of these correlations, scale-up experiments were carried out in mixing tanks of 1.4, 20, and 180 L using a Rushton turbine and broth from a fed-batch fermentation. The energy dissipation/circulation function was a reasonable correlating parameter for hyphal damage over this range of scales, whereas tip

  2. Trends and abrupt changes in 104 years of ice cover and water temperature in a dimictic lake in response to air temperature, wind speed, and water clarity drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Madeline R.; Wu, Chin H.; Robertson, Dale M.; Lathrop, Richard C.; Hamilton, David P.

    2016-05-01

    The one-dimensional hydrodynamic ice model, DYRESM-WQ-I, was modified to simulate ice cover and thermal structure of dimictic Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, USA, over a continuous 104-year period (1911-2014). The model results were then used to examine the drivers of changes in ice cover and water temperature, focusing on the responses to shifts in air temperature, wind speed, and water clarity at multiyear timescales. Observations of the drivers include a change in the trend of warming air temperatures from 0.081 °C per decade before 1981 to 0.334 °C per decade thereafter, as well as a shift in mean wind speed from 4.44 m s-1 before 1994 to 3.74 m s-1 thereafter. Observations show that Lake Mendota has experienced significant changes in ice cover: later ice-on date(9.0 days later per century), earlier ice-off date (12.3 days per century), decreasing ice cover duration (21.3 days per century), while model simulations indicate a change in maximum ice thickness (12.7 cm decrease per century). Model simulations also show changes in the lake thermal regime of earlier stratification onset (12.3 days per century), later fall turnover (14.6 days per century), longer stratification duration (26.8 days per century), and decreasing summer hypolimnetic temperatures (-1.4 °C per century). Correlation analysis of lake variables and driving variables revealed ice cover variables, stratification onset, epilimnetic temperature, and hypolimnetic temperature were most closely correlated with air temperature, whereas freeze-over water temperature, hypolimnetic heating, and fall turnover date were more closely correlated with wind speed. Each lake variable (i.e., ice-on and ice-off dates, ice cover duration, maximum ice thickness, freeze-over water temperature, stratification onset, fall turnover date, stratification duration, epilimnion temperature, hypolimnion temperature, and hypolimnetic heating) was averaged for the three periods (1911-1980, 1981-1993, and 1994-2014) delineated by

  3. Influence of thermal agitation on the electric field induced precessional magnetization reversal with perpendicular easy axis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hongguang Deng, Ning

    2013-12-15

    We investigated the influence of thermal agitation on the electric field induced precessional magnetization switching probability with perpendicular easy axis by solving the Fokker-Planck equation numerically with finite difference method. The calculated results show that the thermal agitation during the reversal process crucially influences the switching probability. The switching probability can be achieved is only determined by the thermal stability factor Δ of the free layer, it is independent on the device dimension, which is important for the high density device application. Ultra-low error rate down to the order of 10{sup −9} can be achieved for the device of thermal stability factor Δ of 40. Low damping factor α material should be used for the free layer for high reliability device applications. These results exhibit potential of electric field induced precessional magnetization switching with perpendicular easy axis for ultra-low power, high speed and high density magnetic random access memory (MRAM) applications.

  4. Particle-liquid mass transfer in three-phase mechanically agitated contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kushalkar, K.B.; Pangarkar, V.G. . Dept. of Chemical Technology)

    1994-07-01

    Mass transfer to or from solid particles suspended in an agitated liquid is relevant to many chemical processes such as adsorption, crystallization, fermentation, slurry reactors, extraction of metals, polymer processing, waste water treatment, etc. Particle-liquid mass transfer in a three-phase mechanically agitated contactor has been studied. The experiments covered a broad range of particle sizes, liquid viscosities, and gas velocities besides variations in system geometry. The impellers used were upflow pitched blade turbine (PTU), downflow pitched blade turbine (PTD), the disk turbine (DT). The results indicated a unique relationship of the particle-liquid mass-transfer coefficient with respect to the critical suspension speed under gassed conditions, N[sub sg]. This observation has resulted in a simplified correlation for the particle-liquid mass-transfer coefficient.

  5. The effect of agitation on the biodegradation of hydrocarbon contaminants in soil slurries.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Jacqueline L; Paton, Graeme I; Semple, Kirk T

    2009-09-01

    Slurry-based mineralisation assays are widely used to investigate contaminant biodegradation in soil; however, the importance of shaking speed on microbial degradation has not been considered. This study investigated the mineralisation of (14)C-analogues of phenanthrene, hexadecane and octacosane, shaken at 0, 25 and 100 rpm. The results showed that the fastest rates and highest levels of mineralisation in 0 d aged soils were in the highly agitated conditions (100 rpm). However, the highest levels of mineralisation in 500 d aged soil were found in the gently shaken conditions (25 rpm), with the levels of mineralisation significantly (p<0.05) one third higher than under the highly agitated conditions (100 rpm). Consequently, estimation of the maximum levels of biodegradation of organic contaminants in aged soil systems should be considered under gentle mixing conditions. PMID:19487012

  6. Influence of extruder temperature and screw speed on pretreatment of corn stover while varying enzymes and their ratios.

    PubMed

    Karunanithy, Chinnadurai; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan

    2010-09-01

    Pretreatment is being the first and most expensive step, it has pervasive impacts on all other steps in overall conversion process. There are several pretreatment methods using physical, chemical, and biological principles which are under various stages of investigation. Extrusion can be used as one of the physical pretreatment methods towards biofuel production. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of barrel temperature and screw speed on sugar recovery from corn stover, to select a suitable enzyme combination and its ratio. Corn stover was pretreated in a single screw extruder with five screw speeds (25, 50, 75, 100, and 125 rpm) and five barrel temperatures (25, 50, 75, 100, and 125 degrees C). In order to select a suitable enzyme combination and ratio, different levels of cellulase and beta-glucosidase, multienzyme complex and beta-glucosidase were used during saccharification of pretreated corn stover. From the statistical analysis, it was found that screw speed and temperature had a significant effect on sugar recovery from corn stover. Higher glucose, xylose, and combined sugar recovery of 75, 49, and 61%, respectively, were recorded at 75 rpm and 125 degrees C. This pretreatment condition resulted in 2.0, 1.7, and 2.0 times higher than the control sample using 1:4 cellulase and beta-glucosidase combination.

  7. Instantaneous 2D Velocity and Temperature Measurements in High Speed Flows Based on Spectrally Resolved Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for high speed flows is described for the simultaneous, instantaneous measurement of gas temperature and velocity at a number (up to about one hundred) of locations in a plane illuminated by an injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. Molecular Rayleigh scattered light is collected and passed through a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. The resulting image is analyzed to determine the gas temperature and bulk velocity at each of the regions. The Cramer Rao lower bound for measurement uncertainty is calculated. Experimental data is presented for a free jet and for preliminary measurements in the Lewis 4 inch by 10 inch supersonic wind tunnel.

  8. Effect of Preferred Music on Agitation After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyun; Williams, Reg Arthur; Lee, Donghyun

    2016-04-01

    Agitation is a common behavioral problem after traumatic brain injury (TBI), which threatens the safety of patients and caregivers and disrupts the rehabilitation process. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a preferred music intervention on the reduction of agitation in TBI patients and to compare the effects of preferred music with those of classical "relaxation" music. A single group, within-subjects, randomized crossover trial design was formed, consisting of 14 agitated patients with cognitive impairment after severe TBI. Patients listened to preferred music and classical "relaxation" music, with a wash-out period in between. Patients listening to the preferred music reported a significantly greater reduction in agitation compared with the effect seen during the classical "relaxation" music intervention (p = .046). These findings provide preliminary evidence that the preferred music intervention may be effective as an environmental therapeutic approach for reducing agitation after TBI.

  9. Effect of Agitation on Crystallization Behavior of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O-CaF2 Mold Fluxes with Varying Basicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangling; Shu, Qifeng; Chou, Kuochih

    2015-08-01

    The effect of agitation on crystallization behaviors of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O-CaF2 mold fluxes with basicity of 1.1 and 1.2 was investigated. It was found that crystallization temperatures of agitated samples were higher than those of static samples. The morphology of cuspidine shifted from dendrites to facet crystals with the decrease of temperature. The agitation was conducive to the formation of small dendritic cuspidine and could lead to crystals with smaller size. Crystalline fraction could be significantly enhanced by agitation at the initial stage of crystallization.

  10. High-speed mixture fraction and temperature imaging of pulsed, turbulent fuel jets auto-igniting in high-temperature, vitiated co-flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorge, Michael J.; Arndt, Christoph; Fuest, Frederik; Meier, Wolfgang; Sutton, Jeffrey A.

    2014-07-01

    In this manuscript, we describe an experimental approach to simultaneously measure high-speed image sequences of the mixture fraction and temperature fields during pulsed, turbulent fuel injection into a high-temperature, co-flowing, and vitiated oxidizer stream. The quantitative mixture fraction and temperature measurements are determined from 10-kHz-rate planar Rayleigh scattering and a robust data processing methodology which is accurate from fuel injection to the onset of auto-ignition. In addition, the data processing is shown to yield accurate temperature measurements following ignition to observe the initial evolution of the "burning" temperature field. High-speed OH* chemiluminescence (CL) was used to determine the spatial location of the initial auto-ignition kernel. In order to ensure that the ignition kernel formed inside of the Rayleigh scattering laser light sheet, OH* CL was observed in two viewing planes, one near-parallel to the laser sheet and one perpendicular to the laser sheet. The high-speed laser measurements are enabled through the use of the unique high-energy pulse burst laser system which generates long-duration bursts of ultra-high pulse energies at 532 nm (>1 J) suitable for planar Rayleigh scattering imaging. A particular focus of this study was to characterize the fidelity of the measurements both in the context of the precision and accuracy, which includes facility operating and boundary conditions and measurement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The mixture fraction and temperature fields deduced from the high-speed planar Rayleigh scattering measurements exhibited SNR values greater than 100 at temperatures exceeding 1,300 K. The accuracy of the measurements was determined by comparing the current mixture fraction results to that of "cold", isothermal, non-reacting jets. All profiles, when properly normalized, exhibited self-similarity and collapsed upon one another. Finally, example mixture fraction, temperature, and OH* emission

  11. Modeling Air Stripping of Ammonia in an Agitated Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Kofi, Adu-Wusu; Martino, Christopher J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Bennett, William M.; Peters, Robert s.

    2005-11-29

    A model has been developed to predict the rate of removal of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) from solution in a sparged agitated vessel. The model is first-order with respect to liquid-phase concentration of NH{sub 3}. The rate constant for the first-order equation is a function of parameters related to the vessel/impeller characteristics, the air/liquid properties as well as the process conditions. However, the vessel/impeller characteristics, the air/liquid properties, and the process conditions reduce the rate constant dependence to only three parameters, namely, the air sparge rate, the liquid volume or batch size, and the Henry's law constant of NH{sub 3} for the liquid or solution. Thus, the rate of removal is not mass-transfer limited. High air sparge rates, high temperatures, and low liquid volumes or batch sizes increase the rate of removal of NH{sub 3} from solution. The Henry's law constant effect is somewhat reflected in the temperature since Henry's law constant increases with increasing temperature. Data obtained from actual air stripping operation agree fairly well with the model predictions.

  12. The effect of mild agitation on in vitro erythroid development.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Daniela; Murphy, William G; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2010-08-31

    The cultivation of erythroid cells at large scale would have to be performed in suitable bioreactors which would most likely employ some mode of agitation to ensure optimal mass and gas transfer and prevent culture inhomogeneity. The effect of low agitation at 15-20 rpm on ex vivo erythropoiesis of PB CD34+ derived cultures was investigated and found to have significant impact on erythroid development. Agitated cultures showed a reduced lag phase and increased cell expansion during the early stages of culture. Additionally, agitation accelerated erythroid differentiation as seen by the loss of early development markers, acquisition of late erythroid markers and premature cell cycle arrest, although not yielding higher fractions of terminally differentiated cells in comparison to stationary culture. However, agitation at 20 rpm led to significantly increased loss of cell viability after day 15 in culture, an effect that could be reduced by decreasing the agitation rate to 15 rpm. On the one hand these results imply that agitation may improve cell yields and reduce expensive cytokine-dependent early culture stages but on the other hand it might introduce the risk of increased cell death in large scale culture.

  13. Assessment of pain and agitation in critically ill infants.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, A S

    1999-09-01

    Critically ill infants are subjected to many painful experiences that, if inadequately treated, can have severe physiological and psychological consequences. Optimal management of pain relies on the adequacy of nurses' assessment; this, however, is complicated by another common condition, agitation. A multidimensional assessment is therefore necessary to adequately identify pain and agitation. The aim of this descriptive study was to identify the cues that nurses caring for critically ill infants use to assess pain and agitation. A questionnaire, developed from the literature, was distributed to all registered nurses (85) working in the neonatal and paediatric intensive care units of an Australian teaching hospital. Questionnaires were completed by 41 nurses (a 57 per cent response rate). Results revealed that, except for diagnosis, there were no significant differences between the cues participants used to assess pain and those to assess agitation. Nurses used numerous cues from various sources: most importantly, their own judgement (99 per cent); the parents' judgement (90 per cent); the infant's environment; documentation (78 per cent), and the infant's cues (70 per cent). These findings demonstrate the relevance of the nurse's role in assessment of pain and agitation in critically ill infants. Nurses used cues specific to the critically ill rather than the less sick infant. Results of this study also show the difficulty of differentiating between pain and agitation. Further research on ways of distinguishing between the construct of pain and agitation needs to be undertaken.

  14. Simulation of effects of direction and air flow speed on temperature distribution in the room covered by various roof materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukanto, H.; Budiana, E. P.; Putra, B. H. H.

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this research is to get a comparison of the distribution of the room temperature by using three materials, namely plastic-rubber composite, clay, and asbestos. The simulation used Ansys Fluent to get the temperature distribution. There were two conditions in this simulations, first the air passing beside the room and second the air passing in front of the room. Each condition will be varied with the air speed of 1 m/s, 2 m/s, 3 m/s, 4 m/s, 5 m/s for each material used. There are three heat transfers in this simulation, namely radiation, convection, and conduction. Based on the ANSI/ ASHRAE Standard 55-2004, the results of the simulation showed that the best temperature distribution was the roof of plastic-rubber composites.

  15. Nanocellulose Composite Materials Synthesizes with Ultrasonic Agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Timothy; Folken, Andrew; Fritch, Byron; Bradley, Derek

    We have extended current techniques in forming nanocellulose composite solids, suspensions and aerogels to enhance the breakdown of cellulose into its molecular components. Using only mechanical processing which includes ball milling, using a simple mortar and pestle, and ultrasonic agitation, we are able to create very low concentration uniform nanocellulose suspensions in water, as well as incorporate other materials such as graphite, carbon nanotubes, and magnetic materials. Of interest is that no chemical processing is necessary, nor is the use of nanoparticles, necessary for composite formation. Using both graphite and carbon nanotubes, we are able to achieve conducting nanocellulose solids and aerogels. Standard magnetic powder can also be incorporated to create magnetic solids. The technique also allows for the creation of an extremely fine nanocellulose suspension in water. Using extremely low concentrations, less than 1% cellulose by mass, along with careful control over processing parameters, we are able to achieve highly dilute, yet homogenous nanocellulose suspensions. When air dried, these suspensions have similar hardness and strength properties to those created with more typical starting cellulose concentrations (2-10%). However, when freeze-dried, these dilute suspensions form aerogels with a new morphology with much higher surface area than those with higher starting concentrations. We are currently examining the effect of this higher surface area on the properties of nanocellulose aerogel composites and how it influences the impact of incorporating nanocellulose into other polymer materials.

  16. Agitated Honeybees Exhibit Pessimistic Cognitive Biases

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Melissa; Desire, Suzanne; Gartside, Sarah E.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Whether animals experience human-like emotions is controversial and of immense societal concern [1–3]. Because animals cannot provide subjective reports of how they feel, emotional state can only be inferred using physiological, cognitive, and behavioral measures [4–8]. In humans, negative feelings are reliably correlated with pessimistic cognitive biases, defined as the increased expectation of bad outcomes [9–11]. Recently, mammals [12–16] and birds [17–20] with poor welfare have also been found to display pessimistic-like decision making, but cognitive biases have not thus far been explored in invertebrates. Here, we ask whether honeybees display a pessimistic cognitive bias when they are subjected to an anxiety-like state induced by vigorous shaking designed to simulate a predatory attack. We show for the first time that agitated bees are more likely to classify ambiguous stimuli as predicting punishment. Shaken bees also have lower levels of hemolymph dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin. In demonstrating state-dependent modulation of categorization in bees, and thereby a cognitive component of emotion, we show that the bees' response to a negatively valenced event has more in common with that of vertebrates than previously thought. This finding reinforces the use of cognitive bias as a measure of negative emotional states across species and suggests that honeybees could be regarded as exhibiting emotions. Video Abstract PMID:21636277

  17. High-speed microfluidic thermal stimulator for temperature-activated ion channel studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Thomas; Wang, Jianbin; Hua, Susan Z.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we have designed and built a microfluidic thermal chip that provides rapid temperature changes in the solution combined with accurate temperature control. The thermal chip was designed to facilitate the patch-clamp to study temperature dependent activities of ion channels. The device consists of a fluid channel for perfusing solution connected to an accessible reservoir for making patch-clamp measurements on individual cells. A thin film platinum heater was used to generate rapid temperature change and the temperature was monitored using a thin film resistor. The thermal chip was constructed using SU-8 materials on glass wafer to minimize the heat loss to the substrate and channel walls. The chip was characterized for various flow rates ranging from 0.0093 mL/min to 0.0507 mL/min with heater power ranging from 2.7 to 19.4 mW. The heating element is capable of alternating the temperature ranging from bath temperature (20°C) to 90°C at maximum heating rate of 1°C/10 ms. Using the chip, patch clamp recordings were made on cultured HEK cells as the temperature was rapidly varied. The results demonstrated that the thermal chip could be used as a thermal clamp for many thermosensitive ion channel studies.

  18. Effects of individualized music on confused and agitated elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gerdner, L A; Swanson, E A

    1993-10-01

    The Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold Model in conjunction with an identified theoretical basis provides a framework for the use of individualized music in individuals with Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type (DAT). The effects of individualized music is explored in five elderly patients who are confused and agitated and residing in a long-term care facility. The Modified Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory is used to measure the outcome. The immediate and 1-hour residual effects suggest the potential of individualized music as an alternative approach to the management of agitation in confused elderly patients.

  19. Speed over efficiency: locusts select body temperatures that favour growth rate over efficient nutrient utilization

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gabriel A.; Clissold, Fiona J.; Mayntz, David; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Ectotherms have evolved preferences for particular body temperatures, but the nutritional and life-history consequences of such temperature preferences are not well understood. We measured thermal preferences in Locusta migratoria (migratory locusts) and used a multi-factorial experimental design to investigate relationships between growth/development and macronutrient utilization (conversion of ingesta to body mass) as a function of temperature. A range of macronutrient intake values for insects at 26, 32 and 38°C was achieved by offering individuals high-protein diets, high-carbohydrate diets or a choice between both. Locusts placed in a thermal gradient selected temperatures near 38°C, maximizing rates of weight gain; however, this enhanced growth rate came at the cost of poor protein and carbohydrate utilization. Protein and carbohydrate were equally digested across temperature treatments, but once digested both macronutrients were converted to growth most efficiently at the intermediate temperature (32°C). Body temperature preference thus yielded maximal growth rates at the expense of efficient nutrient utilization. PMID:19625322

  20. Speed over efficiency: locusts select body temperatures that favour growth rate over efficient nutrient utilization.

    PubMed

    Miller, Gabriel A; Clissold, Fiona J; Mayntz, David; Simpson, Stephen J

    2009-10-22

    Ectotherms have evolved preferences for particular body temperatures, but the nutritional and life-history consequences of such temperature preferences are not well understood. We measured thermal preferences in Locusta migratoria (migratory locusts) and used a multi-factorial experimental design to investigate relationships between growth/development and macronutrient utilization (conversion of ingesta to body mass) as a function of temperature. A range of macronutrient intake values for insects at 26, 32 and 38 degrees C was achieved by offering individuals high-protein diets, high-carbohydrate diets or a choice between both. Locusts placed in a thermal gradient selected temperatures near 38 degrees C, maximizing rates of weight gain; however, this enhanced growth rate came at the cost of poor protein and carbohydrate utilization. Protein and carbohydrate were equally digested across temperature treatments, but once digested both macronutrients were converted to growth most efficiently at the intermediate temperature (32 degrees C). Body temperature preference thus yielded maximal growth rates at the expense of efficient nutrient utilization. PMID:19625322

  1. Micro acoustic resonant chambers for heating/agitating/mixing (MARCHAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Noell, Aaron C.; Fisher, Anita M.; Takano, Nobuyuki; Grunthaner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A variety of applications require the mixing and/or heating of a slurry made from a powder/fluid mixture. One of these applications, Sub Critical Water Extraction (SCWE), is a process where water and an environmental powder sample (sieved soil, drill cuttings, etc.) are heated in a sealed chamber to temperatures greater than 200 degrees Celsius by allowing the pressure to increase, but without reaching the critical point of water. At these temperatures, the ability of water to extract organics from solid particulate increases drastically. This paper describes the modeling and experimentation on the use of an acoustic resonant chamber which is part of an amino acid detection instrument called Astrobionibbler [Noell et al. 2014, 2015]. In this instrument we use acoustics to excite a fluid- solid fines mixture in different frequency/amplitude regimes to accomplish a variety of sample processing tasks. Driving the acoustic resonant chamber at lower frequencies can create circulation patterns in the fluid and mixes the liquid and fines, while driving the chamber at higher frequencies one can agitate the fluid and powder and create a suspension. If one then drives the chamber at high amplitude at resonance heating of the slurry occurs. In the mixing and agitating cell the particle levitation force depends on the relative densities and compressibility's of the particulate and fluid and on the kinetic and potential energy densities associated with the velocity and pressure fields [Glynne-Jones, Boltryk and Hill 2012] in the cell. When heating, the piezoelectric transducer and chamber is driven at high power in resonance where the solid/fines region is modelled as an acoustic transmission line with a large loss component. In this regime, heat is pumped into the solution/fines mixture and rapidly heats the sample. We have modeled the piezoelectric transducer/chamber/ sample using Mason's equivalent circuit. In order to assess the validity of the model we have built and

  2. Influence of particles on the loading capacity and the temperature rise of water film in Ultra-high speed hybrid bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Aibin; Li, Pei; Zhang, Yefan; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Xiaoyang

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-high speed machining technology enables high efficiency, high precision and high integrity of machined surface. Previous researches of hybrid bearing rarely consider influences of solid particles in lubricant and ultra-high speed of hybrid bearing, which cannot be ignored under the high speed and micro-space conditions of ultra-high speed water-lubricated hybrid bearing. Considering the impact of solid particles in lubricant, turbulence and temperature viscosity effects of lubricant, the influences of particles on pressure distribution, loading capacity and the temperature rise of the lubricant film with four-step-cavity ultra-high speed water-lubricated hybrid bearing are presented in the paper. The results show that loading capacity of the hybrid bearing can be affected by changing the viscosity of the lubricant, and large particles can improve the bearing loading capacity higher. The impact of water film temperature rise produced by solid particles in lubricant is related with particle diameter and minimum film thickness. Compared with the soft particles, hard particles cause the more increasing of water film temperature rise and loading capacity. When the speed of hybrid bearing increases, the impact of solid particles on hybrid bearing becomes increasingly apparent, especially for ultra-high speed water-lubricated hybrid bearing. This research presents influences of solid particles on the loading capacity and the temperature rise of water film in ultra-high speed hybrid bearings, the research conclusions provide a new method to evaluate the influence of solid particles in lubricant of ultra-high speed water-lubricated hybrid bearing, which is important to performance calculation of ultra-high speed hybrid bearings, design of filtration system, and safe operation of ultra-high speed hybrid bearings.

  3. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti, Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  4. Fast calibration of speed-of-sound using temperature prior in whole-body small animal optoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Subhamoy; Nasonova, Elena; Deán-Ben, X. L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The speed of sound (SoS) in the imaged sample and in the coupling medium is an important parameter in optoacoustic tomography that must be specified in order to accurately restore maps of local optical absorbance. In this work, several hybrid focusing functions are described that successfully determine the most suitable SoS based on post-reconstruction images. The SoS in the coupling medium (water) can be determined from temperature readings. Thereby, this value is suggested to be used as an initial guess for faster SoS calibration in the reconstruction of tissues having a different SoS than water.

  5. Computer modeling of the sensitivity of a laser water vapor sensor to variations in temperature and air speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, George F.

    1994-01-01

    Currently, there is disagreement among existing methods of determining atmospheric water vapor concentration at dew-points below -40 C. A major source of error is wall effects which result from the necessity of bringing samples into the instruments. All of these instruments also have response times on the order of seconds. NASA Langley is developing a water vapor sensor which utilizes the absorption of the infrared radiation produced by a diode laser to estimate water vapor concentration. The laser beam is directed through an aircraft window to a retroreflector located on an engine. The reflected beam is detected by an infrared detector located near the laser. To maximize signal to noise, derivative signals are analyzed. By measuring the 2f/DC signal and correcting for ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure and air speed (which results in a Doppler shifting of the laser beam), the water vapor concentration can be retrieved. Since this is an in situ measurement there are no wall effects and measurements can be made at a rate of more than 20 per second. This allows small spatial variations of water vapor to be studied. In order to study the sensitivity of the instrument to variations in temperature and air speed, a computer program which generated the 2f, 3f, 4f, DC and 2f/DC signals of the instrument as a function of temperature, pressure and air speed was written. This model was used to determine the effect of errors in measurement of the temperature and air speed on the measured water vapor concentration. Future studies will quantify the effect of pressure measurement errors, which are expected to be very small. As a result of these studied, a retrieval algorithm has been formulated, and will be applied to data taken during the PEM-West atmospheric science field mission. Spectroscopic studies of the water vapor line used by the instrument will be used to refine this algorithm. To prepare for these studies, several lasers have been studied to determine their

  6. Flunitrazepam: psychomotor impairment, agitation and paradoxical reactions.

    PubMed

    Bramness, Jørgen G; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Mørland, Jørg

    2006-06-01

    Benzodiazepines are sedatives used for anxiolysis, hypnosis, muscle relaxation and the treatment of epilepsy. Paradoxical reactions including agitation, talkativeness, confusion, disinhibition, aggression, violent behavior and loss of impulse control may, however, occur in some subjects. It has been claimed that high doses of flunitrazepam may cause aggression on a more regular basis in all individuals. The present study makes use of a Norwegian forensic toxicological database containing analytical results from drivers suspected of driving under the influence and suspects of violent crime to analyze the relationship between behavior and blood flunitrazepam concentration. Four-hundred and fifteen cases of drivers suspected of driving under the influence and seven cases of suspects of violent crime were studied. These selected cases had flunitrazepam as the only drug in blood samples and had been evaluated by a clinical test for impairment (CTI) performed by a police physician at the time of blood sampling. The impaired drivers had higher blood flunitrazepam concentrations than the not impaired drivers. Multivariate analysis revealed that both blood flunitrazepam concentration and age of the suspected drivers had independent impact on impairment, indicating tolerance with age. Most of the effects measured were sedative effects of flunitrazepam and these effects were related to flunitrazepam level. Possible paradoxical reactions were observed in a subgroup of 23 individuals (6%), but these reactions did not relate to blood flunitrazepam concentration. The suspects of violent crime showed similar degree impairment and had not more paradoxical reactions than the suspected drugged drivers. The findings were in agreement with other research that claims paradoxical reactions should be viewed as a reaction in certain individuals, and does not support the notion that flunitrazepam in high concentration produces aggression in all individuals taking the drug.

  7. 91. VIEW OF PORTLAND FILTER VACUUM RECEIVER FROM NORTHWEST. AGITATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW OF PORTLAND FILTER VACUUM RECEIVER FROM NORTHWEST. AGITATORS No. 4 AND No. 5 VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  8. Aeroelasticity-based fluid agitation for lab-on-chips.

    PubMed

    Xia, H M; Wang, Z P; Wang, W; Fan, W; Wijaya, A; Wang, Z F

    2013-04-21

    In this study, we report a robust agitation method for small-volume liquids. It utilizes an elastic diaphragm as the bottom of a liquid chamber, upon which an initial tension is also applied to enhance the aeroelasticity effects at small/micro scales. As a result, spontaneous vibration of the diaphragm can be induced by an external air flow, which further provides fluid agitations. The device structure is simple and can be easily fabricated at low cost. More importantly, the vibration amplitude is controllable and varies widely from several tens to several hundred micrometers depending on the applied air pressure. The resulting agitation is effective and applicable at high viscosities of up to 900 cSt. The influences of air pressure and liquid viscosity on the vibration frequency are discussed. Potential applications of this technique for solid particle agitation, focusing and fluid mixing are also demonstrated.

  9. 6. VIEW OF BRINING TANK Older, redwood model. Paddles agitated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BRINING TANK Older, redwood model. Paddles agitated the skins while they soaked in brine. The skins were then hung to dry. - Sealing Plant, St. George Island, Pribilof Islands, Saint George, Aleutians West Census Area, AK

  10. Hydrodynamic effects on cell growth in agitated microcarrier bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1988-01-01

    The net growth rate of bovine embryonic kidney cells in microcarrier bioreactor is the result of a variable death rate imposed on a cell culture trying to grow at a constant intrinsic growth rate. The death rate is a function of the agitation conditions in the system, and increases at higher agitation because of increasingly energetic interactions of the cell covered microcarriers with turbulent eddies in the fluid. At very low agitation rates bead-bead bridging becomes important; the large clumps formed by bridging can interact with larger eddies than single beads, leading to a higher death rate at low agitation. The growth and death rate were correlated with a dimensionless eddy number which compares eddy forces to the buoyant force on the bead.

  11. Aeroelasticity-based fluid agitation for lab-on-chips.

    PubMed

    Xia, H M; Wang, Z P; Wang, W; Fan, W; Wijaya, A; Wang, Z F

    2013-04-21

    In this study, we report a robust agitation method for small-volume liquids. It utilizes an elastic diaphragm as the bottom of a liquid chamber, upon which an initial tension is also applied to enhance the aeroelasticity effects at small/micro scales. As a result, spontaneous vibration of the diaphragm can be induced by an external air flow, which further provides fluid agitations. The device structure is simple and can be easily fabricated at low cost. More importantly, the vibration amplitude is controllable and varies widely from several tens to several hundred micrometers depending on the applied air pressure. The resulting agitation is effective and applicable at high viscosities of up to 900 cSt. The influences of air pressure and liquid viscosity on the vibration frequency are discussed. Potential applications of this technique for solid particle agitation, focusing and fluid mixing are also demonstrated. PMID:23455690

  12. Improved heat treating through change in agitation and quenchant

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzmacher, W.R.; Walter, M.

    1996-12-31

    Recognized relationships of as-quenched hardness to quenchant agitation severity and quenchant type provide the heat treater with the ability to serve the customer. This paper provides examples of how the use of data bases helped the conversion from oil to polymer in a variable agitated impeller quench. Also discussed are the apparent improvements in quench capability and as quenched properties in the conversion to polymer.

  13. Period Tripling Causes Rotating Spirals in Agitated Wet Granular Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Rehberg, Ingo

    2011-07-01

    Pattern formation of a thin layer of vertically agitated wet granular matter is investigated experimentally. Rotating spirals with three arms, which correspond to the kinks between regions with different colliding phases, are the dominating pattern. This preferred number of arms corresponds to period tripling of the agitated granular layer, unlike predominantly subharmonic Faraday crispations in dry granular matter. The chirality of the spatiotemporal pattern corresponds to the rotation direction of the spirals.

  14. Methods for determining enzymatic activity comprising heating and agitation of closed volumes

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David Neil; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Reed, David William; Jensen, Jill Renee

    2016-03-15

    Methods for determining thermophilic enzymatic activity include heating a substrate solution in a plurality of closed volumes to a predetermined reaction temperature. Without opening the closed volumes, at least one enzyme is added, substantially simultaneously, to the closed volumes. At the predetermined reaction temperature, the closed volumes are agitated and then the activity of the at least one enzyme is determined. The methods are conducive for characterizing enzymes of high-temperature reactions, with insoluble substrates, with substrates and enzymes that do not readily intermix, and with low volumes of substrate and enzyme. Systems for characterizing the enzymes are also disclosed.

  15. Some Effects of Injection Advance Angle, Engine-Jacket Temperature, and Speed on Combustion in a Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1936-01-01

    An optical indicator and a high-speed motion-picture camera capable of operating at the rate of 2,000 frames per second were used to record simultaneously the pressure development and the flame formation in the combustion chamber of the NACA combustion apparatus. Tests were made at engine speeds of 570 and 1,500 r.p.m. The engine-jacket temperature was varied from 100 degrees to 300 degrees F. And the injection advance angle from 13 degrees after top center to 120 degrees before top center. The results show that the course of the combustion is largely controlled by the temperature and pressure of the air in the chamber from the time the fuel is injected until the time at which combustion starts and by the ignition lag. The conclusion is presented that in a compression-ignition engine with a quiescent combustion chamber the ignition lag should be the longest that can be used without excessive rates of pressure rise; any further shortening of the ignition lag decreased the effective combustion of the engine.

  16. Evaluating the Uncertainties in the Electron Temperature and Radial Speed Measurements Using White Light Corona Eclipse Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginald, Nelson L.; Davilla, Joseph M.; St. Cyr, O. C.; Rastaetter, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    We examine the uncertainties in two plasma parameters from their true values in a simulated asymmetric corona. We use the Corona Heliosphere (CORHEL) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around the Sphere (MAS) models in the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) to investigate the differences between an assumed symmetric corona and a more realistic, asymmetric one. We were able to predict the electron temperatures and electron bulk flow speeds to within +/-0.5 MK and +/-100 km s(exp-1), respectively, over coronal heights up to 5.0 R from Sun center.We believe that this technique could be incorporated in next-generation white-light coronagraphs to determine these electron plasma parameters in the low solar corona. We have conducted experiments in the past during total solar eclipses to measure the thermal electron temperature and the electron bulk flow speed in the radial direction in the low solar corona. These measurements were made at different altitudes and latitudes in the low solar corona by measuring the shape of the K-coronal spectra between 350 nm and 450 nm and two brightness ratios through filters centered at 385.0 nm/410.0 nm and 398.7 nm/423.3 nm with a bandwidth of is approximately equal to 4 nm. Based on symmetric coronal models used for these measurements, the two measured plasma parameters were expected to represent those values at the points where the lines of sight intersected the plane of the solar limb.

  17. Highly sensitive detection and stochastic analysis of magnetization agitation induced in a single layered magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu; Motoi, Keiichi; Miyajima, Hideki

    2016-03-01

    This study shows that broadband magnetic noise in a ferromagnetic wire can be detected over a wide frequency range between 500 MHz and 8 GHz using a lock-in detection technique. The magnetic noise spectrum from a 20 nm-thick single-layered Fe19Ni81 wire biased with a dc current is measured as functions of an external field and dc current. This noise is caused by thermal agitation in magnetization due to ambient temperature and Joule heating. The noise behaviors are well reproduced by a stochastic model. Thus, this paper presents a stochastic analysis of magnetic noise behaviors induced by thermal agitation using a highly sensitive technique for detecting the magnetic noise in a single layered ferromagnetic wire.

  18. Imaging of temperature distribution and retinal tissue changes during photocoagulation by high speed OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Heike H.; Ptaszynski, Lars; Schlott, Kerstin; Bonin, Tim; Bever, Marco; Koinzer, Stefan; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2011-03-01

    Considerable improvement in the reproducibility of retinal photocoagulation is expected if degree and extend of the heat-induced tissue damage can be visualized on-line during the treatment. Experimental laser treatments of the retina with enucleated pig eyes were investigated by high speed phase-sensitive OCT. OCT could visualize the increase of tissue scattering during the photocoagulation in a time-resolved way. Immediate and late tissue changes were visualized with more than 15 µm resolution. Changes of the reflectance in the OCT images had a similar sensitivity in detecting tissue changes than macroscopic imaging. By using Doppler OCT slight movements of the tissue in the irradiated spot were detected. At low irradiance the thermal expansion of the tissue is observed. At higher irradiance irreversible tissue changes dominate the tissue expansion. OCT may play an important role in understanding the mechanisms of photocoagulation. This may lead to new treatment strategies. First experiments with rabbits demonstrate the feasibility of in-vivo measurements.

  19. High-speed measurement of an air transect's temperature shift heated by laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, WenYu; Jiang, ZongFu; Xi, Fengjie; Li, Qiang; Xie, Wenke

    2005-02-01

    Laser beam heat the air on the optic path, Beam-deflection optical tomography is a non-intrusive method to measure the 2-dimension temperature distribution in the transect. By means of linear Hartmann Sensor at the rate of 27kHz, the optic path was heated by a 2.7μm HF laser, continuous and high time resolution gradients of optic phase were obtained. the result of analysing and calculation showed the temperament shift in the heated beam path was not higher than 50K when the HF laser power was 9W. The experiment showed that it is a practical non-intrusive temperature shift measurement method for a small area aero-optical medium.

  20. Increasing temperature speeds intracellular PO2 kinetics during contractions in single Xenopus skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Koga, S; Wüst, R C I; Walsh, B; Kindig, C A; Rossiter, H B; Hogan, M C

    2013-01-01

    Precise determination of the effect of muscle temperature (T(m)) on mitochondrial oxygen consumption kinetics has proven difficult in humans, in part due to the complexities in controlling for T(m)-related variations in blood flow, fiber recruitment, muscle metabolism, and contractile properties. To address this issue, intracellular Po(2) (P(i)(O(2))) was measured continuously by phosphorescence quenching following the onset of contractions in single Xenopus myofibers (n = 24) while controlling extracellular temperature. Fibers were subjected to two identical contraction bouts, in random order, at 15°C (cold, C) and 20°C (normal, N; n = 12), or at N and 25°C (hot, H; n = 12). Contractile properties were determined for every contraction. The time delay of the P(i)(O(2)) response was significantly greater in C (59 ± 35 s) compared with N (35 ± 26 s, P = 0.01) and H (27 ± 14 s, P = 0.01). The time constant for the decline in P(i)(O(2)) was significantly greater in C (89 ± 34 s) compared with N (52 ± 15 s; P < 0.01) and H (37 ± 10 s; P < 0.01). There was a linear relationship between the rate constant for P(i)(O(2)) kinetics and T(m) (r = 0.322, P = 0.03). Estimated ATP turnover was significantly greater in H than in C (P < 0.01), but this increased energy requirement alone with increased T(m) could not account for the differences observed in P(i)(O(2)) kinetics among conditions. These results demonstrate that P(i)(O(2)) kinetics in single contracting myofibers are dependent on T(m), likely caused by temperature-induced differences in metabolic demand and by temperature-dependent processes underlying mitochondrial activation at the start of muscle contractions.

  1. Apparatus and method for generating large mass flow of high temperature air at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabol, A. P.; Stewart, R. B. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    High temperature, high mass air flow and a high Reynolds number test air flow in the Mach number 8-10 regime of adequate test flow duration is attained by pressurizing a ceramic-lined storage tank with air to a pressure of about 100 to 200 atmospheres. The air is heated to temperatures of 7,000 to 8,000 R prior to introduction into the tank by passing the air over an electric arc heater means. The air cools to 5,500 to 6,000 R while in the tank. A decomposable gas such as nitrous oxide or a combustible gas such as propane is injected into the tank after pressurization and the heated pressurized air in the tank is rapidly released through a Mach number 8-10 nozzle. The injected gas medium upon contact with the heated pressurized air effects an exothermic reaction which maintains the pressure and temperature of the pressurized air during the rapid release.

  2. Riverine skin temperature response to subsurface processes in low wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumer, Sophia E.; Zappa, Christopher J.; Anderson, Steven P.; Dugan, John P.

    2016-03-01

    Both surface and subsurface processes modulate the surface thermal skin and as such the skin temperature may serve as an indicator for coastal, estuarine, and alluvial processes. Infrared (IR) imagery offers the unique tool to survey such systems, allowing not only to assess temperature variability of the thermal boundary layer, but also to derive surface flow fields through digital particle image velocimetry, optical flow techniques, or spectral methods. In this study, IR time-series imagery taken from a boat moored in the Hudson River estuary is used to determine surface flow, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, and characteristic temperature and velocity length scales. These are linked to subsurface measurements provided by in situ instruments. Under the low wind conditions and weak stratification, surface currents and dissipation rate are found to reflect subsurface mean flow (r2 = 0.89) and turbulence (r2 = 0.75). For relatively low dissipation rates, better correlations are obtained by computing dissipation rates directly from wavenumber spectra rather than when having to assume the validity of the Taylor hypothesis. Furthermore, the subsurface dissipation rate scales with the surface length scales (L) and mean flow (U) using ɛ ∝ U3/L (r2 = 0.9). The surface length scale derived from the thermal fields is found to have a strong linear relationship (r2 = 0.88) to water depth (D) with (D/L) ˜ 13. Such a relation may prove useful for remote bathymetric surveys when no waves are present.

  3. Magnetically driven agitation in a tube mixer affords clog-resistant fast mixing independent of linear velocity.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Sarah J; Nyrop, Jason L; Kuethe, Jeffrey T

    2011-02-01

    An economical and simple flow mixer based on magnetically driven agitation in a tube (MDAT) is reported. Mixing via MDAT compared favorably to both Tee and multilaminar mixers at low flow and was successfully used to screen and optimize two challenging organometallic reactions at low temperature without clogging or the need for high dilution. PMID:21235265

  4. Large Area Divertor Temperature Measurements Using A High-speed Camera With Near-infrared FiIters in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, B C; Zweben, S J; Gray, T K; Hosea, J; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; Maqueda, R J; McLean, A G; Roquemore, A L; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2011-04-05

    Fast cameras already installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have be equipped with near-infrared (NIR) filters in order to measure the surface temperature in the lower divertor region. Such a system provides a unique combination of high speed (> 50 kHz) and wide fi eld-of-view (> 50% of the divertor). Benchtop calibrations demonstrated the system's ability to measure thermal emission down to 330 oC. There is also, however, signi cant plasma light background in NSTX. Without improvements in background reduction, the current system is incapable of measuring signals below the background equivalent temperature (600 - 700 oC). Thermal signatures have been detected in cases of extreme divertor heating. It is observed that the divertor can reach temperatures around 800 oC when high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating is used. These temperature profiles were fi t using a simple heat diffusion code, providing a measurement of the heat flux to the divertor. Comparisons to other infrared thermography systems on NSTX are made.

  5. 1064-nm Nd:YAG and 980-nm Diode Laser EDTA Agitation on the Retention of an Epoxy-Based Sealer to Root Dentin.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Helena Suleiman de; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Rached-Júnior, Fuad Jacob; Oliveira, Ligia Teixeira de; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa; Raucci-Neto, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Root canal irrigants are used to minimize the negative effects of smear layer on endodontic sealer retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of agitation of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with ultrasonic, 1064-nm Nd:YAG and 980-nm diode laser on the retention of an epoxy-based sealer to the root canal walls. Forty single-rooted bovine teeth were instrumented with ProTaper rotary system and divided into four groups according to the final irrigation protocol (n = 10): (1) 17% EDTA (control); (2) 17% EDTA with 50-s ultrasonic agitation; (3) 17% EDTA with 50-s diode laser (2-W) agitation; and (4) 17% EDTA with 50-s Nd:YAG (1.5-W) laser agitation. After endodontic filling with gutta-percha F5 master cone and Sealer 26, the roots were sectioned at the cervical, middle, and apical root thirds to obtain 1.5-mm slices. Push-out tests were performed using a universal testing machine at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). Apical root thirds had significant higher retention values than cervical and middle thirds (p < 0.05). EDTA with 1064-nm Nd:YAG or 980-nm diode laser presented the highest retention values and was significantly different from EDTA with ultrasonic agitation and EDTA only (p < 0.05). Adhesive failures were predominant to EDTA only group. Mixed failures were predominant to all agitation groups. 1064-nm Nd:YAG and 980-nm diode laser EDTA agitation enhanced the retention of the epoxy-based sealer to the root canal walls compared with that due to EDTA only or EDTA with ultrasonic agitation. PMID:27652705

  6. 1064-nm Nd:YAG and 980-nm Diode Laser EDTA Agitation on the Retention of an Epoxy-Based Sealer to Root Dentin.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Helena Suleiman de; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Rached-Júnior, Fuad Jacob; Oliveira, Ligia Teixeira de; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa; Raucci-Neto, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Root canal irrigants are used to minimize the negative effects of smear layer on endodontic sealer retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of agitation of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with ultrasonic, 1064-nm Nd:YAG and 980-nm diode laser on the retention of an epoxy-based sealer to the root canal walls. Forty single-rooted bovine teeth were instrumented with ProTaper rotary system and divided into four groups according to the final irrigation protocol (n = 10): (1) 17% EDTA (control); (2) 17% EDTA with 50-s ultrasonic agitation; (3) 17% EDTA with 50-s diode laser (2-W) agitation; and (4) 17% EDTA with 50-s Nd:YAG (1.5-W) laser agitation. After endodontic filling with gutta-percha F5 master cone and Sealer 26, the roots were sectioned at the cervical, middle, and apical root thirds to obtain 1.5-mm slices. Push-out tests were performed using a universal testing machine at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). Apical root thirds had significant higher retention values than cervical and middle thirds (p < 0.05). EDTA with 1064-nm Nd:YAG or 980-nm diode laser presented the highest retention values and was significantly different from EDTA with ultrasonic agitation and EDTA only (p < 0.05). Adhesive failures were predominant to EDTA only group. Mixed failures were predominant to all agitation groups. 1064-nm Nd:YAG and 980-nm diode laser EDTA agitation enhanced the retention of the epoxy-based sealer to the root canal walls compared with that due to EDTA only or EDTA with ultrasonic agitation.

  7. The Relation Between Wind Speed and Air-Sea Temperature Difference in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer off Northwest Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Wind speed and atmospheric stability have an important role in determining the turbulence in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) as well as the surface wave field. The understanding of MABL dynamics in northwest Europe is complicated by fetch effects, the proximity of coastlines, shallow topography, and larger scale circulation patterns (e.g., cold air outbreaks). Numerical models have difficulty simulating the marine atmospheric boundary layer in coastal areas and partially enclosed seas, and this is partly due to spatial resolution problems at coastlines. In these offshore environments, the boundary layer processes are often best understood directly from time series measurements from fixed platforms or buoys, in spite of potential difficulties from platform flow distortion as well as the spatial sparseness of the data sets. This contribution presents the results of time series measurements from offshore platforms in the North Sea and Norwegian Sea in terms of a summary diagnostic - wind speed versus air-sea temperature difference (U-ΔT) - with important implications for understanding atmospheric boundary layer processes. The U-ΔT diagram was introduced in earlier surveys of data from coastal (Sletringen; O.J. Andersen and J. Løvseth, J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn., 57, 97-109, 1995) and offshore (Statfjord A; K.J. Eidsvik, Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 32, 103-132, 1985) sites in northwest Europe to summarize boundary layer conditions at a given location. Additional information from a series of measurement purpose-built offshore measurement and oil/gas production platforms from the southern North Sea to the Norwegian Sea illustrates how the wind characteristics vary spatially over large distances, highlighting the influence of cold air outbreaks, in particular. The results are important for the offshore wind industry because of the way that wind turbines accrue fatigue damage in different conditions of atmospheric stability and wind speed.

  8. Observations During GRIP from HIRAD: Images of C-Band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Jones, W. L.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Biswas, S.; May, C.; Shah, G.; Black, P.; Buckley, C. D.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD (Hurricane Imaging Radiometer) flew on the WB-57 during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be inferred. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years. The advantage of HIRAD over SFMR is that HIRAD can observe a +/- 60-degree swath, rather than a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP campaign will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. To the extent possible, comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the GRIP campaign, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eyewall, location of vortex wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  9. A compact single-camera system for high-speed, simultaneous 3-D velocity and temperature measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Louise; Sick, Volker; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2013-09-01

    The University of Michigan and Sandia National Laboratories collaborated on the initial development of a compact single-camera approach for simultaneously measuring 3-D gasphase velocity and temperature fields at high frame rates. A compact diagnostic tool is desired to enable investigations of flows with limited optical access, such as near-wall flows in an internal combustion engine. These in-cylinder flows play a crucial role in improving engine performance. Thermographic phosphors were proposed as flow and temperature tracers to extend the capabilities of a novel, compact 3D velocimetry diagnostic to include high-speed thermometry. Ratiometric measurements were performed using two spectral bands of laser-induced phosphorescence emission from BaMg2Al10O17:Eu (BAM) phosphors in a heated air flow to determine the optimal optical configuration for accurate temperature measurements. The originally planned multi-year research project ended prematurely after the first year due to the Sandia-sponsored student leaving the research group at the University of Michigan.

  10. Finite element modal formulation for panel flutter at hypersonic speeds and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanfeng

    A finite element time domain modal formulation for analyzing flutter behavior of aircraft surface panels in hypersonic airflow has been developed and presented for the first time. Von Karman large deflection plate theory is used for description of the structural nonlinearity and third order piston theory is employed to account for the aerodynamic nonlinearity. The thermal loadings of uniformly distributed temperature and temperature gradients across the panel thickness are incorporated into the finite element formulation. By applying the modal reduction technique, the number of governing equations of motion is reduced dramatically so that the computational time of direct numerical integration is dropped significantly. All possible types of panel behavior, including flat, buckled but dynamically stable, limit cycle oscillation (LCO), periodic motion, and chaotic motion can be observed and analyzed. As examples of the applications of the proposed methodology, flutter responses of isotropic, specially orthotropic and laminated composite panels are investigated. Special emphasis is put on the boundary between LCO and chaos, as well as the routes to chaos. A systematic mode filtering procedure that helps mode selection without specific knowledge of the complex mode shapes is presented and illustrated. Influences of aerodynamic parameters, including aerodynamic damping and Mach number, on the panel flutter responses are studied. The importance of nonlinear aerodynamic terms is examined in detail. The supporting conditions and panel aspect ratio on the onset condition of chaos are also investigated as an illustration of optimization among different design options. Several mathematical tools, including the time history, phase plane plot, Poincare map, and bifurcation diagram are employed in the chaos study. The largest Lyapunov exponent is also evaluated to assist in detection of chaos. It is found that at low or moderately high nondimensional dynamic pressures, the

  11. Managing verbal agitation in people with dementia and delirium.

    PubMed

    Inkley, Francesca; Goldberg, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Patients with dementia and delirium in acute hospitals can exhibit verbal agitation, but there is no research on rate of occurrence or how ward staff manage such behaviour. This service evaluation aimed to measure rate of occurrence of verbal agitation in confused older inpatients and understand the management strategies used by staff. An agitation inventory was completed daily by the nursing team for all verbally agitated patients on eight older person wards over two weeks. Six semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff and three hours of non-participant observations were undertaken. A mean 6% (13/223) of patients were verbally agitated each day. Management strategies included trial and error, distraction and engagement, reassurance, communication and familiarity. Staff did not adopt a systematic approach to care planning due to lack of training and support on the ward, as well as scarce resources in terms of staff, space and activities. Research is needed to develop and evaluate interventions that support staff to care for these patients.

  12. Using high-resolution fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing to measure spatially resolved speed and temperature of airflows in a shallow gully

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christoph; Sayde, Chadi; Selker, John

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel observational technique that was applied to study transient shallow cold-air drainages and pools in undulating terrain in weak-wind conditions. Wind speed and air temperature at thousands of closely co-located locations were measured simultaneously at high spatial (0.25m) and temporal (5s) resolution using paired passive and actively heated optical fibers with a distributed temperature sensing system (DTS). The fibers were deployed in a transect across a shallow gully with a total length of 230 m at three levels (0.5, 1, and 2m above ground level) during the Shallow Cold Pool (SCP) Experiment in Northern Colorado, USA in October and November 2012. While we previously demonstrated that air temperature and the thermal structure of the near-surface turbulence can be observed with the DTS technique (Thomas et al., 2012, Zeeman et al., 2014), the novelty here consists of additionally measuring wind speed on horizontal scales of several hundreds of meters with fine resolution. Analogous to a hot-wire anemometer, the approach is based on the principal of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface. We present the theoretical basis for the DTS wind and temperature measurements and validate it against point observations from sonic anemometers and thermo-hygrometers. A space-time analysis of the near-surface gully flow and temperature field is presented based upon the observations subject to an orthogonal multi-resolution decomposition for selected cases. The temporal variability of near-surface air temperature was largest half-way up the slope caused be shifts of the very sharp thermal boundary between the density driven cold-air drainage flow in the gully bottom and the lower density air on the slopes, which was significantly warmed by enhanced downward mixing of sensible heat in the lee of the gully shoulder. Stationary horizontal temperature gradients at this thermal boundary amounted to 6 to 8 K m-1 and persisted for several hours unless

  13. Nicotine withdrawal and agitation in ventilated critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Smoking is highly addictive, and nicotine abstinence is associated with withdrawal syndrome in hospitalized patients. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of sudden nicotine abstinence on the development of agitation and delirium, and on morbidities and outcomes in critically ill patients who required respiratory support, either noninvasive ventilation or intubation, and mechanical ventilation. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study in two intensive care units (ICUs). The 144 consecutive patients admitted to ICUs and requiring mechanical ventilation for >48 hours were included. Smoking status was assessed at ICU admission by using the Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence (FTND). Agitation, with the Sedation-Agitation Scale (SAS), and delirium, with the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC), were tested twice daily during the ICU stay. Agitation and delirium were defined by SAS >4 and ICDSC >4, respectively. Nosocomial complications and outcomes were evaluated. Results Smokers (n = 44) were younger and more frequently male and were more likely to have a history of alcoholism and to have septic shock as the reason for ICU admission than were nonsmokers. The incidence of agitation, but not delirium, increased significantly in the smoker group (64% versus 32%; P = 0.0005). Nicotine abstinence was associated with higher incidences of self-removal of tubes and catheters, and with more interventions, including the need for supplemental sedatives, analgesics, neuroleptics, and physical restraints. Sedation-free days, ventilator-free days, length of stay, and mortality in ICUs did not differ between groups. Multivariate analysis identified active smoking (OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.45-6.74; P = 0.003) as an independent risk factor for agitation. Based on a subgroup of 56 patients, analysis of 28 pairs of patients (smokers and nonsmokers in a 1:1 ratio) matched for age, gender, and alcoholism status found similar results

  14. Mass transfer from bubbles and drops in; mechanically agitated apparatuses

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, V.A.; Belevitskaya, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    Mass transfer from bubbles and drops moving in a turbulent flow is analyzed on the basis of relationships for the flow of a liquid and turbulence damping in the vicinity of the interface being distorted and information on the behavior of the dispersed-phase elements in mechanically agitated apparatuses. Several relations for calculating linear and volumetric mass-transfer coefficients for agitated liquid-gas and liquid-liquid systems are obtained. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data available in the literature.

  15. Application of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs to large agitators

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.E.; Anderson, T.D. ); Bethmann, H.K. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the basis for and implementation of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs for large tank-mounted agitators. This modification to the original design was intended to minimize maintenance personnel exposure to ionizing radiation and also provide for disassembly capability without damage to shafts or hubs. In addition to realizing these objectives, test confirmed that the modified couplings reduced agitator shaft end runouts approximately 65%, thereby reducing bearing loads and increasing service life, a significant enhancement for a nuclear facility. 5 refs.

  16. Application of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs to large agitators

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.E.; Anderson, T.D.; Bethmann, H.K.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the basis for and implementation of hydraulically assembled shaft coupling hubs for large tank-mounted agitators. This modification to the original design was intended to minimize maintenance personnel exposure to ionizing radiation and also provide for disassembly capability without damage to shafts or hubs. In addition to realizing these objectives, test confirmed that the modified couplings reduced agitator shaft end runouts approximately 65%, thereby reducing bearing loads and increasing service life, a significant enhancement for a nuclear facility. 5 refs.

  17. Coal storage hopper with vibrating-screen agitator

    DOEpatents

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1982-04-27

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyer mechanism. The vibrating scrren agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  18. Influence of Commercial Saturated Monoglyceride, Mono-/Diglycerides Mixtures, Vegetable Oil, Stirring Speed, and Temperature on the Physical Properties of Organogels

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Amador, Omar Gerardo; Huang, Qingrong; Rocha-Guzman, Nuria Elizabeth; Moreno-Jimenez, Martha Rocio; Gonzalez-Laredo, Ruben F.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of gelator, vegetable oil, stirring speed, and temperature on the physical properties of obtained organogels. They were prepared under varying independent conditions and applying a fractional experimental design. From there a rheological characterization was developed. The physical characterization also included polarized light microscopy and calorimetric analysis. Once these data were obtained, X-Ray diffraction was applied to selected samples and a microstructure lattice was confirmed. Commonly, the only conditions that affect crystallization have been analyzed (temperature, solvent, gelator, and cooling rate). We found that stirring speed is the most important parameter in the organogel preparation. PMID:26904637

  19. Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Sensible heat models

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpinsky, E.

    1995-12-01

    Transient models for sensible heat were developed to assess the thermal performance of agitated vessels with coils and jackets. Performance is quantified with the computation of heat-transfer coefficients by introducing vessel heating and cooling data into model equations. Of the two model categories studied, differential and macroscopic, the latter is preferred due to mathematical simplicity and lower sensitivity to experimental data variability.

  20. Mechanisms of cell damage in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1986-01-01

    Cells growing on microcarriers may be damaged by collisions of the microcarrier against another microcarrier or the reactor agitator. Bead-bead collisions are caused by small-scale turbulence, which can also cause high local shear stress on the cells. The cells are also exposed to 10-20 Hz cyclic shear stress by bead rotation.

  1. Management of agitation and aggression associated with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Clive G; Gauthier, Serge; Cummings, Jeffrey L; Brodaty, Henry; Grossberg, George T; Robert, Philippe; Lyketsos, Constantine G

    2009-05-01

    Agitation and aggression are frequently occurring and distressing behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). These symptoms are disturbing for individuals with Alzheimer disease, commonly confer risk to the patient and others, and present a major management challenge for clinicians. The most widely prescribed pharmacological treatments for these symptoms-atypical antipsychotics-have a modest but significant beneficial effect in the short-term treatment (over 6-12 weeks) of aggression but limited benefits in longer term therapy. Benefits are less well established for other symptoms of agitation. In addition, concerns are growing over the potential for serious adverse outcomes with these treatments, including stroke and death. A detailed consideration of other pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches to agitation and aggression in patients with Alzheimer disease is, therefore, imperative. This article reviews the increasing evidence in support of psychological interventions or alternative therapies (such as aromatherapy) as a first-line management strategy for agitation, as well as the potential pharmacological alternatives to atypical antipsychotics-preliminary evidence for memantine, carbamazepine, and citalopram is encouraging.

  2. Phonological studies of the new gas-induced agitated reactor using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C; Hsu, Y C; Wang, S F

    2001-06-01

    An ozone-induced agitated reactor has been found to be very effective in degrading industrial wastewater. However, the cost of the ozone generation as well as its short residence time in reactors has restricted its application in a commercial scale. An innovated gas-induced draft tube installed inside a conventional agitated reactor was proved to effectively retain the ozone in a reactor. The setup was demonstrated to significantly promote the ozone utilization rate up to 96% from the conventional rate of 60% above the onset speed. This work investigates the mixing mechanism of an innovated gas-induced reactor for the future scale-up design by using the technique of computational fluid dynamics. A three-dimensional flow model was proposed to compute the liquid-gas free surface as well as the flow patterns inside the reactor. The turbulent effects generated by two 45 degrees pitch-blade turbines were considered and the two phases mixing phenomena were also manipulated by the Eulerian-Eulerian techniques. The consistency of the free surface profiles and the fluid flow patterns proved a good agreement between computational results and the experimental observation. PMID:11482384

  3. Finite Element Modelling of the effect of tool rake angle on tool temperature and cutting force during high speed machining of AISI 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, S.; Roshan, A.; Ariffin, M. K. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a Finite Element Method (FEM) based on the ABAQUS explicit software which involves Johnson-Cook material model was used to simulate cutting force and tool temperature during high speed machining (HSM) of AISI 4340 steel. In this simulation work, a tool rake angle ranging from 0° to 20° and a range of cutting speeds between 300 to 550 m/min was investigated. The purpose of this simulation analysis was to find optimum tool rake angle where cutting force is smallest as well as tool temperature is lowest during high speed machining. It was found that cutting forces to have a decreasing trend as rake angle increased to positive direction. The optimum rake angle observed between 10° and 18° due to decrease of cutting force as 20% for all simulated cutting speeds. In addition, increasing cutting tool rake angle over its optimum value had negative influence on tool's performance and led to an increase in cutting temperature. The results give a better understanding and recognition of the cutting tool design for high speed machining processes.

  4. Sb52Se36Te12 material with high-temperature data retention coupled with rapid crystallization speed for phase change application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liangliang; Song, Sannian; Song, Zhitang; Li, Le; zhang, Zhonghua; Zheng, Yonghui; Zheng, Qianqian; Zhang, Xin; Zhu, Xiuwei; Shao, Hehong

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, Sb52Se36Te12 is proposed for its good data retention and extremely rapid crystallization speed. Compared with usual Ge2Sb2Te5, Sb52Se36Te12 exhibits a higher crystallization temperature of 196 ○C, a better thermal stability, indicating a brilliant performance for data retention of 10 years at 121 ○C, and a much faster switching speed, which is demonstrated by an electric pulse as short as 8 ns that can fulfil the set operation. Thus, Sb52Se36Te12 could be expected to have a wide application in the fields of phase change memory with rapid crystallization speed and high-temperature data retention.

  5. Electron Temperatures and Flow Speeds of the Low Solar Corona: MACS Results from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 in Libya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginald, Nelson L.; Davila, Joseph M.; SaintCyr, O.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Hassler, Donald M.; Gashut, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in conjunction with the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya to measure both the electron temperature and its flow speed simultaneously at multiple locations in the low solar corona by measuring the visible K-coronal spectrum. Coronal model spectra incorporating the effects of electron temperature and its flow speed were matched with the measured K-coronal spectra to interpret the observations. Results show electron temperatures of (1.10 +/- 0.05) MK, (0.70 +/- 0.08) MK, and (0.98 +/- 0.12) MK, at 1.1 Solar Radius from Sun center in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and (0.93 +/- 0.12) MK, at 1.2 Solar Radius from Sun center in the solar west. The corresponding outflow speeds obtained from the spectral fit are (103 +/- 92) km/s, (0 + 10) km/s, (0+10) km/s, and (0+10) km/s. Since the observations were taken only at 1.1 Solar Radius and 1.2 Solar Radius from Sun center, these speeds, consistent with zero outflow, are in agreement with expectations and provide additional confirmation that the spectral fitting method is working. The electron temperature at 1.1 Solar Radius from Sun center is larger at the north (polar region) than the east and west (equatorial region).

  6. Temperature-dependent differences in the nonlinear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents revealed by high-speed imaging and bulk acoustics.

    PubMed

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Tang, Mengxing; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Previous work by the authors has established that increasing the temperature of the suspending liquid from 20°C to body temperature has a significant impact on the bulk acoustic properties and stability of an ultrasound contrast agent suspension (SonoVue, Bracco Suisse SA, Manno, Lugano, Switzerland). In this paper the influence of temperature on the nonlinear behavior of microbubbles is investigated, because this is one of the most important parameters in the context of diagnostic imaging. High-speed imaging showed that raising the temperature significantly influences the dynamic behavior of individual microbubbles. At body temperature, microbubbles exhibit greater radial excursion and oscillate less spherically, with a greater incidence of jetting and gas expulsion, and therefore collapse, than they do at room temperature. Bulk acoustics revealed an associated increase in the harmonic content of the scattered signals. These findings emphasize the importance of conducting laboratory studies at body temperature if the results are to be interpreted for in vivo applications.

  7. Estimation of turbulence dissipation rate by Large eddy PIV method in an agitated vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysela, Bohuš; Jašíková, Darina; Konfršt, Jiří; Šulc, Radek; Ditl, Pavel

    2015-05-01

    The distribution of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate is important for design of mixing apparatuses in chemical industry. Generally used experimental methods of velocity measurements for measurement in complex geometries of an agitated vessel disallow measurement in resolution of small scales close to turbulence dissipation ones. Therefore, Particle image velocity (PIV) measurement method improved by large eddy Ply approach was used. Large eddy PIV method is based on modeling of smallest eddies by a sub grid scale (SGS) model. This method is similar to numerical calculations using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and the same SGS models are used. In this work the basic Smagorinsky model was employed and compared with power law approximation. Time resolved PIV data were processed by Large Eddy PIV approach and the obtained results of turbulent kinetic dissipation rate were compared in selected points for several operating conditions (impeller speed, operating liquid viscosity).

  8. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  9. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  10. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  11. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid service. (a) Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  12. Syndrome of agitated delirium and visual impairment: a manifestation of medial temporo-occipital infarction.

    PubMed

    Medina, J L; Chokroverty, S; Rubino, F A

    1977-09-01

    Three patients presented with sudden visual impairment followed by agitated delirium one to three days later. Examination revealed marked agitation, dementia, and loss of vision. Computerised axial tomography demonstrated temporo-occipital infarctions. All recovered from the agitated state in four days to two months, but their visual impairment and dementia persisted one to four years later.

  13. [Pain, agitation and delirium in acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Funk, G-C

    2016-02-01

    Avoiding pain, agitation and delirium as well as avoiding unnecessary deep sedation is a powerful yet challenging strategy in critical care medicine. A number of interactions between cerebral function and respiratory function should be regarded in patients with respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation. A cooperative sedation strategy (i.e. patient is awake and free of pain and delirium) is feasible in many patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. Especially patients with mild acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) seem to benefit from preserved spontaneous breathing. While completely disabling spontaneous ventilation with or without neuromuscular blockade is not a standard strategy in ARDS, it might be temporarily required in patients with severe ARDS, who have substantial dyssynchrony or persistent hypoxaemia. Since pain, agitation and delirium compromise respiratory function they should also be regarded during noninvasive ventilation and during ventilator weaning. Pharmacological sedation can have favourable effects in these situations, but should not be given routinely or uncritically. PMID:26817653

  14. Agitated granular rod monolayers: Tetratic or uniaxial nematic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas; de Las Heras, Daniel; Rehberg, Ingo; Huang, Kai

    The ordering of granular rod monolayers under vertical agitations against gravity is investigated experimentally and compared quantitatively with equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory. At sufficiently high number density, short rods form a tetratic state and long rods form a uniaxial nematic state. The ordering transitions are found to be independent of the agitation frequency and strength, suggesting that the detailed nature of energy injection into such a nonequilibrium system does not play a crucial role. Interestingly, the length-to-width ratio at which the order changes from tetratic to uniaxial is around 7 . 3 in both experiments and simulations. This quantitative agreement indicates that, despite of driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium, agitated granular systems may share similar features with corresponding equilibrium systems. Finally, we summarize the universal and non-universal aspects between nonequilibrium granular rod and equilibrium liquid crystal systems in a state diagram. Tm and KH acknowledge the support from the DFG through Grant No. HU1939/2-1.

  15. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperature and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate in Hurricanes Earl And Karl (2010)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy; James, Mark; Roberts, Brent J.; Biswax, Sayak; Uhlhorn, Eric; Black, Peter; Linwood Jones, W.; Johnson, Jimmy; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem

    2012-01-01

    Ocean surface emission is affected by: a) Sea surface temperature. b) Wind speed (foam fraction). c) Salinity After production of calibrated Tb fields, geophysical fields wind speed and rain rate (or column) are retrieved. HIRAD utilizes NASA Instrument Incubator Technology: a) Provides unique observations of sea surface wind, temp and rain b) Advances understanding & prediction of hurricane intensity c) Expands Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer capabilities d) Uses synthetic thinned array and RFI mitigation technology of Lightweight Rain Radiometer (NASA Instrument Incubator) Passive Microwave C-Band Radiometer with Freq: 4, 5, 6 & 6.6 GHz: a) Version 1: H-pol for ocean wind speed, b) Version 2: dual ]pol for ocean wind vectors. Performance Characteristics: a) Earth Incidence angle: 0deg - 60deg, b) Spatial Resolution: 2-5 km, c) Swath: approx.70 km for 20 km altitude. Observational Goals: WS 10 - >85 m/s RR 5 - > 100 mm/hr.

  16. Effect of agitation of EDTA with 808-nm diode laser on dentin microhardness.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hakan; Yeter, Kübra Y; Karatas, Ertugrul; Yilmaz, Cenk B; Ayranci, Leyla B; Ozsu, Damla

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of agitation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with diode laser at different agitation times on root dentin microhardness. Eighty-four specimens were divided randomly into seven groups, as follows: (1) distilled water, (2) 17% EDTA, (3) EDTA with 60 s ultrasonic agitation, (4) EDTA with 10 s laser agitation, (5) EDTA with 20 s laser agitation, (6) EDTA with 30 s laser agitation, and (7) EDTA with 40 s laser agitation. All of the specimens were irrigated with 5% NaOCl and distilled water except the distilled water group. Microhardness values were calculated before and after the procedures. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests. Statistically significant differences were determined between the distilled water and other groups. Also, statistically significant differences were observed between EDTA with 40 s laser agitation and EDTA, and EDTA with 10 and 20 s laser agitations. Ultrasonic agitation of EDTA affected microhardness of root dentin similar to EDTA (p > .05). All applications decreased the microhardness of root dentin when compared with distilled water. Agitation of EDTA with diode laser for 40 s caused more reduction in microhardness of root dentin when compared with EDTA.

  17. Effect of agitation of EDTA with 808-nm diode laser on dentin microhardness.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hakan; Yeter, Kübra Y; Karatas, Ertugrul; Yilmaz, Cenk B; Ayranci, Leyla B; Ozsu, Damla

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of agitation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with diode laser at different agitation times on root dentin microhardness. Eighty-four specimens were divided randomly into seven groups, as follows: (1) distilled water, (2) 17% EDTA, (3) EDTA with 60 s ultrasonic agitation, (4) EDTA with 10 s laser agitation, (5) EDTA with 20 s laser agitation, (6) EDTA with 30 s laser agitation, and (7) EDTA with 40 s laser agitation. All of the specimens were irrigated with 5% NaOCl and distilled water except the distilled water group. Microhardness values were calculated before and after the procedures. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests. Statistically significant differences were determined between the distilled water and other groups. Also, statistically significant differences were observed between EDTA with 40 s laser agitation and EDTA, and EDTA with 10 and 20 s laser agitations. Ultrasonic agitation of EDTA affected microhardness of root dentin similar to EDTA (p > .05). All applications decreased the microhardness of root dentin when compared with distilled water. Agitation of EDTA with diode laser for 40 s caused more reduction in microhardness of root dentin when compared with EDTA. PMID:23793370

  18. The Quantitative Measurement Of Temperature Distribution In 3-D Thermal Field With High-Speed Real-Time Holographic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji-zong, Wu; Wei-qiao, Fu; Qin, Wu

    1989-06-01

    The theory of using high-speed real-time holographic interferometry to measure quantitatively 3-D thermal field is discussed in thispaper. An experimental arrangement, and the holographic interference fringes of thermal field formed by the electrAc heating coil wires which were taken by the high-speed camera are given. With CONCEPT 32/2725 computer system and corresponding programms the distribution of 3-D thermal field is calculated and plotted Finally, the problems required to be improved and solved for the method of measuring quantitatively 3-D thermal field are discussed.

  19. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave speeds in compacted, polycrystalline ice lh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on laboratory measurements of compressional- and shear-wave speeds in a compacted, polycrystalline ice-Ih sample. The sample was made from triply distilled water that had been frozen into single crystal ice, ground into small grains, and sieved to extract the 180-250 ??m diameter fraction. Porosity was eliminated from the sample by compacting the granular ice between a hydraulically driven piston and a fixed end plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Based on simultaneous compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements, we calculated Poisson's ratio and compressional-wave, bulk, and shear moduli from -20 to -5??C and 22 to 33 MPa.

  20. Significance of High-Speed Air Temperature Measurements in the Sampling Cell of a Closed-Path Gas Analyzer with a Short Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathilankal, James; Fratini, Gerardo; Burba, George

    2015-04-01

    Eddy covariance gas analyzers measure gas content in a known volume, thus essentially measuring gas density. The fundamental flux equation, however, is based on the dry mole fraction. The relationship between dry mole fraction and density is regulated by the ideal gas law describing the processes of temperature- and pressure-related expansions and contractions, and by the law of partial pressures, describing the process of dilution. As a result, this relationship depends on water vapor content, temperature and pressure of the air sample. If the instrument is able to output precise high-speed dry mole fraction, the flux processing is significantly simplified and WPL density terms accounting for the air density fluctuations are no longer required. This should also lead to the reduction in uncertainties associated with the density terms resulting from the eddy covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes used in these terms. In this framework, three main measurement approaches may be considered: Open-path approach Outputting correct high-speed dry mole fraction from the open-path instrument is difficult because of complexities with maintaining reliable fast temperature measurements integrated over the entire measuring path, and also because of extraordinary challenges with accurate measurements of fast pressure in the open air flow. Classical long-tube closed-path approach For instruments utilizing traditional long-tube closed-path design, with tube length 1000 or more times the tube diameter, the fast dry mole fraction can be used successfully when instantaneous fluctuations in the air temperature of the sampled air are effectively dampened to negligible levels, instantaneous pressure fluctuations are regulated or negligible, and water vapor is measured simultaneously with gas or the air sample is dried. Short-tube closed-path approach, the enclosed design For instruments with a short-tube enclosed design, most - but not all - of the temperature

  1. A Comparative Study of Sound Speed in Air at Room Temperature between a Pressure Sensor and a Sound Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison of sound speed measurements in air using two types of sensor that are widely employed in physics and engineering education, namely a pressure sensor and a sound sensor. A computer-based laboratory with pressure and sound sensors was used to carry out measurements of air through a 60 ml syringe. The fast Fourier…

  2. Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Latent heat models

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpinsky, E.

    1996-03-01

    Latent heat models were developed to calculate heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels for two cases: (1) heating with a condensable fluid flowing through coils and jackets; (2) vacuum reflux cooling with an overhead condenser. In either case the mathematical treatment, based on macroscopic balances, requires no iterative schemes. In addition to providing heat-transfer coefficients, the models predict flow rates of service fluid through the coils and jackets, estimate the percentage of heat transfer due to latent heat, and compute reflux rates.

  3. Decay of isotropic turbulence generated by a mechanically agitated grid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Wan, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental study of weak isotropic turbulence, created by a mechanically agitated grid, has indicated that in the absence of large linear-momentum wakes the energy of turbulence relaxes very quickly into a stable self-preserving structure, which, depending on the initial Reynolds number of turbulence, decays at different constant inverse powers of time. Both the longitudinal correlation coefficients and the corresponding spectral distributions, except for the difference in the parametric constants, are of the same functional type as those found previously for a passive grid.

  4. Application of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pain, Agitation, and Delirium.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Anna; Balas, Michele C

    2016-06-01

    Critically ill patients experience several severe, distressing, and often life-altering symptoms during their intensive care unit stay. A clinical practice guideline released by the American College of Critical Care Medicine provides a template for improving the care and outcomes of the critically ill through evidence-based pain, agitation, and delirium assessment, prevention, and management. Key strategies include the use of valid and reliable assessment tools, setting a desired sedation level target, a focus on light sedation, choosing appropriate sedative medications, the use of nonpharmacologic symptom management strategies, and engaging and empowering patients and their family to play an active role in their intensive care unit care.

  5. Effects of heat, pH, antioxidant, agitation and light on betacyanin stability using red-fleshed dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) juice and concentrate as models.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yen-Ming; Siow, Lee-Fong

    2015-05-01

    Red-fleshed dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is rich in antioxidants. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of heat pasteurization, pH adjustment, ascorbic acid addition as well as storage under agitation and light or dark condition on betacyanin content in red-fleshed dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) juice and concentrate. The concentrate was produced by concentrating clarified red-fleshed dragon fruit juice in a rotary evaporator at 40 °C. UV-Visible spectrophotometer was used for analyzing betacyanin content. Addition of 0.25 % ascorbic acid, pH 4.0, and pasteurization at 65 °C for 30 min were selected as the best processing conditions to retain betacyanin content in red-fleshed dragon fruit juice. Storage at the agitation speed of 220 rpm showed that the concentrated samples had higher betacyanin stability compared to juice, while both juice and concentrate had almost similar betacyanin stability when tested for storage in the presence of light. In summary, ascorbic acid stabilized betacyanin in both juice and concentrate at agitated or non-agitated conditions. In contrast, light degraded betacyanin in both juice and concentrate models.

  6. Removal of copper powder from aqueous solution by cementation using an agitated vessel.

    PubMed

    Amin, N K; El-Ashtouky, E-S Z; Abdelwahab, O

    2014-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the removal of copper powder from aqueous solution by cementation on a stationary disc placed inside an agitated vessel. The influence of several parameters on the rate of cementation, such as initial copper sulphate concentration, impeller rotational speed, presence of surfactant (Triton X-100), distance between the disc and the impeller, type of blade turbine and presence of baffles, has been investigated. The rate of cementation was found to increase with increasing impeller rotational speed and initial copper sulphate concentration. On the other hand, the rate decreases with increasing distance between the disc and the impeller. The rate of cementation was inhibited in solutions containing Triton X-100. Performance of a four-blade 90 degree turbine with regard to the rate of copper cementation was superior to the performance of a four-blade 45 degree pitched turbine. The present data can be correlated in terms of mass transfer coefficient of cementation as Sh = 0.905 Sc0.33 Re0.89 (d/l)0.41 (four-blade 90 degree turbine); Sh = 0.815 Sc0.33Re0.79 (d/l)0.47 (four-blade 45 degree pitched turbine), for the conditions 2035 < Sc < 2810 and 35,000 < Re < 179,000.

  7. Recovery of Copper from Effluents by Cementation on Aluminum in a Multirotating Cylinder-Agitated Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, M. H.; El-Ashtoukhy, E.-S. Z.; Bassyouni, M.

    2016-02-01

    Recovery of copper from synthetic waste solution using cementation technique in a new agitated vessel employing multirotating aluminum cylinders impeller was investigated. Parameters studied are cylinder diameter, rotation speed, initial copper ion concentrations, and effect of surfactants. Solution analysis and scanning electron microscopy were employed to investigate the kinetic and mechanism of the process. The rate of recovery was found to be at its maximum value at the operating conditions of 350 rpm rotation speed, 5000 ppm initial CuSO4 concentration, and 1.2 cm cylinder diameter. All data were correlated by the dimensionless equation: {Sh} = 1.16 {Sc}^{0.33} {Re}^{0.63} ( {{d_{{c}} }/L} )^{0.54}, with an average deviation of ±8.5 pct and a standard deviation of 5.88 pct. Presence of nonylphenol ethoxylate surfactant in the solution decreased the rate of recovery by an amount ranging from 2.94 to 38.57 pct depending on the operating conditions. The present geometry gave higher rates of recovery compared to both the single rotating cylinder and rotating disc reactor.

  8. Effect of viscosity on the mixing efficiency in a self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei-Kang; Guo, Yi-Ling; Xue, Mei; Du, Jing-Ru; Li, Weicheng; Li, Yu-You

    2015-05-01

    One special self-agitation reactor, which does not require a mechanical mixer or other equipment for mixing, has been introduced. Self-agitation is affected by variation in viscosity property. To obtain and research the effect of viscosity on mixing behavior in the self-agitation reactor, Fluent® was used to create numerical simulations and to visualize the fluid flow status. The results show that when the viscosity of the liquid is 1 mPa s, the entire self-agitation results in an almost completely mixed reactor. The substrate becomes difficult to agitate, and the diffusion of the substrate and the tracer become quite after every self-agitation, as the viscosity increases. Once the viscosity is higher than 25 mPa s, the substrate and tracer could not be mixed in the entire reactor, and the reactor is recognized as the combination of several completely mixed reactors between which little exchange of liquid occurs.

  9. Effect of viscosity on the mixing efficiency in a self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei-Kang; Guo, Yi-Ling; Xue, Mei; Du, Jing-Ru; Li, Weicheng; Li, Yu-You

    2015-05-01

    One special self-agitation reactor, which does not require a mechanical mixer or other equipment for mixing, has been introduced. Self-agitation is affected by variation in viscosity property. To obtain and research the effect of viscosity on mixing behavior in the self-agitation reactor, Fluent® was used to create numerical simulations and to visualize the fluid flow status. The results show that when the viscosity of the liquid is 1 mPa s, the entire self-agitation results in an almost completely mixed reactor. The substrate becomes difficult to agitate, and the diffusion of the substrate and the tracer become quite after every self-agitation, as the viscosity increases. Once the viscosity is higher than 25 mPa s, the substrate and tracer could not be mixed in the entire reactor, and the reactor is recognized as the combination of several completely mixed reactors between which little exchange of liquid occurs. PMID:25502876

  10. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1998-12-15

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers is disclosed using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer`s position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates. 4 figs.

  11. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1998-01-01

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer's position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates.

  12. Numerical simulation of mixing in a jet agitated horizontal cylindrical tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zughbi, Habib D.

    2006-02-01

    Mixing in a fluid jet agitated large horizontal cylindrical tank is simulated using computational fluid dynamics. A known volume of hot fluid is mixed with a cooler main fluid in a large tank. Temperature measurements are used to quantify mixing. Results show that the blending time is largely dependent on the flow patterns generated inside the tank. These flow patterns are a function of the tank geometry, the location of the jet and the angle at which the jet is injected. The role played by the length of the jet in determining the blending time is not as great as was thought by earlier workers. A significant reduction in blending times, ranging from 600% at a Reynolds number of 40,000 to 350% at a Reynolds number of 60,000, is achieved by changing the location and/or the angle of the incoming jet in a way that results in a better flow circulation.

  13. Performance Evaluation of an Automotive-Grade, High Speed Gate Driver for SiC FETs, Type UCC27531, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boomer, Kristen; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) devices are becoming widely used in electronic power circuits as replacement for conventional silicon parts due to their attractive properties that include low on-state resistance, high temperature tolerance, and high frequency operation. These attributes have a significant impact by reducing system weight, saving board space, and conserving power. In this work, the performance of an automotive-grade high speed gate driver with potential use in controlling SiC FETs (field-Effect Transistors) in converters or motor control applications was evaluated under extreme temperatures and thermal cycling. The investigations were carried out to assess performance and to determine suitability of this device for use in space exploration missions under extreme temperature conditions.

  14. Effects of High Ion Temperatures on Spectral Line Diagnostics in the Source Region of the High-speed Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickhouse, N. S.; Esser, R.

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical work on solar wind acceleration has suggested that the proton and electron temperatures at the base of the solar coronal hole region are not thermally equilibrated but that instead the proton temperature may exceed the electron temperature significantly. Recently, Kohl, Strachan, & Gardner have measured both broad and narrow components of the H Lyα profile and have suggested that the broad component may be the signature of high proton temperatures, ~4-6 × 106 K or more. Since proton impact excitation can contribute to the emission line excitation processes, high proton temperatures have important implications for some spectral line emissivities that are useful for electron temperature and density determinations. The diagnostics most affected are those which are sensitive to the distribution of population within the fine structure of the ground state configuration. We discuss selected case studies. For modest proton temperatures (Tp = 3Te) we have found effects on temperature diagnostics to be less than 30% but effects on some density diagnostics may be as large as 1 order of magnitude.

  15. Intra-pulp temperature increase of equine cheek teeth during treatment with motorized grinding systems: influence of grinding head position and rotational speed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In equine practice, teeth corrections by means of motorized grinding systems are standard procedure. The heat resulting from that treatment may cause irreparable damage to the dental pulp. It has been shown that a 5.5°C temperature rise may cause severe destruction in pulp cells. Hence, the capability to continuously form secondary dentine is lost, and may lead, due to equine-typical occlusal tooth abrasion, to an opening of the pulp cavity. To obtain reliable data on the intra-pulp increase in temperature during corrective treatments, equine cheek teeth (CT) were modified in a way (occlusal surface smoothed, apical parts detached, pulp horns standardized) that had been qualified in own former published studies. All parameters influencing the grinding process were standardized (force applied, initial temperatures, dimensions of pulp horns, positioning of grinding disk, rotational speed). During grinding experiments, imitating real dental treatments, the time span for an intra-pulp temperature increase of 5.5°C was determined. Results The minimum time recorded for an intra-pulp temperature increase of 5.5°C was 38 s in mandibular CT (buccal grinding, 12,000 rpm) and 70 s in maxillary CT (flat occlusal grinding, 12,000 rpm). The data obtained showed that doubling the rotational speed of the disk results in halving the time span after which the critical intra-pulp temperature increase in maxillary CT is reached. For mandibular CT, the time span even drops by two thirds. Conclusion The use of standardized hypsodont CT enabled comparative studies of intra-pulp heating during the grinding of occlusal tooth surfaces using different tools and techniques. The anatomical structure of the natural vital hypsodont tooth must be kept in mind, so that the findings of this study do not create a deceptive sense of security with regard to the time-dependent heating of the native pulp. PMID:24559121

  16. Obtaining Electron Temperatures and Flow Speeds from Thomson Scattered Coronal Emission Observed during the 29 March 2006 Total Solar Eclipse in Libya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph M.; Geginald, Nelson L.; Gashut, Hadi; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Hassler, Donald M.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment to measure the electron temperature and flow speed in the solar corona by observing the visible K-coronal spectrum was conducted during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya. New corona1 models accounting for the effect of electron temperature and flow on the resulting K-corona spectrum were used to interpret the observations. Results show electron temperatures of 1.10 +/- 0.05, 0.98 +/- 0.12, and 0.70 +/- 0.08 MK, at l.l{\\it R)$-{\\odot)$ in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and 0.93 +/- 0.12 MK, at 1.2 R(sub sun) in the solar east. The corresponding outflow speeds obtained from the spectral fit are 103 +/- 92, 0 + 10, 0 + 10, and 0 + 10 km/s. Since the observations are taken only at 1.1 and 1.2 R(sub sun) these velocities , consistent with zero outflow, are in agreement with expectations and provide additional confirmation that the spectral fitting method is working.

  17. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of GEOSAT sea surface height, SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Zlotnicki, V.; Newman, J.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1991-01-01

    Monthly mean global distributions for 1988 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map. Distributions are included for sea surface height variation estimated from GEOSAT; surface wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on NOAA spacecrafts; and the Cartesian components of the 10m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  18. Optical and thermodynamic properties of MgO from radiative shock temperature and sound speed measurements on samples preheated to 2300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatýanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    Thermodynamic properties of MgO, one of the major end-members of deep planetary interiors, play a significant role in the processes inside the Earth's lower mantle. Of particular importance in geophysics and geochemistry is the MgO melting behavior at high pressure. Despite considerable theoretical and experimental efforts over decades, it remains essentially unknown. The melting temperature predictions for MgO at 135 GPa, the Earth's core-mantle boundary pressure, range from 5 to 9 kK. In a continuous effort to resolve this inconsistency and to probe the P-T region previously unexplored, we developed a technique for radiative shock temperature measurements in single-crystal MgO preheated to 2300 K. Large ventilated Mo capsules were employed to hold ~20 mm long MgO crystals with controlled longitudinal thermal gradients. These hot targets were impacted by 0.8 mm thick Ta flyers launched at 6.5 to 7.5 km/s on the Caltech two-stage light-gas gun. Six spectral radiance histories from MgO shock front were recorded in every shot with 3 ns time resolution over 440-750 nm or 500-830 nm spectral range. The majority of our experiments showed smooth pressure dependence of MgO shock temperature and sound speed consistent with the solid phase at 197-243 GPa. Although most observed temperatures are ~700 K lower and sound speeds ~1 km/s higher than the model predictions, the pressure slopes for both parameters are in close agreement with those calculated for the solid phase. Unconfirmed data from a single experiment at 239 GPa and 8.3 kK showed correlated temperature and sound speed anomalies (both values lower than expected) that may be explained by partial melting. Our past and recent data on shock-compressed preheated MgO suggest its melting curve above 200 GPa is higher than the extrapolation of the experiments of Zerr & Boehler or the theoretical calculation by Strachan et. al. These results, features of shock experiments with 2300 K pre-heat temperatures, data analysis

  19. Can antidepressant medication relieve agitation in Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Porsteinsson, Anton P; Smith, Jessica S; Keltz, Melanie A; Antonsdottir, Inga M

    2014-09-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are a major concern in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Historically, NPS are difficult to treat effectively due to a high side-effect burden associated with commonly used medications, such as atypical antipsychotics. Non-pharmacological treatment approaches have become the first line option. However, when such treatment fails, pharmacological options are often used. Thus, a push toward finding safer alternative pharmacological treatments has occurred. Antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have shown promise in clinical trials for alleviating the burden of NPS. Lower overall agitation and caregiver stress has been reported to correlate to treatment with the SSRI citalopram. However, certain side effects of citalopram, such as QTc interval prolongation and increased cognitive decline, carry clinical concern and should be weighed when prescribing their use. PMID:25148535

  20. Hydrodynamic effects on cells in agitated tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, R. S.; Papoutsakis, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanisms by which hydrodynamic forces can affect cells grown on microcarrier beads in agitated cell culture reactors were investigated by analyzing the motion of microcarriers relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other, and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. It was found that harmful effects on cell cultures that have been previously attributed to shear can be better explained as the effects of turbulence (of a size scale comparable to the microcarriers or the spacing between them) or collisions. The primary mechanisms of cell damage involve direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies, collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow, and collisions against the impeller or other solid surfaces. The implications of these analytical results for the design of tissue culture reactors are discussed.

  1. Time resolved PIV measurement of fluid dynamics in agitated vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, D.; Kotek, M.; Kopecky, V.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the results obtained by TR PIV measurements focused on detailed flow analysis in the selected region. The investigated area was placed 3mm above the blades axis and 5mm far from the blade edge. The captured images were firstly analysed on the mean velocity distribution and the intensity of turbulence {UV} statistics. Here we used the time resolved technique for the experimental study of the flow field in the agitated vessel. The results of the application POD and ODP algorithm on the captured datasets uncovered the existence of unsteady structures in the area that was assumed to be stable. The existence of these structures is bringing a novel view on the mixing process.

  2. Sensitivity of Global Sea-Air CO2 Flux to Gas Transfer Algorithms, Climatological Wind Speeds, and Variability of Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Signorini, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity analyses of sea-air CO2 flux to gas transfer algorithms, climatological wind speeds, sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity (SSS) were conducted for the global oceans and selected regional domains. Large uncertainties in the global sea-air flux estimates are identified due to different gas transfer algorithms, global climatological wind speeds, and seasonal SST and SSS data. The global sea-air flux ranges from -0.57 to -2.27 Gt/yr, depending on the combination of gas transfer algorithms and global climatological wind speeds used. Different combinations of SST and SSS global fields resulted in changes as large as 35% on the oceans global sea-air flux. An error as small as plus or minus 0.2 in SSS translates into a plus or minus 43% deviation on the mean global CO2 flux. This result emphasizes the need for highly accurate satellite SSS observations for the development of remote sensing sea-air flux algorithms.

  3. Automated Agitation-Assisted Demulsification Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Chia, Shao Hua; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-03-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) is an extremely fast and efficient sample preparation procedure. For its capability and applicability to be fully exploited, full automation of its operations seamlessly integrated with analysis is necessary. In this work, for the first time, fully automated agitation-assisted demulsification (AAD)-DLLME integrated with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed for the convenient and efficient determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples. The use of a commercially available multipurpose autosampler equipped with two microsyringes of different capacities allowed elimination or significant reduction of manpower, labor, and time with the large-volume microsyringe used for liquid transfers and the small-volume microsyringe for extract collection and injection for analysis. Apart from enhancing accessibility of DLLME, the procedure was characterized by the application of agitation after extraction to break up the emulsion (that otherwise would need centrifugation or a demulsification solvent), further improving overall operational efficiency and flexibility. Additionally, the application of low-density solvent as extractant facilitated the easy collection of extract as the upper layer over water. Some parameters affecting the automated AAD-DDLME procedure were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the procedure provided good linearity (ranging from a minimum of 0.1-0.5 μg/L to a maximum of 50 μg/L), low limits of detection (0.010-0.058 μg/L), and good repeatability of the extractions (relative standard deviations, below 5.3%, n = 6). The proposed method was applied to analyze PAHs in real river water samples. PMID:26818217

  4. High-speed highly temperature stable 980 nm VCSELs operating at 25 Gb/s at up to 85 °C for short reach optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutig, Alex; Lott, James A.; Blokhin, Sergey A.; Moser, Philip; Wolf, Philip; Hofmann, Werner; Nadtochiy, Alexey M.; Bimberg, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The progressive penetration of optical communication links into traditional copper interconnect markets greatly expands the applications of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for the next-generation of board-to-board, moduleto- module, chip-to-chip, and on-chip optical interconnects. Stability of the VCSEL parameters at high temperatures is indispensable for such applications, since these lasers typically reside directly on or near integrated circuit chips. Here we present 980 nm oxide-confined VCSELs operating error-free at bit rates up to 25 Gbit/s at temperatures as high as 85 °C without adjustment of the drive current and peak-to-peak modulation voltage. The driver design is therefore simplified and the power consumption of the driver electronics is lowered, reducing the production and operational costs. Small and large signal modulation experiments at various temperatures from 20 up to 85 °C for lasers with different oxide aperture diameters are presented in order to analyze the physical processes controlling the performance of the VCSELs. Temperature insensitive maximum -3 dB bandwidths of around 13-15 GHz for VCSELs with aperture diameters of 10 μm and corresponding parasitic cut-off frequencies exceeding 22 GHz are observed. Presented results demonstrate the suitability of our VCSELs for practical high speed and high temperature stable short-reach optical links.

  5. A statistical examination of Nimbus-7 SMMR data and remote sensing of sea surface temperature, liquid water content in the atmosphere and surface wind speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Chang, A. T. C.; Gloersen, P.; Wang, I.

    1983-01-01

    Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) brightness temperature measurements over the global oceans have been examined with the help of statistical and empirical techniques. Such analyses show that zonal averages of brightness temperature measured by SMMR over the oceans on a large scale are primarily influenced by the water vapor in the atmosphere. Liquid water in the clouds and rain, which has a much smaller spatial and temporal scale, contributes substantially to the variability of the SMMR measurements within the latitudinal zones. The surface wind not only increases the surface emissivity, but through its interactions with the atmosphere produces correlations in the SMMR brightness temperature data that have significant meteorological implications. It is found that a simple meteorological model can explain the general characteristics of the SMMR data. With the help of this model, methods to infer over the global oceans, the surface temperature, liquid water content in the atmosphere, and surface wind speed are developed. Monthly mean estimates of the sea surface temperature and surface winds are compared with the ship measurements. Estimates of liquid water content in the atmosphere are consistent with earlier satellite measurements. Previously announced in STAR as N83-19187

  6. A statistical examination of Nimbus 7 SMMR data and remote sensing of sea surface temperature, liquid water content in the atmosphere and surfaces wind speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Wang, I.; Chang, A. T. C.; Gloersen, P.

    1982-01-01

    Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) brightness temperature measurements over the global oceans have been examined with the help of statistical and empirical techniques. Such analyses show that zonal averages of brightness temperature measured by SMMR, over the oceans, on a large scale are primarily influenced by the water vapor in the atmosphere. Liquid water in the clouds and rain, which has a much smaller spatial and temporal scale, contributes substantially to the variability of the SMMR measurements within the latitudinal zones. The surface wind not only increases the surface emissivity but through its interactions with the atmosphere produces correlations, in the SMMR brightness temperature data, that have significant meteorological implications. It is found that a simple meteorological model can explain the general characteristics of the SMMR data. With the help of this model methods to infer over the global oceans, the surface temperature, liquid water content in the atmosphere, and surface wind speed are developed. Monthly mean estimates of the sea surface temperature and surface winds are compared with the ship measurements. Estimates of liquid water content in the atmosphere are consistent with earlier satellite measurements.

  7. System for agitating the acid in a lead-acid battery

    DOEpatents

    Weintraub, Alvin; MacCormack, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    A system and method for agitating the acid in a large lead-sulfuric acid storage battery of the calcium type. An air-lift is utilized to provide the agitation. The air fed to the air-lift is humidified prior to being delivered to the air-lift.

  8. The Relationship between Agitated Behavior and Cognitive Functioning in Nursing Home Residents: Preliminary Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska

    Agitation is a significant problem for nursing home residents, their families, and their caretakers. Agitation is defined as inappropriate verbal, vocal, or motor activity which is not explained by needs or confusion per se. It includes behaviors such as aimless wandering, pacing, cursing, screaming, biting, and fighting. The inappropriate nature…

  9. Behavioral Characteristics of Agitated Nursing Home Residents with Dementia at the End of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rebecca S.; Burgio, Louis D.; Fisher, Susan E.; Hardin, J. Michael; Shuster, John L., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine group differences in verbal agitation, verbal interaction, bed restraint, pain, analgesic and neuroleptic medication use, and medical comorbidity among agitated nursing home residents who died during a 6-month clinical trial compared with residents of the same gender and similar initial cognitive…

  10. A Longitudinal Examination of Agitation and Resident Characteristics in the Nursing Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgio, Louis D.; Park, Nan Sook; Hardin, J. Michael; Sun, Fei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Agitation frequently accompanies cognitive decline among nursing home residents. This study used cross-sectional and longitudinal (up to 18 months) methods to examine agitation among profoundly and moderately impaired residents using both staff report and direct observation methods. Design and Methods: The study included participants (N =…

  11. 40 CFR 63.169 - Standards: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure relief devices in liquid...: Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; instrumentation systems; and pressure..., pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service, and instrumentation systems shall...

  12. Effects of dip-coating speed and annealing temperature on structural, morphological and optical properties of sol-gel nano-structured TiO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touam, Tahar; Atoui, Mohamed; Hadjoub, Ilhem; Chelouche, Azeddine; Boudine, Boubekeur; Fischer, Alexis; Boudrioua, Azzedine; Doghmane, Abdellaziz

    2014-09-01

    We reported material characterization of the nano-structured TiO2 thin films prepared by the sol-gel dip-coating process on glass substrates. The dependence of the structural, morphological and optical properties of the synthesized films on the fabrication parameters such as withdrawal velocity and annealing temperature were investigated by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-visible spectrophotometry. The results indicate that for the TiO2 films annealed at 500 °C there exhibits (1 0 1) XRD peak corresponding to the anatase phase of TiO2. The latter is consistent with the recorded Raman signal observed at 142 cm-1 (Eg mode) and 391 cm-1 (B1g mode), respectively. From the analyses made on the SEM micrographs and AFM images, it was revealed that the morphology and surface roughness of the thin films would depend on the withdrawal speed and the heat treatment temperature. The UV-visible spectroscopy analyses show that all the films were transparent in the visible region with an average transmittance of more than 70%. With an increase on the dip-coating speed from 1 cm/min to 3 cm/min, we observed a spectral red shift of the absorption edge from 3.76 eV to 3.71 eV, indicating a decrease in the bandgap energy (Eg) of the films.

  13. Agitated behavior in elderly nursing home residents with dementia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, A S; Yamamoto, E; Shiotani, H

    2000-05-01

    This study is the first investigation of the frequency of agitated behaviors in elderly dementia patients in Japanese nursing homes using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (J. Cohen-Mansfield, 1991). Despite major differences between Japanese and American cultures, findings were highly consistent with those of previous U.S. studies. Physically aggressive behavior, although evidenced by only 10-20% of the sample, comprised the strongest factor. A separate factor for verbal agitation also emerged. The behaviors declined during the evening and night shifts. In both the Japanese and U.S. samples, wandering, general restlessness, verbal agitation such as repetitious questioning, cursing, and complaining occurred most frequently. Another 4-point scale was used to code the degree to which agitated behavior occurred during eating, dressing, bathing, and toileting for each resident. The majority of aggressive behavior occurred in relation to personal caregiving, especially in regard to bathing. Despite major cultural differences, Japanese findings paralleled previous U.S. results.

  14. Effect of Aromatherapy Massage on Agitation and Depressive Mood in Individuals With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Ping; Wang, Chi-Jane; Wang, Jing-Jy

    2016-09-01

    The current study examined the effects of aromatherapy massage on alleviating agitation and depressive mood in individuals with dementia. A randomized controlled trial and repeated measures design was conducted. A total of 59 participants were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. The intervention group received aromatherapy massage once per week for 8 weeks. Results indicated no significant changes over time in overall agitation for either group, but agitation decreased from Week 1 to Week 5 for the intervention group. In addition, the overall depressive symptoms decreased significantly over time for the intervention group compared to the control group (p < 0.001). However, changes in agitation within 24 hours following aromatherapy massage showed some significant changes in Weeks 5 and 9. Aromatherapy massage can be an effective and safe intervention to alleviate specific agitated behaviors and depressive mood in individuals with dementia. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(9), 38-46.]. PMID:27319407

  15. [Application of music therapy for managing agitated behavior in older people with dementia].

    PubMed

    Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chang, Anne M; Abbey, Jennifer

    2006-10-01

    Older people with dementia may display negative emotions, memory problems, sleep disturbance, and agitated behavior. Among these symptoms, agitated behavior has been identified by families and nursing staff as the care problem that presents the greatest challenge. Several studies have found that music therapy reduced agitated behaviors in those with dementia and recommended use of music as an effective strategy in managing this behavioral problem. Music therapy represents a lower cost, effective care approach that nursing staff can easily learn and apply to those with dementia. Furthermore, reductions in agitated behavior in dementia patients that result from music therapy can also alleviate caregiver stress and burden of care, leading to improvements in the health and quality of life of both dementia patients and their caregivers. This paper aims to introduce the principles and application of music therapy in the management of agitated behavior in those with dementia.

  16. Studies on heat transfer to Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in agitated vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triveni, B.; Vishwanadham, B.; Venkateshwar, S.

    2008-09-01

    Heat transfer studies to Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids are carried out in a stirred vessel fitted with anchor/turbine impeller and a coil for heating/cooling with an objective of determining experimentally the heat transfer coefficient of few industrially important systems namely castor oil and its methyl esters, soap solution, CMC and chalk slurries. The effect of impeller geometry, speed and aeration is investigated. Generalized Reynolds and Prandtl numbers are calculated using an apparent viscosity for non-Newtonian fluids. The data is correlated using a Sieder-Tate type equation. A trend of increase in heat transfer coefficient with RPM in presence and absence of solids has been observed. Relatively high values of Nusselt numbers are obtained for non-Newtonian fluids when aeration is coupled with agitation. The contribution of natural convection to heat transfer has been accounted for by incorporating the Grashof number. The correlations developed based on these studies are applied for design of commercial scale soponification reactor. Power per unit volume resulted in reliable design of a reactor.

  17. Spatially and temporally resolved temperature and shock-speed measurements behind a laser-induced blast wave of energetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh; Jiang, Naibo; Stauffer, Hans U.; Schmidt, Jacob B.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Bunker, Christopher E.; Gord, James R.

    2013-05-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved temperature measurements behind an expanding blast wave are made using picosecond (ps) N2 coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) following laser flash heating of mixtures containing aluminum nanoparticles embedded in ammonium-nitrate oxidant. Production-front ps-CARS temperatures as high as 3600 ± 180 K—obtained for 50-nm-diameter commercially produced aluminum-nanoparticle samples—are observed. Time-resolved shadowgraph images of the evolving blast waves are also obtained to determine the shock-wave position and corresponding velocity. These results are compared with near-field blast-wave theory to extract relative rates of energy release for various particle diameters and passivating-layer compositions.

  18. Nonintrusive shaft speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.; Wyett, L.; Maram, J.

    1985-01-01

    Reusable rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), the Orbital Transfer Vehicles (OTV), etc., have throttling capabilities that require real-time, closed-loop control systems of engine propellant flows, combustion temperatures and pressures, and turbopump rotary speeds. In the case of the SSME, there are four turbopumps that require real-time measurement and control of their rotary speeds. Variable-reluctance magnetic speed sensors were designed, fabricated, and tested for all four turbopumps, resulting in the successful implementation and operation of three of these speed sensors during each of the 12 Shuttle flights.

  19. Reducing agitation energy-consumption by improving rheological properties of corn stover substrate in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Tian, Libin; Shen, Fei; Yuan, Hairong; Zou, Dexun; Liu, Yanping; Zhu, Baoning; Li, Xiujin

    2014-09-01

    Rheological properties of corn stover substrate were investigated to explore agitation energy reduction potential for different total solid (TS) in anaerobic digestion. The effects of particle size and temperature on rheological properties and corresponding energy reduction were studied. The results indicated that corn stover slurry exhibited pseudo-plastic flow behavior at TS of 4.23-7.32%, and was well described by Power-law model. At TS of 4.23%, rheological properties were not obviously affected by particle size and temperature. However, when TS was increased to 7.32%, there was 10.37% shear stress reduction by size-reduction from 20 to 80-mesh, and 11.73% shear stress reduction by temperature-increase from 25 to 55 °C. PTS was advanced as variations of power consumption by TS-increase from 4.23% to 7.32%. There was 9.2% PTS-reduction by size-reduction from 20 to 80-mesh at 35 °C. Moreover, PTS-reduction of 10.3%/10 °C was achieved at 20-mesh compared with 9.0%/10 °C at 80-mesh.

  20. Analysis of fluid flow and wall shear stress patterns inside partially filled agitated culture well plates.

    PubMed

    Salek, M Mehdi; Sattari, Pooria; Martinuzzi, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The appearance of highly resistant bacterial biofilms in both community and hospitals environments is a major challenge in modern clinical medicine. The biofilm structural morphology, believed to be an important factor affecting the behavioral properties of these "super bugs", is strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics over the microcolonies. Despite the common use of agitated well plates in the biology community, they have been used rather blindly without knowing the flow characteristics and influence of the rotational speed and fluid volume in these containers. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the flow in these high-throughput devices to link local hydrodynamics to observed behavior in cell cultures. In this work, the flow and wall shear stress distribution in six-well culture plates under planar orbital translation is simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Free surface, flow pattern and wall shear stress for two shaker speeds (100 and 200 rpm) and two volumes of fluid (2 and 4 mL) were investigated. Measurements with a non-intrusive optical shear stress sensor and High Frame-rate Particle Imaging Velocimetry (HFPIV) are used to validate CFD predictions. An analytical model to predict the free surface shape is proposed. Results show a complex three-dimensional flow pattern, varying in both time and space. The distribution of wall shear stress in these culture plates has been related to the topology of flow. This understanding helps explain observed endothelial cell orientation and bacterial biofilm distributions observed in culture dishes. The results suggest that the mean surface stress field is insufficient to capture the underlying dynamics mitigating biological processes. PMID:22042624

  1. Analysis of fluid flow and wall shear stress patterns inside partially filled agitated culture well plates.

    PubMed

    Salek, M Mehdi; Sattari, Pooria; Martinuzzi, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The appearance of highly resistant bacterial biofilms in both community and hospitals environments is a major challenge in modern clinical medicine. The biofilm structural morphology, believed to be an important factor affecting the behavioral properties of these "super bugs", is strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics over the microcolonies. Despite the common use of agitated well plates in the biology community, they have been used rather blindly without knowing the flow characteristics and influence of the rotational speed and fluid volume in these containers. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the flow in these high-throughput devices to link local hydrodynamics to observed behavior in cell cultures. In this work, the flow and wall shear stress distribution in six-well culture plates under planar orbital translation is simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Free surface, flow pattern and wall shear stress for two shaker speeds (100 and 200 rpm) and two volumes of fluid (2 and 4 mL) were investigated. Measurements with a non-intrusive optical shear stress sensor and High Frame-rate Particle Imaging Velocimetry (HFPIV) are used to validate CFD predictions. An analytical model to predict the free surface shape is proposed. Results show a complex three-dimensional flow pattern, varying in both time and space. The distribution of wall shear stress in these culture plates has been related to the topology of flow. This understanding helps explain observed endothelial cell orientation and bacterial biofilm distributions observed in culture dishes. The results suggest that the mean surface stress field is insufficient to capture the underlying dynamics mitigating biological processes.

  2. Local flux-profile relationships of wind speed and temperature in a canopy layer in atmospheric stable conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Leclerc, M. Y.; Karipot, A.

    2010-11-01

    The particularities of the physics of the canopy layer pose challenges to the determination and use of traditional universal functions so helpful in the atmospheric surface layer. Progress toward "universal-like functions" such as those provided by Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for the canopy layer has been modest. One of the challenges lies in that the assumptions underlying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory do not hold within a canopy layer. This paper thus examines the local flux-profile relations for wind (Φm) and for temperature (Φh). It uses three different stability parameters, i.e., h/L(h) at tree top, local z/L(z), and the local bulk Richardson number (Ri), within a tall forest canopy in nighttime stable (indicated by h/L(h) > 0) conditions. Results suggest that the in-canopy Φm can be described using the local Richardson number Ri. Furthermore, Φm is found to increase linearly with Ri in the upper canopy layer for |Ri| < 1. When local |Ri| > 1, |Φm| decreases with |Ri| in a power function, a result consistent for all levels of measurements within the canopy. When both local Φh and local Ri are positive, i.e., the local downward turbulent heat flux is consistent with the local temperature gradient, the local Φh increases with the local Ri when Ri < 1. However, Φh does not change with Ri (or much more scattered) when Ri > 1. The relationship between local Φh and Ri disappears when counter-gradient heat transfer occurs in strongly stable conditions. A self-correlation analysis is used to examine the influence of self-correlation and the physical meaning of these relationships.

  3. Individual music therapy for agitation in dementia: an exploratory randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stige, Brynjulf; Qvale, Liv Gunnhild; Gold, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Agitation in nursing home residents with dementia leads to increase in psychotropic medication, decrease in quality of life, and to patient distress and caregiver burden. Music therapy has previously been found effective in treatment of agitation in dementia care but studies have been methodologically insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of individual music therapy on agitation in persons with moderate/severe dementia living in nursing homes, and to explore its effect on psychotropic medication and quality of life. Method: In a crossover trial, 42 participants with dementia were randomized to a sequence of six weeks of individual music therapy and six weeks of standard care. Outcome measures included agitation, quality of life and medication. Results: Agitation disruptiveness increased during standard care and decreased during music therapy. The difference at −6.77 (95% CI (confidence interval): −12.71, −0.83) was significant (p = 0.027), with a medium effect size (0.50). The prescription of psychotropic medication increased significantly more often during standard care than during music therapy (p = 0.02). Conclusion: This study shows that six weeks of music therapy reduces agitation disruptiveness and prevents medication increases in people with dementia. The positive trends in relation to agitation frequency and quality of life call for further research with a larger sample. PMID:23621805

  4. Management of pain, agitation, and delirium in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Pandharipande, Pratik P; Patel, Mayur B; Barr, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Pain, agitation, and delirium (PAD) are common in critically ill patients. Consequently, analgesic and sedative medications are frequently administered to critically ill patients to treat PAD, to improve synchrony with mechanical ventilation, and to decrease the physiological stress response. However, prolonged, continuous deep sedation of intensive care unit (ICU) patients is associated with numerous adverse outcomes, including longer durations of mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stays, acute brain dysfunction, and an increased risk of death. The 2013 ICU PAD Guidelines were developed to provide a clear, evidence-based road map for clinicians to better manage PAD in critically ill patients. Significant knowledge gaps in these areas still remain, but if widely adopted, the PAD Guidelines can help bridge these gaps and will be transformative in terms of their impact on ICU care. Strong evidence indicates that linking PAD management strategies with ventilator weaning, early mobility, and sleep hygiene in ICU patients will result in significant synergistic benefits to patient care and reductions in costs. An interdisciplinary team-based approach, using proven process improvement strategies, and ICU patient and family activation and engagement, will help ensure successful implementation of the ICU PAD Care Bundle in ICUs. This paper highlights the major recommendations of the 2013 ICU PAD Guidelines. We hope this review will help ICU physicians and other health care providers advance the management of PAD in critically ill patients, and improve patients' clinical outcomes.

  5. New Observations of C-band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate From the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Buckley, C. D.; Biswas, S.; May, C.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, Cerese

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on the WB-57 during NASA's GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August September of 2010. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP campaign will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the GRIP campaign, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eyewall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  6. High Speed Ice Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Sammonds, Peter; Lishman, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Many different tribological experiments have been run to determine the frictional behaviour of ice at high speeds, ostensibly with the intention of applying results to everyday fields such as winter tyres and sports. However, experiments have only been conducted up to linear speeds of several metres a second, with few additional subject specific studies reaching speeds comparable to these applications. Experiments were conducted in the cold rooms of the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, UCL, on a custom built rotational tribometer based on previous literature designs. Preliminary results from experiments run at 2m/s for ice temperatures of 271 and 263K indicate that colder ice has a higher coefficient of friction, in accordance with the literature. These results will be presented, along with data from further experiments conducted at temperatures between 259-273K (in order to cover a wide range of the temperature dependent behaviour of ice) and speeds of 2-15m/s to produce a temperature-velocity-friction map for ice. The effect of temperature, speed and slider geometry on the deformation of ice will also be investigated. These speeds are approaching those exhibited by sports such as the luge (where athletes slide downhill on an icy track), placing the tribological work in context.

  7. Effect of impeller type and agitation on the performance of pilot scale ASBR and AnSBBR applied to sanitary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    de Novaes, Luciano Farias; Saratt, Bruna Luckmann; Rodrigues, José Alberto Domingues; Ratusznei, Suzana Maria; de Moraes, Deovaldo; Ribeiro, Rogers; Zaiat, Marcelo; Foresti, Eugenio

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the effect of agitation rate and impeller type in two mechanically stirred sequencing batch reactors: one containing granulated biomass (denominated ASBR) and the other immobilized biomass on polyurethane foam (denominated AnSBBR). Each configuration, with total volume of 1 m(3), treated 0.65 m(3) sanitary wastewater at ambient temperature in 8-h cycles. Three impeller types were assessed for each reactor configuration: flat-blade turbine impeller, 45 degrees -inclined-blade turbine impeller and helix impeller, as well as two agitation rates: 40 and 80 rpm, resulting in a combination of six experimental conditions. In addition, the ASBR was also operated at 20 rpm with a flat-blade turbine impeller and the AnSBBR was operated with a draft tube and helix impeller at 80 and 120 rpm. To quantify how impeller type and agitation rate relate to substrate consumption rate, results obtained during monitoring at the end of the cycle, as well as the time profiles during a cycle were analyzed. Increasing agitation rate from 40 rpm to 80 rpm in the AnSBBR improved substrate consumption rate whereas in the ASBR this increase destabilized the system, likely due to granule rupture caused by the higher agitation. The AnSBBR showed highest solids and substrate removal, highest kinetic constant and highest alkalinity production when using a helix impeller, 80 rpm, and no draft tube. The best condition for the ASBR was achieved with a flat-blade turbine impeller at 20 rpm. The presence of the draft tube in the AnSBBR did not show significant improvement in reactor efficiency. Furthermore, power consumption studies in these pilot scale reactors showed that power transfer required to improve mass transfer might be technically and economically feasible. PMID:20363066

  8. Optimal nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer's disease: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Alonso-Búa, Begoña; de Labra, Carmen; González-Abraldes, Isabel; Maseda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with Alzheimer's disease will develop agitation at later stages of the disease, which constitutes one of the most challenging and distressing aspects of dementia. Recently, nonpharmacological therapies have become increasingly popular and have been proven to be effective in managing the behavioral symptoms (including agitation) that are common in the middle or later stages of dementia. These therapies seem to be a good alternative to pharmacological treatment to avoid unpleasant side effects. We present a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on the nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients aged 65 years and above. Of the 754 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. This review suggests that music therapy is optimal for the management of agitation in institutionalized patients with moderately severe and severe AD, particularly when the intervention includes individualized and interactive music. Bright light therapy has little and possibly no clinically significant effects with respect to observational ratings of agitation but decreases caregiver ratings of physical and verbal agitation. Therapeutic touch is effective for reducing physical nonaggressive behaviors but is not superior to simulated therapeutic touch or usual care for reducing physically aggressive and verbally agitated behaviors. Melissa oil aromatherapy and behavioral management techniques are not superior to placebo or pharmacological therapies for managing agitation in AD. Further research in clinical trials is required to confirm the effectiveness and long-term effects of nonpharmacological interventions for managing agitation in AD. These types of studies may lead to the development of future intervention protocols to improve the well-being and daily functioning of these patients, thereby avoiding residential care placement. PMID:26955265

  9. Optimal nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer’s disease: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Alonso-Búa, Begoña; de Labra, Carmen; González-Abraldes, Isabel; Maseda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with Alzheimer’s disease will develop agitation at later stages of the disease, which constitutes one of the most challenging and distressing aspects of dementia. Recently, nonpharmacological therapies have become increasingly popular and have been proven to be effective in managing the behavioral symptoms (including agitation) that are common in the middle or later stages of dementia. These therapies seem to be a good alternative to pharmacological treatment to avoid unpleasant side effects. We present a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on the nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients aged 65 years and above. Of the 754 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. This review suggests that music therapy is optimal for the management of agitation in institutionalized patients with moderately severe and severe AD, particularly when the intervention includes individualized and interactive music. Bright light therapy has little and possibly no clinically significant effects with respect to observational ratings of agitation but decreases caregiver ratings of physical and verbal agitation. Therapeutic touch is effective for reducing physical nonaggressive behaviors but is not superior to simulated therapeutic touch or usual care for reducing physically aggressive and verbally agitated behaviors. Melissa oil aromatherapy and behavioral management techniques are not superior to placebo or pharmacological therapies for managing agitation in AD. Further research in clinical trials is required to confirm the effectiveness and long-term effects of nonpharmacological interventions for managing agitation in AD. These types of studies may lead to the development of future intervention protocols to improve the well-being and daily functioning of these patients, thereby avoiding residential care placement. PMID:26955265

  10. Managing Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder in the Emergency Setting

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Scott L.; Citrome, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patient agitation represents a significant challenge in the emergency department (ED), a setting in which medical staff are working under pressure dealing with a diverse range of medical emergencies. The potential for escalation into aggressive behavior, putting patients, staff, and others at risk, makes it imperative to address agitated behavior rapidly and efficiently. Time constraints and limited access to specialist psychiatric support have in the past led to the strategy of “restrain and sedate,” which was believed to represent the optimal approach; however, it is increasingly recognized that more patient-centered approaches result in improved outcomes. The objective of this review is to raise awareness of best practices for the management of agitation in the ED and to consider the role of new pharmacologic interventions in this setting. Discussion The Best practices in Evaluation and Treatment of Agitation (BETA) guidelines address the complete management of agitation, including triage, diagnosis, interpersonal calming skills, and medicine choices. Since their publication in 2012, there have been further developments in pharmacologic approaches for dealing with agitation, including both new agents and new modes of delivery, which increase the options available for both patients and physicians. Newer modes of delivery that could be useful in rapidly managing agitation include inhaled, buccal/sublingual and intranasal formulations. To date, the only formulation administered via a non-intramuscular route with a specific indication for agitation associated with bipolar or schizophrenia is inhaled loxapine. Non-invasive formulations, although requiring cooperation from patients, have the potential to improve overall patient experience, thereby improving future cooperation between patients and healthcare providers. Conclusion Management of agitation in the ED should encompass a patient-centered approach, incorporating non-pharmacologic approaches

  11. Optimal nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer's disease: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Alonso-Búa, Begoña; de Labra, Carmen; González-Abraldes, Isabel; Maseda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with Alzheimer's disease will develop agitation at later stages of the disease, which constitutes one of the most challenging and distressing aspects of dementia. Recently, nonpharmacological therapies have become increasingly popular and have been proven to be effective in managing the behavioral symptoms (including agitation) that are common in the middle or later stages of dementia. These therapies seem to be a good alternative to pharmacological treatment to avoid unpleasant side effects. We present a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on the nonpharmacological management of agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients aged 65 years and above. Of the 754 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. This review suggests that music therapy is optimal for the management of agitation in institutionalized patients with moderately severe and severe AD, particularly when the intervention includes individualized and interactive music. Bright light therapy has little and possibly no clinically significant effects with respect to observational ratings of agitation but decreases caregiver ratings of physical and verbal agitation. Therapeutic touch is effective for reducing physical nonaggressive behaviors but is not superior to simulated therapeutic touch or usual care for reducing physically aggressive and verbally agitated behaviors. Melissa oil aromatherapy and behavioral management techniques are not superior to placebo or pharmacological therapies for managing agitation in AD. Further research in clinical trials is required to confirm the effectiveness and long-term effects of nonpharmacological interventions for managing agitation in AD. These types of studies may lead to the development of future intervention protocols to improve the well-being and daily functioning of these patients, thereby avoiding residential care placement.

  12. Change in agitation in Alzheimer's disease in the placebo arm of a 9-week controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Devanand, D.P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Ismail, Zahinoor; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Rabins, Peter V.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Newell, Jeffery; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Placebo responses raise significant challenges for design of clinical trials. We report changes in agitation outcomes in the placebo arm of a recent trial of citalopram for agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods In the Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease (Cit AD) study, all participants and caregivers received a psychosocial intervention and 92 were assigned to placebo for 9 weeks. Outcomes included Neurobehavioral Rating Scale agitation subscale (NBRS-A), modified Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC), Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI), the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) Agitation/Aggression domain (NPI A/A) and Total (NPI-Total) and ADLs. Continuous outcomes were analyzed with mixed-effects modeling and dichotomous outcomes with logistic regression. Results Agitation outcomes improved over 9 weeks: NBRS-A mean (SD) decreased from 7.8 (3.0) at baseline to 5.4 (3.2), CMAI from 28.7 (6.7) to 26.7 (7.4), NPI A/A from 8.0 (2.4) to 4.9 (3.8), and NPI-Total from 37.3 (17.7) to 28.4 (22.1). The proportion of CGI-C agitation responders ranged from 21 to 29% and was significantly different from zero. MMSE improved from 14.4 (6.9) to 15.7 (7.2) and ADLs similarly improved. Most of the improvement was observed by 3 weeks and was sustained through 9 weeks. The major predictor of improvement in each agitation measure was a higher baseline score in that measure. Conclusions We observed significant placebo response which may be due to regression to the mean, response to a psychosocial intervention, natural course of symptoms, or nonspecific benefits of participation in a trial. PMID:26305876

  13. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, ARGOS buoy drift, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Knauss, W.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1991 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft; Cartesian components of free-drifting buoys which are tracked by the ARGOS navigation system on NOAA satellites; and Cartesian components of the 10-m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  14. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, ARGOS buoy drift, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Knauss, W.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1990 are proposed with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (US) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft; Cartesian components of free drifting buoys which are tracked by the ARGOS navigation system on NOAA satellites; and Cartesian components on the 10-m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation values are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  15. A direct measurement of the forward shock speed in supernova remnant ``0519‑69.0'': Constraints on the age, ambient density and electron-ion temperature equilibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovey, Luke; Hughes, John P.; Eriksen, Kristoffer; Pandya, Viraj

    2016-06-01

    The supernova remnant 0519-69.0 is the second youngest Ia remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The typing of the remnant rests primarily on ejecta abundances inferred from X-ray spectra and the Balmer-dominated nature of its forward shock. Using two narrow-band Hα imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope separated by ~1 year we are able to measure the global shock velocity of the remnant to be 2780 km/s. Using the global shock speed with the measured size of the remnant as constraints we employ one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to constrain the age and ambient medium density of the remnant. We also report on the degree of electron-to-ion temperature ratios for select portions of the rim for which we have spectroscopic measurements using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on the Southern African Large Telescope.

  16. Removal of salt from high-level waste tanks by density-driven circulation or mechanical agitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-two high-level waste storage tanks at the Savannah River Plant are to be retired in the tank replacement/waste transfer program. The salt-removal portion of this program requires dissolution of about 19 million liters of salt cake. Steam circulation jets were originally proposed to dissolve the salt cake. However, the jets heated the waste tank to 80 to 90/sup 0/C. This high temperature required a long cooldown period before transfer of the supernate by jet, and increased the risk of stress-corrosion cracking in these older tanks. A bench-scale investigation at the Savannah River Laboratory developed two alternatives to steam-jet circulation. One technique was density-driven circulation, which in bench tests dissolved salt at the same rate as a simulated steam circulation jet but at a lower temperature. The other technique was mechanical agitation, which dissolved the salt cake faster and required less fresh water than either density-driven circulation or the simulated steam circulation jet. Tests in an actual waste tank verified bench-scale results and demonstrated the superiority of mechanical agitation.

  17. Grainex Mar-M 247 Turbine Disk Life Study for NASA's High Temperature High Speed Turbine Seal Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental and analytical fatigue life study was performed on the Grainex Mar-M 247 disk used in NASA s Turbine Seal Test Facility. To preclude fatigue cracks from growing to critical size in the NASA disk bolt holes due to cyclic loading at severe test conditions, a retirement-for-cause methodology was adopted to detect and monitor cracks within the bolt holes using eddy-current inspection. For the NASA disk material that was tested, the fatigue strain-life to crack initiation at a total strain of 0.5 percent, a minimum to maximum strain ratio of 0, and a bolt hole temperature of 649 C was calculated to be 665 cycles using -99.95 percent prediction intervals. The fatigue crack propagation life was calculated to be 367 cycles after implementing a safety factor of 2 on life. Thus, the NASA disk bolt hole total life or retirement life was determined to be 1032 cycles at a crack depth of 0.501 mm. An initial NASA disk bolt hole inspection at 665 cycles is suggested with 50 cycle inspection intervals thereafter to monitor fatigue crack growth.

  18. Movement, swimming speed, and oxygen consumption of juvenile white sturgeon in response to changing flows, water temperatures, and light level in the Snake River, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Brown, Richard S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Brink, Steve R.; Lepla, Kenneth B.; Bates, Phil; Chandler, James A.

    2005-07-01

    The flow of the Snake River downstream of Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, frequently fluctuates as the dam responds to power production requirements. These flow fluctuations have the potential to increase the energy used by individual juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) that move to avoid unfavorable habitat or that alter their swimming speeds to maintain position over a range of velocities. Following swimming respirometry experiments, a field study using electromyogram (EMG) and sonic telemetry evaluated whether sturgeon were being negatively affected by operations of Hells Canyon Dam during three study periods where flows were artificially fluctuated (247 to 856 m3/s), held high and stable (438 to 600 m3/s), or held low and stable (275 to 284 m3/s). Respirometry results confirmed that oxygen consumption of juvenile sturgeon increased with swim speed and was temperature dependent, and when corrected for fish mass, ranged from 140.2 to 306.5 mg O2 kg-1 h-1. The telemetry study showed that movements and activity levels, as measured by swimming speeds and oxygen consumption, of sturgeon were variable among fish and across study periods. When flows were held low and stable, sturgeon movement increased while activity levels decreased when compared to the study periods when flows were variable or were high and stable. Although the overall trend was for activity levels to be less during the study period when flows were low and stable, the majority of differences between study periods appeared to be due to differences in water temperature and light levels that changed during the three-month investigation. The results suggest high flows, even those of relatively short durations such as what occurs during load-following operations, restrict the movement of juvenile sturgeon, but do not result in an increase of energy expenditure, possibly because of morphological and behavioral adaptations to living in a high-velocity environment. This may have significant

  19. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The design requirements of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are discussed. The following design concerns are presented: (1) environmental impact (emissions and noise); (2) critical components (the high temperature combustor and the lightweight exhaust nozzle); and (3) advanced materials (high temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMC's)/intermetallic matrix composites (IMC's)/metal matrix composites (MMC's)).

  20. Effects of ambient air temperature, humidity, and wind speed on seminal traits in Braford and Nellore bulls at the Brazilian Pantanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Bremm, Carolina; Koetz, Celso; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli; Fiorentini, Eduardo Custódio; McManus, Concepta; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; da Rocha, Marcela Kuczynski; Lopes, Rubia Branco; Barcellos, Júlio Otávio Jardim

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioclimatic thermal stress assessed by Equivalent Temperature Index (ETI) and Temperature Humidity Index (THI) on Braford and Nellore bulls sperm quality during the reproductive seasons at the tropical region in the Brazilian Pantanal. We used 20 bulls aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Five ejaculates per animal were collected using an electroejaculator. Temperature, air humidity, and wind speed data were collected every hour from the automatic weather station at the National Institute of Meteorology. Infrared thermography images data were collected to assess the testicular temperature gradient in each animal. Data were analyzed with ANOVA using MIXED procedure of SAS and means were compared using Tukey's HSD test. The THI and ETI at 12 days (epididymal transit) were higher in January (89.7 and 28.5, respectively) and February (90.0 and 29.0, respectively) compared to other months (P < 0.01). Total seminal defects differ only in Bradford bulls between the months of November and February. Nellore bulls had lower major defects (MaD) and total defects (TD) compared to Braford. Nellore bulls showed correlation between minor defects (MiD) and THI for 30 days (0.90) and 18 days (0.88; P < 0.05). Braford bulls showed correlation for MaD (0.89) in ETI for 12 days (P < 0.05). Infrared thermography showed no difference between animals. Reproductive response to environmental changes is a consequence of Nellore and Braford adaptation to climate stress conditions. Both THI and ETI environmental indexes can be used to evaluate the morphological changes in the seminal parameters in Nellore or Braford bulls; however, more experiments should be performed focusing on larger sample numbers and also in reproductive assessment during the consecutive years to assess fertility potential.

  1. High-Dose Ketamine Sedation of an Agitated Patient During Air Medical Transport.

    PubMed

    Reicher, David

    2016-01-01

    We report a case in which a high-dose ketamine infusion was used to sedate an agitated patient for air medical transport, avoiding the risks of general anesthesia and causing no exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms. PMID:27021674

  2. Flocculation of colloidal sols: Diffusion-controlled vs agitation-induced flocculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A proposal for carrying out flocculation experiments in microgravity is presented. These experiments might allow a correlation between theory and experiment. First, all particles, whether single primary particles or aggregates of primary particles would not settle or cream at any agitation rate, or even in the absence of agitation. This failure to separate would keep all aggregates active, still serving as centers for diffusion-controlled flocculation. Keeping all particles suspended would allow the possibility of determining the total number of particles as a function of time from beginning to end of flocculation. Finally, the experiments would allow a definite separation diffusion-controlled and agitation-induced flocculation by studying diffusion-controlled flocculation with and without agitation.

  3. Role of citalopram in the treatment of agitation in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Porsteinsson, Anton P; Keltz, Melanie A; Smith, Jessica S

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are common among individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), associated with excess morbidity and mortality, greater healthcare use, earlier institutionalization, and caregiver burden. Agitation presents as emotional distress, excessive psychomotor activity, aggressive behaviors, disruptive irritability and dishibition. There is an unmet need to find pharmacologic treatment for agitation in patients with AD that can be safely and effectively used as a concurrent treatment alongside psychosocial interventions. A recent, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial explored the efficacy of a 30-mg daily dose of citalopram for agitation in patients with AD and showed a significant decrease in agitation for citalopram compared with placebo. Both QTc prolongation and cognitive worsening, as measured by the Mini Mental State Examination, were observed in the citalopram group and present a concern to clinicians. Citalopram at a 20-mg daily dose should be considered as a possible first-line treatment in addition to psychosocial intervention. PMID:25405648

  4. Hydraulic characteristics simulation of an innovative self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR).

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei-Kang; Hojo, Toshimasa; Li, Yu-You

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was conducted on a self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR) with agitation caused solely by the release of stored gas. The compound in the reactor is mixed without the use of any mechanical equipment and electricity. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation used to provide details of the flow pattern and information about the agitation process and a solid basis for design and optimization purposes. Every self-agitation cycle could be separated into the pressure energy storage process, the exergonic process and the buffer stage. The reactor is regarded as the combination of continuous stirred tank reactor and a small plug flow reactor. The liquid level and diffusion varies widely depending on the length of the U-tube. The compound transition phenomenon in the 1st chamber mainly occurs during the energy exergonic process and buffer stage. The fluid-diffusion in the 3rd and 4th chambers mainly happens after the buffer period.

  5. Air temperature, wind speed, and wind direction in the National Petroleum Reserve—Alaska and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1998–2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Urban, Frank E.; Clow, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    This report provides air temperature, wind speed, and wind direction data collected on Federal lands in Arctic Alaska over the period August 1998 to July 2011 by the U.S. Department of the Interior's climate monitoring array, part of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost. In addition to presenting data, this report also describes monitoring, data collection, and quality control methodology. This array of 16 monitoring stations spans 68.5°N to 70.5°N and 142.5°W to 161°W, an area of roughly 150,000 square kilometers. Climate summaries are presented along with provisional quality-controlled data. Data collection is ongoing and includes several additional climate variables to be released in subsequent reports, including ground temperature and soil moisture, snow depth, rainfall, up- and downwelling shortwave radiation, and atmospheric pressure. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in close collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  6. Biological activity of insulin in GMO gels and the effect of agitation.

    PubMed

    Sadhale, Y; Shah, J C

    1999-11-25

    Glyceryl monooleate (GMO)-water cubic phase gel was previously shown to protect insulin from agitation induced aggregation. However, it is not known if insulin is biologically active in the gel and what effect agitation has on insulin in the gel. Therefore, the objective was to determine the stability of insulin in cubic phase gel in terms of its biological activity in a suitable animal model such as Sprague-Dawley rats. Effect of agitation on biological activity of insulin in cubic phase GMO gel was determined by subcutaneous injections of the agitated and non-agitated gels to two groups of previously fasted rats and measuring the effect on their blood glucose levels. Two groups of rats administered with agitated insulin solution and normal saline were used as controls. The biological activity of insulin was evaluated by comparing AAC (area above the blood glucose level-time curve, in %-h), C(max) (maximum % decrease in blood glucose levels) and t(max) (time required to attain C(max), in h) values for the four groups of rats. Since cubic phase gel is highly viscous, therapeutic equivalency of insulin in the lamellar phase gel, which converts in situ into cubic phase gel, was compared to insulin solution with normal saline as the control, using AAC, C(max) and t(max) of the blood glucose profile. Insulin was biologically active in both agitated and non-agitated gels; however, upon agitation, insulin in solution totally lost its hypoglycemic activity. Agitation of insulin in the cubic phase gel was seen to have very little deleterious effect on its biological activity. Insulin in the lamellar phase gel was not only biologically active but also therapeutically equivalent to insulin solution based on AAC (327.9+/-100.8 and 431.7+/-113.3), C(max) (57. 1+/-7.0 and 70.2+/-6.5) and t(max) (2.8+/-0.7 and 4.0+/-1.7) for the lamellar phase gel and insulin solution, respectively (no significant difference, P0.05). In summary, GMO cubic phase gel protected insulin from

  7. Retrospective analysis of psychomotor agitation, hypomanic symptoms, and suicidal ideation in unipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Olgiati, Paolo; Serretti, Alessandro; Colombo, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    In bipolar depression, psychomotor agitation is relatively common and often is associated with other noneuphoric hypomanic symptoms and suicidal ideation. Our goal in this retrospective study was to ascertain the co-occurrence of agitation, bipolar features, and suicidal ideation in unipolar disorder. We retrospectively evaluated 314 inpatients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) and no other Axis I diagnosis with the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Life Chart Method and the Operational Criteria for Psychotic Illness (OPCRIT) checklist to ascertain their symptom profiles across all episodes. Univariate and multivariate comparisons were performed between the subgroups with and without psychomotor agitation (OPCRIT item 23> or =1). Agitated depression (AD, a major depressive episode with psychomotor agitation) was present in 19% of the sample. Compared to nonagitated counterparts, patients with AD were older and had lower educational levels and more dysphoria, insomnia, positive thought disorder, and psychotic manifestations. Hypomanic symptoms other than agitation were relatively uncommon (<10%) and more represented in subjects with AD. No significant differences emerged between AD and control groups with respect to most bipolar validators (gender, familiarity, recurrence). Patients with AD had higher levels of suicidal ideation than non-AD controls; however, such a difference was no longer significant after controlling for psychotic features. Excessive self-reproach, early awakening, diurnal changes, poor appetite, and hypomanic symptoms were independently associated with suicidal thoughts in nonpsychotic MDD. Incomplete information on drug treatment, exclusion of patients with Axis I comorbidity, and tertiary care setting were the most important limitations of the study. Although we failed to support the bipolar nature of MDD-AD by common validators, probably because we used a more heterogeneous definition of agitation compared to similar

  8. [Study of the action of sultopride on psychomotor agitation. Apropos of 31 cases].

    PubMed

    Mouren, P; Poinso, Y; Guigou, G

    1976-06-23

    A study of sultopride, a new derivative of the substituted anisamides, has shown that this neuroleptic drug reduces markedly and rapidly psychomotor agitation, especially its aggressive component. It also has an action on hallucinations. Its indications, in order of efficacy, are states of acute agitation, psychotic states during the active phase, acute manifestations of alcoholism and behaviour disorders such as expansivity, impulsivity and agressivity. Its tolerance is good considering its strong activity.

  9. Using a therapy dog to alleviate the agitation and desocialization of people with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Churchill, M; Safaoui, J; McCabe, B W; Baun, M M

    1999-04-01

    1. Short-term exposure to a therapy dog can reduce the number of agitation behaviors in institutionalized persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD), particularly during the period of agitation known as sundown syndrome. 2. The presence of a therapy dog can increase socialization behaviors among a group of persons with AD. 3. A therapy dog can be used as an adjunct to other calming interventions for persons with AD.

  10. Observations of C-band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; May, C.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on the WB-57 over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010. HIRAD is a new Cband radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. (The resulting swath width for a platform at 60,000 feet is roughly 60 km, and resolution for most of the swath is around 2 km.) By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP campaign will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the GRIP campaign, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eyewall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  11. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) during GRIP and HS3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2013-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and at the time of this writing plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  12. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Observations of Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate During NASA's GRIP and HS3 Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain spatial resolution of approximately 2 km, out to roughly 30 km each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. The physical retrieval technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  13. Comparison of two different sevoflurane expelling methods on emergence agitation in infants following sevoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunliang; Song, Tieying; Wang, Hong; Gu, Kunfeng; Ma, Pengyu; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhao, Jianhui; Li, Yuxia; Zhao, JianHui; Yang, Guangyao; Yan, Ruyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of two different inhalation anesthetic expelling methods on emergence agitation in infants following sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods: 100 infants (1~3 years old) with cleft lip and palate and ASA classification I~II were randomized into two groups, a sevoflurane concentration decreasing expelling group (group n = 50 cases) and a low fresh gas flow expelling group (group D = 50 cases). The operation for cleft lip and palate repair was under general anesthesia, in which 30 minutes after initiation of narcosis ending extubation was indicated and after the tubes were removed the patients were sent to the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) to record anesthesia times, emergence agitation scores, Ramsay scores and adverse reactions including drowsiness, respiratory depression, nausea and vomiting, chills, hiccough or laryngospasms. Results: There were no differences in anesthesia times, awaking time and time until extubation between the two groups. 10 min after start of expelling sevoflurane, blood pressure and heart rates were higher in group N than in group D (P < 0.05). The postoperative agitation incidence and the degree of agitation were lower in group D than in group N (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Postoperative agitation is prone to occur in patients with sevoflurane concentration decreasing expelling. Avoiding sevoflurane application maintenance in the stage of sevoflurane expelling reduces the occurrence of postoperative agitation and diminishes physiological and psychological harm. PMID:26131225

  14. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) insights into agitation stress methods in biopharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ge; Bee, Jared S; Biddlecombe, James G; Chen, Quanmin; Leach, W Thomas

    2012-02-28

    Agitation of small amounts of liquid is performed routinely in biopharmaceutical process, formulation, and packaging development. Protein degradation commonly results from agitation, but the specific stress responsible or degradation mechanism is usually not well understood. Characterization of the agitation stress methods is critical to identifying protein degradation mechanisms or specific sensitivities. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to model agitation of 1 mL of fluid by four types of common laboratory agitation instruments, including a rotator, orbital shaker, magnetic stirrer and vortex mixer. Fluid stresses in the bulk liquid and near interfaces were identified, quantified and compared. The vortex mixer provides the most intense stresses overall, while the stir bar system presented locally intense shear proximal to the hydrophobic stir bar surface. The rotator provides gentler fluid stresses, but the air-water interfacial area and surface stresses are relatively high given its low rotational frequency. The orbital shaker provides intermediate-level stresses but with the advantage of a large stable platform for consistent vial-to-vial homogeneity. Selection of experimental agitation methods with targeted types and intensities of stresses can facilitate better understanding of protein degradation mechanisms and predictability for "real world" applications. PMID:22172288

  15. Citalopram for agitation in Alzheimer’s disease (CitAD): design and methods

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Ismail, Zahinoor; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Weintraub, Daniel; Marano, Christopher; Pelton, Gregory; Frangakis, Constantine; Rabins, Peter V.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Devanand, D.P.; Yesavage, Jerome; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Schneider, Lon S.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Agitation is one of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and is associated with serious adverse consequences for patients and caregivers. Evidence-supported treatment options for agitation are limited. The citalopram for agitation in Alzheimer’s disease (CitAD) study was designed to evaluate the potential of citalopram to ameliorate these symptoms. Methods CitAD is a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled multicenter clinical trial with two parallel treatment groups assigned in a 1:1 ratio and randomization stratified by clinical center. The study has eight recruiting clinical centers, a chair’s office and a coordinating center located in university settings in the United States and Canada. 200 people having probable Alzheimer’s disease with clinically significant agitation and without major depression are being recruited. Patients are randomized to receive citalopram (target dose of 30 mg/day) or matching placebo. Caregivers of patients in both treatment groups receive a structured psychosocial therapy. Agitation will be compared between treatment groups using the NeuroBehavioral Rating Scale and the AD Cooperative Study- Clinical Global Impression of Change which are the primary outcomes. Functional performance, cognition, caregiver distress and rates of adverse and serious adverse events will also be measured. Conclusion The authors believe the design elements in CitAD are important features to be included in trials assessing the safety and efficacy of psychotropic medications for clinically significant agitation in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:22301195

  16. Effect of agitation on ligninase activity and ligninase production by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatadri, R.; Irvine, R.L. )

    1990-09-01

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces extracellular ligninases as part of its idiophasic ligninolytic system. Agitation has been widely reported to suppress both ligninase production and lignin degradation. Results show that mechanical inactivation of ligninase is possibly the reason why ligninase accumulation is low or absent in agitated shake-flask cultures. Agitation seems to affect the catalytic activity of ligninase and has no apparent effect on either the rate of ligninase production or the physiology of P. chrysosporium. The detergents Tween 20, Tween 40, Tween 60, Tween 80, and 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesuflonate (CHAPS) are able to protect both purified ligninase and extant ligninase in culture fluids (free of biomass) against mechanical inactivation due to agitation. Addition of Tween 80 at the end of primary growth to agitated shake flasks containing either pelleted or immobilized mycelial cultures results in production and maintenance of high levels of ligninase activity over several days under conditions of high agitation. Possible mechanisms by which the detergents could protect ligninase are discussed.

  17. Flow-induced agitations create a granular fluid: Effective viscosity and fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Kiri; van Hecke, Martin

    2012-06-01

    We fluidize a granular medium with localized stirring in a split-bottom shear cell. We probe the mechanical response of quiescent regions far from the main flow by observing the vertical motion of cylindrical probes rising, sinking, and floating in the grains. First, we find that the probe motion suggests that the granular material behaves in a liquid-like manner: high-density probes sink and low-density probes float at the depth given by Archimedes’ law. Second, we observe that the drag force on moving probes scales linearly with their velocity, which allows us to define an effective viscosity for the system. This effective viscosity is inversely proportional to the rotation rate of the disk which drives the split bottom flow. Moreover, the apparent viscosity depends on radius and mass of the probe: despite the linear dependence of the drag forces on sinking speed of the probe, the granular medium is not simply Newtonian, but exhibits a more complex rheology. The decrease of viscosity with filling height of the cell, combined with the poor correlation between local strain rate and viscosity, suggests that the fluid-like character of the material is set by agitations generated in the stirred region: the relation between applied stress and observed strain rate in one location depends on the strain rate in another location. We probe the nature of the granular fluctuations that we believe mediates these nonlocal interactions by characterizing the small and random up and down motion that the probe experiences. These Gaussian fluctuations exhibit a mix of diffusive and subdiffusive behavior at short times and saturate at a value of roughly 1/10th of a grain diameter longer times, consistent with the picture of a random walker in a potential well. The product of crossover time and effective viscosity is constant, evidencing a direct link between fluctuations and viscosity.

  18. Can Agitated Behavior of Nursing Home Residents with Dementia be Prevented With the Use of Standardized Stimuli?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Marx, Marcia S.; Dakheel-Ali, Maha; Regier, Natalie G.; Thein, Khin; Freedman, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this paper was to assess the relative impact of different types of stimuli on agitated behaviors of nursing home residents with dementia. Design Setting/Participants Participants were 111 residents of 7 Maryland nursing homes with a diagnosis of dementia who exhibited agitation. Intervention Different types of stimuli (music, social stimuli, simulated social stimuli, and individualized stimuli based on the person’s self-identity) to prevent behavior problems. Measurements Agitation was directly observed and recorded via the Agitated Behaviors Mapping Instrument. Results All stimulus categories were associated with significantly less physical agitation than baseline observations, and all except for manipulative stimuli were associated with significantly less total agitation. Live social stimuli were associated with less agitation than music, self-identity, work, simulated social, and manipulative stimulus categories. Task and reading stimulus categories were each associated with significantly less agitation than work, simulated social, and manipulative stimulus categories. Music and self-identity stimuli were associated with less agitation than simulated social and manipulative stimuli. Conclusion Providing stimuli offers a proactive approach to preventing agitation in persons with dementia, with live social stimuli being most successful. PMID:20579167

  19. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior Evaluation of Grainex Mar-M 247 for NASA's High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Rimnac, Clare M.; Lewandowski, John J.

    2008-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth behavior of Grainex Mar-M 247 is evaluated for NASA s Turbine Seal Test Facility. The facility is used to test air-to-air seals primarily for use in advanced jet engine applications. Because of extreme seal test conditions of temperature, pressure, and surface speeds, surface cracks may develop over time in the disk bolt holes. An inspection interval is developed to preclude catastrophic disk failure by using experimental fatigue crack growth data. By combining current fatigue crack growth results with previous fatigue strain-life experimental work, an inspection interval is determined for the test disk. The fatigue crack growth life of the NASA disk bolt holes is found to be 367 cycles at a crack depth of 0.501 mm using a factor of 2 on life at maximum operating conditions. Combining this result with previous fatigue strain-life experimental work gives a total fatigue life of 1032 cycles at a crack depth of 0.501 mm. Eddy-current inspections are suggested starting at 665 cycles since eddy current detection thresholds are currently at 0.381 mm. Inspection intervals are recommended every 50 cycles when operated at maximum operating conditions.

  20. Influence of air pressure, humidity, solar radiation, temperature, and wind speed on ambulatory visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Bavaria, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Uta; Exner, Teresa; Wanka, Eva R.; Bergemann, Christoph; Meyer-Arnek, Julian; Hildenbrand, Beate; Tufman, Amanda; Heumann, Christian; Huber, Rudolf M.; Bittner, Michael; Fischer, Rainald

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The disease is often aggravated by periods of increased symptoms requiring medical attention. Among the possible triggers for these exacerbations, meteorological factors are under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of various meteorological factors on the health status of patients with COPD. For this purpose, the daily number of ambulatory care visits due to COPD was analysed in Bavaria, Germany, for the years 2006 and 2007. The meteorological factors were provided by the model at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). For the multivariate analysis, a generalised linear model was used. In Bavaria, an increase of 1% of daily consultations (about 103 visits per day) was found to be associated with a change of 0.72 K temperature, 209.55 of log air surface pressure in Pa, and a decrease of 1% of daily consultations with 1,453,763 Ws m2 of solar radiation. There also seem to be regional differences between north and south Bavaria; for instance, the effect of wind speed and specific humidity with a lag of 1 day were only significant in the north. This study could contribute to a tool for the prevention of exacerbations. It also serves as a model for the further evaluation of the impact of meteorological factors on health, and could easily be applied to other diseases or other regions.

  1. Influence of air pressure, humidity, solar radiation, temperature, and wind speed on ambulatory visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Bavaria, Germany.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Uta; Exner, Teresa; Wanka, Eva R; Bergemann, Christoph; Meyer-Arnek, Julian; Hildenbrand, Beate; Tufman, Amanda; Heumann, Christian; Huber, Rudolf M; Bittner, Michael; Fischer, Rainald

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The disease is often aggravated by periods of increased symptoms requiring medical attention. Among the possible triggers for these exacerbations, meteorological factors are under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of various meteorological factors on the health status of patients with COPD. For this purpose, the daily number of ambulatory care visits due to COPD was analysed in Bavaria, Germany, for the years 2006 and 2007. The meteorological factors were provided by the model at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). For the multivariate analysis, a generalised linear model was used. In Bavaria, an increase of 1% of daily consultations (about 103 visits per day) was found to be associated with a change of 0.72 K temperature, 209.55 of log air surface pressure in Pa, and a decrease of 1% of daily consultations with 1,453,763 Ws m(2) of solar radiation. There also seem to be regional differences between north and south Bavaria; for instance, the effect of wind speed and specific humidity with a lag of 1 day were only significant in the north. This study could contribute to a tool for the prevention of exacerbations. It also serves as a model for the further evaluation of the impact of meteorological factors on health, and could easily be applied to other diseases or other regions.

  2. Effect of Citalopram on Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease – The CitAD Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Drye, Lea T.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Devanand, D.P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Ismail, Zahinoor; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Rabins, Peter V.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Agitation is common, persistent, and associated with adverse consequences for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Pharmacological treatment options, including antipsychotics are not satisfactory. Objective The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy of citalopram for agitation in patients with AD. Key secondary objectives examined effects of citalopram on function, caregiver distress, safety, cognitive safety, and tolerability. Design, Setting and Participants The Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease Study (CitAD) was a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group trial that enrolled 186 patients with probable AD and clinically significant agitation from eight academic centers in the US and Canada from August 2009 to January 2013. Interventions Participants (n=186) were randomized to receive a psychosocial intervention plus either citalopram (n=94) or placebo (n=92) for 9 weeks. Dose began at 10 mg/d with planned titration to 30 mg/d over 3 weeks based on response and tolerability. Main Outcomes and Measures Primary outcome measures were the Neurobehavioral Rating Scale, agitation subscale (NBRS-A) and the modified Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (mADCS-CGIC) Other outcomes were the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), activities of daily living (ADLs), caregiver distress, cognitive safety (MMSE), and adverse events. Results Participants on citalopram showed significant improvement compared to placebo on both primary outcome measures. NBRS-A estimated treatment difference at week 9 (citalopram minus placebo) was −0.93 [95% CI: −1.80 to −0.06], p = 0.036. mADCS-CGIC results showed 40% of citalopram participants having moderate or marked improvement from baseline compared to 26% on placebo, with estimated treatment effect (odds ratio of being at or better than a given CGIC category) of 2.13 [95% CI 1.23 to 3.69], p = 0

  3. An investigation of long-term effects of group music therapy on agitation levels of people with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ledger, Alison J; Baker, Felicity A

    2007-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the long-term effects of group music therapy on agitation manifested by nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease. A non-randomised experimental design was employed with one group receiving weekly music therapy (n = 26) and another group receiving standard nursing home care (n = 19). Agitation levels were measured five times over one year using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (Cohen-Mansfield, J. (1989). Agitation in the elderly. In N. Billig & P. V. Rabins (Eds.), Issues in geriatric psychiatry (pp. 101-113). Basel, Switzerland: Karger). Although music therapy participants showed short-term reductions in agitation, there were no significant differences between the groups in the range, frequency, and severity of agitated behaviours manifested over time. Multiple measures of treatment efficacy are necessary to better understand the long-term effects music therapy programs have on this population.

  4. Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Agitation and Aggression in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Celina S; Chau, Sarah A; Ruthirakuhan, Myuri; Lanctôt, Krista L; Herrmann, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is frequently associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as agitation and aggression, especially in the moderate to severe stages of the illness. The limited efficacy and high-risk profiles of current pharmacotherapies for the management of agitation and aggression in AD have driven the search for safer pharmacological alternatives. Over the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the therapeutic potential of medications that target the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The behavioural effects of ECS medications, as well as their ability to modulate neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, make targeting this system potentially relevant in AD. This article summarizes the literature to date supporting this rationale and evaluates clinical studies investigating cannabinoids for agitation and aggression in AD. Letters, case studies, and controlled trials from four electronic databases were included. While findings from six studies showed significant benefits from synthetic cannabinoids—dronabinol or nabilone—on agitation and aggression, definitive conclusions were limited by small sample sizes, short trial duration, and lack of placebo control in some of these studies. Given the relevance and findings to date, methodologically rigorous prospective clinical trials are recommended to determine the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of agitation and aggression in dementia and AD.

  5. Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Agitation and Aggression in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Celina S; Chau, Sarah A; Ruthirakuhan, Myuri; Lanctôt, Krista L; Herrmann, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is frequently associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as agitation and aggression, especially in the moderate to severe stages of the illness. The limited efficacy and high-risk profiles of current pharmacotherapies for the management of agitation and aggression in AD have driven the search for safer pharmacological alternatives. Over the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the therapeutic potential of medications that target the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The behavioural effects of ECS medications, as well as their ability to modulate neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, make targeting this system potentially relevant in AD. This article summarizes the literature to date supporting this rationale and evaluates clinical studies investigating cannabinoids for agitation and aggression in AD. Letters, case studies, and controlled trials from four electronic databases were included. While findings from six studies showed significant benefits from synthetic cannabinoids—dronabinol or nabilone—on agitation and aggression, definitive conclusions were limited by small sample sizes, short trial duration, and lack of placebo control in some of these studies. Given the relevance and findings to date, methodologically rigorous prospective clinical trials are recommended to determine the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of agitation and aggression in dementia and AD. PMID:26271310

  6. The effects of researcher-composed music at mealtime on agitation in nursing home residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shu-Yuan; Lai, Hui-Ling; Jeng, Shaw-Yeu; Tang, Chih-Wei; Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chen, Pin-Wen

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effects of music at mealtimes on agitation in 22 nursing home residents with dementia. We used a pretest-posttest research design. We played researcher-composed music to residents at each of two mealtimes daily over a consecutive 4-week period. We observed and recorded agitation 24 hours daily for the 4-week period and the following 2-week period. Results revealed a significant decline in mean agitation scores. A cumulative dose effect and a short-term linger effect were observed. Findings suggest that soothing music may be beneficial in managing agitation in nursing home residents with dementia.

  7. A protocol for the acute control of agitation in palliative care: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ferraz; Almeida, Ana; Teixeira, Sara; Pereira, Sara; Edra, Natércia

    2012-11-01

    Agitation is one of the most frequent causes for palliative sedation. It often requires urgent control to avoid negative consequences and even endangerment of all involved, including the patients themselves. A protocol for the control of episodes of agitation was developed, based on a previous experience. The protocol includes a combination of haloperidol and midazolam. The protocol was used 86 times in 27 patients. Each patient was sedated from 1 to 12 times, median 2 times. The median time from the beginning of sedation to the control of agitation was 15 minutes with a range from 1 minute (2 cases) to 3 hours and 5 minutes (only 1 case). In 71 cases (83%), only the first dose was needed. There were no significant complications. PMID:22363035

  8. Stabilization of tetanus toxoid formulation containing aluminium hydroxide adjuvant against agitation.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Vipul A; Jain, Nishant K; Roy, Ipsita

    2012-02-28

    The aggregation of tetanus toxoid leads to reduced bioavailability of the vaccine and failure of immunization programmes in many parts of the globe. One of the main reasons for denaturation and aggregation of tetanus toxoid formulations is agitation of the protein during transport. We have identified that agitation leads to collapse of the gel matrix of aluminium hydroxide which is used as an adjuvant in these preparations. This results in desorption of the toxoid from the matrix, which then loses its antigenicity due to agitation-induced denaturation of the protein. We show that incorporation of some compatible osmolytes like sorbitol, glucose and arginine, but not trehalose, is able to protect the adjuvant matrix from degradation, and retain the integrity of the vaccine preparation in terms of its antigenicity.

  9. Evaluation and accuracy of the local velocity data measurements in an agitated vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysela, Bohuš; Konfršt, Jiří; Chára, Zdeněk; Kotek, Michal

    2014-03-01

    Velocity measurements of the flow field in an agitated vessel are necessary for the improvement and better understanding of the mixing processes. The obtained results are used for the calculations of the impeller pumping capacity, comparison of the power consumption etc. We performed various measurements of the local velocities in an agitated vessel final results of which should be processed for several purposes so it was necessary to make an analysis of the obtained data suitability and their quality. Analysed velocity data were obtained from the LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry) and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) measurements performed on a standard equipment where the flat bottomed vessel with four baffles was agitated by the six-blade Rushton turbine. The results from both used methods were compared. The frequency analyses were examined as well as the dependency of the data rates, time series lengths etc. The demands for the data processed in the form of the ensemble-averaged results were also established.

  10. Stabilization of insulin against agitation-induced aggregation by the GMO cubic phase gel.

    PubMed

    Sadhale, Y; Shah, J C

    1999-11-25

    The main objective of the study was to evaluate if the liquid crystalline cubic phase gel of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) protects insulin from agitation induced aggregation. The aggregation of Humulin(R), Regular Iletin I(R) and Regular Iletin II(R), in cubic phase GMO gels at 30 U/g of gel was compared with that in PBS at 100 oscillations/min at 37 degrees C using optical density at 600 nm. The effect of agitation on the secondary structure of insulin in solution and in the gels was determined with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and the time course of aggregation was also followed by HPLC. A sigmoidal increase in optical density of solution with time indicated formation of increasing amounts of insoluble insulin aggregates. However, in the gels, optical density values stayed at, or around, the initial optical density value, comparable with that of a blank gel suggesting that insulin had not aggregated in the gel. CD spectroscopy of the soluble insulin showed a total loss of native conformation upon aggregation of insulin in solution. In contrast, CD spectra of insulin in the gel were unaltered suggesting protection from aggregation during agitation. Furthermore, agitation of insulin in gels for a duration as long as 2 months at 37 degrees C, had very little adverse effect on the native conformation of insulin, as indicated by the lack of a significant change in its CD spectrum. Therefore, the cubic phase gel was indeed able to protect insulin from agitation-induced aggregation and subsequent precipitation. Although the majority of insulin in solution appeared to have aggregated and precipitated after 8 days by UV and CD spectroscopy, RP-HPLC results indicated the presence of some soluble aggregates of insulin. In summary, the liquid crystalline cubic phase gel of GMO protects peptides, like insulin, from agitation-induced aggregation.

  11. Pain, agitation, and delirium guidelines: nurses' involvement in development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Judy E; Winkelman, Chris; Gélinas, Céline; Dermenchyan, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The 2013 American College of Critical Care Medicine/Society of Critical Care Medicine clinical practice guidelines for the management of pain, agitation, and delirium in adult patients in the intensive care unit serves as a living example of nurses' involvement in the development and implementation of professional guidelines. Nurses who served on this guideline-writing panel describe their experiences. Specific examples from the pain, agitation, and delirium guidelines for care are used to explore the roles of the nurse leader, nurse informaticist, staff nurse, and nurse researcher in relationship to guideline implementation. PMID:26033098

  12. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, AMI surface wind velocity, TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height, and ECMWF surface wind velocity during 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Fu, L.; Knauss, W.; Pihos, G.; Brown, O.; Freilich, M.; Wentz, F.

    1995-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1993 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (U.S.) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite; 10-m height wind speed and direction estimated from the Active Microwave Instrument (AMI) on the European Space Agency (ESA) European Remote Sensing (ERS-1) satellite; sea surface height estimated from the joint U.S.-France Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON spacecraft; and 10-m height wind speed and direction produced by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of annual mean, monthly mean, and sampling distributions are displayed.

  13. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service;...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service;...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service;...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems..., connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service;...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 2 Standards § 63.1029 Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1010 Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation...

  19. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 2 Standards § 63.1029 Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation...

  20. Effect of agitation on the performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor in the treatment of dairy effluents.

    PubMed

    Penteado, T Z; Santana, R S S; Dibiazi, A L B; de Pinho, S C; Ribeiro, R; Tommaso, G

    2011-01-01

    Agitation rate is an important parameter in the operation of Anaerobic Sequencing Biofilm Batch Reactors (ASBBRs), and a proper agitation rate guarantees good mixing, improves mass transfer, and enhances the solubility of the particulate organic matter. Dairy effluents have a high amount of particulate organic matter, and their anaerobic digestion presents inhibitory intermediates (e.g., long-chain fatty acids). The importance of studying agitation in such batch systems is clear. The present study aimed to evaluate how agitation frequency influences the anaerobic treatment of dairy effluents. The ASBBR was fed with wastewater from milk pasteurisation process and cheese manufacture with no whey segregation. The organic matter concentration, measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD), was maintained at approximately 8,000 mg/L. The reactor was operated with four agitation frequencies: 500 rpm, 350 rpm, 200 rpm, and no agitation. In terms of COD removal efficiency, similar results were observed for 500 rpm and 350 rpm (around 90%) and for 200 rpm and no agitation (around 80%). Increasing the system's agitation thus not only improved the global efficiency of organic matter removal but also influenced volatile acid production and consumption and clearly modified this balance in each experimental condition. PMID:21411951

  1. Effect of agitation on the performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor in the treatment of dairy effluents.

    PubMed

    Penteado, T Z; Santana, R S S; Dibiazi, A L B; de Pinho, S C; Ribeiro, R; Tommaso, G

    2011-01-01

    Agitation rate is an important parameter in the operation of Anaerobic Sequencing Biofilm Batch Reactors (ASBBRs), and a proper agitation rate guarantees good mixing, improves mass transfer, and enhances the solubility of the particulate organic matter. Dairy effluents have a high amount of particulate organic matter, and their anaerobic digestion presents inhibitory intermediates (e.g., long-chain fatty acids). The importance of studying agitation in such batch systems is clear. The present study aimed to evaluate how agitation frequency influences the anaerobic treatment of dairy effluents. The ASBBR was fed with wastewater from milk pasteurisation process and cheese manufacture with no whey segregation. The organic matter concentration, measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD), was maintained at approximately 8,000 mg/L. The reactor was operated with four agitation frequencies: 500 rpm, 350 rpm, 200 rpm, and no agitation. In terms of COD removal efficiency, similar results were observed for 500 rpm and 350 rpm (around 90%) and for 200 rpm and no agitation (around 80%). Increasing the system's agitation thus not only improved the global efficiency of organic matter removal but also influenced volatile acid production and consumption and clearly modified this balance in each experimental condition.

  2. Effect of the Bace Intervention on Agitation of People with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovach, Christine R.; Taneli, Yavuz; Dohearty, Paul; Schlidt, Andrea Matovina; Cashin, Susan; Silva-Smith, Amy L.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study tests the effectiveness of the theoretically driven BACE (i.e., Balancing Arousal Controls Excesses) intervention in decreasing agitation in residents of long-term care with moderate or severe dementia. Design and Methods: A pretest-posttest double-blinded experimental design with random assignment was used with a sample of 78…

  3. Women, Scientists, Agitators: Magazine Portrayal of Rachel Carson and Theo Colborn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Julia B.

    2001-01-01

    Utilizes a theoretical framework of the media's role in reporting conflict and uncertain science, and feminism and science in a thematic analysis of magazine coverage given Rachel Carson and "the Rachel Carson of '90s," Theo Colborn. Notes that Carson and Colborn's identities as women, scientists, and agitators led critics to charge that their…

  4. Hydraulic characteristics simulation of an innovative self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR).

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei-Kang; Hojo, Toshimasa; Li, Yu-You

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was conducted on a self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR) with agitation caused solely by the release of stored gas. The compound in the reactor is mixed without the use of any mechanical equipment and electricity. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation used to provide details of the flow pattern and information about the agitation process and a solid basis for design and optimization purposes. Every self-agitation cycle could be separated into the pressure energy storage process, the exergonic process and the buffer stage. The reactor is regarded as the combination of continuous stirred tank reactor and a small plug flow reactor. The liquid level and diffusion varies widely depending on the length of the U-tube. The compound transition phenomenon in the 1st chamber mainly occurs during the energy exergonic process and buffer stage. The fluid-diffusion in the 3rd and 4th chambers mainly happens after the buffer period. PMID:23567669

  5. Using Simulation to Train Junior Psychiatry Residents to Work with Agitated Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigman, Daniel; Young, Meredith; Chalk, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the benefit and feasibility of introducing a new, simulation-based learning intervention for junior psychiatry residents. Method: Junior psychiatry residents were invited to participate in a new simulation-based learning intervention focusing on agitated patients. Questionnaires were used to explore the success of…

  6. Effect of agitation and aeration on the citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica grown on glycerol.

    PubMed

    Rywińska, Anita; Musiał, Izabela; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Zarowska, Barbara; Boruczkowski, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    The effects of agitation rates from 400 to 900 rpm and aeration rates ranging from 0.18 to 0.6 vvm on biomass and citric acid production on glycerol media by acetate-negative mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica, Wratislavia 1.31 and Wratislavia AWG7, in batch culture were studied. The agitation rates of 800 and 900 rpm (at a constant aeration rate of 0.36 vvm) and aeration rates within the range of 0.24-0.48 vvm (at a constant agitation rate of 800 rpm), which generated dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) higher than 40%, were found the best for citric acid biosynthesis from glycerol. An increase in agitation rate (higher than 800 rpm) and aeration rate (higher than 0.36 vvm) had no impact on DO and citric acid production. The highest citric acid concentration (92.8 g/L) and yield (0.63 g/g) were obtained with Wratislavia 1.31 strain at 0.24 vvm. The highest volumetric citric acid production rate (1.15 g/Lh) and specific citric acid production rate (0.071 g/gh) were reached at 0.48 vvm.

  7. Brief Report: Retrospective Case Series of Oxcarbazepine for Irritability/Agitation Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jessica F.; Sanders, Kevin B.; Benneyworth, M. Hannah; Smith, Jessica L.; DeJean, Virginia M.; McGrew, Susan G.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    We examined response to oxcarbazepine prescribed for irritability/agitation symptoms in a retrospective case series of 30 patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The average patient was 12.0 years old (range 5-21) and taking two other psychotropic medications (range 0-4). Fourteen patients (47 %) had a clinical global impression of…

  8. Pharmacological Management of Agitation and Aggression in an Adolescent with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Findling, Robert L.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Scahill, Lawrence; Hamarman, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an "autism vignette" and then poses an evaluative question to several autism specialists, documenting their varied responses to the scenario and question posed. A 13-year-old boy with autism and severe mental retardation presented to the inpatient psychiatric unit due to a recent increase in agitation and physical aggression.…

  9. Mass transfer in a bubble-agitated liquid-liquid system

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, S.D.; Perona, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A polarographic method was used to measure the mass transfer coefficients between a mercury layer and an aqueous layer agitated by gas bubbles. The effects of gas rate, vessel size, and sparge-tube diameter were studied. The Schmidt number of the aqueous phase was varied by the use of sucrose solutions.

  10. Boiling heat transfer enhancement of nanofluids on a smooth surface with agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xin; Qi, Baojin; Wei, Jinjia; Li, Wei; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Yonghai

    2016-02-01

    The pool boiling heat transfer performance on a smooth silicon chip surface with agitation was experimentally investigated in this study. The nanofluids (Ag/alcohol) of 0.02 % volume concentration and ethyl alcohol with purification over 99.9 % were the two contrast working fluids. For each group, subcoolings of 40, 50 and 60 K were conducted under atmospheric pressure. To enhance the heat transfer performance, an agitating device was fixed above the top of the chip. The experimental results indicated that nanofluids could enhance the heat transfer performance especially in the nucleate boiling region. The heat transfer coefficient was significantly increased with nanofluids, while the critical heat flux (CHF) was nearly not changed. In the agitation Reynolds number of 20,300, the heat transfer performance of nanofluids was significantly enhanced in the convection region, and the CHF was increased by more than 25 % for all groups. This boiling phenomenon was observed for both nanofluids and alcohol groups. Meanwhile, the boiling curves of different liquid subcoolings in the nucleate region were quite similar to each other under agitation.

  11. The effect of agitation state on polyol synthesis of silver nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirjani, Amirmostafa; Marashi, Pirooz; Fatmehsari, Davoud Haghshenas

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the effect of agitation rate on the growth mechanism of silver nanowires is evaluated during polyol process. It was found that increasing the agitation rate leads to the increase in the oxygen transfer rate which in turn enhances the oxidative etching conditions leading to the formation of a variety of nanostructures (nanoparticles, nanorods and nanowires). In light of the obtained experimental results, it can be stated that agitation is not essential for synthesizing silver nanowires by polyol method and it is possible to obtain uniform nanowires with ~200 nm diameters in the length of 20-30 microns several microns length in the stagnant condition. By setting the stirring rate at 200 rpm, it is possible to reduce the nanowires diameters to ~130 nm and the obtained nanostructures are still mono-dispersed. This paper provides complete information about the effect of agitation state on the polyol synthesis of silver nanowires which is truly useful for further studies in this case.

  12. Effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation and CO2 stress on Phytophthora nicotianae zoospore survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan was used as a model pathogen to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation, and aeration with CO2 or breathable air on the survival of Phytophthora zoospores in water. Injecting CO2 into 2 liters of zoospore-infested water for 5 min at 110.4 ml ...

  13. Escherichia coli O8-antigen enhances biofilm formation under agitated conditions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Akash; Mallik, Dhriti; Pal, Shilpa; Mallick, Sathi; Sarkar, Sujoy; Chanda, Ajoy; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial surface components have a major role in the development of biofilms. In the present study, the effect of Escherichia coli O8-antigen on biofilms was investigated using two E. coli K-12 derived strains that differed only in the O8-antigen biosynthesis. In the presence of O8-antigen both bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation slightly decreased under static conditions whereas a substantial increase in adhesion and biofilm formation was observed under agitated conditions. It was noted that, irrespective of the O8-antigen status, the hydrophobic interactions played an important role in bacterial adhesion under both static and agitated conditions. However, under agitated conditions, the extent of bacterial adhesion in the O8-antigen bearing strain was predominantly determined by the electrostatic interactions. Results showed that the presence of O8-antigen decreases the surface hydrophobicity and surface charge. Moreover, O8-antigen facilitates adhesion on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces as revealed through tests with modified substrata. Our results indicate that O8-antigen, which appears dispensable for biofilm formation under static conditions, actually enhances E. coli biofilm formation under agitated conditions. PMID:26187746

  14. Enhancing the adhesion strength of micro electroforming layer by ultrasonic agitation method and the application.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Du, Liqun; Tao, Yousheng; Li, Qingfeng; Luo, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Micro electroforming is widely used for fabricating micro metal devices in Micro Electro Mechanism System (MEMS). However, there is the problem of poor adhesion strength between micro electroforming layer and substrate. This dramatically influences the dimensional accuracy of the device. To solve this problem, ultrasonic agitation method is applied during the micro electroforming process. To explore the effect of the ultrasonic agitation on the adhesion strength, micro electroforming experiments were carried out under different ultrasonic power (0W, 100W, 150W, 200W, 250W) and different ultrasonic frequencies (0kHz, 40kHz, 80kHz, 120kHz, 200kHz). The effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency on the micro electroforming process were investigated by polarization method and alternating current (a.c.) impedance method. The adhesion strength between the electroforming layer and the substrate was measured by scratch test. The compressive stress of the electroforming layer was measured by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method. The crystallite size of the electroforming layer was measured by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) method. The internal contact surface area of the electroforming layer was measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV) method. The experimental results indicate that the ultrasonic agitation can decrease the polarization overpotential and increase the charge transfer process. Generally, the internal contact surface area is increased and the compressive stress is reduced. And then the adhesion strength is enhanced. Due to the different depolarization effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency, the effects on strengthening the adhesion strength are different. When the ultrasonic agitation is 200W and 40kHz, the effect on strengthening the adhesion strength is the best. In order to prove the effect which the ultrasonic agitation can improve the adhesion strength of the micro devices, micro pillar arrays were fabricated under

  15. Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, Alkhafaji R.; Bao, Jianguo; Du, Jiangkun; Zheng, Dan; Luo, Ye

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • A novel method of stripping (agitation) was investigated for NH{sub 3}-N removal. • PFS coagulation followed agitation process enhanced the leachate biodegradation. • Nitrification–denitrification achieved by changing operation process in SBR treatment. • A dual filter of carbon-sand is suitable as a polishing treatment of leachate. • Combined treatment success for the complete treatment of non-biodegradable leachate. - Abstract: This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH{sub 3}-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s{sup −1} within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L{sup −1} at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD{sub 5}/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD{sub 5}, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH{sub 3}-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic–aerobic–anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD{sub 5}, suspended solid (SS), NH{sub 3}-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L{sup −1}, 22.8 mg L{sup −1}, 24.2 mg L{sup −1}, 18.4 mg L{sup −1} and 50.8 mg L{sup −1} respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated

  16. Comparisons between cellulase production by Aspergillus fumigatus in agitated vessels and in an air-lift fermentor

    SciTech Connect

    Wase, D.A.J.; McManamey, W.J.; Raymahasay, S.; Vaid, A.K.

    1985-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus was cultured in disc-turbine-agitated vessels and in an air-lift fermentor. In the agitated vessels the yield of cellulase was reduced when the agitation rate was increased, although extracellular protein levels rose. The enzyme complex itself was shown to be exceptionally stable under conditions similar to those in the agitated vessels, so probably shear damage to the mycelium had occurred, liberating intracellular contents. These appeared to contain an inhibitor that could be removed by fabricated inorganic protein absorbents, such as kieselguhr and alumina. However, the inhibitor was not likely to be protease, since only relatively low levels could be detected and its identity has not been established. The use of an air-lift fermentor avoided the shear effects due to use of the disc turbine agitator in the conventional fermentors, and yields of enzyme were then found to increase by about 20%, maximum yields being obtained at maximum Kla values.

  17. Preparation of fine-particles at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, H.

    1970-01-01

    Flash freezing process yields gelling agent for use at cryogenic temperatures. Vaporized material, diluted with an inert gas, is injected below the surface of an agitated cryogenic liquid. This method disperses particles of chlorine trifluoride in liquid oxygen difluoride.

  18. Collisional broadening and shifting parameters of the Raman {ital Q} branch of H{sub 2} perturbed by N{sub 2} determined from speed-dependent line profiles at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, P.M.; Berger, J.P.; Michaut, X.; Saint-Loup, R.; Chaux, R.; Berger, H.; Bonamy, J.; Robert, D.

    1996-07-01

    The broadening and shifting of the {ital Q} branch of H{sub 2} diluted in N{sub 2} are studied at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. (i) In order to account for the observed anomalies (asymmetric profiles and nonlinearity of the linewidth versus perturber concentration), the results are interpreted using a speed-dependent model in its general form. This model introduces the speed dependence of the shift and the broadening. In contrast with the previous H{sub 2}{endash}rare-gas studies, the high-temperature measurements prove the necessity to include speed-dependent broadening that was ignored in the previous studies. (ii) Concomitantly, we report as well pure H{sub 2} results including Raman frequencies for the {ital Q}(7{endash}9) lines and broadening and shifting results at 800 and 1200 K. A consistent set of data is deduced for H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} up to 1200 K and the proposed model would be pertinent at higher temperatures for combustion applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Experimental measurement of speeds of sound in dense supercritical carbon monoxide and development of a high-pressure, high-temperature equation of state.

    PubMed

    Zaug, Joseph M; Carter, Jeffrey A; Bastea, Sorin; Armstrong, Michael R; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Fried, Laurence E

    2013-05-01

    We report the adiabatic sound speeds for supercritical fluid carbon monoxide along two isotherms, from 0.17 to 2.13 GPa at 297 K and from 0.31 to 3.2 GPa at 600 K. The carbon monoxide was confined in a resistively heated diamond-anvil cell, and the sound speed measurements were conducted in situ using a recently reported variant of the photoacoustic light scattering effect. The measured sound speeds were then used to parametrize a single site dipolar exponential-6 intermolecular potential for carbon monoxide. PρT thermodynamic states, sound speeds, and shock Hugoniots were calculated using the newly parametrized intermolecular potential and compared to previously reported experimental results. Additionally, we generated an analytical equation of state for carbon monoxide by fitting to a grid of calculated PρT states over a range of 0.1-10 GPa and 150-2000 K. A 2% mean variation was found between computed high-pressure solid-phase densities and measured data-a surprising result for a spherical interaction potential. We further computed a rotationally dependent fluid to β-solid phase boundary; results signal the relative magnitude of short-range rotational disorder under conditions that span existing phase boundary measurements. PMID:23586650

  20. Non-intrusive speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L.

    1986-01-01

    In Phase I of the Non-Intrusive Speed Sensor program, a computerized literature search was performed to identify candidate technologies for remote, non-intrusive speed sensing applications in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. The three most promising technologies were subjected to experimental evaluation to quantify their performance characteristics under the harsh environmental requirements within the turbopumps. Although the infrared and microwave approaches demonstrated excellent cavitation immunity in laboratory tests, the variable-source magnetic speed sensor emerged as the most viable approach. Preliminary design of this speed sensor encountered no technical obstacles and resulted in viable and feasible speed nut, sensor housing, and sensor coil designs. Phase II of this program developed the variable-source magnetic speed sensor through the detailed design task and guided the design into breadboard fabrication. The speed sensor and its integral speed nut were evaluated at both unit and system level testing. The final room-temperature and cryogenic spin testing of the hardware demonstrated that the sensor was capable of generating sufficient output signal to enable remote speed sensing from 1500 to 40000 rpm over a speed nut/sensor separation of 3.5 inches.

  1. High-speed Air Temperature Measurements in a Closed-path Cell and Quality of CO2 and H2O Fluxes from a Short-tube Gas Analyzer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; Kathilankal, J. C.; Fratini, G.

    2015-12-01

    Gas analyzers traditionally used for eddy covariance method measure gas density. When fluxes are calculated, corrections are applied to account for the changes in gas density due to changing temperature and pressure (Ideal Gas Law) and changing water vapor density (Dalton's Law). The new generation of gas analyzers with fast air temperature and pressure measurements in the sampling cell enables on-the-fly calculation of fast dry mole fraction. This significantly simplifies the flux processing because the WPL density terms are no longer required, and leads to the reduction in uncertainties associated with latent and sensible heat flux inputs into the density terms. Traditional closed-path instruments with long intake tubes often can effectively dampen the fast temperature fluctuations in the tube before reaching the measurement cell, thus reducing or eliminating the need for temperature correction for density-based fluxes. But in instruments with a short-tube design, most - but not all - of the temperature fluctuations are attenuated, so calculating unbiased fluxes using fast dry mole fraction requires high-speed precise temperature measurements of the air stream inside the cell. Fast pressure and water vapor content of the sampled air should also be measured in the cell and carefully aligned in time with gas density and sample temperature measurements.In this study we examine the impact of fast-response air temperature measurements in the cell on the calculations of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes at different time scales from three different ecosystems. The fast cell air temperature data is filtered mathematically to obtain slower response cell temperature time series, which is used in the calculation of fluxes. This exercise is intended to simulate the use of thicker slower response thermocouples instead of fast response fine wire thermocouples for estimating cell temperature. The directly measured block temperature is also utilized to illustrate the

  2. Corelation between Machines Assisted Endodontic Irrigant Agitation and Apical Extrusion of Debris and Irrigant: A Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Jatin; Jha, Padmanabh

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To compare amount of root canal debris and irrigant extruded apically after irrigants agitation using closed and open chambers. Methods and Material. Sixty maxillary central incisors were selected, decoronated, and mounted in preweighed glass vials filled with distilled water. Biomechanical preparation was completed using ProTaper rotary files until number F4 and 1 mL of 3% NaOCl solution after each file use. Samples were randomly divided into closed or open chamber sets which were further subdivided into 6 groups, based on the agitation techniques: no agitation (control), canalBrush, lentulospiral, passive ultrasonic agitation (PUA), EndoActivator, and EndoVac. Canals were irrigated with 1 mL of 17% EDTA and agitated for 30 s and then flushed with 2 mL of distilled water. Apically extruded irrigant was measured and vials were kept in incubator for 5 days at 68°C for drying for weight calculation. Statistical Analysis. Analysis was done using Student's t-test, one-way ANOVA, and post-hoc. Results. All agitation techniques showed apical extrusion of the debris and irrigant. The closed chamber apparatus showed significantly less extrusion of debris and irrigant than open chamber (P < 0.05). Conclusions. EndoVac was found to be the safest agitation system among all test groups with regard to apical extrusion of debris and irrigant. PMID:25386593

  3. Identifying proper agitation interval to prevent floating layers formation of corn stover and improve biogas production in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Tian, Libin; Zou, Dexun; Yuan, Hairong; Wang, Linfeng; Zhang, Xin; Li, Xiujin

    2015-06-01

    Floating tests were conducted in anaerobic digestion with different OLR of corn stover to investigate formation of floating layers and to find proper agitation interval for preventing floating layer formation. Floating layers were formed in the early stage of no-agitation period. The daily biogas production was decreased by 81.87-87.90% in digesters with no agitation and feeding compared with digesters having agitation. Reduction of biogas production was mainly attributed to poor contact of substrate-microorganisms. Agitation intervals of 10 h, 6 h, and 2 h were found to be proper for eliminating floating layer at OLR of 1.44, 1.78 and 2.11 g(TS) L(-1) d(-1), respectively. The proper agitation interval was further validated by anaerobic experiments. It showed that proper agitation interval could not only prevent floating layer formation and achieve high biogas production but also increase energy efficiency of anaerobic digestion. The finding is useful for operating anaerobic digester with corn stover in a cost-effective way.

  4. Psychosis-related disturbances. Psychosis, agitation, and disinhibition in Alzheimer's disease: definitions and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lesser, Jary M; Hughes, Susan

    2006-12-01

    Approximately 50% to 80% of persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have some type of behavioral or psychiatric condition (eg, agitation, psychosis, and/or disinhibition). Agitation is defined in the context of restlessness, irritability, and resistiveness. Psychosis is recognized as a disturbance in the perception of objective reality. Disinhibition means a chronic loss of social restraint. In the case of AD, disinhibition can present as aggression, hyperactivity, and socially intrusive behavior. Such conditions can be burdensome for physicians and caregivers to manage. Consequences may include caregiver burnout or illness, patient abuse, and even institutionalization for the patient. Management of behavioral disturbances is no longer primarily handled by psychiatrists, but is now entering the realm of family practice and primary care. This article provides evaluation methods and treatment options for the aforementioned behavioral disturbances.

  5. [Sultopride, treatment of choice for psychomotor agitation in severe encephalopathy. 33 cases in a neuropediatric milieu].

    PubMed

    Gadisseux, J F; Fournaux, J; Hallet, J; Ferriere, G

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-three patients showing a definite group of symptoms including chiefly agitation or self-mutilation often dramatic have been treated with sultopride at doses ranging from 7 to 50 mg/kg/day at the Institut Médico-Pédagogique de l'Enfant-Jésus at Ciney. Forty-eight per cent showing this particular symptoms have been cured or greatly improved with sultopride. In 36% the response was incomplete in that it appeared to be identical with sultopride solely or with the previous medications. An opposite result has been noted in 16% only. Side-effects consisted in extra-pyramidal symptoms, drowsiness and digestive disorders. This study leads to the conclusion that sultopride can be considered as the most efficient therapeutical approach to the management of agitation or self-mutilation in severe encephalopathy.

  6. Mixing and solid suspension of up-down agitators in a slab tank

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, C.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Kyser, E.A. III; Tatterson, G.B. )

    1989-01-01

    Seven different up-down agitators were studied for their ability to produce mixing and solid suspension in a slab tank. Mixing times were measured as the time needed to disperse injected dye. The solid suspension studies determined the minimum stroke frequency of the agitators needed for complete off-bottom suspension. The effects of stroke frequency, n; amplitude, a; blade width, w; blade clearance, c; and liquid depth, h, and weight percent solids, X, were studied. The most effective geometry, in terms of mixing, solid suspension and design simplicity, was a single flat blade with minimum off-bottom clearance and a blade width/tank thickness ratio, w/T, of 0.74 at the maximum stroke amplitude studied. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Unlocking Chain Exchange in Highly Amphiphilic Block Polymer Micellar Systems: Influence of Agitation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chain exchange between block polymer micelles in highly selective solvents, such as water, is well-known to be arrested under quiescent conditions, yet this work demonstrates that simple agitation methods can induce rapid chain exchange in these solvents. Aqueous solutions containing either pure poly(butadiene-b-ethylene oxide) or pure poly(butadiene-b-ethylene oxide-d4) micelles were combined and then subjected to agitation by vortex mixing, concentric cylinder Couette flow, or nitrogen gas sparging. Subsequently, the extent of chain exchange between micelles was quantified using small angle neutron scattering. Rapid vortex mixing induced chain exchange within minutes, as evidenced by a monotonic decrease in scattered intensity, whereas Couette flow and sparging did not lead to measurable chain exchange over the examined time scale of hours. The linear kinetics with respect to agitation time suggested a surface-limited exchange process at the air–water interface. These findings demonstrate the strong influence of processing conditions on block polymer solution assemblies. PMID:25642383

  8. Effect Of Developer Type And Agitation On Dissolution Of Positive Photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zee, Cynthia; Bell, W. R.; Neureuther, A. R.

    1988-01-01

    The role of surfactants and agitation in improving the performance of diazo type positive photoresist is explored through dissolution measurements, quantitative models for process simulation with SAM-PLE and SEM profile comparison. In-situ dissolution measurements of a commercial resist, Shipley 1400-31 in MF312, 314 and 319 developers were made on a Perkin Elmer development rate monitor (DRM) with and without moderate agitation. The quality of the measurement data was improved by using a nitride-oxide-nitride thin-film coating to reduce standing wave effects within the resist. Both developers with surfactants, MF314 and 319, show improved contrast over MF312 in plots of thickness remaining versus exposure dose. Although contrast was improved in all three cases by agitation, the effect was most pronounced with MF314. R(M) plots, obtained from combining dissolution rate data with exposure state, distinguish surface retardation effects from bulk effects and suggest that the improvement in contrast for MF314 is due to enhanced surface rate retardation. Using the rate parameters extracted from the R(M) plots, resist profiles were simulated and compared to SEM profiles of fine-lines.

  9. Performance and characterization of a newly developed self-agitated anaerobic reactor with biological desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takuro; Li, Yu-You

    2011-05-01

    The continuous operation of a newly developed methane fermentation reactor, which requires no electricity for the agitation of the fermentation liquid was investigated, and the extent of the biological desulfurization was monitored. Inside the reactor, the continual change in the liquid level and the self-agitation, occurring between 5 and 16 times every day, distributed the organic load near the inlet port of the reactor, as well as providing a nutrient supply to the hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria. At different COD(Cr) loading rates (5, 7, 10 kg m(3)d(-1)), the reactor achieved a biogas production yield of 0.72-0.82 m(3)g(-1)-TS, a COD(Cr) reduction of 79.4-85.5% and an average of 99% hydrogen sulfide removal. This investigation demonstrated that the self-agitated reactor is comparable in digestion performance to the completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) investigated in a previous study, and that the desulfurization performance was significantly enhanced compared to the CSTR.

  10. Impacts on wave-driven harbour agitation due to climate change in Catalan ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, J. P.; Casas-Prat, M.; Virgili, M.; Mosso, C.; Sanchez-Arcilla, A.

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present work is to analyse how changes in wave patterns due to the effect of climate change can affect harbour agitation (oscillations within the port due to wind waves). The study focuses on 13 harbours located on the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean) using a methodology with general applicability. To obtain the patterns of agitation, a Boussinesq-type model is used, which is forced at the boundaries by present/future offshore wave conditions extracted from recently developed high-resolution wave projections in the NW Mediterranean. These wave projections were obtained with the SWAN model forced by present/future surface wind fields projected, respectively, by five different combinations of global and regional circulation models (GCMs and RCMs) for the A1B scenario. The results show a general slight reduction in the annual average agitation for most of the ports, except for the northernmost and southernmost areas of the region, where a slight increase is obtained. A seasonal analysis reveals that the tendency to decrease is accentuated in winter. However, the inter-model variability is large for both the winter and the annual analysis. Conversely, a general increase with a larger agreement among models is found during summer, which is the period with greater activity in most of the studied ports (marinas). A qualitative assessment of the factors of variability seems to indicate that the choice of GCM tends to affect the spatial pattern, whereas the choice of RCM induces a more homogeneous bias over the regional domain.

  11. Helically agitated mixing in dry dilute acid pretreatment enhances the bioconversion of corn stover into ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dry dilute acid pretreatment at extremely high solids loading of lignocellulose materials demonstrated promising advantages of no waste water generation, less sugar loss, and low steam consumption while maintaining high hydrolysis yield. However, the routine pretreatment reactor without mixing apparatus was found not suitable for dry pretreatment operation because of poor mixing and mass transfer. In this study, helically agitated mixing was introduced into the dry dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover and its effect on pretreatment efficiency, inhibitor generation, sugar production, and bioconversion efficiency through simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation (SSF) were evaluated. Results The overall cellulose conversion taking account of cellulose loss in pretreatment was used to evaluate the efficiency of pretreatment. The two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model on dry pretreatment was established and applied to analyze the mixing mechanism. The results showed that the pretreatment efficiency was significantly improved and the inhibitor generation was reduced by the helically agitated mixing, compared to the dry pretreatment without mixing: the ethanol titer and yield from cellulose in the SSF reached 56.20 g/L and 69.43% at the 30% solids loading and 15 FPU/DM cellulase dosage, respectively, corresponding to a 26.5% increase in ethanol titer and 17.2% increase in ethanol yield at the same fermentation conditions. Conclusions The advantage of helically agitated mixing may provide a prototype of dry dilute acid pretreatment processing for future commercial-scale production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:24387051

  12. Pumping Characteristics of a Helical Screw Agitator with a Draught Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Youn-Jea

    In the use of helical type agitator, the mixing process is usually restricted to the laminar flow regime. Common examples of laminar mixing are found where the fluid has a very high viscosity, i.e., pseudoplastic fluids. It can be indicated that a helical type agitator is sufficiently suited to the creeping flow mixing. The pumping characteristic of a Helical Screw Agitator with a draught tube (HSA) is required to evaluate its capacity for the optimal configuration of the mixing chamber. It could be executed by changing some parameters such as the number of helix, the angular velocity and the rotating direction and so on. In this study, the numerical simulation was carried out with the Eulerian multiphase mixture model and the moving mesh approximation. Some of the optimum design parameters have been developed with the aid of numerical data from the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. Using the commercial code, Fluent, the pumping characteristics in the HSA are investigated from the rheological properties, and the results are graphically depicted.

  13. Union Agitators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honawar, Vaishali

    2006-01-01

    A decade has passed since a few union leaders formed the network known as Teacher Union Reform Network (TURN) to search for innovative ways to enhance education. Selling their message has not always been easy. Created in 1995, TURN was the brain child of Adam Urbanski, the president of the Rochester (N.Y.) Teachers Association for the past 25…

  14. Toward an understanding of the effects of agitation and aeration on growth and laccases production by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Gómez-Cruz, Cristina; Galindo, Enrique; Serrano-Carreón, Leobardo

    2014-05-10

    Mycelial growth and laccase production by Pleurotus ostreatus CP50 cultured in a 10-L mechanically agitated bioreactor were assessed through a 2(3) factorial experimental design. The main effects and interactions of three factors (agitation, aeration and copper induction) over five responses (μ, αLacc, βLacc, maximal volumetric laccase activity and maximal biomass concentration) were analyzed. P. ostreatus growth was significantly improved when culturing was conducted with high agitation (5.9kW/m(3)s) and aeration flow (0.5vvm) rates. Under the experimental conditions evaluated, no evidence of hydrodynamic stress affecting fungal growth was observed. However, the high agitation and aeration conditions were detrimental for the growth-associated laccase production constant (αLacc), leading to a very complex optimization of the process. The maximal laccase volumetric activity (1.2 and 3.8U/ml for non-induced and copper-induced cultures, respectively) was observed when the culturing was performed at a low agitation rate (0.9kW/m(3)s) and a high aeration flow rate (0.5vvm). Laccase proteolysis may explain the complex interactions observed between agitation and aeration and the effects of these factors on the laccase volumetric activity observed in the cultures.

  15. Diode-laser measurements of linestrength and temperature-dependent lineshape parameters for H2O transitions near 1.4 μm using Voigt, Rautian, Galatry, and speed-dependent Voigt profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenstein, Christopher S.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2015-02-01

    Linestrengths and lineshapes for 7 H2O absorption transitions in the ν1 +ν3 combination band near 1.4 μm were measured at high resolution using tunable diode laser absorption. H2O- and N2-perturbed lineshapes were measured at 300-1300 K and 2-760 Torr and Voigt, Galatry, Rautian, and quadratic-speed-dependent-Voigt profiles were least-squares fit to measured spectra using a multi-spectrum fitting routine. Transitions with J ″ of 6-18 were studied to highlight the importance of collisional resonance and illustrate how the best-fit lineshape parameters varied with J ″. The accuracy of the Voigt profile decreased as J ″ increased (especially for J =Kc doublets). For transitions in N2, the collisional-broadening temperature exponents varied from ≈ 0.8 to -0.4 (for the Voigt profile) as J ″ increased and this behavior coincided with increasing speed-dependent collisional-broadening coefficients. The quadratic-speed-dependent Voigt profile was found to offer the best combination of accuracy and robust lineshape parameters; however, Rautian and Galatry profiles provided similar performance.

  16. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) during GRIP and HS3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Biswas, S.; Jones, W. L.; Johnson, J.; Farrar, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    HIRAD is a new technology developed by NASA/MSFC, in partnership with NOAA and the Universities of Central Florida, Michigan, and Alabama-Huntsville. HIRAD is designed to measure wind speed and rain rate over a wide swath in heavy-rain, strong-wind conditions. HIRAD is expected to eventually fly routinely on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) such as Global Hawk over hurricanes threatening the U.S. coast and other Atlantic basin areas, and possibly in the Western Pacific as well. HIRAD first flew on GRIP in 2010 and is part of the 2012-14 NASA Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission on the Global Hawk, a high-altitude UAV. The next-generation HIRAD will include wind direction observations, and the technology can eventually be used on a satellite platform to extend the dynamical range of Ocean Surface Wind (OSV) observations from space.

  17. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation of compounds affected during optoacoustic monitoring of thermal therapies measured in the temperature range from 5°C to 60°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruganti, Tanmayi; Petrova, Elena; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.

    2015-03-01

    Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging is being adopted for monitoring tissue temperature during hypothermic and hyperthermic cancer treatments. The technique's accuracy benefits from the knowledge of speed of sound (SoS) and acoustic coefficient of attenuation (AcA) as they change with temperature in biological tissues, blood, and acoustic lens of an ultrasound probe. In these studies we measured SoS and AcA of different ex vivo tissues and blood components (plasma and erythrocyte concentrates) in the temperature range from 5°C to 60°C. We used the technique based on measurements of time-delay and spectral amplitude of pressure pulses generated by wideband planar acoustic waves propagating through the interrogated medium. Water was used as a reference medium with known acoustic properties. In order to validate our experimental technique, we measured the temperature dependence of SoS and AcA for aqueous NaCl solution of known concentration and obtained the results in agreement with published data. Similar to NaCl solution and pure water, SoS in blood and plasma was monotonously increasing with temperature. However, SoS of erythrocyte concentrates displayed abnormalities at temperatures above 45°C, suggesting potential effects from hemoglobin denaturation and/or hemolysis of erythrocytes. On the contrary to aqueous solutions, the SoS in polyvinyl-chloride (plastisol) - a material frequently used for mimicking optical and acoustic properties of tissues - decreased with temperature. We also measured SoS and AcA in silicon material of an acoustic lens and did not observe temperature-related changes of SoS.

  18. Prehospital Use of IM Ketamine for Sedation of Violent and Agitated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scheppke, Kenneth A.; Braghiroli, Joao; Shalaby, Mostafa; Chait, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Violent and agitated patients pose a serious challenge for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel. Rapid control of these patients is paramount to successful prehospital evaluation and also for the safety of both the patient and crew. Sedation is often required for these patients, but the ideal choice of medication is not clear. The objective is to demonstrate that ketamine, given as a single intramuscular injection for violent and agitated patients, including those with suspected excited delirium syndrome (ExDS), is both safe and effective during the prehospital phase of care, and allows for the rapid sedation and control of this difficult patient population. Methods We reviewed paramedic run sheets from five different catchment areas in suburban Florida communities. We identified 52 patients as having been given intramuscular ketamine 4mg/kg IM, following a specific protocol devised by the EMS medical director of these jurisdictions, to treat agitated and violent patients, including a subset of which would be expected to suffer from ExDS. Twenty-six of 52 patients were also given parenteral midazolam after medical control was obtained to prevent emergence reactions associated with ketamine. Results Review of records demonstrated that almost all patients (50/52) were rapidly sedated and in all but three patients no negative side effects were noted during the prehospital care. All patients were subsequently transported to the hospital before ketamine effects wore off. Conclusion Ketamine may be safely and effectively used by trained paramedics following a specific protocol. The drug provides excellent efficacy and few clinically significant side effects in the prehospital phase of care, making it an attractive choice in those situations requiring rapid and safe sedation especially without intravenous access. PMID:25493111

  19. Growth kinetics of potassium alum crystal in a well-agitated vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Clifford Y.; Yu, K. H.

    1989-08-01

    Growth rates of potassium alum crystal in a well-agitated vessel were determined from the de-supersaturation curve of the solution. The mass transfer and surface integration coefficients were then estimated using the two-step model. Both coefficients were found to increase with increasing crystal size. Judging from the Damköhler number for crystal growth and the over-all order of the growth rate equation, it is concluded that both mass transfer resistance and surface integration resistance are significant in the growth process.

  20. Dexmedetomidine Infusion to Control Agitation due to Anticholinergic Toxidromes in Adolescents, a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ada; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2-adrenergic agonist approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the sedation of adults who are intubated on mechanical ventilation and in non-intubated adults who are undergoing surgical procedures. However, it has also recently become a commonly used sedative agent in varied clinical settings for the pediatric patient as well. We present the use of dexmedetomidine for sedation in a unique clinical scenario, the severely agitated and combative patient following the intentional misuse of anticholinergic drugs. Its applications in this situation are discussed, and previous reports in the literature are reviewed. PMID:26380573

  1. High-quality fiber fabrication in buffered hydrofluoric acid solution with ultrasonic agitation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nianbing; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Wang, Yongzhong; Chen, Rong

    2013-03-01

    An etching method for preparing high-quality fiber-optic sensors using a buffered etchant with ultrasonic agitation is proposed. The effects of etching conditions on the etch rate and surface morphology of the etched fibers are investigated. The effect of surface roughness is discussed on the fibers' optical properties. Linear etching behavior and a smooth fiber surface can be repeatedly obtained by adjusting the ultrasonic power and etchant pH. The fibers' spectral quality is improved as the ratio of the pit depth to size decreases, and the fibers with smooth surfaces are more sensitive to a bacterial suspension than those with rough surfaces.

  2. Kinetics of insulin aggregation in aqueous solutions upon agitation in the presence of hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Sluzky, V; Tamada, J A; Klibanov, A M; Langer, R

    1991-01-01

    The stability of protein-based pharmaceuticals (e.g., insulin) is important for their production, storage, and delivery. To gain an understanding of insulin's aggregation mechanism in aqueous solutions, the effects of agitation rate, interfacial interactions, and insulin concentration on the overall aggregation rate were examined. Ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and quasielastic light scattering analyses were used to monitor the aggregation reaction and identify intermediate species. The reaction proceeded in two stages; insulin stability was enhanced at higher concentration. Mathematical modeling of proposed kinetic schemes was employed to identify possible reaction pathways and to explain greater stability at higher insulin concentration. Images PMID:1946348

  3. Mass transfer in a bubble-agitated liquid-liquid system

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, S.D.; Perona, J.J.

    1982-08-01

    A polarographic method was used to measure the mass transfer coefficients between a mercury layer and an aqueous layer agitated by gas bubbles. The effects of gas rate, vessel size, and sparge-tube diameter were studied. The Schmidt number of the aqueous phase was varied by the use of sucrose solutions. The data are well represented by N/sub Sh/.1.33N/sub Re//sup 0.70/N/sub SC//sup 1/3/. 4 refs.

  4. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder: Confluent Patient History of Agitated Depression, Paroxetine Cessation, and a Tarlov Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Hans Mørch

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a woman suffering from persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) after paroxetine cessation. She was admitted to a psychiatric department and diagnosed with agitated depression. Physical investigation showed no gynaecological or neurological explanation; however, a pelvic MRI scan revealed a Tarlov cyst. Size and placement of the cyst could not explain the patient's symptoms; thus neurosurgical approach would not be helpful. Her depression was treated with antidepressant with little effect. Electroconvulsive therapy improved the patient's symptoms though they did not fully resolve. More awareness of PGAD and thorough interdisciplinary conferences are necessary to insure an unequivocal treatment strategy. PMID:25525548

  5. Time-Average Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Technique for Measurement of Velocity, Denisty, Temperature, and Turbulence Intensity in High Speed Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2004-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering based flow diagnostic is developed to measure time average velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence intensity in a 25.4-mm diameter nozzle free jet facility. The spectrum of the Rayleigh scattered light is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer operated in the static imaging mode. The resulting fringe pattern containing spectral information of the scattered light is recorded using a low noise CCD camera. Nonlinear least squares analysis of the fringe pattern using a kinetic theory model of the Rayleigh scattered light provides estimates of density, velocity, temperature, and turbulence intensity of the gas flow. Resulting flow parameter estimates are presented for an axial scan of subsonic flow at Mach 0.95 for comparison with previously acquired pitot tube data, and axial scans of supersonic flow in an underexpanded screeching jet. The issues related to obtaining accurate turbulence intensity measurements using this technique are discussed.

  6. Speeding up solar disinfection (SODIS): effects of hydrogen peroxide, temperature, pH, and copper plus ascorbate on the photoinactivation of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Michael B; Keenan, Christina R; Nelson, Kara L; Voelker, Bettina M

    2008-03-01

    Solar disinfection, or SODIS, shows tremendous promise for point-of-use drinking water treatment in developing countries, but can require 48 h or more for adequate disinfection in cloudy weather. In this research, we show that a number of low-cost additives are capable of accelerating SODIS. These additives included 100-1000 muM hydrogen peroxide, both at room temperature and at elevated temperatures, 0.5 - 1% lemon and lime juice, and copper metal or aqueous copper plus ascorbate, with or without hydrogen peroxide. Laboratory and field experiments indicated that additives might make SODIS more rapid and effective in both sunny and cloudy weather, developments that could help make the technology more effective and acceptable to users.

  7. Subduction Factory 3: An Excel worksheet and macro for calculating the densities, seismic wave speeds, and H2O contents of minerals and rocks at pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Abers, Geoffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    An Excel macro to calculate mineral and rock physical properties at elevated pressure and temperature is presented. The workbook includes an expandable database of physical parameters for 52 rock-forming minerals stable at high pressures and temperatures. For these minerals the elastic moduli, densities, seismic velocities, and H2O contents are calculated at any specified P and T conditions, using basic thermodynamic relationships and third-order finite strain theory. The mineral modes of suites of rocks are also specifiable, so that their predicted aggregate properties can be calculated using standard solid mixing theories. A suite of sample rock modes taken from the literature provides a useful starting point. The results of these calculations can be applied to a wide variety of geophysical questions including estimating the alteration of the oceanic crust and mantle; predicting the seismic velocities of lower-crustal xenoliths; estimating the effects of changes in mineralogy, pressure and temperature on buoyancy; and assessing the H2O content and mineralogy of subducted lithosphere from seismic observations.

  8. Prophylactic Use of Oral Acetaminophen or IV Dexamethasone and Combination of them on Prevention Emergence Agitation in Pediatric after Adenotonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sajedi, Parvin; Baghery, Kivan; Hagibabie, Ezzat; Mehr, Asieh Maghami

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen plus dexamethasone on post-operative emergence agitation in pediatric adenotonsillectomy. Methods: A total of 128 patients were randomized and assigned among four groups as: Intravenous (IV) dexamethasone, oral acetaminophen, IV dexamethasone plus oral acetaminophen, placebo. Group 1 received 0.2 mg/kg dexamethasone plus 0.25 mg/kg strawberry syrup 2 h before surgery. Group 2 received 20 mg/kg oral acetaminophen (0.25 ml/kg) with 0.05 ml/kg IV normal saline. Group 3 received 20 mg/kg acetaminophen and 0.2 mg/kg dexamethasone intravenously. Group 4 received 0.25 ml/kg strawberry syrup and 0.05 ml/kg normal saline. Agitation was measured according to Richmond agitation sedation score in the post anesthetic care unit (PACU) after admission, 10, 20 and 30 min after extubation. Pain score was measured with FACE scale. Nurse satisfaction was measured with verbal analog scale. If agitation scale was 3 ≥ or pain scale was 4 ≥ meperidine was prescribed. If symptoms did not control wit in 15 min midazolam was prescribed. Patients were discharged from PACU according Modified Alderet Score. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, Chi-square, and Kruskal-Wallis among four groups. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 140 patients were recruited in the study, which 12 of them were excluded. Thus, 128 patients were randomized and assigned among four groups. The four treatment groups were generally matched at baseline data. Median of pain score in 0, 10, 20 and 30 min after extubation were different between each study group with the control group (<0.001, 0.003 respectively). Also median of agitation score in 0, 10, 20 and 30 min after extubation were different between each study group with the control group (<0.001). Incidence of pain and incidence of agitation after extubation were not statistically identical among groups (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002 respectively). Mean of

  9. Shear and mixing effects on cells in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1987-01-01

    Tissue cells are known to be sensitive to mechanical stresses imposed on them by agitation in bioreactors. The amount of agitation provided in a microcarrier or suspension bioreactor should be only enough to provide effective homogeneity. Three distinct flow regions can be identified in the reactor: bulk turbulent flow, bulk laminar flow and boundary-layer flows. Possible mechanisms of cell damage are examined by analyzing the motion of microcarriers or free cells relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. The primary mechanisms of cell damage appear to result from: (1) direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies; (2) collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow; and (3) collisions against the impeller or other stationary surfaces. If the smallest eddies of turbulent flow are of the same size as the microcarrier beads, they may cause high shear stresses on the cells. Eddies the size of the average interbead spacing may cause bead-bead collisions which damage cells. The severity of the collisions increases when the eddies are also of the same size as the beads. Impeller collisions occur when beads cannot avoid the impeller leading edge as it advances through the liquid. The implications of the results of this analysis on the design and operation of tissue culture reactors are discussed.

  10. Magnetically agitated photocatalytic reactor for photocatalytic oxidation of aqueous phase organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Kostedt, William L; Drwiega, Jack; Mazyck, David W; Lee, Seung-Woo; Sigmund, Wolfgang; Wu, Chang-Yu; Chadik, Paul

    2005-10-15

    A magnetically agitated photocatalytic reactor (MAPR) has been developed and assessed for oxidation of phenol. The MAPR uses a titanium dioxide composite photocatalyst with a ferromagnetic barium ferrite core. The catalyst motion was controlled with a dual-component magnetic field. First, a permanent magnet above the reactor provided a static magnetic field to counteract the force of gravity, hence increasing catalyst exposure to UV. Second, an alternating magnetic field generated by a solenoid was used to agitate the catalyst, thus increasing mass transfer between pollutants and byproducts to the catalyst. Optimal performance of the MAPR was achieved with the permanent magnet present and 1 A of alternating current to the solenoid between 20 and 80 Hz. Operating with a 60-Hz signal at 1 A with the permanent magnet present and 100 mg of catalyst, the system reduced an 11 mg/L phenol concentration by97% and decreased nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon by 93% in 7 h using three 8-W 365-nm peak UV lamps.

  11. [Aconite in homeopathic relief of post-operative pain and agitation in children].

    PubMed

    Alibeu, J P; Jobert, J

    1990-01-01

    Despite the use of modern analgesic methods and an improved use of narcotics, the combination pain-agitation sometimes persists in the recovery-room. Aconit seems to be an appropriate homeopathic treatment in this case. To prescribe it, the following conditions must be combined: violence and suddeness of the stress bringing about intense and anguish. The study included 50 children with such symptoms; it was carried out double-blind, the children being given either placebo or Aconit. Aconit proved to be effective for children's postoperative agitation with 95% good results. It is usually stated in such studies that the placebo effect is high and may reach rates higher than 30%. Aconit is an amazing cure when well prescribed, as much for the speediness of its action as for its efficiency. This remedy has a place in the recovery-room and should be in every physician's emergency case. The fundamental research could specify how the remedy works and may be discover other molecules effective for stress.

  12. The Interactive Relationship between Pain, Psychosis, and Agitation in People with Dementia: Results from a Cluster-Randomised Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Habiger, Torstein F; Flo, Elisabeth; Achterberg, Wilco P; Husebo, Bettina S

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in people with dementia, and pain is thought to be an important underlying factor. Pain has previously been associated with agitation, and pain treatment has been shown to ameliorate agitated behaviour. So far, the association between pain and psychosis and the effect of pain treatment on psychotic symptoms is unclear. Furthermore, the impact of opioid treatment on psychosis is not established. Aim. To investigate the efficacy of a stepwise protocol for treating pain (SPTP) on psychosis and agitation measured with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Nursing Home version, and to explore the impact of opioid analgesics on psychosis. Method. Secondary analyses are from a cluster-randomised controlled trial including 352 patients with advanced dementia and agitation from 18 nursing homes in Western Norway. The intervention group received pain treatment according to SPTP. Results. Pain was associated with disinhibition (adjusted OR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.10-1.34) and irritability (adjusted OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.01-1.21) at baseline. Pain treatment reduced agitation (p < 0.001, df = 1; 300) and aberrant motor behaviour (p = 0.017, df = 1; 300). Psychosis was reduced in people with at least one symptom at baseline (p = 0.034, df = 1; 135). The use of opioid analgesics did not increase psychotic symptoms. Study Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01021696), Norwegian Medicines Agency, EudraCT (EudraCTnr: 2008-007490-20). PMID:27247487

  13. Effect of agitation regimen on the in vitro release of leuprolide from poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid microparticles.

    PubMed

    Schoubben, Aurélie; Blasi, Paolo; Deluca, Patrick P

    2012-03-01

    Because of the importance of in vitro release tests in establishing batch-to-batch reproducibility and in vitro-in vivo correlation, this study investigated the influence of agitation regimen on the in vitro release behavior of leuprolide from poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid microparticles. Leuprolide-loaded microspheres were prepared using Resomer(®) RG502H and RG503H as polymers. Leuprolide in vitro release was performed in phosphate buffer solution under continuous or once-a-week agitation. At predetermined intervals, leuprolide release, polymer mass loss, and degree of hydration were investigated. Leuprolide release and polymer mass loss were higher under continuous agitation with respect to that under intermittent agitation. Using a modified version of Koizumi equation, it was possible to fit leuprolide release profiles. Similarity factor comparison showed a high level of similarity between experimental and modeled data in the case of once-a-week agitation regimen. This work highlights the importance of the in vitro release conditions on peptide release behavior from polyester microparticles.

  14. Mathematical model for predicting topographical properties of poly (ε-caprolactone) melt electrospun scaffolds including the effects of temperature and linear transitional speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Junghyuk; Khadem Mohtaram, Nima; Lee, Patrick C.; Willerth, Stephanie M.; Jun, Martin B. G.

    2015-04-01

    Melt electrospinning can be used to fabricate various fibrous biomaterial scaffolds with a range of mechanical properties and varying topographical properties for different applications such as tissue scaffold and filtration and etc, making it a powerful technique. Engineering the topography of such electrospun microfibers can be easily done by tuning the operational parameters of this process. Recent experimental studies have shown promising results for fabricating various topographies, but there is no body of work that focuses on using mathematical models of this technique to further understand the effect of operational parameters on these properties of microfiber scaffolds. In this study, we developed a novel mathematical model using numerical simulations to demonstrate the effect of temperature, feed rate and flow rate on controlling topographical properties such as fiber diameter of these spun fibrous scaffolds. These promising modelling results are also compared to our previous and current experimental results. Overall, we show that our novel mathematical model can predict the topographical properties affected by key operational parameters such as change in temperature, flow rate and feed rate, and this model could serve as a promising strategy for the controlling of topographical properties of such structures for different applications.

  15. A MATLAB toolbox and Excel workbook for calculating the densities, seismic wave speeds, and major element composition of minerals and rocks at pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, Geoffrey A.; Hacker, Bradley R.

    2016-02-01

    To interpret seismic images, rock seismic velocities need to be calculated at elevated pressure and temperature for arbitrary compositions. This technical report describes an algorithm, software, and data to make such calculations from the physical properties of minerals. It updates a previous compilation and Excel® spreadsheet and includes new MATLAB® tools for the calculations. The database of 60 mineral end-members includes all parameters needed to estimate density and elastic moduli for many crustal and mantle rocks at conditions relevant to the upper few hundreds of kilometers of Earth. The behavior of α and β quartz is treated as a special case, owing to its unusual Poisson's ratio and thermal expansion that vary rapidly near the α-β transition. The MATLAB tools allow integration of these calculations into a variety of modeling and data analysis projects.

  16. A simple collapse, agitation and pathological crying in a young woman? - Atypical onset of a basilar thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Etgen, Thorleif; Milankovic-Eberl, Dragana; Rieder, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background A collapse and agitation in a young person comprises many differential diagnoses, but usually does not include a life-threatening basilar thrombosis. Methods and Results We report the case of a 19-year old woman who presented mainly with a collapse and agitation. CT and CT-angiography yielded distal basilar thrombosis which was successfully treated by intraarterial thrombolysis. MRI confirmed multiple small ischemic lesions in the vertebrobasilar territory. The patient improved quickly and returned to her normal daily activities of life after a few months. Conclusions Posterior circulation ischemia should be included among the possible differential diagnoses of any acute onset of an agitated or confusional state. Conflicts of interest/Disclosures None to declare. Ethics Written informed consent of the patient has been obtained. PMID:25422712

  17. [Effective Dexmedetomidine Administration for the Prevention of Emergence Agitation and Postoperative Delirium in Patients with a History of Postoperative Delirium].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takanobu; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Kido, Haruki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    We successfully performed intraoperative dexmedetomidine (DEX) administration for the prevention of emergence agitation or postoperative delirium after lung resection in four patients (71.3 ± 5.7 year old, 3 males and 1 female) with a past history of postoperative delirium. DEX was started at 0.35-0.45 μg x kg(-1) x hr(-1) continuously without loading. The average time from DEX initiation to extubation was 141.3 ± 94.4 minutes. No patient had emergence agitation, and DEX administration was continued until the following morning with monitoring in all patients without any symptoms of delirium. Intraoperative DEX administration may be beneficial for the prevention of emergence agitation or postoperative delirium in patients with a past history of postoperative delirium. PMID:27188116

  18. [Effective Dexmedetomidine Administration for the Prevention of Emergence Agitation and Postoperative Delirium in Patients with a History of Postoperative Delirium].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takanobu; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Kido, Haruki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    We successfully performed intraoperative dexmedetomidine (DEX) administration for the prevention of emergence agitation or postoperative delirium after lung resection in four patients (71.3 ± 5.7 year old, 3 males and 1 female) with a past history of postoperative delirium. DEX was started at 0.35-0.45 μg x kg(-1) x hr(-1) continuously without loading. The average time from DEX initiation to extubation was 141.3 ± 94.4 minutes. No patient had emergence agitation, and DEX administration was continued until the following morning with monitoring in all patients without any symptoms of delirium. Intraoperative DEX administration may be beneficial for the prevention of emergence agitation or postoperative delirium in patients with a past history of postoperative delirium.

  19. Dexmedetomidine Injection during Strabismus Surgery Reduces Emergence Agitation without Increasing the Oculocardiac Reflex in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ah-Young; Baik, Ji-Seok; Kim, Jin Hee; Hwang, Jung- Won; Jeon, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dexmedetomidine is known to reduce the incidence of emergence agitation, which is a common complication after inhalational anesthesia like sevoflurane or desflurane in children. However, the dose of dexmedetomidine used for this purpose is reported variously and the most effective dose is not known. In this study, we tried to find the most effective dose of dexmedetomidine to reduce the incidence of emergence agitation in children undergoing strabismus surgery without the complications like oculocardiac reflex (OCR) or postoperative vomiting. Methods We randomized 103 pediatric patients aged 2–6 years and undergoing elective strabismus surgery into four groups. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane and maintained with desflurane. At the start of induction, dexmedetomidine, delivered at 0.25, 0.5, or 1 μg/kg, or saline was infused intravenously in the D0.25, D0.5, D1 groups, respectively. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of emergence agitation and the secondary outcome measure was the incidence of intraoperative OCR, postoperative vomiting, and desaturation events. Results The incidence of emergence agitation was 60, 48, 44, and 21% (P = 0.005) and the incidence of intraoperative OCR was 36, 36, 36, and 37% (P = 0.988) in the control, D0.25, D0.5, and D1 groups, respectively. And, postoperative vomiting rate and desaturation events were low in the all groups. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine decreased the incidence of emergence agitation without increasing intraoperative oculocardiac reflex. Dexmedetomidine delivered at 1 μg/kg was more effective at reducing emergence agitation than lower doses in children undergoing strabismus surgery under desflurane anesthesia. Trial Registration Clinical Research Information Service KCT0000141 PMID:27617832

  20. Reducing Heating In High-Speed Cinematography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared-absorbing and infrared-reflecting glass filters simple and effective means for reducing rise in temperature during high-speed motion-picture photography. "Hot-mirror" and "cold-mirror" configurations, employed in projection of images, helps prevent excessive heating of scenes by powerful lamps used in high-speed photography.

  1. Cultivation of microorganisms in an air-solid fluidized bed fermentor with agitators

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, M.; Kawaide, A.; Matsuno, R.

    1986-09-01

    The productivity of a cell mass of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and enzymes of Eupenicillium javanicum increased by cultivation in an air-solid fluidized bed fermentor with agitators. The usefulness of the apparatus for the fluidized bed culture was verified. The productivity of amylase and protease of the fungus by fluidized bed culture was twice as high as that by stationary culture, considering the dry weight of cells and the enzyme activity. Physiological properties of yeast cells were changed by the fludized bed culture; there was a decrease in the cell size of yeast and changes to the aerobic properties of the yeast cells resulting from excessive supply of oxygen with a high flowrate of air. 8 references.

  2. Remediating agitation-induced antibody aggregation by eradicating exposed hydrophobic motifs

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rutilio H; Latypov, Ramil F; De Imus, Cyr; Carter, Jane; Wilson, Zien; Manchulenko, Kathy; Brown, Michael E; Ketchem, Randal R

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies must encompass drug product suitable attributes to be commercially marketed. An undesirable antibody characteristic is the propensity to aggregate. Although there are computational algorithms that predict the propensity of a protein to aggregate from sequence information alone, few consider the relevance of the native structure. The Spatial Aggregation Propensity (SAP) algorithm developed by Chennamsetty et. al. incorporates structural and sequence information to identify motifs that contribute to protein aggregation. We have utilized the algorithm to design variants of a highly aggregation prone IgG2. All variants were tested in a variety of high-throughput, small-scale assays to assess the utility of the method described herein. Many variants exhibited improved aggregation stability whether induced by agitation or thermal stress while still retaining bioactivity. PMID:25484048

  3. Mechanism of continuous-phase mass transfer in agitated liquid-liquid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skelland, A.H.P.; Moeti, L.T. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper data are reported on 180 area-free, continuous-phase mass-transfer coefficients for 9 turbine-agitated liquid-liquid systems in baffled vessels. Criteria are established that identify the prevailing class of mass-transfer mechanisms for systems of intermediate or high interfacial tension with low {phi}---namely, k{sub c} {proportional to} D{sub c}{sup 2/3} {mu}{sub c}{sup {minus}1/3} N{sup 3/2}. It is also deduced that k{sub c} {proportional to} d{sub p}{sup 0} for the combined ranges of d{sub p}, {Delta}{rho}, and {mu}{sub c} investigated. A subsidiary result is the correlation of the k{sub c} values obtained, on the basis of local isotropic turbulence theory for the inertial subrange of eddy sizes.

  4. Reactor concepts for atomic layer deposition on agitated particles: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Longrie, Delphine Deduytsche, Davy; Detavernier, Christophe

    2014-01-15

    The number of possible applications for nanoparticles has strongly increased in the last decade. For many applications, nanoparticles with different surface and bulk properties are necessary. A popular surface modification technique is coating the particle surface with a nanometer thick layer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is known as a reliable method for depositing ultrathin and conformal coatings. In this article, agitation or fluidization of the particles is necessary for performing ALD on (nano)particles. The principles of gas fluidization of particles will be outlined, and a classification of the gas fluidization behavior of particles based on their size and density will be given. Following different reactor concepts that have been designed to conformally coat (nano)particles with ALD will be described, and a concise overview will be presented of the work that has been performed with each of them ending with a concept reactor for performing spatial ALD on fluidized particles.

  5. Entropy correlates with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankur; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Trikha, Anjan; Rewari, Vimi; Chandralekha

    2014-04-01

    Sedation is routinely used in intensive care units. However due to absence of objective scoring systems like Bispectral Index and entropy our ability to regulate the degree of sedation is limited. This deficiency is further highlighted by the fact that agitation scores used in intensive care units (ICU) have no role in paralyzed patients. The present study compares entropy as a sedation scoring modality with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients in an ICU. Twenty-seven, mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients of either sex, 16-65 years of age, were studied over a period of 24 h. They received a standard sedation regimen consisting of a bolus dose of propofol 0.5 mg/kg and fentanyl 1 lg/kg followed by infusions of propofol and fentanyl ranging from 1.5 to 5 mg/kg/h and 0.5 to 2.0 lg/kg/h, respectively. Clinically relevant values of RASS for optimal ICU sedation (between 0 and -3) in non-paralyzed patients were compared to corresponding entropy values, to find if any significant correlation exists between the two. These entropy measurements were obtained using the Datex-Ohmeda-M-EntropyTM module. This module is presently not approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for monitoring sedation in ICU. A total of 527 readings were obtained. There was a statistically significant correlation between the state entropy (SE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.334, p\\0.0001]; response entropy (RE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.341, p\\0.0001]). For adequate sedation as judged by a RASS value of 0 to -3, the mean SE was 57.86 ± 16.50 and RE was 67.75 ± 15.65. The present study illustrates that entropy correlates with RASS (between scores 0 and -3) when assessing the level of sedation in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

  6. Reducing fischer-tropsch catalyst attrition losses in high agitation reaction systems

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2001-01-01

    A method for reducing catalyst attrition losses in hydrocarbon synthesis processes conducted in high agitation reaction systems; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst; a catalyst produced by such method; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support; and a catalyst support produced by such method. The inventive method of reducing catalyst attrition losses comprises the step of reacting a synthesis gas in a high agitation reaction system in the presence of a catalyst. In one aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support including an amount of titanium effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support which has been treated, after calcination, with an acidic, aqueous solution. The acidic aqueous solution preferably has a pH of not more than about 5. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support wherein the cobalt has been applied to the .gamma.-alumina support by totally aqueous, incipient wetness-type impregnation. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support with an amount of a lanthana promoter effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support produced from boehmite having a crystallite size, in the 021 plane, in the range of from about 30 to about 55 .ANG.ngstrons. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst comprises the step of treating a .gamma.-alumina support, after calcination of and before adding catalytic material to the support, with an acidic solution effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support comprises the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina with an acidic, aqueous

  7. High speed handpieces.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-02-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2.

  8. Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a concise survey of the measurement of air speed and ground speed on board aircraft. Special attention is paid to the pitot-static air-speed meter which is the standard in the United States for airplanes. Air-speed meters of the rotating vane type are also discussed in considerable detail on account of their value as flight test instruments and as service instruments for airships. Methods of ground-speed measurement are treated briefly, with reference to the more important instruments. A bibliography on air-speed measurement concludes the report.

  9. Reducing Agitated-Disruptive Behavior of Mentally Retarded Residents of Community Group Homes: The Role of Self-Recording and Peer-Prompted Self-Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, R. Matthew; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Agitated-disruptive behavior from three mentally retarded adults in community group homes was reduced using procedures that included a self-recorded differential reinforcement of other behavior point fines for agitated-disruptive behavior, social skills training, and relaxation training. (Author/CL)

  10. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., based on design considerations and operating experience, criteria that indicates failure of the seal... the design criteria and an explanation of the design criteria; and any changes to these criteria and the reasons for the changes. (2) No external shaft. Any agitator that is designed with no...

  11. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... service and in light liquid service. 65.109 Section 65.109 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or... system that purges the barrier fluid into a process stream. (ii) The barrier fluid is not in light...

  12. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... light liquid organic HAP service. (3) Each barrier fluid system is equipped with a sensor that will... service and in light liquid service. 63.173 Section 63.173 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1)...

  13. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... light liquid organic HAP service. (3) Each barrier fluid system is equipped with a sensor that will... service and in light liquid service. 63.173 Section 63.173 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1)...

  14. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... service and in light liquid service. 65.109 Section 65.109 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or... system that purges the barrier fluid into a process stream. (ii) The barrier fluid is not in light...

  15. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... light liquid organic HAP service. (3) Each barrier fluid system is equipped with a sensor that will... service and in light liquid service. 63.173 Section 63.173 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1)...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in light liquid service standards. 63.1009 Section 63.1009 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 63.1009 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... the barrier fluid into a process stream. (ii) The barrier fluid is not in light liquid service....

  17. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... service and in light liquid service. 65.109 Section 65.109 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or... system that purges the barrier fluid into a process stream. (ii) The barrier fluid is not in light...

  18. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... service and in light liquid service. 65.109 Section 65.109 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or... system that purges the barrier fluid into a process stream. (ii) The barrier fluid is not in light...

  19. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in light liquid service standards. 63.1028 Section 63.1028 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... barrier fluid into a process stream. (ii) The barrier fluid is not in light liquid service. (iii)...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in light liquid service standards. 63.1028 Section 63.1028 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standards § 63.1028 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... barrier fluid into a process stream. (ii) The barrier fluid is not in light liquid service. (iii)...

  1. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... light liquid organic HAP service. (3) Each barrier fluid system is equipped with a sensor that will... service and in light liquid service. 63.173 Section 63.173 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Equipment Leaks § 63.173 Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service. (a)(1)...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in light liquid service standards. 63.1009 Section 63.1009 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 63.1009 Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards. (a) Compliance... the barrier fluid into a process stream. (ii) The barrier fluid is not in light liquid service....

  3. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems standards. 63.1010 Section 63.1010 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  4. How to Radicalize Graduate Students: Take These Simple Steps to Intimidate, Alienate, and Agitate Your Own Flock of Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffen, Heather

    2011-01-01

    As the recession, budget cuts, endowment losses, and Republican governors gut university funding, campuses across the country have become host to occupations, union actions, and demonstrations. One can take steps to intimidate, alienate, and agitate a flock of graduate students. The author discusses steps that offer simple ways to rile up and…

  5. 40 CFR 63.173 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... leakage from the seal or seals to a process or fuel gas system or to a control device that complies with... agitator shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks by the methods specified in § 63.180(b) of this subpart... system that includes a barrier fluid system is exempt from the requirements of paragraph (a) of...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reservoir that is routed to a process or fuel gas system or connected by a closed vent system to a control... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1... in the referencing subpart. (b) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or fuel gas system or connected by a closed-vent system to a control device that meets the... process or fuel gas system that captures and transports leakage from the agitator to a control device... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level...

  8. 40 CFR 65.109 - Standards: Agitators in gas/vapor service and in light liquid service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... system to a control device that meets the requirements of § 65.115; or (C) Equipped with a closed-loop...) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall be monitored monthly to detect leaks by the methods specified in § 65.104(b) and (c), except as provided in § 65.102(b) or paragraph (e)...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1028 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or fuel gas system or connected by a closed-vent system to a control device that meets the... process or fuel gas system that captures and transports leakage from the agitator to a control device... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1009 - Agitators in gas and vapor service and in light liquid service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reservoir that is routed to a process or fuel gas system or connected by a closed vent system to a control... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1... in the referencing subpart. (b) Leak detection—(1) Monitoring method. Each agitator seal shall...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1029 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems... instrumentation systems standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator shall comply with this section... instrumentation systems shall be monitored within 5 calendar days by the method specified in § 63.1023(b) and,...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1010 - Pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agitators in heavy liquid service; pressure relief devices in liquid service; and instrumentation systems... instrumentation systems standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator shall comply with this section... instrumentation systems shall be monitored within 5 calendar days by the method specified in § 63.1004(b)...

  13. Effects of ultrasonic agitation and surfactant additive on surface roughness of Si (111) crystal plane in alkaline KOH solution.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qingbin; Tan, Xin; Zhu, Jiwei; Feng, Shulong; Gao, Jianxiang

    2016-07-01

    In the silicon wet etching process, the "pseudo-mask" formed by the hydrogen bubbles generated during the etching process is the reason causing high surface roughness and poor surface quality. Based upon the ultrasonic mechanical effect and wettability enhanced by isopropyl alcohol (IPA), ultrasonic agitation and IPA were used to improve surface quality of Si (111) crystal plane during silicon wet etching process. The surface roughness Rq is smaller than 15 nm when using ultrasonic agitation and Rq is smaller than 7 nm when using IPA. When the range of IPA concentration (mass fraction, wt%) is 5-20%, the ultrasonic frequency is 100 kHz and the ultrasound intensity is 30-50 W/L, the surface roughness Rq is smaller than 2 nm when combining ultrasonic agitation and IPA. The surface roughness Rq is equal to 1 nm when the mass fraction of IPA, ultrasound intensity and the ultrasonic frequency is 20%, 50 W and 100 kHz respectively. The experimental results indicated that the combination of ultrasonic agitation and IPA could obtain a lower surface roughness of Si (111) crystal plane in silicon wet etching process.

  14. A study for the thermal treatment of dehydrated sewage sludge with gas-agitated double screw type dryer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hey-Suk; Shin, Mi-Soo; Jang, Dong-Soon; Na, Eun-Soo

    2005-01-01

    A specially designed dryer has been developed for the thermal treatment of dehydrated, highly viscous sewage sludge with moisture content more than 80 wt.% by an gas-agitated, double-screw type dryer system. The treatment capacity of sludge dryer was about 100 kg/h. It consists of burner, feeding hopper, hot gas supplying ducts with double screw conveyor, damper and outlets of drying gas and dried material. The sewage sludge was transported by the revolution of the cylinder conveyor together with the tumbling and mixing action of the screw and lifters. The heating of the sludge was made efficient by the combination action of conduction and convection modes together with the gas-agitation process. The conduction occurred across the surface of the combustor cylinder, the convection was made by the flue gas interaction over the sludge and the agitation action through holes of conveyor cylinder into the bottom of the sludge. The number and location of gas-agitation holes and thereby the fraction of drying gas into the agitation holes were evaluated by numerical calculation of turbulent reacting flow. To evaluate the performance of the dryer developed in this study, a series of parametric experiments were performed in terms of important variables. In general drying process occurred successfully even for the highly agglomerating municipal sewage sludge through the first lumped plastic phase to a fine granulate state when the heat and mass balance was matched by adjusting rpm of the conveyor, burner capacity, and the fraction of gas-agitation. Further the avoidance of initial sludge agglomeration was considered to be important by the combination action of screw and lifter. The weight of the sludge was reduced approximately by 60% and therefore the volume of sludge was decreased to approximately 75% of initial volume with the water content of 10-20%. Energy efficiency of dryer was evaluated in the range of 70-75% at the sludge feed rate, 100 kg/h. The results obtained show

  15. Vehicle speed control device

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Trump, W.E.

    1987-03-10

    An apparatus is described for automatically limiting the speed of a vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine having a spark ignition system with an ignition coil, comprising: sensor means for generating a speed signal directly representative of the speed of the vehicle comprising a series of speed signal pulses having a pulse repetition frequency proportional to the speed of the vehicle; control means for converting speed signal pulses into a DC voltage proportional to the vehicle speed; means for comparing the DC voltage to a predetermined DC voltage having substantially zero AC components representative of a predetermined maximum speed and for generating a difference signal in response thereto; and means for generating a pulse-width modulated control signal responsive to the difference signal; power means responsive to the control signal for intermittently interrupting the ignition system.

  16. [Management of agitated, violent or psychotic patients in the emergency department: an overdue protocol for an increasing problem].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Busselo, M T; Aragó Domingo, J; Nuño Ballesteros, A; Loño Capote, J; Ochando Perales, G

    2005-12-01

    Patients with extreme agitation, delirium, violent behavior or acute psychosis are frequently evaluated in the emergency departments of general hospitals. However, the traditional infrequency of this type of situation in pediatric emergency services can lead to a certain lack of foresight and efficiency in the initial management of these patients. Because of the current known increase of psychosocial disorders in pediatric emergencies, new pharmacological treatments for juvenile psychotic processes, and particularly the lack of compliance with these treatments, as well as the earlier consumption of ever more varied illicit drugs among young people, the frequency and diversity of this kind of disorder is on the increase. The treatment of agitation, aggression and violence begins with successful management of the acute episode, followed by strategies designed to reduce the intensity and frequency of subsequent episodes. The key to safety is early intervention to prevent progression from agitation to aggression and violence. Consequently, urgent measures designed to inhibit agitation should be adopted without delay by the staff initially dealing with the patient, usually in the emergency unit. Patients with psychomotor agitation disorder (PMAD) may require emergency physical and/or chemical restraints for their own safety and that of the healthcare provider in order to prevent harmful clinical sequelae and to expedite medical evaluation to determine the cause. However, the risks of restraint measures must be weighed against the benefits in each case. This review aims to present the emergency measures to be taken in children with PMAD. The distinct etiological situations and criteria for the choice of drugs for chemical restraint in each situation, as well as the complications associated with certain drugs, are discussed. It is advisable, therefore, that health professionals become familiar with the distinct pharmacological options.

  17. Regulation of chromosome speeds in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Betterton, M. D.; McIntosh, J. Richard

    2015-01-01

    When chromosome are being separated in preparation for cell division, their motions are slow (~16 nm/s) relative to the speed at which many motor enzymes can move their cellular cargoes (160–1000 nm/s and sometimes even faster) and at which microtubules (MTs) depolymerize (~200 nm/s). Indeed, anaphase chromosome speeds are so slow that viscous drag puts little load on the mechanisms that generate the relevant forces [35]. Available evidence suggests that chromosome speed is due to some form of regulation. For example, big and little chromosomes move at about the same speed, chromosomes that have farther to go move faster than others, and chromosome speed is affected by both temperature and an experimentally applied load. In this essay we review data on these phenomena and present our ideas about likely properties of the mechanisms that regulate chromosome speed. PMID:26405462

  18. Variable-Speed Instrumented Centrifuges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, David K.; Brown, Allan H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes conceptual pair of centrifuges, speed of which varied to produce range of artificial gravities in zero-gravity environment. Image and data recording and controlled temperature and gravity provided for 12 experiments. Microprocessor-controlled centrifuges include video cameras to record stop-motion images of experiments. Potential applications include studies of effect of gravity on growth and on production of hormones in corn seedlings, experiments with magnetic flotation to separate cells, and electrophoresis to separate large fragments of deoxyribonucleic acid.

  19. Use of seagrass meadows as an adaptation measure to climate change for reducing port agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Lin, Jue; Pau Sierra, Joan; Gracia, Vicenç; Casas-Prat, Merce; Virgili, Marc

    2014-05-01

    One of the best-known consequences of the greenhouse effect and the resulting global warming is sea-level rise. However, sea level rise is not the only process of concern to coastal communities. The greenhouse effect and the complex interactions in atmospheric processes is expected to produce changes in near-surface wind and pressure patterns, which in turn can affect the pattern of another important coastal driver: the wave field. Changes in wave conditions can affect the wave pattern within harbours as shown by Casas-Prat and Sierra (2012), increasing port agitation and, as a consequence, reducing the safety and comfort of the users, decreasing operation performance or even generating port inactivity. This effect will be enhanced by an increase in mean sea level. To avoid costly structural measure there are "green" options such as sea-grass that can attenuate wave energy (Koftis et al., 2013), since their roots induce sea bottom roughness and their stems and leaves increase the drag coefficient. The combined effect of vegetation is, thus, to create drag forces that dissipate part of the energy from incoming waves. Casas-Prat and Sierra (2013) showed that wave patterns may change in the future in certain areas of the Catalan Coast (northwestern Mediterranean) and as a consequence port agitation could be affected by changes in wave height or direction as well in those areas. The suggested "green" measures can help to prevent potential negative effects on port operations. The adaptive approach, depending on the downscaled climatic projections, would combine vegetation (as for example the existence of a sea-grass meadow in the vicinity of the harbour entrance) with some structural reinforcement if required. In this paper, the wave projections of Casas-Prat and Sierra (2013) are used together with a Boussinesq-type model to study wave propagation in several harbours of the Catalan Coast. This analysis of harbour oscillations is carried out for present conditions and

  20. Sevoflurane-emergence agitation: Effect of supplementary low-dose oral ketamine premedication in preschool children undergoing dental surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ahmed Metwally; El-Seify, Zeinab Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The use of sevoflurane in pediatric anesthesia, which could enable a more rapid emergence and recovery, is complicated by the frequent occurrence of post-anesthesia agitation. This study aims to test the efficacy of adding a low dose of ketamine orally, as a supplement to the midazolam-based oral premedication for reducing sevoflurane-related emergence agitation. Materials and Methods: Ninety-two preschool children, aged between two and six years, with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, scheduled for elective dental filling and extractions under general anesthesia were included. The patients were allocated into two groups: Group M (46 patients) received oral midazolam 0.5 mg/kg, mixed with ibuprofen 10 mg/kg, while group KM (46 patients) received a similar premedication mixture, in addition to ketamine 2 mg/kg. The acceptance of the drug mixture, the onset of action, and the occurrence of vomiting were monitored over the next 30 minutes. Induction of anesthesia was carried out using sevoflurane 8 Vol% in 100% oxygen via face mask. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane 1.5-2 Vol% in an oxygen-nitrous oxide mixture. After extubation, the standard scoring scale was used for assessing the quality of emergence. Agitation parameters were measured using a five-point scale. Agitated children were managed by giving intravenous increments of fentanyl 1 μg/ kg. The time of hospital discharge allowance was recorded. Results: Drug palatability, vomiting, and onset of action of premedication; showed no significant differences between both groups. Time of eye opening after discontinuation of sevoflurane showed no significant differences between both groups. Postoperative agitation score and rescue fentanyl consumption were higher in group M than in group KM on admission to the PACU (P < 0.01). The time of hospital discharge allowance in group M was longer than in group KM (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Adding a low dose of

  1. Drying process optimization for an API solvate using heat transfer model of an agitated filter dryer.

    PubMed

    Nere, Nandkishor K; Allen, Kimberley C; Marek, James C; Bordawekar, Shailendra V

    2012-10-01

    Drying an early stage active pharmaceutical ingredient candidate required excessively long cycle times in a pilot plant agitated filter dryer. The key to faster drying is to ensure sufficient heat transfer and minimize mass transfer limitations. Designing the right mixing protocol is of utmost importance to achieve efficient heat transfer. To this order, a composite model was developed for the removal of bound solvent that incorporates models for heat transfer and desolvation kinetics. The proposed heat transfer model differs from previously reported models in two respects: it accounts for the effects of a gas gap between the vessel wall and solids on the overall heat transfer coefficient, and headspace pressure on the mean free path length of the inert gas and thereby on the heat transfer between the vessel wall and the first layer of solids. A computational methodology was developed incorporating the effects of mixing and headspace pressure to simulate the drying profile using a modified model framework within the Dynochem software. A dryer operational protocol was designed based on the desolvation kinetics, thermal stability studies of wet and dry cake, and the understanding gained through model simulations, resulting in a multifold reduction in drying time.

  2. Critical review and meta-analysis of serial agitated dilutions in experimental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Linde, K; Jonas, W B; Melchart, D; Worku, F; Wagner, H; Eitel, F

    1994-07-01

    1. We conducted an overview and quantitative meta-analysis of all experimental literature on the protective effects of serial agitated dilutions (SADs) of toxin preparations. 2. Articles were systematically collected and evaluated for scientific quality using pre-defined methodological criteria and then independently analysed for validity. 3. We found 105 publications exploring the effects of SAD preparations in toxicological systems. 4. The quality of evidence in these studies was low with only 43% achieving one half of the maximum possible quality score and only 31% reported in a fashion that permitted reevaluation of the data. 5. Very few studies were independently replicated using comparable models. 6. Among the high quality studies, positive effects were reported 50% more often than negative effects. 7. Four of 5 outcomes meeting quality and comparability criteria for meta-analysis showed positive effects from SAD preparations. 8. Average percent protection over controls in these preparations was 19.7 (95%Cl 6.2-33.2). 9. Further research with special attention to methodological detail and independent replication should be done.

  3. Systematic microcarrier screening and agitated culture conditions improves human mesenchymal stem cell yield in bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Qasim A.; Coopman, Karen; Nienow, Alvin W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Production of human mesenchymal stem cells for allogeneic cell therapies requires scalable, cost‐effective manufacturing processes. Microcarriers enable the culture of anchorage‐dependent cells in stirred‐tank bioreactors. However, no robust, transferable methodology for microcarrier selection exists, with studies providing little or no reason explaining why a microcarrier was employed. We systematically evaluated 13 microcarriers for human bone marrow‐derived MSC (hBM‐MSCs) expansion from three donors to establish a reproducible and transferable methodology for microcarrier selection. Monolayer studies demonstrated input cell line variability with respect to growth kinetics and metabolite flux. HBM‐MSC1 underwent more cumulative population doublings over three passages in comparison to hBM‐MSC2 and hBM‐MSC3. In 100 mL spinner flasks, agitated conditions were significantly better than static conditions, irrespective of donor, and relative microcarrier performance was identical where the same microcarriers outperformed others with respect to growth kinetics and metabolite flux. Relative growth kinetics between donor cells on the microcarriers were the same as the monolayer study. Plastic microcarriers were selected as the optimal microcarrier for hBM‐MSC expansion. HBM‐MSCs were successfully harvested and characterised, demonstrating hBM‐MSC immunophenotype and differentiation capacity. This approach provides a systematic method for microcarrier selection, and the findings identify potentially significant bioprocessing implications for microcarrier‐based allogeneic cell therapy manufacture. PMID:26632496

  4. Assessing Alzheimer's disease patients with the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory: scoring and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Myron F; Tractenberg, Rochelle E; Jin, Shelia; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G; Koss, Elisabeth; Thal, Leon J

    2002-01-01

    We explored the applicability of the standard scoring of the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI), a widely used nursing-home derived instrument, to community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Item responses to the CMAI were gathered from participants in two large clinical studies, one of which specifically included patients with behavioral disturbances. Confirmatory factor analysis in these two groups of well-characterized AD patients suggested that conventional CMAI subscoring did not adequately describe the responses of these two groups. Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the four CMAI subscores, based on a verbal-physical and aggressive-non-aggressive conceptualization of behavioral disturbance, did not fit community dwelling persons with AD. Based on cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, there was suggestive evidence for three behavioral clusters, but these clusters did not achieve statistical significance Overall, the CMAI seemed best suited to describe the overall level rather than the specific subtypes of behavioral dyscontrol in community-dwelling persons with AD. PMID:11755457

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Simulations on Multiphase Flow in Mechanically Agitated Seed Precipitation Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Ting-An; Gu, Songqing; Zhang, Chao

    2014-07-01

    The large-scale mechanically agitated tank has been widely used in the decomposition process of sodium aluminate solution in the alumina industry. The mixing process in three types of seed precipitation tanks (Robin, Ekato, and improved Ekato) stirred with multiple impellers was compared by using computational fluid dynamics, respectively. The flow field, solid distribution, mixing time, and power consumption were numerically simulated by adopting a Eulerian granular multiphase model and a standard k- ɛ turbulence model. A steady multiple reference frame approach was used to represent impeller rotation. Compared with the Robin tank, the Ekato tank can generate an axial circulation loop, which is better for fluid mixing and solid suspension; meanwhile about half of the power can be saved. With future improvements in the Ekato tank, the fluid mixing and exchanging can be enhanced under the interaction of a lengthened Intermig impeller coupled with sloped baffles. With a little increase in power consumption, the maximum of the relative solid concentration difference in the whole tank can be maintained within 3%, which meets the design requirement.

  6. CFD investigation of turbulence models for mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluates six turbulence models for mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in a lab-scale anaerobic digestion tank with a pitched blade turbine (PBT) impeller. The models studied are: (1) the standard k-ɛ model, (2) the RNG k-ɛ model, (3) the realizable k-ɛ model, (4) the standard k-ω model, (5) the SST k-ω model, and (6) the Reynolds stress model. Through comparing power and flow numbers for the PBT impeller obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from the lab specifications, the realizable k-ɛ and the standard k-ω models are found to be more appropriate than the other turbulence models. An alternative method to calculate the Reynolds number for the moving zone that characterizes the impeller rotation is proposed to judge the flow regime. To check the effect of the model setup on the predictive accuracy, both discretization scheme and numerical approach are investigated. The model validation is conducted by comparing the simulated velocities with experimental data in a lab-scale digester from literature. Moreover, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale digester with two side-entry impellers is performed to optimize the installation. PMID:21216428

  7. High speed handpieces

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-01-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2. PMID:24653618

  8. Vehicle speed control system

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, D.; Tanno, T.; Fukunaga, T.

    1987-06-16

    This patent describes a vehicle speed control system for performing vehicle speed control by controlling the displacement of at least one of a hydraulic pump and a hydraulic motor of a hydraulic transmission through an electric servo device, comprising: vehicle speed setting means for generating a voltage signal corresponding to a vehicle speed to be set; compensating means interposed between the vehicle speed setting means and the electric servo device, the compensating means comprising a first delay element; and second delay element having a response characteristic slower than that of the first delay element. A selecting means for judging as to whether a voltage signal changed by the operation of the vehicle speed setting means represents an acceleration command or a deceleration command and for selecting the first delay element when the voltage signal represents an acceleration command and for selecting the second delay element when the voltage signal represents a deceleration command.

  9. 'What price speed', revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitler, S.; Proodian, R. E.

    1980-02-01

    An attempt is made to examine fuel transport effectiveness as a function of vehicle cruise velocity, when studying limits in speed beyond which a particular form of locomotion becomes inefficient and economically unattractive. Attention is given to the Dix-Riddell relationship and to the specific fuel energy expenditure ratio. It is concluded that for each value of speed at which useful work is carried out, there is an experiential maximum that sets the standard for fuel transport effectiveness at that speed.

  10. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  11. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  12. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  13. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  14. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  15. Protective effects of Healon and Occucoat against air bubble endothelial damage during ultrasonic agitation of the anterior chamber.

    PubMed

    Monson, M C; Tamura, M; Mamalis, N; Olson, R J; Olson, R J

    1991-09-01

    An important aspect of any new viscoelastic substance is the corneal endothelial protection. We compared the protective effects of sodium hyaluronate (Healon) and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (Occucoat) by introducing a controlled volume of air bubbles into the anterior chamber of human eye bank eyes during ultrasonic agitation of the anterior chamber. Eight eyes received Healon and 11 eyes received Occucoat. Damage to endothelial cells in the central cornea was quantified by vital staining. Endothelial damage averaged 4.5% in eyes in which no viscoelastic was used (positive control); damage was 0.4% in eyes in which a viscoelastic was injected but no air bubbles were introduced (negative control). We found that endothelial damage averaged 4.25% in specimens that received air plus Healon and 1.4% in specimens that received air plus Occucoat. Occucoat appeared to have somewhat better protective effects than Healon against air bubble damage to the corneal endothelium during ultrasonic agitation of the anterior chamber.

  16. Radiocesium and radioiodine in soil particles agitated by agricultural practices: field observation after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, N; Eguchi, S; Fujiwara, H; Hayashi, K; Tsukada, H

    2012-05-15

    Three weeks after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, we determined the activity concentrations of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs in atmospheric dust fugitively resuspended from soil particles due to soil surface perturbation by agricultural practices. The atmospheric concentrations of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs increased because of the agitation of soil particles by a hammer-knife mower and a rotary tiller. Coarse soil particles were primarily agitated by the perturbation of the soil surface of Andosols. For dust particles smaller than 10 μm, the resuspension factors of radiocesium during the operation of agricultural equipment were 16-times higher than those under background condition. Before tillage, most of the radionuclides accumulated within a few cm of the soil surface. Tillage diluted their concentration in the uppermost soil layer.

  17. An application of numerical simulation of multiphase flow for the redesign of a mixer agitator in Pb refining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donizak, J.; Jarosz, P.; Kraszewska, A.; Sarre, P.

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation of multiphase turbulent flow in a mixing crucible unit. Results of simulation were used for redesign of mixer agitator to achieve better performance of the Pb refining process. The simulation is based on Euler-Lagrange description of turbulent multiphase flow with the one way coupling, due to low concentration of solid state particles and significant differences in density of coexisting phases, base metal and particles. Dispersions of solid particles are traced using stochastic-deterministic approach. The developed construction of an agitator has been tested in the industrial Pb refining factory, giving very promising results in comparison with long term statistical data. Duration of unit operations of removal copper and tin was reduced of about 40% together with even better removal efficiency and less energy and reagents consumption.

  18. High-speed phosphor thermometry.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, N; Baum, E; Brübach, J; Dreizler, A

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm. PMID:22047319

  19. High-speed phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Baum, E.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm.

  20. High-speed phosphor thermometry.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, N; Baum, E; Brübach, J; Dreizler, A

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm.

  1. A methodological approach for quantifying and characterizing the stability of agitated saline contrast: implications for quantifying intrapulmonary shunt.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Heather K; Boulet, Lindsey M; Dominelli, Paolo B; Foster, Glen E

    2016-08-01

    Agitated saline contrast echocardiography is often used to determine blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (Q̇IPAVA). We applied indicator dilution theory to time-acoustic intensity curves obtained from a bolus injection of hand-agitated saline contrast to acquire a quantitative index of contrast mass. Using this methodology and an in vitro model of the pulmonary circulation, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of transit time and gas composition [air vs. sulphur hexafluoride (SF6)] on contrast conservation between two detection sites separated by a convoluted network of vessels. We hypothesized that the contrast lost between the detection sites would increase with transit times and be reduced by using contrast bubbles composed of SF6 Changing the flow and/or reducing the volume of the circulatory network manipulated transit time. Contrast conservation was measured as the ratio of outflow and inflow contrast masses. For air, 53.2 ± 3.4% (SE) of contrast was conserved at a transit time of 9.25 ± 0.02 s but dropped to 16.0 ± 1.0% at a transit time of 10.17 ± 0.06 s. Compared with air, SF6 contrast conservation was significantly greater (P < 0.05) with 114.3 ± 2.9% and 73.7 ± 3.3% of contrast conserved at a transit time of 10.39 ± 0.02 s and 13.46 ± 0.04 s, respectively. In summary, time-acoustic intensity curves can quantify agitated saline contrast, but loss of contrast due to bubble dissolution makes measuring Q̇IPAVA across varying transit time difficult. Agitated saline composed of SF6 is stabilized and may be a suitable alternative for Q̇IPAVA measurement. PMID:27365283

  2. Prevalence and clinical significance of subsyndromal manic symptoms, including irritability and psychomotor agitation, during bipolar major depressive episodes

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Lewis L.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Akiskal, Hagop; Coryell, William; Fawcett, Jan; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Solomon, David A.; Keller, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that subsyndromal manic symptoms occur frequently during bipolar major depressive episodes (MDEs) and may be a subtle form of ‘depressive mixed state.’ This paper examines the prevalence and clinical characteristics of MDEs with subsyndromal manic symptoms. The specific effects of overt irritability and psychomotor agitation are examined. Methods Bipolar (type I or II) patients with an MDE at intake (N=142) were compared based on the presence or absence of concurrent subsyndromal manic symptoms. The groups were further subdivided by the presence of symptoms of overt irritability and/or psychomotor agitation. Results Subsyndromal manic symptoms during bipolar MDEs were highly prevalent (76.1%), and were associated with significantly increased severity of depression/dysphoria in the intake episode, longer episode duration, and more suicidal ideation and behavior (past, current, and during long-term follow-up). Overt irritability and psychomotor agitation were the most prevalent subsyndromal manic symptoms (co-occurring in 57% and 39% of MDEs, respectively), and accounted for most of the negative effects associated with subsyndromal manic symptoms. Limitations The findings need to be confirmed in larger samples, which also examine the relationship to adequate antidepressant and/or mood stabilizing treatment. Conclusions The presence of one or more subsyndromal manic symptoms appears to be the modal presentation of bipolar MDEs and a marker for a subtle form of bipolar mixed depressive state. In particular, patients with symptoms of overt irritability and/or psychomotor agitation should be monitored closely to avoid serious clinical outcomes such as longer affective episodes, exacerbation of manic symptoms syndromal mania, and heightened suicidality. PMID:22314261

  3. Effect of visual art on patient anxiety and agitation in a mental health facility and implications for the business case.

    PubMed

    Nanda, U; Eisen, S; Zadeh, R S; Owen, D

    2011-06-01

    There is a growing body of evidence on the impact of the environment on health and well-being. This study focuses on the impact of visual artworks on the well-being of psychiatric patients in a multi-purpose lounge of an acute care psychiatric unit. Well-being was measured by the rate of pro re nata (PRN) medication issued by nurses in response to visible signs of patient anxiety and agitation. Nurses were interviewed to get qualitative feedback on the patient response. Findings revealed that the ratio of PRN/patient census was significantly lower on the days when a realistic nature photograph was displayed, compared to the control condition (no art) and abstract art. Nurses reported that some patients displayed agitated behaviour in response to the abstract image. This study makes a case for the impact of visual art on mental well-being. The research findings were also translated into the time and money invested on PRN incidents, and annual cost savings of almost $US30,000 a year was projected. This research makes a case that simple environmental interventions like visual art can save the hospital costs of medication, and staff and pharmacy time, by providing a visual distraction that can alleviate anxiety and agitation in patients.

  4. Small Scale High Speed Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Adam P. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd J. (Inventor); Lehman, Matthew K. (Inventor); Mehra, Amitav (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A small scale, high speed turbomachine is described, as well as a process for manufacturing the turbomachine. The turbomachine is manufactured by diffusion bonding stacked sheets of metal foil, each of which has been pre-formed to correspond to a cross section of the turbomachine structure. The turbomachines include rotating elements as well as static structures. Using this process, turbomachines may be manufactured with rotating elements that have outer diameters of less than four inches in size, and/or blading heights of less than 0.1 inches. The rotating elements of the turbomachines are capable of rotating at speeds in excess of 150 feet per second. In addition, cooling features may be added internally to blading to facilitate cooling in high temperature operations.

  5. Experiments on high speed ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to investigate the flow and the performance of thrust augmenting ejectors for flight Mach numbers in the range of 0.5 to 0.8, primary air stagnation pressures up to 107 psig (738 kPa), and primary air stagnation temperatures up to 1250 F (677 C). The experiment verified the existence of the second solution ejector flow, where the flow after complete mixing is supersonic. Thrust augmentation in excess of 1.2 was demonstrated for both hot and cold primary jets. The experimental ejector performed better than the corresponding theoretical optimal first solution ejector, where the mixed flow is subsonic. Further studies are required to realize the full potential of the second solution ejector. The research program was started by the Flight Dynamics Research Corporation (FDRC) to investigate the characteristic of a high speed ejector which augments thrust of a jet at high flight speeds.

  6. Atari: Speed Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Steve

    1983-01-01

    Reviews "Atari Speed Reading" course materials (which include eight units on four cassettes, 200-page workbook, and cassette with pacer/timer program). Indicates that the course is successful in meeting its goal to help average readers double their reading speed and comprehension. (JN)

  7. Speed Listening and Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradtmueller, Weldon G.

    Compressed speech (speed listening), in which audiotapes are speeded up, is examined in this paper along with its relationship to the reading process. Among the topics discussed first are the close relationship between reading and listening, the rationale behind compressed speech, and the use of compressed speech in business communication, special…

  8. How to Combine Engines to Achieve High Speed, Hypersonic Speed, Speed of Light and Even Higher-Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwizerwa, Celestin; Nishimwe, Celestine

    2014-03-01

    When Einstein left us, he left us a really big problem to solve, does anything can travel faster than the speed of light? There hasn't been any way to try this in the past, because there were any technology which could accelerate objects at this speed. What researchers tried to do, was to accelerate particles. But there must be a way to play with speeds so that, as we do math, we may practically multiply the speed by any number we want, we also may practically divide the speed by any number we want. In this paper I will try to show how. Also, In our real life, there might be a need of such high speeds, so that a lot of problems may be solved, as for example the airplane technology, electric power, space travel, car transmission, industrial high temperature and so on ...I do not say for sure that, the object will move faster than the speed of light, but, people who have ability may try to accelerate it at this speed and even faster to see what will happen as now it is very easy to realize. There are two ways; you go to space to do it or, you create a vacuum and move it inside.

  9. Effect of ketamine combined with butorphanol on emergence agitation of postoperative patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang; Liu, Shuncui; Chen, Zhenyi; Lin, Shaoli

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the effect of ketamine combined with butorphanol on emergence agitation (EA) in postoperative gastric cancer patients. Materials and methods A total of 150 patients with gastric cancer were included and divided into group B (1 mg butorphanol before anesthesia induction, n=50), group K (1 mg/kg ketamine, n=50), and group C (1 mg butorphanol combined with 1 mg/kg ketamine, n=50). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) at the end of operation, just before extubation (T0) and at 0 minute (T1), 5 minutes (T2), and 30 minutes (T3) after extubation were compared. Statistical analysis of recovery time, extubation time, time in postanesthesia care unit, and EA incidence and adverse reactions were performed. Results There were no differences among groups with respect to MAP and HR at T0 and T1 (P>0.05). Compared with patients in group C, significant reduction of MAP and HR were observed in groups K and B at T2 and T3 (P<0.05), while no differences were found between group K and group B (P>0.05). Recovery time, extubation time, time in postanesthesia care unit, and incidence of EA in group C were significantly less than those in groups K and B (P<0.05), but no differences were observed between group K and group B (P>0.05). Total incidence of adverse reactions were significantly increased in group K compared to those in groups C and B (P<0.05). Conclusion Injection of ketamine combined with butorphanol before anesthesia induction was more effective than injection of ketamine or butorphanol separately in the prevention of EA. PMID:27217761

  10. Effects of physical agitation on yield of greenhouse-grown soybean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Agronomic and horticultural crop species experience reductions in growth and harvestable yield after exposure to physical agitation (also known as mechanical stress), as by wind or rain. A greenhouse study was conducted to test the influence of mechanical stress on soybean yield and to determine if exposure to mechanical stress during discrete growth periods has differential effects on seed yield. A modified rotatory shaker was used to apply seismic (i.e., shaking) stress. Brief, periodic episodes of seismic stress reduced stem length, total seed dry weight, and seed number of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Lodging resistance was greater for plants stressed during vegetative growth or throughout vegetative and reproductive growth than during reproductive growth only. Seed dry weight yield was reduced regardless of the timing or duration of stress application, but was lowest when applied during reproductive development. Seismic stress applied during reproductive growth stages R1 to R2 (Days 3 to 4) was as detrimental to seed dry weight accumulation as was stress applied during growth stages R1 to R6 (Days 39 to 42). Seed dry weight per plant was highly correlated with seed number per plant, and seed number was correlated with the seed number of two- and three-seeded pods. Dry weight per 100 seeds was unaffected by seismic-stress treatment. Growth and yield reductions resulting from treatments applied only during the vegetative stage imply that long-term mechanical effects were induced, from which the plants did not fully recover. It is unclear which yield-controlling physiological processes were affected by mechanical stress. Both transient and long-term effects on yield-controlling processes remain to be elucidated.

  11. Prevention of sevoflurane related emergence agitation in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy: A comparison of dexmedetomidine and propofol

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Monaz Abdulrahman; Abdellatif, Ashraf Abualhasan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Emergence agitation (EA) in children is increased after sevoflurane anesthesia. Propofol and dexmedetomidine have been used for prophylactic treatment with controversial results. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of a single dose of propofol or dexmedetomidine prior to termination of sevoflurane-based anesthesia on the incidence and severity of EA in children. Methods: One hundred and twenty children, American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II, 2-6 years old undergoing adenotonsillectomy under sevoflurane based anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Children were randomly allocated to one of the three equal groups: (Group C) received 10 ml saline 0.9%, (Group P) received propofol 1 mg/kg or (group D) received dexmedetomidine 0.3 ug/kg-1. The study drugs were administered 5 min before the end of surgery. In post anesthesia care unit (PACU), the incidence of EA was assessed with Aonos four point scale and the severity of EA was assessed with pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale upon admission (T0), after 5 min (T5), 15 min (T15) and 30 min (T30). Extubation time, emergence time, duration of PACU stay and pain were assessed. Results: The incidence and severity of EA were lower in group P and group D compared to group C at T0, T5 and T15. The incidence and severity of EA in group P were significantly higher than group D at the same times. The incidence and severity of EA decreased significantly over time in all groups. The modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale was significantly lower in group D compared to group C and group P. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine 0.3 ug/kg1 was more effective than propofol 1 mg/kg in decreasing the incidence and severity of EA, when administered 5 min before the end of surgery in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy under sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:24015133

  12. Agitation during lipoplex formation improves the gene knockdown effect of siRNA.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Jose Mario; Kizuki, Shinji; Tagami, Tatsuaki; Asai, Tomohiro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Oku, Naoto; Kiwada, Hiroshi

    2011-05-30

    The successful delivery of therapeutic siRNA to the designated target cells and their availability at the intracellular site of action are crucial requirements for successful RNAi therapy. In the present study, we focused on the siRNA-lipoplex preparation procedure and its effect on the gene-knockdown efficiency of siRNA in vitro. Agitation (vortex-mixing) during siRNA-lipoplex (vor-LTsiR) preparation and its effect on the gene-knockdown efficiency of stably expressed cell GFP was investigated, and their efficiency was compared with that of spontaneously formed lipoplex (spo-LTsiR). A dramatic difference in size between lipoplexes was observed at the N/P ratio of 7.62 (siRNA dose of 30 nM), even though both lipoplexes were positively charged. With the siRNA dose of 30 nM, vor-LTsiR accomplished a 50% gene-knockdown, while spo-LTsiR managed a similar knockdown effect at the 120 nM level, suggesting that the preparation procedure remarkably affects the gene-knockdown efficacy of siRNA. The uptake of vor-LTsiR was mainly via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, whereas that of spo-LTsiR was via membrane fusion. In addition, by inhibiting clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the gene-knockdown efficiency was significantly lowered. The size of the lipoplex, promoted by the preparation procedure, is likely to define the entry pathway, resulting in an increased amount of siRNA internalized in cells and an enhanced gene-knockdown efficacy. The results of the present study definitively show that a proper siRNA-lipoplex preparation procedure makes a significant contribution to the efficiency of cellular uptake, and thereby, to the gene-knockdown efficiency of siRNA. PMID:21392562

  13. Effect of aripiprazole lauroxil on agitation and hostility in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Citrome, Leslie; Du, Yangchun; Risinger, Robert; Stankovic, Srdjan; Claxton, Amy; Zummo, Jacqueline; Bose, Anjana; Silverman, Bernard L; Ehrich, Elliot W

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of aripiprazole lauroxil on hostility and aggressive behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Patients aged 18-70 years with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and currently experiencing an acute exacerbation or relapse were randomized to intramuscular (IM) aripiprazole lauroxil 441 mg (n=207), 882 mg (n=208), or placebo (n=207) for 12 weeks. In post-hoc analyses, hostility and aggression were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) Hostility item (P7) and a specific antihostility effect was assessed by adjusting for positive symptoms of schizophrenia, somnolence, and akathisia. The PANSS excited component score [P4 (Excitement), P7 (Hostility), G4 (Tension), G8 (Uncooperativeness), and G14 (Poor impulse control)], and the Personal and Social Performance scale disturbing and aggressive behavior domain were also assessed. Of the 147 patients who received aripiprazole lauroxil 882 mg and with a baseline PANSS Hostility item P7 more than 1, there was a significant (P<0.05) improvement versus placebo on the PANSS Hostility item P7 score by mixed-model repeated-measures at the end of the study, which remained significant when PANSS-positive symptoms and somnolence or akathisia were included as additional covariates. The proportion with PANSS Hostility item P7 more than 1 at endpoint was significantly (P<0.05) lower with aripiprazole lauroxil versus placebo (53.6, 46.1, and 66.3% for 441, 882 mg, and placebo). A significant (P<0.05) improvement was found with aripiprazole lauroxil versus placebo for change from baseline in the PANSS excited component score. The proportion of patients with aggressive behavior on the Personal and Social Performance scale was significantly (P<0.05) lower for aripiprazole lauroxil: 30.0% for 441 mg versus 44.1% for placebo (P=0.006) and 22.2% for 881 mg (P<0.001 versus placebo). Treatment with aripiprazole lauroxil resulted in decreases in agitation and hostility in patients

  14. High-Speed Photography

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Schelev, M.Y.

    1998-08-01

    The applications of high-speed photography to a diverse set of subjects including inertial confinement fusion, laser surgical procedures, communications, automotive airbags, lightning etc. are briefly discussed. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}

  15. SPEEDES benchmarking analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capella, Sebastian J.; Steinman, Jeffrey S.; McGraw, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    SPEEDES, the Synchronous Parallel Environment for Emulation and Discrete Event Simulation, is a software framework that supports simulation applications across parallel and distributed architectures. SPEEDES is used as a simulation engine in support of numerous defense projects including the Joint Simulation System (JSIMS), the Joint Modeling And Simulation System (JMASS), the High Performance Computing and Modernization Program's (HPCMP) development of a High Performance Computing (HPC) Run-time Infrastructure, and the Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) development of a Human Behavioral Representation (HBR) Testbed. This work documents some of the performance metrics obtained from benchmarking the SPEEDES Simulation Framework with respect to the functionality found in the summer of 2001. Specifically this papers the scalability of SPEEDES with respect to its time management algorithms and simulation object event queues with respect to the number of objects simulated and events processed.

  16. High Speed Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert E.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Schmitz, Frederic H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NASA High Speed Research Program will be presented from a NASA Headquarters perspective. The presentation will include the objectives of the program and an outline of major programmatic issues.

  17. Hydrodynamique dans les milieux gaz/liquide non-newtoniens, agités mécaniquement, étude de l'hélice à profil mince [HPM] et de la turbine à disque de Rushton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukili, A.; Desplanches, H.; Gaston Bonhomme, Y.; Chevalier, J. L.; Bruxelmane, M.; Ouazzani Chahdi, T.; El Ghadraoui, H.

    1999-03-01

    The power consumption is measured for non-newtonian gas-liquid systems. The useful zone situated beyond the flooding point was defined by using the power caracteristics plot and hydrodynamic observations. Correlations were established in dimensional or adimensional form, to estimate the stirrer speed at the flooding point, and the power consumption in the working zone. Those correlations established in a large scale of rheological behaviour, for two kind of impellers in different geometrical ratios and for two tanks for scaling up, are used to compare an axial impeller (the thinny profile propeller) to a radial one (the Rushton's disc turbine). La puissance d'agitation est mesurée pour des systèmes gaz-liquides non-newtoniens rhéofluidifiants. Le domaine utile de fonctionnement du réacteur gaz-liquide, situé au-delà du point de désengorgement complet, est défini à partir de la courbe caractéristique de puissance et d'observations hydrodynamiques. Des corrélations sont établies sous forme dimensionnelle ou adimensionnelle pour prédire la vitesse d'agitation au point de charge, et la puissance consommée dans la zone utile. Ces corrélations définies pour une gamme étendue de comportements rhéofluidifiants, pour différentes géomètries de mobiles et sur deux tailles de cuves en extrapolation, permettent en outre de comparer deux mobiles, l'un axial et l'autre radial.

  18. Insights into Kinetics of Agitation-Induced Aggregation of Hen Lysozyme under Heat and Acidic Conditions from Various Spectroscopic Methods.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Ali; Fahy, Christine; Chevillot-Biraud, Alexandre; Rholam, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and amyloid formation are an underlying pathological hallmark in a number of prevalent diseases of protein aggregation ranging from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases to systemic lysozyme amyloidosis. In this context, we have used complementary spectroscopic methods to undertake a systematic study of the self-assembly of hen egg-white lysozyme under agitation during a prolonged heating in acidic pH. The kinetics of lysozyme aggregation, monitored by Thioflavin T fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide, is described by a sigmoid curve typical of a nucleation-dependent polymerization process. Nevertheless, we observe significant differences between the values deduced for the kinetic parameters (lag time and aggregation rate). The fibrillation process of lysozyme, as assessed by the attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is accompanied by an increase in the β-sheet conformation at the expense of the α-helical conformation but the time-dependent variation of the content of these secondary structures does not evolve as a gradual transition. Moreover, the tryptophan fluorescence-monitored kinetics of lysozyme aggregation is described by three phases in which the temporal decrease of the tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield is of quasilinear nature. Finally, the generated lysozyme fibrils exhibit a typical amyloid morphology with various lengths (observed by atomic force microscopy) and contain exclusively the full-length protein (analyzed by highly performance liquid chromatography). Compared to the data obtained by other groups for the formation of lysozyme fibrils in acidic pH without agitation, this work provides new insights into the structural changes (local, secondary, oligomeric/fibrillar structures) undergone by the lysozyme during the agitation-induced formation of fibrils. PMID:26571264

  19. Changes in QTc Interval in the Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease (CitAD) Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Spragg, David; Devanand, D. P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Pollock, Bruce G.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Rabins, Peter V.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2014-01-01

    Background A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety communication in August 2011 warned that citalopram was associated with a dose dependent risk of QT prolongation and recommended dose restriction in patients over the age of 60 but did not provide data for this age group. Methods CitAD was a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial for agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Participants were assigned to citalopram (target dose of 30 mg/day) or placebo in a 1∶1 ratio. 186 people, 181 of whom were over the age of 60, having probable AD with clinically significant agitation were recruited from September 2009 to January 2013. After the FDA safety communication about citalopram, ECG was added to the required study procedures before enrollment and repeated at week 3 to monitor change in QTc interval. Forty-eight participants were enrolled after enhanced monitoring began. Results Citalopram treatment was associated with a larger increase in QTc interval than placebo (difference in week 3 QTc adjusting for baseline QTc: 18.1 ms [95% CI: 6.1, 30.1]; p = 0.004). More participants in the citalopram group had an increase ≥30 ms from baseline to week 3 (7 in citalopram versus 1 in placebo; Fisher's exact p = 0.046), but only slightly more in the citalopram group met a gender-specific threshold for prolonged QTc (450 ms for males; 470 ms for females) at any point during follow-up (3 in citalopram versus 1 in placebo, Fisher's exact p = 0.611). One of the citalopram participants who developed prolonged QTc also displayed ventricular bigeminy. No participants in either group had a cardiovascular-related death. Conclusion Citalopram at 30 mg/day was associated with improvement in agitation in patients with AD but was also associated with QT prolongation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00898807 PMID:24914549

  20. Insights into Kinetics of Agitation-Induced Aggregation of Hen Lysozyme under Heat and Acidic Conditions from Various Spectroscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Ali; Fahy, Christine; Chevillot-Biraud, Alexandre; Rholam, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and amyloid formation are an underlying pathological hallmark in a number of prevalent diseases of protein aggregation ranging from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases to systemic lysozyme amyloidosis. In this context, we have used complementary spectroscopic methods to undertake a systematic study of the self-assembly of hen egg-white lysozyme under agitation during a prolonged heating in acidic pH. The kinetics of lysozyme aggregation, monitored by Thioflavin T fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide, is described by a sigmoid curve typical of a nucleation-dependent polymerization process. Nevertheless, we observe significant differences between the values deduced for the kinetic parameters (lag time and aggregation rate). The fibrillation process of lysozyme, as assessed by the attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is accompanied by an increase in the β-sheet conformation at the expense of the α-helical conformation but the time-dependent variation of the content of these secondary structures does not evolve as a gradual transition. Moreover, the tryptophan fluorescence-monitored kinetics of lysozyme aggregation is described by three phases in which the temporal decrease of the tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield is of quasilinear nature. Finally, the generated lysozyme fibrils exhibit a typical amyloid morphology with various lengths (observed by atomic force microscopy) and contain exclusively the full-length protein (analyzed by highly performance liquid chromatography). Compared to the data obtained by other groups for the formation of lysozyme fibrils in acidic pH without agitation, this work provides new insights into the structural changes (local, secondary, oligomeric/fibrillar structures) undergone by the lysozyme during the agitation-induced formation of fibrils. PMID:26571264

  1. Novel physical solvents for selective CO{sub 2} capture from fuel gas streams at elevated pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yannick J. Heintz; Laurent Sehabiague; Badie I. Morsi; Kenneth L. Jones; Henry W. Pennline

    2008-11-15

    Three perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), PP10, PP11, and PP25, manufactured by F2 Chemicals Ltd., U.K., were investigated as physical solvents for selective CO{sub 2} capture from synthesis gas or syngas streams at elevated pressures and temperatures. The equilibrium solubility, the hydrodynamic, and the mass-transfer parameters of CO{sub 2} in the solvents were measured in a 4-L ZipperClave agitated reactor under wide ranges of operating conditions: pressures (6-30 bar), temperatures (300-500 K), mixing speeds (10-20 Hz), and liquid heights (0.14-0.22 m). The CO{sub 2} solubilities in the three solvents decreased with an increasing temperature at constant pressure and followed Henry's law. The CO{sub 2} solubilities in PP25 were greater than those in PP10 and PP11. The volumetric liquid-side mass-transfer coefficients (k{sub La}) of CO{sub 2} in the PFCs increased with mixing speed, pressure, and temperature. Also, the gas-liquid interfacial areas of CO{sub 2} in the three PFCs appeared to control the behavior of k{sub La}. This study proved the thermal and chemical stability and the ability of the PFCs to selectively absorb CO{sub 2} at temperatures up to 500 K and pressures as high as 30 bar. A preliminary conceptual process design using PP25 for selective CO{sub 2} capture from hot-shifted gas with pressure-swing and pressure-temperature-swing regeneration options was devised. The pressure-temperature-swing option led to greater PP25 solvent loss but a more favorable (more negative) net enthalpy than the pressure-swing option. However, for either regeneration option to be economically viable, the PP25 solvent must be completely recovered from the process. 109 refs., 9 figs., 14 tabs.

  2. A Summary of Scatterometer Returns from Water Surfaces Agitated by Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, Larry F.; Giovanangeli, Jean-Paul; Branger, Hubert; Sobieski, Piotr W.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize our initial findings from K(a)- and K(u)-band scatterometers which include: a scaling law for backscattered power as a function of rain rate; a linear superposition model for light rains and low wind speeds; evidence of the importance of scattering from rain-generated ring-waves; and progress towards development of a scattering model for computing normalized radar cross sections from wind and rain roughened water surfaces.

  3. Bathyphotometer bioluminescence potential measurements: A framework for characterizing flow agitators and predicting flow-stimulated bioluminescence intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latz, Michael I.; Rohr, Jim

    2013-07-01

    Bathyphotometer measurements of bioluminescence are used as a proxy for the abundance of luminescent organisms for studying population dynamics; the interaction of luminescent organisms with physical, chemical, and biological oceanographic processes; and spatial complexity especially in coastal areas. However, the usefulness of bioluminescence measurements has been limited by the inability to compare results from different bathyphotometer designs, or even the same bathyphotometer operating at different volume flow rates. The primary objective of this study was to compare measurements of stimulated bioluminescence of four species of cultured dinoflagellates, the most common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, using two different bathyphotometer flow agitators as a function of bathyphotometer volume flow rate and dinoflagellate concentration. For both the NOSC and BIOLITE flow agitators and each species of dinoflagellate tested, there was a critical volume flow rate, above which average bioluminescence intensity, designated as bathyphotometer bioluminescence potential (BBP), remained relatively constant and scaled directly with dinoflagellate cell concentration. At supra-critical volume flow rates, the ratio of BIOLITE to NOSC BBP was nearly constant for the same species studied, but varied between species. The spatial pattern and residence time of flash trajectories within the NOSC flow agitator indicated the presence of dominant secondary recirculating flows, where most of the bioluminescence was detected. A secondary objective (appearing in the Appendix) was to study the feasibility of using NOSC BBP to scale flow-stimulated bioluminescence intensity across similar flow fields, where the contributing composition of luminescent species remained the same. Fully developed turbulent pipe flow was chosen because it is hydrodynamically well characterized. Average bioluminescence intensity in a 2.54-cm i.d. pipe was highly correlated with wall shear stress and

  4. Mixing Time in a Cylindrical Bath Agitated by Swirling Liquid Jet Generated with J-Shaped Lance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Naoko; Iguchi, Manabu

    A novel and efficient method is proposed to agitate a molten steel bath. A water model study is carried out to understand the mixing characteristic of the bath. A water jet is generated with a J-shaped lance in a cylindrical bath. The lance exit made of glass pipe is sharpened to form a single-hole nozzle and the nozzle is placed on the centerline of the bath. Mixing time in the bath is measured with an electric conductivity sensor. An empirical equation is proposed for correlating the measured values of the mixing time as a function of the water flow rate, vessel diameter, and so on.

  5. Speed Reading Scores in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brenda Golembesky

    1975-01-01

    Cites the factors that influence reading rates and comprehension scores on timed speed reading tests, concluding that the reading speed achieved for any particular test or timed reading is the speed for that situation only. (RB)

  6. Speed Reading: Remember the Tortoise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Richard G.

    1973-01-01

    After speed-reading partisans questioned the criticisms in a Psychology Today article, another psychologist conducted a controlled study of speed readers. As we said before, "Speed Readers Don't Read; They Skim". (Editor)

  7. Everyone Deserves a Speeding Ticket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burris, Harold

    1993-01-01

    Presents a first day physics activity having students determine the fine for a speeding ticket if the speeds considered include the earth's rotation and revolution speed, and the movement through the galaxy. (MDH)

  8. High speed hydrogen/graphite interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Hamman, R.; Sharma, O. P.; Harrje, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Various aspects of a research program on high speed hydrogen/graphite interaction are presented. Major areas discussed are: (1) theoretical predictions of hydrogen/graphite erosion rates; (2) high temperature, nonequilibrium hydrogen flow in a nozzle; and (3) molecular beam studies of hydrogen/graphite erosion.

  9. TREC-Rio trial: a randomised controlled trial for rapid tranquillisation for agitated patients in emergency psychiatric rooms [ISRCTN44153243

    PubMed Central

    Huf, Gisele; Coutinho, Evandro SF; Adams, Clive E

    2002-01-01

    Background Agitated or violent patients constitute 10% of all emergency psychiatric treatment. Management guidelines, the preferred treatment of clinicians and clinical practice all differ. Systematic reviews show that all relevant studies are small and none are likely to have adequate power to show true differences between treatments. Worldwide, current treatment is not based on evidence from randomised trials. In Brazil, the combination haloperidol-promethazine is frequently used, but no studies involving this mix exist. Methods TREC-Rio (Tranquilização Rápida-Ensaio Clínico [Translation: Rapid Tranquillisation-Clinical Trial]) will compare midazolam with haloperidol-promethazine mix for treatment of agitated patients in emergency psychiatric rooms of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. TREC-Rio is a randomised, controlled, pragmatic and open study. Primary measure of outcome is tranquillisation at 20 minutes but effects on other measures of morbidity will also be assessed. TREC-Rio will involve the collaboration of as many health care professionals based in four psychiatric emergency rooms of Rio as possible. Because the design of this trial does not substantially complicate clinical management, and in several aspects simplifies it, the study can be large, and treatments used in everyday practice can be evaluated. PMID:12383353

  10. Isolation and characterization of an efficient bacterial cellulose producer strain in agitated culture: Gluconacetobacter hansenii P2A.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Yasar Andelib; Aksoy, Nuran Deveci

    2014-02-01

    In this study, typical niches of acetic acid bacteria were screened for isolation of cellulose producer strains. Hestrin Schramm broth was used as enrichment and production media. Only nine out of 329 isolates formed thick biofilms on liquid surface and were identified as potential cellulose producers. Physiological and biochemical tests proved that all cellulose producers belonged to Gluconacetobacter genus. Most productive and mutation-resistant strain was subjected to 16S rRNA sequence analysis and identified as Gluconacetobacter hansenii P2A due to 99.8 % sequence similarity. X-ray diffraction analysis proved that the biofilm conformed to Cellulose I crystal structure, rich in Iα mass fraction. Static cultivation of G. hansenii P2A in HS medium resulted with 1.89 ± 0.08 g/l of bacterial cellulose production corresponding to 12.0 ± 0.3 % yield in terms of substrate consumption. Shaking and agitation at 120 rpm aided in enhancement of the amount and yield of produced cellulose. Productivity and yield reached up to 3.25 ± 0.11 g/l and 17.20 ± 0.14 % in agitated culture while a slight decrease from 78.7 % to 77.3 % was observed in the crystallinity index. PMID:24190494

  11. Control of Grifola frondosa Morphology by Agitation and Aeration for Improving Mycelia and Exo-Polymer Production.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng-Jie; Chen, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Wei-Min; Sun, Wen-Jing; Huo, Shuhao; Yang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The present study describes the improved mycelia and exo-polymer production under control of Grifola frondosa morphology by changing the aeration rate and agitation intensity in a 25-L stirred fermentor. The aeration rate of 1.0 vvm yielded a highest mycelia biomass of 24.754 g/L with the lowest pellet percentage of 20.5 %. The maximum exo-polymer (2.324 g/L) was achieved at 0.75 vvm with mycelia polysaccharide production (0.321 g/g), whereas clumps and filaments dominated the ratios of 45.6 and 33.9 %, respectively. The change of aeration rate and agitation intensity had slight influence on the monosaccharide compositions in exo-polymers and significantly affected glucose and mannose contents in the mycelia polysaccharides. These findings will provide a clue for exploring the relationship between fermentation parameters, morphologies, and polysaccharide synthesis pathway of G. frondosa.

  12. Isolation and characterization of an efficient bacterial cellulose producer strain in agitated culture: Gluconacetobacter hansenii P2A.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Yasar Andelib; Aksoy, Nuran Deveci

    2014-02-01

    In this study, typical niches of acetic acid bacteria were screened for isolation of cellulose producer strains. Hestrin Schramm broth was used as enrichment and production media. Only nine out of 329 isolates formed thick biofilms on liquid surface and were identified as potential cellulose producers. Physiological and biochemical tests proved that all cellulose producers belonged to Gluconacetobacter genus. Most productive and mutation-resistant strain was subjected to 16S rRNA sequence analysis and identified as Gluconacetobacter hansenii P2A due to 99.8 % sequence similarity. X-ray diffraction analysis proved that the biofilm conformed to Cellulose I crystal structure, rich in Iα mass fraction. Static cultivation of G. hansenii P2A in HS medium resulted with 1.89 ± 0.08 g/l of bacterial cellulose production corresponding to 12.0 ± 0.3 % yield in terms of substrate consumption. Shaking and agitation at 120 rpm aided in enhancement of the amount and yield of produced cellulose. Productivity and yield reached up to 3.25 ± 0.11 g/l and 17.20 ± 0.14 % in agitated culture while a slight decrease from 78.7 % to 77.3 % was observed in the crystallinity index.

  13. Verbal De-escalation of the Agitated Patient: Consensus Statement of the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry Project BETA De-escalation Workgroup.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Janet S; Berlin, Jon S; Fishkind, Avrim B; Holloman, Garland H; Zeller, Scott L; Wilson, Michael P; Rifai, Muhamad Aly; Ng, Anthony T

    2012-02-01

    Agitation is an acute behavioral emergency requiring immediate intervention. Traditional methods of treating agitated patients, ie, routine restraints and involuntary medication, have been replaced with a much greater emphasis on a noncoercive approach. Experienced practitioners have found that if such interventions are undertaken with genuine commitment, successful outcomes can occur far more often than previously thought possible. In the new paradigm, a 3-step approach is used. First, the patient is verbally engaged; then a collaborative relationship is established; and, finally, the patient is verbally de-escalated out of the agitated state. Verbal de-escalation is usually the key to engaging the patient and helping him become an active partner in his evaluation and treatment; although, we also recognize that in some cases nonverbal approaches, such as voluntary medication and environment planning, are also important. When working with an agitated patient, there are 4 main objectives: (1) ensure the safety of the patient, staff, and others in the area; (2) help the patient manage his emotions and distress and maintain or regain control of his behavior; (3) avoid the use of restraint when at all possible; and (4) avoid coercive interventions that escalate agitation. The authors detail the proper foundations for appropriate training for de-escalation and provide intervention guidelines, using the "10 domains of de-escalation."

  14. Progress in Treatment Development for Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Alzheimer’s Disease: Focus on Agitation and Aggression. A Report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Soto, M.; Abushakra, S.; Cummings, J.; Siffert, J.; Robert, P.; Vellas, B.; Lyketsos, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The management of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as agitation and aggression is a major priority in caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Agitation and aggression (A/A) are among the most disruptive symptoms, and given their impact, they are increasingly an important target for development of effective treatments. Considerable progress has been made in the last years with a growing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of drugs for NPS. The limited benefits reported in some RCTs may be accounted for by the absence of a biological link of the tested molecule to NPS and also by key methodological issues. In recent RCTs of A/A, a great heterogeneity design was found. Designing trials for dementia populations with NPS presents many challenges, including identification of appropriate participants for such trials, engagement and compliance of patients and caregivers in the trials and the choice of optimal outcome measures to demonstrate treatment effectiveness. The EU/US -CTAD Task Force, an international collaboration of investigators from academia, industry, non-profit foundations, and regulatory agencies met in Philadelphia on November 19, 2014 to address some of these challenges. Despite potential heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and neurobiology, agitation and aggression seems to be accepted as an entity for drug development. The field appears to be reaching a consensus in using both agitation and aggression (or other NPS)-specific quantitative measures plus a global rating of change for agitation outcomes based on clinician judgment as the main outcomes. PMID:26413494

  15. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  16. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  17. Rotational speed control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on rotational speed control are presented. The Centrifuge Facility Systems Study - 2.5 m centrifuge is shown. A life sciences centrifuge is scheduled to fly aboard Space Station Freedom. Live animal and plant specimens will be carried on the rotor and compared with microgravity specimens in racks.

  18. SPEEDE Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Barbara H.; Wei, P. Betty

    1993-01-01

    A nontechnical overview of electronic data interchange (EDI) and of the SPEEDE/ExPRESS Project, which uses EDI to transmit transcripts between schools and colleges, is presented. It explores the fundamental value of the technology, specific costs and benefits, and its potential to transform the delivery of academic support services. (Author/MSE)

  19. Transition at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Certain conjectures on the physics of instabilities in high-speed flows are discussed and the state of knowledge of hypersonic transition summarized. The case is made for an unpressured systematic research program in this area consisting of controlled microscopic experiments, theory, and numerical simulations.

  20. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  1. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing.

  2. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing. PMID:27475167

  3. [Comparative study of the effects of sultopride and haloperidol in agitation states. 94 cases at the psychiatric infirmary of the Paris police headquarters].

    PubMed

    Anguera, P; Bulteau, J; Soubrier, J P

    1983-06-23

    We report the results of a comparative study of sultopride and haloperidol in two groups of 46 and 48 patients. The study was single-blind at first, then double-blind. It was carried out at the psychiatric infirmary of the central police station, run according to the law of June 30th, 1938, which allows to detain patients presenting with severe agitation during 24 hours or more for observation and treatment. The target symptom is psychomotor agitation. The purpose is to make a psychiatric interview possible without suppressing all the clinical manifestations or masking the patient's personality. The efficiency of both drugs seems comparable but is better with sultopride given initially in high dosages. As its side-effects are mild and are not aggravated when dosages are increased sultopride is the choice neuroleptic for the initial treatment of psychomotor agitation in patients admitted in the specific conditions of deferred emergencies.

  4. Effect of agitation on the peptide fibrillization: Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide 1-42 but not amylin and insulin fibrils can grow under quiescent conditions.

    PubMed

    Tiiman, Ann; Noormägi, Andra; Friedemann, Merlin; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Palumaa, Peep; Tõugu, Vello

    2013-06-01

    Many peptides and proteins can form fibrillar aggregates in vitro, but only a limited number of them are forming pathological amyloid structures in vivo. We studied the fibrillization of four peptides--Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ) 1-40 and 1-42, amylin and insulin. In all cases, intensive mechanical agitation of the solution initiated fast fibrillization. However, when the mixing was stopped during the fibril growth phase, the fibrillization of amylin and insulin was practically stopped, and the rate for Aβ40 substantially decreased, whereas the fibrillization of Aβ42 peptide continued to proceed with almost the same rate as in the agitated conditions. The reason for the different sensitivity of the in vitro fibrillization of these peptides towards agitation in the fibril growth phase remains elusive. PMID:23609985

  5. Propagated fixed-bed mixed-acid fermentation: Part I: Effect of volatile solid loading rate and agitation at high pH.

    PubMed

    Golub, Kristina W; Forrest, Andrea K; Mercy, Kevin L; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-11-01

    Countercurrent fermentation is a high performing process design for mixed-acid fermentation. However, there are high operating costs associated with moving solids, which is an integral component of this configuration. This study investigated the effect of volatile solid loading rate (VSLR) and agitation in propagated fixed-bed fermentation, a configuration which may be more commercially viable. To evaluate the role of agitation on fixed-bed configuration performance, continuous mixing was compared with periodic mixing. VSLR was also varied and not found to affect acid yields. However, increased VSLR and liquid retention time did result in higher conversions, productivity, acid concentrations, but lower selectivities. Agitation was demonstrated to be important for this fermentor configuration, the periodically-mixed fermentation had the lowest conversion and yields. Operating at a high pH (∼9) contributed to the high selectivity to acetic acid, which might be industrially desirable but at the cost of lower yield compared to a neutral pH.

  6. Sustained-release microsphere formulation containing an agrochemical by polyurethane polymerization during an agitation granulation process.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takatoshi; Tagami, Manabu; Ohtsubo, Toshiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-07-25

    In this report, a new solventless microencapsulation method by synthesizing polyurethane (PU) from polyol and isocyanate during an agglomeration process in a high-speed mixing apparatus was developed. Clothianidin (CTD), which is a neonicotinoid insecticide and highly effective against a wide variety of insect pests, was used as the model compound. The microencapsulated samples covered with PU (CTD microspheres) had a median diameter of <75μm and sustained-release properties. The CTD microspheres were analyzed by synchrotron X-ray computed tomography measurements. Multiple cores of CTD and other solid excipient were dispersed in PU. Although voids appeared in the CTD microspheres after CTD release, the spherical shape of the microspheres remained stable and no change in its framework was observed. The experimental release data were highly consistent with the Baker-Lonsdale model derived from drug release of spherical monolithic dispersions and consistent with the computed tomography measurements. PMID:27246815

  7. Variable speed controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Christa; Spiggle, Charles; Swift, Shannon; Vangeffen, Stephen; Younger, Frank

    1992-01-01

    This report details a new design for a variable speed controller which can be used to operate lunar machinery without the astronaut using his or her upper body. In order to demonstrate the design, a treadle for an industrial sewing machine was redesigned to be used by a standing operator. Since the invention of an electrically powered sewing machine, the operator has been seated. Today, companies are switching from sit down to stand up operation involving modular stations. The old treadle worked well with a sitting operator, but problems have been found when trying to use the same treadle with a standing operator. Emphasis is placed on the ease of use by the operator along with the ergonomics involved. Included with the design analysis are suggestions for possible uses for the speed controller in other applications.

  8. The speed of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Benjamin; Larson, Katherine; Bossari, Joshua

    2003-04-01

    Benjamin Costa Katherine Larson Joshua Borsari Advisor: Dr. Jong-Ping Shu Our project analyzes the Michelson- Morley "ether" experiment from three different perspectives: classical physics, special relativity, and from a revised special relativity. The heart of the project is centered on our revised edition of special relativity. Moreover, this modified theory of special relativity is focused on the question: Can the theory of relativity be formulated solely on the basis of the first principle of relativity(without assuming the constancy of the speed of light)? We are essentially trying to prove that the speed of light is not constant in a one way trip, but is constant throughout an entire round trip."

  9. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogardus, Scott; Loper, Brent; Nauman, Chris; Page, Jeff; Parris, Rusty; Steinbach, Greg

    1990-01-01

    The design process of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) combines existing technology with the expectation of future technology to create a Mach 3.0 transport. The HSCT was designed to have a range in excess of 6000 nautical miles and carry up to 300 passengers. This range will allow the HSCT to service the economically expanding Pacific Basin region. Effort was made in the design to enable the aircraft to use conventional airports with standard 12,000 foot runways. With a takeoff thrust of 250,000 pounds, the four supersonic through-flow engines will accelerate the HSCT to a cruise speed of Mach 3.0. The 679,000 pound (at takeoff) HSCT is designed to cruise at an altitude of 70,000 feet, flying above most atmospheric disturbances.

  10. High-Speed Video Analysis of Damped Harmonic Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poonyawatpornkul, J.; Wattanakasiwich, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we acquire and analyse high-speed videos of a spring-mass system oscillating in glycerin at different temperatures. Three cases of damped harmonic oscillation are investigated and analysed by using high-speed video at a rate of 120 frames s[superscript -1] and Tracker Video Analysis (Tracker) software. We present empirical data for…

  11. High speed door assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, C.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  12. Two-speed transaxle

    DOEpatents

    Kalns, Ilmars

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  13. Multi-speed transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ashikawa, N.; Nakayama, H.; Sumi, M.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a multi-speed transmission having forward speed gear trains and at least one reverse speed gear train, comprising, a pair of parallel fork shafts, one the shaft being fixed, the other the shaft being slidable along its axial direction, means to selectively engage the gear trains and means to retain the selective engagement means in the selected position. The means selectively engages the gear trains including a first shift fork connected to the fixed fork shaft so as to slide to either side of its disengaged neutral position, a second shift fork connected to the slideable fork shaft so as to slide to either side of its disengaged neutral position, and a third shift fork connected to the slidable fork shaft so as to slide in one direction by motion of the slideable fork shaft to only one side of its disengaged neutral position. Also included is a reverse shift fork connected to the slideable fork shaft and adapted to be actuated by motion of the slideable fork shaft in a direction opposite to the direction of the motion which engages the third shift fork.

  14. Gas-Liquid Mass Transfer in Agitated Tanks Containing Non-Newtonian Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    1998-11-06

    The purpose of the tests was to investigate the effects of operating parameters, such as KTPB concentration, time, sodium molarity, temperature, salt composition, sludge concentration, and radiation dose, on benzene retention and release. This paper describes the results of the tests.

  15. Do speed cameras reduce speeding in urban areas?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Daniele Falci de; Friche, Amélia Augusta de Lima; Costa, Dário Alves da Silva; Mingoti, Sueli Aparecida; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2015-11-01

    This observational study aimed to estimate the prevalence of speeding on urban roadways and to analyze associated factors. The sample consisted of 8,565 vehicles circulating in areas with and without fixed speed cameras in operation. We found that 40% of vehicles 200 meters after the fixed cameras and 33.6% of vehicles observed on roadways without speed cameras were moving over the speed limit (p < 0.001). Motorcycles showed the highest recorded speed (126km/h). Most drivers were men (87.6%), 3.3% of all drivers were using their cell phones, and 74.6% of drivers (not counting motorcyclists) were wearing their seatbelts. On roadway stretches without fixed speed cameras, more women drivers were talking on their cell phones and wearing seatbelts when compared to men (p < 0.05 for both comparisons), independently of speed limits. The results suggest that compliance with speed limits requires more than structural interventions. PMID:26648375

  16. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Elizabeth L; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

  17. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Elizabeth L; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia.

  18. Tandem air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction as an efficient method for determination of acidic drugs in complicated matrices.

    PubMed

    Bazregar, Mohammad; Rajabi, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Asghari, Alireza; Hemmati, Maryam

    2016-04-21

    A rapid and simple microextraction method with a high sample clean-up, termed as tandem air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction (TAALLME), is described. This method is based upon the tandem implementation of the air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME), and this approach improves the applicability of the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) methods in complicated matrices. With very simple tools, the three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs diclofenac, ibuprofen, and mefenamic acid were efficiently extracted, with an overall extraction time of 7 min. By performing the first AALLME, these acidic analytes, contained in an aqueous sample solution (donor phase, 8.0 mL), were extracted into the organic solvent (1,2-dichloroethane, 37 μL), and their simple back-extraction into the aqueous acceptor solution (pH, 10.01, 51 μL) was obtained in 2 min by a second implementation of AALLME. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for optimization of the experimental parameters. The pH values 2.94 and 10.01 were obtained for the donor and acceptor phases, respectively, and the volumes 99.5 and 51 μL were obtained for the organic solvent and the acceptor phase, respectively, as the optimal extraction conditions. Under the optimized conditions, tandem AALLME-HPLC-UV provided a good linearity in the range of 0.5-4000 ng mL(-1), limits of detection (0.1-0.3 ng mL(-1)), extraction repeatabilities (relative standard deviations (RSDs) below 7.7%, n = 5), and the enrichment factors (EFs) of 80-104. Finally, the applicability of the proposed method was evaluated by the extraction and determination of the drugs under study in the wastewater and human plasma samples. PMID:27026599

  19. Swab Sample Transfer for Point-Of-Care Diagnostics: Characterization of Swab Types and Manual Agitation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Panpradist, Nuttada; Toley, Bhushan J.; Zhang, Xiaohong; Byrnes, Samantha; Buser, Joshua R.; Englund, Janet A.; Lutz, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    Background The global need for disease detection and control has increased effort to engineer point-of-care (POC) tests that are simple, robust, affordable, and non-instrumented. In many POC tests, sample collection involves swabbing the site (e.g., nose, skin), agitating the swab in a fluid to release the sample, and transferring the fluid to a device for analysis. Poor performance in sample transfer can reduce sensitivity and reproducibility. Methods In this study, we compared bacterial release efficiency of seven swab types using manual-agitation methods typical of POC devices. Transfer efficiency was measured using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for Staphylococcus aureus under conditions representing a range of sampling scenarios: 1) spiking low-volume samples onto the swab, 2) submerging the swab in excess-volume samples, and 3) swabbing dried sample from a surface. Results Excess-volume samples gave the expected recovery for most swabs (based on tip fluid capacity); a polyurethane swab showed enhanced recovery, suggesting an ability to accumulate organisms during sampling. Dry samples led to recovery of ∼20–30% for all swabs tested, suggesting that swab structure and volume is less important when organisms are applied to the outer swab surface. Low-volume samples led to the widest range of transfer efficiencies between swab types. Rayon swabs (63 µL capacity) performed well for excess-volume samples, but showed poor recovery for low-volume samples. Nylon (100 µL) and polyester swabs (27 µL) showed intermediate recovery for low-volume and excess-volume samples. Polyurethane swabs (16 µL) showed excellent recovery for all sample types. This work demonstrates that swab transfer efficiency can be affected by swab material, structure, and fluid capacity and details of the sample. Results and quantitative analysis methods from this study will assist POC assay developers in selecting appropriate swab types and transfer methods. PMID:25181250

  20. Tandem air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction as an efficient method for determination of acidic drugs in complicated matrices.

    PubMed

    Bazregar, Mohammad; Rajabi, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Asghari, Alireza; Hemmati, Maryam

    2016-04-21

    A rapid and simple microextraction method with a high sample clean-up, termed as tandem air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction (TAALLME), is described. This method is based upon the tandem implementation of the air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME), and this approach improves the applicability of the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) methods in complicated matrices. With very simple tools, the three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs diclofenac, ibuprofen, and mefenamic acid were efficiently extracted, with an overall extraction time of 7 min. By performing the first AALLME, these acidic analytes, contained in an aqueous sample solution (donor phase, 8.0 mL), were extracted into the organic solvent (1,2-dichloroethane, 37 μL), and their simple back-extraction into the aqueous acceptor solution (pH, 10.01, 51 μL) was obtained in 2 min by a second implementation of AALLME. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for optimization of the experimental parameters. The pH values 2.94 and 10.01 were obtained for the donor and acceptor phases, respectively, and the volumes 99.5 and 51 μL were obtained for the organic solvent and the acceptor phase, respectively, as the optimal extraction conditions. Under the optimized conditions, tandem AALLME-HPLC-UV provided a good linearity in the range of 0.5-4000 ng mL(-1), limits of detection (0.1-0.3 ng mL(-1)), extraction repeatabilities (relative standard deviations (RSDs) below 7.7%, n = 5), and the enrichment factors (EFs) of 80-104. Finally, the applicability of the proposed method was evaluated by the extraction and determination of the drugs under study in the wastewater and human plasma samples.