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Sample records for agn bolometric luminosity

  1. The Suzaku view of highly ionized outflows in AGN - II. Location, energetics and scalings with bolometric luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofford, J.; Reeves, J. N.; McLaughlin, D. E.; Braito, V.; Turner, T. J.; Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.

    2015-08-01

    Ongoing studies with XMM-Newton have shown that powerful accretion disc winds, as revealed through highly ionized Fe K-shell absorption at E ≥ 6.7 keV, are present in a significant fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the local Universe (Tombesi et al. 2010a). In Gofford et al., we analysed a sample of 51 Suzaku-observed AGNs and independently detected Fe K absorption in ˜40 per cent of the sample, and we measured the properties of the absorbing gas. In this work, we build upon these results to consider the properties of the associated wind. On average, the fast winds (vw > 0.01c) are located ˜ 1015-18 cm (typically ˜102-4 rs) from their black hole, their mass outflow rates are of the order of < dot{M}_w > ˜ 0.01-1 M⊙ yr-1 or {˜ }(0.01-1)dot{M}_Edd and kinetic power is constrained to ˜ 1043-45 erg s-1, equivalent to ˜(0.1-10 per cent)LEdd. We find a fundamental correlation between the source bolometric luminosity and the wind velocity, with v_w ∝ L_bol^{α } and α =0.4^{+0.3}_{-0.2} (90 per cent confidence), which indicates that more luminous AGN tend to harbour faster Fe K winds. The mass outflow rate dot{M}_w, kinetic power Lw and momentum flux dot{p}_w of the winds are also consequently correlated with Lbol, such that more massive and more energetic winds are present in more luminous AGN. We investigate these properties in the framework of a continuum-driven wind, showing that the observed relationships are broadly consistent with a wind being accelerated by continuum-scattering. We find that, globally, a significant fraction (˜85 per cent) of the sample can plausibly exceed the Lw/Lbol ˜ 0.5 per cent threshold thought necessary for feedback, while 45 per cent may also exceed the less conservative ˜5 per cent of Lbol threshold as well. This suggests that the winds may be energetically significant for AGN-host-galaxy feedback processes.

  2. Low luminosity AGNs in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikiz, Tuba; Peletier, Reynier F.; Yesilyaprak, Cahit

    2016-04-01

    Galaxies are known to contain black holes (e.g. Ferrarese & Merritt 2000), whose mass correlates with the mass of their bulge. A fraction of them also has an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), showing excess emission thought to be due to accretion of mass by the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy. It is thought that AGNs play a very important role during the formation of galaxies by creating large outflows that stop star formation in the galaxy (see e.g. Kormendy & Ho 2013). The aim is to detect the fraction of Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus (LLAGN) in the nearby Universe. At present, they are typically found using optical spectroscopy (e.g. Kauffmann, Heckman et al. 2003), who discuss the influence of the AGN on the host galaxy and vice versa. However, optical spectra are seriously affected by extinction in these generally very dusty objects, and therefore can only give us partial information about the AGN. I used a newly-found method, and apply it to the S4G sample, a large, complete, sample of nearby galaxies, which I am studying in detail with a large collaboration, to detect the fraction of low luminosity AGNs, and to better understand the relation between AGNs and their host galaxy which is thought to be crucial for their formation.

  3. Correlations of Circumnuclear Water Maser Luminosity with AGN Activity and SMBH Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Ming-Yi Jeffrey; Zaw, I.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    We examine 53 water masers, the only known resolvable tracers of gas in the sub-parsec disks of active galactic nuclei (AGN). We test if there is a relationship between the isotropic maser luminosity and black hole mass and AGN activity. Black hole mass is estimated from velocity dispersion, sigma, and AGN bolometric luminosity from [OIII]5007 luminosity, from SDSS spectra. The maser are sorted, based on their radio spectra, into disk-type masers, located in the accretion disk, jet-type masers, located in a jet/outflow, or other-type masers, where the location of the masers is unclear. The maser luminosity is fit against black hole mass and AGN luminosity and compared with the theoretical predictions from Neufeld and Maloney (1995). This builds on the result from Zhu et al. (2011) with a doubled sample size and fitting for both variables at the same time. The dependence of isotropic maser luminosity of the disk and jet masers on black hole mass and AGN luminosity agree within error to the model, while the "other" masers show no correlation.

  4. Characterizing Quasar Outflows III: SEDs, and Bolometric Luminosity Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Joseph; Robbins, J. M.; Ganguly, R.; Stark, M. A.; Christenson, D. H.; Derseweh, J. A.; Townsend, S. L.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). For this purpose, we are examining a sample of 11000 z=1.7-2.0 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This redshift range permits the following from the SDSS spectra: (1) separation of objects that do and do not exhibit outflows; (2) classification/measurement of outflow properties (ionization, velocity, velocity width); and (3) measurements of UV emission line and continuum parameters. In this poster, we add photometry from both the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). 2MASS photometry covers the rest-frame optical regime of these qusars, while the WISE W1, W2, and W3 bands cover the rest-frame wavelength ranges 0.9-1.27 micron, 1.35-1.75 micron, and 2.52-5.51 micron, respectively. The preliminary release of WISE data cover 3800 of our quasars. In an accompnying poster, we have subjectively divided these quasars into four categories: broad absorption-line quasars (2700 objects), associated absorption-line quasars (1700 objects), reddened quasars (160 objects), and unabsorbed/unreddened quasars (6300 objects). Here, we present average SEDs for these subsamples, estimates of bolometric luminosity, and explore changes in SED based on both outflow properties and quasar physical properties. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the

  5. Bolometric luminosities and colors for K and M dwarfs and the subluminous stars of the halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstein, Jesse L.

    1989-09-01

    The H-R diagrams of dM, sdK, and sdM proper-motion stars are examined. A method for integrating energy distributions using discrete weights is proposed. The bolometric corrections are assessed at various wavelengths and a method for obtaining luminosities even if a star lacks IR data is presented. The color-luminosity diagrams suggest that high-velocity, low-metallicity stars of the halo are subluminous. It is found that the apparent cutoff in the halo is a bolometric magnitude of about 12 m.

  6. Does the obscured AGN fraction really depend on luminosity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.

    2015-12-01

    We use a sample of 151 local non-blazar active galactic nuclei (AGN) selected from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray survey to investigate if the observed declining trend of the fraction of obscured (i.e. showing X-ray absorption) AGN with increasing luminosity is mostly an intrinsic or selection effect. Using a torus-obscuration model, we demonstrate that in addition to negative bias, due to absorption in the torus, in finding obscured AGN in hard X-ray flux-limited surveys, there is also positive bias in finding unobscured AGN, due to Compton reflection in the torus. These biases can be even stronger taking into account plausible intrinsic collimation of hard X-ray emission along the axis of the obscuring torus. Given the AGN luminosity function, which steepens at high luminosities, these observational biases lead to a decreasing observed fraction of obscured AGN with increasing luminosity even if this fraction has no intrinsic luminosity dependence. We find that if the central hard X-ray source in AGN is isotropic, the intrinsic (i.e. corrected for biases) obscured AGN fraction still shows a declining trend with luminosity, although the intrinsic obscured fraction is significantly larger than the observed one: the actual fraction is larger than ˜85 per cent at L ≲ 1042.5 erg s-1 (17-60 keV), and decreases to ≲60 per cent at L ≳ 1044 erg s-1. In terms of the half-opening angle θ of an obscuring torus, this implies that θ ≲ 30° in lower luminosity AGN, and θ ≳ 45° in higher luminosity ones. If, however, the emission from the central supermassive black hole is collimated as dL/dΩ ∝ cos α, the intrinsic dependence of the obscured AGN fraction is consistent with a luminosity-independent torus half-opening angle θ ˜ 30°.

  7. Linking X-ray AGN with dark matter halos: a model compatible with AGN luminosity function and large-scale clustering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütsi, Gert; Gilfanov, Marat; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our goal is to find a minimalistic model that describes the luminosity function and large-scale clustering bias of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei in the general framework of the concordance ΛCDM model. Methods: We assume that a simple population-averaged scaling relation between the AGN X-ray luminosity LX and the host dark matter halo mass Mh exists. With such a relation, the AGN X-ray luminosity function can be computed from the halo mass function. Using the concordance ΛCDM halo mass function for the latter, we obtain the Mh - LX relation required to match the redshift-dependent AGN X-ray luminosity function known from X-ray observations. Results: We find that with a simple power-law-scaling Mh ∝ LΓ(z), our model can successfully reproduce the observed X-ray luminosity function. Furthermore, we automatically obtain predictions for the large-scale AGN clustering amplitudes and their dependence on the luminosity and redshift, which seem to be compatible with AGN clustering measurements. Our model also includes the redshift-dependent AGN duty cycle, which peaks at the redshift z ≃ 1, and its peak value is consistent with unity, suggesting that on average there is no more than one AGN per dark matter halo. For a typical X-ray-selected AGN at z ~ 1, our best-fit Mh - LX scaling implies low Eddington ratio LX/LEdd ~ 10-4 - 10-3 (2-10 keV band, no bolometric correction applied) and correspondingly high mass-growth e-folding times, suggesting that typical X-ray AGN are dominantly fueled via relatively inefficient "hot-halo" accretion mode.

  8. Anchoring the AGN X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, John

    2003-09-01

    Knowledge of the AGN LF over a range of luminosities and redshifts is crucial to understanding the accretion history of supermassive blackholes. Much of the CXRB has been resolved and spectroscopic follow-up has revealed a mixed bag of object types at moderate to high redshifts. For the deep Chandra survey results to be useful in studying the evolution of the XLF, a representative sample of local AGNs of various types with known X-ray luminosities is needed. The new KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS) provides the best available sample of H-alpha selected Type 1 and 2 AGNs to serve as the baseline for XLF evolution studies. We propose to observe a volume-limited sample of 28 KISS AGNs to assess their X-ray emission characteristics and establish the local AGN XLF.

  9. Revisiting the relationship between 6 μm and 2-10 keV continuum luminosities of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Rovilos, E.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X.; Blain, A.; Caccianiga, A.; Della Ceca, R.; Severgnini, P.

    2015-05-01

    We have determined the relation between the AGN luminosities at rest-frame 6 μm associated with the dusty torus emission and at 2-10 keV energies using a complete, X-ray-flux-limited sample of 232 AGN drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The objects have intrinsic X-ray luminosities between 1042 and 1046 erg s-1 and redshifts from 0.05 to 2.8. The rest-frame 6 μm luminosities were computed using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and are based on a spectral energy distribution decomposition into AGN and galaxy emission. The best-fitting relationship for the full sample is consistent with being linear, L6 μm ∝ L_{2-10 keV}^{0.99± 0.03}, with intrinsic scatter, Δ log L6 μm ˜ 0.35 dex. The L_{6 μ m}/L_{2-10 keV} luminosity ratio is largely independent of the line-of-sight X-ray absorption. Assuming a constant X-ray bolometric correction, the fraction of AGN bolometric luminosity reprocessed in the mid-IR decreases weakly, if at all, with the AGN luminosity, a finding at odds with simple receding torus models. Type 2 AGN have redder mid-IR continua at rest-frame wavelengths <12 μm and are overall ˜1.3-2 times fainter at 6 μm than type 1 AGN at a given X-ray luminosity. Regardless of whether type 1 and type 2 AGN have the same or different nuclear dusty toroidal structures, our results imply that the AGN emission at rest-frame 6 μm is not isotropic due to self-absorption in the dusty torus, as predicted by AGN torus models. Thus, AGN surveys at rest-frame ˜6 μm are subject to modest dust obscuration biases.

  10. Multiwavelength Energy Distributions and Bolometric Luminosities of the 12 Micron Galaxy Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Malkan, Matthew A.; Rush, Brian; Carrasco, Luis; Recillas-Cruz, Elsa

    1995-11-01

    Aperture photometry from our own observations and the literature is presented for the 12 microns galaxies in the near-infrared J, H, and K bands and, in some cases, in the L band. These data are corrected to "total" near-infrared magnitudes (with a typical uncertainty of 0.3 mag) for a direct comparison with our IRAS fluxes which apply to the entire galaxy. The corrected data are used to derive integrated total near-infrared and far-infrared luminosities. We then combine these with blue photometry and an estimate of the flux contribution from cold dust at wavelengths longward of 100 microns to derive the first bolometric luminosities for a large sample of galaxies. The presence of nonstellar radiation at 2-3 microns correlates very well with nonstellar IRAS colors. This enables us to identify a universal Seyfert nuclear continuum from near- to far-infrared wavelengths. Thus, there is a sequence of infrared colors which runs from a pure "normal galaxy" to a pure Seyfert/quasar nucleus. Seyfert 2 galaxies fall close to this same sequence, although only a few extreme narrow-line Seyfert galaxies have quasar-like colors, and these show strong evidence of harboring an obscured broad-line region. A corollary is that the host galaxies of Seyfert nuclei have normal near- to far-infrared spectra on average. Starburst galaxies lie significantly off the sequence, having a relative excess of 60 microns emission probably as a result of stochastically heated dust grains. We use these correlations to identify several combinations of infrared colors which discriminate between Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies, LINERs, and ultraluminous starbursts. In the infrared, Seyfert 2 galaxies are much more like Seyfert 1s than they are like starbursts, presumably because both kinds of Seyferts are heated by a single central source, rather than a distributed region of star formation. Moreover, combining the [25-2.2 mum] color with the [60-12 mum] color, it appears that Seyfert 1 galaxies are

  11. Disc outflows and high-luminosity true type 2 AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Netzer, Hagai

    2016-06-01

    The absence of intrinsic broad-line emission has been reported in a number of active galactic nuclei (AGN), including some with high Eddington ratios. Such `true type 2 AGN' are inherent to the disc-wind scenario for the broad-line region: broad-line emission requires a minimal column density, implying a minimal outflow rate and thus a minimal accretion rate. Here we perform a detailed analysis of the consequences of mass conservation in the process of accretion through a central disc. The resulting constraints on luminosity are consistent with all the cases where claimed detections of true type 2 AGN pass stringent criteria, and predict that intrinsic broad-line emission can disappear at luminosities as high as ˜4 × 1046 erg s-1 and any Eddington ratio, though more detections can be expected at Eddington ratios below ˜1 per cent. Our results are applicable to every disc outflow model, whatever its details and whether clumpy or smooth, irrespective of the wind structure and its underlying dynamics. While other factors, such as changes in spectral energy distribution or covering factor, can affect the intensities of broad emission lines, within this scenario they can only produce true type 2 AGN of higher luminosity then those prescribed by mass conservation.

  12. The AGN Contribution to Galaxy Merger Infrared Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Lee; Hayward, Christopher C.; Smith, Howard; Ashby, Matthew; Hung, Chao-Ling; Martinez-Galarza, Rafael; Weiner, Aaron; Zezas, Andreas; Lanz, Lauranne

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of AGN activity to the infrared luminosity of interacting galaxies by analyzing dust radiative transfer calculations of a hydrodynamically simulated merger, created with the code GADGET-2. We focus on emission in the mid-IR to far-IR wavelength ranges, and trace the luminosity density of an interacting gas-rich galaxy pair throughout its evolution. We find that the AGN contribution to IR luminosity is greatest during and immediately after coalescence of the galaxies' central black holes. This period lasts roughly 80 Myr, during which time the increased influx of gas to the center of the merger increases the total luminosity by a factor of a thousand or more due to both increased star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion. We compare different interstellar medium models used to describe sub-resolution gas and dust clouds in the radiative transfer calculations by studying the color evolution of our merger in the Herschel Space Observatory photometric filter bands, and compare the results to Herschel observations. We conclude that using infrared luminosity as a simple surrogate for SFR can overestimate the true rate, due to the contribution of AGN or other dust heating mechanisms. This conclusion has an especially significant impact in assessing the star formation activity in high-redshift galaxies for which luminosity (the best measured property) may not accurately measure the SFR, and in cases where the molecular gas content can differ from that of local systems. Further work will extend this analysis to simulations of mergers between late-type galaxies. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851, by the Smithsonian Institution and by NASA grant NNX14AJ6IG.

  13. Near-UV Snapshot Survey of Low Luminosity AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Delgado, Rosa

    2005-07-01

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei {LLAGNs} comprise 30% of all bright galaxies {B<12.5} and are the most common type of AGN. These include low-luminosity Seyfert galaxies, LINERs, and transition-type objects {TOs, also called weak-[OI] LINERs}. What powers them is still at the forefront of AGN research. To unveil the nature of the central source we propose a near-UV snapshot survey of 50 nearby LLAGNs using ACS/HRC and the filter {F330W}, a configuration which is optimal to detect faint star forming regions around their nuclei. These images will complement optical and near-IR images available in the HST archive, providing a panchromatic atlas of the inner regions of these galaxies, which will be used to study their nuclear stellar population. Our main goals are to: 1} Investigate the presence of nuclear unresolved sources that can be attributed to an AGN; 2} Determine the frequency of nuclear and circumnuclear stellar clusters, and whether they are more common in Transition Objects {TOs} than in LINERs; 3} Characterize the sizes, colors, luminosities, masses and ages of these clusters; 4} Derive the luminosity function of star clusters and study their evaporation over time in the vicinity of AGNs. Finally, the results of this project will be combined with those of a previous similar one for Seyfert galaxies in order to compare the nature of the nuclear sources and investigate if there could be an evolution from Seyferts to TOs and LINERs. By adding UV images to the existing optical and near-IR ones, this project will also create an extremely valuable database for astronomers with a broad range of scientific interests.

  14. The stellar content of low luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid Fernandes, R.; Gonzalez-Delgado, R.; Schmitt, H.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Martins, L. P.

    2003-08-01

    We present a spectroscopic study of the stellar populations of LINERs and LINER/HII Transition Objects (TOs). Our main goal is to determine whether the stars who live in the innermost regions of these low luminosity active galaxies are in some way related to their emission line properties, which would imply in a link between the stellar population and the gas excitation mechanism. High sinal to noise long-slit spectra in the 3500-5400 Å interval were collected for over 50 galaxies. The sample was selected out of the magnitude limited survey of ~ 500 galaxies of Ho et al (1997), which provides a representative sample of the local universe. The stellar content of these galaxies was examined in entirely empirical terms, both by the measurement of colors and absorption features and by a comparison with non-active galaxies spanning a wide range of stellar populations, from young starbursts to old elliptical galaxies. Our main findings are: No features due to Wolf-Rayet stars were detected in either LINERs or TOs. On the other hand, strong High order Balmer lines (HOBLs) of HI in absorption are ubiquitous in TOs but not in LINERs. About 50% of the TOs exihibit these features, which indicate the presence of 108-109 yr populations. These TOs also have diluted metal absorption lines and somewhat bluer colors than other objects in the sample. Most LINERs and the remaining 50% TOs, on the other hand, have deep metal lines typical of old stellar populations. The presence of intermediate age populations anti-correlates strongly with [OI]/Ha, a critical diagnostic line ratio. For instance, over 90% of nuclei with conspicuous intermediate age populations are weak [OI]-emitters. These findings strongly suggest a link between the stellar populations and the ionization mechanism in TOs. Possible scenarios, including weak circumnuclear starbursts, supernova-remnannts and evolved post-starburst populations, are being examined. By analogy with previous work on starburst + Seyfert 2

  15. Liners and Low Luminosity AGN in the ROSAT Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This program has led to a series of papers being written and published in the Astrophysical Journal. Together these papers try to explain major parts of the LINER and low luminosity AGN puzzle. One paper ('Accretion Disk Instabilities, Cold Dark Matter Models, and Their Role in Quasar Evolution', Hatziminaoglou E., Siemiginowska A., & Elvis M., 2001, ApJ, 547, 90) describes an analytical model for the evolution of the quasar luminosity function. By combining the Press-Schechter formalism for the masses of initial structures with the luminosity distribution for a population of single mass black holes given by an unstable accretion disk an almost complete end-to-end physics-based model of quasar evolution is produced. In this model black holes spend 75% of their time in a low accretion state (at L(Edd)). This low state population of black holes is likely to be observed as the LINER and low luminosity AGNs in the local universe. Another paper ('Broad Emission Line Regions in AGN: the Link with the Accretion Power', Nicastro F., 2000, ApJ Letters, 530, L65) gives a physical basis for why low state black holes appear as LINERS. By linking the Lightman-Eardley instability in an accretion disk to the ori.gin of a wind that contains the broad emission line cloud material this model explains the large widths seen in these lines as being the Keplerian velocity of the disk at the instability radius. For LINERS the key is that below an accretion rate of 10(exp -3)M(sub Edd)the Lightman-Eardley instability falls within the innermost stable orbit of the disk, and so leaves the entire disk stable. No wind occurs, and so no broad emission lines are seen. Most LINERS are likely to be black holes in this low state. Tests of this model are being considered.

  16. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of AGN evolution stretching back to z˜5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function - all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is demonstrated at z ≈0 and 0.9, and clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z. The results support the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering: one, at high luminosity, that only occurs in high mass, highly biased haloes, and one that can occur over a wide range of halo masses and leads to luminosities that are correlated with halo mass. This latter mode dominates at z<0.9. The CLFs for Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs are also constrained at z ≈0, and we find evidence that unobscured quasars are more likely to be found in higher mass halos than obscured quasars. Thus, the AGN unification model seems to fail at quasar luminosities.

  17. 'Harder when Brighter' Spectral Variability in Low-Luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, S.; McHardy, I.; Skipper, C.; Dwelly, T.

    2015-07-01

    We present X-ray spectral variability of four low accretion rate AGN - M81, NGC 1097, NGC 1052 and NGC 3998 - as observed by Swift and RXTE. All four objects were selected due to having spectra which hardened with increasing count rate, converse to the `softer when brighter' behaviour normally observed in AGN with higher accretion rates. The spectra were summed in flux bins and fitted with a variety of models. A simple absorbed power law model was found to fit the spectra of M81, NGC 1097 and NGC 3998 well, whilst NGC 1052 required a partially covered power law model. In all four cases, the most likely main source of spectral variability is found to be luminosity-dependent changes in the photon index of the power law component. An anticorrelation between the photon index and the count rate is found in all of the sources. The anticorrelation is likely to be caused by accretion via a radiatively-inefficient accretion flow, expected in low-Eddington ratio systems such as these, and/or due to the presence of a jet. This behaviour is similar to that seen in the `hard state' of X-ray binaries, implying that these LLAGN are in a similar state.

  18. On the variable nature of low luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Lorena

    2015-09-01

    X-ray variability is very common in active galactic nuclei (AGN), but it is still unknown if these variations occur similarly in different families of AGN. The main purpose of this work is to disentangle the true structure of low ionization nuclear emission line regions (LINERs) compared to Seyfert 2s by the study of their X-ray variations. We assembled the X-ray spectral properties, as well as the X-ray variability pattern(s), which were obtained from simultaneous spectral fittings and letting different parameters to vary in the model, derived from our previous analyses (Hernández-García et al. 2013, 2014, 2015). We find that Seyfert 2s need more complex models to fit their spectra than LINERs. Among the spectral parameters, major differences are observed in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosities, and the Eddington ratios, which are higher in Seyfert 2s. Differences are observed also in the hard column densities, temperatures, and black hole masses, although less significant. Short-term X-ray variations cannot be claimed, while long-term variability is very common in both families. An exception is found for Compton-thick sources, which do not vary, most probably because the AGN is not accesible in the 0.5--10 keV energy band. The changes are mostly related with variations in the nuclear continuum, but other patterns of variability show that variations in the absorbers (more common in Seyfert 2s) and at soft energies can be present in a few cases. Variations at UV frequencies are observed only in LINER nuclei. The X-ray variations occur similarly in LINERs and Seyfert 2s, i.e., they are related to the nuclear continuum, although they might have different accretion mechanisms, being more efficient in Seyfert 2s. Absorption variations and changing-look sources are not usually observed in LINERs. However, UV nuclear variations are common among LINERs, indicating an unobstructed view of the inner disc where the UV emission might take place. We

  19. Mini Survey of SDSS [OIII] AGN with Swift: Testing the Hypothesis that L(sub [OIII]) Traces AGN Luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The number of AGN and their luminosity distribution are crucial parameters for our understanding of the AGN phenomenon. Recent work strongly suggests every massive galaxy has a central black hole. However most of these objects either are not radiating or have been very difficult to detect We are now in the era of large surveys, and the luminosity function (LF] of AGN has been estimated in various ways. In the X-ray band. Chandra and XMM surveys have revealed that the LF of hard X-ray selected AGN shows a strong luminosity-dependent evolution with a dramatic break towards low L(sub x) (at all z). This is seen for all types of AGN, but is stronger for the broad-line objects. In sharp contrast, the local LF of optically-selected samples shows no such break and no differences between narrow and broad-line objects. If as been suggested, hard X ray and optical emission line can both can be fair indicators of AGN activity, it is important to first understand how reliable these characteristics are if we hope to understand the apparent discrepancy in the LFs.

  20. The Properties of Low-Luminosity AGN: Variability, Accretion Rate, Black Hole Mass and Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleas, Juan; Podjed, Stephanie; Sarajedini, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    We present the results from a study of ~5000 Broad-Line selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. Galaxy and AGN templates have been fit to the SDSS spectra to isolate the AGN component. The sources have absolute magnitudes in the range -23 < Mi < -18 and lie at redshifts less than z ~ 0.8. A variability analysis reveals that the anti-correlation between luminosity and variability amplitude continues to the faintest AGN in our sample (Gallastegui-Aizpun & Sarajedini 2014), though the underlying cause of the relation is still poorly understood. To address this, we further explore the connection between AGN luminosity and variability through measurement of the Hβ line width to determine black hole mass and accretion rate. We find that AGN with the highest variability amplitudes at a given luminosity appear to have lower accretion rates compared to low amplitude variables. We also investigate correlations with AGN color and accretion rate among these low-luminosity AGN.

  1. Nuclear mid-infrared properties of nearby low-luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.; Hönig, S. F.; Gandhi, P.; Smette, A.; Duschl, W. J.

    2012-07-01

    We present ground-based high-spatial resolution mid-infrared (MIR) observations of 20 nearby low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) with VLT/VISIR and the preliminary analysis of a new sample of 10 low-luminosity Seyferts observed with Gemini/Michelle. LLAGN are of great interest because these objects are the most common among active galaxies, especially in the nearby universe. Studying them in great detail makes it possible to investigate the AGN evolution over cosmic timescale. Indeed, many LLAGN likely represent the final stage of an AGN's lifetime. We show that even at low luminosities and accretion rates nuclear unresolved MIR emission is present in most objects. Compared to lower spatial resolution Spitzer/IRS spectra, the high-resolution MIR photometry exhibits significantly lower fluxes and different PAH emission feature properties in many cases. By using scaled Spitzer/IRS spectra of typical starburst galaxies, we show that the star formation contribution to the 12 μm emission is minor in the central parsecs of most LLAGN. Therefore, the observed MIR emission in the VISIR and Michelle data is most likely emitted by the AGN itself, which, for higher luminosity AGN, is interpreted as thermal emission from a dusty torus. Furthermore, the 12 /amemission of the LLAGN is strongly correlated with the absorption corrected 2-10 keV luminosity and the MIR- X-ray correlation found previously for AGN is extended to a range from 1040 to 1045 erg/s. This correlation is independent of the object type, and in particular the low-luminosity Seyferts observed with Michelle fall exactly on the power-law fit valid for brighter AGN. In addition, no dependency of the MIR-X-ray ratio on the accretion rate is found. These results are consistent with the unification model being applicable even in the probed low-luminosity regime.

  2. Do low-luminosity AGN differ? -- The mid-infrared perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.

    2015-09-01

    In this talk I will discuss the results of Asmus et al. (2011) about the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of nearby low-luminosity AGN and their relation to the nuclear hard X-ray properties. The focus will be on the question whether and how low-luminosity AGN differ from their more powerful counterparts, and in particular whether the dusty torus still exists in this regime. This question was addressed from the observational side with new high angular resolution (subarcsecond) MIR data. As one of the main diagnostics, the tight MIR--X-ray luminosity correlation present for all types of AGN can help to distinguish different scenarios for the nuclear structure at low luminosities. Specifically, star formation and radio jets as alternative sources of nuclear MIR emission are discussed. Furthermore, I investigate whether structural changes in the MIR are present with decreasing accretion rate and conclude with putting the low-luminosity AGN into a wider context with the other AGN types.

  3. An Upper Limit on the Ratio Between the Extreme Ultraviolet and the Bolometric Luminosities of Stars Hosting Habitable Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Sujan

    2016-06-01

    A large number of terrestrial planets in the classical habitable zone of stars of different spectral types have already been discovered and many are expected to be discovered in the near future. However, owing to the lack of knowledge on the atmospheric properties, the ambient environment of such planets are unknown. It is known that sufficient amount of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from the star can drive hydrodynamic outflow of hydrogen that may drag heavier species from the atmosphere of the planet. If the rate of mass loss is sufficiently high, then substantial amount of volatiles would escape causing the planet to become uninhabitable. Considering energy-limited hydrodynamical mass loss with an escape rate that causes oxygen to escape alongwith hydrogen, an upper limit for the ratio between the EUV and the bolometric luminosities of stars which constrains the habitability of planets around them is presented here. Application of the limit to planet-hosting stars with known EUV luminosities implies that many M-type of stars should not have habitable planets around them.

  4. Do Radio Jets Contribute to Driving Ionized Gas Outflows in Moderate Luminosity Type 2 AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Julia; Sajina, Anna; Lacy, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This poster examines the role of AGN-driven feedback in low to intermediate power radio galaxies. We begin with [OIII] measurements of ionized gas outflows in 29 moderate AGN-luminosity z~0.3-0.7 dust-obscured Type 2 AGN. We aim to examine the relative role of the AGN itself, of star-formation and of nascent radio jets in driving these outflows. The strength of the AGN and star formation are based on the [OIII] luminosities, and the far-IR luminosities respectively. For the radio jets, we present multi-frequency radio (X, S, and L-bands) JVLA imaging of our sample, which allows us both to constrain the overall radio power, but also look for signatures of young radio sources, including Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) sources, as well as small-scale jets. While radio jet-driven outflows are well known for powerful radio-loud galaxies, this study allows us to constrain the degree to which this mechanism is significant at more modest radio luminosities of L5GHz~10^22-25 W/Hz.

  5. METALLICITY AS A SOURCE OF DISPERSION IN THE SNIa BOLOMETRIC LIGHT CURVE LUMINOSITY-WIDTH RELATIONSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, E.; DomInguez, I.; Badenes, C.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O. E-mail: inma@ugr.es

    2010-03-10

    The recognition that the metallicity of Type Ia supernova (SNIa) progenitors might bias their use for cosmological applications has led to an increasing interest in its role in shaping SNIa light curves. We explore the sensitivity of the synthesized mass of {sup 56}Ni, M({sup 56}Ni), to the progenitor metallicity starting from pre-main-sequence models with masses M {sub 0} = 2-7 M {sub sun} and metallicities Z = 10{sup -5}-0.10. The interplay between convective mixing and carbon burning during the simmering phase eventually raises the neutron excess, {eta}, and leads to a smaller {sup 56}Ni yield, but does not change substantially the dependence of M({sup 56}Ni) on Z. Uncertain attributes of the progenitor white dwarf, like the central density, have a minor effect on M({sup 56}Ni). Our main results are: (1) a sizeable amount of {sup 56}Ni is synthesized during incomplete Si-burning, which leads to a stronger dependence of M({sup 56}Ni) on Z than obtained by assuming that {sup 56}Ni is produced in material that burns fully to nuclear statistical equilibrium; (2) in one-dimensional delayed detonation simulations a composition dependence of the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) density gives a nonlinear relationship between M({sup 56}Ni) and Z and predicts a luminosity larger than previously thought at low metallicities (however, the progenitor metallicity alone cannot explain the whole observational scatter of SNIa luminosities); and (3) an accurate measurement of the slope of the Hubble residuals versus metallicity for a large enough data set of SNIa might give clues to the physics of DDT in thermonuclear explosions.

  6. AGN UV and X-ray luminosities in clumpy accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, W.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.

    2009-02-01

    We consider the fuelling of the central massive black hole in active galactic nuclei (AGN), through an inhomogeneous accretion flow. Performing simple analytical treatments, we show that shocks between elements (clumps) forming the accretion flow may account for the UV and X-ray emission in AGNs. In this picture, a cascade of shocks is expected, where optically thick shocks give rise to optical/UV emission, while optically thin shocks give rise to X-ray emission. The resulting blue bump temperature is found to be quite similar in different AGNs. We obtain that the ratio of X-ray luminosity to UV luminosity is smaller than unity, and that this ratio is smaller in massive objects compared to less massive sources. This is in agreement with the observed L_X/L_UV ratio and suggests a possible interpretation of the α_OX-l_UV anticorrelation.

  7. A Method of Identifying AGNs Based on Emission-Line Excess and the Nature of Low-Luminosity AGNs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. II. The Nature of Low-Luminosity AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayuki

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a new method of identifying active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and studied the nature of low-luminosity AGNs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This is the latter part of a series of papers in which we consider correlations between the AGN activities and the host-galaxy properties. Based on a sample of AGNs identified by a new method developed in the former part (2012, PASJ, 64, 36), we found that AGNs typically show extinction of τV = 1.2, and exhibit a wide range of ionization levels. The finding of ionization levels motivated us to use [O II] + [O III] as an indicator of AGN power. We found that AGNs are preferentially located in massive, red, early-type galaxies. Taking into account a selection bias of the Oxygen-excess method, we showed that strong AGNs are located in active star-forming galaxies, and that rapidly growing super-massive black holes are located in rapidly growing galaxies, which clearly shows the coevolution of super-massive black holes and their host galaxies. This is a surprising phenomenon, given that the growths of black holes and host galaxies occur on their respective physical scales which are very different. Interestingly, the AGN power does not strongly correlate with the host-galaxy mass. It seems that the mass works as a ``switch'' for activating AGNs. The absence of AGNs in low-mass galaxies might be due to the absence of super-massive black holes there, but a dedicated observation of the nuclear region of nearby low-mass galaxies would be necessary to obtain a deeper insight into it.

  8. Star-Formation in Low Radio Luminosity AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W H; Hodge, J A; Becker, R H; White, R L; Helfand, D J

    2007-04-18

    We investigate faint radio emission from low- to high-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Their radio properties are inferred by coadding large ensembles of radio image cut-outs from the FIRST survey, as almost all of the sources are individually undetected. We correlate the median radio flux densities against a range of other sample properties, including median values for redshift, [O III] luminosity, emission line ratios, and the strength of the 4000{angstrom} break. We detect a strong trend for sources that are actively undergoing star-formation to have excess radio emission beyond the {approx} 10{sup 28} ergs s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1} level found for sources without any discernible star-formation. Furthermore, this additional radio emission correlates well with the strength of the 4000{angstrom} break in the optical spectrum, and may be used to assess the age of the star-forming component. We examine two subsamples, one containing the systems with emission line ratios most like star-forming systems, and one with the sources that have characteristic AGN ratios. This division also separates the mechanism responsible for the radio emission (star-formation vs. AGN). For both cases we find a strong, almost identical, correlation between [O III] and radio luminosity, with the AGN sample extending toward lower, and the star-formation sample toward higher luminosities. A clearer separation between the two subsamples is seen as function of the central velocity dispersion {sigma} of the host galaxy. For systems at similar redshifts and values of {sigma}, the star-formation subsample is brighter than the AGN in the radio by an order of magnitude. This underlines the notion that the radio emission in star-forming systems can dominate the emission associated with the AGN.

  9. The dependency of AGN infrared colour-selection on source luminosity and obscuration. An observational perspective in CDFS and COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messias, H.; Afonso, J. M.; Salvato, M.; Mobasher, B.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    Aims: This work addresses the AGN IR-selection dependency on intrinsic source luminosity and obscuration, in order to identify and characterise biases that could affect conclusions in studies. Methods: We study IR-selected AGN in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) survey and in the Cosmological Survey (COSMOS). The AGN sample is divided into low and high X-ray luminosity classes and into unobscured (type-1) and obscured (type-2) classes by means of X-ray and optical spectroscopy data. Specifically in the X-ray regime, we adopt the intrinsic luminosity taking the estimated column density (NH) into account. We also take the opportunity to highlight important differences resulting from adopting different methods of assessing AGN obscuration. Results: In agreement with previous studies, we also find that AGN IR-selection efficiency shows a decrease with decreasing source AGN X-ray luminosity. For the intermediate-luminosity AGN population (43.3 ≲ log (LX [erg s-1] ) ≲ 44), the efficiency also worsens with increasing obscuration (NH). The same sample also shows an evolution with cosmic time of the obscured fraction at the highest X-ray luminosities, independently of the adopted type-1/type-2 classification method. Conclusions: We confirm that AGN IR-selection is genuinely biased towards unobscured AGNe, but only at intermediate luminosities. At the highest luminosities, where AGN IR-selection is more efficient, there is no obscuration bias. We show that type-1 AGNe are intrinsically more luminous than type-2 AGNe only at z ≲ 1.6, thus resulting in more type-1 AGN being selected when the IR survey is shallower. Based on this and other studies, we conclude that deep hard-X-ray coverages, high-resolution IR imaging, or a combination of IR and radio data are required to recover the lower luminosity obscured AGN population. In addition, wide IR surveys are needed to recover the rare powerful, obscured AGN population. Finally, when the James Webb Space Telescope comes

  10. Looking below the floor: constraints on the AGN radio luminosity functions at low power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capetti, Alessandro; Raiteri, Claudia M.

    2015-04-01

    We constrain the behaviour of the radio luminosity function (RLF) of two classes of active galactic nuclei (AGN) namely AGN of low radio power (LRP) and BL Lac objects. The extrapolation of the observed steep RLFs to low power predicts a space density of such objects that exceeds that of the sources that can harbour them and this requires a break to a shallower slope. For LRP AGN, we obtain Pbr, LRP ≳ 1020.5 W Hz- 1 at 1.4 GHz to limit their density to be smaller than that of elliptical galaxies with black hole masses MBH > 107.5 M⊙. By combining this value with the limit derived by the observations the break must occur at Pbr, LRP ˜ 1020.5-1021.5 W Hz- 1. For BL Lacs, we find Pbr, BLLAC ≳ 1023.3 W Hz- 1 otherwise they would outnumber the density of weak-lined and compact radio sources, while the observations indicate Pbr, BLLAC ≲ 1024.5 W Hz- 1. In the framework of the AGN unified model, a low luminosity break in the RLF of LRP AGN must correspond to a break in the RLF of BL Lacs. The ratio between Pbr, LRP and Pbr, BLLAC is ˜103, as expected for a jet Doppler factor of ˜10.

  11. The Cosmological Impact of AGN Outflows: Measuring Absolute Abundances and Kinetic Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arav, Nahum

    2009-07-01

    AGN outflows are increasingly invoked as a major contributor to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes, their host galaxies, the surrounding IGM, and cluster cooling flows. Our HST/COS proposal will determine reliable absolute chemical abundances in six AGN outflows, which influences several of the processes mentioned above. To date there is only one such determination, done by our team on Mrk 279 using 16 HST/STIS orbits and 100 ksec of FUSE time. The advent of COS and its high sensitivity allows us to choose among fainter objects at redshifts high enough to preclude the need for FUSE. This will allow us to determine the absolute abundances for six AGN {all fainter than Mrk 279} using only 40 HST COS orbits. This will put abundances studies in AGN on a firm footing, an elusive goal for the past four decades. In addition, prior FUSE observations of four of these targets indicate that it is probable that the COS observations will detect troughs from excited levels of C III. These will allow us to measure the distances of the outflows and thereby determine their kinetic luminosity, a major goal in AGN feedback research. We will use our state of the art column density extraction methods and velocity-dependent photoionization models to determine the abundances and kinetic luminosity. Previous AGN outflow projects suffered from the constraints of deciding what science we could do using ONE of the handful of bright targets that were observable. With COS we can choose the best sample for our experiment. As an added bonus, most of the spectral range of our targets has not been observed previously, greatly increasing the discovery phase space.

  12. Unification of Low Luminosity AGN and Hard State X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present X-ray spectral variability of four low accretion rate and low luminosity AGN (LLAGN)- M81, NGC 1097, NGC 1052 and NGC 3998 - as observed by Swift and RXTE. All four objects were selected due to having spectra which hardened with increasing count rate, converse to the 'softer when brighter' behaviour normally observed in AGN with higher accretion rates. The spectra were summed in flux bins and fitted with a variety of models. A simple absorbed power law model was found to fit the spectra of M81, NGC 1097 and NGC 3998 well, whilst NGC 1052 required a partially covered power law model. In all four cases, the most likely cause of spectral variability is found to be hardening of the photon index of the power law component with increasing luminosity. Such a correlation has been seen previously within samples of low accretion rate AGN but in only one case has it been seen within observations of a single AGN. Here we show that such behaviour may be very common in LLAGN. A similar anticorrelation is found in X-ray binary systems in the 'hard state', at low accretion rates similar to those of the LLAGN discussed here. Our observations thus imply that LLAGN are the active galaxy equivalent of hard state X-ray binaries.

  13. THE GALAXY OPTICAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Forman, William R.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Moustakas, John

    2012-03-20

    We present the galaxy optical luminosity function for the redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.75 from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey, a spectroscopic survey of 7.6 deg{sup 2} in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Our statistical sample is composed of 12,473 galaxies with known redshifts down to I = 20.4 (AB). Our results at low redshift are consistent with those from Sloan Digital Sky Survey; at higher redshift, we find strong evidence for evolution in the luminosity function, including differential evolution between blue and red galaxies. We find that the luminosity density evolves as (1 + z){sup (0.54{+-}0.64)} for red galaxies and (1 + z){sup (1.64{+-}0.39)} for blue galaxies.

  14. Complete Hard X-Ray Surveys, AGN Luminosity Functions and the X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack

    2011-01-01

    AGN are believed to make up most of the Cosmic X-Ray Background (CXB) above a few keV, but this background cannot be fully resolved at energies less than 10 keV due to absorption. The Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL missions are performing the first complete hard x-ray surveys with minimal bias due to absorption. The most recent results for both missions will be presented. Although the fraction of the CXB resolved by these surveys is small, it is possible to derive unbiased number counts and luminosity functions for AGN in the local universe. The survey energy range from 15-150 keV contains the important reflection and cutoff spectral features dominate the shape of the AGN contribution to the CXB. Average spectral characteristics of survey detected AGN will be presented and compared with model distributions. The numbers of hard x-ray blazars detected in these surveys are finally sufficient to estimate this important component's contribution the cosmic background. Constraints on CXB models and their significance will be discussed.

  15. The Hard X-ray 20-40 keV AGN Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Soldi, S.; Shrader, C. R.; Gehrels, N.; Produit, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have compiled a complete, significance limited extragalactic sample based on approximately 25,000 deg(sup 2) to a limiting flux of 3 x 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second. (approximately 7,000 deg(sup 2)) to a flux limit of 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second)) in the 20 - 40 keV band with INTEGRAL. We have constructed a detailed exposure map to compensate for effects of non-uniform exposure. The flux-number relation is best described by a power-law with a slope of alpha = 1.66 plus or minus 0.11. The integration of the cumulative flux per unit area leads to f(sub 20-40 keV) = 2.6 x 10(exp -10) ergs per square centimeter per second per sr(sup -1) which is about 1% of the known 20-40 keV X-ray background. We present the first luminosity function of AGN in the 20-40 keV energy range, based on 68 extragalactic objects detected by the imager IBIS/ISGRI on-board INTEGRAL. The luminosity function shows a smoothly connected two power-law form, with an index of gamma (sub 1) = 0.9 below, and gamma (sub 2) = 2.2 above the turn-over luminosity of L(sub *), = 4.6 x 10(sup 43) ergs per second. The emissivity of all INTEGRAL AGNs per unit volume is W(sub 20-40keV)(greater than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) = 2.8 x 10(sup 38) ergs per second h(sup 3)(sub 70) Mpc(sup -3). These results are consistent with those derived in the 2-20keV energy band and do not show a significant contribution by Compton-thick objects. Because the sample used in this study is truly local (z(raised bar) = 0.022)), only limited conclusions can be drawn for the evolution of AGNs in this energy band. But the objects explaining the peak in the cosmic X-ray background are likely to be either low luminosity AGN (L(sub x) less than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) or of other type, such as intermediate mass black holes, clusters, and star forming regions.

  16. The 5-10 keV AGN luminosity function at 0.01 < z < 4.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotopoulou, S.; Buchner, J.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Georgakakis, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Ranalli, P.; Hsu, L. T.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Miyaji, T.; Nandra, K.; Aird, J.; Paltani, S.

    2016-03-01

    The active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function traces actively accreting supermassive black holes and is essential for the study of the properties of the AGN population, black hole evolution, and galaxy-black hole coevolution. Up to now, the AGN luminosity function has been estimated several times in soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard X-rays (2-10 keV). AGN selection in these energy ranges often suffers from identification and redshift incompleteness and, at the same time, photoelectric absorption can obscure a significant amount of the X-ray radiation. We estimate the evolution of the luminosity function in the 5-10 keV band, where we effectively avoid the absorbed part of the spectrum, rendering absorption corrections unnecessary up to NH ~ 1023 cm-2. Our dataset is a compilation of six wide, and deep fields: MAXI, HBSS, XMM-COSMOS, Lockman Hole, XMM-CDFS, AEGIS-XD, Chandra-COSMOS, and Chandra-CDFS. This extensive sample of ~1110 AGN (0.01 < z < 4.0, 41 < log Lx < 46) is 98% redshift complete with 68% spectroscopic redshifts. For sources lacking a spectroscopic redshift estimation we use the probability distribution function of photometric redshift estimation specifically tuned for AGN, and a flat probability distribution function for sources with no redshift information. We use Bayesian analysis to select the best parametric model from simple pure luminosity and pure density evolution to more complicated luminosity and density evolution and luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE). We estimate the model parameters that describe best our dataset separately for each survey and for the combined sample. We show that, according to Bayesian model selection, the preferred model for our dataset is the LDDE. Our estimation of the AGN luminosity function does not require any assumption on the AGN absorption and is in good agreement with previous works in the 2-10 keV energy band based on X-ray hardness ratios to model the absorption in AGN up to redshift three

  17. The Spitzer Mid-infrared AGN Survey. II. The Demographics and Cosmic Evolution of the AGN Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, M.; Ridgway, S. E.; Sajina, A.; Petric, A. O.; Gates, E. L.; Urrutia, T.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.

    2015-04-01

    We present luminosity functions derived from a spectroscopic survey of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from Spitzer Space Telescope imaging surveys. Selection in the mid-infrared is significantly less affected by dust obscuration. We can thus compare the luminosity functions of obscured and unobscured AGNs in a more reliable fashion than by using optical or X-ray data alone. We find that the AGN luminosity function can be well described by a broken power-law model in which the break luminosity decreases with redshift. At high redshifts (z\\gt 1.6), we find significantly more AGNs at a given bolometric luminosity than found by either optical quasar surveys or hard X-ray surveys. The fraction of obscured AGNs decreases rapidly with increasing AGN luminosity, but, at least at high redshifts, appears to remain at ≈ 50% even at bolometric luminosities ˜ {{10}14} {{L}⊙ }. The data support a picture in which the obscured and unobscured populations evolve differently, with some evidence that high luminosity obscured quasars peak in space density at a higher redshift than their unobscured counterparts. The amount of accretion energy in the universe estimated from this work suggests that AGNs contribute about 12% to the total radiation intensity of the universe, and a high radiative accretion efficiency ≈ 0.18-0.07+0.12 is required to match current estimates of the local mass density in black holes.

  18. Redshift and luminosity evolution of the intrinsic alignments of galaxies in Horizon-AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, N.; Laigle, C.; Codis, S.; Dubois, Y.; Devriendt, J.; Miller, L.; Benabed, K.; Slyz, A.; Gavazzi, R.; Pichon, C.

    2016-09-01

    Intrinsic galaxy shape and angular momentum alignments can arise in cosmological large-scale structure due to tidal interactions or galaxy formation processes. Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations have recently come of age as a tool to study these alignments and their contamination to weak gravitational lensing. We probe the redshift and luminosity evolution of intrinsic alignments in Horizon-AGN between z = 0 and 3 for galaxies with an r-band absolute magnitude of Mr ≤ -20. Alignments transition from being radial at low redshifts and high luminosities, dominated by the contribution of ellipticals, to being tangential at high redshift and low luminosities, where discs dominate the signal. This cannot be explained by the evolution of the fraction of ellipticals and discs alone: intrinsic evolution in the amplitude of alignments is necessary. The alignment amplitude of elliptical galaxies alone is smaller in amplitude by a factor of ≃2, but has similar luminosity and redshift evolution as in current observations and in the non-linear tidal alignment model at projected separations of ≳1 Mpc. Alignments of discs are null in projection and consistent with current low-redshift observations. The combination of the two populations yields an overall amplitude a factor of ≃4 lower than observed alignments of luminous red galaxies with a steeper luminosity dependence. The restriction on accurate galaxy shapes implies that the galaxy population in the simulation is complete only to Mr ≤ -20. Higher resolution simulations will be necessary to avoid extrapolation of the intrinsic alignment predictions to the range of luminosities probed by future surveys.

  19. Clustering of moderate luminosity X-ray-selected type 1 and type 2 AGNs at z ∼ 3

    SciTech Connect

    Allevato, V.; Finoguenov, A.; Civano, F.; Cappelluti, N.; Shankar, F.; Miyaji, T.; Hasinger, G.; Gilli, R.; Zamorani, G.; Comastri, A.; Lanzuisi, G.; Salvato, M.; Elvis, M.; Silverman, J.

    2014-11-20

    We investigate, for the first time at z ∼ 3, the clustering properties of 189 Type 1 and 157 Type 2 X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs) of moderate luminosity ((L {sub bol}) = 10{sup 45.3} erg s{sup –1}), with photometric or spectroscopic redshifts in the range 2.2 < z < 6.8. These samples are based on Chandra and XMM-Newton data in COSMOS. We find that Type 1 and Type 2 COSMOS AGNs at z ∼ 3 inhabit DMHs with typical mass of log M{sub h} = 12.84{sub −0.11}{sup +0.10} and 11.73{sub −0.45}{sup +0.39} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}, respectively. This result requires a drop in the halo masses of Type 1 and 2 COSMOS AGNs at z ∼ 3 compared to z ≲ 2 XMM-COSMOS AGNs with similar luminosities. Additionally, we infer that unobscured COSMOS AGNs at z ∼ 3 reside in 10 times more massive halos compared to obscured COSMOS AGNs, at the 2.6σ level. This result extends to z ∼ 3 the results found in COSMOS at z ≲ 2, and rules out the picture in which obscuration is purely an orientation effect. A model which assumes that the AGNs activity is triggered by major mergers is quite successful in predicting both the low halo mass of COSMOS AGNs and the typical mass of luminous SDSS quasars at z ∼ 3, with the latter inhabiting more massive halos respect to moderate luminosity AGNs. Alternatively we can argue, at least for Type 1 COSMOS AGNs, that they are possibly representative of an early phase of fast (i.e., Eddington limited) BH growth induced by cosmic cold flows or disk instabilities. Given the moderate luminosity, these new fast growing BHs have masses of ∼10{sup 7-8} M {sub ☉} at z ∼ 3 which might evolve into ∼10{sup 8.5-9} M {sub ☉} mass BHs at z = 0. Following our clustering measurements, we argue that this fast BH growth at z ∼ 3 in AGNs with moderate luminosity occurs in DMHs with typical mass of ∼ 6× 10{sup 12} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}.

  20. THE RADIUS-LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: THE EFFECT OF HOST-GALAXY STARLIGHT ON LUMINOSITY MEASUREMENTS. II. THE FULL SAMPLE OF REVERBERATION-MAPPED AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Misty C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W.; Netzer, Hagai; Vestergaard, Marianne E-mail: peterson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: netzer@wise.tau.ac.il

    2009-05-20

    We present high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images of all 35 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with optical reverberation-mapping results, which we have modeled to create a nucleus-free image of each AGN host galaxy. From the nucleus-free images, we determine the host-galaxy contribution to ground-based spectroscopic luminosity measurements at 5100 A. After correcting the luminosities of the AGNs for the contribution from starlight, we re-examine the H{beta} R {sub BLR}-L relationship. Our best fit for the relationship gives a power-law slope of 0.52 with a range of 0.45-0.59 allowed by the uncertainties. This is consistent with our previous findings, and thus still consistent with the naive assumption that all AGNs are simply luminosity-scaled versions of each other. We discuss various consistency checks relating to the galaxy modeling and starlight contributions, as well as possible systematic errors in the current set of reverberation measurements from which we determine the form of the R {sub BLR}-L relationship.

  1. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE KINETIC POWER AND BOLOMETRIC LUMINOSITY OF JETS: LIMITATION FROM BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI, AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Renyi; Hou, Shujin; Xie, Fu-Guo E-mail: fgxie@shao.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P {sub jet} and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L {sub jet} of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P {sub jet} and L {sub jet} being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ∼10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1} to ∼10{sup 52} erg s{sup –1}, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P {sub jet}-L {sub jet} correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  2. Relationship between the Kinetic Power and Bolometric Luminosity of Jets: Limitation from Black Hole X-Ray Binaries, Active Galactic Nuclei, and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Renyi; Xie, Fu-Guo; Hou, Shujin

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P jet and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L jet of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P jet and L jet being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ~1031 erg s-1 to ~1052 erg s-1, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P jet-L jet correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  3. Mid-infrared properties of nearby low-luminosity AGN at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.; Gandhi, P.; Smette, A.; Hönig, S. F.; Duschl, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    We present high spatial resolution mid-infrared (MIR) 12 μm continuum imaging of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN) obtained with VLT/VISIR. Our goal is to determine whether the nuclear MIR emission of LLAGN is consistent with the existence of a dusty obscuring torus, the key component of the unification model for AGN. Based on available hard X-ray luminosities and the previously known tight correlation between the hard X-ray and 12 μm luminosities, we selected a sample of 17 nearby LLAGN without available VISIR N-band photometry. Combined with archival VISIR data of 9 additional LLAGN with available X-ray measurements, the dataset represents the bulk of southern LLAGN currently detectable from the ground in the MIR. Of the 17 observed LLAGN, 7 are detected, while upper limits are derived for the 10 non-detections. This increases the total number of AGN detected with VLT/VISIR to more than 50. All detections except NGC 3125 appear point-like on a spatial scale of ~0.35″. The detections do not significantly deviate from the known MIR-X-ray correlation but exceed it by a factor of ~10 down to luminosities <1041 erg/s with a narrow scatter (σ = 0.35 dex, Spearman rank ρ = 0.92). The latter is dominated by the uncertainties in the X-ray luminosity. Interestingly, a similar correlation with a comparable slope but with a normalization differing by ~2.6 orders of magnitude has been found for local starburst galaxies. In addition, we compared the VISIR data with lower spatial resolution data from Spitzer/IRS and IRAS. By using a scaled starburst template spectral energy distribution and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) 11.3 μm emission line, we were able to restrict the maximum nuclear star-formation contamination of the VISIR photometry to ≲30% for 75% of the LLAGN. Exceptions are NGC 1097 and NGC 1566, which may possess unresolved strong PAH emission. Furthermore, the MIR-X-ray luminosity ratio is unchanged over more than 4 orders of

  4. A New Catalog of Type 1 AGNs and its Implications on the AGN Unified Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyuseok; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Schawinski, Kevin; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Soto, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    We have recently identified a substantial number of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) featuring weak broad-line regions (BLRs) at z\\lt 0.2 from detailed analysis of galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. These objects predominantly show a stellar continuum but also a broad Hα emission line, indicating the presence of a low-luminosity AGN oriented so that we are viewing the central engine directly without significant obscuration. These accreting black holes have previously eluded detection due to their weak nature. The newly discovered BLR AGNs have increased the number of known type 1 AGNs by 49%. Some of these new BLR AGNs were detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and their X-ray properties confirm that they are indeed type 1 AGNs. Based on our new and more complete catalog of type 1 AGNs, we derived the type 1 fraction of AGNs as a function of [O iii] λ 5007 emission luminosity and explored the possible dilution effect on obscured AGNs due to star formation. The new type 1 AGN fraction shows much more complex behavior with respect to black hole mass and bolometric luminosity than has been suggested previously by the existing receding torus model. The type 1 AGN fraction is sensitive to both of these factors, and there seems to be a sweet spot (ridge) in the diagram of black hole mass and bolometric luminosity. Furthermore, we present the possibility that the Eddington ratio plays a role in determining opening angles.

  5. Iron K Line Variability in the Low-Luminosity AGN NGC 4579

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terashima, Yuichi; Ho, Luis C.; Ptak, Andrew F.; Yaqoob, Tahir; Kunieda, Hideyo; Misaki, Kazutami; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present results of new ASCA observations of the low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) NGC 4579 obtained in 1998 December 18 and 28, and we report on detection of variability of an iron K emission line. The X-ray luminosities in the 2-10 keV band for the two observations are nearly identical, L(sub X) approximately = 2 x 10(exp 4l) ergs/s, but they are approximately 35% larger than that measured in 1995 July by Terashima et al. (1998). An Fe K emission line is detected at 6.39 +/- 0.09 keV (source rest frame) which is lower than the line energy 6.73(sup +0.13, sub -0.12) keV in the 1995 observation. If we fit the Fe lines with a blend of two Gaussians centered at 6.4 keV and 6.73 KeV, the intensity of the 6.7 keV line decreased, while the intensity of the 6.4 keV line increased, within an interval of 3.5 years. This variability rules out thermal plasmas in the host galaxy as the origin of the ionized Fe line in this LLAGN. The detection and variability of the 6.4 keV line suggest that an optically thick standard accretion disk is present and subtends a large solid angle viewed from the nucleus at the Eddington ratio of L(sub Bol)/L(sub Eddington) approximately 2 x 10(exp -3) (Ho 1999). A broad disk-line profile is not clearly seen and the structure of the innermost part of accretion disk remains unclear.

  6. X-ray View of Four High-Luminosity Swift-BAT AGN: Unveiling Obscuration and Reflection with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorettil, V.; Angelini, L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Koss, M.; Malaguti, G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. A complete census of obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is necessary to reveal the history of the super massive black hole (SMBH) growth and galaxy evolution in the Universe given the complex feedback processes and the fact that much of this growth occurs in an obscured phase. In this context, hard X-ray surveys and dedicated follow-up observations represent a unique tool for selecting highly absorbed AGN and for characterizing the obscuring matter surrounding the SMBH. Here we focus on the absorption and reflection occurring in highly luminous, quasar-like AGN, to study the relation between the geometry of the absorbing matter and the AGN nature (e.g. X-ray, optical, and radio properties), and to help to determine the column density dependency on the AGN luminosity. Methods. The Swift/BAT nine-month survey observed 153 AGN, all with ultra-hard X-ray BAT fluxes in excess of 10(exp -11) erg per square centimeter and an average redshift of 0.03. Among them, four of the most luminous BAT AGN (44.73 less than LogLBAT less than 45.31) were selected as targets of Suzaku follow-up observations: J2246.0+3941 (3C 452), J0407.4+0339 (3C 105), J0318.7+6828, and J0918.5+0425. The column density, scattered/reflected emission, the properties of the Fe K line, and a possible variability are fully analyzed. For the latter, the spectral properties from Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift/XRT public observations were compared with the present Suzaku analysis, adding an original spectral analysis when non was available from the literature. Results. Of our sample, 3C 452 is the only certain Compton-thick AGN candidate because of i) the high absorption (N(sub H) approximately 4 × 10(exp 23) per square centimeter) and strong Compton reflection; ii) the lack of variability; iii) the "buried" nature, i.e. the low scattering fraction (less than 0.5%) and the extremely low relative [OIII] luminosity. In contrast 3C 105 is not reflection-dominated, despite the comparable column density

  7. The dependence of the soft X ray spectral slope with radio property, luminosity, and redshift, for a large sample of AGN from the Einstein IPC data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, H.; Worrall, D. M.; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Elvis, Martin

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of the soft X-ray spectral slope on radio, optical and X-ray properties, and on redshift are reported for a large sample of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The sample includes 317 optically and radio-selected AGN from a preliminary version of the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) quasar and AGN data base. The main results are: the difference in X-ray slope between radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN were confirmed for an independent and much larger sample of sources; a difference in X-ray slope between flat and steep radio spectrum AGN is observed only in high luminosity sub-sample; in flat radio spectrum AGNs there is an indication for a dependence of the X-ray spectral index on X-ray luminosity redshift and alpha sub 0x.

  8. STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY QUASAR HOSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE AGN BLACK HOLE MASS SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Zu, Y.; Watson, L. C.; Bentz, M. C.; Dasyra, K. M.; Dietrich, M.; Ferrarese, L.

    2013-08-20

    We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8 m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole (BH) masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of BHs and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass BHs are not offset with respect to the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation exhibited by lower-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with lower-mass BHs, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor (f) that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain (f) = 4.31 {+-} 1.05, which is slightly lower than, but consistent with, most previous determinations.

  9. Correlations of the IR Luminosity and Eddington Ratio with a Hard X-ray Selected Sample of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzy, Richard F.; Winter, Lisa M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Tueller, Jack

    2008-01-01

    We use the SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample of hard x-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a median redshift of 0.03 and the 2MASS J and K band photometry to examine the correlation of hard x-ray emission to Eddington ratio as well as the relationship of the J and K band nuclear luminosity to the hard x-ray luminosity. The BAT sample is almost unbiased by the effects of obscuration and thus offers the first large unbiased sample for the examination of correlations between different wavelength bands. We find that the near-IR nuclear J and K band luminosity is related to the BAT (14 - 195 keV) luminosity over a factor of 10(exp 3) in luminosity (L(sub IR) approx.equals L(sub BAT)(sup 1.25) and thus is unlikely to be due to dust. We also find that the Eddington ratio is proportional to the x-ray luminosity. This new result should be a strong constraint on models of the formation of the broad band continuum.

  10. The dark matter haloes of moderate luminosity X-ray AGN as determined from weak gravitational lensing and host stellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leauthaud, Alexie; J. Benson, Andrew; Civano, Francesca; L. Coil, Alison; Bundy, Kevin; Massey, Richard; Schramm, Malte; Schulze, Andreas; Capak, Peter; Elvis, Martin; Kulier, Andrea; Rhodes, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei (AGN) and the dark matter haloes in which they reside is key to constraining how black hole fuelling is triggered and regulated. Previous efforts have relied on simple halo mass estimates inferred from clustering, weak gravitational lensing, or halo occupation distribution modelling. In practice, these approaches remain uncertain because AGN, no matter how they are identified, potentially live a wide range of halo masses with an occupation function whose general shape and normalization are poorly known. In this work, we show that better constraints can be achieved through a rigorous comparison of the clustering, lensing, and cross-correlation signals of AGN hosts to the fiducial stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR) derived for all galaxies, irrespective of nuclear activity. Our technique exploits the fact that the global SHMR can be measured with much higher accuracy than any statistic derived from AGN samples alone. Using 382 moderate luminosity X-ray AGN at z < 1 from the COSMOS field, we report the first measurements of weak gravitational lensing from an X-ray-selected sample. Comparing this signal to predictions from the global SHMR, we find that, contrary to previous results, most X-ray AGN do not live in medium size groups - nearly half reside in relatively low mass haloes with M200b ˜ 1012.5 M⊙. The AGN occupation function is well described by the same form derived for all galaxies but with a lower normalization - the fraction of haloes with AGN in our sample is a few per cent. The number of AGN satellite galaxies scales as a power law with host halo mass with a power-law index α = 1. By highlighting the relatively `normal' way in which moderate luminosity X-ray AGN hosts occupy haloes, our results suggest that the environmental signature of distinct fuelling modes for luminous quasars compared to moderate luminosity X-ray AGN is less obvious than previously claimed.

  11. An exceptionally powerful AGN outburst in the low-luminosity non-cool-core group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Ewan

    2013-10-01

    The shallow potentials of galaxy groups make them vulnerable to heating and gas loss caused by powerful AGN outbursts. Theoretical models suggest that feedback at z~2 must have ejected gas from groups, reducing their baryon content, but a lack of identified nearby non-cool-core (NCC) groups makes it difficult to determine whether AGN continue to have such a significant impact on the structure of the intra-group medium (IGM). We propose a deep observation of HCG 15, a disturbed non-cool-core group which appears to have undergone an exceptionally powerful AGN outburst ~190-330 Myr ago. We will search for cavities, make a more accurate estimate of the outburst power, examine the IGM for evidence of outward gas transport, and determine whether the AGN has disrupted the group core.

  12. Rest-frame UV Single-epoch Black Hole Mass Estimates of Low-luminosity AGNs at Intermediate Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouzos, Marios; Woo, Jong-Hak; Matsuoka, Kenta; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Onken, Christopher A.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Park, Dawoo; Nagao, Tohru; Kim, Sang Chul

    2015-12-01

    The ability to accurately derive black hole (BH) masses at progressively higher redshifts and over a wide range of continuum luminosities has become indispensable in the era of large-area extragalactic spectroscopic surveys. In this paper, we present an extension of existing comparisons between rest-frame UV and optical virial BH mass estimators to intermediate redshifts and luminosities comparable to the local Hβ reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We focus on the Mg ii, C iv, and C iii] broad emission lines and compare them to both Hα and Hβ. We use newly acquired near-infrared spectra from the Fiber-fed Multi-object Spectrograph instrument on the Subaru telescope for 89 broad-lined AGNs at redshifts between 0.3 and 3.5, complemented by data from the AGES survey. We employ two different prescriptions for measuring the emission line widths and compare the results. We confirm that Mg ii shows a tight correlation with Hα and Hβ, with a scatter of ∼0.25 dex. The C iv and C iii] estimators, while showing larger scatter, are viable virial mass estimators after accounting for a trend with the UV-to-optical luminosity ratio. We find an intrinsic scatter of ∼0.37 dex between Balmer and carbon virial estimators by combining our data set with previous high redshift measurements. This updated comparison spans a total of three decades in BH mass. We calculate a virial factor for C iv/C iii] {log}{f}{{C}{{IV}}/{{C}}{{III}}]}=0.87 with an estimated systematic uncertainty of ∼0.4 dex and find excellent agreement between the local reverberation mapped AGN sample and our high-z sample.

  13. The clustering amplitude of X-ray-selected AGN at z ˜ 0.8: evidence for a negative dependence on accretion luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountrichas, G.; Georgakakis, A.; Menzel, M.-L.; Fanidakis, N.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Salvato, M.; Nandra, K.

    2016-04-01

    The northern tile of the wide-area and shallow XMM-XXL X-ray survey field is used to estimate the average dark matter halo mass of relatively luminous X-ray-selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) [log {L}_X (2-10 keV)= 43.6^{+0.4}_{-0.4} erg s^{-1}] in the redshift interval z = 0.5-1.2. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of X-ray sources in the XMM-XXL field by the Sloan telescope are combined with the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey spectroscopic galaxy survey to determine the cross-correlation signal between X-ray-selected AGN (total of 318) and galaxies (about 20 000). We model the large scales (2-25 Mpc) of the correlation function to infer a mean dark matter halo mass of log M / (M_{{⊙}} h^{-1}) = 12.50 ^{+0.22} _{-0.30} for the X-ray-selected AGN sample. This measurement is about 0.5 dex lower compared to estimates in the literature of the mean dark matter halo masses of moderate-luminosity X-ray AGN [LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1042-1043 erg s- 1] at similar redshifts. Our analysis also links the mean clustering properties of moderate-luminosity AGN with those of powerful ultraviolet/optically selected QSOs, which are typically found in haloes with masses few times 1012 M⊙. There is therefore evidence for a negative luminosity dependence of the AGN clustering. This is consistent with suggestions that AGN have a broad dark matter halo mass distribution with a high mass tail that becomes subdominant at high accretion luminosities. We further show that our results are in qualitative agreement with semi-analytic models of galaxy and AGN evolution, which attribute the wide range of dark matter halo masses among the AGN population to different triggering mechanisms and/or black hole fuelling modes.

  14. Magellan Adaptive Optics First-light Observations of the Exoplanet β Pic b. II. 3-5 μm Direct Imaging with MagAO+Clio, and the Empirical Bolometric Luminosity of a Self-luminous Giant Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzinski, Katie M.; Males, Jared R.; Skemer, Andy J.; Close, Laird M.; Hinz, Phil M.; Rodigas, T. J.; Puglisi, Alfio; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Follette, Katherine B.; Kopon, Derek; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Wu, Ya-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Young giant exoplanets are a unique laboratory for understanding cool, low-gravity atmospheres. A quintessential example is the massive extrasolar planet β Pic b, which is 9 AU from and embedded in the debris disk of the young nearby A6V star β Pictoris. We observed the system with first light of the Magellan Adaptive Optics (MagAO) system. In Paper I we presented the first CCD detection of this planet with MagAO+VisAO. Here we present four MagAO+Clio images of β Pic b at 3.1 μm, 3.3 μm, L‧, and {M}\\prime , including the first observation in the fundamental CH4 band. To remove systematic errors from the spectral energy distribution (SED), we re-calibrate the literature photometry and combine it with our own data, for a total of 22 independent measurements at 16 passbands from 0.99 to 4.8 μm. Atmosphere models demonstrate the planet is cloudy but are degenerate in effective temperature and radius. The measured SED now covers >80% of the planet's energy, so we approach the bolometric luminosity empirically. We calculate the luminosity by extending the measured SED with a blackbody and integrating to find log({{L}}{bol}/{{L}}⊙ ) \\=\\-3.78+/- 0.03. From our bolometric luminosity and an age of 23 ± 3 Myr, hot-start evolutionary tracks give a mass of 12.7 ± 0.3 {{M}}{Jup}, radius of 1.45 ± 0.02 {{R}}{Jup}, and Teff of 1708 ± 23 K (model-dependent errors not included). Our empirically determined luminosity is in agreement with values from atmospheric models (typically -3.8 dex), but brighter than values from the field-dwarf bolometric correction (typically -3.9 dex), illustrating the limitations in comparing young exoplanets to old brown dwarfs.

  15. AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity in Herschel selected galaxies out to z~1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronchelli, Ivano; Scarlata, Claudia; Rodighiero, Giulia; Berta, Stefano; Sedgwick, Christopher; Vaccari, Mattia; Franceschini, Alberto; Urrutia, Tanya; Malkan, Matthew Arnold; Salvato, Mara; Bonato, Matteo; Serjeant, Stephen; Pearson, Chris; Marchetti, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, a growing amount of evidence suggests a tight link between the growth of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and that of their host galaxies. X-ray studies on the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBHs) activity indicate the existence of a Black Hole Accretion Rate (BHAR) "main sequence", similar to the "main sequence" observed in star-forming galaxies, between the star-formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (M*). We use the multi wavelength data from the SIMES survey to study the optical to sub-mm spectral energy distribution (SED) of galaxies identified at 250 μm by the Herschel Space Observatory. In particular, for galaxies in the 0.2-1.5 redshift range, we explore the relations among galaxy's stellar mass, SFR, and SMBH accretion rate. The deep Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS (3.6, 4.5 and 24 μm) together with the deep AKARI-IRC observations (7, 11 and 15 μm) allow us to constrain the critical spectral region where the dusty torus emission of AGNs is more prominent. Thanks to the Herschel-SPIRE observations, we can also precisely measure the SFR from the bolometric (i.e. 8-1000 μm) far-IR emission. Using this multi-wavelength approach we confirm the existence, at z<0.5, of the M*-BHAR "main sequence". The measured average ratio between BHAR and SFR is close to the value required to maintain the SMBH-to-M* ratio of ˜103 and decreases at higher specific SFRs (SSFR=SFR/M*). Finally, combining our observations with literature results, we show that the slope of the BHAR main sequence is evolving with redshift between z~0 and z~2.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 2-10keV luminosity function of AGN (Ranalli+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranalli, P.; Koulouridis, E.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Fotopoulou, S.; Hsu, L.-T.; Salvato, M.; Comastri, A.; Pierre, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Carrera, F. J.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Gilli, R.; Iwasawa, K.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, E.; Vignali, C.

    2016-02-01

    The XMM-LSS, XMM-CDFS, and XMM-COSMOS are three surveys with complementary properties in terms of luminosity and redshift coverage. We used these three surveys to derive Bayesian estimates of the unabsorbed luminosity function (LF) of AGN in the 2-10keV band. The LF estimates are presented as a set of samples from the posterior probability distribution of the LF parameters. The LF is parameterised as a double power-law, with either the luminosity and density evolution (LADE) model, or the luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE) model. The double power-law is described by Eq.(10) in the paper. The LADE and LDDE models are described by Eqs.(11-14) and Eqs.(15-17), respectively. A Fortran 2008 implementation of these models can be found in file src2/lumf_funcs.f90 of the LFTools package, in the classes doublepowerlaw, ladevol, and lddevol (see the paper). (8 data files).

  17. The 2-10 keV unabsorbed luminosity function of AGN from the LSS, CDFS, and COSMOS surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranalli, P.; Koulouridis, E.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Fotopoulou, S.; Hsu, L.-T.; Salvato, M.; Comastri, A.; Pierre, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Carrera, F. J.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Gilli, R.; Iwasawa, K.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, E.; Vignali, C.

    2016-05-01

    The XMM-Large scale structure (XMM-LSS), XMM-Cosmological evolution survey (XMM-COSMOS), and XMM-Chandra deep field south (XMM-CDFS) surveys are complementary in terms of sky coverage and depth. Together, they form a clean sample with the least possible variance in instrument effective areas and point spread function. Therefore this is one of the best samples available to determine the 2-10 keV luminosity function of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and their evolution. The samples and the relevant corrections for incompleteness are described. A total of 2887 AGN is used to build the LF in the luminosity interval 1042-1046 erg s-1 and in the redshift interval 0.001-4. A new method to correct for absorption by considering the probability distribution for the column density conditioned on the hardness ratio is presented. The binned luminosity function and its evolution is determined with a variant of the Page-Carrera method, which is improved to include corrections for absorption and to account for the full probability distribution of photometric redshifts. Parametric models, namely a double power law with luminosity and density evolution (LADE) or luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE), are explored using Bayesian inference. We introduce the Watanabe-Akaike information criterion (WAIC) to compare the models and estimate their predictive power. Our data are best described by the LADE model, as hinted by the WAIC indicator. We also explore the recently proposed 15-parameter extended LDDE model and find that this extension is not supported by our data. The strength of our method is that it provides unabsorbed, non-parametric estimates, credible intervals for luminosity function parameters, and a model choice based on predictive power for future data. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and NASA.Tables with the samples of the posterior probability distributions

  18. The line continuum luminosity ratio in AGN: Or on the Baldwin Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.; Ferland, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    The luminosity dependence of the equivalent width of CIV in active galaxies, the "Baldwin" effect, is shown to be a consequence of a luminosity dependent ionization parameter. This law also agrees with the lack of a "Baldwin" effect in Ly alpha or other hydrogen lines. A fit to the available data gives a weak indication that the mean covering factor decreases with increasing luminosity, consistent with the inference from X-ray observations. The effects of continuum shape and density on various line ratios of interest are discussed.

  19. Unveiling the Physics of Low-luminosity AGNs through X-Ray Variability: LINER versus Seyfert 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, L.; Masegosa, J.; González-Martín, O.; Márquez, I.; Perea, J.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray variability is very common in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but these variations may not occur similarly in different families of AGNs. We aim to disentangle the structure of low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) compared to Seyfert 2s by the study of their spectral properties and X-ray variations. We assembled the X-ray spectral parameters and variability patterns, which were obtained from simultaneous spectral fittings. Major differences are observed in the X-ray luminosities and the Eddington ratios, which are higher in Seyfert 2s. Short-term X-ray variations were not detected, while long-term changes are common in LINERs and Seyfert 2s. Compton-thick sources generally do not show variations, most probably because the AGN is not accesible in the 0.5–10 keV energy band. The changes are mostly related to variations in the nuclear continuum, but other patterns of variability show that variations in the absorbers and at soft energies can be present in a few cases. We conclude that the X-ray variations may occur similarly in LINERs and Seyfert 2s, i.e., they are related to the nuclear continuum, although they might have different accretion mechanisms. Variations at UV frequencies are detected in LINER nuclei but not in Seyfert 2s. This is suggestive of at least some LINERs having an unobstructed view of the inner disk where the UV emission might take place, with UV variations being common in them. This result might be compatible with the disappeareance of the torus and/or the broad-line region in at least some LINERs.

  20. X-ray long-term variations in the low-luminosity AGN NGC 835 and its circumnuclear emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Martín, O.; Hernández-García, L.; Masegosa, J.; Márquez, I.; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J. M.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Dultzin, D.; Esparza Arredondo, D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are thought to be very common in the Universe. Observations and surveys have shown that the number of sources increases for near galaxies and at the low-luminosity regime (the so-called LLAGNs). Furthermore, many AGNs show changes in their obscuration properties at X-rays that may suggest a configuration of clouds very close to the accretion disk. However, these variations could also be due to changes in the intrinsic continuum of the source. It is therefore important to study nearby AGN to better understand the locus and distribution of clouds in the neighbourhood of the nucleus. Aims: We aim to study the nuclear obscuration of LLAGN NGC 835 and its extended emission using mid-infrared observations. Methods: We present sub-arcsecond-resolution mid-infrared 11.5 μm imaging of the LLAGN galaxy NGC 835 obtained with the instrument CanariCam in the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC), archival Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy, and archival Chandra data observed in 2000, 2008, and 2013. Results: The GTC/CanariCam 11.5 μm image reveals faint extended emission out to ~6 arcsec. We obtained a nuclear flux of F(11.5 μm) ~ 18 mJy, whereas the extended emission accounts for 90% of the total flux within the 6 arcsec. This means that the low angular resolution (~4 arcsec) IRS spectrum is dominated by this extended emission and not by the AGN. This is clearly seen in the Spitzer/IRS spectrum, which resembles that of star-forming galaxies. Although the extended soft X-ray emission shows some resemblance with that of the mid-infrared, the knots seen at X-rays are mostly located in the inner side of this mid-infrared emission. The nuclear X-ray spectrum of the source has undergone a spectral change between 2000/2008 and 2013. We argue that this variation is most probably due to changes in the hydrogen column density from ~8 × 1023 cm-2 to ~3 × 1023 cm-2. NGC 835 therefore is one of the few LLAGN, together with NGC 1052, in which changes in

  1. CO luminosity function from Herschel-selected galaxies and the contribution of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallini, L.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2016-02-01

    We derive the carbon monoxide (CO) luminosity function (LF) for different rotational transitions [i.e. (1-0), (3-2), (5-4)] starting from the Herschel LF by Gruppioni et al. and using appropriate LCO-LIR conversions for different galaxy classes. Our predicted LFs fit the data so far available at z ≈ 0 and 2. We compare our results with those obtained by semi-analytical models (SAMs): while we find a good agreement over the whole range of luminosities at z ≈ 0, at z ≈ 1 and z ≈ 2, the tension between our LFs and SAMs in the faint and bright ends increases. We finally discuss the contribution of luminous active galactic nucleus (LX > 1044 erg s- 1) to the bright end of the CO LF concluding that they are too rare to reproduce the actual CO LF at z ≈ 2.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of Type-1 AGNs from SDSS-DR7 (Oh+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, K.; Yi, S. K.; Schawinski, K.; Koss, M.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Soto, K.

    2015-08-01

    We have recently identified a substantial number of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) featuring weak broad-line regions (BLRs) at z<0.2 from detailed analysis of galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. These objects predominantly show a stellar continuum but also a broad Hα emission line, indicating the presence of a low-luminosity AGN oriented so that we are viewing the central engine directly without significant obscuration. These accreting black holes have previously eluded detection due to their weak nature. The newly discovered BLR AGNs have increased the number of known type 1 AGNs by 49%. Some of these new BLR AGNs were detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and their X-ray properties confirm that they are indeed type 1 AGNs. Based on our new and more complete catalog of type 1 AGNs, we derived the type 1 fraction of AGNs as a function of [OIII]λ5007 emission luminosity and explored the possible dilution effect on obscured AGNs due to star formation. The new type 1 AGN fraction shows much more complex behavior with respect to black hole mass and bolometric luminosity than has been suggested previously by the existing receding torus model. The type 1 AGN fraction is sensitive to both of these factors, and there seems to be a sweet spot (ridge) in the diagram of black hole mass and bolometric luminosity. Furthermore, we present the possibility that the Eddington ratio plays a role in determining opening angles. (2 data files).

  3. Eddington Ratio Distribution of X-Ray-selected Broad-line AGNs at 1.0 < z < 2.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyewon; Hasinger, Günther; Steinhardt, Charles; Silverman, John D.; Schramm, Malte

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the Eddington ratio distribution of X-ray-selected broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.0 < z < 2.2, where the number density of AGNs peaks. Combining the optical and Subaru/Fiber Multi Object Spectrograph near-infrared spectroscopy, we estimate black hole masses for broad-line AGNs in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDF-S), and the XMM-Newton Lockman Hole (XMM-LH) surveys. AGNs with similar black hole masses show a broad range of AGN bolometric luminosities, which are calculated from X-ray luminosities, indicating that the accretion rate of black holes is widely distributed. We find a substantial fraction of massive black holes accreting significantly below the Eddington limit at z ≲ 2, in contrast to what is generally found for luminous AGNs at high redshift. Our analysis of observational selection biases indicates that the “AGN cosmic downsizing” phenomenon can be simply explained by the strong evolution of the comoving number density at the bright end of the AGN luminosity function, together with the corresponding selection effects. However, one might need to consider a correlation between the AGN luminosity and the accretion rate of black holes, in which luminous AGNs have higher Eddington ratios than low-luminosity AGNs, in order to understand the relatively small fraction of low-luminosity AGNs with high accretion rates in this epoch. Therefore, the observed downsizing trend could be interpreted as massive black holes with low accretion rates, which are relatively fainter than less-massive black holes with efficient accretion. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  4. Herschel Observed Stripe 82 Quasars and Their Host Galaxies: Connections between AGN Activity and host Galaxy Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. Y.; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high-luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of 1046.4 erg s‑1. The redshift range of this sample is within z < 4, with a mean value of 1.5 ± 0.78. Because we only selected quasars that have been detected in all three Herschel-SPIRE bands, the quasar sample is complete yet highly biased. Based on the multi-wavelength photometric observation data, we conducted a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting through UV to FIR. Parameters such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, far-IR (FIR) luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 M ⊙ yr‑1 and the mean gas mass is ∼1011.3 M ⊙. All of these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Compared with star formation main sequence (MS) galaxies, at least 80 out of 207 quasars are hosted by starburst galaxies. This supports the statement that luminous AGNs are more likely to be associated with major mergers. The SFR increases with the redshift up to z = 2. It is correlated with the AGN bolometric luminosity, where {L}{{FIR}}\\propto {L}{{Bol}}0.46+/- 0.03. The AGN bolometric luminosity is also correlated with the host galaxy mass and gas mass. Yet the correlation between L FIR and L Bol has higher significant level, implies that the link between AGN accretion and the SFR is more primal. The M BH/M * ratio of our sample is 0.02, higher than the value 0.005 in the local universe. It might indicate an evolutionary trend of the M BH–M * scaling relation.

  5. A Sub-Arcsecond Mid-Infrared Survey of X-Ray-Selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson, N. A.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Packham, Chris; Los Piratas AGN Science Team

    2015-08-01

    Detailed studies of local active galactic nuclei (AGN) following X-ray selection yields significant measurements of the physical properties of the AGN and their host galaxies. In turn, the complete analysis of the nearby cases at high spatial resolution---to distinguish multiple physical components---and high signal-to-noise ratio informs broader surveys of more distant examples where such observations are not possible. We apply these methods in the Los Piratas survey, which emphasizes new observations at mid-infrared wavelengths obtained using CanariCam on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We measure intrinsic bolometric luminosity of the roughly 100 AGN in the sample using X-rays, ensuring a span of luminosity over a range of activity level (from low-ionization nuclei through Seyfert galaxies and quasars), optical type, and radio loudness. The mid-infrared observations at resolution of ~0.3arcsec correspond to typical spatial scales of 60 pc for the low-luminosity AGN and Seyferts and 400 pc for other types. We isolate the AGN emission that is reprocessed by dust in the central regions, which we model in a clumpy distribution. We distinguish this emission from the stellar contributions on larger scales. Across types, the AGN-heated dust emission is overall well-correlated with the X-ray flux, but stellar contributions can be significant on larger scales, especially at moderate AGN luminosity.

  6. MODERATE-LUMINOSITY GROWING BLACK HOLES FROM 1.25 < z < 2.7: VARIED ACCRETION IN DISK-DOMINATED HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, B. D.; Glikman, E.; Urry, C. M.; Schawinski, K.; Cardamone, C.

    2012-12-10

    We compute black hole masses and bolometric luminosities for 57 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.25 {<=} z {<=} 2.67, selected from the GOODS-South deep multi-wavelength survey field via their X-ray emission. We determine host galaxy morphological parameters by separating the galaxies from their central point sources in deep Hubble Space Telescope images, and host stellar masses and colors by multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution fitting. Of GOODS AGNs at these redshifts, 90% have detected rest-frame optical nuclear point sources; bolometric luminosities range from 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}. The black holes are growing at a range of accretion rates, with {approx}> 50% of the sample having L/L{sub Edd} < 0.1. Of the host galaxies, 70% have stellar masses M{sub *} > 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, with a range of colors suggesting a complex star formation history. We find no evolution of AGN bolometric luminosity within the sample, and no correlation between AGN bolometric luminosity and host stellar mass, color, or morphology. Fully half the sample of host galaxies are disk-dominated, with another 25% having strong disk components. Fewer than 15% of the systems appear to be at some stage of a major merger. These moderate-luminosity AGN hosts are therefore inconsistent with a dynamical history dominated by mergers strong enough to destroy disks, indicating that minor mergers or secular processes dominate the coevolution of galaxies and their central black holes at z {approx} 2.

  7. On the Nature of the Prototype Luminous Blue Variable Ag Carinae. I. Fundamental Parameters During Visual Minimum Phases and Changes in the Bolometric Luminosity During the S-Dor Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, J. H.; Hillier, D. J.; Damineli, A.; Whitelock, P. A.; Marang, F.; Rossi, C.

    2009-06-01

    We present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the luminous blue variable (LBV) AG Carinae (AG Car) during the last two visual minimum phases of its S-Dor cycle (1985-1990 and 2000-2003). The analysis reveals an overabundance of He, N, and Na, and a depletion of H, C, and O, on the surface of the AG Car, indicating the presence of a CNO-processed material. Furthermore, the ratio N/O is higher on the stellar surface than in the nebula. We found that the minimum phases of AG Car are not equal to each other, since we derived a noticeable difference between the maximum effective temperature achieved during 1985-1990 (22, 800 K) and 2000-2001 (17,000 K). Significant differences between the wind parameters in these two epochs were also noticed. While the wind terminal velocity was 300 km s-1 in 1985-1990, it was as low as 105 km s-1 in 2001. The mass-loss rate, however, was lower from 1985-1990 (1.5 × 10-5 M sun yr-1) than from 2000-2001 (3.7 × 10-5 M sun yr-1). We found that the wind of AG Car is significantly clumped (f sime 0.10-0.25) and that clumps must be formed deep in the wind. We derived a bolometric luminosity of 1.5 × 106 L sun during both minimum phases which, contrary to the common assumption, decreases to 1.0 × 106 L sun as the star moves toward the maximum flux in the V band. Assuming that the decrease in the bolometric luminosity of AG Car is due to the energy used to expand the outer layers of the star, we found that the expanding layers contain roughly 0.6-2 M sun. Such an amount of mass is an order of magnitude lower than the nebular mass around AG Car, but is comparable to the nebular mass found around lower-luminosity LBVs and to that of the Little Homunculus of Eta Car. If such a large amount of mass is indeed involved in the S Dor-type variability, we speculate that such instability could be a failed Giant Eruption, with several solar masses never becoming unbound from the star. Based on observations made with the 1.6 m telescope at the

  8. Bright and Faint Ends of Lyα Luminosity Functions at z = 2 Determined by the Subaru Survey: Implications for AGNs, Magnification Bias, and ISM H I Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Duval, Florent; Kusakabe, Haruka; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We present the Lyα luminosity functions (LFs) derived by our deep Subaru narrowband survey that identifies a total of 3137 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 in five independent blank fields. This sample of LAEs is the largest to date and covers a very wide Lyα luminosity range of {log}{L}{Lyα }=41.7{--}44.4 erg s‑1. We determine the Lyα LF at z = 2.2 with unprecedented accuracy and obtain the best-fit Schechter parameters of {L}{Lyα }*={5.29}-1.13+1.67× {10}42 erg s‑1, {φ }{Lyα }*={6.32}-2.31+3.08× {10}-4 Mpc‑3, and α =-{1.75}-0.09+0.10, showing a steep faint-end slope. We identify a significant hump at the LF bright end ({log}{L}{Lyα }\\gt 43.4 erg s‑1). Because all of the LAEs in the bright-end hump have a bright counterpart(s) in either the X-ray, UV, or radio data, this bright-end hump is not made by gravitational lensing magnification bias but by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These AGNs allow us to derive the AGN UV LF at z ∼ 2 down to the faint magnitude limit of M UV ≃ ‑22.5 and to constrain the faint-end slope of the AGN UV LF, α AGN = ‑1.2 ± 0.1, which is flatter than those at z > 4. Based on the Lyα and UV LFs from our and previous studies, we find an increase of Lyα escape fraction {f}{esc}{Lyα } from z ∼ 0 to 6 by two orders of magnitude. This large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase can be explained neither by the evolution of stellar population nor by outflow alone, but by the evolution of neutral hydrogen H i density in the interstellar medium that enhances dust attenuation for Lyα by resonance scattering. Our uniform expanding shell models suggest that the typical H i column density decreases from {N}{{H}{{I}}}∼ 7× {10}19 (z ∼ 0) to ∼1 × 1018 cm‑2 (z ∼ 6) to explain the large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase.

  9. Bright and Faint Ends of Lyα Luminosity Functions at z = 2 Determined by the Subaru Survey: Implications for AGNs, Magnification Bias, and ISM H I Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Duval, Florent; Kusakabe, Haruka; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We present the Lyα luminosity functions (LFs) derived by our deep Subaru narrowband survey that identifies a total of 3137 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 in five independent blank fields. This sample of LAEs is the largest to date and covers a very wide Lyα luminosity range of {log}{L}{Lyα }=41.7{--}44.4 erg s‑1. We determine the Lyα LF at z = 2.2 with unprecedented accuracy and obtain the best-fit Schechter parameters of {L}{Lyα }*={5.29}-1.13+1.67× {10}42 erg s‑1, {φ }{Lyα }*={6.32}-2.31+3.08× {10}-4 Mpc‑3, and α =-{1.75}-0.09+0.10, showing a steep faint-end slope. We identify a significant hump at the LF bright end ({log}{L}{Lyα }\\gt 43.4 erg s‑1). Because all of the LAEs in the bright-end hump have a bright counterpart(s) in either the X-ray, UV, or radio data, this bright-end hump is not made by gravitational lensing magnification bias but by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These AGNs allow us to derive the AGN UV LF at z ˜ 2 down to the faint magnitude limit of M UV ≃ ‑22.5 and to constrain the faint-end slope of the AGN UV LF, α AGN = ‑1.2 ± 0.1, which is flatter than those at z > 4. Based on the Lyα and UV LFs from our and previous studies, we find an increase of Lyα escape fraction {f}{esc}{Lyα } from z ˜ 0 to 6 by two orders of magnitude. This large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase can be explained neither by the evolution of stellar population nor by outflow alone, but by the evolution of neutral hydrogen H i density in the interstellar medium that enhances dust attenuation for Lyα by resonance scattering. Our uniform expanding shell models suggest that the typical H i column density decreases from {N}{{H}{{I}}}˜ 7× {10}19 (z ˜ 0) to ˜1 × 1018 cm‑2 (z ˜ 6) to explain the large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase.

  10. Type 1 AGN at low z- I. Emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Laor, Ari

    2012-06-01

    We analyse the emission properties of a new sample of 3579 type 1 AGN, selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 based on the detection of broad Hα emission. The sample extends over a broad Hα luminosity LbHα of ? and a broad Hα full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of ?, which covers the range of black hole mass 106 < MBH/M⊙ < 109.5 and luminosity in Eddington units 10-3 < L/LEdd < 1. We combine ROSAT, GALEX and 2MASS observations to form the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 2.2 ?m to 2 keV. We find the following. (1) The distribution of the Hα FWHM values is independent of luminosity. (2) The observed mean optical-ultraviolet (optical-UV) SED is well matched by a fixed-shape SED of luminous quasars, which scales linearly with LbHα, and a host galaxy contribution. (3) The host galaxy r-band (fibre) luminosity function follows well the luminosity function of inactive non-emission-line galaxies (NEGs), consistent with a fixed fraction of ˜3 per cent of NEGs hosting an AGN, regardless of the host luminosity. (4) The hosts of lower luminosity AGN have a mean z-band luminosity and u-z colour which are identical to NEGs with the same redshift distribution. With increasing LbHα the AGN hosts become bluer and less luminous than NEGs. The implied increasing star formation rate with LbHα is consistent with the relation for SDSS type 2 AGN of similar bolometric luminosity. (5) The optical-UV SED of the more luminous AGN shows a small dispersion, consistent with dust reddening of a blue SED, as expected for thermal thin accretion disc emission. (6) There is a rather tight relation between ? and LbHα, which provides a useful probe for unobscured (true) type 2 AGN. (7) The primary parameter that drives the X-ray to UV emission ratio is luminosity, rather than MBH or L/LEdd.

  11. The power output of local obscured and unobscured AGN: crossing the absorption barrier with Swift/BAT and IRAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, R. V.; Fabian, A. C.; Gandhi, P.; Winter, L. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2010-02-01

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) 9-month catalogue of active galactic nuclei (AGN) provides an unbiased census of local supermassive black hole accretion, and probes to all but the highest levels of absorption in AGN. We explore a method for characterizing the bolometric output of both obscured and unobscured AGN by combining the hard X-ray data from the Swift/BAT instrument (14-195keV) with the reprocessed infrared (IR) emission as seen with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) all-sky surveys. This approach bypasses the complex modifications to the spectral energy distribution introduced by absorption in the optical, UV and 0.1-10 keV regimes and provides a long-term, average picture of the bolometric output of these sources. We broadly follow the approach of Pozzi et al. for calculating the bolometric luminosities by adding nuclear IR and hard X-ray luminosities, and consider different approaches for removing non-nuclear contamination in the large-aperture IRAS fluxes. Using mass estimates from the black hole mass-host galaxy bulge luminosity relation, we present the Eddington ratios λEdd and 2-10 keV bolometric corrections for a subsample of 63 AGN (35 obscured and 28 unobscured) from the Swift/BAT catalogue, and confirm previous indications of a low Eddington ratio distribution for both samples. Importantly, we find a tendency for low bolometric corrections (typically 10-30) for the obscured AGN in the sample (with a possible rise from ~15 for λEdd < 0.03 to ~32 above this), providing a hitherto unseen window on to accretion processes in this class of AGN. This finding is of key importance in calculating the expected local black hole mass density from the X-ray background since it is composed of emission from a significant population of such obscured AGN. Analogous studies with high-resolution IR data and a range of alternative models for the torus emission will form useful future extensions to this work.

  12. Low-Luminosity AGN As Analogues of Galactic Black Holes in the Low/Hard State: Evidence from X-Ray Timing of NGC 4258

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Uttley, P.

    2005-01-01

    We present a broadband power spectral density function (PSD) measured from extensive RXTE monitoring data of the low-luminosity AGN NGC 4258, which has an accurate, maser-determined black hole mass of (3.9 plus or minus 0.1) x 10(exp 7) solar mass. We constrain the PSD break time scale to be greater than 4.5 d at greater than 90% confidence, which appears to rule out the possibility that NGC 4258 is an analogue of black hole X-ray binaries (BHXRBs) in the high/soft state. In this sense, the PSD of NGC 4258 is different to that of some more-luminous Seyferts, which appear similar to the PSDs of high/soft state X-ray binaries. This result supports previous analogies between LLAGN and X-ray binaries in the low/hard state based on spectral energy distributions, indicating that the AGN/BHXRB analogy is valid across a broad range of accretion rates.

  13. Hot Flow Model for Low Luminosity AGNs and Black Hole Binaries: the Role and Origin of Non-thermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzwiecki, Andrzej; Xie, Fu-Guo; Stepnik, Agnieszka

    2014-08-01

    Optically thin, two-temperature accretion flows are widely considered as a relevant accretion mode below ~0.01 LEdd in AGNs as well as in X-ray binaries. We study spectral formation in such flows using a refined model with a fully general relativistic description of both the radiative (leptonic and hadronic) and hydrodynamic processes, and with an exact treatment of global Comptonization. We point out that basic properties of two-temperature flows determine the relative strengths of the synchrotron radiation of thermal electrons and non-thermal electrons from charged-pion decay, in a manner consistent with observations. In AGNs, the non-thermal synchrotron dominates the seed photon input down to ~10-5 LEdd and it allows to explain the X-ray spectral index-Eddington ratio relation as well as the cut-off energies measured in the best-studied AGNs; the (standard) model with the thermal synchrotron being the main source of seed photons does not agree with these observations. For stellar-mass black holes, non-thermal electrons from hadronic processes become important only above ~0.01 LEdd (and may be relevant for the non-thermal tails observed in luminous hard states of Cyg X-1 and GX 339-4) and we find that the thermal synchrotron provides a sufficient seed photon flux to explain observations of black hole transients below ~0.01 LEdd. We also note that non-thermal acceleration processes in hot flows are constrained by comparisons of the predicted gamma-ray fluxes (from neutral pion decay) with Fermi-LAT upper limits. For NGC 4151, it limits the energy content in the non-thermal component of proton distribution to at most 1 per cent.

  14. The star formation-AGN interplay in merging galaxies: insights from hydrodynamical simulations and observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Galarza, Juan R.; Smith, Howard Alan; Weiner, Aaron; Hayward, Christopher C.; Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Rosenthal, Lee; Ashby, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Thermal emission from an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) can provide a significant contribution to the bolometric luminosity of galaxies, and its effect at infrared wavelengths can mimic the process of star-formation, jeopardizing star formation rate (SFR) diagnostics. It is therefore important to model the AGN emission and to quantify its effect on the estimated SFRs when SED fitting tools are applied. We tackle this problem by studying the dust radiative transfer calculations of hydrodynamically simulated binary galaxy mergers covering a broad range of parameters, including stellar mas ratios, gas contents, AGN luminosity and viewing angles. We apply the energy balance SED fitting codes CHIBURST and CIGALE to the mock SEDs of our simulated merger, and then compare with the results of applying the same codes to the SEDs of observed merging galaxies in the Local Universe. At different stages of the interaction, we compare their derived SFRs and AGN fractions with those predicted by the hydrodynamical simulations, for a broad range of the interaction parameters, but focus on the stages near coalescence, when the AGN contribution exceed 10% of the total luminosity. We show that the contribution to IR luminosity is greatest during and immediately after coalescence, when the two supermassive black holes of the interacting pair merge and undergo and enhanced period of accretion. Under certain conditions, CIGALE succeeds at recovering the SFRs and AGN fractions with higher accuracy than other available codes, such as MAGPHYS, even during these extreme stages. Our results show that using the IR luminosity as a simple surrogate for star formation can significantly overestimate the true SFR by underestimating the contribution from the AGN. Finally, we study the effect of using different parametric star formation histories (SFHs) when fitting the SEDs of galaxies, and show that a delayed SFH is usually a reasonable choice for merging galaxies.

  15. CONTRIBUTION OF THE ACCRETION DISK, HOT CORONA, AND OBSCURING TORUS TO THE LUMINOSITY OF SEYFERT GALAXIES: INTEGRAL AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.; Revnivtsev, M.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Hickox, R. C.; Gorjian, V.; Werner, M. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.

    2012-10-01

    We estimate the relative contributions of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion disk, corona, and obscuring torus to the bolometric luminosity of Seyfert galaxies, using Spitzer mid-infrared (MIR) observations of a complete sample of 68 nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray (HX) survey. This is the first HX-selected (above 15 keV) sample of AGNs with complementary high angular resolution, high signal-to-noise, MIR data. Correcting for the host galaxy contribution, we find a correlation between HX and MIR luminosities: L{sub 15{mu}m}{proportional_to}L{sup 0.74{+-}0.06}{sub HX}. Assuming that the observed MIR emission is radiation from an accretion disk reprocessed in a surrounding dusty torus that subtends a solid angle decreasing with increasing luminosity (as inferred from the declining fraction of obscured AGNs), the intrinsic disk luminosity, L{sub Disk}, is approximately proportional to the luminosity of the corona in the 2-300 keV energy band, L{sub Corona}, with the L{sub Disk}/L{sub Corona} ratio varying by a factor of 2.1 around a mean value of 1.6. This ratio is a factor of {approx}2 smaller than for typical quasars producing the cosmic X-ray background. Therefore, over three orders of magnitude in luminosity, HX radiation carries a large, and roughly comparable, fraction of the bolometric output of AGNs. We estimate the cumulative bolometric luminosity density of local AGNs at {approx}(1-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3}. Finally, the Compton temperature ranges between kT{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2 and Almost-Equal-To 6 keV for nearby AGNs, compared to kT{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2 keV for typical quasars, confirming that radiative heating of interstellar gas can play an important role in regulating SMBH growth.

  16. INFRARED CLASSIFICATION AND LUMINOSITIES FOR DUSTY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THE MOST LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine; Houck, James; Barry, Donald; Lebouteiller, Vianney

    2012-12-20

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic measurements from the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on Spitzer are given for 125 hard X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs; 14-195 keV) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample and for 32 AGNs with black hole masses (BHMs) from reverberation mapping. The 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature in emission or absorption defines an infrared AGN classification describing whether AGNs are observed through dust clouds, indicating that 55% of the BAT AGNs are observed through dust. The mid-infrared dust continuum luminosity is shown to be an excellent indicator of intrinsic AGN luminosity, scaling closely with the hard X-ray luminosity, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m)/L(X) = -0.31 {+-} 0.35, and independent of classification determined from silicate emission or absorption. Dust luminosity scales closely with BHM, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) = (37.2 {+-} 0.5) + 0.87 log BHM for luminosity in erg s{sup -1} and BHM in M{sub Sun }. The 100 most luminous type 1 quasars as measured in {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) are found by comparing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optically discovered quasars with photometry at 22 {mu}m from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), scaled to rest frame 7.8 {mu}m using an empirical template determined from IRS spectra. The most luminous SDSS/WISE quasars have the same maximum infrared luminosities for all 1.5 < z < 5, reaching total infrared luminosity L{sub IR} = 10{sup 14.4} L{sub Sun }. Comparing with dust-obscured galaxies from Spitzer and WISE surveys, we find no evidence of hyperluminous obscured quasars whose maximum infrared luminosities exceed the maximum infrared luminosities of optically discovered quasars. Bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} estimated from rest-frame optical or ultraviolet luminosities are compared to L{sub IR}. For the local AGN, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = -0.35, consistent with a covering factor of 45% for the absorbing dust clouds. For the SDSS/WISE quasars, the median log L

  17. A POWERFUL AGN OUTBURST IN RBS 797

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnolo, K. W.; McNamara, B. R.; Wise, M. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Gitti, M.; Brueggen, M.; Rafferty, D. A.

    2011-05-10

    Utilizing {approx}50 ks of Chandra X-Ray Observatory imaging, we present an analysis of the intracluster medium (ICM) and cavity system in the galaxy cluster RBS 797. In addition to the two previously known cavities in the cluster core, the new and deeper X-ray image has revealed additional structure associated with the active galactic nucleus (AGN). The surface brightness decrements of the two cavities are unusually large and are consistent with elongated cavities lying close to our line of sight. We estimate a total AGN outburst energy and mean jet power of {approx}(3-6) x 10{sup 60} erg and {approx}(3-6) x 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, respectively, depending on the assumed geometrical configuration of the cavities. Thus, RBS 797 is apparently among the most powerful AGN outbursts known in a cluster. The average mass accretion rate needed to power the AGN by accretion alone is {approx}1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We show that accretion of cold gas onto the AGN at this level is plausible, but that Bondi accretion of the hot atmosphere is probably not. The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) harbors an unresolved, non-thermal nuclear X-ray source with a bolometric luminosity of {approx}2 x 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. The nuclear emission is probably associated with a rapidly accreting, radiatively inefficient accretion flow. We present tentative evidence that star formation in the BCG is being triggered by the radio jets and suggest that the cavities may be driving weak shocks (M {approx} 1.5) into the ICM, similar to the process in the galaxy cluster MS 0735.6+7421.

  18. The Optical and X-ray Spectral Properties of the Swift BAT-detected AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Lisa M.; Mushotzky, R.; Lewis, K.; Veilleux, S.; Koss, M.; Keeney, B.

    2010-01-01

    The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), while not focused on a Gamma-ray burst, conducts an all-sky survey in the 14 - 195 keV band. After the first 9 months, the BAT has detected a sample of 153 local (z 0.03) AGN at a flux limit of a few times 10-11 erg/s/cm-2 (Tueller et al. 2007). Since the AGN were detected at very high X-ray energies, they are an unbiased sample towards Compton thin AGN. We present the X-ray and optical spectral properties of a sample of the BAT AGN, including optical spectra obtained from the literature, SDSS, and our own KPNO 2.1-m observations. Among our results, we show that the optically identified Seyfert 1s and 2s have the same distribution of X-ray and [O III] luminosities. We also find that [O III] luminosity is not well-correlated with the hard X-rays and therefore not a good indicator of bolometric luminosity, supporting the results of Melendez et al. (2008).

  19. The solar bolometric imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, D.; Bernasconi, P.; Foukal, P.

    The balloon-borne Solar Bolometric Imager (SBI) will provide the first bolometric (integrated light) maps of the photosphere, to evaluate the photometric contribution of magnetic structures more accurately than has been achievable with spectrally selective imaging over restricted wavebands. More accurate removal of the magnetic feature contribution will enable us to determine if solar irradiance variation mechanisms exist other than the effects of photospheric magnetism. The SBI detector is an array of 320 x 240 ferro -electric thermal IR elements whose spectral absorptance has been extended and flattened by a deposited layer of gold- black. The telescope itself is a 30-cm Dall-Kirkham design with uncoated primary and secondary pyrex mirrors. The combination of telescope and bolometric array provides an image of the sun with a flat spectral response between 0.28 microns and 2.6 microns, over a field of view of 15.2 x 11.4 min, and a pixel size of 2.8 arcsec. After a successful set of ground-based tests, the instrument is being readied for a one-day stratospheric balloon flight that will take place in September 2003. The observing platform will be the gondola previously used for the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), retrofitted to house and control the SBI telescope and detector. The balloon flight will enable SBI to image over essentially the full spectral range accepted by non-imaging space-borne radiometers such as ACRIM, making the data sets complementary. The SBI flight will also provide important engineering data to validate the space worthiness of the novel gold-blackened thermal array detectors, and verify the thermal performance of the SBI's uncoated optics in a vacuum environment. This work was funded by NASA under grant NAG5-10998.

  20. The solar bolometric imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, P. N.; Eaton, H. A. C.; Foukal, P.; Rust, D. M.

    2004-01-01

    The balloon-borne Solar Bolometric Imager (SBI) will provide the first bolometric (integrated light) maps of the solar photosphere. It will evaluate the photometric contribution of magnetic structures more accurately than has been possible with spectrally selective imaging over restricted wavebands. More accurate removal of the magnetic feature contribution will enable us to determine if solar irradiance variation mechanisms exist other than the effects of photospheric magnetism. The SBI detector is an array of 320 × 240 ferro-electric thermal IR elements whose spectral absorptance has been extended and flattened by a deposited layer of gold-black. The telescope itself is a 30-cm Dall-Kirkham design with uncoated primary and secondary pyrex mirrors. The combination of telescope and bolometric array provides an image of the Sun with a flat spectral response between 0.28 and 2.6 μm, over a field of view of 917 × 687 arcsec, and a pixel size of 2.8 arcsec. After a successful set of ground-based tests, the instrument is being readied for a one-day stratospheric balloon flight that will take place in September 2003. The observing platform will be the gondola previously used for the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), retrofitted to house and control the SBI telescope and detector. The balloon flight will enable SBI to image over essentially the full spectral range accepted by non-imaging space-borne radiometers such as ACRIM, making the data sets complementary. The SBI flight will also provide important engineering data to validate the space worthiness of the novel gold-blackened thermal array detectors, and verify the thermal performance of the SBI's uncoated optics in a vacuum environment.

  1. The Role of Star Formation and an AGN in Dust Heating of z = 0.3-2.8 Galaxies. I. Evolution with Redshift and Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Sajina, Anna; Roebuck, Eric; Yan, Lin; Armus, Lee; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Stierwalt, Sabrina

    2015-11-01

    We characterize infrared spectral energy distributions of 343 (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies from z = 0.3-2.8. We diagnose the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) by decomposing individual Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy into emission from star formation and an AGN-powered continuum; we classify sources as star-forming galaxies (SFGs), AGNs, or composites. Composites comprise 30% of our sample and are prevalent at faint and bright S24, making them an important source of IR AGN emission. We combine spectroscopy with multiwavelength photometry, including Herschel imaging, to create three libraries of publicly available templates (2-1000 μm). We fit the far-IR emission using a two-temperature modified blackbody to measure cold and warm dust temperatures (Tc and Tw). We find that Tc does not depend on mid-IR classification, while Tw shows a notable increase as the AGN grows more luminous. We measure a quadratic relationship between mid-IR AGN emission and total AGN contribution to LIR. AGNs, composites, and SFGs separate in S8/S3.6 and S250/S24, providing a useful diagnostic for estimating relative amounts of these sources. We estimate that >40% of IR-selected samples host an AGN, even at faint selection thresholds (S24 > 100 μJy). Our decomposition technique and color diagnostics are relevant given upcoming observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  2. Bolometric detection of neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Krauss, L. M.; Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic neutrino scattering off electrons in crystalline silicon at 1-10 mK results in measurable temperature changes in macroscopic amounts of material, even for low-energy (less than 0.41-MeV) pp neutrinos from the sun. New detectors for bolometric measurement of low-energy neutrino interactions, including coherent nuclear elastic scattering, are proposed. A new and more sensitive search for oscillations of reactor antineutrinos is practical (about 100 kg of Si), and would lay the groundwork for a more ambitious measurement of the spectrum of pp, Be-7, and B-8 solar neutrinos, and of supernovae anywhere in the Galaxy (about 10 tons of Si).

  3. Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy of powerful 2Jy and 3CRR radio galaxies. II. AGN power indicators and unification

    SciTech Connect

    Dicken, D.; Tadhunter, C.; Morganti, R.; Axon, D.; Robinson, A.; Magagnoli, M.; Kharb, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Hardcastle, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Singh, V.; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Rose, M.; Spoon, H.; Inskip, K. J.; Holt, J.

    2014-06-20

    It remains uncertain which continuum and emission line diagnostics best indicate the bolometric powers of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), especially given the attenuation caused by the circumnuclear material and the possible contamination by components related to star formation. Here we use mid-IR spectra along with multiwavelength data to investigate the merit of various diagnostics of AGN radiative power, including the mid-IR [Ne III] λ25.89 μm and [O IV] λ25.89 μm fine-structure lines, the optical [O III] λ5007 forbidden line, and mid-IR 24 μm, 5 GHz radio, and X-ray continuum emission, for complete samples of 46 2Jy radio galaxies (0.05 < z < 0.7) and 17 3CRR FRII radio galaxies (z < 0.1). We find that the mid-IR [O IV] line is the most reliable indicator of AGN power for powerful radio-loud AGNs. By assuming that the [O IV] is emitted isotropically, and comparing the [O III] and 24 μm luminosities of the broad- and narrow-line AGNs in our samples at fixed [O IV] luminosity, we show that the [O III] and 24 μm emission are both mildly attenuated in the narrow-line compared to the broad-line objects by a factor of ≈2. However, despite this attenuation, the [O III] and 24 μm luminosities are better AGN power indicators for our sample than either the 5 GHz radio or the X-ray continuum luminosities. We also detect the mid-IR 9.7 μm silicate feature in the spectra of many objects but not ubiquitously: at least 40% of the sample shows no clear evidence for these features. We conclude that, for the majority of powerful radio galaxies, the mid-IR lines are powered by AGN photoionization.

  4. The Multiwavelength AGN Population and the X-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treister, Ezequiel; Urry, Claudia M.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Volonteri, Marta

    2014-07-01

    In order to fully understand galaxy formation we need to know when in the cosmic history are supermassive black holes (SMBHs) growing more intensively, in what type of galaxies this growth is happening and what fraction of these sources are invisible at most wavelengths due to obscuration. Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) population synthesis models that can explain the spectral shape and intensity of the cosmic X-ray background (CXRB) indicate that most of the SMBH growth occurs in moderate-luminosity (L X ~ 1044 erg/s) sources (Seyfert-type AGN), at z~ 0.5-1 and in heavily obscured but Compton-thin, NH ~ 1023cm-2, systems. However, this is not the complete history, as a large fraction of black hole growth does not emit significantly in X-rays either due to obscuration, intrinsic low luminosities or large distances. The integrated intensity at high energies indicates that a significant fraction of the total black hole growth, 22%, occurs in heavily-obscured systems that are not individually detected in even the deepest X-ray observations. We further investigate the AGN triggering mechanism as a function of bolometric luminosity, finding evidence for a strong connection between significant black hole growth events and major galaxy mergers from z~ 0 to z~ 3, while less spectacular but longer accretion episodes are most likely due to other (stochastic) processes. AGN activity triggered by major galaxies is responsible for ~60% of the total black hole growth. Finally, we constrain the total accreted mass density in supermassive black holes at z > 6, inferred via the upper limit derived from the integrated X-ray emission from a sample of photometrically selected galaxy candidates. We estimate an accreted mass density <1000 M⊙Mpc-3 at z~ 6, significantly lower than the previous predictions from some existing models of early black hole growth and earlier prior observations.

  5. The AGN Population and the Cosmic X-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treister, Ezequiel; Urry, C. Meg; Schawinski, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    In order to fully understand galaxy formation we need to know when in the cosmic history are supermassive black holes (SMBHs) growing more intensively, in what type of galaxies this growth is happening and what fraction of these sources are invisible at most wavelengths due to obscuration. Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) population synthesis models that can explain the spectral shape and intensity of the cosmic X-ray background (CXRB) indicate that most of the SMBH growth occurs in moderate-luminosity (Lx~1044 erg/s) sources (Seyfert-type AGN), at z~0.5-1 and in heavily obscured but Compton-thin, NH~1023 cm-2, systems.However, this is not the complete history, as a large fraction of black hole growth does not emit significantly in X-rays either due to obscuration, intrinsic low luminosities or large distances. Using a combination of X-ray stacking and multi wavelength selection techniques we constrain the amount of black hole accretion as a function of cosmic history, from z~0 to z~6. The integrated intensity at high energies indicates that a significant fraction of the total black hole growth, 22%, occurs in heavily-obscured systems that are not individually detected in even the deepest X-ray observations.We finally investigate the AGN triggering mechanism as a function of bolometric luminosity, finding evidence for a strong connection between significant black hole growth events and major galaxy mergers from z~0 to z~3, while less spectacular but longer accretion episodes are most likely due to other (stochastic) processes. AGN activity triggered by major galaxies is responsible for ~60% of the total black hole growth.

  6. The Solar Bolometric Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, P. N.; Foukal, P.; Rust, D. M.

    2002-05-01

    The Solar Bolometric Imager (SBI) is an innovative solar telescope capable of recording images in essentially total photospheric light, with an angular resolution of 5", sufficient to distinguish sunspots, faculae and enhanced network. These are the photospheric magnetic structures so far linked most closely to irradiance variation. The balloon-borne SBI will provide the first bolometric maps of the photosphere, to evaluate the photometric contribution of magnetic structures more accurately than has been achievable so far, using spectrally selective imaging over restricted wavebands. More accurate removal of the magnetic feature contribution will enable us to determine whether other solar irradiance mechanisms exist besides the effects of photospheric magnetism. The SBI detector is an array of 320 X 240 ferro-electric thermal IR elements whose spectral absorptance has been extended and flattened by a deposited layer of gold-black. The telescope itself is a 30-cm Dall-Kirkham design with uncoated primary and secondary pyrex mirrors. The combination of telescope and bolometric array provides an image of the solar irradiance with a flat spectral response between 0.28 um and 2.6 um, over a field of view of 15.2' X 11.4', and a pixel size of 2.8". After a successful set of ground-based tests, the instrument is being readied for a one-day stratospheric balloon flight that will take place in September 2003. The observing platform will be the gondola previously used for the Flare Genesis Experiment project (FGE), retrofitted to house and control the SBI telescope and detector. The balloon flight will enable SBI to image over essentially the full spectral range accepted by non-imaging space borne radiometers such as ACRIM, making the data sets complementary. The SBI flight will also provide important engineering data to validate the space worthiness of the novel gold-blackened thermal array detectors, and verify the thermal performance of the SBI's uncoated optics in a

  7. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, D.; Zakamska, N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. It operates by either heating or driving the gas that would otherwise be available for star formation out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. We have assembled a large sample of 133 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1AGN-ionized gas, the stellar masses of the host galaxies and their star formation rates. We then investigate the relationships between AGN luminosities, specific star formation rates (sSFR) and outflow strengths W_{90} - the 90% velocity width of the [OIII]λ5007Å line power and a proxy for the AGN-driven outflow speed. Outflow strength W_{90} is independent of sSFR for AGN selected based on their mid-IR luminosity. This is in agreement with previous work that demonstrates that star formation is not sufficient to produce the observed ionized gas outflows which have to be powered by AGN activity. More importantly, we find a negative correlation between W_{90} and sSFR in the AGN hosts with the highest star formation rates, i.e., with the highest gas content. This relationship implies that AGN with strong outflow signatures are hosted in galaxies that are more `quenched' considering their stellar mass than galaxies with weaker outflow signatures. This correlation is only seen in AGN host galaxies with SFR >100 M_{⊙} yr^{-1} where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, or `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  8. Toward the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background: Evolution of X-ray luminosity and absorption functions of active galactic nuclei including Compton-thick populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Günther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-10

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ∼ 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ≈0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  9. Toward the Standard Population Synthesis Model of the X-Ray Background: Evolution of X-Ray Luminosity and Absorption Functions of Active Galactic Nuclei Including Compton-thick Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Günther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-01

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ~ 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ≈0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  10. Probing dark matter in the luminous radio galaxy 3C220.3 and the structure of the z=2.22 SMG/AGN it is lensing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Belinda

    2013-09-01

    The radio galaxy 3C 220.3 (z=0.685) is lensing a submm galaxy (SMG) at z=2.221 housing an AGN. This unique system allows accurate estimates of both stellar and dark mass in the luminous radio galaxy. In addition, the lensing magnification of 7 offers an unprecedented view of the interaction between star formation and AGN feedback in a luminous, dusty galaxy at the peak epoch of cosmic star formation. Our previous 10ks Chandra observation shows X-ray emission throughout the system, including the SMG, but with too few counts to identify the origin(s). We propose deeper Chandra and HST observations to (1) locate the X-ray sources, measure the X-ray properties and independently estimate the bolometric luminosities of both AGN (2) better map the offset between the SMG's UV and dust emission.

  11. Probing dark matter in the luminous radio galaxy 3C220.3 and the structure of the z=2.22 SMG/AGN it is lensing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Belinda

    2013-10-01

    The radio galaxy 3C 220.3 {z=0.685} is lensing a submm galaxy {SMG} at z=2.221 housing an AGN. This unique system allows accurate estimates of both stellar and dark mass in the luminous radio galaxy. In addition, the lensing magnification of 7 offers an unprecedented view of the interaction between star formation and AGN feedback in a luminous, dusty galaxy at the peak epoch of cosmic star formation. Our previous 10ks Chandra observation shows X-ray emission throughout the system, including the SMG, but with too few counts to identify the origin{s}. We propose deeper Chandra and HST observations to {1} locate the X-ray sources, measure the X-ray properties and independently estimate the bolometric luminosities of both AGN {2} better map the offset between the SMG's UV and dust emission.

  12. Bolometric measurements in ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroe, S.; Wilgen, J.B.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bigelow, T.S.; Wing, W.R.; Bell, G.L.; Gandy, R.F.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Kindsfather, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Bolometer measurements are made under various plasma conditions in ATF. Each bolometer module includes four pairs of detectors; each pair consists of a sensor and a reference detector. Two or three detector pairs in each module were installed with various types of aperture masks to serve as radiation detectors. The rest were completely shielded from plasma emissions and used as blind detectors to measure background levels. When electron cyclotron heating (ECH) power was applied to ATF, the radiation signal was more than 10 times higher than that expected for 100 kW of radiated power. Surprisingly, similar signal levels were observed on the blind detectors. It is hypothesized that the bolometers are sensitive to ECH power at 53 GHz. (This problem may be general in near-term fusion experiments, in which microwave power will be an important tool for plasma heating.) In this paper, experiments aimed at proving this hypothesis are reported; bolometric signals before and after chromium gettering are discussed; and measurements of the microwave power deposition profile around the torus, made by using the observed microwave interference with the blind detectors, are presented. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  13. The Contribution of Compton-Thick AGN/ULIRGs to the X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardini, Emanuele

    Accretion onto the supermassive black holes located at the centre of Active Galactic Nuclei(AGN) is one of the most efficient power sources in the Universe, and provides a significant contribution to the energy radiated over cosmic times. The spectral shape of the X-ray background and its progressive resolution strongly suggests that most AGN are heavily obscured by large amounts of dust and gas. Their primary radiation field is reprocessed and re-emitted at longer wavelengths, driving a huge IR luminosity. Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) are the local counterparts of the high-redshift (z < 1 3) IR systems that harbour the bulk of obscured nuclear activity in the early Universe. We have been recently awarded Suzaku observations of two ULIRGs, IRAS 00182 7112 and IRAS 12127 1412, for a total exposure time of 150 ks. Both the sources are known to host an elusive AGN whose intrinsic luminosity is estimated to fall in the quasar range. Although classified as Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Regions in the optical, these ULIRGs sport the typical features of buried AGN in the mid-IR. IRAS 12127 1412 was observed for the first time in the X-rays by our group. Its Chandra spectrum clearly shows the signatures of AGN reflection at 2 10 keV. Similar properties were previously found in IRAS 00182 7112. Our Suzaku observations will allow to pinpont the AGN emission above 10 keV, and will provide fundamental information on the physical and geometrical structure of Compton-thick AGN embedded in a nuclear starburst. These sources are believed to experience the very initial phase of the AGN feedback on the surrounding environment, eventually leading to the formation of powerful optically- bright quasars. Besides this, we stress another remarkable opportunity related to the study of these two ULIRGs. Due to their really unique mid-IR and hard X-ray spectral properties, IRAS 00182 7112 and IRAS 12127 1412 can be considered as representative templates for a significant

  14. BAT AGN spectroscopic survey-II. X-ray emission and high-ionization optical emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berney, Simon; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Baloković, Mislav; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby (z ≃ 0.04) AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (L_[O III]^{int} ∝ L_{14-195}) with a large scatter (RPear = 0.64, σ = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear = 0.63, σ = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low-ionization lines (H α, [S II]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (σ = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical differences in the scattering of the ionized gas or long-term AGN variability are important.

  15. SWIFT Observations AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    I will present results from the x-ray and optical follow-up observations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) survey. I will discuss the nature of obscuration in these objects, the relationship to optical properties and the change of properties with luminosity and galaxy type.

  16. SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF LOW-LUMINOSITY RADIO GALAXIES AT z {approx}1-3: A HIGH-z VIEW OF THE HOST/AGN CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Chiaberge, Marco; Rodriguez-Zaurin, Javier; Deustua, Susana; Sparks, William B.; Capetti, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We study the spectral energy distributions, SEDs (from FUV to MIR bands), of the first sizeable sample of 34 low-luminosity radio galaxies at high redshifts, selected in the COSMOS field. To model the SEDs, we use two different template-fitting techniques: (1) the Hyperz code that only considers single stellar templates and (2) our own developed technique 2SPD that also includes the contribution from a young stellar population and dust emission. The resulting photometric redshifts range from z {approx} 0.7 to 3 and are in substantial agreement with measurements from earlier work, but significantly more accurate. The SED of most objects is consistent with a dominant contribution from an old stellar population with an age {approx}1-3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} years. The inferred total stellar mass range is {approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} M {sub Sun }. Dust emission is needed to account for the 24 {mu}m emission in 15 objects. Estimates of the dust luminosity yield values in the range L {sub dust} {approx} 10{sup 43.5}-10{sup 45.5} erg s{sup -1}. The global dust temperature, crudely estimated for the sources with an MIR excess, is {approx}300-850 K. A UV excess is often observed with a luminosity in the range {approx}10{sup 42}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} at 2000 A rest frame. Our results show that the hosts of these high-z low-luminosity radio sources are old massive galaxies, similar to the local FR Is. However, the UV and MIR excesses indicate the possible significant contribution from star formation and/or nuclear activity in such bands, not seen in low-z FR Is. Our sources display a wide variety of properties: from possible quasars at the highest luminosities to low-luminosity old galaxies.

  17. Spectral Energy Distributions of Low-luminosity Radio Galaxies at z ~1-3: A High-z View of the Host/AGN Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Chiaberge, Marco; Capetti, Alessandro; Rodriguez-Zaurin, Javier; Deustua, Susana; Sparks, William B.

    2013-01-01

    We study the spectral energy distributions, SEDs (from FUV to MIR bands), of the first sizeable sample of 34 low-luminosity radio galaxies at high redshifts, selected in the COSMOS field. To model the SEDs, we use two different template-fitting techniques: (1) the Hyperz code that only considers single stellar templates and (2) our own developed technique 2SPD that also includes the contribution from a young stellar population and dust emission. The resulting photometric redshifts range from z ~ 0.7 to 3 and are in substantial agreement with measurements from earlier work, but significantly more accurate. The SED of most objects is consistent with a dominant contribution from an old stellar population with an age ~1-3 × 109 years. The inferred total stellar mass range is ~1010-1012 M ⊙. Dust emission is needed to account for the 24 μm emission in 15 objects. Estimates of the dust luminosity yield values in the range L dust ~ 1043.5-1045.5 erg s-1. The global dust temperature, crudely estimated for the sources with an MIR excess, is ~300-850 K. A UV excess is often observed with a luminosity in the range ~1042-1044 erg s-1 at 2000 Å rest frame. Our results show that the hosts of these high-z low-luminosity radio sources are old massive galaxies, similar to the local FR Is. However, the UV and MIR excesses indicate the possible significant contribution from star formation and/or nuclear activity in such bands, not seen in low-z FR Is. Our sources display a wide variety of properties: from possible quasars at the highest luminosities to low-luminosity old galaxies.

  18. WISE Discovery of Hyper Luminous Galaxies at z=2-4 and Their Implications for Galaxy and AGN Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Chao Wei; Eisenhardt, Peter; Wu, Jingwen; Bridge, Carrie; Assef, Roberto; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Robert L.; Jarrett, Thomas; Lonsdale, Carol; Petty, Sara; Sayers, Jack; Stanford, Adam; Stern, Daniel; Wright, Edward L.; Yan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    On behalf of the WISE Science team, we present the discovery of a class of distant dust-enshrouded galaxies with extremely high luminosity. These galaxies are selected to have extreme red colors in the mid-IR using NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). They are faint in the optical and near-IR, predominantly at zeta = 2-4, and with IR luminosity > 10(exp 13) Solar Luminosity, making them Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (HyLIRGs). SEDs incorporating the WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometry indicate hot dust dominates the bolometric luminosity, presumably powered by AGN. Preliminary multi-wavelength follow-up suggests that they are different from normal populations in the local M-sigma relation. Their low source density implies that these objects are either intrinsically rare, or a short-lived phase in a more numerous population. If the latter is the case, these hot, dust-enshrouded galaxies may be an early stage in the interplay between AGN and galaxies.

  19. MEAN SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND BOLOMETRIC CORRECTIONS FOR LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Mehta, Sajjan S.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2013-05-01

    We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.064 < z < 5.46 using mid-IR data from Spitzer and WISE, near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIDSS, optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and UV data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The mean SED requires a bolometric correction (relative to 2500 A) of BC{sub 2500A} =2.75 {+-} 0.40 using the integrated light from 1 {mu}m-2 keV, and we further explore the range of bolometric corrections exhibited by individual objects. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the mean SED on various parameters, particularly the UV luminosity for quasars with 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 and the properties of the UV emission lines for quasars with z {approx}> 1.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED-dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope ({alpha}{sub UV}), a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extreme UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possible models and explore the resulting bolometric corrections. Understanding these various SED-dependent effects will be important for accurate determination of quasar accretion rates.

  20. The HELLAS2XMM survey. XIII. Multi-component analysis of the spectral energy distribution of obscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, F.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Bellocchi, E.; Fritz, J.; Gruppioni, C.; Mignoli, M.; Maiolino, R.; Pozzetti, L.; Brusa, M.; Fiore, F.; Zamorani, G.

    2010-07-01

    magnitude for models with high optical depth (τ9.7 µm = 10). The ratio between the luminosities obtained by the fitting procedure and from the observed SED suggest that, at least for type 2 AGN, observed bolometric luminosities are likely to underestimate intrinsic ones and the effect is more severe for highly obscured sources. Bolometric corrections from the hard X-ray band are computed and have a median value of k2-10 keV ~ 20. The obscured AGN in our sample are characterized by relatively low Eddington ratios (median λEdd ~ 0.08). On average, they are consistent with the Eddington ratio increasing at increasing bolometric correction.

  1. Obscured AGNs in Bulgeless Hosts discovered by WISE: The Case Study of SDSS J1224+5555

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyapal, S.; Secrest, N. J.; Rothberg, B.; O’Connor, J. A.; Ellison, S. L.; Hickox, R. C.; Constantin, A.; Gliozzi, M.; Rosenberg, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    There is mounting evidence that supermassive black holes (SMBHs) form and grow in bulgeless galaxies. However, a robust determination of the fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in bulgeless galaxies, an important constraint to models of SMBH seed formation and merger-free models of AGN fueling, is unknown, since optical studies have been shown to be incomplete for AGNs in low-mass galaxies. In a recent study using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we discovered hundreds of bulgeless galaxies that display mid-infrared signatures of extremely hot dust suggestive of powerful accreting massive black holes, despite having no signatures of black hole activity at optical wavelengths. Here we report X-ray follow-up observations of J122434.66+555522.3, a nearby (z = 0.052) isolated bulgeless galaxy that contains an unresolved X-ray source detected at the 3σ level by XMM-Newton with an observed luminosity uncorrected for intrinsic absorption of {L}2-10{keV}=(1.1+/- 0.4)× {10}40 erg s‑1. Ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy with the Large Binocular Telescope and multiwavelength observations from ultraviolet to millimeter wavelengths together suggest that J1224+5555 harbors a highly absorbed AGN with an intrinsic absorption of {N}{{H}}\\gt {10}24 cm‑2. The hard X-ray luminosity of the putative AGN corrected for absorption is {L}2-10{keV}∼ 3× {10}42 erg s‑1, which, depending on the bolometric correction factor, corresponds to a bolometric luminosity of the AGN of {L}{bol}.∼ 6× {10}43‑3 × 1044 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 and a lower mass limit for the black hole of {M}{BH}≃ 2× {10}6 {M}ȯ , based on the Eddington limit. While enhanced X-ray emission and hot dust can be produced by star formation in extremely low metallicity environments typical in dwarf galaxies, J1224+5555 has a stellar mass of ∼ 2.0× {10}10 {M}ȯ and an above solar metallicity (12 + {logO}/{{H}} = 9.11), typical of our WISE-selected bulgeless galaxy sample. While collectively these

  2. Obscured AGNs in Bulgeless Hosts discovered by WISE: The Case Study of SDSS J1224+5555

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyapal, S.; Secrest, N. J.; Rothberg, B.; O’Connor, J. A.; Ellison, S. L.; Hickox, R. C.; Constantin, A.; Gliozzi, M.; Rosenberg, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    There is mounting evidence that supermassive black holes (SMBHs) form and grow in bulgeless galaxies. However, a robust determination of the fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in bulgeless galaxies, an important constraint to models of SMBH seed formation and merger-free models of AGN fueling, is unknown, since optical studies have been shown to be incomplete for AGNs in low-mass galaxies. In a recent study using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we discovered hundreds of bulgeless galaxies that display mid-infrared signatures of extremely hot dust suggestive of powerful accreting massive black holes, despite having no signatures of black hole activity at optical wavelengths. Here we report X-ray follow-up observations of J122434.66+555522.3, a nearby (z = 0.052) isolated bulgeless galaxy that contains an unresolved X-ray source detected at the 3σ level by XMM-Newton with an observed luminosity uncorrected for intrinsic absorption of {L}2-10{keV}=(1.1+/- 0.4)× {10}40 erg s‑1. Ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy with the Large Binocular Telescope and multiwavelength observations from ultraviolet to millimeter wavelengths together suggest that J1224+5555 harbors a highly absorbed AGN with an intrinsic absorption of {N}{{H}}\\gt {10}24 cm‑2. The hard X-ray luminosity of the putative AGN corrected for absorption is {L}2-10{keV}˜ 3× {10}42 erg s‑1, which, depending on the bolometric correction factor, corresponds to a bolometric luminosity of the AGN of {L}{bol}.˜ 6× {10}43‑3 × 1044 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 and a lower mass limit for the black hole of {M}{BH}≃ 2× {10}6 {M}ȯ , based on the Eddington limit. While enhanced X-ray emission and hot dust can be produced by star formation in extremely low metallicity environments typical in dwarf galaxies, J1224+5555 has a stellar mass of ˜ 2.0× {10}10 {M}ȯ and an above solar metallicity (12 + {logO}/{{H}} = 9.11), typical of our WISE-selected bulgeless galaxy sample. While collectively these

  3. New Insights on the Accretion Disk-Winds Connection in Radio-Loud AGNs from Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, F.; Sambruna, R. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.; Cappi, M.; Reynolds, S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    From the spectral analysis of long Suzaku observations of five radio-loud AGNs we have been able to discover the presence of ultra-fast outflows with velocities ,,approx.0.1 c in three of them, namely 3C III, 3C 120 and 3C 390.3. They are consistent with being accretion disk winds/outflows. We also performed a follow-up on 3C III to monitor its outflow on approx.7 days time-scales and detected an anti-correlated variability of a possible relativistic emission line with respect to blue-shifted Fe K features, following a flux increase. This provides the first direct evidence for an accretion disc-wind connection in an AGN. The mass outflow rate of these outflows can be comparable to the accretion rate and their mechanical power can correspond to a significant fraction of the bolometric luminosity and is comparable to their typical jet power. Therefore, they can possibly play a significant role in the expected feedback from AGNs and can give us further clues on the relation between the accretion disk and the formation of winds/jets.

  4. Evidence for Ultra-Fast Outflows in Radio-Quiet AGNs: III - Location and Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2012-01-01

    Using the results of a previous X-ray photo-ionization modelling of blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines on a sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton, in this letter we estimate the location and energetics of the associated ultrafast outflows (UFOs). Due to significant uncertainties, we are essentially able to place only lower/upper limits. On average, their location is in the interval approx.0.0003-0.03pc (approx.10(exp 2)-10(exp 4)tau(sub s) from the central black hole, consistent with what is expected for accretion disk winds/outflows. The mass outflow rates are constrained between approx.0.01- 1 Stellar Mass/y, corresponding to approx. or >5-10% of the accretion rates. The average lower-upper limits on the mechanical power are logE(sub K) approx. or = 42.6-44.6 erg/s. However, the minimum possible value of the ratio between the mechanical power and bolometric luminosity is constrained to be comparable or higher than the minimum required by simulations of feedback induced by winds/outflows. Therefore, this work demonstrates that UFOs are indeed capable to provide a significant contribution to the AGN r.osmological feedback, in agreement with theoretical expectations and the recent observation of interactions between AGN outflows and the interstellar medium in several Seyferts galaxies .

  5. Evidence for ultrafast outflows in radio-quiet AGNs - III. Location and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2012-05-01

    Using the results of a previous X-ray photoionization modelling of blueshifted Fe K absorption lines on a sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton, in this Letter we estimate the location and energetics of the associated ultrafast outflows (UFOs). Due to significant uncertainties, we are essentially able to place only lower/upper limits. On average, their location is in the interval ˜0.0003-0.03 pc (˜ 102-104rs) from the central black hole, consistent with what is expected for accretion disc winds/outflows. The mass outflow rates are constrained between ˜0.01 and 1 M⊙ yr-1, corresponding to >rsim5-10 per cent of the accretion rates. The average lower/upper limits on the mechanical power are log? 42.6-44.6 erg s-1. However, the minimum possible value of the ratio between the mechanical power and bolometric luminosity is constrained to be comparable or higher than the minimum required by simulations of feedback induced by winds/outflows. Therefore, this work demonstrates that UFOs are indeed capable to provide a significant contribution to the AGN cosmological feedback, in agreement with theoretical expectations and the recent observation of interactions between AGN outflows and the interstellar medium in several Seyfert galaxies.

  6. THE GALACTIC SPIN OF AGN GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Hernandez, X.; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young E-mail: xavier@astroscu.unam.mx

    2011-07-01

    Using an extensive sample of galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5, we compare the angular momentum distribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with non-AGN hosting late-type galaxies. To this end we characterize galactic spin through the dimensionless angular momentum parameter {lambda}, which we estimate through simple dynamical considerations. Using a volume-limited sample, we find a considerable difference when comparing the empirical distributions of {lambda} for AGNs and non-AGN galaxies, the AGNs showing typically low {lambda} values and associated dispersions, while non-AGNs present higher {lambda} values and a broader distribution. A more striking difference is found when looking at {lambda} distributions in thin M{sub r} cuts; while the spin of non-AGN galaxies presents an anticorrelation with M{sub r} , with bright (massive) galaxies having low spins, AGN host galaxies present uniform values of {lambda} at all magnitudes, a behavior probably imposed by the fact that most late-type AGN galaxies present a narrow range in color, with a typical constant {lambda} value. We also find that the fraction of AGN hosting galaxies in our sample strongly depends on galactic spin, increasing dramatically for decreasing {lambda}. For AGN host galaxies, we compute the mass of their supermassive black holes and find that this value tends to be higher for low spin galaxies, even at fixed luminosity, a result that could account, to a certain extent, for the spread on the luminosity-black-hole mass relation.

  7. The Importance of Winds for AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.; Fischer, T. C.; Gagne, J.

    2014-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are fed by accretion of matter onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs), generating huge amounts of radiation from very small volumes. AGN also provide feedback to their environments via mass outflows of ionized gas, which could play a critical role in the formation of large-scale structure in the early Universe, chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium, and self-regulation of SMBH and galactic bulge growth. We provide an update on our research on the winds in nearby moderate-luminosity AGN, In particular, we concentrate on winds that occur on relatively large scales (hundreds of parsecs) that are revealed through spatially resolved HST spectra of emission-line gas in the narrow line regions (NLRs) of nearby AGN. We discuss the techniques for measuring the mass outflow rates and kinetic luminosities of these AGN winds and gauge their importance for providing significant AGN feedback.

  8. Starburst or AGN dominance in submm-luminous candidate AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppin, Kristen; Alexander, Dave; Aretxaga, Itziar; Blain, Andrew; Chapman, Scott; Clements, Dave; Dunlop, James; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Farrah, Duncan; Hughes, David; Ivison, Rob; Kim, Sungeun; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mat; Pope, Alexandra; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Scott, Douglas; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Vaccari, Mattia; van Kampen, Eelco

    2008-03-01

    It is widely believed that starbursts/ULIRGs and AGN activity are triggered by galaxy interactions and merging; and sub-mm selected galaxies (SMGs) seem to be simply high redshift ULIRGs, observed near the peak of activity. In this evolutionary picture every SMG would host an AGN, which would eventually grow a black hole strong enough to blow off all of the gas and dust leaving an optically luminous QSO. In order to probe this evolutionary sequence, a crucial sub-sample to focus on would be the 'missing link' sources, which demonstrate both strong starburst and AGN signatures and to determine if the starburst is the main power source even in SMGs when we have evidence that an AGN is present. The best way to determine if a dominant AGN is present is to look in the mid-IR for their signatures, since often even deep X-ray observations miss identifying the presence of AGN in heavily dust-obscured SMGs. We have selected a sample of SMGs which are good candidates for harboring powerful AGN on the basis of their IRAC colours (S8um/S4.5um>2). Once we confirm these SMGs are AGN-dominated, we can then perform an audit of the energy balance between star-formation and AGN within this special sub-population of SMGs where the BH has grown appreciably to begin heating the dust emission. The proposed observations with IRS will probe the physics of how SMGs evolve from a cold-dust starburst-dominated ULIRG to an AGN/QSO by measuring the level of the mid-IR continuum, PAH luminosity, and Si absorption in these intermediate `transitory' AGN/SMGs.

  9. Obscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Amy

    2014-07-01

    Obscured AGN may correspond to a substantial fraction of the supermassive black hole growth rate. I will present new surveys with the SCUBA-2 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope of the Chandra Deep Fields and discuss whether we can distinguish obscured AGN in hard X-ray and radio selected samples using submillimeter observations.

  10. Recent progress in HTSC bolometric and non-bolometric detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kreisler, A.J.; Gaugue, A.; Ayadi, Z.B.; Degardin, A.; Depond, J.M. |

    1996-12-31

    The main phenomena that may be responsible of radiation detecting mechanisms in superconductors are described in the first part of this paper. Several examples are given, ranging from broadband and sensitive bolometric devices to ultrafast nonbolometric infrared detectors. The second part is devoted to the study of various transition edge bolometers designed to be built at low cost. Polycrystalline zirconia substrates have been used, to grow YBaCuO films by both in situ and ex situ oxygenation after radiofrequency sputtering. The voltage responsibility at 10.6 {micro}m wavelength has been studied with respect to the modulation frequency of the incident radiation, both experimentally and theoretically. A 2D thermal model has been developed, allowing to interpret the complex (amplitude and phase) experimental frequency responses of various devices. In particular, the amplitude response can be described as a succession of f{sup {minus}1} and f{sup {minus}1/2} segments. Noise measurements show NEP and detectivity values reaching a very satisfactory level for granular films.

  11. The Close AGN Reference Survey (CARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Barry; Husemann, Bernd; Busch, Gerold; Dierkes, Jens; Eckart, Andreas; Krajnovic, Davor; Scharwaechter, Julia; Tremblay, Grant R.; Urrutia, Tanya

    2015-08-01

    We present the first science results from the Close AGN Reference Survey (CARS). This program is a snapshot survey of 39 local type 1 AGN (0.01 < z <0.06) designed to address the issue of AGN-driven star formation quenching by characterizing the condition for star formation in AGN host galaxies. The primary sample was observed with Multi Unit Spectrscopic Explorer (MUSE), an optical wavelength integral field unit (IFU) with a 1'x1' field of view on the VLT. The optical 3D spectroscopy complements existing sub-mm CO(1-0) data and near-IR imaging to establish a unique dataset combining molecular and stellar masses with star formation rates, gas, stellar kinematics and AGN properties. The primary goals of CARS are to:1) investigate if the star formation efficiency and gas depletion time scales are suppressed as a consequence of AGN feedback; 2) identify AGN-driven outflows and their relation to the molecular gas reservoir of the host galaxy; 3) investigate the the balance of AGN feeding and feedback through the ratio of the gas reservoir to the AGN luminosity; and 4) provide the community with a reference survey of local AGN with a high legacy value. Future work will incorporate near-infrared IFU observations to present a complete spatially resolved picture of the interplay among AGN, star-formation, stellar populations, and the ISM.

  12. The Starburst-AGN connection: quenching the fire and feeding the monster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnick, Jorge; Telles, Eduardo; De Propris, Roberto; Chu, Zhang-Hu

    2015-10-01

    The merger of two spiral galaxies is believed to be one of the main channels for the production of elliptical and early-type galaxies. In the process, the system becomes an (ultra) luminous infrared galaxy, or (U)LIRG, that morphs to a quasar, to a K+A galaxy, and finally to an early-type galaxy. The time scales for this metamorphosis are only loosely constrained by observations. In particular, the K+A phase should follow immediately after the quasi stellar object (QSO) phase during which the dust and gas remaining from the (U)LIRG phase are expelled by the active galactic nucleus (AGN). An intermediate class of QSOs with K+A spectral signatures, the post-starburst QSOs (PSQ), may represent the transitional phase between QSOs and K+As. We have compiled a sample of 72 bona fide z < 0.5 PSQ from the SDSS DR7 QSO catalogue. We find the intermediate age populations in this sample to be on average significantly weaker and metal poorer than their putative descendants, the K+A galaxies. The typical spectral energy distribution of PSQ is well fitted by three components: starlight; an obscured power-law; and a hot dust component required to reproduce the mid-IR fluxes. From the slope and bolometric luminosity of the power-law component we estimate typical masses and accretion rates of the AGN, but we find little evidence of powerful radio-loud or strong X-ray emitters in our sample. This may indicate that the power-law component originates in a nuclear starburst rather than in an AGN, as expected if the bulk of their young stars are still being formed, or that the AGN is still heavily enshrouded in dust and gas. We find that both alternatives are problematic and that more and better optical, X-ray, and mm-wave observations are needed to elucidate the evolutionary history of PSQ.

  13. Observations of changes in the bolometric contrast of sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Dobias, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid changes in the total solar irradiance from space borne sensors are largely due to the passage of large sunspots across the disk. The effect of sunspots has often been modeled, using ground-based observations, by the use of a sunspot index such as the PSI, which assumes that all sunspots have the same thermal structure, which remains constant with time. In this paper, we report on photometric observations of sunspot groups that show significant differences in their mean bolometric contrast ( up to a factor of 2) and some of which show cooling or warming during their disk transit. Most of these changes can be ascribed to the changing ratio of umbral-to-prenumbral area. By measuring the mean temperature or bolometric contrast, together with corrected (hemispherical) areas, we can determine the instantaneous solar luminosity fluctuation and its diurnal change due to individual sunspot groups. These results show that the use of solar indices based on estimates of sunspot area and fixed sunspot contrast, such as the photometric sunspot index, do not remove all of the significant sunspot effects from satellite measurements of the total solar irradiance.

  14. The 60-month all-sky BAT Survey of AGN and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGN

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Alexander, D.M.; Greiner, J.; Madejski, G.M.; Gehrels, N.; Burlon, D.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2012-04-02

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/BAT. In this timeframe, BAT detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGN, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of {approx}2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGN. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona-fide Compton-thick AGN and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGN represent a {approx}5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT dataset to refine the determination of the LogN-LogS of AGN which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, towards assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the LogN-LogS of AGN selected above 10 keV is now established to a {approx}10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGN and measure a space density of 7.9{sub -2.9}{sup +4.1} x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. As the BAT AGN are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGN in the nearby Universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGN that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local ({le} 85 Mpc) Universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions.

  15. The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, S.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Novak, G.; Piccirillo, L.; Timbie, P.; Tucker, G. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is a proposed ground-based instrument designed for a wide range of cosmological and astrophysical observations including studies of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MBI combines the advantages of two well-developed technologies - interferometers and bolometric detectors. Interferometers have many advantages over .filled-aperture telescopes and are particularly suitable for high resolution imaging. Cooled bolometers are the highest sensitivity detectors at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. The combination of these two technologies results in an instrument with both high sensitivity and high angular resolution.

  16. AGN and Starbursts in Dusty Galaxy Mergers: Insights from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Joseph M.

    2014-07-01

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is combining imaging and spectroscopic data from the Herschel, Spitzer, Hubble, GALEX, Chandra, and XMM-Newton space telescopes augmented with extensive ground-based observations in a multiwavelength study of approximately 180 Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) and 20 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) that comprise a statistically complete subset of the 60μm-selected IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. The objects span the full range of galaxy environments (giant isolated spirals, wide and close pairs, minor and major mergers, merger remnants) and nuclear activity types (Seyfert 1, Seyfert 2, LINER, starburst/HII), with proportions that depend strongly on the total infrared luminosity. I will review the science motivations and present highlights of recent results selected from over 25 peer-reviewed journal articles published recently by the GOALS Team. Statistical investigations include detection of high-ionization Fe K emission indicative of deeply embedded AGN, comparison of UV and far-IR properties, investigations of the fraction of extended emission as a function of wavelength derived from mid-IR spectroscopy, mid-IR spectral diagnostics and spectral energy distributions revealing the relative contributions of AGN and starbursts to powering the bolometric luminosity, and quantitative structure analyses that delineate the evolution of stellar bars and nuclear stellar cusps during the merger process. Multiwavelength dissections of individual systems have unveiled large populations of young star clusters and heavily obscured AGN in early-stage (II Zw 96), intermediate-stage (Mrk 266, Mrk 273), and late-stage (NGC 2623, IC 883) mergers. A recently published study that matches numerical simulations to the observed morphology and gas kinematics in mergers has placed four systems on a timeline spanning 175-260 million years after their first passages, and modeling of additional (U)LIRGs is underway. A very

  17. A New Look at Ionized Disk Winds in Seyfert-1 AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostrom, Allison; Miller, Jon M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of deep, high signal-to-noise Chandra/HETG observations of four Seyfert-1 galaxies with known warm absorbers (outflowing winds), including NGC 4151, MCG-6-30-15, NGC 3783, and NGC 3516. Focusing on the 4-10 keV Fe K-band, we fit the spectra using grids of models characterized by photoion- ized absorption. Even in this limited band, the sensitive, time-averaged spectra all require 2-3 zones within the outflow. In an improvement over most previous studies, re-emission from the winds was self-consistently included in our models. The broadening of these emission components, when attributed to Keplerian rotation, yields new launching radius estimations that are largely consistent with the broad-line region. If this is correct, the hot outflow may supply the pressure needed to confine clumps within the broad-line region. NGC 4151 and NGC 3516 each appear to have a high-velocity component with speeds comparable to 0.01c. The winds in each of the four objects have kinetic luminosities greater than 0.5% of the host galaxy bolometric luminosity for a filling factor of unity, indicating that they may be significant agents of AGN feedback.

  18. MBI: Millimetre-wave bolometric interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.; Rossinot, P.; Piccirillo, L.; Gear, W. K.; Mauskopf, P.; Ade, P.; Haynes, V.; Timbie, P.

    2002-05-01

    We present the design of the prototype of a millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer (MBI). This interferometer uses two arrays bolometers as detectors. The combination of high sensitivity bolometers and interferometric imaging appears to be well suited for precision measurements in observational cosmology. .

  19. Bolometric Device Based on Fluxoid Quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonetti, Joseph A.; Kenyon, Matthew E.; Leduc, Henry G.; Day, Peter K.

    2010-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fluxoid quantization in a superconducting loop. The sensitivity of the device is expected to surpass that of other superconducting- based bolometric devices, such as superconducting transition-edge sensors and superconducting nanowire devices. Just as important, the proposed device has advantages in sample fabrication.

  20. First Results Of The Solar Bolometric Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, P. N.; Foukal, P.; Eaton, H. H.; Rust, D. M.

    2003-12-01

    On September 1 2003, the Solar Bolometric Imager (SBI) successfully observed the Sun for several hours while suspended from a balloon in the stratosphere above New Mexico. The SBI represents a totally new approach in finding the sources of the solar irradiance variation. The mission provided the first bolometric (integrated light) maps of the solar photosphere, that will allow to evaluate the photometric contribution of magnetic structures more accurately than has been achievable with spectrally selective imaging over restricted wavebands. The more accurate removal of the magnetic features contribution will enable us to determine if solar irradiance variation mechanisms exist other than the effects of photospheric magnetism. The SBI detector was an array of 320 x 240 thermal IR elements whose spectral absorptance has been extended and flattened by a deposited layer of gold-black. The telescope was a 30-cm Dall-Kirkham with uncoated primary and secondary pyrex mirrors. The combination of telescope and bolometric array provided an image of the Sun with a flat spectral response between 0.28 and 2.6 microns, over a field of view of 917 x 687 arcsec with a pixel size of 2.8 arcsec. The observing platform was the gondola previously used for the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), retrofitted to house and control the SBI telescope and detector. During the 9 hours of flight the SBI gathered several thousand bolometric images that are now being processed to produce the first maps of the total solar irradiance. The SBI flight is also providing important engineering data to validate the space worthiness of the novel gold-blackened thermal array detectors, and to verify the thermal performance of the SBI's uncoated optics in a vacuum environment. In this paper we will briefly describe the characteristics of the SBI, its in flight performance, and we will present the first results of the analysis of the bolometric images. This work was funded by NASA under grant# NAG5-10998.

  1. A reexamination of luminosity sources in T Tauri stars. I - Taurus-Auriga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Emerson, J. P.; Beichman, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented of 72 T Tau stars identified by IRAS in the Tau-Aur complex. The composite energy distributions of the stars are constructed to define bolometric luminosities and the luminosity components in different spectral regimes are separated. The near- to far-IR spectral indices of these stars are analyzed. It is shown that 2/3 of typical T Tau stars have a bolometric to stellar luminosity ratio of about 1.0, which implies no appreciable disks. The distribution is bimodal, however, with a second peak at about 2.0, suggesting that 1/3 of the stars have disks. The bolometric luminosities of the north and south components of T Tau are found to be in the range of 9-21 solar luminosities and 1.5-14 solar luminosities for T Tau N and T Tau S, respectively.

  2. Obscured AGN Accretion Across Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coil, Alison

    We propose to combine data from XMM-Newton, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Spitzer Space Telescope with ground-based optical spectroscopy from Keck and Magellan to measure the relationship between AGN obscuration and accretion activity over the bulk of cosmic history. This work will establish the prominence of both obscured and unobscured growth phases of black holes and shed light on the processes that trigger and fuel AGN as a function of time. We will complete three complementary projects that focus on a) understanding the completeness and biases of AGN selection at mid-IR versus X-ray wavelengths, b) tracing optical obscuration as a function of luminosity and redshift, and c) measuring the distribution and evolution of X-ray absorption of AGN. We will undertake a study of AGN demographics comparing selection techniques at three different wavelengths: mid-IR selection using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, X- ray selection using data from the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, and broad-line optical selection using PRIMUS spectroscopy. We will determine the overlap and uniqueness of samples created using each method, to quantify the completeness and biases inherent in AGN selection at each wavelength. This will lead to a constraint on the fraction of heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGN to z~1. To study the optical obscuration of AGN, we will use three recently-completed spectroscopic surveys -- PRIMUS, DEEP2, and our own Keck program -- to robustly determine the ratio of unobscured (broad-line) to obscured (non--broad-line) X-ray selected AGN as a function of luminosity from z~0.2 to z~3. We will utilize the well- understood selection functions and characterize the AGN completeness of each survey as a function of redshift, magnitude, and obscuration properties. This will allow us to correct for a variety of observational effects to measure the underlying joint redshift- and luminosity-dependence of optical obscuration, which has direct implications

  3. Bolometric Flux Estimation for Cool Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Belle, Gerard T.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Ruiz-Velasco, Alma E.

    2016-07-01

    Estimation of bolometric fluxes ({F}{{BOL}}) is an essential component of stellar effective temperature determination with optical and near-infrared interferometry. Reliable estimation of {F}{{BOL}} simply from broadband K-band photometry data is a useful tool in those cases were contemporaneous and/or wide-range photometry is unavailable for a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) fit, as was demonstrated in Dyck et al. Recalibrating the intrinsic {F}{{BOL}} versus observed {F}{{2.2}μ {{m}}} relationship of that study with modern SED fitting routines, which incorporate the significantly non-blackbody, empirical spectral templates of the INGS spectral library (an update of the library in Pickles) and estimation of reddening, serves to greatly improve the accuracy and observational utility of this relationship. We find that {F}{{BOL}} values predicted are roughly 11% less than the corresponding values predicted in Dyck et al., indicating the effects of SED absorption features across bolometric flux curves.

  4. Pan-STARRS1 variability of XMM-COSMOS AGN. II. Physical correlations and power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, T.; Salvato, M.; Saglia, R.; Ponti, G.; Lanzuisi, G.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Nandra, K.; Bender, R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to better understand the correlations between the rest-frame UV/optical variability amplitude of quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) and physical quantities such as redshift, luminosity, black hole mass, and Eddington ratio. Previous analyses of the same type found evidence for correlations between the variability amplitude and these active galactic nucleus (AGN) parameters. However, most of the relations exhibit considerable scatter, and the trends obtained by various authors are often contradictory. Moreover, the shape of the optical power spectral density (PSD) is currently available for only a handful of objects. Methods: We searched for scaling relations between the fundamental AGN parameters and rest-frame UV/optical variability properties for a sample of ~90 X-ray selected AGNs covering a wide redshift range from the XMM-COSMOS survey, with optical light curves in four bands (gP1, rP1, iP1, zP1) provided by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field 04 survey. To estimate the variability amplitude, we used the normalized excess variance (σ2rms) and probed variability on rest-frame timescales of several months and years by calculating σ2rms from different parts of our light curves. In addition, we derived the rest-frame optical PSD for our sources using continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models. Results: We observe that the excess variance and the PSD amplitude are strongly anticorrelated with wavelength, bolometric luminosity, and Eddington ratio. There is no evidence for a dependency of the variability amplitude on black hole mass and redshift. These results suggest that the accretion rate is the fundamental physical quantity determining the rest-frame UV/optical variability amplitude of quasars on timescales of months and years. The optical PSD of all of our sources is consistent with a broken power law showing a characteristic bend at rest-frame timescales ranging between ~100 and ~300 days. The break timescale

  5. Heavily reddened type 1 quasars at z > 2 - I. Evidence for significant obscured black hole growth at the highest quasar luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, Manda; Alaghband-Zadeh, S.; Hewett, Paul C.; McMahon, Richard G.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new population of z > 2 dust-reddened, type 1 quasars with 0.5 ≲ E(B - V) ≲ 1.5, selected using near-infrared (NIR) imaging data from the UKIDSS-LAS (Large Area Survey), ESO-VHS (European Southern Obseratory-VISTA Hemisphere Survey) and WISE surveys. NIR spectra obtained using the Very Large Telescope for 24 new objects bring our total sample of spectroscopically confirmed hyperluminous (>1013 L⊙), high-redshift dusty quasars to 38. There is no evidence for reddened quasars having significantly different Hα equivalent widths relative to unobscured quasars. The average black hole masses (˜109-1010 M⊙) and bolometric luminosities (˜1047 erg s-1) are comparable to the most luminous unobscured quasars at the same redshift, but with a tail extending to very high luminosities of ˜1048 erg s-1. 66 per cent of the reddened quasars are detected at >3σ at 22 μm by WISE. The average 6-μm rest-frame luminosity is log10(L6 μm/ erg s-1) = 47.1 ± 0.4, making the objects among the mid-infrared brightest active galactic nuclei (AGN) currently known. The extinction-corrected space density estimate now extends over three magnitudes (-30 < Mi < -27) and demonstrates that the reddened quasar luminosity function is significantly flatter than that of the unobscured quasar population at z = 2-3. At the brightest magnitudes, Mi ≲ -29, the space density of our dust-reddened population exceeds that of unobscured quasars. A model where the probability that a quasar becomes dust reddened increases at high luminosity is consistent with the observations and such a dependence could be explained by an increase in luminosity and extinction during AGN-fuelling phases. The properties of our obscured type 1 quasars are distinct from the heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGN that have been identified at much fainter luminosities and we conclude that they likely correspond to a brief evolutionary phase in massive galaxy formation.

  6. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation in Soft X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF)) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF))from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF) derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3sigma confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne ii]12.8 micron and [O iv]26 micron lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L(sub x,SF) and L(sub x,AGN) at the 3 sigma level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  7. DISENTANGLING AGN AND STAR FORMATION IN SOFT X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-10-20

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF}) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3{sigma} confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m and [O IV]26 {mu}m lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L{sub x,SF} and L{sub x,AGN} at the 3{sigma} level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  8. SWIFT BAT Survey of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, J.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barthelmy, S.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Winter, L. M.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results1 of the analysis of the first 9 months of data of the Swift BAT survey of AGN in the 14-195 keV band. Using archival X-ray data or follow-up Swift XRT observations, we have identified 129 (103 AGN) of 130 objects detected at [b] > 15deg and with significance > 4.8-delta. One source remains unidentified. These same X-ray data have allowed measurement of the X-ray properties of the objects. We fit a power law to the logN - log S distribution, and find the slope to be 1.42+/-0.14. Characterizing the differential luminosity function data as a broken power law, we find a break luminosity logL*(ergs/s)= 43.85+/-0.26. We obtain a mean photon index 1.98 in the 14-195 keV band, with an rms spread of 0.27. Integration of our luminosity function gives a local volume density of AGN above 10(exp 41) erg/s of 2.4x10(exp -3) Mpc(sup -3), which is about 10% of the total luminous local galaxy density above M* = -19.75. We have obtained X-ray spectra from the literature and from Swift XRT follow-up observations. These show that the distribution of log nH is essentially flat from nH = 10(exp 20)/sq cm to 10(exp 24)/sq cm, with 50% of the objects having column densities of less than 10(exp 22)/sq cm. BAT Seyfert galaxies have a median redshift of 0.03, a maximum log luminosity of 45.1, and approximately half have log nH > 22.

  9. AGN Variability Surveys: DASCH from BATSS to EXIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, J. E.

    2007-10-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are variable on a wide range of timescales. Combined with their redshifts and thus luminosity, variability was of course instrumental in their initial identification with accretion onto supermassive black holes. Previous broad-band (both spectral and temporal) variability surveys of AGN are limited in their temporal and spectral bandwidth, despite their promise for probing the central engine and black hole mass. We provide a brief summary of three new AGN variability surveys, two (BATSS and DASCH) about to begin and the third (EXIST) possible within the next decade, which will open new windows on the physics and fundamental properties of AGN.

  10. Identifying Luminous AGN in Deep Surveys: Revised IRAC Selection Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donley, Jennifer; Koekemoer, A. M.; Brusa, M.; Capak, P.; Cardamone, C. N.; Civano, F.; Ilbert, O.; Impey, C. D.; Kartaltepe, J.; Miyaji, T.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Trump, J. R.; Zamorani, G.

    2012-01-01

    Spitzer IRAC selection is a powerful tool for identifying luminous AGN. The AGN selection wedges currently in use, however, are heavily contaminated by star-forming galaxies, especially at high redshift. Using the large samples of luminous AGN and high-redshift star-forming galaxies in COSMOS, we redefine the AGN selection criteria for use in deep IRAC surveys. The new IRAC criteria are designed to be both highly complete and reliable, and incorporate the best aspects of the current AGN selection wedges and of infrared power-law selection while excluding high redshift star-forming galaxies selected via the BzK, DRG, LBG, and SMG criteria. At QSO-luminosities of log L(2-10 keV)>44, the new IRAC criteria recover 75% of the hard X-ray and IRAC-detected XMM-COSMOS sample, yet only 37% of the IRAC AGN candidates have X-ray counterparts, a fraction that rises to 51% in regions with Chandra exposures of 50-160 ks. X-ray stacking of the individually X-ray non-detected AGN candidates leads to a hard X-ray signal indicative of heavily obscured to mildly Compton-thick obscuration (log NH >= 23.7). While IRAC selection recovers a substantial fraction of luminous unobscured and obscured AGN, it is incomplete to low-luminosity and host-dominated AGN.

  11. DIAGNOSTICS OF AGN-DRIVEN MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN ULIRGs FROM HERSCHEL-PACS OBSERVATIONS OF OH AT 119 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Spoon, H. W. W.; Lebouteiller, V.; Farrah, D.; González-Alfonso, E.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Urrutia, T.; Rigopoulou, D.; Verma, A.; Westmoquette, M. S.; Smith, H. A.; Afonso, J.; Pearson, C.; Cormier, D.; Efstathiou, A.; Borys, C.; Etxaluze, M.; Clements, D. L.

    2013-10-01

    We report on our observations of the 79 and 119 μm doublet transitions of OH for 24 local (z < 0.262) ULIRGs observed with Herschel-PACS as part of the Herschel ULIRG Survey (HERUS). Some OH 119 μm profiles display a clear P-Cygni shape and therefore imply outflowing OH gas, while other profiles are predominantly in absorption or are completely in emission. We find that the relative strength of the OH emission component decreases as the silicate absorption increases. This result locates the OH outflows inside the obscured nuclei. The maximum outflow velocities for our sources range from less than 100 to ∼2000 km s{sup –1}, with 15/24 (10/24) sources showing OH absorption at velocities exceeding 700 km s{sup –1} (1000 km s{sup –1}). Three sources show maximum OH outflow velocities exceeding that of Mrk231. Since outflow velocities above 500-700 km s{sup –1} are thought to require an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to drive them, about two-thirds of our ULIRG sample may host AGN-driven molecular outflows. This finding is supported by the correlation we find between the maximum OH outflow velocity and the IR-derived bolometric AGN luminosity. No such correlation is found with the IR-derived star formation rate. The highest outflow velocities are found among sources that are still deeply embedded. We speculate that the molecular outflows in these sources may be in an early phase of disrupting the nuclear dust veil before these sources evolve into less-obscured AGNs. Four of our sources show high-velocity wings in their [C II] fine-structure line profiles, implying neutral gas outflow masses of at least (2-4.5) × 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉}.

  12. Improved low frequency stability of bolometric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbanks, T.; Devlin, M.; Lange, A. E.; Beeman, J. W.; Sato, S.

    1990-01-01

    An ac bridge readout system has been developed that greatly improves the low-frequency stability of bolometric detectors. The readout can be implemented with a simple circuit appropriate for use in space applications. A matched pair of detectors was used in the readout to achieve system noise within a factor of two of the fundamental noise limit of the detectors at frequencies as low as 10 mHz. The low-frequency stability of the readout system allows slower, more sensitive detectors to be used in many applications, and it facilitates observing strategies that are well suited to spaceborne observations.

  13. Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548. VI. Long-term variability of the warm absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrero, J.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kriss, G. A.; Di Gesu, L.; Costantini, E.; Mehdipour, M.; Bianchi, S.; Cappi, M.; Boissay, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Ponti, G.; Pozo Núñez, F.; Seta, H.; Steenbrugge, K. C.; Whewell, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. We observed the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 in 2013-2014 in the context of an extensive multiwavelength campaign involving several satellites, which revealed the source to be in an extraordinary state of persistent heavy obscuration. Aims: We re-analyzed the archival grating spectra obtained by XMM-Newton and Chandra between 1999 and 2007 in order to characterize the classic warm absorber (WA) using consistent models and up-to-date photoionization codes and atomic physics databases and to construct a baseline model that can be used as a template for the physical state of the WA in the 2013 observations. Methods: We used the latest version of the photoionization code CLOUDY and the SPEX fitting package to model the X-ray grating spectra of the different archival observations of NGC 5548. Results: We find that the WA in NGC 5548 is composed of six distinct ionization phases outflowing in four kinematic regimes. The components seem to be in the form of a stratified wind with several layers intersected by our line of sight. Assuming that the changes in the WA are solely due to ionization or recombination processes in response to variations in the ionizing flux among the different observations, we are able to estimate lower limits on the density of the absorbing gas, finding that the farthest components are less dense and have a lower ionization. These limits are used to put stringent upper limits on the distance of the WA components from the central ionizing source, with the lowest ionization phases at several pc distances (<50, <20, and <5 pc, respectively), while the intermediately ionized components lie at pc-scale distances from the center (<3.6 and <2.2 pc, respectively). The highest ionization component is located at ~0.6 pc or closer to the AGN central engine. The mass outflow rate summed over all WA components is ~0.3 M⊙ yr-1, about six times the nominal accretion rate of the source. The total kinetic luminosity injected into the surrounding

  14. Compton Thick AGN in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Cosmos Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    I will present the results we published in a couple of recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, arXiv 1505.01153) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^24 cm^-2) AGN, in the COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems.We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^25 cm^-2), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line.The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.We will also present estimates on the detectability of such extreme sources up to redshift ~6-7 with Athena. Combining the most up to date models for the Luminosity Function of CT AGN at high z, aggressive data analysis techniques on faint sources, and the current Athena survey design, we demonstrate that we will detect, and recognize as such, a small (few to ten) but incredibly valuable sample of CT AGN at such high redshift.

  15. Are the hosts of VLBI-selected radio-AGN different to those of radio-loud AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, G. A.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Herrera-Ruiz, N.; Middelberg, E.

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have found that radio-AGN selected by radio-loudness show little difference in terms of their host galaxy properties when compared to non-AGN galaxies of similar stellar mass and redshift. Using new 1.4 GHz very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the Cosmological Evolution Survey field, we find that approximately 49 ± 8 per cent of high-mass (M > 1010.5 M⊙), high-luminosity (L1.4 > 1024 W Hz-1) radio-AGN possess a VLBI-detected counterpart. These objects show no discernible bias towards specific stellar masses, redshifts or host properties other than what is shown by the radio-AGN population in general. Radio-AGN that are detected in VLBI observations are not special, but form a representative sample of the radio-loud AGN population.

  16. Clustering of ROSAT All-Sky Survey AGNs Through Cross-Correlation Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumpe, Mirko; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Coil, Alison

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the clustering propertiesof ~1550 low-redshift broad-line AGNs detected in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through a cross-correlation function (CCF) with ~46000 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using this approach, we avoid small-number statistics and systematic errors caused by the variation of the Galactic absorption compared to a direct measurement of the AGN auto-correlation function (ACF). We compute the ACF of low-z RASS-AGN based on the CCF for the total X-ray sample ( = 0.25) and found a correlation length of r0 = 4.3-0.4+0.4 h-1 Mpc. Furthermore, we discovered an X-ray luminosity dependence of the clustering signal, i.e. high luminosity AGN cluster stronger than low luminosity AGN. We have also applied a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model directly to our AGN-LRG CCF.

  17. Decreased specific star formation rates in AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and M*'s from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and M* as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find that a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (CO Legacy Database for GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey, COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray luminosity and distance from the MS. While the morphological distribution of the BAT AGN is more similar to star-forming galaxies, the sSFR of each morphology is more similar to the COLD GASS AGN. The merger fraction in the BAT AGN is much higher than the COLD GASS AGN and star-forming galaxies and is related to distance from the MS. These results support a model in which bright AGN tend to be in high-mass star-forming galaxies in the process of quenching which eventually starves the supermassive black hole itself.

  18. AGN Winds and Blazar Phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2012-01-01

    The launch of {\\em Fermi} produced a significant number of AGN detections to allow statistical treatment of their properties. One of the first such systematics was the "Blazar Divide" in FSRQs and BL Lacs according to their gamma-ray spectral index and luminosity. Further data accumulation indicated this separation to be less clear than thought before. An MHD wind model which can model successfully the Seyfert X-ray absorber properties provides the vestiges of an account of the observed blazar classification. We propose to employ this model to model in detail the broad band blazar spectra and their statistical properties in terms of the physical parameters of these MHD winds.

  19. A Global Picture of AGN Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Fukumura, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present a unified structure for accretion powered sources across their entire luminosity range from accreting galactic black holes to the most luminous quasars, with emphasis on AGN and their phenomenology. Central to this end is the notion of MHD winds launched from the accretion disks that power these objects. This work similar in spirit to that of Elvis of more that a decade ago, provides, on one hand, only the broadest characteristics of these objects, but on the other, also scaling laws that allow one to make contact with objects of different luminosity. The conclusion of this work is that AGN phenomenology can be accounted for in terms of dot(m), the wind mass flux in units of the Eddington value, the observer's inclination angle theta and alpha_OX the logarithmic slope between UV and X-ray flares. However given the well known correlation between alpha(sub ox) and UV Luminosity, we conclude that the AGN structure depends on only two parameters. The small number of model parameters hence suggests that an understanding of the global AGN properties maybe within reach.

  20. Suzaku Discovery of Ultra-fast Outflows in Radio-loud AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Tombesi, F.; Reeves, J.; Braito, V.; Gofford, J.; Cappi, M.

    2010-03-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the 3.5--10.5 keV spectra of five bright Broad-Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs) using proprietary and archival Suzaku observations. In three sources -- 3C 111, 3C 120, and 3C 390.3 -- we find evidence, for the first time in a radio-loud AGN, for absorption features at observed energies 7 keV and 8--9 keV, with high significance according to both the F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations (99% or larger). In the remaining two BLRGs, 3C 382 and 3C 445, there is no evidence for such absorption features in the XIS spectra. If interpreted as due to Fe XXV and/or Fe XXVI K-shell resonance lines, the absorption features in 3C 111, 3C 120, and 3C 390.3 imply an origin from an ionized gas outflowing with velocities in the range v 0.04-0.15c, reminiscent of Ultra-Fast Outflows (UFOs) previously observed in radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. A fit with specific photoionization models gives ionization parameters log ξ 4--5.6 erg s-1 cm and column densities of NH 1022-23 cm-2, similar to the values observed in Seyferts. Based on light travel time arguments, we estimate that the UFOs in the three BLRGs are located within 20--500 gravitational radii from the central black hole, and thus most likely are connected to disk winds/outflows. Our estimates show that the UFOs mass outflow rate is comparable to the accretion rate and their kinetic energy a significant fraction of the AGN bolometric luminosity, making these outflows significant for the global energetic of these systems, in particular for mechanisms of jet formation.

  1. The Low-Luminosity End of the Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, K.; Grier, C.; Barth, A. J.; Peterson, B. M.; Vestergaard, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present an updated and revised analysis of the relationship between the Hβ broad-line region (BLR) radius and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we have carried out two-dimensional surface brightness decompositions of the host galaxies of nine new AGNs imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. The surface brightness decompositions allow us to create "AGN-free" images of the galaxies, from which we measure the starlight contribution to the optical luminosity measured through the ground-based spectroscopic aperture. We also incorporate 20 new reverberation-mapping measurements of the Hβ time lag, which is assumed to yield the average Hβ BLR radius. The final sample includes 41 AGNs covering four orders of magnitude in luminosity. The additions and updates incorporated here primarily affect the low-luminosity end of the R-L relationship. The best fit to the relationship using a Bayesian analysis finds a slope of α = 0.533^{+0.035}_{-0.033}, consistent with previous work and with simple photoionization arguments. Only two AGNs appear to be outliers from the relationship, but both of them have monitoring light curves that raise doubt regarding the accuracy of their reported time lags. The scatter around the relationship is found to be 0.19 ± 0.02 dex, but would be decreased to 0.13 dex by the removal of these two suspect measurements. A large fraction of the remaining scatter in the relationship is likely due to the inaccurate distances to the AGN host galaxies. Our results help support the possibility that the R-L relationship could potentially be used to turn the BLRs of AGNs into standardizable candles. This would allow the cosmological expansion of the universe to be probed by a separate population of objects, and over a larger range of redshifts.

  2. The Low-luminosity End of the Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, Kelly D.; Grier, Catherine J.; Barth, Aaron J.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Bennert, Vardha N.; Canalizo, Gabriela; De Rosa, Gisella; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Li, Weidong; Malkan, Matthew A.; Pogge, Richard W.; Stern, Daniel; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-04-01

    We present an updated and revised analysis of the relationship between the Hβ broad-line region (BLR) radius and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we have carried out two-dimensional surface brightness decompositions of the host galaxies of nine new AGNs imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. The surface brightness decompositions allow us to create "AGN-free" images of the galaxies, from which we measure the starlight contribution to the optical luminosity measured through the ground-based spectroscopic aperture. We also incorporate 20 new reverberation-mapping measurements of the Hβ time lag, which is assumed to yield the average Hβ BLR radius. The final sample includes 41 AGNs covering four orders of magnitude in luminosity. The additions and updates incorporated here primarily affect the low-luminosity end of the R BLR-L relationship. The best fit to the relationship using a Bayesian analysis finds a slope of \\alpha = 0.533^{+0.035}_{-0.033}, consistent with previous work and with simple photoionization arguments. Only two AGNs appear to be outliers from the relationship, but both of them have monitoring light curves that raise doubt regarding the accuracy of their reported time lags. The scatter around the relationship is found to be 0.19 ± 0.02 dex, but would be decreased to 0.13 dex by the removal of these two suspect measurements. A large fraction of the remaining scatter in the relationship is likely due to the inaccurate distances to the AGN host galaxies. Our results help support the possibility that the R BLR-L relationship could potentially be used to turn the BLRs of AGNs into standardizable candles. This would allow the cosmological expansion of the universe to be probed by a separate population of objects, and over a larger range of redshifts.

  3. THE LOW-LUMINOSITY END OF THE RADIUS-LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, Kelly D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Grier, Catherine J.; Peterson, Bradley M.; De Rosa, Gisella; Pogge, Richard W.; Barth, Aaron J.; Bennert, Vardha N.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Gates, Elinor L.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stern, Daniel; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-04-20

    We present an updated and revised analysis of the relationship between the H{beta} broad-line region (BLR) radius and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we have carried out two-dimensional surface brightness decompositions of the host galaxies of nine new AGNs imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. The surface brightness decompositions allow us to create ''AGN-free'' images of the galaxies, from which we measure the starlight contribution to the optical luminosity measured through the ground-based spectroscopic aperture. We also incorporate 20 new reverberation-mapping measurements of the H{beta} time lag, which is assumed to yield the average H{beta} BLR radius. The final sample includes 41 AGNs covering four orders of magnitude in luminosity. The additions and updates incorporated here primarily affect the low-luminosity end of the R{sub BLR}-L relationship. The best fit to the relationship using a Bayesian analysis finds a slope of {alpha}= 0.533{sup +0.035}{sub -0.033}, consistent with previous work and with simple photoionization arguments. Only two AGNs appear to be outliers from the relationship, but both of them have monitoring light curves that raise doubt regarding the accuracy of their reported time lags. The scatter around the relationship is found to be 0.19 {+-} 0.02 dex, but would be decreased to 0.13 dex by the removal of these two suspect measurements. A large fraction of the remaining scatter in the relationship is likely due to the inaccurate distances to the AGN host galaxies. Our results help support the possibility that the R{sub BLR}-L relationship could potentially be used to turn the BLRs of AGNs into standardizable candles. This would allow the cosmological expansion of the universe to be probed by a separate population of objects, and over a larger range of redshifts.

  4. Spectral decomposition of broad-line agns and host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Shen, Jiajian; Yip, Ching-Wa; Schneider, Donald P.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Burton, Ross E.; Jester, Sebastian; Hall, Patrick B.; Szalay, Alex S.; Brinkmann, John; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-09-01

    Using an eigenspectrum decomposition technique, we separate the host galaxy from the broad line active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a set of 4666 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), from redshifts near zero up to about 0.75. The decomposition technique uses separate sets of galaxy and quasar eigenspectra to efficiently and reliably separate the AGN and host spectroscopic components. The technique accurately reproduces the host galaxy spectrum, its contributing fraction, and its classification. We show how the accuracy of the decomposition depends upon S/N, host galaxy fraction, and the galaxy class. Based on the eigencoefficients, the sample of SDSS broad-line AGN host galaxies spans a wide range of spectral types, but the distribution differs significantly from inactive galaxies. In particular, post-starburst activity appears to be much more common among AGN host galaxies. The luminosities of the hosts are much higher than expected for normal early-type galaxies, and their colors become increasingly bluer than early-type galaxies with increasing host luminosity. Most of the AGNs with detected hosts are emitting at between 1% and 10% of their estimated Eddington luminosities, but the sensitivity of the technique usually does not extend to the Eddington limit. There are mild correlations among the AGN and host galaxy eigencoefficients, possibly indicating a link between recent star formation and the onset of AGN activity. The catalog of spectral reconstruction parameters is available as an electronic table.

  5. A Herschel View on Galaxy/AGN Co-Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D.; Pep Consortium

    2011-10-01

    Deep far-infrared photometric surveys studying galaxy evolution and the nature of the cosmic infrared background are a key strength of the Herschel mission. The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) guaranteed time key program obtains deep photometric surveys of some of the key extragalactic multiwavelength fields at wavelengths between 70 and 160μm. This contribution gives an overview of first science results, illustrating the potential of Herschel in providing calorimetric star formation rates for various high redshift galaxy populations, thus testing and superseding previous extrapolations from other wavelengths, and enabling a wide range of galaxy evolution studies. Herschel measured star formation rates of high redshift X-ray AGN suggest an interplay between two paths of AGN/host coevolution. A correlation of AGN luminosity and host star formation is traced locally over a wide range of luminosities and also extends to luminous high-z AGN. This correlation reflects an evolutionary connection, likely via merging. For lower AGN luminosities, star formation is similar to that in non-active massive galaxies and shows little dependence on AGN luminosity. The level of this secular, non-merger driven star formation increasingly dominates over the correlation at increasing redshift.

  6. Luminosity Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1997-04-01

    In a symmetric or 'energy transparent' relativistic collider, the luminosity is given by L = N{sup 2}f{sub c}/4{pi}{sigma}*{sub x}{sigma}*{sub y} where N is the number of electrons or positrons per bunch, {sigma}*{sub x} ({sigma}*{sub y}) is the horizontal (vertical) rms beam size at the interaction point (IP), and f{sub c} is the collision frequency. If the beam sizes remain constant as the luminosity decreases, then the time dependence of luminosity is contained entirely in the time dependence of the beam currents, i.e., N O N(t), and we can rewrite the equation as L(t) = N{sup 2}(t)f{sub c}/4{pi}{sigma}*{sub x}{sigma}*{sub y}. There are two distinct categories for luminosity loss. In the first category are loss processes due to collisions between the two beams, that is, processes associated directly with the luminosity. In the second category (see below) are single-beam loss processes. The processes in the first category relevant to a high-energy collider are Bhabha scattering (e{sup +}e{sup -} O e{sup +}e{sup -}) and 'radiative' Bhabha scattering (e{sup +}e{sup -} O e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}). In the first process, a beam particle is lost if its angular deflection is beyond the ring's transverse acceptance; in the second process, loss occurs if the beam particle's momentum change is outside the longitudinal acceptance of the ring (typically determined by the RF bucket height).

  7. An ac bridge readout for bolometric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, F. M.; Lange, A. E.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a bolometer readout circuit which greatly improves the low-frequency stability of bolometric detectors. The circuit uses an ac bias voltage and two matched bolometers and allows stable dc bolometer operation for integration times greater than 10 s. In astronomical applications the readout allows for qualitatively different observation modes (e.g. staring or slow-drift scanning) which are particularly well suited for space observations and for the use of arrays. In many applications the readout can increase sensitivity. The authors present noise spectra for 4He temperature bolometers with no excess noise at frequencies greater than 0.1 Hz. The measured optical responsivity of a bolometer operated with the present readout is the same as that of a bolometer operated with a conventional readout.

  8. Steps Toward Unveiling the True Population of AGN: Photometric Selection of Broad-Line AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Evan; Impey, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present an AGN selection technique that enables identification of broad-line AGN using only photometric data. An extension of infrared selection techniques, our method involves fitting a given spectral energy distribution with a model consisting of three physically motivated components: infrared power law emission, optical accretion disk emission, and host galaxy emission. Each component can be varied in intensity, and a reduced chi-square minimization routine is used to determine the optimum parameters for each object. Using this model, both broad- and narrow-line AGN are seen to fall within discrete ranges of parameter space that have plausible bounds, allowing physical trends with luminosity and redshift to be determined. Based on a fiducial sample of AGN from the catalog of Trump et al. (2009), we find the region occupied by broad-line AGN to be distinct from that of quiescent or star-bursting galaxies. Because this technique relies only on photometry, it will allow us to find AGN at fainter magnitudes than are accessible in spectroscopic surveys, and thus probe a population of less luminous and/or higher redshift objects. With the vast availability of photometric data in large surveys, this technique should have broad applicability and result in large samples that will complement X-ray AGN catalogs.

  9. The millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Amanda Charlotte

    The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is a technology demonstrator for future searches for the B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). If observed, B-modes would be a direct probe of the energy scale of inflation, an energy scale that is impossible to reach with even the most sophisticated particle accelerators. In this thesis, I outline the technology differences between MBI and conventional interferometers, including the Faraday effect phase modulators (FPM) used both to control systematic effects and to allow for phase sensitive detection of signals. MBI is a four element adding interferometer with a Fizeau optical beam combiner. This allows simple scaling of the instrument to a large numbers of baselines without requiring complicated pair-wise correlations of signals. Interferometers have an advantage over imaging telescopes when measuring the CMB power spectrum as each baseline is sensitive to a single Fourier mode (angular scale) on the sky. Recovering individual baseline information with this combination scheme requires phase modulating the signal from each antenna. MBI performs this modulation with Faraday effect phase modulators. In these novel cryogenic devices a modulated magnetic field switches the phase of a millimeter-wave RF signal by +/- 90 degrees at frequencies up to a few Hertz. MBI's second season of observations occurred in the winter of 2009 at Pine Bluff Observatory a few miles west of Madsion, WI. We successfully observed interference fringes of a microwave test source located in the far field of the instrument that agree well with those expected from simulations. MBI has inspired a second generation bolometric interferometer, QUBIC, which will have hundreds of antennas and thousands of detectors. When it deploys in 2015, it will be sensitive enough to search for B-mode signals from the CMB.

  10. The jets-accretion relation, mass-luminosity relation in Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Xiong; Zhang, Haojing; Xiong, Dingrong; Li, Bijun; Cha, Yongjuan; Chen, Yongyun; Huang, Xia; Wang, Yuwei

    2015-05-01

    A sample of 111 Fermi blazars each with a well-established radio core luminosity, broad-line luminosity, bolometric luminosity and black hole mass has been compiled from the literatures. We present a significant correlation between radio core and broad-line emission luminosities that supports a close link between accretion processes and relativistic jets. Analysis reveals a relationship of which is consistant with theoretical predicted coefficient and supports that blazar jets are powered by energy extraction from a rapidly spinning Kerr black hole through the magnetic field provided by the accretion disk. Through studying the correlation between the intrinsic bolometric luminosity and the black hole mass, we find a relationship of which supports mass-luminosity relation for Fermi blazars derived in this work is a powerlaw relation similar to that for main-sequence stars. Finally, EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE OF BLAZARS is discussed.

  11. Three years of Swift/BAT Survey of AGN: Reconciling Theory and Observations?

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, D.; Ajello, M.; Greiner, J.; Comastri, A.; Merloni, A.; Gehrels, N.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-02-07

    It is well accepted that unabsorbed as well as absorbed AGN are needed to explain the nature and the shape of the Cosmic X-ray background, even if the fraction of highly absorbed objects (dubbed Compton-thick sources) substantially still escapes detection. We derive and analyze the absorption distribution using a complete sample of AGN detected by Swift-BAT in the first three years of the survey. The fraction of Compton-thick AGN represents only 4.6% of the total AGN population detected by Swift-BAT. However, we show that once corrected for the bias against the detection of very absorbed sources the real intrinsic fraction of Compton-thick AGN is 20{sub -6}{sup +9}%. We proved for the first time (also in the BAT band) that the anti-correlation of the fraction of absorbed AGN and luminosity it tightly connected to the different behavior of the luminosity functions (XLFs) of absorbed and unabsorbed AGN. This points towards a difference between the two subsamples of objects with absorbed AGN being, on average, intrinsically less luminous than unobscured ones. Moreover the XLFs show that the fraction of obscured AGN might also decrease at very low luminosity. This can be successfully interpreted in the framework of a disk cloud outflow scenario as the disappearance of the obscuring region below a critical luminosity. Our results are discussed in the framework of population synthesis models and the origin of the Cosmic X-ray Background.

  12. Radio Loud AGNs are Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaberge, Marco; Gilli, Roberto; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Norman, Colin

    2015-06-01

    We measure the merger fraction of Type 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z\\gt 1 using new samples. The objects have Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the IR channel. These samples are compared to the 3CR sample of radio galaxies at z\\gt 1 and to a sample of non-active galaxies. We also consider lower redshift radio galaxies with HST observations and previous generation instruments (NICMOS and WFPC2). The full sample spans an unprecedented range in both redshift and AGN luminosity. We perform statistical tests to determine whether the different samples are differently associated with mergers. We find that all (92%-14%+8%) radio-loud galaxies at z\\gt 1 are associated with recent or ongoing merger events. Among the radio-loud population there is no evidence for any dependence of the merger fraction on either redshift or AGN power. For the matched radio-quiet samples, only 38%-15+16 are merging systems. The merger fraction for the sample of non-active galaxies at z\\gt 1 is indistinguishable from radio-quiet objects. This is strong evidence that mergers are the triggering mechanism for the radio-loud AGN phenomenon and the launching of relativistic jets from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We speculate that major black hole (BH)–BH mergers play a major role in spinning up the central SMBHs in these objects.

  13. Satellites of radio AGN in SDSS: Insights into agn triggering and feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, Cameron; Salim, Samir E-mail: salims@indiana.edu

    2014-04-10

    We study the effects of radio jets on galaxies in their vicinity (satellites) and the role of satellites in triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The study compares the aggregate properties of satellites of a sample of 7220 radio AGNs at z < 0.3 (identified by Best and Heckman from the SDSS and NVSS+FIRST surveys) to the satellites of a control sample of radio-quiet galaxies, which are matched in redshift, color, luminosity, and axis ratio, as well as by environment type: field galaxies, cluster members, and brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Remarkably, we find that radio AGNs exhibit on average a 50% excess (17σ significance) in the number of satellites within 100 kpc even though the cluster membership was controlled (e.g., radio BCGs have more satellites than radio-quiet BCGs, etc.). Satellite excess is not confirmed for high-excitation sources, which are only 2% of radio AGN. Extra satellites may be responsible for raising the probability for hot gas AGN accretion via tidal effects or may otherwise enhance the intensity or duration of the radio-emitting phase. Furthermore, we find that the incidence of radio AGNs among potential hosts (massive ellipticals) is similar for field galaxies and for non-BCG cluster members, suggesting that AGN fueling depends primarily on conditions in the host halo rather than the parent, cluster halo. Regarding feedback, we find that radio AGNs, either high or low excitation, have no detectable effect on star formation in their satellites, as neither induced star formation nor star formation quenching is present in more than ∼1% of radio AGN.

  14. Mini-Survey Of SDSS of [OIII] AGN With Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; George, I. M.; Hill, J.; Padgett, C. A.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2008-01-01

    The number of AGN and their luminosity distribution are crucial parameters for our understanding of the AGN phenomenon. Recent work (e.g. Ferrarese and Merritt 2000) strongly suggests every massive galaxy has a central black hole. However, most of these objects either are not radiating or have been very difficult to detect. We are now in the era of large surveys, and the luminosity function (LF) of AGN has been estimated in various ways. In the X-ray band, Chandra and XMM surveys (e.g., Barger et al. 2005; Hasinger, et al. 2005) have revealed that the LF of Hard X-ray selected AGN shows a strong luminosity-dependent evolution with a dramatic break towards low L(x) (at al z). This is seen for all types of AGN, but is stronger for the broad-line objects (e.g., Steffen et al. 2004). In sharp contrast, the local LF of optically-selected samples shows no such break and no differences between narrow and broad-line objects (Hao et al. 2005). If, as been suggested, hard X-ray and optical emission line can both be fair indicators of AGN activity, it is important to first understand how reliable these characteristics are if we hope to understand the apparent discrepancy in the LFs.

  15. Near- to mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of two buried AGNs of the nearby merging galaxy NGC 6240 with Subaru/IRCS+AO and GTC/CanariCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Tamami I.; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Packham, Chris; Ramos Almeida, Cristina; Nikutta, Robert; González-Martín, Omaira; Perlman, Eric; Saito, Yuriko; Levenson, Nancy A.

    2014-10-01

    We report near-infrared K ', L', and M ' band imaging observations of the nearby merging galaxy NGC 6240 with the Infrared Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope. The observations were performed with the assistance of the Subaru Adaptive Optics System, and the achieved spatial resolutions were around 0{^''.}10-0{^''.}20. We also obtained new mid-infrared imaging in the Si-2 filter band (8.7 μm) and N-band (7.5-13 μm) spectroscopy of this galaxy with the CanariCam on the Gran Telescopio Canarias with a spatial resolution of 0{^''.}4-0{^''.}5. In the K ' band image the two nuclei of the galaxy each show a double peak suggesting the complex geometry of the source, while the L', M ', and Si-2 band images show single compact structures in each of the two nuclei. Assuming that the center core observed at wavelengths longer than 3.8 μm is associated with dust heated by the buried AGN, we re-evaluated the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the southern nucleus from 2 to 30 μm with additional literature values, and performed the SED+spectroscopy fit using the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. (2008a, ApJ, 685, 145; 2008b, ApJ, 685, 160) and a Bayesian fitting approach. The model fit suggests that the high covering factor torus emission in the southern nucleus is also obscured by foreground dust in the host galaxy. The estimated AGN bolometric luminosity of the southern nucleus, Lbol(AGN) ˜ 1 × 1045 erg s-1, accounts for approximately 40% of the whole luminosity of the system.

  16. PRIMUS: The Relationship between Star Formation and AGN Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Mojegan; Aird, James; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Mendez, Alexander J.; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-06-01

    We study the evidence for a connection between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) fueling and star formation by investigating the relationship between the X-ray luminosities of AGNs and the star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. We identify a sample of 309 AGNs with {10}41\\lt {L}X\\lt {10}44 erg s-1 at 0.2\\lt z\\lt 1.2 in the PRIMUS redshift survey. We find AGNs in galaxies with a wide range of SFR at a given LX. We do not find a significant correlation between SFR and the observed instantaneous LX for star-forming AGN host galaxies. However, there is a weak but significant correlation between the mean LX and SFR of detected AGNs in star-forming galaxies, which likely reflects that LX varies on shorter timescales than SFR. We find no correlation between stellar mass and LX within the AGN population. Within both populations of star-forming and quiescent galaxies, we find a similar power-law distribution in the probability of hosting an AGN as a function of specific accretion rate. Furthermore, at a given stellar mass, we find a star-forming galaxy ˜2-3 more likely than a quiescent galaxy to host an AGN of a given specific accretion rate. The probability of a galaxy hosting an AGN is constant across the main sequence of star formation. These results indicate that there is an underlying connection between star formation and the presence of AGNs, but AGNs are often hosted by quiescent galaxies.

  17. The PEP survey: infrared properties of radio-selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Lutz, D.; Rosario, D.; Berta, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Santini, P.

    2014-07-01

    By exploiting the VLA-COSMOS and the Herschel-PEP surveys, we investigate the far-infrared (FIR) properties of radio-selected AGN. To this purpose, from VLA-COSMOS we considered the 1537, F1.4 GHz ≥ 0.06 mJy sources with a reliable redshift estimate, and sub-divided them into star-forming galaxies and AGN solely on the basis of their radio luminosity. The AGN sample is complete with respect to radio selection at all z ≲ 3.5. 832 radio sources have a counterpart in the PACS Evolutionary Probe catalogue. 175 are AGN. Their redshift distribution closely resembles that of the total radio-selected AGN population, and exhibits two marked peaks at z ˜ 0.9 and 2.5. We find that the probability for a radio-selected AGN to be detected at FIR wavelengths is both a function of radio power and redshift, whereby powerful sources are more likely to be FIR emitters at earlier epochs. This is due to two distinct effects: (1) at all radio luminosities, FIR activity monotonically increases with look-back time and (2) radio activity of AGN origin is increasingly less effective at inhibiting FIR emission. Radio-selected AGN with FIR emission are preferentially located in galaxies which are smaller than those hosting FIR-inactive sources. Furthermore, at all z ≲ 2, there seems to be a preferential (stellar) mass scale M* ˜ [1010-1011] M⊙ which maximizes the chances for FIR emission. We find such FIR (and mid-infrared) emission to be due to processes indistinguishable from those which power star-forming galaxies. It follows that radio emission in at least 35 per cent of the entire AGN population is the sum of two contributions: AGN accretion and star-forming processes within the host galaxy.

  18. Studying AGN Feedback with Galactic Outflows in Luminous Obscured Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Feedback from Active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been proposed as an important quenching mechanism to suppress star formation in massive galaxies. We investigate the most direct form of AGN feedback - galactic outflows - in the most luminous obscured AGN (L>10^45 erg/s) from the SDSS sample in the nearby universe (z<0.2). Using ALMA and Magellan observations to target molecular and ionized outflows, we find that luminous AGN can impact the dynamics and phase of the galactic medium, and confirm the complex multi-phase and multi-scaled nature of the feedback phenomenon. In particular, we found that most of these luminous AGN hosts ionized outflows. The outflow size, velocity, and energetics correlate with the AGN luminosity, and can be very extended (r > 10 kpc) and fast (v > 1000 km/s) for the most luminous ones. I end with presenting a new technique to find extended ionized outflows using broadband imaging surveys, and to characterize their occurrence rate, morphology, size distribution, and their dependence on the AGN luminosity. This technique will open a new window for feedback studies in the era of large-scale optical imaging surveys, e.g., HSC and then LSST.

  19. The millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer (MBI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Gregory S.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Gault, Amanda C.; Hyland, Peter O.; Malu, Siddharth; Timbie, Peter T.; Bunn, Emory F.; Keating, Brian G.; Bierman, Evan; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Ade, Peter A. R.; Piccirillo, Lucio

    2008-07-01

    We report on the design and tests of a prototype of the Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI). MBI is designed to make sensitive measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It combines the differencing capabilities of an interferometer with the high sensitivity of bolometers at millimeter wavelengths. The prototype, which we call MBI-4, views the sky directly through four corrugated horn antennas. MBI ultimately will have ~ 1000 antennas. These antennas have low sidelobes and nearly symmetric beam patterns, so spurious instrumental polarization from reflective optics is avoided. The MBI-4 optical band is defined by filters with a central frequency of 90 GHz. The set of baselines, determined by placement of the four antennas, results in sensitivity to CMB polarization fluctuations over the multipole range l = 150 - 270. The signals are combined with a Fizeau beam combiner and interference fringes are detected by an array of spider-web bolometers. In order to separate the visibility signals from the total power detected by each bolometer, the phase of the signal from each antenna is modulated by a ferrite-based waveguide phase shifter. Initial tests and observations have been made at Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) outside Madison, WI.

  20. The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, Andrei; Ade, P. A.; Ali, S.; Bierman, E.; Bunn, E. F.; Calderon, C.; Gault, A. C.; Hyland, P. O.; Keating, B. G.; Kim, J.; Malu, S. S.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Murphy, J. A.; O'Sullivan, C.; Piccirillo, L.; Timbie, P. T.; Tucker, G. S.; Wandelt, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    We report on the status of the Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI), an instrument designed for polarization measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MBI combines the differencing capabilities of an interferometer with the high sensitivity of bolometers. The design of the ground-based four-channel version of the instrument with 7-degree-FOV corrugated horns (MBI-4) and first measurements results are discussed. Corrugated horn antennas with low sidelobes and nearly symmetric beam patterns minimize spurious instrumental polarization. The MBI-4 optical band is limited by filters with a central frequency of 90 GHz. The antenna separation is chosen so the instrument is sensitive over the multipole range l=150-270. In MBI-4, the signals from antennas are combined with a quasi-optical Fizeau beam combiner and interference fringes are detected by an array of spider-web bolometers with NTD germanium thermistors. In order to separate the visibility signals from the total power detected by each bolometer, the phase of the signal from each antenna is modulated by a ferrite-based waveguide phase shifter. First observations will be from the Pine Bluff Observatory outside Madison, WI. The project is supported by NASA.

  1. The millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, Andrei L.; Kim, Jaiseung; Tucker, Gregory S.; Gault, Amanda; Hyland, Peter; Malu, Siddharth; Timbie, Peter T.; Bunn, Emory F.; Bierman, Evan; Keating, Brian; Murphy, Anthony; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Ade, Peter A. R.; Calderon, Carolina; Piccirillo, Lucio

    2006-06-01

    The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is designed for sensitive measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MBI combines the differencing capabilities of an interferometer with the high sensitivity of bolometers at millimeter wavelengths. It views the sky directly through corrugated horn antennas with low sidelobes and nearly symmetric beam patterns to avoid spurious instrumental polarization from reflective optics. The design of the first version of the instrument with four 7-degree-FOV corrugated horns (MBI-4) is discussed. The MBI-4 optical band is defined by filters with a central frequency of 90 GHz. The set of baselines determined by the antenna separation makes the instrument sensitive to CMB polarization fluctuations over the multipole range l=150-270. In MBI-4, the signals from antennas are combined with a Fizeau beam combiner and interference fringes are detected by an array of spider-web bolometers with NTD germanium thermistors. In order to separate the visibility signals from the total power detected by each bolometer, the phase of the signal from each antenna is modulated by a ferrite-based waveguide phase shifter. Observations are planned from the Pine Bluff Observatory outside Madison, WI.

  2. The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Amanda C.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bierman, E.; Bunn, E. F.; Hyland, P. O.; Keating, B. G.; Korotkov, A. L.; Malu, S. S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Piccirillo, L.; Timbie, P. T.; Tucker, G. S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the design and tests of a prototype of the Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI). MBI is designed to make sensitive measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It combines the differencing capabilities of an interferometer with the high sensitivity of bolometers at millimeter wavelengths. The prototype, which we call MBI-4, views the sky directly through four corrugated horn antennas. MBI ultimately will have 1000 antennas. These antennas have low sidelobes and nearly symmetric beam patterns, so spurious instrumental polarization from reflective optics is avoided. The MBI-4 optical band is defined by filters with a central frequency of 90 GHz. The set of baselines, determined by placement of the four antennas, results in sensitivity to CMB polarization fluctuations over the multipole range l = 150 - 270. The signals are combined with a Fizeau beam combiner and interference fringes are detected by an array of spiderweb bolometers. In order to separate the visibility signals from the total power detected by each bolometer, the phase of the signal from each antenna is modulated by a ferrite-based waveguide phase shifter. Initial tests and observations have been made at Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) outside Madison, WI. This work was supported by NASA grants NAG5-12758, NNX07AG82G, the Rhode Island Space Grant and the Wisconsin Space Grant.

  3. Bolometric detectors: optimization for differential radiometers.

    PubMed

    Glezer, E N; Lange, A E; Wilbanks, T M

    1992-12-01

    A differential radiometer can be constructed by placing two matched bolometric detectors in an ac bridge, thus producing a signal that is proportional to the difference in power incident on the two detectors. In conditions of large and time-varying common-mode radiative load, the common-mode response resulting from imperfectly matched detectors can limit the stability of the difference signal. For semiconductor thermistor bolometers we find that the bridge can always be trimmed to null the common-mode response for a given instantaneous value of the radiative load. However, subsequent changes in the commonmode radiative load change the operating point of the detectors, giving rise to a second-order common-mode response. This response can be minimized by increasing the electrical-power dissipation in the detectors at the cost of sensitivity. For the case that we are analyzing, and for mismatches in detector parameters that are typical of randomly paired detectors, common-mode rejection ratios in excess of 10(3) can be achieved under 20% changes in radiative load. PMID:20802585

  4. Detectivity comparison of bolometric optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadrado, Alexander; López-Alonso, José M.; Martínez-Antón, Juan C.; Ezquerro, Jose M.; González, Francisco J.; Alda, Javier

    2015-08-01

    The practical application of optical antennas in detection devices strongly depends on its ability to produce an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio for the given task. It is known that, due to the intrinsic problems arising from its sub-wavelength dimensions, optical antennas produce very small signals. The quality of these signals depends on the involved transduction mechanism. The contribution of different types of noise should be adapted to the transducer and to the signal extraction regime. Once noise is evaluated and measured, the specific detectivity, D*, becomes the parameter of interest when comparing the performance of antenna coupled devices with other detectors. However, this parameter involves some magnitudes that can be defined in several ways for optical antennas. In this contribution we are interested in the evaluation and comparison of D_ values for several bolometric optical antennas working in the infrared and involving two materials. At the same time, some material and geometrical parameters involved in the definition of noise and detectivity will be discussed to analyze the suitability of D_ to properly account for the performance of optical antennas.

  5. Toward a Unified AGN Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; Fukumura, Keigo; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulosa, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    We present a unified model for the structure and appearance of accretion powered sources across their entire luminosity range from galactic X-ray binaries (XRB) to luminous quasars, with emphasis on AG N and their phenomenology. Central to this model is the notion of MHD winds launched by the accretion disks that power these objects. These winds provide the matter that manifests as blueshifted absorption features in the UV and X-ray spectra of a large fraction of these sources; furthermore, their density distribution in the poloidal plane determines their "appearance" (i.e. the column and velocity structure of these absorption features and the obscuration of the continuum source) as a function of the observer inclination angle (a feature to which INTEGRAL has made significant contributions). This work focuses on just the broadest characteristics of these objects; nonetheless, it provides scaling laws that allow one to reproduce within this model the properties of objects extending in luminosity from luminous quasars to XRBs. Our general conclusion is that the AGN phenomenology can be accounted for in terms of three parameters: The wind maSS flux in units of the Eddington value, m(dot), the observers' inclination angle Theta and the logarithmic slope between the 0/UV and X-ray fluxes alpha(sub ox); however because of a correlation between alpha(sub ox) and UV luminosity the number of significant parameters is two. The AGN correlations implied by this model appear to extend to and consistent with the XRB phenomenology, suggesting the presence of a truly unified underlying structure for accretion powered sources.

  6. Spectral Energy Distributions of Type 1 AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Heng

    The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are essential to understand the physics of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. This thesis present a detailed study of AGN SED shapes in the optical-near infrared bands (0.3--3microm) for 413 X-ray selected Type 1 AGNs from the XMM-COSMOS Survey. We define a useful near-IR/optical index-index ('color-color') diagram to investigate the mixture of AGN continuum, host galaxy and reddening contributions. We found that ˜90% of the AGNs lie on mixing curves between the Elvis et al. (1994) mean AGN SED (E94) and a host galaxy, with only the modest reddening [E(B-V)=0.1--0.2] expected in type 1 AGNs. Lower luminosity and Eddington ratio objects have more host galaxy, as expected. The E94 template is remarkably good in describing the SED shape in the 0.3--3microrn decade of the spectrum over a range of 3.2 dex in LOPT, 2.7 dex in L/LEdd, and for redshifts up to 3. The AGN phenomenon is thus insensitive to absolute or relative accretion rate and to cosmic time. However, 10% of the AGNs are inconsistent with any AGN+host+reddening mix. These AGNs have weak or non-existent near-IR bumps, suggesting a lack of the hot dust characteristic of AGNs. The fraction of these hot-dust-poor AGNs evolves with redshift from 6% at low redshift (z < 2) to 20% at moderately high redshift (2 < z < 3.5). A similar fraction of HDP quasars are found in the Elvis et al. 1994 (BQS) and Richards et al. 2006 (SDSS) samples. The 1--3microm emission of the HDP quasars is a factor 2--4 smaller than the typical E94 AGN SED. The implied torus covering factor is 2%--29%, well below the 75% required by unified models. The weak hot dust emission seems to expose an extension of the accretion disk continuum in some of AGNs. For these, we estimate the outer edge of their accretion disks to lie at ˜104 Schwarzschild radii, more than ten times the gravitational stability radii. Either the host-dust is destroyed

  7. Sub-arcsec mid-IR observations of NGC 1614: Nuclear star formation or an intrinsically X-ray weak AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira-Santaella, M.; Colina, L.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Usero, A.; Díaz-Santos, T.; García-Burillo, S.; Alberdi, A.; Gonzalez-Martin, O.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Imanishi, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Ramos Almeida, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present new mid-infrared (mid-IR) N-band spectroscopy and Q-band photometry of the local luminous IR galaxy NGC 1614, one of the most extreme nearby starbursts. We analyse the mid-IR properties of the nucleus (central 150 pc) and four regions of the bright circumnuclear (diameter˜600 pc) star-forming (SF) ring of this object. The nucleus differs from the circumnuclear SF ring by having a strong 8-12 μm continuum (low 11.3 μm PAH equivalent width). These characteristics, together with the nuclear X-ray and sub-mm properties, can be explained by an X-ray weak active galactic nucleus (AGN), or by peculiar SF with a short molecular gas depletion time and producing an enhanced radiation field density. In either case, the nuclear luminosity (LIR < 6 × 1043 erg s-1) is only <5 per cent of the total bolometric luminosity of NGC 1614. So this possible AGN does not dominate the energy output in this object. We also compare three star formation rate (SFR) tracers (Pa α, 11.3 μm PAH, and 24 μm emissions) at 150 pc scales in the circumnuclear ring. In general, we find that the SFR is underestimated (overestimated) by a factor of 2-4 (2-3) using the 11.3 μm PAH (24 μm) emission with respect to the extinction corrected Pa α SFR. The former can be explained because we do not include diffuse polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in our measurements, while the latter might indicate that the dust temperature is particularly warmer in the central regions of NGC 1614.

  8. The luminosity function of the brightest galaxies in the IRAS survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Sanders, D. B.; Madore, B. F.; Neugebauer, G.; Persson, C. J.; Persson, S. E.; Rice, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    Results from a study of the far infrared properties of the brightest galaxies in the IRAS survey are described. There is a correlation between the infrared luminosity and the infrared to optical luminosity ratio and between the infrared luminosity and the far infrared color temperature in these galaxies. The infrared bright galaxies represent a significant component of extragalactic objects in the local universe, being comparable in space density to the Seyferts, optically identified starburst galaxies, and more numerous than quasars at the same bolometric luminosity. The far infrared luminosity in the local universe is approximately 25% of the starlight output in the same volume.

  9. The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, Peter Owen

    2008-12-01

    The Millimeter-wave Bolometeric Interferometer (MBI) is a novel instrument for measuring signals from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. MBI is a proof-of-concept designed to control systematic effects with the use of bolometers and interferometry. This scheme extends radio astronomy techniques of spatial interferometry, which rely on coherent receivers, to a system using incoherent detectors. In this thesis we outline the principles upon which MBI works and provide the reader with an understanding of both the particulars involved in the design and operation of MBI as well as the analysis of the resulting data. MBI observes the sky directly with 4 corrugated horn antennas in a band centered on l = 3 mm . A quasi-optical beam combiner forms interference fringes on an array of bolometers cooled to 300 mK. Phase modulation of the signals modulates the fringe patterns on the array and allows decoding of the visibilities formed by each pair of antennas. An altitude-azimuth mounting structure allows the horns to observe any point on the sky; rotation about the boresite extends the u - v coverage of the interferometer and allows for systematics checks and measurements of the Stokes parameters. MBI was deployed at the Pine Bluff Observatory near UW - Madison in winter 2008 for its first test observations of astronomical and artificial sources. Interference fringes were seen from a microwave generator located in the far- field, verifying our basic model of bolometric interferometry. Further analysis is needed to measure the scattering matrix of the instrument and to compare it against simulations.

  10. Changes in the Bolometric Contrast of Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Dobias, J. J.

    1993-12-01

    We report on photometric observations of sunspots carried out with the Cartesian Full Disk Telescope (CFDT) at the San Fernando Observatory (SFO). The pixel size is 5.1 arc-sec and the wavelength for the data discussed here is 6723 Angstroms. Fluctuations in total solar irradiance due to sunspots are often modeled using a constant value of alpha, which we are calling the bolometric contrast of a sunspot. We have defined alpha_ {eff} as DEF/(2 times PSI), where DEF is the sunspot's photometric deficit relative to the quiet photosphere, and PSI is the digitally determined Photometric Sunspot Index (Willson et al., 1981). For 40 sunspot groups, we find that alpha_ {eff} = (0.276 +/- 0.051) + (3.22 +/- 0.34) 10(-5) A_s, where A_s is the corrected area of the sunspot in micro-hemispheres. The coefficient of determination is r(2) = 0.1936, which is significant at the p = 0.005 level. We also find that alpha_ {eff} is highly correlated with the ratio of umbral to total spot area (A_u/A_s). For 86 sunspot-days we find alpha_ {eff} = (0.219 +/- 0.018) + (0.643 +/- 0.028) (A_u/A_s) with the linear coefficient of determination r(2) = 0.859. This suggests that an improved PSI can be constructed from knowledge of a sunspot's umbral to total area ratio. The use of such an improved PSI or, better still, actual photometry should reduce the statistical noise in comparisons with spacecraft measurements of the total solar irradiance. This work has been partially supported by grants from NSF and NASA.

  11. Merger-driven fueling of active galactic nuclei: Six dual and of AGNs discovered with Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope observations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Comerford, Julia M.; Pooley, David; Barrows, R. Scott; Greene, Jenny E.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Madejski, Greg M.; Cooper, Michael C.

    2015-06-19

    Dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and offset AGNs are kpc-scale separation supermassive black holes pairs created during galaxy mergers, where both or one of the black holes are AGNs, respectively. These dual and offset AGNs are valuable probes of the link between mergers and AGNs but are challenging to identify. Here we present Chandra/ACIS observations of 12 optically selected dual AGN candidates atmore » $$z\\lt 0.34$$, where we use the X-rays to identify AGNs. We also present Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 observations of 10 of these candidates, which reveal any stellar bulges accompanying the AGNs. We discover a dual AGN system with separation $${\\rm \\Delta }x=2.2$$ kpc, where the two stellar bulges have coincident [O iii] λ5007 and X-ray sources. This system is an extremely minor merger (460:1) that may include a dwarf galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole. We also find six single AGNs, and five systems that are either dual or offset AGNs with separations $${\\rm \\Delta }x\\lt 10$$ kpc. Four of the six dual AGNs and dual/offset AGNs are in ongoing major mergers, and these AGNs are 10 times more luminous, on average, than the single AGNs in our sample. This hints that major mergers may preferentially trigger higher luminosity AGNs. Further, we find that confirmed dual AGNs have hard X-ray luminosities that are half of those of single AGNs at fixed [O III] λ5007 luminosity, on average. Lastly, this could be explained by high densities of gas funneled to galaxy centers during mergers, and emphasizes the need for deeper X-ray observations of dual AGN candidates.« less

  12. The Starburst-AGN Connection under the Multiwavelength Limelight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guainazzi, Matteo

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of a tight relation between supermassive black hole masses, the bulge luminosity, and the stellar velocity dispersion in the local universe galaxies, mounting experimental evidence has been collected pointing to a connection between nuclear activity and star formation over a wide range of redshifts. Although a growing number of galaxies from different samples exhibit simultaneous starburst and AGN phenomenology, it is still a matter of debate whether this is the smoking gun of a causal relation between them, and, if so, with which trend. Basic issues in modern astrophysics, such as the evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes, AGN feeding and feedback to the interstellar and intergalactic medium, as well as the role played by the environment on the star formation history are related to this "Starburst-AGN Connection". This Workshop aims at gathering observational and theoretical astronomers so as to answer the following questions: * The "Starburst-AGN Connection": A causal relation? * "Starburst-AGN Connection" at low and high redshift: any evidence for evolution? * Is there a connection between AGN obscuration and star formation? * In which way are the star formation and AGN phenomena affected by the environment? * Do stars contribute to AGN fueling? Multiwavelength observations in the last decade have given a paramount contribution to improve our understanding in this field. The Workshop will build on this panoptic view, and aims at contributing to the scientific case of future ground-based and space large observatories.

  13. An enhanced fraction of starbursting galaxies among high Eddington ratio AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, E.; Mullaney, J. R.; Daddi, E.; Ciesla, L.; Schreiber, C.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the star-forming properties of 1620 X-ray selected AGN host galaxies as a function of their specific X-ray luminosity (i.e., X-ray luminosity per unit host stellar mass) - a proxy of the Eddington ratio. Our motivation is to determine whether there is any evidence of a suppression of star-formation at high Eddington ratios, which may hint toward "AGN feedback" effects. Star-formation rates (SFRs) are derived from fits to Herschel-measured far-infrared spectral energy distributions, taking into account any contamination from the AGN. Herschel-undetected AGNs are included via stacking analyses to provide average SFRs in bins of redshift and specific X-ray luminosity (spanning 0.01 ≲ L_X/M_{ast } ≲ 100 L_{⊙} M_{⊙}^{-1}). After normalising for the effects of mass and redshift arising from the evolving galaxy main sequence, we find that the SFRs of high specific luminosity AGNs are slightly enhanced compared to their lower specific luminosity counterparts. This suggests that the SFR distribution of AGN hosts changes with specific X-ray luminosity, a result reinforced by our finding of a significantly higher fraction of starbursting hosts among high specific luminosity AGNs compared to that of the general star-forming galaxy population (i.e., 8-10 per cent vs. 3 per cent). Contrary to our original motivation, our findings suggest that high specific luminosity AGNs are more likely to reside in galaxies with enhanced levels of star-formation.

  14. An enhanced fraction of starbursting galaxies among high Eddington ratio AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, E.; Mullaney, J. R.; Daddi, E.; Ciesla, L.; Schreiber, C.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the star-forming properties of 1620 X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxies as a function of their specific X-ray luminosity (i.e. X-ray luminosity per unit host stellar mass) - a proxy of the Eddington ratio. Our motivation is to determine whether there is any evidence of a suppression of star formation at high Eddington ratios, which may hint towards `AGN feedback' effects. Star formation rates (SFRs) are derived from fits to Herschel-measured far-infrared spectral energy distributions, taking into account any contamination from the AGN. Herschel-undetected AGNs are included via stacking analyses to provide average SFRs in bins of redshift and specific X-ray luminosity (spanning 0.01 ≲ L_X/M_{ast } ≲ 100 L_{{⊙}} M_{{⊙}}^{-1}). After normalizing for the effects of mass and redshift arising from the evolving galaxy main sequence, we find that the SFRs of high specific luminosity AGNs are slightly enhanced compared to their lower specific luminosity counterparts. This suggests that the SFR distribution of AGN hosts changes with specific X-ray luminosity, a result reinforced by our finding of a significantly higher fraction of starbursting hosts among high specific luminosity AGNs compared to that of the general star-forming galaxy population (i.e. 8-10 per cent versus 3 per cent). Contrary to our original motivation, our findings suggest that high specific luminosity AGNs are more likely to reside in galaxies with enhanced levels of star formation.

  15. AGN host galaxy mass function in COSMOS. Is AGN feedback responsible for the mass-quenching of galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, A.; Schulze, A.; Merloni, A.; Zamorani, G.; Ilbert, O.; La Franca, F.; Peng, Y.; Piconcelli, E.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Brusa, M.; Fiore, F.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the role of supermassive black holes in the global context of galaxy evolution by measuring the host galaxy stellar mass function (HGMF) and the specific accretion rate, that is, λSAR, the distribution function (SARDF), up to z ~ 2.5 with ~1000 X-ray selected AGN from XMM-COSMOS. Using a maximum likelihood approach, we jointly fit the stellar mass function and specific accretion rate distribution function, with the X-ray luminosity function as an additional constraint. Our best-fit model characterizes the SARDF as a double power-law with mass-dependent but redshift-independent break, whose low λSAR slope flattens with increasing redshift while the normalization increases. This implies that for a given stellar mass, higher λSAR objects have a peak in their space density at earlier epoch than the lower λSAR objects, following and mimicking the well-known AGN cosmic downsizing as observed in the AGN luminosity function. The mass function of active galaxies is described by a Schechter function with an almost constant M∗⋆ and a low-mass slope α that flattens with redshift. Compared to the stellar mass function, we find that the HGMF has a similar shape and that up to log (M⋆/M⊙) ~ 11.5, the ratio of AGN host galaxies to star-forming galaxies is basically constant (~10%). Finally, the comparison of the AGN HGMF for different luminosity and specific accretion rate subclasses with a previously published phenomenological model prediction for the "transient" population, which are galaxies in the process of being mass-quenched, reveals that low-luminosity AGN do not appear to be able to contribute significantly to the quenching and that at least at high masses, that is, M⋆ > 1010.7 M⊙, feedback from luminous AGN (log Lbol ≳ 46 [erg/s]) may be responsible for the quenching of star formation in the host galaxy.

  16. Host Galaxy Properties of the Swift BAT Ultra Hard X-Ray Selected AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa M.; Baumgartner, Wayne; Tueller, Jack; Gehrels, Neil; Valencic, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    We have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected (14-195 keV) AGN with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z<0.05), moderate luminosity AGN from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample. The BAT AGN host galaxies have intermediate optical colors (u -- r and g -- r) that are bluer than a comparison sample of inactive galaxies and optically selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are chosen to have the same stellar mass. Based on morphological classifications from the RC3 and the Galaxy Zoo, the bluer colors of BAT AGN are mainly due to a higher fraction of mergers and massive spirals than in the comparison samples. BAT AGN in massive galaxies (log Stellar Mass >10.5) have a 5 to 10 times higher rate of spiral morphologies than in SDSS AGN or inactive galaxies. We also see enhanced far-IR emission in BAT AGN suggestive of higher levels of star formation compared to the comparison samples. BAT AGN are preferentially found in the most massive host galaxies with high concentration indexes indicative of large bulge-to-disk ratios and large supermassive black holes. The narrow-line (NL) BAT AGN have similar intrinsic luminosities as the SDSS NL Seyferts based on measurements of [O III] Lambda 5007. There is also a correlation between the stellar mass and X-ray emission. The BAT AGN in mergers have bluer colors and greater ultra hard X-ray emission compared to the BAT sample as whole. In agreement with the Unified Model of AGN, and the relatively unbiased nature of the BAT sources, the host galaxy colors and morphologies are independent of measures of obscuration such as X-ray column density or Seyfert type. The high fraction of massive spiral galaxies and galaxy mergers in BAT AGN suggest that host galaxy morphology is related to the activation and fueling of local AGN.

  17. AGN are cooler than you think: the intrinsic far-IR emission from QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symeonidis, M.; Giblin, B. M.; Page, M. J.; Pearson, C.; Bendo, G.; Seymour, N.; Oliver, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present an intrinsic AGN spectral energy distribution (SED) extending from the optical to the submm, derived with a sample of unobscured, optically luminous (νLν,5100 > 1043.5 erg s-1) QSOs at z < 0.18 from the Palomar Green survey. The intrinsic AGN SED was computed by removing the contribution from stars using the 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature in the QSOs' mid-IR spectra; the 1σ uncertainty on the SED ranges between 12 and 45 per cent as a function of wavelength and is a combination of PAH flux measurement errors and the uncertainties related to the conversion between PAH luminosity and star-forming luminosity. Longwards of 20 μm, the shape of the intrinsic AGN SED is independent of the AGN power indicating that our template should be applicable to all systems hosting luminous AGN (νLν, 5100 or L_X(2-10 keV) ≳ 1043.5 erg s-1). We note that for our sample of luminous QSOs, the average AGN emission is at least as high as, and mostly higher than, the total stellar powered emission at all wavelengths from the optical to the submm. This implies that in many galaxies hosting powerful AGN, there is no `safe' broad-band photometric observation (at λ < 1000 μm) which can be used in calculating star formation rates without subtracting the AGN contribution. Roughly, the AGN contribution may be ignored only if the intrinsic AGN luminosity at 5100 AA is at least a factor of 4 smaller than the total infrared luminosity (LIR, 8-1000 μm) of the galaxy. Finally, we examine the implication of our work in statistical studies of star formation in AGN host galaxies.

  18. Comparative study of bolometric and non-bolometric switching elements for microwave phase shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood; Bhasin, Kul B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of semiconductor and high critical temperature superconductor switches is compared as they are used in delay-line-type microwave and millimeter-wave phase shifters. Such factors as their ratios of the off-to-on resistances, parasitic reactances, power consumption, speed, input-to-output isolation, ease of fabrication, and physical dimensions are compared. Owing to their almost infinite off-to-on resistance ratio and excellent input-to-output isolation, bolometric superconducting switches appear to be quite suitable for use in microwave phase shifters; their only drawbacks are their speed and size. The SUPERFET, a novel device whose operation is based on the electric field effect in high critical temperature ceramic superconductors is also discussed. Preliminary results indicate that the SUPERFET is fast and that it can be scaled; therefore, it can be fabricated with dimensions comparable to semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  19. X-Ray Absorption, Nuclear Infrared Emission, and Dust Covering Factors of AGNs: Testing Unification Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Watson, M. G.; Blain, A.; Caccianiga, A.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Ramos Almeida, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present the distributions of the geometrical covering factors of the dusty tori (f2) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGNs drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGNs have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2-10 keV luminosities between 1042 and 1046 erg s-1, and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work, we determined the rest-frame 1-20 μm continuum emission from the torus, which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGNs are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGNs having, on average, tori with higher f2 than type 1 AGNs. Nevertheless, ˜20% of type 1 AGNs have tori with large covering factors, while ˜23%-28% of type 2 AGNs have tori with small covering factors. Low f2 are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGNs the effect is certainly small. f2 increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction and X-ray absorption take place in material that share an overall geometry and most likely belong to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity, and also f2 determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ˜1-20 μm nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.

  20. The bolometric light curves and physical parameters of stripped-envelope supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, S. J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pian, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Rubin, A.; Corsi, A.; Fremling, C.; Sollerman, J.; Yaron, O.; Arcavi, I.; Zheng, W.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Nugent, P. E.

    2016-05-01

    The optical and optical/near-infrared pseudo-bolometric light curves of 85 stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) are constructed using a consistent method and a standard cosmology. The light curves are analysed to derive temporal characteristics and peak luminosity Lp, enabling the construction of a luminosity function. Subsequently, the mass of 56Ni synthesized in the explosion, along with the ratio of ejecta mass to ejecta kinetic energy, are found. Analysis shows that host-galaxy extinction is an important factor in accurately determining luminosity values as it is significantly greater than Galactic extinction in most cases. It is found that broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-BL) and gamma-ray burst SNe are the most luminous subtypes with a combined median Lp, in erg s-1, of log(Lp) = 43.00 compared to 42.51 for SNe Ic, 42.50 for SNe Ib, and 42.36 for SNe IIb. It is also found that SNe Ic-BL synthesize approximately twice the amount of 56Ni compared with SNe Ic, Ib, and IIb, with median MNi = 0.34, 0.16, 0.14, and 0.11 M⊙, respectively. SNe Ic-BL, and to a lesser extent SNe Ic, typically rise from Lp/2 to Lp more quickly than SNe Ib/IIb; consequently, their light curves are not as broad.

  1. A UV to mid-IR study of AGN selection

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stern, Daniel; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Moustakas, John

    2014-07-20

    We classify the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 431,038 sources in the 9 deg{sup 2} Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). There are up to 17 bands of data available per source, including ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (NDWFS), near-IR (NEWFIRM), and mid-infrared (IRAC and MIPS) data, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for ∼20,000 objects, primarily from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. We fit galaxy, active galactic nucleus (AGN), stellar, and brown dwarf templates to the observed SEDs, which yield spectral classes for the Galactic sources and photometric redshifts and galaxy/AGN luminosities for the extragalactic sources. The photometric redshift precision of the galaxy and AGN samples are σ/(1 + z) = 0.040 and σ/(1 + z) = 0.169, respectively, with the worst 5% outliers excluded. On the basis of the χ{sub ν}{sup 2} of the SED fit for each SED model, we are able to distinguish between Galactic and extragalactic sources for sources brighter than I = 23.5 mag. We compare the SED fits for a galaxy-only model and a galaxy-AGN model. Using known X-ray and spectroscopic AGN samples, we confirm that SED fitting can be successfully used as a method to identify large populations of AGNs, including spatially resolved AGNs with significant contributions from the host galaxy and objects with the emission line ratios of 'composite' spectra. We also use our results to compare with the X-ray, mid-IR, optical color, and emission line ratio selection techniques. For an F-ratio threshold of F > 10, we find 16,266 AGN candidates brighter than I = 23.5 mag and a surface density of ∼1900 AGN deg{sup –2}.

  2. AGN Black Hole Masses from Reverberation Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.

    2004-01-01

    Emission-line variability data on bright AGNs indicates that the central objects in these sources have masses in the million to few-hundred million solar mass range. The time-delayed response of the emission lines to continuum variations can be used to infer the size of the line-emitting region via light travel-time arguments. By combining these sizes with the Doppler widths of the variable part of the emission lines, a virial mass estimate can be obtained. For three especially well-studied sources, NGC 5548, NGC 7469, and 3C 390.3, data on multiple emission lines can be used to test the virial hypothesis. In each of these cases, the response time of the various emission lines is anticorrelated with the line width, with the dependence as expected for gravitationally bound motion of the line-emitting clouds, i.e., that the square of the Doppler line width is inversely proportional to the emission-line time delay. Virial masses based on the Balmer lines have now been measured for about three dozen AGNs. Systematic effects currently limit the accuracy of these masses to a factor of several, but characteristics of the radius-luminosity and mass-luminosity relationships for AGNs are beginning to emerge.

  3. The sharpest view of the local AGN population at mid-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, Daniel; Hönig, Sebastian F.; Gandhi, Poshak; Smette, Alain; Duschl, Wolfgang J.

    2014-07-01

    We present the largest mid-infrared (MIR) atlas of active galactic nuclei at sub-arcsec spatial scales containing 253 objects with a median redshift of 0.016. It comprises all available ground-based high-angular resolution MIR observations performed to date with 8-meter class telescopes and includes 895 photometric measurements. All types of AGN are present in the atlas, which also includes 80 per cent of the 9-month BAT AGN sample. Therefore, this atlas and its subsamples are very well-suited for AGN unification studies. A first application of the atlas is the extension of the MIR-X-ray luminosity correlation for AGN.

  4. The high angular resolution view of local X-ray selected AGN in the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Poshak; Asmus, D.; Hönig, S. F.; Smette, A.; Duschl, W. J.; Matsuta, K.; Ichikawa, K.; Ueda, Y.; Terashima, Y.; Gilli, R.; Comastri, A.; Vignali, C.

    2012-09-01

    Hard X-ray and mid-infrared observations probe the peaks in broadband spectra of active galactic nucle (AGN), sampling the bulk of their accretion energy. But bolometric emission measurements of Seyfert galaxies can be strongly biased by unresolved nuclear stellar emission. Disentangling these components using emission line proxies for the intrinsic AGN power suffers from various uncertainties. Here, we show that fundamental new insights into AGN are enabled by using high angular resolution observations of Seyferts with the largest telescopes currently available. We have imaged the 9 month Swift/BAT selected AGN sample using the VLT, Gemini and Subaru at their diffraction-limit at 12°. Collecting all high angular resolution data yields a large database of 150 AGN of all types with a point-like detected nucleus. This sample serves as a benchmark for studies on unification issues and accurate (unbiased) AGN bolometric corrections. We discuss some key results, including new inferences on the structures of Seyfert nuclei from the enlarged infrared/Xray correlation and show that the MIR to X-ray flux ratio is independent of the Eddington fraction (lEdd) over about 4 orders of magnitude down to lEdd 10^{-4} at least, which appears to be the threshold below which accretion properties change.

  5. The KMOS AGN Survey at High redshift (KASHz): the prevalence and drivers of ionized outflows in the host galaxies of X-ray AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Stott, J. P.; Swinbank, A. M.; Arumugam, V.; Bauer, F. E.; Bower, R. G.; Bunker, A. J.; Sharples, R. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present the first results from the KMOS (K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph) AGN (active galactic nuclei) Survey at High redshift (KASHz), a VLT/KMOS integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) survey of z ≳ 0.6 AGN. We present galaxy-integrated spectra of 89 X-ray AGN (L2-10 keV = 1042-1045 erg s-1), for which we observed [O III] (z ≈ 1.1-1.7) or Hα emission (z ≈ 0.6-1.1). The targets have X-ray luminosities representative of the parent AGN population and we explore the emission-line luminosities as a function of X-ray luminosity. For the [O III] targets, ≈50 per cent have ionized gas velocities indicative of gas that is dominated by outflows and/or highly turbulent material (i.e. overall line widths ≳600 km s-1). The most luminous half (i.e. LX > 6 × 1043 erg s-1) have a ≳2 times higher incidence of such velocities. On the basis of our results, we find no evidence that X-ray obscured AGN are more likely to host extreme kinematics than unobscured AGN. Our KASHz sample has a distribution of gas velocities that is consistent with a luminosity-matched sample of z < 0.4 AGN. This implies little evolution in the prevalence of ionized outflows, for a fixed AGN luminosity, despite an order-of-magnitude decrease in average star formation rates over this redshift range. Furthermore, we compare our Hα targets to a redshift-matched sample of star-forming galaxies and despite a similar distribution of Hα luminosities and likely star formation rates, we find extreme ionized gas velocities are up to ≈10 times more prevalent in the AGN-host galaxies. Our results reveal a high prevalence of extreme ionized gas velocities in high-luminosity X-ray AGN and imply that the most powerful ionized outflows in high-redshift galaxies are driven by AGN activity.

  6. The Star-Forming Properties of an Ultra-Hard X-ray Selected Sample of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Thomas Taro; Mushotzky, Richard; Melendez, Marcio; Koss, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We present results from our Herschel follow-up survey of the Swift/BAT AGN 58 month catalog. Using the PACS and SPIRE instruments, 313 AGN were imaged at 5 far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths (70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm) producing the largest and most complete FIR catalog of local AGN. We combine our FIR photometry with archival mid-infrared photometry to form broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that for the first time reach into the sub-millimeter regime. We fit these SEDs with several models to determine the star-forming properties of the host galaxies such as star-formation rate (SFR), IR luminosity, dust temperature, and dust mass and measure their relationship with various AGN properties such as X-ray luminosity, Eddington ratio, black hole mass, and column density. We find a weak dependence of the global SFR on the AGN strength indicating either the AGN has little influence on star formation over the entire galaxy or that the variability of the AGN on short timescales washes away any correlation between star formation and the AGN. Comparing the BAT AGN to a sample of normal star-forming galaxies on the “main sequence”, we find the BAT AGN systematically have decreased levels of specific SFR (sSFR = SFR/stellar mass). This is possibly indirect evidence that the AGN has suppressed star-formation in its host galaxy. Analysis of the FIR images themselves reveals that many of the BAT AGN are compact which leads to increased levels of SFR surface density, high enough for starburst driven winds. Finally, we show the 70 μm luminosity can be heavily contaminated by AGN emission and should not be used as a SFR indicator for AGN host galaxies.

  7. Bolometric and UV light curves of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, T. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; Brown, Peter J.; Bayless, Amanda J.; Frey, Lucille H.

    2014-06-01

    The Swift UV-Optical Telescope (UVOT) has been observing core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) of all subtypes in the UV and optical since 2005. Here we present 50 CCSNe observed with the Swift UVOT, analyzing their UV properties and behavior. Where we have multiple UV detections in all three UV filters (λ {sub c} = 1928-2600 Å), we generate early time bolometric light curves, analyze the properties of these light curves and the UV contribution to them, and derive empirical corrections for the UV-flux contribution to optical-IR based bolometric light curves.

  8. Neutrinos from AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The great penetrating power of neutrinos makes them ideal probe of astrophysical sites and conditions inaccessible to other forms of radiation. These are the centers of stars (collapsing or not) and the centers of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). It has been suggested that AGN presented a very promising source of high energy neutrinos, possibly detectable by underwater neutrino detectors. This paper reviews the evolution of ideas concerning the emission of neutrinos from AGN in view of the more recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy and their implications for the neutrino emission from these class of objects.

  9. AGN feedback in action: a new powerful wind in 1SXPS J050819.8+172149?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballo, L.; Severgnini, P.; Braito, V.; Campana, S.; Della Ceca, R.; Moretti, A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-09-01

    strong enough to be comparable to the AGN bolometric luminosity. Based on observations obtained with the Swift satellite.

  10. Discovering Rare AGN with Stripe 82X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMassa, S.; Urry, C.; Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Glikman, E.; Richards, G.; Boehringer, H.; Murray, S.; Civano, F.

    2014-07-01

    We have begun a wide-area survey overlapping the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) region Stripe 82 which contains extensive multi-wavelength coverage from both ground- and space-based observatories. With the initial data release of Stripe 82X, covering 16.5 deg^{2} from XMM-Newton and Chandra, we identified ˜3300 X-ray sources, including the highest spectroscopically confirmed X-ray selected quasar to date (z = 5.86). I will review the science highlights of this survey so far, including the space density of high luminosity AGN and results from our ground-based campaign to target optically dull, infrared bright targets, which are prime candidates for obscured AGN at high redshift. I will conclude with a discussion of what we expect to learn with the additional 20 deg^{2} of coverage with XMM-Newton awarded to us in AO 13, which will more than double our current survey area.

  11. The cosmological evolution and luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Avni, Y.; Giommi, P.; Griffiths, R. E.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Danziger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 31 AGNs extracted from a fully identified sample of X-ray sources from the Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey and is therefore exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space is found to be strongly nonuniform. The amount of cosmological evolution required by the X-ray data is derived in the framework of pure luminosity evolution and is found to be smaller than the amount determined from optically selected samples. The X-ray luminosity function is derived. It can be satisfactorily represented by a single power law only over a limited range of absolute luminosities. Evidence that the luminosity function flattens at low luminosity or steepens at high luminosity, or both, is presented and discussed.

  12. Further Studies of the Bolometric Contrast of Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Dobias, J. J.; Walton, S. R.

    2002-05-01

    Daily images are obtained at the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) of the full solar disk with two photometric telescopes, CFDT1 and CFDT2. CFDT1 produces images with 5" x 5" pixels while CFDT2 produces images with 2.5" x 2.5" pixels. In a previous paper (Chapman et al. 1994) we reported on the bolometric contrast of sunspots using red images from CFDT1. The bolometric contrast, α eff, is heuristically defined as α eff = Dr/(2 x PSI), where Dr is the photometric deficit in the red image and PSI is the usual Photometric Sunspot Index. Here, we will report on studies of the bolometric contrast from red CFDT2 images. We will examine the effects of higher spatial resolution and we will look for differences in the bolometric contrast between cycle 22 and 23. This research was partially supported by grants from NSF (ATM-9912132) and NASA (NAG5-7191). Reference: Chapman, G.A., Cookson, A.M. and Dobias, J.J. 1994, Ap.J. 432, 403.

  13. Type 1 AGN at low z. I. Emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J.; Laor, A.

    2012-07-01

    We analyze the emission properties of a new sample of 3 596 type 1 AGN, selected from the SDSS DR7 based on the detection of broad Hα emission. The sample extends over a broad Hα luminosity LbHα of 1040-1044 erg s-1 and a broad Hα FWHM of 1 000-25 000 km s-1, which covers the range of black hole mass 106 < MBH/Modot < 109.5 and luminosity in Eddington units 10-3 < L/LEdd < 1. We combine ROSAT, GALEX and 2MASS observations to form the SED from 2.2 μm to 2 keV. We find the following: 1. The distribution of the Hα FWHM values is independent of luminosity. 2. The observed mean optical-UV SED is well matched by a fixed shape SED of luminous quasars, which scales linearly with LbHα, and a host galaxy contribution. 3. The host galaxy r-band (fibre) luminosity function follows well the luminosity function of inactive non-emission line galaxies (NEG), consistent with a fixed fraction of ~ 3% of NEG hosting an AGN, regardless of the host luminosity. 4. The optical-UV SED of the more luminous AGN shows a small dispersion, consistent with dust reddening of a blue SED, as expected for thermal thin accretion disc emission. 5. There is a rather tight relation of νLν(2 keV) and LbHα, which provides a useful probe for unobscured (true) type 2 AGN.

  14. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Aldcroft, Tom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Mossman, Amy; Silverman, John D.; Barkhouse, Wayne; Cameron, Robert A.; Constantin, Anca; Ellison, Sara L.; Foltz, Craig; Haggard, Daryl; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Marshall, Herman L.; Perez, Laura M.; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Ruiz, Angel; Smith, Malcolm G.; and others

    2012-06-01

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z {approx} 5.5 and galaxies out to z {approx} 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While {approx}58% of X-ray Seyferts (10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} < L{sub 2-10keV} <10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L{sub 2-10keV} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO

  15. The Host Galaxy Properties of Variability Selected AGN in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinis, S.; Gezari, S.; Kumar, S.; Burgett, W. S.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-07-01

    We study the properties of 975 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected by variability in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium deep Survey. Using complementary multi-wavelength data from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared, we use spectral energy distribution fitting to determine the AGN and host properties at z < 1 and compare to a well-matched control sample. We confirm the trend previously observed: that the variability amplitude decreases with AGN luminosity, but we also observe that the slope of this relation steepens with wavelength, resulting in a “redder when brighter” trend at low luminosities. Our results show that AGNs are hosted by more massive hosts than control sample galaxies, while the rest frame dust-corrected NUV ‑ r color distribution of AGN hosts is similar to control galaxies. We find a positive correlation between the AGN luminosity and star formation rate (SFR), independent of redshift. AGN hosts populate the entire range of SFRs within and outside of the Main Sequence of star-forming galaxies. Comparing the distribution of AGN hosts and control galaxies, we show that AGN hosts are less likely to be hosted by quiescent galaxies and more likely to be hosted by Main Sequence or starburst galaxies.

  16. Host Galaxy Properties of BAT Hard X-ray Selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2010-07-01

    Surveys of AGN taken in the optical, UV, and soft X-rays miss an important population of obscured AGN only visible in the hard X-rays and mid-IR wavelengths. The SWIFT BAT survey in the hard X-ray range (14-195 keV) has provided a uniquely unbiased sample of 246 AGN unaffected by galactic or circumnuclear absorption [1]. Most of the sources in the survey are bright, Seyfert like AGN's with median redshift of 0.03. Of the AGN, 43% are obscured, type II AGN. We obtained 17 nights of imaging of 90 host galaxies of these AGN in 2008 at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope in the SDSS ugriz filters. For the broad line sources we subtracted the AGN contribution using GALFIT. By comparing our sample of AGN to inactive galaxies in the SDSS, we find that AGN are found in the most massive galaxies and are bluer in color than inactive galaxies of comparable stellar mass. We also find a correlation between the point source optical light and hard X-ray luminosity.

  17. Host Galaxy Properties of BAT Hard X-ray Selected AGN

    SciTech Connect

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2010-07-15

    Surveys of AGN taken in the optical, UV, and soft X-rays miss an important population of obscured AGN only visible in the hard X-rays and mid-IR wavelengths. The SWIFT BAT survey in the hard X-ray range (14-195 keV) has provided a uniquely unbiased sample of 246 AGN unaffected by galactic or circumnuclear absorption [1]. Most of the sources in the survey are bright, Seyfert like AGN's with median redshift of 0.03. Of the AGN, 43% are obscured, type II AGN. We obtained 17 nights of imaging of 90 host galaxies of these AGN in 2008 at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope in the SDSS ugriz filters. For the broad line sources we subtracted the AGN contribution using GALFIT. By comparing our sample of AGN to inactive galaxies in the SDSS, we find that AGN are found in the most massive galaxies and are bluer in color than inactive galaxies of comparable stellar mass. We also find a correlation between the point source optical light and hard X-ray luminosity.

  18. The ensemble optical variability of type-1 AGN in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallastegui-Aizpun, Unai; Sarajedini, Vicki L.

    2014-11-01

    We use a sample of over 5000 active galactic nuclei (AGN) with extended morphologies at z < 0.8 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the ensemble optical variability as a function of rest-frame time lag and AGN luminosity with the aim of investigating these parameter relationships at lower luminosities than previously studied. We compare photometry from imaging data with spectrophotometry obtained weeks to years later in the Sloan g, r, and i bands. We employ quasar and galaxy eigenspectra fitting to separate the AGN and host galaxy components. A strong correlation between the variability amplitude and rest-frame time lag is observed, in agreement with quasar structure functions but extending to AGN several magnitudes fainter than previously studied. The structure function slopes for our fainter AGN sample are slightly shallower than those found in quasars studies. An anticorrelation with luminosity is clearly detected, with lower luminosity AGN displaying greater variability amplitudes. We demonstrate for the first time that this anticorrelation extends to AGN as faint as MAGNi ˜ -18.5, with a slight trend towards shallower slopes at luminosities fainter than MAGNi ˜ -20.2.

  19. Effectiveness of WISE colour-based selection techniques to uncover obscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, S.

    2014-07-01

    We present a highly reliable and efficient mid-infrared colour-based selection technique for luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey. Our technique is designed to identify objects with red mid-infrared power-law spectral energy distributions. We studied the dependency of our mid-infrared selection on the AGN intrinsic luminosity and the effectiveness of our technique to uncover obscured AGN missed in X-ray surveys. To do so we used two samples of luminous AGN independently selected in hard X-ray and optical surveys. We used the largest catalogue of 887 [OIII] λ5007-selected type 2 quasars (QSO2s) at z<~0.83 in the literature from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and the 258 hard (>4.5 keV) X-ray-selected AGN from the Bright Ultrahard XMM-Newton Survey (BUXS). The effectiveness of our mid-infrared selection technique increases with the AGN luminosity. At high luminosities and at least up to z~1 our technique is very effective at identifying both Compton-thin and Compton-thick AGN.

  20. AKARI IRC 2.5-5 μm spectroscopy of infrared galaxies over a wide luminosity range

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kohei; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oyabu, Shinki

    2014-10-20

    We present the result of a systematic infrared 2.5-5 μm spectroscopic study of 22 nearby infrared galaxies over a wide infrared luminosity range (10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} < L {sub IR} < 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}) obtained from the AKARI Infrared Camera (IRC). The unique band of the AKARI IRC spectroscopy enables us to access both the 3.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission feature from star-forming activity and the continuum of torus-dust emission heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Applying our AGN diagnostics to the AKARI spectra, we discover 14 buried AGNs. The large fraction of buried AGNs suggests that AGN activity behind the dust is almost ubiquitous in ultra-/luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs). We also find that both the fraction and energy contribution of buried AGNs increase with infrared luminosity from 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} to 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}, including normal infrared galaxies with L {sub IR} < 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}. The energy contribution from AGNs in the total infrared luminosity is only ∼7% in LIRGs and ∼20% in ULIRGs, suggesting that the majority of the infrared luminosity originates from starburst activity. Using the PAH emission, we investigate the luminosity relation between star formation and AGNs. We find that these infrared galaxies exhibit higher star formation rates than optically selected Seyfert galaxies with the same AGN luminosities, implying that infrared galaxies could be an early evolutionary phase of AGN.

  1. The roles of star formation and AGN activity of IRS sources in the HerMES fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltre, A.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Fritz, J.; Franceschini, A.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Solares, E. A. González; Ibar, E.; Isaak, K. G.; Faro, B. Lo; Marchetti, L.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Rigopoulou, D.; Roseboom, I. G.; Symeonidis, M.; Vaccari, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we explore the impact of the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) on the mid- and far-infrared (IR) properties of galaxies as well as the effects of simultaneous AGN and starburst activity in the same galaxies. To do this, we apply a multicomponent, multiband spectral synthesis technique to a sample of 250 μm selected galaxies of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES), with Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra available for all galaxies. Our results confirm that the inclusion of the IRS spectra plays a crucial role in the spectral analysis of galaxies with an AGN component improving the selection of the best-fitting hot dust (torus) model. We find a correlation between the obscured star formation rate, SFRIR, derived from the IR luminosity of the starburst component, and SFRPAH, derived from the luminosity of the PAH features, LPAH, with SFRFIR taking higher values than SFRPAH. The correlation is different for AGN- and starburst-dominated objects. The ratio of LPAH to that of the starburst component, LPAH/LSB, is almost constant for AGN-dominated objects but decreases with increasing LSB for starburst-dominated objects. SFRFIR increases with the accretion luminosity, Lacc, with the increase less prominent for the very brightest, unobscured AGN-dominated sources. We find no correlation between the masses of the hot (AGN-heated) and cold (starburst-heated) dust components. We interpret this as a non-constant fraction of gas driven by the gravitational effects to the AGN while the starburst is ongoing. We also find no evidence of the AGN affecting the temperature of the cold dust component, though this conclusion is mostly based on objects with a non-dominant AGN component. We conclude that our findings do not provide evidence that the presence of AGN affects the star formation process in the host galaxy, but rather that the two phenomena occur simultaneously over a wide range of luminosities.

  2. ON THE USE OF EMPIRICAL BOLOMETRIC CORRECTIONS FOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Guillermo

    2010-11-15

    When making use of tabulations of empirical bolometric corrections for stars (BC{sub V}), a commonly overlooked fact is that while the zero point is arbitrary, the bolometric magnitude of the Sun (M{sub bol,sun}) that is used in combination with such tables cannot be chosen arbitrarily. It must be consistent with the zero point of BC{sub V} so that the apparent brightness of the Sun is reproduced. The latter is a measured quantity, for which we adopt the value V{sub sun} = -26.76 {+-} 0.03. Inconsistent values of M{sub bol,sun} are listed in many of the most popular sources of BC{sub V}. We quantify errors that are introduced by failure to pay attention to this detail. We also take the opportunity to reprint the BC{sub V} coefficients of the often used polynomial fits by Flower, which were misprinted in the original publication.

  3. The bulge-disc decomposition of AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, V. A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Mortlock, A.; Kocevski, D. D.; McGrath, E. J.; Rosario, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results from a study of the morphologies of moderate luminosity X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxies in comparison to a carefully mass-matched control sample at 0.5 < z < 3 in the CANDELS GOODS-S field. We apply a multiwavelength morphological decomposition analysis to these two samples and report on the differences between the morphologies as fitted from single Sérsic and multiple Sérsic models, and models which include an additional nuclear point-source component. Thus, we are able to compare the widely adopted single Sérsic fits from previous studies to the results from a full morphological decomposition, and address the issue of how biased the inferred properties of AGN hosts are by a potential nuclear contribution from the AGN itself. We find that the AGN hosts are indistinguishable from the general galaxy population except that beyond z ≃ 1.5 they have significantly higher bulge fractions. Even including nuclear sources in our modelling, the probability of this result arising by chance is ˜1 × 10-5, alleviating concerns that previous, purely single Sérsic, analyses of AGN hosts could have been spuriously biased towards higher bulge fractions. This data set also allows us to further probe the physical nature of these point-source components; we find no strong correlation between the point-source component and AGN activity. Our analysis of the bulge and disc fractions of these AGN hosts in comparison to a mass-matched control sample reveals a similar morphological evolutionary track for both the active and non-active populations, providing further evidence in favour of a model where AGN activity is triggered by secular processes.

  4. MERGING AND CLUSTERING OF THE SWIFT BAT AGN SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2010-06-20

    We discuss the merger rate, close galaxy environment, and clustering on scales up to an Mpc of the Swift BAT hard X-ray sample of nearby (z<0.05), moderate-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find a higher incidence of galaxies with signs of disruption compared to a matched control sample (18% versus 1%) and of close pairs within 30 kpc (24% versus 1%). We also find a larger fraction with companions compared to normal galaxies and optical emission line selected AGNs at scales up to 250 kpc. We hypothesize that these merging AGNs may not be identified using optical emission line diagnostics because of optical extinction and dilution by star formation. In support of this hypothesis, in merging systems we find a higher hard X-ray to [O III] flux ratio, as well as emission line diagnostics characteristic of composite or star-forming galaxies, and a larger IRAS 60 {mu}m to stellar mass ratio.

  5. Detailed Shape and Evolutionary Behavior of the X-Ray Luminosity Function of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, T.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Puccetti, S.; Elvis, M.; Brunner, H.; Fotopoulou, S.; Ueda, Y.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Akiyama, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Lanzuisi, G.; Merloni, A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-05-01

    We construct the rest-frame 2-10 keV intrinsic X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from a combination of X-ray surveys from the all-sky Swift BAT survey to the Chandra Deep Field South. We use ˜3200 AGNs in our analysis, which covers six orders of magnitude in flux. The inclusion of XMM and Chandra COSMOS data has allowed us to investigate the detailed behavior of the XLF and evolution. In deriving our XLF, we take into account realistic AGN spectrum templates, absorption corrections, and probability density distributions in photometric redshift. We present an analytical expression for the overall behavior of the XLF in terms of the luminosity-dependent density evolution, smoothed two-power-law expressions in 11 redshift shells, three-segment power-law expression of the number density evolution in four luminosity classes, and binned XLF. We observe a sudden flattening of the low luminosity end slope of the XLF slope at z ≳0.6. Detailed structures of the AGN downsizing have also been revealed, where the number density curves have two clear breaks at all luminosity classes above log {{L}X}\\gt 43. The two-break structure is suggestive of two-phase AGN evolution, consisting of major merger triggering and secular processes.

  6. Luminosity monitor at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Franklin, M.E.B.

    1981-02-01

    The luminosity monitor system utilized by the MKII Detector and by the PEP operators is described. This system processes information from 56 photomultipliers and calculates independent luminosities for each of the 3 colliding bunches in PEP. Design considerations, measurement techniques, and sources of error in the luminosity measurement are discussed.

  7. THE 60 MONTH ALL-SKY BURST ALERT TELESCOPE SURVEY OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS AND THE ANISOTROPY OF NEARBY AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Madejski, G. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Greiner, J.; Burlon, D.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-04-10

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). In this time frame, BAT-detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGNs, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of {approx}2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGNs. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona fide Compton-thick AGNs and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGNs represent {approx}5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT data set to refine the determination of the log N-log S of AGNs which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, toward assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the log N-log S of AGNs selected above 10 keV is now established to {approx}10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGNs and measure a space density of 7.9{sup +4.1}{sub -2.9} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. As the BAT AGNs are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGNs in the nearby universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGNs that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local ({<=}85 Mpc) universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions.

  8. The 60 Month All-Sky Burst Alert Telescope Survey of Active Galactic Nucleus and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Greiner, J.; Madejeski, G. M.; Gehrels, N.; Burlon, D.

    2014-01-01

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). In this time frame, BAT-detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGNs, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of approx. 2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGNs. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona fide Compton-thick AGNs and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGNs represent approx. 5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT data set to refine the determination of the log N-log S of AGNs which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, toward assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the log N-log S of AGNs selected above 10 keV is now established to approx. 10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGNs and measure a space density of 7.9(+4.1/-2.9)× 10(exp -5)/cubic Mpc for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 × 10(exp 42) erg / s. As the BAT AGNs are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGNs in the nearby universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGNs that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local (much < 85 Mpc) universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions..

  9. Bolometric temperature and young stars in the Taurus and Ophiuchus complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H.; Myers, P. C.; Ladd, E. F.; Wood, D. O. S.

    1995-01-01

    We calculated bolometric temperature (T(sub bol)) and luminosity (L(sub bol)) for 128 young stellar objects (YSOs) in Taurus, 74 in the Ophiuchus 'core', and 33 in the Ophiuchus 'off-core' region. We have constructed the bolometric luminosity-temperature (BLT) diagram, the log-log plot of L(sub bol) versus T(sub bol), for the three samples. T(sub bol) is defined as the temperature of a blackbody having the same frequency as the observed continuum spectrum. It measures the redness (or coldness) of an astronomical source. The BLT diagram is analogous to the H-R diagram and allows for a direct and quantitative comparison of YSOs at a wide variety of evolutionary states, ranging from the most deeply embedded stars to T Tauri stars nearly on the main sequence. We found (1) T(sub bol) increases monotonically from embedded sources (approximately 60-500 K) to classical T Tauri stars (approximately 1000-3000 K) to weak-line T Tauri stars (approximately 2000-5000 K); (2) T(sub bol) correlates reasonably well with the age inferred from the evolutionary models of pre-main-sequence stars and protostars for embedded 'protostars' and weak-line T Tauri stars. There is no significant correlation for the classical T Tauri stars. These results can be understood in terms of dissipation of circumstellar dust envelope and disk during the early stages of stellar evolution. Sources in the three regions have different distributions in the BLT diagram. The Ophiuchus core has the highest fraction of cold sources among the three regions. These cold sources are also more luminous than the YSOs in the other regions. The Ophiuchus off-core sample is dominated by the more evolved pre-main-sequence stars. The Taurus sources have distributions intermediate in L(sub bol), T(sub bol), and age between the Ophiuchus core and off-core distributions. These may suggest differences in the star formation history, and possibly in the stellar masses and mass accretion rates in these star-forming regions.

  10. Modelling galaxy and AGN evolution in the infrared: black hole accretion versus star formation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Zamorani, G.; Vignali, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present a new backward evolution model for galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the infrared (IR). What is new in this model is the separate study of the evolutionary properties of different IR populations (i.e. spiral galaxies, starburst galaxies, low-luminosity AGNs, 'unobscured' type 1 AGNs and 'obscured' type 2 AGNs) defined through a detailed analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of large samples of IR-selected sources. The evolutionary parameters have been constrained by means of all the available observables from surveys in the mid- and far-IR (source counts, redshift and luminosity distributions, luminosity functions). By decomposing the SEDs representative of the three AGN classes into three distinct components (a stellar component emitting most of its power in the optical/near-IR, an AGN component due to the hot dust heated by the central black hole peaking in the mid-IR, and a starburst component dominating the far-IR spectrum), we have disentangled the AGN contribution to the monochromatic and total IR luminosity emitted by different populations considered in our model from that due to star formation activity. We have then obtained an estimate of the total IR luminosity density [and star formation density (SFD) produced by IR galaxies] and the first ever estimate of the black hole mass accretion density (BHAR) from the IR. The derived evolution of the BHAR is in agreement with estimates from X-rays, though the BHAR values we derive from the IR are slightly higher than the X-ray ones. Finally, we have simulated source counts, redshift distributions, and SFD and BHAR that we expect to obtain with the future cosmological surveys in the mid-/far-IR that will be performed with the JWST-MIRI and SPICA-SAFARI. Outputs of the model are available online.1

  11. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  12. Type 1 AGN at low z - III. The optical narrow-line ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Laor, Ari

    2013-05-01

    We present the optical narrow-line ratios in a Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based sample of 3175 broad Hα selected type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN), and explore their positions in the BPT diagrams as a function of the AGN and the host properties. We find the following: (1) the luminosities of all measured narrow lines (Hα, Hβ, [O III], [N II], [S II], [O I]) show a Baldwin relation relative to the broad Hα luminosity LbHα, with slopes in the range of 0.53-0.72. (2) About 20 per cent of the type 1 AGN reside within the `Composite' and `star-forming' (SF) regions of the Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich (BPT) diagrams. These objects also show excess narrow Hα and ultraviolet (UV) luminosities, for their LbHα, consistent with contribution from star formation which dominates the narrow-lines emission, as expected from their positions in the BPT diagrams. (3) The type 1 which reside within the AGN region in the BPT diagrams, are offset to lower [S II]/Hα and [N II]/Hα luminosity ratios, compared to type 2 AGN. This offset is a selection effect, related to the lower AGN/host luminosity selection of the type 2 AGN selected from the SDSS galaxy sample. (4) The [N II]/Hα and [N II]/[S II] ratios in type 1 AGN increase with the host mass, as expected if the mass-metallicity relation of quiescent galaxies holds for the AGN narrow-line region (NLR). (5) The broad lines optical Fe II is higher for a higher [N II]/Hα, at a fixed Lbol and Eddington ratio L/LEdd. This suggests that the broad line region metallicity is also related to the host mass. (6) The fraction of AGN which are low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) increases sharply with decreasing L/LEdd. This fraction is the same for type 1 and type 2 AGN. (7) The BPT position is unaffected by the amount of dust extinction of the optical-UV continuum, which suggests that the extincting dust resides on scales larger than the NLR.

  13. The complete census of optically selected AGNs in the Coma supercluster: the dependence of AGN activity on the local environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Savorgnan, G.; Fumagalli, Mattia

    2011-10-01

    Aims: To investigate the dependence of the occurrence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on local galaxy density, we study the nuclear properties of ~5000 galaxies in the Coma supercluster whose density spans two orders of magnitude from the sparse filaments to the cores of rich clusters. Methods: We obtained optical spectra of the nuclei of 283 galaxies using the 1.5 m Cassini telescope of Bologna observatory. Among these galaxies, 177 belong to the Coma supercluster and are added to the 4785 spectra available from SDSS (DR7) to fill-in the incomplete coverage by SDSS of luminous galaxies. We perform a spectral classification of the nuclei of galaxies in this region (with a completeness of 98% at r ≤ 17.77), classifying the nuclear spectra in six classes: three of them (SEY, sAGN, LIN) refer to AGNs and the remaining three (HII, RET, PAS) refer to different stages of starburst activity. We perform this classification as recommended by Cid Fernandes and collaborators using the ratio of λ 6584 [NII] to Hα lines and the equivalent width of Hα (WHAN diagnostic), after correcting the last quantity by 1.3 Å for underlying absorption. Results: We find that 482 (10%) of 5027 galaxies host an AGN: their frequency strongly increases with increasing luminosity of the parent galaxies, such that 32% of galaxies with Log(Li/L⊙) ≥ 10.2 harbor an AGN at their interior. In addition to their presence in luminous galaxies, AGNs are also found in red galaxies with ⟨g - i⟩ ≃ 1.15 ± 0.15 mag. The majority of SEY and sAGN (strong AGNs) are associated with luminous late-type (or S0a) galaxies, while LIN (weak AGNs) and RET ("retired": nuclei that have experienced a starburst phase in the past and are now ionized by their hot evolved low-mass stars), are mostly found among E/S0as. The number density of AGNs, HII region-like, and retired galaxies is found to anti-correlate with the local density of galaxies, such that their frequency drops by a factor of two near the cluster

  14. PRIMUS: The Dependence of AGN Accretion on Host Stellar Mass and Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, James; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Burles, Scott M.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2012-02-01

    We present evidence that the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the distribution of their accretion rates do not depend on the stellar masses of their host galaxies, contrary to previous studies. We use hard (2-10 keV) X-ray data from three extragalactic fields (XMM-LSS, COSMOS, and ELAIS-S1) with redshifts from the Prism Multi-object Survey to identify 242 AGNs with L 2-10 keV = 1042-44 erg s-1 within a parent sample of ~25,000 galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 over ~3.4 deg2 and to i ~ 23. We find that although the fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN at fixed X-ray luminosity rises strongly with stellar mass, the distribution of X-ray luminosities is independent of mass. Furthermore, we show that the probability that a galaxy will host an AGN can be defined by a universal Eddington ratio distribution that is independent of the host galaxy stellar mass and has a power-law shape with slope -0.65. These results demonstrate that AGNs are prevalent at all stellar masses in the range 9.5 and that the same physical processes regulate AGN activity in all galaxies in this stellar mass range. While a higher AGN fraction may be observed in massive galaxies, this is a selection effect related to the underlying Eddington ratio distribution. We also find that the AGN fraction drops rapidly between z ~ 1 and the present day and is moderately enhanced (factor ~2) in galaxies with blue or green optical colors. Consequently, while AGN activity and star formation appear to be globally correlated, we do not find evidence that the presence of an AGN is related to the quenching of star formation or the color transformation of galaxies.

  15. The Average 0.5-200 keV Spectrum of AGNs at 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2013-04-01

    The X-ray spectra of AGNs span nearly three decades in energy and are comprised of many separate components: a power-law with a high energy cutoff, reflection from the accretion disk as well as distant material, and, in many cases, a soft excess. Aside from a small number of bright sources observed with BeppoSAX, the full energy range of AGN spectra has only been studied in piecemeal by a fleet of X-ray observatories that can only focus on a small part of the entire spectrum. Therefore, while catalogues of the spectral properties of hundreds of AGNs have been published in different energy bands, these results are isolated from one another and a clear picture of the broadband spectral properties of typical AGNs remains elusive. In this work, we make use of the 0 X-ray luminosity functions of AGNs in the 0.5-2 keV, 2-10 keV, 3-20 keV, 15-55 keV and 14-195 keV bands to construct the spectral model of an average AGN that can simultaneously account for all 5 luminosity functions. Enhanced iron abundances, disk reflection, and the presence or absence of the X-ray Baldwin Effect are considered, along with the traditional parameters of photon index and cutoff energy. Applications to X-ray background modelling and AGN physics are discussed.

  16. The X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei in the redshift interval z=3-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Buchner, J.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Brandt, W. N.; McGreer, I. D.; Dwelly, T.; Mountrichas, G.; Koki, C.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hsu, L.-T.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Nandra, K.; Ross, N. P.

    2015-10-01

    We combine deep X-ray survey data from the Chandra observatory and the wide-area/shallow XMM-XXL field to estimate the active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function in the redshift range z = 3-5. The sample consists of nearly 340 sources with either photometric (212) or spectroscopic (128) redshift in the above range. The combination of deep and shallow survey fields also provides a luminosity baseline of three orders of magnitude, LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1043-1046 erg s- 1 at z > 3. We follow a Bayesian approach to determine the binned AGN space density and explore their evolution in a model-independent way. Our methodology properly accounts for Poisson errors in the determination of X-ray fluxes and uncertainties in photometric redshift estimates. We demonstrate that the latter is essential for unbiased measurement of space densities. We find that the AGN X-ray luminosity function evolves strongly between the redshift intervals z = 3-4 and z = 4-5. There is also suggestive evidence that the amplitude of this evolution is luminosity dependent. The space density of AGN with LX(2-10 keV) < 1045 erg s- 1 drops by a factor of 5 between the redshift intervals above, while the evolution of brighter AGN appears to be milder. Comparison of our X-ray luminosity function with that of ultraviolet (UV)/optical selected quasi-stellar objects at similar redshifts shows broad agreement at bright luminosities, LX(2-10 keV) > 1045 erg s- 1. At fainter luminosities X-ray surveys measure higher AGN space densities. The faint-end slope of UV/optical luminosity functions, however, is steeper than for X-ray selected AGN. This implies that the Type I AGN fraction increases with decreasing luminosity at z > 3, opposite to trends established at lower redshift. We also assess the significance of AGN in keeping the hydrogen ionized at high redshift. Our X-ray luminosity function yields ionizing photon rate densities that are insufficient to keep the Universe ionized at redshift z > 4. A

  17. A Meeting on the AGN/Galaxy Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1999-01-01

    This grant was used for travel support of several junior astronomers to attend the meeting "The Actice Galactic Nuclei (AGN)/Normal Galaxy Connection", Session El.2 of the 32nd COSPAR Assembly held in Nagoya, Japan, 12-19 July 1998. This meeting included the contributions from both theoretical and observational astronomers to the following fundamental questions: What causes the activity in galaxies? What is the difference between normal and active galaxies? Which processes are responsible for fueling the AGN? Do all galaxies have central Black Holes? What is the difference between low and high luminosity AGN? The observational papers discussed themes like: the detection of the black hole at the nucleus of our Galaxy, as well as in other galaxies; results from surveys of AGN in local galaxies, the source of their activity and their cold gas content; the observations of quasar host galaxies; the properties of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies. These papers used data from ground based observatories and several space missions (e.g. ASCA, ROSAT, HST, ISO) in wavebands from radio through gamma-rays. The theoretical papers discussed issues like: mechanisms to fuel the AGN; the physics of the accretion process; the formation of black-holes, quasars and their jets.

  18. Characterization of bolometric light detectors for rare event searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cardani, L.; Dafinei, I.; Di Domizio, S.; Ferroni, F.; Gironi, L.; Nagorny, S.; Orio, F.; Pattavina, L.; Pessina, G.; Piperno, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Rusconi, C.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2013-07-01

    Bolometers have proven to be very good detectors to search for rare processes thanks to their excellent energy resolution and their low intrinsic background. Further active background rejection can be obtained by the simultaneous readout of the heat and light signals produced by particles interacting in scintillating bolometers, as proposed by the LUCIFER experiment. In this framework, the choice of the light detector and the optimization of its working conditions play a crucial role. In this paper, we report a study of the performances of a Germanium bolometric light detector in terms of signal amplitude, energy resolution and signal time development. The impact of various operational parameters on the detector performances is discussed.

  19. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-08-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  20. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  1. Detecting AGNs using multi-filter imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiaoyi

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this research project was to develop and test a technique to detect active galactic nuclei, AGNs, using high quality, multi-filter imaging data alone. In order to perform a physically meaningful aperture photometric measurement, we have adapted an image manipulation method - shapelets. shapelets can remove the Point Spread Function (PSF) from an image without the traditional deconvolution in Fourier space. It can therefore be used to adjust the image PSF, i.e., to sharpen the PSF and to make each filter's PSF have the same full width at half maximum (FWHM). shapelets is realized by an IDL based package SHAPELETS, originally designed for studying weak gravitational lensing, and adjusted to suit our application. The primary data we used were selected from the CFHT Legacy Survey Wide Survey field W4. The sample included 6670 galaxies, with u magnitudes ≤ +22 mag, and inclinations ≤ 60°. We applied shapelets to each galaxy for each filter. The result was a shapelets reconstructed image with a 2-D Gaussian PSF with FWHM=3 pixels. We then made relevant photometric measurements on the reconstructed image. In order to calculate distance-dependent parameters such as the galaxy luminosity, we estimated the photometric redshift using an artificial neural network (ANN) with a root mean square (RMS) of 0.025. We designed another neural net to classify the galaxy morphological type based on its photometric properties. The classification was based on Nair and Abraham (2010), and has an accuracy < 2T types. Because galaxy colours alone cannot be used to distinguish AGNs from "normal" galaxies, we also designed a neural net to separate AGN, "normal" , and starforming/starburst galaxies. The accuracy of this classification technique is about 75%. Because our method relies largely on the spatial resolution of the data, we limited our analysis to z ≤ 0.1. The sample contained 1570 galaxies, and we detected 178 AGNs (11.3%), 176 "normal" (11.2%), and 1216

  2. THE OPTX PROJECT. IV. HOW RELIABLE IS [O III] AS A MEASURE OF AGN ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Trouille, L.; Barger, A. J.

    2010-10-10

    We compare optical and hard X-ray identifications of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using a uniformly selected (above a flux limit of f{sub 2-8{sub keV}} = 3.5 x 10{sup -15} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and highly optically spectroscopically complete (>80% for f{sub 2-8{sub keV}} > 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and >60% below) 2-8 keV sample observed in three Chandra fields (CLANS, CLASXS, and the CDF-N). We find that empirical emission-line ratio diagnostic diagrams misidentify 50% of the X-ray-selected AGNs that can be put on these diagrams as star formers. We confirm that there is a large (two orders of magnitude) dispersion in the ratio of the [O III]{lambda}5007 (hereafter [O III]) to hard X-ray luminosities for the non-broad-line AGNs, even after applying reddening corrections to the [O III] luminosities. We find that the dispersion is similar for the broad-line AGNs, where there is not expected to be much X-ray absorption from an obscuring torus around the AGN nor much obscuration from the galaxy along the line of sight if the AGN is aligned with the galaxy. We postulate that the X-ray-selected AGNs that are misidentified by the diagnostic diagrams have low [O III] luminosities due to the complexity of the structure of the narrow-line region, which causes many ionizing photons from the AGN not to be absorbed. This would mean that the [O III] luminosity can only be used to predict the X-ray luminosity to within a factor of {approx}3 (1{sigma}). Despite selection effects, we show that the shapes and normalizations of the [O III] and transformed hard X-ray luminosity functions show reasonable agreement, suggesting that the [O III] samples are not finding substantially more AGNs at low redshifts than hard X-ray samples.

  3. Bolometric Interferometry for Cosmic Microwave Background Polariztion Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malu, Siddharth

    2009-05-01

    CMB studies are now a data-rich field in astrophysics. The power spectrum of CMB is well measured and cosmological models have been characterized and polarization has been detected in the CMB. All results fit well within and are explained well by the inflationary paradigm. But current evidence for inflation is indirect. The next generation of CMB experiments will aim at providing the most direct evidence for inflation through the detection of B-modes in CMB polarization. Despite improvements in experimental techniques, it is as yet unclear what configuration and approach a CMB polarization experiment should adopt, in view of lack of information about polarization foregrounds and instrument systematic effects. We describe a novel approach to these measurements, called bolometric interferometry, which avoids many of the systematic errors found in imaging systems. In particular, we describe a prototype, the Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI). We present a few promising approaches from our collaboration (BRAIN/MBI) and discuss plans for feasibility studies for detecting CMB polarization foregrounds and signals with adding interferometers.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ASCA AGN optical identifications (Akiyama+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, M.; Ueda, Y.; Ohta, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yamada, T.

    2003-10-01

    We present the results of optical spectroscopic identifications of a bright subsample of 2-10keV hard X-ray-selected sources from the ASCA Medium Sensitivity Survey in the northern sky (AMSSn). The flux limit of the subsample is 3x10-13erg/s/cm2 in the 2-10keV band. All but one of the 87 hard X-ray-selected sources are optically identified, with AGNs (including broad-line AGNs, narrow-line AGNs, and three BL Lac objects), seven clusters of galaxies, and one galactic star. It is the largest complete sample of hard X-ray-selected AGNs at the bright flux limit. Amounts of absorption to their nuclei are estimated to be hydrogen column densities (NH) of up to 3x1023cm-2 from their X-ray spectra. Optical properties of X-ray absorbed AGNs with NH>1x1022cm-2 indicate the effects of dust absorption: at redshifts z<0.6, AGNs without broad H{beta} emission lines have significantly larger NH-values than AGNs with broad H{beta} emission lines. At z>0.6, the X-ray absorbed AGNs have a large hard X-ray to optical flux ratio (logf2-10keV/fR>+1). However, three X-ray absorbed z>0.6 AGNs show strong broad lines. In combination with hard X-ray-selected AGN samples from the ASCA Large Sky Survey, the ASCA Deep Survey in the Lockman Hole, and Chandra Deep Field North, the luminosity distributions of absorbed (NH>1x1022cm-2) and less-absorbed (NH<1x1022cm-2) AGNs are compared. (4 data files).

  5. Are Compton-thick AGNs the Missing Link between Mergers and Black Hole Growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Brightman, Murray; Nandra, Kirpal; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salvato, Mara; Aird, James; Bell, Eric F.; Hsu, Li-Ting; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Koo, David C.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Mozena, Mark; Rosario, David; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2015-12-01

    We examine the host morphologies of heavily obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z∼ 1 to test whether obscured super-massive black hole growth at this epoch is preferentially linked to galaxy mergers. Our sample consists of 154 obscured AGNs with {N}{{H}}\\gt {10}23.5 {{cm}}-2 and z\\lt 1.5. Using visual classifications, we compare the morphologies of these AGNs to control samples of moderately obscured (1022 cm{}-2\\lt {N}{{H}}\\lt {10}23.5 {{cm}}-2) and unobscured ({N}{{H}}\\lt {10}22 {{cm}}-2) AGN. These control AGNs have similar redshifts and intrinsic X-ray luminosities to our heavily obscured AGN. We find that heavily obscured AGNs are twice as likely to be hosted by late-type galaxies relative to unobscured AGNs ({65.3}-4.6+4.1% versus {34.5}-2.7+2.9%) and three times as likely to exhibit merger or interaction signatures ({21.5}-3.3+4.2% versus {7.8}-1.3+1.9%). The increased merger fraction is significant at the 3.8σ level. If we exclude all point sources and consider only extended hosts, we find that the correlation between the merger fraction and obscuration is still evident, although at a reduced statistical significance (2.5σ ). The fact that we observe a different disk/spheroid fraction versus obscuration indicates that the viewing angle cannot be the only thing differentiating our three AGN samples, as a simple unification model would suggest. The increased fraction of disturbed morphologies with obscuration supports an evolutionary scenario, in which Compton-thick AGNs are a distinct phase of obscured super-massive black hole (SMBH) growth following a merger/interaction event. Our findings also suggest that some of the merger-triggered SMBH growth predicted by recent AGN fueling models may be hidden among the heavily obscured, Compton-thick population.

  6. AGN and QSOs in the eROSITA All-Sky Survey. II. The large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-10-01

    The four-year X-ray all-sky survey (eRASS) of the eROSITA telescope aboard the Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite will detect about 3 million active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a median redshift of z ≈ 1 and a typical luminosity of L0.5-2.0 keV ~ 1044 ergs-1. We show that this unprecedented AGN sample, complemented with redshift information, will supply us with outstanding opportunities for large-scale structure research. For the first time, detailed redshift- and luminosity-resolved studies of the bias factor for X-ray selected AGN will become possible. The eRASS AGN sample will not only improve the redshift- and luminosity resolution of these studies, but will also expand their luminosity range beyond L0.5-2.0 keV ~ 1044 ergs-1, thus enabling a direct comparison of the clustering properties of luminous X-ray AGN and optical quasars. These studies will dramatically improve our understanding of the AGN environment, triggering mechanisms, the growth of supermassive black holes and their co-evolution with dark matter halos. The eRASS AGN sample will become a powerful cosmological probe. It will enable detecting baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) for the first time with X-ray selected AGN. With the data from the entire extragalactic sky, BAO will be detected at a ≳10σ confidence level in the full redshift range and with ~8σ confidence in the 0.8 < z < 2.0 range, which is currently not covered by any existing BAO surveys. To exploit the full potential of the eRASS AGN sample, photometric and spectroscopic surveys of large areas and a sufficient depth will be needed.

  7. AGN Clustering in the Local Universe: An Unbiased Picture from Swift-BAT

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelluti, N.; Ajello, M.; Burlon, D.; Krumpe, M.; Miyaji, T.; Bonoli, S.; Greiner, J.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2011-08-11

    We present the clustering measurement of hard X-ray selected AGN in the local Universe. We used a sample of 199 sources spectroscopically confirmed detected by Swift-BAT in its 15-55 keV all-sky survey. We measured the real space projected auto-correlation function and detected a signal significant on projected scales lower than 200 Mpc/h. We measured a correlation length of r{sub 0} = 5.56{sup +0.49}{sub -0.43} Mpc/h and a slope {gamma} = 1.64{sup -0.08}{sub -0.07}. We also measured the auto-correlation function of Tyep I and Type II AGN and found higher correlation length for Type I AGN. We have a marginal evidence of luminosity dependent clustering of AGN, as we detected a larger correlation length of luminous AGN than that of low luminosity sources. The corresponding typical host DM halo masses of Swift-BAT are {approx} log(M{sub DMH) {approx} 12-14 h{sup -1}M/M{sub {circle_dot}} which is the typical mass of a galaxy group. We estimated that the local AGN population has a typical lifetime {tau}{sub AGN} {approx}0.7 Gyr, it is powered by SMBH with mass M{sub BH} {approx}1-10x10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}} and accreting with very low efficiency, log({epsilon}){approx}-2.0>. We also conclude that local AGN galaxies are typically red-massive galaxies with stellar mass of the order 2-80x10{sup 10} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}. We compared our results with clustering predictions of merger-driven AGN triggering models and found a good agreement.

  8. Constraining AGN triggering mechanisms through the clustering analysis of active black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, M.; Shankar, F.; Bouillot, V.; Menci, N.; Lamastra, A.; Hirschmann, M.; Fiore, F.

    2016-02-01

    The triggering mechanisms for active galactic nuclei (AGN) are still debated. Some of the most popular ones include galaxy interactions (IT) and disc instabilities (DIs). Using an advanced semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation, coupled to accurate halo occupation distribution modelling, we investigate the imprint left by each separate triggering process on the clustering strength of AGN at small and large scales. Our main results are as follows: (i) DIs, irrespective of their exact implementation in the SAM, tend to fall short in triggering AGN activity in galaxies at the centre of haloes with Mh > 1013.5 h-1 M⊙. On the contrary, the IT scenario predicts abundance of active central galaxies that generally agrees well with observations at every halo mass. (ii) The relative number of satellite AGN in DIs at intermediate-to-low luminosities is always significantly higher than in IT models, especially in groups and clusters. The low AGN satellite fraction predicted for the IT scenario might suggest that different feeding modes could simultaneously contribute to the triggering of satellite AGN. (iii) Both scenarios are quite degenerate in matching large-scale clustering measurements, suggesting that the sole average bias might not be an effective observational constraint. (iv) Our analysis suggests the presence of both a mild luminosity and a more consistent redshift dependence in the AGN clustering, with AGN inhabiting progressively less massive dark matter haloes as the redshift increases. We also discuss the impact of different observational selection cuts in measuring AGN clustering, including possible discrepancies between optical and X-ray surveys.

  9. The evolution of AGN's at x ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, Tommaso; Dellaceca, R.; Gioia, I. M.; Stocke, J. T.; Wolter, A.

    1992-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the Luminosity Function (LF) of x-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are discussed. The sample used is extracted from the Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) and consists of more than 420 objects. Preliminary results from the Rosat all sky survey data confirm the correctness of the optical identification of the EMSS sources, thus giving confidence to the results obtained from the analysis of the AGN sample. The XLF observed at different redshifts gives direct evidence of cosmological evolution. Data were analyzed within the framework of luminosity evolution models and the two most common evolutionary forms were considered. Luminosity dependent evolution is required if the evolution function has the exponential form, whereas the simpler pure luminosity evolution model is still acceptable if the evolution function has the power law form. Using the whole sample of objects the number counts and the devolved XLF were derived. A comparison of the EMSS Data with preliminary Rosat results indicates an overall agreement.

  10. Mass-luminosity relation of low mass stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O. Yu.; Piskunov, A. E.; Shpil'Kina, D. A.

    1997-04-01

    The data on dynamic masses and multicolor photometry of 56 M-type components of binary/multiple systems was collected. Critical evaluation of late type stars bolometric correction scales have been performed. Our refined and reduced data is compared with published empirical and theoretical mass-luminosity relations. Our data does not exclude the existence of a step-like feature at M_V_=12mag. The best agreement between observations and theoretical models is found for recent calculations of D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1994ApJS...90..467D) with Alexander opacities. We conclude that present-day knowledge of the mass-luminosity relation at faintest magnitudes is not sufficient for making definite conclusions on the initial mass function of low mass stars.

  11. Compton thick AGN in the XMM-COSMOS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Ranalli, P.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Georgakakis, A.; Delvecchio, I.; Akylas, T.; Berta, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Hasinger, G.; Iwasawa, K.; Koekemoer, A.; Lusso, E.; Marchesi, S.; Mainieri, V.; Merloni, A.; Mignoli, M.; Piconcelli, E.; Pozzi, F.; Rosario, D. J.; Salvato, M.; Silverman, J.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-01-01

    Heavily obscured, Compton thick (CT, NH> 1024 cm-2) active galactic nuclei (AGN) may represent an important phase in AGN/galaxy co-evolution and are expected to provide a significant contribution to the cosmic X-ray background at its peak. However, unambiguously identifying CT AGN beyond the local Universe is a challenging task even in the deepest X-ray surveys, and given the expected low spatial density of these sources in the 2-10 keV band, large area surveys are needed to collect sizable samples. Through direct X-ray spectra analysis, we selected 39 heavily obscured AGN (NH>3 × 1023 cm-2) at bright X-ray fluxes (F2-10 ≳ 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2) in the 2 deg2 XMM-COSMOS survey. After selecting CT AGN based on the fit of a simple absorbed two power law model to the shallow XMM-Newton data, the presence of bona fide CT AGN was confirmed in 80% of the sources using deeper Chandra data and more complex models. The final sample comprises ten CT AGN (six of them also have a detected Fe Kα line with EW ~ 1 keV), spanning a wide range of redshifts (z ~ 0.1-2.5) and luminosity (L2-10 ~ 1043.5-1045 erg s-1) and is complemented by 29 heavily obscured AGN spanning the same redshift and luminosity range. We collected the rich multi-wavelength information available for all these sources, in order to study the distribution of super massive black hole and host properties, such as black hole mass (MBH), Eddington ratio (λEdd), stellar mass (M∗), specific star formation rate (sSFR) in comparison with a sample of unobscured AGN. We find that highly obscured sources tend to have significantly smaller MBH and higher λEdd with respect to unobscured sources, while a weaker evolution in M∗ is observed. The sSFR of highly obscured sources is consistent with the one observed in the main sequence of star forming galaxies, at all redshifts. We also present and briefly discuss optical spectra, broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) and morphology for the sample of ten CT AGN. Both

  12. Extending the Fermi - Swift Joint AGN Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, Chris R.; Macomb, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Swift BAT and the Fermi LAT each provide excellent sky coverage and have led to impressive compilations of extragalactic source catalogs. For the most part they sample separate AGN subpopulations - Swift the lower-luminosity and relatively nearby Seyfert galaxies while the Fermi sample is dominated by blazars and does not include any radio-quiet objects. The overlap between these samples is among the radio-loud subset of the Swift sample as has been discussed elsewhere in the literature. The observable properties at these two bands - flux and spectral indices - are not expected to be well correlated as they sample different portions of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) spectral energy distribution. In this contribution we consider an extension of the high-latitude Swift sample by relaxing the significance cut to less than 5 standard deviations and consider the overlap of that subsample with the Fermi AGN catalog. While such a threshold is generally inadvisable as it introduces the strong possibility of spurious detections, the objects of the overlapping sample which are detected at high significance in Fermi can be considered as reasonably high-confidence Swift detections. For example, there are 190 Swift sub-5-sigma Swift sources that have significance >2-sigma with Fermi counterparts, whereas we predict only ~5 due to statistical fluctuation. We also investigate any coincident INTEGRAL/IBIS observations to further bolster or diminish candidate Swift detections. We present our correlation analyses and offer interpretation in the context of the blazar sequence.

  13. The connection between AGN-driven dusty outflows and the surrounding environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, W.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Significant reservoirs of cool gas are observed in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding galaxies. The CGM is also found to contain substantial amounts of metals and dust, which require some transport mechanism. We consider AGN (active galactic nucleus) feedback-driven outflows based on radiation pressure on dust. Dusty gas is ejected when the central luminosity exceeds the effective Eddington luminosity for dust. We obtain that a higher dust-to-gas ratio leads to a lower critical luminosity, implying that the more dusty gas is more easily expelled. Dusty outflows can reach large radii with a range of velocities (depending on the outflowing shell configuration and the ambient density distribution) and may account for the observed CGM gas. In our picture, dust is required in order to drive AGN feedback, and the preferential expulsion of dusty gas in the outflows may naturally explain the presence of dust in the CGM. On the other hand, the most powerful AGN outflow events can potentially drive gas out of the local galaxy group. We further discuss the effects of radiation pressure of the central AGN on satellite galaxies. AGN radiative feedback may therefore have a significant impact on the evolution of the whole surrounding environment.

  14. Luminosity and redshift dependence of the covering factor of active galactic nuclei viewed with WISE and Sloan digital sky survey

    SciTech Connect

    Toba, Y.; Matsuhara, H.; Oyabu, S.; Malkan, M. A.; Gandhi, P.; Nakagawa, T.; Isobe, N.; Shirahata, M.; Oi, N.; Takita, S.; Yano, K.; Ohyama, Y.; Yamauchi, C.

    2014-06-10

    In this work, we investigate the dependence of the covering factor (CF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on the mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity and the redshift. We constructed 12 and 22 μm luminosity functions (LFs) at 0.006 ≤z ≤ 0.3 using Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. Combining the WISE catalog with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic data, we selected 223,982 galaxies at 12 μm and 25,721 galaxies at 22 μm for spectroscopic classification. We then identified 16,355 AGNs at 12 μm and 4683 AGNs at 22 μm by their optical emission lines and cataloged classifications in the SDSS. Following that, we estimated the CF as the fraction of Type 2 AGN in all AGNs whose MIR emissions are dominated by the active nucleus (not their host galaxies) based on their MIR colors. We found that the CF decreased with increasing MIR luminosity, regardless of the choice of Type 2 AGN classification criteria, and the CF did not change significantly with redshift for z ≤ 0.2. Furthermore, we carried out various tests to determine the influence of selection bias and confirmed that similar dependences exist, even when taking these uncertainties into account. The luminosity dependence of the CF can be explained by the receding torus model, but the 'modified' receding torus model gives a slightly better fit, as suggested by Simpson.

  15. The hard X-ray luminosity function of high-redshift (3 < z ≲ 5) active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Iwasawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (HXLF) of 0.5-2 keV band selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshift. We have assembled a sample of 141 AGN at 3 < z ≲ 5 from X-ray surveys of different size and depth, in order to sample different regions in the LX - z plane. The HXLF is fitted in the range log LX ˜ 43-45 with standard analytical evolutionary models through a maximum likelihood procedure. The evolution of the HXLF is well described by a pure density evolution, with the AGN space density declining by a factor of ˜10 from z = 3 to 5. A luminosity-dependent density evolution model, which, normally, best represents the HXLF evolution at lower redshift, is also consistent with the data, but a larger sample of low-luminosity (log LX < 44), high-redshift AGN is necessary to constrain this model. We also estimated the intrinsic fraction of AGN obscured by a column density log NH ≥ 23 to be 0.54 ± 0.05, with no strong dependence on luminosity. This fraction is higher than the value in the Local Universe, suggesting an evolution of the luminous (LX > 1044 erg s-1) obscured AGN fraction from z = 0 to z > 3.

  16. Models of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Françcoise

    2015-02-01

    The physical processes responsible of sweeping up the surrounding gas in the host galaxy of an AGN, and able in some circumstances to expel it from the galaxy, are not yet well known. The various mechanisms are briefly reviewed: quasar or radio modes, either momentum-conserving outflows, energy-conserving outflows, or intermediate. They are confronted to observations, to know whether they can explain the M-sigma relation, quench the star formation or whether they can also provide some positive feedback and how the black hole accretion history is related to that of star formation.

  17. The most obscured AGN in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Perna, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pozzi, F.; Vietri, G.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-06-01

    Highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN) are common in nearby galaxies, but are difficult to observe beyond the local Universe, where they are expected to significantly contribute to the black hole accretion rate density. Furthermore, Compton-thick (CT) absorbers (NH ≳ 1024 cm-2) suppress even the hard X-ray (2-10 keV) AGN nuclear emission, and therefore the column density distribution above 1024 cm-2 is largely unknown. We present the identification and multi-wavelength properties of a heavily obscured (NH ≳ 1025 cm-2), intrinsically luminous (L2-10 > 1044 erg s-1) AGN at z = 0.353 in the COSMOS field. Several independent indicators, such as the shape of the X-ray spectrum, the decomposition of the spectral energy distribution and X-ray/[NeV] and X-ray/6 μm luminosity ratios, agree on the fact that the nuclear emission must be suppressed by a ≳1025 cm-2 column density. The host galaxy properties show that this highly obscured AGN is hosted in a massive star-forming galaxy, showing a barred morphology, which is known to correlate with the presence of CT absorbers. Finally, asymmetric and blueshifted components in several optical high-ionization emission lines indicate the presence of a galactic outflow, possibly driven by the intense AGN activity (LBol/LEdd = 0.3-0.5). Such highly obscured, highly accreting AGN are intrinsically very rare at low redshift, whereas they are expected to be much more common at the peak of the star formation and BH accretion history, at z ~ 2-3. We demonstrate that a fully multi-wavelength approach can recover a sizable sample of such peculiar sources in large and deep surveys such as COSMOS.

  18. Enhanced star formation rates in AGN hosts with respect to inactive galaxies from PEP-Herschel observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, P.; Rosario, D. J.; Shao, L.; Lutz, D.; Maiolino, R.; Alexander, D. M.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Bauer, F. E.; Berta, S.; Bongiovanni, A.; Brandt, W. N.; Brusa, M.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D.; Fontana, A.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Grazian, A.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Mainieri, V.; Nordon, R.; Pérez Garcia, A. M.; Poglitsch, A.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Salvato, M.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Wuyts, S.

    2012-04-01

    We compare the average star formation (SF) activity in X-ray selected AGN hosts with a mass-matched control sample of inactive galaxies, including both star forming and quiescent sources, in the 0.5 < z < 2.5 redshift range. Recent observations carried out by PACS, the 60-210 μm photometric camera on board the Herschel Space Observatory, in GOODS-S, GOODS-N and COSMOS allow us to obtain an unbiased estimate of the far-IR luminosity, and hence of the SF properties, of the two samples. Accurate AGN host stellar mass estimates are obtained by decomposing their total emission into the stellar and the nuclear components. We report evidence of a higher average SF activity in AGN hosts with respect to the control sample of inactive galaxies. The level of SF enhancement is modest (~0.26 dex at ~3σ confidence level) at low X-ray luminosities (LX ≲ 1043.5 erg s-1) and more pronounced (0.56 dex at > 10σ confidence level) in the hosts of luminous AGNs. However, when comparing to star forming galaxies only, AGN hosts are found broadly consistent with the locus of their "main sequence". We investigate the relative far-IR luminosity distributions of active and inactive galaxies, and find a higher fraction of PACS detected, hence normal and highly star forming systems among AGN hosts. Although different interpretations are possible, we explain our findings as a consequence of a twofold AGN growth path: faint AGNs evolve through secular processes, with instantaneous AGNaccretion not tightly linked to the current total SF in the host galaxy, while the luminous AGNs co-evolve with their hosts through periods of enhanced AGN activity and star formation, possibly through major mergers. While an increased SF activity with respect to inactive galaxies of similar mass is expected in the latter, we interpret the modest SF offsets measured in low-LX AGN hosts as either a) generated by non-synchronous accretion and SF histories in a merger scenario or b) due to possible connections

  19. RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS: IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN LUMINOSITY AND CLUSTER ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Ineson, J.; Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kraft, R. P.; Evans, D. A.

    2013-06-20

    We present here the first results from the Chandra ERA (Environments of Radio-loud AGN) Large Project, characterizing the cluster environments of a sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z {approx} 0.5 that covers three decades of radio luminosity. This is the first systematic X-ray environmental study at a single epoch, and has allowed us to examine the relationship between radio luminosity and cluster environment without the problems of Malmquist bias. We have found a weak correlation between radio luminosity and host cluster X-ray luminosity, as well as tentative evidence that this correlation is driven by the subpopulation of low-excitation radio galaxies, with high-excitation radio galaxies showing no significant correlation. The considerable scatter in the environments may be indicative of complex relationships not currently included in feedback models.

  20. Obscured accretion from AGN surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignali, Cristian

    2014-07-01

    Recent models of super-massive black hole (SMBH) and host galaxy joint evolution predict the presence of a key phase where accretion, traced by obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) emission, is coupled with powerful star formation. Then feedback processes likely self-regulate the SMBH growth and quench the star-formation activity. AGN in this important evolutionary phase have been revealed in the last decade via surveys at different wavelengths. On the one hand, moderate-to-deep X-ray surveys have allowed a systematic search for heavily obscured AGN, up to very high redshifts (z~5). On the other hand, infrared/optical surveys have been invaluable in offering complementary methods to select obscured AGN also in cases where the nuclear X-ray emission below 10 keV is largely hidden to our view. In this review I will present my personal perspective of the field of obscured accretion from AGN surveys.

  1. Transition edge sensors for bolometric applications: responsivity and saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldie, D. J.; Audley, M. D.; Glowacka, D. M.; Tsaneva, V. N.; Withington, S.

    2008-04-15

    Microstrip-coupled transition edge sensors (TESs) combined with waveguide-horn technology produce sensitive bolometric detectors with well-defined, single-mode beam patterns and excellent polarization characteristics. These devices are now being deployed for astronomical observations. In bolometric applications, where power levels are monitored, the critical parameter that characterizes the detection is the power-to-current responsivity s{sub I}({omega}), where {omega} is the postdetection angular frequency. In real applications, such as on a ground-based telescope, the signal of interest is superimposed on a background such as the thermal emission from the atmosphere. The power emitted by the atmosphere changes slowly in time and these changes may change the responsivity of the detector. A detailed understanding of how s{sub I}({omega}) changes as a function of applied power levels and how the TES response saturates is vital for accurate calibration of astronomical data. In this paper we describe measurements of the changes in the current flowing through a TES as a function of the circuit bias and the applied power. From these measurements we calculate the efficiency of the coupling of power into the TES from a closely thermally coupled microstrip termination resistor and we determine the zero frequency responsivity s{sub I}(0) as a function of both the circuit bias and power. The variation of the responsivity is compared with predictions of a small-signal model: for the case when the loop gain L{sub I} is high, when simplifying approximations to the full solution to the electrothermal equations apply; and using the electrothermal parameters of the TES, determined by impedance measurements, as inputs to the full model solution. We find good agreement between theory and measurement in both cases in the relevant regimes.

  2. Run II luminosity progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gollwitzer, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron Collider Run II program continues at the energy and luminosity frontier of high energy particle physics. To the collider experiments CDF and D0, over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity has been delivered to each. Upgrades and improvements in the Antiproton Source of the production and collection of antiprotons have led to increased number of particles stored in the Recycler. Electron cooling and associated improvements have help make a brighter antiproton beam at collisions. Tevatron improvements to handle the increased number of particles and the beam lifetimes have resulted in an increase in luminosity.

  3. Starburst or AGN Dominance in Submillimetre-Luminous Candidate AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppin, Kristen; Pope, Alexandra; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Alexander, David M.; Dunlop, James

    2010-06-01

    It is widely believed that ultraluminous infrared (IR) galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity are triggered by galaxy interactions and merging, with the peak of activity occurring at z~2, where submillimetre galaxies are thousands of times more numerous than local ULIRGs. In this evolutionary picture, submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) would host an AGN, which would eventually grow a black hole (BH) strong enough to blow off all of the gas and dust leaving an optically luminous QSO. To probe this evolutionary sequence we have focussed on the `missing link' sources, which demonstrate both strong starburst (SB) and AGN signatures, in order to determine if the SB is the main power source even in SMGs when we have evidence that an AGN is present from their IRAC colours. The best way to determine if a dominant AGN is present is to look for their signatures in the mid-infrared with the Spitzer IRS, since often even deep X-ray observations miss identifying the presence of AGN in heavily dust-obscured SMGs. We present the results of our audit of the energy balance between star-formation and AGN within this special sub-population of SMGs-where the BH has grown appreciably to begin heating the dust emission.

  4. Prospects for AGN Science using the ART-XC on the SRG Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Bonamente, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    The enhanced hard X-ray sensitivity provided by the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope to the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission facilitates the detection of heavily obscured and other hard-spectrum cosmic X-ray sources. The SRG all-sky survey will obtain large, statistically-well-defined samples of active galactic nuclei (AGN) including a significant population of local heavily-obscured AGN. In anticipation of the SRG all-sky survey, we investigate the prospects for refining the bright end of the AGN luminosity function and determination of the local black hole mass function and comparing the spatial distribution of AGN with large-scale structure defined by galaxy clusters and groups. Particular emphasis is placed on studies of the deep survey Ecliptic Pole regions.

  5. AGN POPULATION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS. I. DATA AND NUCLEAR ACTIVITY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    MartInez, M. A.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Coziol, R. E-mail: chony@iaa.es E-mail: rcoziol@astro.ugto.mx

    2010-03-15

    We have conducted a new spectroscopic survey to characterize the nature of nuclear activity in Hickson compact group (HCG) galaxies and establish its frequency. We have obtained new intermediate-resolution optical spectroscopy for 200 member galaxies and corrected for underlying stellar population contamination using galaxy templates. Spectra for 11 additional galaxies have been acquired from the ESO and 6dF public archives, and emission-line ratios have been taken from the literature for 59 more galaxies. Here we present the results of our classification of the nuclear activity for 270 member galaxies, which belong to a well-defined sample of 64 HCGs. We found a large fraction of galaxies, 63%, with emission lines. Using standard diagnostic diagrams, 45% of the emission-line galaxies were classified as pure active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 23% as Transition Objects (TOs), and 32% as star-forming nuclei (SFNs). In the HCGs, the AGN activity appears as the most frequent activity type. Adopting the interpretation that in TOs a low-luminosity AGN coexists with circumnuclear star formation, the fraction of galaxies with an AGN could rise to 42% of the whole sample. The low frequency (20%) of SFNs confirms that there is no star formation enhancement in HCGs. After extinction correction, we found a median AGN H{alpha} luminosity of 7.1 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}, which implies that AGNs in HCG have a characteristically low luminosity. This result added to the fact that there is an almost complete absence of broad-line AGNs in compact groups (CGs) as found by MartInez et al. and corroborated in this study for HCGs, is consistent with very few gas left in these galaxies. In general, therefore, what may characterize the level of activity in CGs is a severe deficiency of gas.

  6. AGN Population in Hickson Compact Groups. I. Data and Nuclear Activity Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M. A.; Del Olmo, A.; Coziol, R.; Perea, J.

    2010-03-01

    We have conducted a new spectroscopic survey to characterize the nature of nuclear activity in Hickson compact group (HCG) galaxies and establish its frequency. We have obtained new intermediate-resolution optical spectroscopy for 200 member galaxies and corrected for underlying stellar population contamination using galaxy templates. Spectra for 11 additional galaxies have been acquired from the ESO and 6dF public archives, and emission-line ratios have been taken from the literature for 59 more galaxies. Here we present the results of our classification of the nuclear activity for 270 member galaxies, which belong to a well-defined sample of 64 HCGs. We found a large fraction of galaxies, 63%, with emission lines. Using standard diagnostic diagrams, 45% of the emission-line galaxies were classified as pure active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 23% as Transition Objects (TOs), and 32% as star-forming nuclei (SFNs). In the HCGs, the AGN activity appears as the most frequent activity type. Adopting the interpretation that in TOs a low-luminosity AGN coexists with circumnuclear star formation, the fraction of galaxies with an AGN could rise to 42% of the whole sample. The low frequency (20%) of SFNs confirms that there is no star formation enhancement in HCGs. After extinction correction, we found a median AGNluminosity of 7.1 × 1039 erg s-1, which implies that AGNs in HCG have a characteristically low luminosity. This result added to the fact that there is an almost complete absence of broad-line AGNs in compact groups (CGs) as found by Martínez et al. and corroborated in this study for HCGs, is consistent with very few gas left in these galaxies. In general, therefore, what may characterize the level of activity in CGs is a severe deficiency of gas.

  7. Time Series Analysis of the UV Flickering in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Edward L.; Welsh, William F.

    2001-01-01

    Many active galactic nuclei (AGN) exhibit large-amplitude luminosity fluctuations on short timescales. The fluctuations lead to a profound conclusion: The size of the emitting region is remarkably small. This observational fact is one of the pillars supporting the AGN paradigm: Prodigious amounts of gravitational potential energy are liberated in an accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The goals of the research were to extract from the IUE Archive the very best observational characterizations of AGN flickering, and to use these to test and develop models for AGN variability. We hoped to answer these specific questions: 1) What does the intrinsic flickering continuum spectrum look like? 2) What do the intrinsic flickering emission-line profiles look like? 3) What is the power spectrum of the flickering? 4) What is the wavelength dependence of the power spectrum? 5) Is the flickering spectrum timescale dependent? and 6) What do the high-order cross correlation functions look like? A short summary of the papers produced by this research is presented.

  8. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  9. A tale of two feedbacks: Star formation in the host galaxies of radio AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Kim, Ji Hoon; Trichas, Markos; Goto, Tomo; Malkan, Matt; Ruiz, Angel; Lee, Hyung Mok; Kim, Seong Jin; Oi, Nagisa; Matsuhara, Hideo; Takagi, Toshinobu; Murata, K.; Wada, Takehiko; Wada, Kensuke; Shim, Hyunjin; Hanami, Hitoshi; Serjeant, Stephen; White, Glenn J.; and others

    2014-04-01

    Several lines of argument support the existence of a link between activity at the nuclei of galaxies, in the form of an accreting supermassive black hole, and star formation activity in these galaxies. Radio jets have long been argued to be an ideal mechanism that allows active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to interact with their host galaxies and affect star formation. We use a sample of radio sources in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) field to study the nature of this putative link, by means of spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We employ the excellent spectral coverage of the AKARI infrared space telescope and the rich ancillary data available in the NEP to build SEDs extending from UV to far-IR wavelengths. We find a significant AGN component in our sample of relatively faint radio sources (luminosity of the AGN component and that of star formation in the host galaxy, independent of the radio luminosity. In contrast, for narrow redshift and AGN luminosity ranges, we find that increasing radio luminosity leads to a decrease in the specific star formation rate. The most radio-loud AGNs are found to lie on the main sequence of star formation for their respective redshifts. For the first time, we potentially see such a two-sided feedback process in the same sample. We discuss the possible suppression of star formation, but not total quenching, in systems with strong radio jets, that supports the maintenance nature of feedback from radio AGN jets.

  10. On the Star Formation-AGN Connection at zeta (is) approximately greater than 0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, Andrew; Urry, C. Megan

    2013-01-01

    Using the spectra of a sample of approximately 28,000 nearby obscured active galaxies from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we probe the connection between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation over a range of radial scales in the host galaxy. We use the extinction-corrected luminosity of the [O iii] 5007A line as a proxy of intrinsic AGN power and supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion rate. The star formation rates (SFRs) are taken from the MPA-JHU value-added catalog and are measured through the 3 inch SDSS aperture. We construct matched samples of galaxies covering a range in redshifts. With increasing redshift, the projected aperture size encompasses increasing amounts of the host galaxy. This allows us to trace the radial distribution of star formation as a function of AGN luminosity. We find that the star formation becomes more centrally concentrated with increasing AGN luminosity and Eddington ratio. This implies that such circumnuclear star formation is associated with AGN activity, and that it increasingly dominates over omnipresent disk star formation at higher AGN luminosities, placing critical constraints on theoretical models that link host galaxy star formation and SMBH fueling. We parameterize this relationship and find that the star formation on radial scales (is) less than 1.7 kpc, when including a constant disk component, has a sub-linear dependence on SMBH accretion rate: SFR in proportion to solar mass(sup 0.36), suggesting that angular momentum transfer through the disk limits accretion efficiency rather than the supply from stellar mass loss.

  11. FRESH ACTIVITY IN OLD SYSTEMS: RADIO AGNs IN FOSSIL GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Kelley M.; Wilcots, Eric M.; Hartwick, Victoria L. E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu

    2012-08-15

    We present the first systematic 1.4 GHz Very Large Array radio continuum survey of fossil galaxy group candidates. These are virialized systems believed to have assembled over a gigayear in the past through the merging of galaxy group members into a single, isolated, massive elliptical galaxy and featuring an extended hot X-ray halo. We use new photometric and spectroscopic data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to determine that three of the candidates are clearly not fossil groups. Of the remaining 30 candidates, 67% contain a radio-loud (L{sub 1.4GHz} > 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at the center of their dominant elliptical galaxy. We find a weak correlation between the radio luminosity of the AGN and the X-ray luminosity of the halo suggesting that the AGN contributes to energy deposition into the intragroup medium. We only find a correlation between the radio and optical luminosity of the central elliptical galaxy when we include X-ray-selected, elliptically dominated non-fossil groups, indicating a weak relationship between AGN strength and the mass assembly history of the groups. The dominant elliptical galaxy of fossil groups is on average roughly an order of magnitude more luminous than normal group elliptical galaxies in optical, X-ray, and radio luminosities and our findings are consistent with previous results that the radio-loud fraction in elliptical galaxies is linked to the stellar mass of a population. The current level of activity in fossil groups suggests that AGN fueling continues long after the last major merger. We discuss several possibilities for fueling the AGN at the present epoch.

  12. The faintest stars - The luminosity and mass functions at the bottom of the main sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinney, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    We present IR K-band photometry of complete samples of VLM candidates constructed from IIIaF and IVN plates in 10 fields taken as part of the POSSII and UKSRC surveys. Using the I-K colors constructed for these stars we estimate a bolometric luminosity function which extends to M(Bol) = 13.75. We find significant evidence for a luminosity function decreasing toward these luminosities. We also find that our results are consistent with those of studies based on the Nearby Star sample, when those data are presented as a bolometric luminosity function. We convert our observed luminosity function into a mass function, which extends with reasonable statistics to 0.08 solar masses - the H-burning minimum mass. We find significant evidence for features in the mass function at these masses. Specifically, the mass function 'turns over' at 0.25 solar mass, goes through a local minimum at about 0.15 solar mass, and may increase again below 0.1 solar mass - none of these features are predicted by any of the current theories of star formation. Lastly, the mass density we observe just above the H-burning minimum mass makes it difficult to envisage brown dwarfs contributing significant quantities of missing mass without invoking either a mass function in this region significantly steeper than that seen for main-sequence stars, or an extremely low cutoff mass to the mass function.

  13. A Model for Type 2 Coronal Line Forest (CLiF) AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glidden, Ana; Rose, Marvin; Elvis, Martin; McDowell, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    We present a model for the classification of Coronal Line Forest Active Galactic Nuclei (CLiF AGNs). CLiF AGNs are of special interest due to their remarkably large number of emission lines, especially forbidden high-ionization lines (FHILs). Rose et al. suggest that their emission is dominated by reflection from the inner wall of the obscuring region rather than direct emission from the accretion disk. This makes CLiF AGNs laboratories to test AGN-torus models. Modeling an AGN as an accreting supermassive black hole surrounded by a cylinder of dust and gas, we show a relationship between the viewing angle and the revealed area of the inner wall. From the revealed area, we can determine the amount of FHIL emission at various angles. We calculate the strength of [Fe vii]λ6087 emission for a number of intermediate angles (30°, 40°, and 50°) and compare the results with the luminosity of the observed emission line from six known CLiF AGNs. We find that there is good agreement between our model and the observational results. The model also enables us to determine the relationship between the type 2:type 1 AGN fraction vs the ratio of torus height to radius, h/r.

  14. The Search for Molecular Outflows in Local Volume AGNs with Herschel-PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M.; Veilleux, S.; Meléndez, M.; Sturm, E.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; González-Alfonso, E.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results from a systematic search for galactic-scale, molecular (OH 119 μm) outflows in a sample of 52 Local Volume (d\\lt 50 Mpc) Burst Alert Telescope detected active galactic nuclei (BAT AGNs) with Herschel-PACS. We combine the results from our analysis of the BAT AGNs with the published Herschel/PACS data of 43 nearby (z\\lt 0.3) galaxy mergers, mostly ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. The objects in our sample of BAT AGNs have, on average, ˜ 10{--}100 times lower AGN luminosities, star formation rates, and stellar masses than those of the ULIRG and QSO samples. OH 119 μm is detected in 42 of our BAT AGN targets. Evidence for molecular outflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than ‑50 km s‑1 and/or blueshifted wings with 84% velocities less than ‑300 km s‑1) is seen in only four BAT AGNs (NGC 7479 is the most convincing case). Evidence for molecular inflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than 50 km s‑1) is seen in seven objects, although an inverted P-Cygni profile is detected unambiguously in only one object (Circinus). Our data show that both the starburst and AGN contribute to driving OH outflows, but the fastest OH winds require AGNs with quasar-like luminosities. We also confirm that the total absorption strength of OH 119 μm is a good proxy for dust optical depth as it correlates strongly with the 9.7 μm silicate absorption feature, a measure of obscuration originating in both the nuclear torus and host galaxy disk. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  15. The Search for Molecular Outflows in Local Volume AGNs with Herschel-PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M.; Veilleux, S.; Meléndez, M.; Sturm, E.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; González-Alfonso, E.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results from a systematic search for galactic-scale, molecular (OH 119 μm) outflows in a sample of 52 Local Volume (d\\lt 50 Mpc) Burst Alert Telescope detected active galactic nuclei (BAT AGNs) with Herschel-PACS. We combine the results from our analysis of the BAT AGNs with the published Herschel/PACS data of 43 nearby (z\\lt 0.3) galaxy mergers, mostly ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. The objects in our sample of BAT AGNs have, on average, ∼ 10{--}100 times lower AGN luminosities, star formation rates, and stellar masses than those of the ULIRG and QSO samples. OH 119 μm is detected in 42 of our BAT AGN targets. Evidence for molecular outflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than ‑50 km s‑1 and/or blueshifted wings with 84% velocities less than ‑300 km s‑1) is seen in only four BAT AGNs (NGC 7479 is the most convincing case). Evidence for molecular inflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than 50 km s‑1) is seen in seven objects, although an inverted P-Cygni profile is detected unambiguously in only one object (Circinus). Our data show that both the starburst and AGN contribute to driving OH outflows, but the fastest OH winds require AGNs with quasar-like luminosities. We also confirm that the total absorption strength of OH 119 μm is a good proxy for dust optical depth as it correlates strongly with the 9.7 μm silicate absorption feature, a measure of obscuration originating in both the nuclear torus and host galaxy disk. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  16. Infrared and hard X-ray diagnostics of AGN identifications from the Swift/BAT and AKARI all sky surveys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuta, Keiko

    2011-11-01

    It is known that there is a good correlation between the mid-infrared and the intrinsic soft X-ray luminosities (<10 keV) of local active galactic nuclei (AGN). We now combine two complete all sky surveys in order to study the connection between the infrared and very hard X-ray (>10 keV) luminosities in AGN. We selected sources from the 22-month Swift/BAT hard X-ray survey catalogue which were also detected by Infrared Camera (IRC, 9 and 18 micron) and Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS, 90 micron) on AKARI. The large sample allows us to include not only Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies but also quasars, low luminosity AGN and radio-loud objects. We found a strong linear correlation for most of the AGN between the logarithms of the observed infrared and hard X-ray powers over four decades in luminosity, L(IR) vs. L(HX). Many Compton-thick sources show a large deviation from the correlation, probably because of the relatively low observed L(HX) due to the high column density. The observed luminosity correlation indicates that the various types of AGN may be occupying distinct regions of parameter space in the diagram. Color-color plots such as "L(90um)/L(9um) vs. L(HX)/L(9um)" are found to be useful redshift independent indicators for isolating Compton-thick AGN. Interestingly, starburst galaxies are also separated in this plane. This correlation can be a new and important tool for AGN classification, which may be useful for large upcoming surveys.

  17. The QUEST-La Silla AGN Variability Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, Régis; Lira, Paulina; Coppi, Paolo; Sánchez, Paula; Arévalo, Patricia; Bauer, Franz E.; Rabinowitz, David; Zinn, Robert; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Meza, Nicolás

    2015-09-01

    We present the characterization and initial results from the QUEST-La Silla active galactic nucleus (AGN) variability survey. This is an effort to obtain well-sampled optical light curves in extragalactic fields with unique multiwavelength observations. We present photometry obtained from 2010 to 2012 in the XMM-COSMOS field, which was observed over 150 nights using the QUEST camera on the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Schmidt telescope. The survey uses a broadband filter, the Q band, similar to the union of the g and the r filters, achieving an intrinsic photometric dispersion of 0.05 mag and a systematic error of 0.05 mag in the zero point. Since some detectors of the camera show significant nonlinearity, we use a linear correlation to fit the zero points as a function of the instrumental magnitudes, thus obtaining a good correction to the nonlinear behavior of these detectors. We obtain good photometry to an equivalent limiting magnitude of r˜ 20.5. The astrometry has an internal precision of ˜ 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 1 and an overall accuracy of 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2 when compared to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Studying the optical variability of X-ray-detected sources in the XMM-COSMOS field, we find that the survey is ˜75%-80% complete to magnitudes r˜ 20, and ˜67% complete to a magnitude r˜ 21. Additionally, broad-line (BL) AGNs have larger variation amplitude than non-broad-line (NL) AGNs, with ˜80% of the BL AGNs classified as variable, while only ˜21% of the NL AGNs are classified as variable. We also find that ˜22% of objects classified as galaxies (GALs) are also variable. The determination and parameterization of the structure function ({{SF}}{norm}(τ )=A{τ }γ ) of the variable sources show that most BL AGNs are characterized by A\\gt 0.1 and γ \\gt 0.025. It is further shown that NL AGNs and GAL sources occupying the same parameter space in A and γ are very likely to correspond to obscured or low-luminosity

  18. AGN from HeII: AGN host galaxy properties & demographics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Rudolf E.; Schawinski, Kevin; Weigel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of HeII emitting objects classified as AGN. In a sample of 81'192 galaxies taken from the seventh data release (DR7) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the redshift interval 0.02 < z < 0.05 and with r < 17 AB mag, the Baldwin, Philips & Terlevitsch 1981 method (BPT) identifies 1029 objects as active galactic nuclei. By applying an analysis using HeII λ 4686 emission lines, based on Shirazi & Binchmann 2012, we have identified an additional 283 active galactic nuclei, which were missed by the BPT method. This represents an increase of over 25 %. The characteristics of the HeII selected AGN are different from the AGN found through the PBT; the colour - mass diagram and the colour histogram both show that HeII selected AGN are bluer. This new selection technique can help inform galaxy black hole coevolution scenarios.

  19. Mid-IR Properties of an Unbiased AGN Sample of the Local Universe. 1; Emission-Line Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, K. A.; Melendez, M.; Muhotzky, R. F.; Kraemer, S.; Engle, K.; Malumuth. E.; Tueller, J.; Markwardt, C.; Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Winter, L. M.; Armus, L.

    2010-01-01

    \\Ve compare mid-IR emission-lines properties, from high-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra of a statistically-complete hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected sample of nearby (z < 0.05) AGN detected by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) aboard Swift. The luminosity distribution for the mid-infrared emission-lines, [O IV] 25.89 microns, [Ne II] 12.81 microns, [Ne III] 15.56 microns and [Ne V] 14.32 microns, and hard X-ray continuum show no differences between Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 populations, although six newly discovered BAT AGNs are shown to be under-luminous in [O IV], most likely the result of dust extinction in the host galaxy. The overall tightness of the mid-infrared correlations and BAT luminosities suggests that the emission lines primarily arise in gas ionized by the AGN. We also compared the mid-IR emission-lines in the BAT AGNs with those from published studies of star-forming galaxies and LINERs. We found that the BAT AGN fall into a distinctive region when comparing the [Ne III]/[Ne II] and the [O IV]/[Ne III] quantities. From this we found that sources that have been previously classified in the mid-infrared/optical as AGN have smaller emission line ratios than those found for the BAT AGNs, suggesting that, in our X-ray selected sample, the AGN represents the main contribution to the observed line emission. Overall, we present a different set of emission line diagnostics to distinguish between AGN and star forming galaxies that can be used as a tool to find new AGN.

  20. AGN Science: The Past, The Present, The Future . AGN Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, Th.

    I review some basic results on AGN science by concentrating on the Fe K and Fe L line observations and on the Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 physics. This paper is based on a talk given at the Vulcano workshop, 'The multifrequency behavior of high energy cosmic sources` in 2009. Given the length of the talk and the number of pages the review on AGN science cannot be complete and is biased towards two science topics and my personal view.

  1. Mergers as triggers for nuclear activity: a near-IR study of the close environment of AGN in the VISTA-VIDEO survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouzos, M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Bonfield, D.

    2014-03-01

    There is an ongoing debate concerning the driver of nuclear activity in galaxies, with active galactic nuclei (AGN) either being triggered by major or minor galactic mergers or, alternatively, through secular processes like cold gas accretion and/or formation of bars. We investigate the close environment of active galaxies selected in the X-ray, the radio and the mid-IR. We utilize the first data release of the new near-IR VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey of the XMM-Large Scale Structure field. We use two measures of environment density, namely counts within a given aperture and a finite redshift slice (pseudo-3D density) and closest neighbour density measures Σ2 and Σ5. We select both AGN and control samples, matching them in redshift and apparent Ks-band magnitude. We find that AGN are found in a range of environments, with a subset of the AGN samples residing in overdense environments. Seyfert-like X-ray AGN and flat-spectrum radio-AGN are found to inhabit significantly overdense environments compared to their control sample. The relation between overdensities and AGN luminosity does not however reveal any positive correlation. Given the absence of an environment density-AGN luminosity relation, we find no support for a scheme where high-luminosity AGN are preferentially triggered by mergers. On the contrary, we find that AGN likely trace over dense environments at high redshift due to the fact that they inhabit the most massive galaxies, rather than being an AGN.

  2. X-ray AGN Clustering, Bias & Accretion mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plionis, Manolis; Koutoulidis, Lazaros; Georgantopoulos, Ioannis; Fanidakis, Nikolaos

    2012-09-01

    We present the spatial clustering properties of 1466 X-ray selected AGN compiled from the Chandra CDF-N, CDF-S, eCDF-S, COSMOS and AEGIS fields in the 0.5-8 keV band. The X-ray sources span the redshift interval 0AGN bias and the corresponding dark-matter host halo mass, are significantly higher than the corresponding values of optically selected AGN (at the same redshifts. The redshift evolution of the X-ray selected AGN bias indicates, in agreement with other recent studies, that a unique dark-matter halo mass does not fit well the bias at all the different redshifts probed. Furthermore, we investigate if there is a dependence of the clustering strength on X-ray luminosity, applying a procedure to disentangle the dependence of clustering on redshift. We find indications for a positive dependence of the clustering length on X-ray luminosity, in the sense that the more luminous sources have a larger clustering length and hence a higher dark-matter halo mass.

  3. The Triggering and Evolution of AGN in Cluster Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Steven

    It is now well established that the evolution of super-massive black holes (SMBHs) is closely linked to that of their host galaxies. However, the detailed causal connections behind this relationship remain largely unknown. This is due in part to the complex diversity of active galactic nuclei (AGN) properties, the differing time-scales for AGN and star-forming processes, and a variety of observational selection effects. Physically, a prerequisite for both AGN activity and the formation of new stars in the host galaxy is the availability of gas. Environmental processes in galaxy clusters can strongly and rapidly affect gas reservoirs. Observations of star-forming galaxies in clusters have shown that the cluster environment drives evolution at a different rate than in the field. We here propose to make new measurements of the distribution of X-ray selected AGN, within cluster fields, and of their infrared (IR) and ultra-violet (UV) host galaxy properties to better understand the AGN triggering process, and the physical links between the SMBHs and their host galaxies. With a combination of superb spatial resolution and excellent sensitivity, Chandra X-ray observations have revolutionised studies of AGN evolution. The X-ray waveband is optimally suited for AGN surveys suffering little contamination from the host galaxy and only modest absorption bias, down to luminosities of 10^43 erg/s and across a wide range of source redshifts, providing direct access to a significant fraction of the total accretion power in the Universe (Brandt & Alexander 2015). However, two significant challenges exist that limit current studies of X-ray AGN in clusters: 1) the expense of optical follow-up of X-ray point source targets in order to confirm cluster membership; and 2) the low number of X-ray AGN that reside in clusters (typically 2-3 per cluster) relative to the background population (9,800 deg^2 in the deepest Chandra fields). In Ehlert et al. (2013, 2014 and 2015) we presented a

  4. THE QUASAR OUTFLOW CONTRIBUTION TO AGN FEEDBACK: VLT MEASUREMENTS OF SDSS J0318-0600

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Jay P.; Bautista, Manuel; Arav, Nahum; Edmonds, Doug; Moe, Max; Korista, Kirk; Costantini, Elisa; Benn, Chris; Ellison, Sara E-mail: arav@vt.ed E-mail: kirk.korista@wmich.ed E-mail: mmoe@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-02-01

    We present high spectral resolution Very Large Telescope observations of the broad absorption line quasar SDSS J0318 - 0600. This high-quality data set allows us to extract accurate ionic column densities and determine an electron number density of n{sub e} = 10{sup 3.3+}-{sup 0.2} cm{sup -3} for the main outflow absorption component. The heavily reddened spectrum of SDSS J0318-0600 requires purely silicate dust with a reddening curve characteristic of predominately large grains, from which we estimate the bolometric luminosity. We carry out photoionization modeling to determine the total column density, ionization parameter, and distance of the gas and find that the photoionization models suggest abundances greater than solar. Due to the uncertainty in the location of the dust extinction, we arrive at two viable distances for the main ouflow component from the central source, 6 and 17 kpc, where we consider the 6 kpc location as somewhat more physically plausible. Assuming the canonical global covering of 20% for the outflow and a distance of 6 kpc, our analysis yields a mass flux of 120 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a kinetic luminosity that is approx0.1% of the bolometric luminosity of the object. Should the dust be part of the outflow, then these values are approx4x larger. The large mass flux and kinetic luminosity make this outflow a significant contributor to active galactic nucleus feedback processes.

  5. Evolution and Luminosity Dependendence of the Hosts of Radio-quiet Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, S. E.; Heckman, T.; Lacy, M.

    2004-12-01

    The discovery that the nearest galaxies may all contain supermassive black holes, and that the black hole mass and galactic spheroid mass are strongly correlated, implies that most bulge-dominated massive galaxies went through an early quasar phase. Therefore, quasar activity is probably a natural part of the evolution of typical early-type galaxies. To investigate these links between the formation and evolution of the AGN population and that of galaxies, we have been studying the relationship between these populations at moderate and high redshift, where the quasar luminosity function is reaching a maximum. At z ˜ 2 -- 3, we found that faint radio-quiet quasars seem to be associated with L* galaxies, as opposed to the many times L* galaxies associated with the radio-loud objects at similar redshifts. Although the radio-quiet hosts have luminosities and compactnesses similar to the Lyman-break galaxies, their rest-frame UV-optical colors indicate that they may be less actively forming stars. This is roughly consistent with hierarchical schemes of galaxy formation, with these high-redshift, low AGN-luminosity objects still in the process of formation. In contrast, at z ˜ 1, most high-luminosity quasars seem to have very massive hosts, more comparable to those of the radio-loud objects. To determine whether this difference is due to evolution or to the difference in AGN luminosity, we have obtained deep ACS imaging of a sample of lower-luminosity radio-quiet quasar hosts at z ˜ 1. This allows us to study the host galaxy mass as a function of AGN luminosity (and therefore black hole mass) and as a function of redshift. This work has been funded by NASA LTSA grant NAG5-10762 and NASA/STScI HST grant GO-09902.

  6. Assessing AGN feedback models with c iii* measurement and photoionization modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnis, Daniel J.

    2013-12-01

    Mass outflows in active galactic nuclei (AGN) have been hypothesized to represent a feedback mechanism through which black hole growth and galaxy formation are linked. In order to assess this claim, typical outflow kinetic luminosities must be compared to calculated minimum values that are needed to produce feedback relevance. We have developed a method for placing lower limits on the kinetic luminosity by combining photoionization modeling with column density measurements of a select few ionic species, including C III* 1175 as a measure of gas density. This method is applied to sample AGNs representative of those observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (HST/COS). We find that although measured kinetic luminosity lower limits for the quasar SDSS J170322.41+23124.3 and Seyfert galaxy Akn 564 are several orders of magnitude less than that required for feedback relevance, our method can be drastically improved with increased signal to noise ratios.

  7. AGN and their host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinborn, L. K.; Dolag, K.; Hirschmann, M.; Remus, R.-S.; Teklu, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    Large scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations are an important tool to study the co-evolution between black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies. However, in order to model the accretion onto BHs and AGN feedback we need sub-grid models which contain several free parameters. The choice of these parameters has a significant impact on the properties of the BHs and their host galaxies. Therefore, we improve the accretion model and the AGN feedback model based on both theory and observations to eliminate most free parameters. In that way, the slope of the observed relation between BH mass and stellar mass is reproduced self-consistently. We performed a few extremely large simulation runs as part of the Magneticum Pathfinder simulation set, combining a high resolution with very large cosmological volumes, enabling us to study for example dual AGN, the role of galaxy mergers and AGN clustering properties.

  8. Obscuration in active galactic nuclei: near-infrared luminosity relations and dust colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtscher, L.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Davies, R. I.; Janssen, A.; Lutz, D.; Rosario, D.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; Lin, M.-Y.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Sternberg, A.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L.

    2015-06-01

    We combine two approaches to isolate the AGN luminosity at near-IR wavelengths and relate the near-IR pure AGN luminosity to other tracers of the AGN. Using integral-field spectroscopic data of an archival sample of 51 local AGNs, we estimate the fraction of non-stellar light by comparing the nuclear equivalent width of the stellar 2.3 μm CO absorption feature with the intrinsic value for each galaxy. We compare this fraction to that derived from a spectral decomposition of the integrated light in the central arcsecond and find them to be consistent with each other. Using our estimates of the near-IR AGN light, we find a strong correlation with presumably isotropic AGN tracers. We show that a significant offset exists between type 1 and type 2 sources in the sense that type 1 sources are 7 (10) times brighter in the near-IR at log lmir{} = 42.5 (log lx{} = 42.5). These offsets only become clear when treating infrared type 1 sources as type 1 AGNs. All AGNs have very red near- to mid-IR dust colors. This, as well as the range of observed near-IR temperatures, can be explained with a simple model with only two free parameters: the obscuration to the hot dust and the ratio between the warm and hot dust areas. We find obscurations of AV^hot = 5 ldots 15 mag for infrared type 1 sources and AV^hot = 15 ldots 35 mag for type 2 sources. The ratio of hot dust to warm dust areas of about 1000 is nicely consistent with the ratio of radii of the respective regions as found by infrared interferometry.

  9. Seeking the epoch of maximum luminosity for dusty quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z ≳ 3 with maximum luminosity νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) ≳ 10{sup 47} erg s{sup –1}; luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc{sup –3} having νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) > 10{sup 46.6} erg s{sup –1} for all 2 luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm)/νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define 'obscured' quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  10. Seeking the Epoch of Maximum Luminosity for Dusty Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL ν(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z >~ 3 with maximum luminosity νL ν(7.8 μm) >~ 1047 erg s-1 luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc-3 having νL ν(7.8 μm) > 1046.6 erg s-1 for all 2 luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL ν(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL ν(0.25 μm)/νL ν(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define "obscured" quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ~ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ~ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  11. Bolometric Array Detectors for Space-Borne Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Andrew E.

    2000-01-01

    Funding from the NASA Innovative Research Grant was used to develop bolometric detectors. As described in the proposal, silicon nitride micromesh ('spider-web') absorbers had been demonstrated at U.C. Berkeley but not developed to be flight-worthy devices. We proceeded to first fabricate bolometers with Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) Ge thermistors that demonstrated high optical coupling (Church et al. 1996) and were developed for a ground-based millimeter-wave receiver (Mauskopf et al. 1997). The next generation of devices used In bump-bonded thermistors to achieve devices with performance product NEP*sqrt(tau) = 3e - 18 j at 300 mK, demonstrating a full order of magnitude improvement over pervious devices. These devices achieved an NEP = 1e-18 W/rtHz (Murray et al. 1996) as promised in the proposal. Sensitivities as good as 1e - 19 W/rtHz appear achievable with the silicon nitride architecture (Bock et al. 1997). Finally, arrays of micromesh bolometers were shown to be feasible in the last year of the program by etching a large number of devices on a single silicon wafer (75 mm). Full arrays were subsequently demonstrated for selection on the ESA/NASA Far-Infrared Space Telescope (FIRST) in competition with detectors provided by CEA in France and GSFC in the US Micromesh bolometer arrays are now baselined for both the ESA/NASA Planck and FIRST missions.

  12. Unravelling ICM Physics and AGN Feedback with Deep Chandra Observations of NGC 5813

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Scott; Nulsen, Paul; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Clarke, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    We present results based on very deep (650 ks) Chandra observations of the galaxy group NGC 5813. This system shows three pairs of collinear cavities, with each pair associated with an elliptical AGN outburstshock. Due to the relatively regular morphology of this system, and the unique unambiguous detection of three distinct AGN outburstshocks, it is particularly well-suited for the study of AGN feedbackand the AGN outburst history. The implied mean kinetic power is roughly the same for each outburst, demonstrating that the average AGN kinetic luminosity can remain stable over long timescales (roughly 50Myr). The two older outbursts have larger, roughly equal total energies as compared with the youngest outburst, implying that the youngest outburst is ongoing. We find that the radiative cooling rate and the mean shock heating rate of the gas are well balanced at each shock front, suggesting that AGN outburst shock heating alone is sufficient to offset cooling and establish AGN/ICM feedback within at least the central 30 kpc. This heating takes place roughly isotropically and most strongly at small radii, as is required for feedback to operate. We suggest that shock heating may play a significant role in AGN feedback at smaller radii in other systems, where weak shocks are more difficult to detect. We find non-zero shockfront widths that are too large to be explained by particle diffusion. Instead, all measured widths are consistent with shock broadening due to propagation through a turbulent ICM with a mean turbulent speed of roughly 70 km/s. Significant contributions to our understanding of AGN feedback and ICM physics, partially via studies similar to the one described here, will be one of the major achievements of the Athena mission.

  13. Luminosity enhancements at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Several ideas are discussed that have been proposed to improve the luminosity at the SPEAR and PEP electron-positron storage rings and to insure good luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider. There have been two proposals studied recently for SPEAR: a Microbeta insertion using Samarium Cobalt permanent magnets, and a Minibeta insertion using conventional quadrupole magnets. The notations Microbeta and minibeta used here are somewhat arbitrary since the front faces of the first quadrupole magnets for both insertions are at nearly the same distance from the interaction point.

  14. Accretion Timescales from Kepler AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-01-01

    We constrain AGN accretion disk variability mechanisms using the optical light curves of AGN observed by Kepler. AGN optical fluxes are known to exhibit stochastic variations on timescales of hours, days, months and years. The excellent sampling properties of the original Kepler mission - high S/N ratio (105), short sampling interval (30 minutes), and long sampling duration (~ 3.5 years) - allow for a detailed examination of the differences between the variability processes present in various sub-types of AGN such as Type I and II Seyferts, QSOs, and Blazars. We model the flux data using the Auto-Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) representation from the field of time series analysis. We use the Kalman filter to determine optimal mode parameters and use the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) to select the optimal model. We find that optical light curves from Kepler AGN cannot be fit by low order statistical models such as the popular AR(1) process or damped random walk. Kepler light curves exhibit complicated power spectra and are better modeled by higher order ARMA processes. We find that Kepler AGN typically exhibit power spectra that change from a bending power law (PSD ~ 1/fa) to a flat power spectrum on timescales in the range of ~ 5 - 100 days consistent with the orbital and thermal timescales of a typical 107 solar mass black hole.

  15. Luminosity measurements at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we discuss luminosity measurements at Tevatron and HERA as well as plans for luminosity measurements at LHC. We discuss luminosity measurements using the luminosity detectors of the experiments as well as measurements by the machine. We address uncertainties of the measurements, challenges and lessons learned.

  16. The X-ray spectral properties of the AGN population in the XMM-Newton bright serendipitous survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral, A.; Della Ceca, R.; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.; Brunner, H.; Carrera, F. J.; Page, M. J.; Schwope, A. D.

    2011-06-01

    Context. X-ray surveys are a key instrument in the study of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Thanks to their penetrating ability, X-rays are able to map the innermost regions close to the central super massive black hole (SMBH) as well as to detect and characterize its emission up to high redshift. Aims: We present here a detailed X-ray spectral analysis of the AGN belonging to the XMM-Newton bright survey (XBS). The XBS is composed of two flux-limited samples selected in the complementary 0.5-4.5 and 4.5-7.5 keV energy bands and comprising more than 300 AGN up to redshift ~2.4. Methods: We performed an X-ray analysis following two different approaches: by analyzing individually each AGN X-ray spectrum and by constructing average spectra for different AGN types. Results: From the individual analysis, we find that there seems to be an anti correlation between the spectral index and the sources' hard X-ray luminosity, such that the average photon index for the higher luminosity sources (>1044 erg s-1) is significantly (>2σ) flatter than the average for the lower luminosity sources. We also find that the intrinsic column density distribution agrees with AGN unified schemes, although a number of exceptions are found (3% of the whole sample), which are much more common among optically classified type 2 AGN. We also find that the so-called "soft-excess", apart from the intrinsic absorption, constitutes the principal deviation from a power-law shape in AGN X-ray spectra and it clearly displays different characteristics, and likely a different origin, for unabsorbed and absorbed AGN. Regarding the shape of the average spectra, we find that it is best reproduced by a combination of an unabsorbed (absorbed) power law, a narrow Fe Kα emission line and a small (large) amount of reflection for unabsorbed (absorbed) sources. We do not significantly detect any relativistic contribution to the line emission and we compute an upper limit for its equivalent width (EW) of 230 eV at

  17. X-ray AGN in the XMM-LSS galaxy clusters: no evidence of AGN suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulouridis, E.; Plionis, M.; Melnyk, O.; Elyiv, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Clerc, N.; Surdej, J.; Chiappetti, L.; Pierre, M.

    2014-07-01

    We present a study of the overdensity of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) in 33 galaxy clusters in the XMM-LSS field (The XMM-Newton Large Scale Structure Survey), up to redshift z = 1.05 and further divided into a lower (0.14 ≤ z ≤ 0.35) and a higher redshift (0.43 ≤ z ≤ 1.05) subsample. Previous studies have shown that the presence of X-ray-selected AGN in rich galaxy clusters is suppressed, since their number is significantly lower than what is expected from the high galaxy overdensities in the area. In the current study we have investigated the occurrence of X-ray-selected AGN in low (⟨ Lx,bol ⟩ = 2.7 × 1043 erg/s) and moderate (⟨ Lx,bol ⟩ = 2.4 × 1044 erg/s) X-ray luminosity galaxy clusters in an attempt to trace back the relation between high-density environments and nuclear activity. Owing to the wide contiguous XMM-LSS survey area, we were able to extend the study to the cluster outskirts. We therefore determined the projected overdensity of X-ray point-like sources around each cluster out to 6r500 radius, within δr500 = 1 annulus, with respect to the field expectations based on the X-ray source log N - log S of the XMM-LSS field. To provide robust statistical results we also conducted a consistent stacking analysis separately for the two z ranges. We investigated whether the observed X-ray overdensities are to be expected thanks to the obvious enhancement of galaxy numbers in the cluster environment by also estimating the corresponding optical galaxy overdensities, and we assessed the possible enhancement or suppression of AGN activity in clusters. We find a positive X-ray projected overdensity in both redshift ranges at the first radial bins, which however has the same amplitude as that of optical galaxies. Therefore, no suppression (or enhancement) of X-ray AGN activity with respect to the field is found, in sharp contrast to previous results based on rich galaxy clusters, implying that the mechanisms responsible for the

  18. High-energy neutrino fluxes from AGN populations inferred from X-ray surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Idunn B.; Wu, Kinwah; On, Alvina Y. L.; Saxton, Curtis J.

    2015-08-01

    High-energy neutrinos and photons are complementary messengers, probing violent astrophysical processes and structural evolution of the Universe. X-ray and neutrino observations jointly constrain conditions in active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets: their baryonic and leptonic contents, and particle production efficiency. Testing two standard neutrino production models for local source Cen A (Koers & Tinyakov and Becker & Biermann), we calculate the high-energy neutrino spectra of single AGN sources and derive the flux of high-energy neutrinos expected for the current epoch. Assuming that accretion determines both X-rays and particle creation, our parametric scaling relations predict neutrino yield in various AGN classes. We derive redshift-dependent number densities of each class, from Chandra and Swift/BAT X-ray luminosity functions (Silverman et al. and Ajello et al.). We integrate the neutrino spectrum expected from the cumulative history of AGN (correcting for cosmological and source effects, e.g. jet orientation and beaming). Both emission scenarios yield neutrino fluxes well above limits set by IceCube (by ˜4-106 × at 1 PeV, depending on the assumed jet models for neutrino production). This implies that: (i) Cen A might not be a typical neutrino source as commonly assumed; (ii) both neutrino production models overestimate the efficiency; (iii) neutrino luminosity scales with accretion power differently among AGN classes and hence does not follow X-ray luminosity universally; (iv) some AGN are neutrino-quiet (e.g. below a power threshold for neutrino production); (v) neutrino and X-ray emission have different duty cycles (e.g. jets alternate between baryonic and leptonic flows); or (vi) some combination of the above.

  19. The largest X-ray-selected sample of z>3 AGNs: C-COSMOS and ChaMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfountzou, E.; Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Trichas, M.; Green, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from an analysis of the largest high-redshift (z > 3) X-ray-selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) sample to date, combining the Chandra Cosmological Evolution Survey and Chandra Multi-wavelength Project surveys and doubling the previous samples. The sample comprises 209 X-ray-detected AGNs, over a wide range of rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosities log LX = 43.3-46.0 erg s-1. X-ray hardness rates show that ˜39 per cent of the sources are highly obscured, NH > 1022 cm-2, in agreement with the ˜37 per cent of type-2 AGNs found in our sample based on their optical classification. For ˜26 per cent of objects have mismatched optical and X-ray classifications. Utilizing the 1/Vmax method, we confirm that the comoving space density of all luminosity ranges of AGNs decreases with redshift above z > 3 and up to z ˜ 7. With a significant sample of AGNs (N = 27) at z > 4, it is found that both source number counts in the 0.5-2 keV band and comoving space density are consistent with the expectation of a luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE) model at all redshifts, while they exclude the luminosity and density evolution (LADE) model. The measured comoving space density of type-1 and type-2 AGNs shows a constant ratio between the two types at z > 3. Our results for both AGN types at these redshifts are consistent with the expectations of LDDE model.

  20. Probing the Luminosity Function of Young Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Tanya; Glikman, E.; Lacy, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last year, we have been using the Triple Spec Near-Infrared spectrograph on the Palomar Observatory to identify candidate dust-reddened quasars using the FIRST radio survey, the UKIDSS near-infrared survey and the SDSS optical survey. A previous campaign using the shallow near-infrared 2MASS survey, was very successful in finding dust obscured quasars by finding very red (R-K > 4, J-K > 1.7) radio sources (Glikman et al. 2007). Among them are many young, interacting galaxies (Urrutia, Lacy & Becker 2008) and a large fraction of Low Ionization Broad Absorption Line Quasars (Urrutia et al. 2009), implying that the red quasar population probes a young phase in the lifetime of an AGN. By using the same color criteria on the deeper UKIDSS survey, we are able to probe into higher redshifts and lower luminosity red quasars. This is a first step to build a luminosity function for dust-obscured quasars. We then will be able to answer the question if young quasars are more generally more luminous as their older counterparts, perhaps because of higher accretion efficiency.

  1. An X-ray study of the lower-luminosity LIRGs from GOALS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Alba, N.; Iwasawa, K.; Sanders, D.; Chu, J.; Evans, A.; Mazzarella, J.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Larson, K.

    2016-06-01

    We present Chandra observations for a sample of 59 Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) from the lower luminosity portion of the Great Observatory All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The GOALS is a multiwavelegth study of the most luminous IR-selected galaxies in the local Universe, and this X-ray study, complimenting the previous work on the higher-luminosity sample, benefits from the imaging and spectroscopic data from HST, Spitzer and Herschel. With combined X-ray and mid-infrared diagnostics, AGN are found in 33% of the galaxies in the sample, a fraction lower than that found for the higher luminosity sample. The correlation study of far-IR and X-ray emission shows that the GOALS galaxies without traces of AGN appear to be underluminous in X-ray, compared to the previously studied star-forming galaxies with lower star formation rates. Results on X-ray spectral study of the sample will also be presented.

  2. AGN Observations with STACEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramel, D. A.; Boone, L. M.; Carson, J.; Chae, E.; Covault, C. E.; Fortin, P.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hanna, D. S.; Hinton, J. A.; Mukherjee, R.; Mueller, C.; Ong, R. A.; Ragan, K.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schuette, D. R.; Theoret, C. G.; Williams, D. A.; Wong, J.; Zweerink, J.

    2003-03-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a gamma-ray detector designed to study astrophysical sources at energies between 50 and 500 GeV. It uses 64 large, steerable mirrors at the National Solar Tower Test Facility near Albuquerque, NM, USA to collect Cherenkov light from extended air showers and concentrate it onto an array of photomultiplier tubes. The large light-collection area gives it a lower energy threshold than imaging-type Cherenkov detectors. STACEE is now fully operational, and we report here on the performance of the complete STACEE instrument, as well as preliminary results of recent observations of several AGN targets. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (under Grant Numbers PHY-9983836, PHY-0070927, and PHY-0070953), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Le Fond Quebecois de la Recherche sur la Nature et les Technologies (FQRNT), the Research Corporation, and the California Space Institute. CEC is a Cottrell Scholar of the Research Corporation.

  3. Absorption-line measurements of AGN outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Dale L.

    Investigations into the elemental abundances in two nearby active galaxies, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 Markarian 1044 and the Seyfert 1 Markarian 279, are reported. Spectra from three space-based observatories HST, FUSE, and CHANDRA, are used to measure absorption lines in material outflowing from the nucleus. I make multi-wavelength comparisons to better convert the ionic column densities into elemental column densities which can then be used to determine abundances (metallicities). Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are known to have extreme values of a number of properties compared to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as a class. In particular, emission-line studies have suggested that NLS1s are unusually metal-rich compared to broad-line AGNs of comparable luminosity. To test these suggestions I perform absorption-line studies on the NLS1 Markarian 1044, a nearby and bright AGN. I use lines of H I, C IV, N V, and O VI to properly make the photoionization correction through the software Cloudy and determine abundances of Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen. I find two results. The first is that Markarian 1044 has a bulk metallicity greater than five times solar. The second is that the N/C ratio in Markarian 1044 is consistent with a solar mixture. This is in direct contradiction of extrapolations from local H II regions which state N/ C should scale with bulk metallicity. This implies a different enrichment history in Markarian 1044 than in the Galactic disk. I also report discovery of three new low-redshift Lya forest lines with log N HI >= 12:77 in the spectrum of Markarian 1044. This number is consistent with the 2.6 expected Lya forest lines in the path length to Markarian 1044. I also investigate the CHANDRA X-ray spectrum of Markarian 279, a broad-line Seyfert 1. I use a new code, PHASE, to self-consistently model the entire absorption spectrum simultaneously. Using solely the X-ray spectrum I am able to determine the physical parameters of this absorber to a degree only

  4. The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danae Griffin, Rhiannon; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.; Nugent, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    The Swift active galactic nucleus (AGN) and Cluster Survey (SACS) uses 125 deg^2 of Swift X-ray Telescope serendipitous fields with variable depths surrounding X-ray bursts to provide a medium depth (4 × 10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and area survey filling the gap between deep, narrow Chandra/XMM-Newton surveys and wide, shallow ROSAT surveys. Here, we present the first two papers in a series of publications for SACS. In the first paper, we introduce our method and catalog of 22,563 point sources and 442 extended sources. We examine the number counts of the AGN and galaxy cluster populations. SACS provides excellent constraints on the AGN number counts at the bright end with negligible uncertainties due to cosmic variance, and these constraints are consistent with previous measurements. The depth and areal coverage of SACS is well suited for galaxy cluster surveys outside the local universe, reaching z ˜ 1 for massive clusters. In the second paper, we use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 data to study the 203 extended SACS sources that are located within the SDSS footprint. We search for galaxy over-densities in 3-D space using SDSS galaxies and their photometric redshifts near the Swift galaxy cluster candidates. We find 103 Swift clusters with a > 3σ over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmations as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, BCG magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, X-ray luminosity and red sequences. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≤ 0.3 and 80% complete for z ≤ 0.4, consistent with the survey depth of SDSS. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 2 and 1 matches in optical, X-ray and SZ catalogs, respectively, so the majority of these

  5. CANDELS: CONSTRAINING THE AGN-MERGER CONNECTION WITH HOST MORPHOLOGIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Faber, S. M.; Mozena, Mark; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Wuyts, Stijn; Rangel, Cyprian; Laird, Elise S.; Bell, Eric F.; Alexander, David M.; Bournaud, Frederic; Conselice, Christopher J.; Dekel, Avishai; and others

    2012-01-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging taken as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, we examine the role that major galaxy mergers play in triggering active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity at z {approx} 2. Our sample consists of 72 moderate-luminosity (L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 42-44} erg s{sup -1}) AGNs at 1.5 < z < 2.5 that are selected using the 4 Ms Chandra observations in the Chandra Deep Field South, the deepest X-ray observations to date. Employing visual classifications, we have analyzed the rest-frame optical morphologies of the AGN host galaxies and compared them to a mass-matched control sample of 216 non-active galaxies at the same redshift. We find that most of the AGNs reside in disk galaxies (51.4{sup +5.8}{sub -5.9}%), while a smaller percentage are found in spheroids (27.8{sup +5.8}{sub -4.6}%). Roughly 16.7{sup +5.3}{sub -3.5}% of the AGN hosts have highly disturbed morphologies and appear to be involved in a major merger or interaction, while most of the hosts (55.6{sup +5.6}{sub -5.9}%) appear relatively relaxed and undisturbed. These fractions are statistically consistent with the fraction of control galaxies that show similar morphological disturbances. These results suggest that the hosts of moderate-luminosity AGNs are no more likely to be involved in an ongoing merger or interaction relative to non-active galaxies of similar mass at z {approx} 2. The high disk fraction observed among the AGN hosts also appears to be at odds with predictions that merger-driven accretion should be the dominant AGN fueling mode at z {approx} 2, even at moderate X-ray luminosities. Although we cannot rule out that minor mergers are responsible for triggering these systems, the presence of a large population of relatively undisturbed disk-like hosts suggests that the stochastic accretion of gas plays a greater role in fueling AGN activity at z {approx} 2 than previously thought.

  6. The scaling of X-ray variability with luminosity in ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Martín, O.; Papadakis, I.; Reig, P.; Zezas, A.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We investigate the relationship between the X-ray variability amplitude and X-ray luminosity for a sample of 14 bright ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with XMM-Newton/EPIC data, and compare it with the well-established, similar relationship for active galactic nuclei (AGN). Methods: We computed the normalised excess variance in the 2-10 keV light curves of these objects and their 2-10 keV band intrinsic luminosity L2-10 keV. We also determined model "variability-luminosity" relationships for AGN, under several assumptions regarding their power-spectral shape. We compared these model predictions at low luminosities with the ULX data. Results: The variability amplitude of the ULXs is significantly smaller than expected from a simple extrapolation of the AGN "variability-luminosity" relationship at low luminosities. We also find evidence of an anti-correlation between the variability amplitude and L2-10 keV for ULXs. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the AGN data but only if the ULXs data are shifted by four orders of magnitudes in luminosity. Conclusions: Most (but not all) of the ULXs could be "scaled-down" version of AGN if we assume that i) their black hole mass and accretion rate are between ~(2.5-30)× 103 M⊙ and ~1-80% of the Eddington limit and ii) their power spectral density has a doubly broken power-law shape. This shape and accretion rate is consistent with Galactic black hole systems operating in their so-called "low-hard" and "very-high" states.

  7. The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey: Measuring the AGN contribution to galaxies over cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Kate

    2014-07-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) is the widest deep radio survey ever attempted, covering ~7deg2 across its two fields, the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) and the European Large Area ISO Survey South 1 Region (ELAIS-S1). ATLAS has extensive multiwavelength data, including optical, infrared and X-ray, to complement its ~15μJy rms 1.4 GHz radio data. At these faint radio flux densities, the proportion of AGN to star-forming galaxies (SFGs) is high, and there are likely many composite objects, which have both an AGN and ongoing star formation. In ATLAS, we estimate that the number of AGN is approximately 50%, and this proportion will change with decreasing flux density. To understand the relationship between the AGN and the host galaxy, we need to measure the contribution of the AGN to the total luminosity, and determine how this varies with the evolutionary stage of the galaxy. Here I present results exploring the AGN contribution to galaxies over cosmic time, through the use of different multiwavelength discriminants.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGN neutrino source candidates (Achterberg+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achterberg, A.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Ahrens, J.; Atlee, D. W.; Bahcall, J. N.; Bair, X.; Baret, B.; Bartelt, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Becka, T.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Braun, J.; Burgess, C.; Burgess, T.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Clem, J.; Collin, B.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Davour, A.; Day, C. T.; de Clercq, C.; Desiati, P.; De Young, T.; Dreyer, J.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Evenson, P. A.; Fazely, A. R.; Feser, T.; Filimonov, K.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Greene, M. G.; Grullon, S.; Gross, A.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, D.; Hardtke, R.; Harenberg, T.; Hart, J. E.; Hauschildt, T.; Hays, D.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G. C.; Hodges, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Hughey, B.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jones, A.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Karle, A.; Kawai, H.; Kelley, J. L.; Kestel, M.; Kitamura, N.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Koepke, L.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Liubarsky, I.; Lundbert, J.; Madsen, J.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McCauley, T.; McParland, C. P.; Meli, A.; Messarius, T.; Meszaros, P.; Minor, R. H.; Miocinovic, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Mokhtarani, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morey, A.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Munich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Oegelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Olivas, A.; Patton, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Pretz, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Razzaque, S.; Refflinghaus, F.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rizzo, A.; Robbins, S.; Rott, C.; Rutledge, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schneider, D.; Seckel, D.; Seo, S. H.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, A. J.; Solarz, M.; Song, C.; Sopher, J. E.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Steffen, P.; Steele, D.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R.G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sumner, T.J.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Turcan, D.; Van Eijndhoven, T. J.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Voigt, B.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Waldmann, H.; Walter, M.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wendt, C.; Wiesbusch, C. H.; Wikstroem, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zornoza, J. D.; Biermann, P.L.

    2007-02-01

    The sensitivity of a search for sources of TeV neutrinos can be improved by grouping potential sources together into generic classes in a procedure that is known as source stacking. In this paper, we define catalogs of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and use them to perform a source stacking analysis. The grouping of AGN into classes is done in two steps: first, AGN classes are defined, then, sources to be stacked are selected assuming that a potential neutrino flux is linearly correlated with the photon luminosity in a certain energy band (radio, IR, optical, keV, GeV, TeV). Lacking any secure detailed knowledge on neutrino production in AGN, this correlation is motivated by hadronic AGN models, as briefly reviewed in this paper. The source stacking search for neutrinos from generic AGN classes is illustrated using the data collected by the AMANDA-II high-energy neutrino detector during the year 2000. No significant excess for any of the suggested groups was found. (11 data files).

  9. On the Scatter in the Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilerci Eser, E.; Vestergaard, M.; Peterson, B. M.; Denney, K. D.; Bentz, M. C.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate and quantify the observed scatter in the empirical relationship between the broad line region size R and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus, in order to better understand its origin. This study is motivated by the indispensable role of this relationship in the mass estimation of cosmologically distant black holes, but may also be relevant to the recently proposed application of this relationship for measuring cosmic distances. We study six nearby reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for which simultaneous UV and optical monitoring data exist. We also examine the long-term optical luminosity variations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 and employ Monte Carlo simulations to study the effects of the intrinsic variability of individual objects on the scatter in the global relationship for a sample of ~40 AGNs. We find the scatter in this relationship has a correctable dependence on color. For individual AGNs, the size of the Hβ emitting region has a steeper dependence on the nuclear optical luminosity than on the UV luminosity, which can introduce a scatter of ~0.08 dex into the global relationship, due the nonlinear relationship between the variations in the ionizing continuum and those in the optical continuum. Also, our analysis highlights the importance of understanding and minimizing the scatter in the relationship traced by the intrinsic variability of individual AGNs since it propagates directly into the global relationship. We find that using the UV luminosity as a substitute for the ionizing luminosity can reduce a sizable fraction of the current observed scatter of ~0.13 dex.

  10. X-ray surveys - Weighting the dark matter haloes of X-ray AGN: towards a physical description of the accretion history of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, Antonis; Mountrichas, G.; Fanidakis, N.; Finoguenov, A.; Aegis Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    The masses of the dark matter haloes in which AGN live is powerful diagnostic of the conditions under which supermassive black holes form and evolve across cosmic time. A new clustering estimation method will be presented which requires spectroscopy only for the AGN and uses photometric redshift probability density functions for galaxies to determine the projected real-space AGN/galaxy cross-correlation function. Our method is superior to traditional AGN clustering estimators (e.g. auto-correlation function) because (i) random errors are significantly suppressed when counting AGN/galaxy pairs, (ii) the impact of sample variance is minimized, and (iii) the requirements for spectroscopy are minimal; only spectroscopic redshift measurements for the AGN are needed. This method is applied to the combined AEGIS, COSMOS and ECDFS fields to infer the bias and dark matter halo mass of moderate luminosity (Lx~10^43 erg/s/cm^2) X-ray AGN at z~1 (total of 400). Predictions from the GALFORM semi-analytic model will be compared to the observations to show that a combination of hot and cold-gas accretion (the latter triggered by disk instabilities in spirals rather than mergers) reproduce well the clustering properties of X-ray AGN over a range of redshifts and luminosities.

  11. X-ray selected quasars and Seyfert galaxies - Cosmological evolution, luminosity function, and contribution to the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Stocke, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of quasars and Seyfert galaxies (active galactic nuclei /AGNs/) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 56 objects extracted from the expanded Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey, and it is exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space of X-ray selected AGNs is confirmed to be strongly nonuniform; the amount of cosmological evolution required by the data is in agreement with a previous determination based on a smaller sample of objects. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) is derived. The high-luminosity part of the XLF is satisfactorily described by a power law of slope gamma approximately 3.6. A significant flattening is observed at low luminosities. The simultaneous determination of the cosmological evolution and of the X-ray luminosity function of AGNs is then used to estimate the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse X-ray background. Using the best fit values for the evolution of AGNs and for their volume density, it is found that they contribute approximately 80 percent of the 2 keV diffuse X-ray background. Uncertainties in this estimate are still rather large; however, it seems difficult to reconcile the data with a contribution much less than 50 percent.

  12. The INTEGRAL/IBIS AGN catalogue - I. X-ray absorption properties versus optical classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malizia, A.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Masetti, N.; Panessa, F.; Stephen, J. B.; Ubertini, P.

    2012-11-01

    In this work we present the most comprehensive INTEGRAL active galactic nucleus (AGN) sample. It lists 272 AGN for which we have secure optical identifications, precise optical spectroscopy and measured redshift values plus X-ray spectral information, i.e. 2-10 and 20-100 keV fluxes plus column density. Here we mainly use this sample to study the absorption properties of active galaxies, to probe new AGN classes and to test the AGN unification scheme. We find that half (48 per cent) of the sample is absorbed, while the fraction of Compton-thick AGN is small (˜7 per cent). In line with our previous analysis, we have however shown that when the bias towards heavily absorbed objects which are lost if weak and at large distance is removed, as it is possible in the local Universe, the above fractions increase to become 80 and 17 per cent. We also find that absorption is a function of source luminosity, which implies some evolution in the obscuration properties of AGN. A few peculiar classes, so far poorly studied in the hard X-ray band, have been detected and studied for the first time such as 5 X-ray bright optically normal galaxies, 5 type 2 QSOs and 11 low-ionization nuclear emission regions. In terms of optical classification, our sample contains 57 per cent of type 1 and 43 per cent of type 2 AGN; this subdivision is similar to that found in X-rays if unabsorbed versus absorbed objects are considered, suggesting that the match between optical and X-ray classifications is overall good. Only a small percentage of sources (12 per cent) does not fulfil the expectation of the unified theory as we find 22 type 1 AGN which are absorbed and 10 type 2 AGN which are unabsorbed. Studying in depth these outliers we found that most of the absorbed type 1 AGN have X-ray spectra characterized by either complex or warm/ionized absorption more likely due to ionized gas located in an accretion disc wind or in the biconical structure associated with the central nucleus, therefore

  13. Hipparcos luminosities and asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedding, Timothy R.

    Asteroseismology involves using the resonant frequencies of a star to infer details about its internal structure and evolutionary state. Large efforts have been made and continue to be made to measure oscillation frequencies with both ground- and space-based telescopes, with typical precisions of one part in 103-104. However, oscillation frequencies are most useful when accompanied by accurate measurements of the more traditional stellar parameters such as luminosity and effective temperature. The Hipparcos catalogue provides luminosities with precisions of a few percent or better for many oscillating stars. I briefly discuss the importance of Hipparcos measurements for interpreting asteroseismic data on three types of oscillating stars: δ Scuti variables, rapidly oscillating Ap stars and solar-like stars.

  14. PRIMUS: THE DEPENDENCE OF AGN ACCRETION ON HOST STELLAR MASS AND COLOR

    SciTech Connect

    Aird, James; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Blanton, Michael R.; Zhu Guangtun; Burles, Scott M.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.

    2012-02-10

    We present evidence that the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the distribution of their accretion rates do not depend on the stellar masses of their host galaxies, contrary to previous studies. We use hard (2-10 keV) X-ray data from three extragalactic fields (XMM-LSS, COSMOS, and ELAIS-S1) with redshifts from the Prism Multi-object Survey to identify 242 AGNs with L{sub 2-10keV} = 10{sup 42-44} erg s{sup -1} within a parent sample of {approx}25,000 galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 over {approx}3.4 deg{sup 2} and to i {approx} 23. We find that although the fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN at fixed X-ray luminosity rises strongly with stellar mass, the distribution of X-ray luminosities is independent of mass. Furthermore, we show that the probability that a galaxy will host an AGN can be defined by a universal Eddington ratio distribution that is independent of the host galaxy stellar mass and has a power-law shape with slope -0.65. These results demonstrate that AGNs are prevalent at all stellar masses in the range 9.5< log M{sub *}/M{sub sun}<12 and that the same physical processes regulate AGN activity in all galaxies in this stellar mass range. While a higher AGN fraction may be observed in massive galaxies, this is a selection effect related to the underlying Eddington ratio distribution. We also find that the AGN fraction drops rapidly between z {approx} 1 and the present day and is moderately enhanced (factor {approx}2) in galaxies with blue or green optical colors. Consequently, while AGN activity and star formation appear to be globally correlated, we do not find evidence that the presence of an AGN is related to the quenching of star formation or the color transformation of galaxies.

  15. Highly variable AGN from the XMM-Newton slew survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strotjohann, N. L.; Saxton, R. D.; Starling, R. L. C.; Esquej, P.; Read, A. M.; Evans, P. A.; Miniutti, G.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We investigate the properties of a variability-selected complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in order to identify the mechanisms which cause large amplitude X-ray variability on timescales of years. Methods: A complete sample of 24 sources was constructed, from AGN which changed their soft X-ray luminosity by more than one order of magnitude over 5-20 years between ROSAT observations and the XMM-Newton slew survey. Follow-up observations were obtained with the Swift satellite. We analysed the spectra of these AGN at the Swift and XMM observation epochs, where six sources had continued to display extreme variability. Multiwavelength data are used to calculate black hole masses and the relative X-ray brightness αOX. Results: After removal of two probable spurious sources, we find that the sample has global properties which differ little from a non-varying control sample drawn from the wider XMM-slew/ROSAT/Veron sample of all secure AGN detections. A wide range of AGN types are represented in the varying sample. The black hole mass distributions for the varying and non-varying sample are not significantly different. This suggests that long timescale variability is not strongly affected by black hole mass. There is marginal evidence that the variable sources have a lower redshift (2σ) and X-ray luminosity (1.7σ). Apart from two radio-loud sources, the sample sources have normal optical-X-ray ratios (αOX) when at their peak but are X-ray weak during their lowest flux measurements. Conclusions: Drawing on our results and other studies, we are able to identify a variety of variability mechanisms at play: tidal disruption events, jet activity, changes in absorption, thermal emission from the inner accretion disc, and variable accretion disc reflection. Little evidence for strong absorption is seen in the majority of the sample and single-component absorption can be excluded as the mechanism for most sources.

  16. Multichroic Bolometric Detector Architecture for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Aritoki

    Characterization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) B-mode polarization signal will test models of inflationary cosmology, as well as constrain the sum of the neutrino masses and other cosmological parameters. The low intensity of the B-mode signal combined with the need to remove polarized galactic foregrounds requires a sensitive millimeter receiver and effective methods of foreground removal. Current bolometric detector technology is reaching the sensitivity limit set by the CMB photon noise. Thus, we need to increase the optical throughput to increase an experiment's sensitivity. To increase the throughput without increasing the focal plane size, we can increase the frequency coverage of each pixel. Increased frequency coverage per pixel has additional advantage that we can split the signal into frequency bands to obtain spectral information. The detection of multiple frequency bands allows for removal of the polarized foreground emission from synchrotron radiation and thermal dust emission, by utilizing its spectral dependence. Traditionally, spectral information has been captured with a multi-chroic focal plane consisting of a heterogeneous mix of single-color pixels. To maximize the efficiency of the focal plane area, we developed a multi-chroic pixel. This increases the number of pixels per frequency with same focal plane area. We developed multi-chroic antenna-coupled transition edge sensor (TES) detector array for the CMB polarimetry. In each pixel, a silicon lens-coupled dual polarized sinuous antenna collects light over a two-octave frequency band. The antenna couples the broadband millimeter wave signal into microstrip transmission lines, and on-chip filter banks split the broadband signal into several frequency bands. Separate TES bolometers detect the power in each frequency band and linear polarization. We will describe the design and performance of these devices and present optical data taken with prototype pixels and detector arrays. Our

  17. Effects of AGN feedback in galaxy groups and Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, C.; Padilla, N.; Cora, S.

    2009-05-01

    The combination of Cosmological numerical simulations and semi-analytical models of galaxy formation is a very appropriate method to study how different phenomena influence the galaxy and galaxy cluster formation. The main advantage of this combination consists in the fact that N-body simulations do not need to be rerun every time a change in the assumptions about baryonic processes is made since these are included in the semi-analytical models which run on the final N-Body simulation output. The Semi-analytic model takes into account radiative cooling of gas, stellar formation and different types of SN contribution, which eject energy and metals to the interstellar medium, allowing the chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium. In this project we use the semi-analytic hybrid model by Cora (2006, MNRAS, 368, 1540) and implement the AGN feedback, in two modes, the QSO mode (which takes into account mergers and galactic disk instabilities), and the Radio mode, which modifies the cooling in the galaxies These two processes allow to suppress the super flows in the hybrid model, and allows the study of QSOs in galaxy groups. This new implementation opens different possibles studies including the QSO luminosity function, the anti-hierarchical evolution of Mass Function, the BH mass and bulge mass relation, Color-Magnitude diagrams, TF relation, the galaxy luminosity function, the effects of AGN in neighbor galaxies and the behavior of QSOs in the sub-millimeter window.

  18. X-ray spectral properties of the AGN sample in the northern XMM-XXL field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhu; Merloni, Andrea; Georgakakis, Antonis; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Buchner, Johannes; Nandra, Kirpal; Salvato, Mara; Shen, Yue; Brusa, Marcella; Streblyanska, Alina

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and publicly release a catalogue consisting of 8445 point-like X-ray sources detected in the XMM-XXL north survey. For the 2512 AGN which have reliable spectroscopy from SDSS-III/BOSS, we present the X-ray spectral fitting which has been computed with a Bayesian approach. We have also applied an X-ray spectral stacking method to different sub-samples, selected on the basis of the AGN physical properties (L2-10 keV, z, MBH, λEdd and NH). We confirm the well-known Iwasawa-Taniguchi effect in our luminosity-redshift sub-samples, and argue that such an effect is due to a decrease in the covering factor of a distant obscuring `torus' with increasing X-ray luminosity. By comparing the distribution of the reflection fraction, the ratio of the normalization of the reflected component to the direct radiation, we find that the low-luminosity, low-redshift sub-sample had systematically higher reflection fraction values than the high-redshift, high-luminosity one. On the other hand, no significant difference is found between samples having similar luminosity but different redshift, suggesting that the structure of the torus does not evolve strongly with redshift. Contrary to previous works, we do not find evidence for an increasing photon index at high Eddington ratio. This may be an indication that the structure of the accretion disc changes as the Eddington ratio approaches unity. Comparing our X-ray spectral analysis results with the optical spectral classification, we find that ˜20 per cent of optical type-1 AGN show an X-ray absorbing column density higher than 1021.5 cm- 2, and about 50 per cent of type-2 AGN have an X-ray absorbing column density less than 1021.5 cm- 2. We suggest that the excess X-ray absorption shown in the high-luminosity optical type-1 AGN can be due to small-scale dust-free gas within (or close to) the broad-line region, while in the low-luminosity ones it can be due to a clumpy torus with a large covering factor.

  19. Searching for Dual AGNs in Galaxy Mergers: Understanding Double-Peaked [O III] and Ultra Hard X-rays as Selection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGurk, Rosalie C.; Max, Claire E.; Medling, Anne; Shields, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    When galaxies merge, gas accretes onto both central supermassive black holes. Thus, one expects to see close pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or dual AGNs, in a fraction of galaxy mergers. However, finding them remains a challenge. The presence of double-peaked [O III] or of ultra hard X-rays have been proposed as techniques to select dual AGNs efficiently. We studied a sample of double-peaked narrow [O III] emitting AGNs from SDSS DR7. By obtaining new and archival high spatial resolution images taken with the Keck 2 Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the near-infrared (IR) camera NIRC2, we showed that 30% of double-peaked [O III] emission line SDSS AGNs have two spatial components within a 3' radius. However, spatially resolved spectroscopy or X-ray observations are needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems containing two AGNs. We followed up these spatially-double candidate dual AGNs with integral field spectroscopy from Keck OSIRIS and Gemini GMOS and with long-slit spectroscopy from Keck NIRSPEC and Shane Kast Double Spectrograph. We find double-peaked emitters are caused sometimes by dual AGN and sometimes by outflows or narrow line kinematics. We also performed Chandra X-ray ACIS-S observations on 12 double-peaked candidate dual AGNs. Using our observations and 8 archival observations, we compare the distribution of X-ray photons to our spatially double near-IR images, measure X-ray luminosities and hardness ratios, and estimate column densities. By assessing what fraction of double-peaked emission line SDSS AGNs are true dual AGNs, we can better determine whether double-peaked [O III] is an efficient dual AGN indicator and constrain the statistics of dual AGNs. A second technique to find dual AGN is the detection of ultra hard X-rays by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. We use CARMA observations to measure and map the CO(1-0) present in nearby ultra-hard X-ray Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) merging with either a quiescent companion

  20. Why are AGN found in high-mass galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lan; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2008-12-01

    There is a strong observed mass dependence of the fraction of nearby galaxies that contain either low-luminosity [low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) type] or higher luminosity (Seyfert or composite type) active galactic nuclei (AGN). This implies that either only a small fraction of low-mass galaxies contain black holes, or that the black holes in these systems only accrete rarely or at very low rates, and hence are generally not detectable as AGN. In this paper, we use semi-analytic models implemented in the Millennium Simulation to analyse the mass dependence of the merging histories of dark matter haloes and of the galaxies that reside in them. Only a few per cent of galaxies with stellar masses less than M* < 1010Msolar are predicted to have experienced a major merger. The fraction of galaxies that have experienced major mergers increases steeply at larger stellar masses. We argue that if a major merger is required to form the initial seed black hole, the mass dependence of AGN activity in local galaxies can be understood quite naturally. We then investigate when the major mergers that first create these black holes are predicted to occur. High-mass galaxies are predicted to have formed their first black holes at very early epochs. The majority of low-mass galaxies never experience a major merger and hence may not contain a black hole, but a significant fraction of the supermassive black holes that do exist in low-mass galaxies are predicted to have formed recently.

  1. Revisiting Stochastic Variability of AGNs with Structure Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Szymon

    2016-08-01

    Discrepancies between reported structure function (SF) slopes and their overall flatness as compared to the expectations from the damped random walk (DRW) model, which generally well describes the variability of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), have triggered us to study this problem in detail. We review common AGN variability observables and identify their most common problems. Equipped with this knowledge, we study ∼9000 r-band AGN light curves from Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, using SFs described by stochastic processes with the power exponential covariance matrix of the signal. We model the “subensemble” SFs in the redshift–absolute magnitude bins with the full SF equation (including the turnover and the noise part) and a single power law (SPL; in the “red noise regime” after subtracting the noise term). The distribution of full-equation SF (SPL) slopes peaks at γ =0.55+/- 0.08 (0.52 ± 0.06) and is consistent with the DRW model. There is a hint of a weak correlation of γ with the luminosity and a lack of correlation with the black hole mass. The typical decorrelation timescale in the optical is τ =0.97+/- 0.46 year. The SF amplitude at one year obtained from the SPL fitting is {{SF}}0=0.22+/- 0.06 mag and is overestimated because the SF is already at the turnover part, so the true value is {{SF}}0=0.20+/- 0.06 mag. The asymptotic variability is {{SF}}∞ =0.25+/- 0.06 mag. It is strongly anticorrelated with both the luminosity and the Eddington ratio and is correlated with the black hole mass. The reliability of these results is fortified with Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. II. Multidimensional, Radiation-Hydrodynamics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, Anton; Kallman, Tim; Bisno\\vatyiI-Kogan, Gennadyi

    2011-01-01

    We explore a detailed model in which the active galactic nucleus (AGN) obscuration results from the extinction of AGN radiation in a global ow driven by the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains. We assume that external illumination by UV and soft X-rays of the dusty gas located at approximately 1pc away from the supermassive black hole is followed by a conversion of such radiation into IR. Using 2.5D, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulations in a ux-limited di usion approximation we nd that the external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via out ows driven by infrared radiation pressure in AGN with luminosities greater than 0:05 L(sub edd) and Compton optical depth, Tau(sub T) approx > & 1.

  3. The influence of local environment on the emergence of AGN activity in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M. A.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Coziol, R.; Focardi, P.

    2011-11-01

    We have carried out a spectroscopic study to determine the frequency and nature of the nuclear activity found in compact groups. With this aim we chose two samples, one selected from the Hickson Compact Groups Catalogue and another one from the Updated Zwicky Catalogue of Compact Groups. With the analysis of 1056 galaxies we found that more than 71% present some kind of emission, most of them, being low luminosity AGN (L_{Hα}=10^{39} erg s^{-1}). From these we only detect broad components in 16 which means a remarkable deficiency of broad line AGNs as compared to narrow lineAGNs, despite the high frequency of active galaxies encountered ingeneral in these groups.

  4. AGN spectral states from simultaneous UV and X-ray observations by XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, J.; Guainazzi, M.; Merloni, A.

    2016-06-01

    The accretion on super-massive black holes is believed to be similar to the accretion on stellar-mass black holes. It has been suggested by Koerding et al. (2006) and Sobolewska et al. (2008) that different types of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) correspond to different spectral states of X-Ray Binaries. We extend previous works by comparing strictly simultaneous UV and X-ray measurements of AGN obtained by the XMM-Newton satellite. The thermal disc component is estimated from the UV flux while the non-thermal flux is constrained from the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity. For sources with available radio-flux measurements, we investigate how the spectral hardness is related to their radio power, radio spectral slope and morphology. Our results suggest that the AGN may spectrally evolve in a similar way as X-ray binaries, however, several problems still remain unclear.

  5. AGNfitter: SED-fitting code for AGN and galaxies from a MCMC approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calistro Rivera, Gabriela; Lusso, Elisabeta; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Hogg, David W.

    2016-07-01

    AGNfitter is a fully Bayesian MCMC method to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxies from the sub-mm to the UV; it enables robust disentanglement of the physical processes responsible for the emission of sources. Written in Python, AGNfitter makes use of a large library of theoretical, empirical, and semi-empirical models to characterize both the nuclear and host galaxy emission simultaneously. The model consists of four physical emission components: an accretion disk, a torus of AGN heated dust, stellar populations, and cold dust in star forming regions. AGNfitter determines the posterior distributions of numerous parameters that govern the physics of AGN with a fully Bayesian treatment of errors and parameter degeneracies, allowing one to infer integrated luminosities, dust attenuation parameters, stellar masses, and star formation rates.

  6. Long Term Optical and Infrared Reverberation Mapping of High and Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Barth, Aaron; Brandt, Niel; Dawson, Kyle; Green, Paul; Ho, Luis; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Joner, Mike; Kenney, John; McGreer, Ian; Nordgren, Tyler; Schneider, Donald; Shen, Yue; Tao, Charling

    2016-08-01

    Previous Spitzer reverberation monitoring projects looking for UV/optical light absorbed and re-emitted in the IR by dust have been limited to very low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN) that could potentially show reverberation within a single cycle (~1 year). Cycle 11-12's two year baseline allowed for the reverberation mapping of 17 high luminosity quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. By combining ground based monitoring from Pan-STARRS, CFHT, and Steward Observatory telescopes with Spitzer data we have for the first time detected dust reverberation in quasars. We propose to continue this project to capitalize on the continuing optical motnoring from the ground and to increase the confidence in the detected lags. Additionally, the Call for Proposals asks for up to 1000 hours of observations in the Spitzer CVZ to accommodate battery charging needs. We propose to add to our quasar sample five lower luminosity Seyfert galaxies from the Pan-STARRS ground based optical survey that are in the Spitzer CVZ, which will increase the luminosity range of AGN we are studying and, combined with additional ground based observatories, provide for a continuous monitoring campaign lasting 2 years and thus provide the most detailed study of dust around AGN to date.

  7. Properties of galaxies around AGNs with the most massive supermassive black holes revealed by clustering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasaki, Yuji; Komiya, Yutaka; Ohishi, Masatoshi; Mizumoto, Yoshihiko

    2016-04-01

    We present results of the clustering analysis between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and galaxies at redshift 0.1-1.0, which was performed to investigate the properties of galaxies associated with the AGNs and reveal the nature of the fueling mechanism of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We used 8059 AGNs/quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) for which virial masses of individual SMBHs were measured, and divided them into four mass groups.Cross-correlation analysis was performed to reconfirm our previous result that cross-correlation length increases with SMBH mass MBH; we obtained consistent results. A linear bias of AGN for each mass group was measured as 1.47 for MBH = 107.5-108.2 M⊙ and 3.08 for MBH = 109-1010 M⊙. The averaged color and luminosity distributions of galaxies around the AGNs/QSOs were also derived for each mass group. The galaxy color Dopt-IR was estimated from a spectral energy distribution (SED) constructed from a catalog derived by merging the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) catalogs. The distributions of color and luminosity were derived by a subtraction method, which does not require redshift information of galaxies. The main results of this work are as follows. (1) A linear bias increases by a factor of two from the lower-mass group to the highest-mass group. (2) The environment around AGNs with the most massive SMBHs (MBH > 109 M⊙) is dominated by red sequence galaxies. (3) Marginal indication of decline in luminosity function at dimmer side of MIR > -19.5 is found for galaxies around AGNs with MBH = 108.2-109 M⊙ and nearest redshift group (z = 0.1-0.3). These results indicate that AGNs with the most massive SMBHs reside in haloes where a large fraction of galaxies have been transited to the red sequence. The accretion of hot halo gas as well as recycled gas from evolving stars can be one of the plausible mechanisms to fuel the SMBHs above ˜ 109 M⊙.

  8. Luminosity function and cosmological evolution of X-ray selected quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    The preliminary analysis of a complete sample of 55 X-ray sources is presented as part of the Medium Sensitivity Survey of the Einstein Observatory. A pure luminosity evolutionary law is derived in order to determine the uniform distribution of the sources and the rates of evolution for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) observed by X-ray and optical techniques are compared. A nonparametric representation of the luminosity function is fitted to the observational data. On the basis of the reduced data, it is determined that: (1) AGNs evolve cosmologically; (2) less evolution is required to explain the X-ray data than the optical data; (3) the high-luminosity portion of the X-ray luminosity can be described by a power-law with a slope of gamma = 3.6; and (4) the X-ray luminosity function flattens at low luminosities. Some of the implications of the results for conventional theoretical models of the evolution of quasars and Seyfert galaxies are discussed.

  9. [O iii] λ5007 and X-Ray Properties of a Complete Sample of Hard X-Ray Selected AGNs in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Ichikawa, K.; Ishino, Y.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Väisänen, P.; Ricci, C.; Berney, S.; Gandhi, P.; Koss, M.; Mushotzky, R.; Terashima, Y.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Crenshaw, M.

    2015-12-01

    We study the correlation between the [O iii] λ5007 and X-ray luminosities of local active galactic nuclei (AGNs), using a complete, hard X-ray (>10 keV) selected sample in the Swift/BAT 9-month catalog. From our optical spectroscopic observations at the South African Astronomical Observatory and the literature, a catalog of [O iii] λ5007 line flux for all 103 AGNs at Galactic latitudes of | b| \\gt 15^\\circ is compiled. Significant correlations with intrinsic X-ray luminosity ({L}{{X}}) are found for both observed ({L}[{{O} {{III}}] }) and extinction-corrected ({L}[{{O} {{III}}]}{{cor}}) luminosities, separately for X-ray unabsorbed and absorbed AGNs. We obtain the regression form of {L}[{{O} {{III}}] } \\propto \\{L}2-10\\{keV}1.18+/- 0.07 and {L}[{{O} {{III}}]}{{cor}} \\propto \\{L}2-10\\{keV}1.16+/- 0.09 from the whole sample. The absorbed AGNs with low (<0.5%) scattering fractions in soft X-rays show on average smaller {L}[{{O} {{III}}]}/{L}{{X}} and {L}[{{O} {{III}}]}{{cor}}/{L}{{X}} ratios than the other absorbed AGNs, while those in edge-on host galaxies do not. These results suggest that a significant fraction of this population is buried in tori with small opening angles. By using these {L}[{{O} {{III}}] } versus {L}{{X}} correlations, the X-ray luminosity function (LF) of local AGNs (including Compton-thick AGNs) in a standard population synthesis model gives much better agreement with the [O iii] λ5007 LF derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey than previously reported. This confirms that hard X-ray observations are a very powerful tool to find AGNs with high completeness.

  10. Multiwavelength AGN Surveys and Studies (IAU S304)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.; Sanders, David B.

    2014-08-01

    1. Historical surveys: spectral and colorimetric surveys for AGN, surveys for UV-excess galaxies; 2. AGN from IR/submm surveys: 2MASS, IRAS, ISO, AKARI, SCUBA, SST, WISE, Herschel; 3. AGN from radio/mm surveys: NVSS, FIRST, ALMA, Planck, and others; 4. AGN from X-ray/gamma-ray surveys: ROSAT, ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra, XMM, INTEGRAL, Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS, NuSTAR; 5. Multiwavelength AGN surveys, AGN statistics and cross-correlation of multiwavelength surveys; 6. Unification and other models of AGN, accretion modes, understanding of the structure of nearby AGN from IFUs on VLT and other telescopes; 7. AGN feedback in galaxies and clusters, AGN host galaxies and the AGN environments; 8. Binary AGN and Merging Super-Massive Black Holes; 9. Study of unique AGN, AGN variability and the Phenomena of Activity; 10. Future large projects; Author index.

  11. A spectroscopic survey of X-ray-selected AGNs in the northern XMM-XXL field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, M.-L.; Merloni, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Salvato, M.; Aubourg, E.; Brandt, W. N.; Brusa, M.; Buchner, J.; Dwelly, T.; Nandra, K.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Schwope, A.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a survey of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with optical spectroscopic follow-up in a ˜ 18 deg2 area of the equatorial XMM-XXL north field. A sample of 8445 point-like X-ray sources detected by XMM-Newton above a limiting flux of F_{0.5-10 keV} > 10^{-15} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} was matched to optical (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS) and infrared (IR; WISE) counterparts. We followed up 3042 sources brighter than r = 22.5 mag with the SDSS Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectrograph. The spectra yielded a reliable redshift measurement for 2578 AGNs in the redshift range z = 0.02-5.0, with 0.5-2 keV luminosities ranging from 1039-1046 erg s- 1. This is currently the largest published spectroscopic sample of X-ray-selected AGNs in a contiguous area. The BOSS spectra of AGN candidates show a distribution of optical line widths which is clearly bimodal, allowing an efficient separation between broad- and narrow-emission line AGNs. The former dominate our sample (70 per cent) due to the relatively bright X-ray flux limit and the optical BOSS magnitude limit. We classify the narrow-emission line objects (22 per cent of the full sample) using standard optical emission line diagnostics: the majority have line ratios indicating the dominant source of ionization is the AGN. A small number (8 per cent of the full sample) exhibit the typical narrow line ratios of star-forming galaxies, or only have absorption lines in their spectra. We term the latter two classes `elusive' AGN, which would not be easy to identify correctly without their X-ray emission. We also compare X-ray (XMM-Newton), optical colour (SDSS) and and IR (WISE) AGN selections in this field. X-ray observations reveal, by far, the largest number of AGN. The overlap between the selections, which is a strong function of the imaging depth in a given band, is also remarkably small. We show using spectral stacking that a large fraction of the X-ray AGNs would not be

  12. z ~ 1 Lyα Emitters. I. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, Isak G. B.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2014-03-01

    We construct a flux-limited sample of 135 candidate z ~ 1 Lyα emitters (LAEs) from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data using a new data cube search method. These LAEs have luminosities comparable to those at high redshifts and lie within a 7 Gyr gap present in existing LAE samples. We use archival and newly obtained optical spectra to verify the UV redshifts of these LAEs. We use the combination of the GALEX UV spectra, optical spectra, and X-ray imaging data to estimate the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction and its dependence on Lyα luminosity. We remove the AGNs and compute the luminosity function (LF) from 60 z ~ 1 LAE galaxies. We find that the best-fit LF implies a luminosity density increase by a factor of ~1.5 from z ~ 0.3 to z ~ 1 and ~20 from z ~ 1 to z ~ 2. We find a z ~ 1 volumetric Lyα escape fraction of 0.7% ± 0.4%. Based in part on data obtained from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Support for MAST for non-HST data is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science via grant NNX09AF08G and by other grants and contracts. Based in part on zCOSMOS observations carried out using the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory under Program ID: LP175.A-0839.

  13. OH/IR stars near the Galactic Center: Pulsation periods, luminosities, and polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry Jay; Mcgregor, Peter J.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Lawrence, Geoffrey F.

    1994-01-01

    17 stars in the direction of the Galactic Center, 15 of which are OH/IR stars, have been monitored at infrared wavelengths over a period of nearly eight years. Pulsation periods, bolometric luminosities, and light curves for 14 OH/IR stars are presented. The Galactic Center OH/IR stars range in luminosity between M(sub Bol) = -4.5 to M(sub Bol) = -6, implying main sequence progenitors with masses less than 3 solar mass. When compared to optically visible long period variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with similar bolometric luminosities, the Galactic Center OH/IR stars have pulsation periods on average 30% longer. This shift to longer periods is consistent with the current picture of late asymptotic giant branch evolution, placing the OH/IR stars in a phase immediately following the optically visible Mira variable phase during which the star dramatically increases its mass loss rate, becoming invisible at optical wavelength. Infrared polarimetry of 11 of the stars is also presented. The polarization for all of the stars is consistent with purely interstellar polarization, with little evidence for a significant intrinsic component. When compared to OH/IR stars in the galactic plane, the Galactic Center OH/IR stars appear similar in photometric characteristics, except none of the Galactic Center OH/IR stars shows the extremely thick dust shells or very high intrinsic polarization found in the more extreme galactic plane OH/IR stars.

  14. The SRG/eROSITA All-Sky Survey: A new era of large-scale structure studies with AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2015-08-01

    The four-year X-ray All-Sky Survey (eRASS) of the eROSITA telescope aboard the Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) satellite will detect about 3 million active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a median redshift of z~1 and typical luminosity of L0.5-2.0keV ~ 1044 erg/s. We demonstrate that this unprecedented AGN sample, complemented with redshift information, will supply us with outstanding opportunities for large-scale structure (LSS) studies.We show that with this sample of X-ray selected AGN, it will become possible for the first time to perform detailed redshift- and luminosity-resolved studies of the AGN clustering. This enable us to put strong constraints on different AGN triggering/fueling models as a function of AGN environment, which will dramatically improve our understanding of super-massive black hole growth and its correlation with the co-evolving LSS.Further, the eRASS AGN sample will become a powerful cosmological probe. We demonstrate for the first time that, given the breadth and depth of eRASS, it will become possible to convincingly detect baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) with ~8σ confidence in the 0.8 < z < 2.0 range, currently uncovered by any existing BAO survey.Finally, we discuss the requirements for follow-up missions and demonstrate that in order to fully exploit the potential of the eRASS AGN sample, photometric and spectroscopic surveys of large areas and a sufficient depth will be needed.

  15. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AS MAIN CONTRIBUTORS TO THE ULTRAVIOLET IONIZING EMISSIVITY AT HIGH REDSHIFTS: PREDICTIONS FROM A {Lambda}-CDM MODEL WITH LINKED AGN/GALAXY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Fiore, F.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Grazian, A.; Pentericci, L.

    2012-08-20

    We have evaluated the contribution of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) population to the ionization history of the universe based on a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation and evolution in the cold dark matter cosmological scenario. The model connects the growth of black holes and of the ensuing AGN activity to galaxy interactions. In the model we have included a self-consistent physical description of the escape of ionizing UV photons; this is based on the blast-wave model for the AGN feedback we developed in a previous paper to explain the distribution of hydrogen column densities in AGNs of various redshifts and luminosities, due to absorption by the host galaxy gas. The model predicts UV luminosity functions for AGNs that are in good agreement with those derived from the observations especially at low and intermediate redshifts (z {approx} 3). At higher redshifts (z > 5), the model tends to overestimate the data at faint luminosities. Critical biases in both the data and in the model are discussed to explain such apparent discrepancies. The predicted hydrogen photoionization rate as a function of redshift is found to be consistent with that derived from the observations. All of the above suggests that we should reconsider the role of the AGNs as the main driver of the ionization history of the universe.

  16. Radio Loudness of AGNs: Host Galaxy Morphology and the Spin Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Sikora, M.; Lasota, J.-P.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate how the total radio luminosity of AGN-powered radio sources depends on their accretion luminosity and the central black hole mass. We find that AGNs form two distinct and well separated sequences on the radio-loudness -- Eddington-ratio plane. We argue that these sequences mark the real upper bounds of radio-loudness of two distinct populations of AGNs: those hosted respectively by elliptical and disk galaxies. Both sequences show the same dependence of the radio-loudness on the Eddington ratio (an increase with decreasing Eddington ratio), which suggests that another parameter in addition to the accretion rate must play a role in determining the jet production efficiency in active galactic nuclei, and that this parameter is related to properties of the host galaxy. The revealed host-related radio dichotomy breaks down at high accretion rates where the dominant fraction of luminous quasars hosted by elliptical galaxies is radio quiet. We argue that the huge difference between the radio-loudness reachable by AGNs in disc and elliptical galaxies can be explained by the scenario according to which the spin of a black hole determines the outflows power, and central black holes can reach large spins only in early type galaxies (following major mergers), and not (in a statistical sense) in spiral galaxies.

  17. Delving into X-ray obscuration of type 2 AGN, near and far

    SciTech Connect

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Meg Urry, C.; Yaqoob, Tahir; Ptak, Andrew F.; Gandhi, Poshak

    2014-05-20

    Using self-consistent, physically motivated models, we investigate the X-ray obscuration in 19 Type 2 [O III] 5007 Å selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 9 of which are local Seyfert 2 galaxies and 10 of which are Type 2 quasar candidates. We derive reliable line-of-sight and global column densities for these objects, which is the first time this has been reported for an AGN sample; four AGNs have significantly different global and line-of-sight column densities. Five sources are heavily obscured to Compton-thick. We comment on interesting sources revealed by our spectral modeling, including a candidate 'naked' Sy2. After correcting for absorption, we find that the ratio of the rest-frame, 2-10 keV luminosity (L{sub 2-10} {sub keV,} {sub in}) to L{sub [O} {sub III]} is 1.54 ± 0.49 dex which is essentially identical to the mean Type 1 AGN value. The Fe Kα luminosity is significantly correlated with L{sub [O} {sub III]} but with substantial scatter. Finally, we do not find a trend between L {sub 2-10keV,} {sub in} and global or line-of-sight column density, between column density and redshift, between column density and scattering fraction, or between scattering fraction and redshift.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Variability-selected AGN in Chandra DFS (Trevese+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevese, D.; Boutsia, K.; Vagnetti, F.; Cappellaro, E.; Puccetti, S.

    2008-11-01

    Variability is a property shared by virtually all active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and was adopted as a criterion for their selection using data from multi epoch surveys. Low Luminosity AGNs (LLAGNs) are contaminated by the light of their host galaxies, and cannot therefore be detected by the usual colour techniques. For this reason, their evolution in cosmic time is poorly known. Consistency with the evolution derived from X-ray detected samples has not been clearly established so far, also because the low luminosity population consists of a mixture of different object types. LLAGNs can be detected by the nuclear optical variability of extended objects. Several variability surveys have been, or are being, conducted for the detection of supernovae (SNe). We propose to re-analyse these SNe data using a variability criterion optimised for AGN detection, to select a new AGN sample and study its properties. We analysed images acquired with the wide field imager at the 2.2m ESO/MPI telescope, in the framework of the STRESS supernova survey. We selected the AXAF field centred on the Chandra Deep Field South where, besides the deep X-ray survey, various optical data exist, originating in the EIS and COMBO-17 photometric surveys and the spectroscopic database of GOODS. (1 data file).

  19. Delving into X-Ray Obscuration of Type 2 AGN, Near and Far

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamassa, Stephanie M.; Yaqoob, Tahir; Ptak, Andrew F.; Jia, Jianjun; Heckman, Timothy M.; Gandhi, Poshak; Urry, C. Meg

    2014-01-01

    Using self-consistent, physically motivated models, we investigate the X-ray obscuration in 19 Type 2 [O iii] 5007Å selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 9 of which are local Seyfert 2 galaxies and 10 of which are Type 2 quasar candidates. We derive reliable line-of-sight and global column densities for these objects, which is the first time this has been reported for an AGN sample; four AGNs have significantly different global and line-of-sight column densities. Five sources are heavily obscured to Compton-thick. We comment on interesting sources revealed by our spectral modeling, including a candidate "naked" Sy2. After correcting for absorption, we find that the ratio of the rest-frame, 2-10 keV luminosity (L2-10 keV,in) to L[O iii] is 1.54 +/- 0.49 dex which is essentially identical to the mean Type 1 AGN value. The Fe K(alpha) luminosity is significantly correlated with L[O iii] but with substantial scatter. Finally, we do not find a trend between L2-10 keV,in and global or line-of-sight column density, between column density and redshift, between column density and scattering fraction, or between scattering fraction and redshift. Key words: galaxies: active - galaxies: Seyfert - X-rays: general

  20. NUSTAR Unveils a Heavily Obscured Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus in the Luminous Infrared Galaxy NGC 6286

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Treister, E.; Romero-Cañizales, C.; Arevalo, P.; Iwasawa, K.; Privon, G. C.; Sanders, D. B.; Schawinski, K.; Stern, D.; Imanishi, M.

    2016-03-01

    We report the detection of a heavily obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) NGC 6286 identified in a 17.5 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation. The source is in an early merging stage and was targeted as part of our ongoing NuSTAR campaign observing local luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies in different merger stages. NGC 6286 is clearly detected above 10 keV and by including the quasi-simultaneous Swift/XRT and archival XMM-Newton and Chandra data, we find that the source is heavily obscured (NH ≃(0.95-1.32) × 1024 cm-2) with a column density consistent with being Compton-thick (CT, {log}({N}{{H}}/{{cm}}-2)≥slant 24). The AGN in NGC 6286 has a low absorption-corrected luminosity (L2-10 keV ˜ 3-20 × 1041 erg s-1) and contributes ≲1% to the energetics of the system. Because of its low luminosity, previous observations carried out in the soft X-ray band (<10 keV) and in the infrared did not notice the presence of a buried AGN. NGC 6286 has multiwavelength characteristics typical of objects with the same infrared luminosity and in the same merger stage, which might imply that there is a significant population of obscured low-luminosity AGNs in LIRGs that can only be detected by sensitive hard X-ray observations.

  1. Rejection of Alpha Surface Background in Non-scintillating Bolometric Detectors: The ABSuRD Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; di Vacri, M. L.; Gorla, P.; Pavan, M.; Yeh, M.

    2016-08-01

    Due to their excellent energy resolution values and the vast choice of possible materials, bolometric detectors are currently widely used in the physics of rare events. A limiting aspect for bolometers rises from their inability to discriminate among radiation types or surface from bulk events. It has been demonstrated that the main limitation to sensitivity for purely bolometric detectors is represented by surface alpha contaminations, causing a continuous background that cannot be discriminated. A new scintillation-based technique for the rejection of surface alpha background in non-scintillating bolometric experiments is proposed in this work. The idea is to combine a scintillating and a high sensitivity photon detector with a non-scintillating absorber. We present results showing the possibility to reject events due to alpha decay at or nearby the surface of the crystal.

  2. XMM Observations of Intermediate-Luminosity BLRGs: Expanding the parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambruna, R.

    2005-10-01

    From the SDSS radio-loud AGN sample of Best et al. (2005) we extracted a volume-limited (z<0.1) sample of 11 Broad Line Radio Galaxies, with X-ray luminosities in the range 10^41-10^43 erg/s, 3 orders of magnitude lower than classical BLRGs, and matching most Seyferts. The XMM observations of this new sample will allow us to: 1) measure the X-ray continua; 2) test multiwavelength correlations valid for bright BLRGs; and 3) constrain the optical-to-X-ray SEDs. We will constrain the nature of the accretion flow and relative importance of the jet in these sources,and compare to luminous radio-loud and radio-quiet AGNs to uncover the fundamental parameters that determine the properties of radio-loud AGN.

  3. HIGHER LUMINOSITY B-FACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, John T

    2002-08-20

    The present B-factories PEP-II and KEKB have reached luminosities of 3-4 x 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}/s and delivered integrated luminosity at rates in excess of 4fb{sup -1} per month [1,2]. The recent turn on of these two B-Factories has shown that modern accelerator physics, design, and engineering can produce colliders that rapidly reach their design luminosities and deliver integrated luminosities capable of frontier particle physics discoveries. PEP-II and KEK-B with ongoing upgrade programs should reach luminosities of over 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s in a few years and with more aggressive improvements may reach luminosities of order 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/s by the end of the decade. However, due to particle physics requirements, the next generation B-Factory may require significantly more luminosity. Initial parameters of a very high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} B-Factory or Super B-Factory (SBF) are being developed incorporating several new ideas from the successful operation of the present generation e{sup +}e{sup -} accelerators [3,4]. A luminosity approaching 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s{sup -1} appears possible. Furthermore, the ratio of average to peak luminosity may be increased by 30% due to continuous injection. The operation of this accelerator will be qualitatively different from present e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders due to this continuous injection.

  4. Plasmonic and bolometric terahertz detection by graphene field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraviev, A. V.; Rumyantsev, S. L.; Liu, G.; Balandin, A. A.; Knap, W.; Shur, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    Polarization dependence analysis of back-gated graphene field-effect transistor terahertz responsivity at frequencies ranging from 1.63 to 3.11 THz reveals two independent mechanisms of THz detection by graphene transistor: plasmonic, associated with the transistor nonlinearity, and bolometric, caused by graphene sheet temperature increase due to THz radiation absorption. In the bolometric regime, electron and hole branches demonstrate a very different response to THz radiation, which we link to the asymmetry of the current-voltage characteristics temperature dependence with respect to the Dirac point. Obtained results are important for development of high-efficiency graphene THz detectors.

  5. 128 x 128 pixel uncooled bolometric FPA for IR detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerominek, Hubert; Pope, Timothy D.; Alain, Christine; Zhang, Rose; Lehoux, Mario; Picard, Francis; Fuchs, R. Wayne; Grenier, Carol; Rouleau, Yves; Cayer, Felix; Savard, Simon; Bilodeau, Ghislain; Couillard, Jean-Francois; Larouche, Carl; Ngo, Linh P.

    1998-10-01

    An uncooled IR camera making use of a 128 X 128 pixel bolometric FPA is presented. The reconfigurable bolometric focal plane array consist of 50 micrometer X 50 micrometer pixels and simple on-chip CMOS readout electronics which can be operated in random access, independent row and column clocking, and self-scanning modes. Depending on the selected pixel format and frame rate, the FPA's NETD varies from 0.52 degrees Celsius down to 0.10 degrees Celsius. The modular IR camera is software configured and provides RS170A analog video and 12-bit TTL format digital outputs.

  6. Feeding and feeback: The impact of AGN on the circumgalactic medium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara

    2014-10-01

    A galaxy's history is shaped by the fuelling and feedback of gas both from and into the circumgalactic medium (CGM). The importance of the CGM in low z galaxies has been unequivocally demonstrated in recent years, thanks to the availability of COS and a coupling with large galaxy surveys. These studies have traced the HI and metals out to several hundred kpc, revealing a rich and extended medium around star-forming galaxies. However, the impact of AGN on this CGM is almost completely unknown. We propose to observe the CGM probed by background QSOs at impact parameters up to 175 kpc around 10 moderately high luminosity AGN-dominated galaxies selected from the SDSS. By comparing with an archival sample of non-AGN in the same stellar mass, redshift and impact parameter regime we will investigate 1) the extent of the halo, its velocity structure and its metal enrichment and 2) the ionization structure and physical properties of the AGN galaxies' CGM. These objectives are both scientifically timely and yet only recently achievable, thanks to the combination of COS's high sensitivity, the compilation of large numbers of local AGN, and the development of sophisticated ionization models by our team.

  7. The 58-month BAT AGN catalogue: results from the Northern Galactic Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, R.; Mushotzky, R.; Brandt, N.; Winter, L.; Gandhi, P.; Melendez, M.; Baumgartner, W.

    2014-07-01

    The ongoing Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky survey is providing the most complete, hard X-ray selected census of local AGN activity, continually probing to deeper flux limits. I will present recent results from the 58-month BAT catalogue in the Northern Galactic Cap (Galactic latitude b > 50°), probing deeper than previous analyses of the 9-month and 36-month AGN catalogues. Our work includes a comprehensive analysis of the 0.1-200 keV properties (luminosity, absorption, spectral shape, Iron line and reflection properties) of 100 AGN in this sky region. This sample has excellent potential for further multi-wavelength study due to a wide range of archival data already available in other bands, and we propose it as a low-redshift analog to the "deep field" observations of AGNs at higher redshifts (e.g., CDFN/S, COSMOS, Lockman Hole). The stacked spectrum from this representative AGN sample looks remarkably like the Cosmic X-ray background (CXB) spectrum, albeit with a different underlying absorption and Compton reflection distributions than previous CXB synthesis models. I will outline various possibilities of how this sample can be used to further our understanding of local supermassive black hole accretion.

  8. The relationships between galaxies/AGN and the circum-/intergalactic medium at z<1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Sean; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Mulchaey, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The growth and evolution of galaxies is governed by gas accretion from circum-/intergalactic gas reservoirs and satellites that is regulated by feedback from stars and active galactic nuclei. To constrain the relationship between these gas reservoirs and galaxy properties, I have carried out deep and highly complete surveys of several thousand galaxies in fields with high quality absorption spectra of background quasars from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. The survey results imply that (1) highly ionized, heavy-element enriched gas traced by OVI absorption primarily arise in low-mass, gas-rich galaxy groups rather than the warm-hot phase of the intergalactic medium and that (2) galaxies with nearby neighbors exhibit more extened OVI absorbing gas than isolated galaxies. Together, these observations suggest that galaxy and group interactions play a role in stripping bound, heavy element enriched halo gas to enrich the intergalactic medium. In addition, I carried out the first large survey of circumgalactic gas around active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quasars. The cool, heavy-element enriched gas content of AGN and quasar host halos is strongly correlated with AGN luminosity, and the gas exhibit extreme kinematics with velocity spread inconsistent with gas bound to the AGN host. These observations provide tantalizing hints at the widespread impact of AGN feedback on the extended gas reservoirs around galaxies.

  9. The Stripe 82X Multiwavelength Survey of Supermassive Black Hole Growth in Powerful AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, C. Megan; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Cappelluti, Nico; Ananna, Tonima; Salvato, Mara; Civano, Francesca; Marchesi, Stefano; Comastri, Andrea; Richards, Gordon T.; Glikman, Eilat; Boehringer, Hans; Brusa, Marcella; Cardamone, Carolin; Chon, Gayoung; Farrah, Duncan; Gilfanov, Marat; Green, Paul J.; Komossa, Stefanie; Lira, Paulina; Makler, Martin; Pecoraro, Robert; Ranalli, Piero; Schawinski, Kevin; Stern, Daniel K.; Treister, Ezequiel; Viero, Marco; Stripe 82X Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Deep multiwavelength surveys over the past 15 years have told us that most black hole growth in low- to moderate-luminosity AGN is obscured, and thus not well sampled by optical or soft X-ray surveys. To study whether this also holds for high-luminosity AGN, however, requires a large volume survey (because luminous AGN are rare) that is sensitive to hard X-ray plus infrared emission out to high redshifts. Stripe 82X is exactly this survey — it adds X-ray coverage at F(0.5-10 keV) ≥ 10-15 ergs/cm^2/s to an equatorial legacy field with abundant data at other wavelengths, including far- and mid-infrared imaging (Herschel, Spitzer, WISE, UKIDSS, VHS, VICS82), deep radio imaging (VLA), deep optical imaging (SDSS, HSC, DES, CFHT), UV imaging (GALEX medium-depth), and extensive optical spectroscopy (~800 spectra per square degree). The current 31.3 deg2 X-ray catalog has 6181 unique X-ray sources, of which 88% have optical or infrared counterparts and 1842 have spectroscopic redshifts. We present the characteristics of this source population and describe our search for high-luminosity and/or high-redshift obscured quasars.

  10. ALMA resolves extended star formation in high-z AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.; Simpson, J. M.; Stanley, F.; Alexander, D. M.; Daddi, E.; Mullaney, J. R.; Pannella, M.; Rosario, D. J.; Smail, Ian

    2016-03-01

    We present high-resolution (0.3 arcsec) Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) 870 μm imaging of five z ≈ 1.5-4.5 X-ray detected AGN (with luminosities of L2-8keV > 1042 erg s-1). These data provide a ≳20 times improvement in spatial resolution over single-dish rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) measurements. The sub-millimetre emission is extended on scales of FWHM ≈ 0.2 arcsec-0.5 arcsec, corresponding to physical sizes of 1-3 kpc (median value of 1.8 kpc). These sizes are comparable to the majority of z=1-5 sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) with equivalent ALMA measurements. In combination with spectral energy distribution analyses, we attribute this rest-frame FIR emission to dust heated by star formation. The implied star-formation rate surface densities are ≈20-200 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, which are consistent with SMGs of comparable FIR luminosities (i.e. LIR ≈ [1-5] × 1012 L⊙). Although limited by a small sample of AGN, which all have high-FIR luminosities, our study suggests that the kpc-scale spatial distribution and surface density of star formation in high-redshift star-forming galaxies is the same irrespective of the presence of X-ray detected AGN.

  11. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A SAMPLE OF INTERMEDIATE-LUMINOSITY RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Karen T.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Cheung, Chi C.; Eracleous, Michael; Kadler, Matthias

    2011-07-15

    We present the results from exploratory (12-23 ks) XMM-Newton observations of six optically selected, radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs), together with new radio data and a reanalysis of their archival SDSS spectra. The sources were selected in an effort to expand the current sample of radio-loud AGNs suitable for detailed X-ray spectroscopy studies. The sample includes three broad-line and three narrow-line sources, with X-ray luminosities of the order of L{sub 2-10keV} {approx} 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}. The EPIC spectra of the broad-lined sources can be described by single power laws with photon indices {Gamma} {approx} 1.6 and little to negligible absorption (N{sub H} {approx}<10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}); on the contrary, significant absorption is detected in the narrow-lined objects, N{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}, one of which displays a prominent (equivalent width {approx}2 keV) Fe K{alpha} emission line. Studying their location in several luminosity-luminosity diagrams for radio-loud AGNs, we find that the sources fall at the lower end of the distribution for bright, classical radio-loud AGNs and close to LINER-like sources. As such, and as indicated by the ratios of their optical emission lines, we conclude that the sources of our sample fall on the border between radiatively efficient and inefficient accretion flows. Future deeper studies of these targets at X-rays and longer wavelengths will expand our understanding of the central engines of radio-loud AGNs at a critical transition region.

  12. A luminous hot accretion flow in the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus NGC 7213

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Ma, Renyi; Yang, Qi-Xiang

    2016-08-01

    The active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 7213 shows a complex correlation between the monochromatic radio luminosity LR and the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity LX, i.e. the correlation is unusually weak with p ˜ 0 (in the form L_R∝ L_X^p) when LX is below a critical luminosity, and steep with p > 1 when LX is above that luminosity. Such a hybrid correlation in individual AGNs is unexpected as it deviates from the fundamental plane of AGN activity. Interestingly, a similar correlation pattern is observed in the black-hole X-ray binary H1743-322, where it has been modelled by switching between different modes of accretion. We propose that the flat LR-LX correlation of NGC 7213 is due to the presence of a luminous hot accretion flow, an accretion model whose radiative efficiency is sensitive to the accretion rate. Given the low luminosity of the source, LX ˜ 10-4 of the Eddington luminosity, the viscosity parameter is determined to be small, α ≈ 0.01. We also modelled the broad-band spectrum from radio to γ-rays, the time lag between the radio and X-ray light curves, and the implied size and the Lorentz factor of the radio jet. We predict that NGC 7213 will enter into a two-phase accretion regime when L_X⪆ 1.5 × 10^{42} erg s^{-1}. When this happens, we predict a softening of the X-ray spectrum with the increasing flux and a steep radio/X-ray correlation.

  13. Higher prevalence of X-ray selected AGN in intermediate-age galaxies up to z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Barro, Guillermo; Aird, James; Ferreras, Ignacio; Cava, Antonio; Cardiel, Nicolás; Esquej, Pilar; Gallego, Jesús; Nandra, Kirpal; Rodríguez-Zaurín, Javier

    2014-10-01

    We analyse the stellar populations in the host galaxies of 53 X-ray selected optically dull active galactic nuclei (AGN) at 0.34 < z < 1.07 with ultradeep (mAB = 26.5, 3σ) optical medium-band (R ˜ 50) photometry from the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS). The spectral resolution of SHARDS allows us to consistently measure the strength of the 4000 Å break, Dn(4000), a reliable age indicator for stellar populations. We confirm that most X-ray selected moderate-luminosity AGN (LX < 1044 erg s-1) are hosted by massive galaxies (typically M* >1010.5 M⊙) and that the observed fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN increases with the stellar mass. A careful selection of random control samples of inactive galaxies allows us to remove the stellar mass and redshift dependences of the AGN fraction to explore trends with several stellar age indicators. We find no significant differences in the distribution of the rest-frame U - V colour for AGN hosts and inactive galaxies, in agreement with previous results. However, we find significantly shallower 4000 Å breaks in AGN hosts, indicative of younger stellar populations. With the help of a model-independent determination of the extinction, we obtain extinction-corrected U - V colours and light-weighted average stellar ages. We find that AGN hosts have younger stellar populations and higher extinction compared to inactive galaxies with the same stellar mass and at the same redshift. We find a highly significant excess of AGN hosts with Dn(4000) ˜ 1.4 and light-weighted average stellar ages of 300-500 Myr, as well as a deficit of AGN in intrinsic red galaxies. We interpret failure in recognizing these trends in previous studies as a consequence of the balancing effect in observed colours of the age-extinction degeneracy.

  14. The SIX survey: evolution and properties of AGN in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottacini, Eugenio

    2014-07-01

    evolution of AGN in the local universe discussing the X-ray luminosity function. The properties of the AGN circum-nuclear environment will be discussed checking the consistency with the AGN unification scheme. Also I will compare the results from the SIX survey to the results predicted for the NuSTAR survey. Finally preliminary results of the all-sky SIX survey are presented.

  15. The development of a color-magnitude diagram for active galactic nuclei (AGN): hope for a new standard candle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnis, G.; Chung, S.; Gonzales, E. V.; Gorjian, V.; Pruett, L.

    2015-12-01

    Of the galaxies in our universe, only a small percentage currently have Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). These galaxies tend to be further out in the universe and older, and are different from inactive galaxies in that they emit high amounts of energy from their central black holes. These AGN can be classified as either Seyferts or quasars, depending on the amount of energy emitted from the center (less or more). We are studying the correlation between the ratio of dust emission and accretion disk emission to luminosities of AGN in order to determine if there is a relationship strong enough to act as a predictive model for distance within the universe. This relationship can be used as a standard candle if luminosity is found to determine distances in space. We have created a color-magnitude diagram depicting this relationship between luminosity and wavelengths, similar to the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. The more luminous the AGN, the more dust surface area over which to emit energy, which results in a greater near-infrared (NIR) luminosity. This differs from previous research because we use NIR to differentiate accretion from dust emission. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), we analyzed over one thousand Type 1 Seyferts and quasars. We studied data at different wavelengths in order to show the relationship between color (the ratio of one wavelength to another) and luminosity. It was found that plotting filters i-K (the visible and mid-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum) against the magnitude absolute K (luminosity) showed a strong correlation. Furthermore, the redshift range between 0.14 and 0.15 was the most promising, with an R2 of 0.66.

  16. Non-thermal AGN models

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.L.

    1986-12-01

    The infrared, optical and x-ray continua from radio quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN) are explained by a compact non-thermal source surrounding a thermal ultraviolet emitter, presumably the accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The ultraviolet source is observed as the ''big blue bump.'' The flat (..cap alpha.. approx. = .7) hard x-ray spectrum results from the scattering of thermal ultraviolet photons by the flat, low energy end of an electron distribution ''broken'' by Compton losses; the infrared through soft x-ray continuum is the synchrotron radiation of the steep, high energy end of the electron distribution. Quantitative fits to specific AGN result in models which satisfy the variability constraints but require electron (re)acceleration throughout the source. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  17. A Chandra-Swift View of Point Sources in Hickson Compact Groups: High AGN Fraction but a Dearth of Strong AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Fedotov, K.; Eracleous, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Desjardins, T. D.; Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.

    2014-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray point source catalogs for 9 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs, 37 galaxies) at distances of 34-89 Mpc. We perform detailed X-ray point source detection and photometry and interpret the point source population by means of simulated hardness ratios. We thus estimate X-ray luminosities (L(sub x)) for all sources, most of which are too weak for reliable spectral fitting. For all sources, we provide catalogs with counts, count rates, power-law indices (gamma), hardness ratios, and L(sub X), in the full (0.5-8.0 keV), soft (0.5-2.0 keV), and hard (2.0-8.0 keV) bands. We use optical emission-line ratios from the literature to re-classify 24 galaxies as star-forming, accreting onto a supermassive black hole (AGNs), transition objects, or low-ionization nuclear emission regions. Two-thirds of our galaxies have nuclear X-ray sources with Swift/UVOT counterparts. Two nuclei have L(sub X),0.5-8.0 keV > 10(exp 42) erg s-1, are strong multi-wavelength active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and follow the known alpha OX-?L? (nearUV) correlation for strong AGNs. Otherwise, most nuclei are X-ray faint, consistent with either a low-luminosity AGN or a nuclear X-ray binary population, and fall in the 'non-AGN locus' in alpha OX-?L? (nearUV) space, which also hosts other normal galaxies. Our results suggest that HCG X-ray nuclei in high specific star formation rate spiral galaxies are likely dominated by star formation, while those with low specific star formation rates in earlier types likely harbor a weak AGN. The AGN fraction in HCG galaxies with MR (is) less than -20 and L(sub X),0.5-8.0 keV (is) greater than 10(exp 41) erg s-1 is 0.08+0.35 -0.01, somewhat higher than the 5% fraction in galaxy clusters.

  18. A Chandra-Swift View of Point Sources in Hickson Compact Groups: High AGN Fraction but a Dearth of Strong AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Fedotov, K.; Eracleous, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Desjardins, T. D.; Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.

    2014-05-01

    We present Chandra X-ray point source catalogs for 9 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs, 37 galaxies) at distances of 34-89 Mpc. We perform detailed X-ray point source detection and photometry and interpret the point source population by means of simulated hardness ratios. We thus estimate X-ray luminosities (LX ) for all sources, most of which are too weak for reliable spectral fitting. For all sources, we provide catalogs with counts, count rates, power-law indices (Γ), hardness ratios, and LX , in the full (0.5-8.0 keV), soft (0.5-2.0 keV), and hard (2.0-8.0 keV) bands. We use optical emission-line ratios from the literature to re-classify 24 galaxies as star-forming, accreting onto a supermassive black hole (AGNs), transition objects, or low-ionization nuclear emission regions. Two-thirds of our galaxies have nuclear X-ray sources with Swift/UVOT counterparts. Two nuclei have L X, 0.5-8.0 keV >1042 erg s-1, are strong multi-wavelength active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and follow the known αOX-νL ν (nearUV) correlation for strong AGNs. Otherwise, most nuclei are X-ray faint, consistent with either a low-luminosity AGN or a nuclear X-ray binary population, and fall in the "non-AGN locus" in αOX-νL ν (nearUV) space, which also hosts other normal galaxies. Our results suggest that HCG X-ray nuclei in high specific star formation rate spiral galaxies are likely dominated by star formation, while those with low specific star formation rates in earlier types likely harbor a weak AGN. The AGN fraction in HCG galaxies with MR <= -20 and L X, 0.5-8.0 keV >=1041 erg s-1 is 0.08^{+0.35}_{-0.01}, somewhat higher than the ~5% fraction in galaxy clusters.

  19. Comparing Simulations of AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Thacker, Robert J.; Dubois, Yohan; Wurster, James; Silk, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological zoom simulations of a region around a forming galaxy cluster, comparing the ability of the methods to handle successively more complex baryonic physics. In the simplest, non-radiative case, the two methods are in good agreement with each other, but the SPH simulations generate central cores with slightly lower entropies and virial shocks at slightly larger radii, consistent with what has been seen in previous studies. The inclusion of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback leads to much larger differences between the two methods. Most dramatically, at z=5, rapid cooling in the AMR case moves the accretion shock to well within the virial radius, while this shock remains near the virial radius in the SPH case, due to excess heating, coupled with poorer capturing of the shock width. On the other hand, the addition of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to the simulations results in much better agreement between the methods. For our AGN model, both simulations display halo gas entropies of 100 keV cm2, similar decrements in the star formation rate, and a drop in the halo baryon content of roughly 30%. This is consistent with the AGN growth being self-regulated, regardless of the numerical method. However, the simulations with AGN feedback continue to differ in aspects that are not self-regulated, such that in SPH a larger volume of gas is impacted by feedback, and the cluster still has a lower entropy central core.

  20. New insights into AGN coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohfink, Anne; Fabian, Andrew C.; Malzac, Julien; Belmont, Renaud; Buisson, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are some of the most energetic sources of radiation in the Universe. The conversion of gravitational energy into radiation is thought to take place in an accretion disk/corona system just outside the black hole. In this system thermal, UV/optical photons from the accretion disk are upscattered in a corona of hot electrons situated above the accretion disk producing X-rays. The nature of this Comptonizing corona remains a key open question in AGN physics. The NuSTAR satellite provides the opportunity to study the Comptonization spectrum produced by the corona in great detail. In our talk we will show some key results from these new studies of the Comptonization spectrum. We explore how, together with our growing knowledge of coronal sizes, we are able to draw first conclusions about the physics taking place in the corona. We find evidence for coronae to be hot and radiatively compact, putting them close to the boundary of the region in the compactness-temperature diagram which is forbidden due to runaway pair production. This suggests that pair production and annihilation are essential ingredients in the coronae of AGN and that they control the coronal temperature and shape of the observed spectra.

  1. AGN Feedback in Overdense Environments at z=2.23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucy, Adrian B.; Lehmer, B.; Alexander, D. M.; Best, P.; Geach, J.; Harrison, C. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Matsuda, Y.; Mullaney, J.; Smail, I.; Sobral, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from a ≈100 ks Chandra observation of the 2QZ Cluster 1004+00 galaxy overdensity at z=2.23. This 2QZ Clus structure was first identified as an overdensity of four optically-selected quasars; that sample was subsequently found to overlap with an overdensity of 22 Hα-emitting galaxies (HAEs) identified through narrow and broad band near-infrared imaging by Matsuda et al. (2011). In addition to the preselected quasars in 2QZ Clus, our Chandra observation reveals that a further three HAEs are X-ray sources, all characterized by X-ray luminosities and spectral slopes consistent with unobscured active galactic nuclei (AGN). In total, we find that ≈30% of HAEs in our observed region of 2QZ Clus are AGN. This AGN fraction is high compared to AGN fractions among HAEs in the Chandra-COSMOS field (C-COSMOS), and if this enhancement is purely a result of the quasar selection bias of our sample, we estimate that such activity is rare at this redshift. Hα is a tracer of star formation, so 2QZ Clus is well suited to the investigation of the coeval growth of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies in the precursors to rich local clusters. Moreover, we have an ideal control sample in C-COSMOS; this survey contains a large sample of HAEs classified identically using infrared imaging, but without any selection of quasars. We calculate AGN fraction as a function of galaxy overdensity in C-COSMOS, and perform stacking analyses of Chandra and 250μ Herschel SPIRE data to obtain mean black hole accretion rates dMBH/dt and star formation rates SFR. Preliminary results indicate that dMBH/dt and its ratio to SFR are significantly elevated in 2QZ Clus compared to similarly overdense regions of C-COSMOS. We discuss these relations in the context of theoretical models describing the emergence of the MBH/Mgal relation of the local Universe.

  2. The Einstein polarization interferometer for cosmology (EPIC) and the millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer (MBI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Tucker, G. S.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ali, S.; Bierman, E.; Bunn, E. F.; Calderon, C.; Gault, A. C.; Hyland, P. O.; Keating, B. G.; Kim, J.; Korotkov, A.; Malu, S. S.; Mauskopf, P.; Murphy, J. A.; O'Sullivan, C.; Piccirillo, L.; Wandelt, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    We provide an overview of a mission concept study underway for the Einstein Inflation Probe (EIP). Our study investigates the advantages and tradeoffs of using an interferometer (EPIC) for the mission. We also report on the status of the millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer (MBI), a ground-based pathfinder optimized for degree-scale CMB polarization measurements at 90 GHz.

  3. Bolometric light curves and explosion parameters of 38 stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, J. D.; Bersier, D.; James, P. A.; Mazzali, P. A.; Eldridge, J. J.; Fraser, M.; Pian, E.

    2016-03-01

    Literature data are collated for 38 stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae (SE SNe; i.e. SNe IIb, Ib, Ic and Ic-BL) that have good light-curve coverage in more than one optical band. Using bolometric corrections derived in previous work, the bolometric light curve of each SN is recovered and template bolometric light curves provided. Peak light distributions and decay rates are investigated; SNe subtypes are not cleanly distinguished in this parameter space, although some grouping of types does occur and there is a suggestion of a Phillips-like relation for most SNe Ic-BL. The bolometric light curves are modelled with a simple analytical prescription and compared to results from more detailed modelling. Distributions of the explosion parameters show the extreme nature of SNe Ic-BL in terms of their 56Ni mass and the kinetic energy, however ejected masses are similar to other subtypes. SNe Ib and Ic have very similar distributions of explosion parameters, indicating a similarity in progenitors. SNe IIb are the most homogeneous subtype and have the lowest average values for 56Ni mass, ejected mass, and kinetic energy. Ejecta masses for each subtype and SE SNe as a whole are inconsistent with those expected from very massive stars. The majority of the ejecta mass distribution is well described by more moderately massive progenitors in binaries, indicating these are the dominant progenitor channel for SE SNe.

  4. Extended X-ray emission in the IC 2497 - Hanny's Voorwerp system: energy injection in the gas around a fading AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Lia F.; Schawinski, Kevin; Koss, Michael; Treister, Ezequiel; Maksym, W. Peter; Keel, William C.; Urry, C. Megan; Lintott, Chris J.; Wong, O. Ivy

    2016-04-01

    We present deep Chandra X-ray observations of the core of IC 2497, the galaxy associated with Hanny's Voorwerp and hosting a fading AGN. We find extended soft X-ray emission from hot gas around the low intrinsic luminosity (unobscured) AGN (Lbol ˜ 1042-1044 erg s-1). The temperature structure in the hot gas suggests the presence of a bubble or cavity around the fading AGN ({{E}}_bub ˜ 10^{54}{-}10^{55} erg). A possible scenario is that this bubble is inflated by the fading AGN, which after changing accretion state is now in a kinetic mode. Other possibilities are that the bubble has been inflated by the past luminous quasar (Lbol ˜ 1046 erg s-1), or that the temperature gradient is an indication of a shock front from a superwind driven by the AGN. We discuss the possible scenarios and the implications for the AGN-host galaxy interaction, as well as an analogy between AGN and X-ray binaries lifecycles. We conclude that the AGN could inject mechanical energy into the host galaxy at the end of its lifecycle, and thus provide a source for mechanical feedback, in a similar way as observed for X-ray binaries.

  5. Massive molecular outflows and evidence for AGN feedback from CO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicone, C.; Maiolino, R.; Sturm, E.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; Feruglio, C.; Neri, R.; Aalto, S.; Davies, R.; Fiore, F.; Fischer, J.; García-Burillo, S.; González-Alfonso, E.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Piconcelli, E.; Veilleux, S.

    2014-02-01

    We study the properties of massive, galactic-scale outflows of molecular gas and investigate their impact on galaxy evolution. We present new IRAM PdBI CO(1-0) observations of local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and quasar-hosts: a clear signature of massive and energetic molecular outflows, extending on kpc scales, is found in the CO(1-0) kinematics of four out of seven sources, with measured outflow rates of several 100 M⊙ yr-1. We combine these new observations with data from the literature, and explore the nature and origin of massive molecular outflows within an extended sample of 19 local galaxies. We find that starburst-dominated galaxies have an outflow rate comparable to their star formation rate (SFR), or even higher by a factor of ~2-4, implying that starbursts can indeed be effective in removing cold gas from galaxies. Nevertheless, our results suggest that the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) can boost the outflow rate by a large factor, which is found to increase with the LAGN/Lbol ratio. The gas depletion time scales due to molecular outflows are anti-correlated with the presence and luminosity of an AGN in these galaxies, and range from a few hundred million years in starburst galaxies down to just a few million years in galaxies hosting powerful AGNs. In quasar hosts, the depletion time scales due to the outflow are much shorter than the depletion time scales due to star formation. We estimate the outflow kinetic power and find that, for galaxies hosting powerful AGNs, it corresponds to about 5% of the AGN luminosity, as expected by models of AGN feedback. Moreover, we find that momentum rates of about 20 LAGN/c are common among the AGN-dominated sources in our sample. For "pure" starburst galaxies, our data tentatively support models in which outflows are mostly momentum-driven by the radiation pressure from young stars onto dusty clouds. Overall, our results indicate that, although starbursts are effective in powering

  6. STS atmospheric luminosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the STS-8 space shuttle mission special photographic and TV operations were carried out to record the properties of the spacecraft induced luminosities. One of these luminous phenomena is the quiescent vehicle glow which was photographed during the STS-8 mission with an image intensified photographic camera, with and without an objective grating. During the latter part of the mission the altitude of the shuttle was relatively low (120 n.m. = 222 km) and unprecedentedly high intensity of the glow was observed. The crew reported that the glow was easily visible to the naked eye. The proper orientation of the shuttle with respect to the velocity vector and the objective grating permitted the exposure of good objective spectrum of the glow in the visible region. From the results it is clear that the spectrum appears to be a continuum as observed by the image intensifier objective grating camera. Qualitative examination of the data shows that there is very tail little glow ion the wavelength range of 4300 to about 5000 angstroms. Above 5000 angstroms the glow becomes stronger towards the red and then it falls off towards higher wavelength and of the spectrum presumably because of the responsivity of the device.

  7. ZFOURGE catalogue of AGN candidates: an enhancement of 160-μm-derived star formation rates in active galaxies to z = 3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Michael J.; Spitler, Lee R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Rees, Glen A.; Labbé, Ivo; Allen, Rebecca J.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Mullaney, James R.; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Papovich, Casey; Quadri, Ryan F.; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Tomczak, Adam R.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates within the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) to determine the impact they have on star formation in their host galaxies. We first identify a population of radio, X-ray, and infrared-selected AGN by cross-matching the deep Ks-band imaging of ZFOURGE with overlapping multiwavelength data. From this, we construct a mass-complete (log(M_{{*}}/M_{{⊙}}) ≥9.75), AGN luminosity limited sample of 235 AGN hosts over z = 0.2-3.2. We compare the rest-frame U - V versus V - J (UVJ) colours and specific star formation rates (sSFRs) of the AGN hosts to a mass-matched control sample of inactive (non-AGN) galaxies. UVJ diagnostics reveal AGN tend to be hosted in a lower fraction of quiescent galaxies and a higher fraction of dusty galaxies than the control sample. Using 160 μm Herschel PACS data, we find the mean specific star formation rate of AGN hosts to be elevated by 0.34 ± 0.07 dex with respect to the control sample across all redshifts. This offset is primarily driven by infrared-selected AGN, where the mean sSFR is found to be elevated by as much as a factor of ˜5. The remaining population, comprised predominantly of X-ray AGN hosts, is found mostly consistent with inactive galaxies, exhibiting only a marginal elevation. We discuss scenarios that may explain these findings and postulate that AGN are less likely to be a dominant mechanism for moderating galaxy growth via quenching than has previously been suggested.

  8. Spectral-luminosity evolution of active galactic nuclei and the cosmic X- and gamma ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, Darryl; Boldt, Elihu

    1992-01-01

    Coherent electromagnetic dynamo acceleration processes, which act on charge particles within the context of black hole accretion disk scenarios, are generally regarded as the underlying central power source for active galactic nuclei (AGN). If the precursor active galaxies (PAG) for such AGN are formed at high redshift and contain initial seed black holes with mass approximately equal to 10(exp 4) solar masses, then the Eddington limited X-ray radiation emitted during their lifetime will undergo the phenomenon of 'spectral-luminosity evolution'. When accretion disks are first formed at the onset of galaxy formation the accretion rate occurs at very high values of luminosity/size compactness parameter L/R greater than 10(exp 30) erg/cm-sec. In the absence of extended structure, such high values of L/R generate dynamic constraints which suppress coherent, black hole/accretion disk dynamo particle acceleration processes. This inhibits nonthermal radiation processes and causes the spectrum of X-radiation emitted by PAG to be predominantly thermal. A superposition of PAG sources at z is greater than or equal to 6 can account for the residual cosmic X-ray background (CXB) obtained from the total CXB after subtraction of foreground AGN sources associated with present epoch Seyfert galaxies. The manner in which the PAG undergo spectral-luminosity evolution into Seyfert galaxies is investigated.

  9. The Luminosity and Stellar Mass Functions of Red W1-W2 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. A.; Rosenberg, J. L.; Satyapal, S.; Secrest, N. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of nearby galaxies as a function of their [3.4]-[4.6] colour. Galaxies that are red in their [3.4]-[4.6] colour contain heated dust and the reddest systems ([3.4]-[4.6] > 0.5) are classified as AGN by some selection criteria. The sample discussed here includes nearby galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that are also in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalogue. We calculate the number density of galaxies, in the form of the luminosity and mass functions, using the V/Vmax method and a Stepwise Maximum Likelihood method that has been modified to account for the additional colour selection. The reddest galaxies which have [3.4]-[4.6] > 0.8 and are sometimes classified as AGN by their colour, make up 0.2% of nearby galaxies. However, the reddest galaxies are a rising fraction of the low mass galaxy population. Identifying the lowest mass (M < 108M⊙) red ([3.4]-[4.6] > 0.8) galaxies as AGN is surprising given that none are optical AGN or composites, in contrast with their more massive (M > 1010M⊙) red galaxy counterparts that are dominated by optical AGN and composites (86.4%). We also show that these low mass red galaxies are associated with higher specific star formation rates than their bluer counterparts. While the properties of this relatively rare segment of nearby low-mass galaxies are intriguing, particularly if they are associated with AGN activity, there is not yet enough evidence to determine whether it is AGN or unusual star formation that is driving red colours in these systems.

  10. THE VLA SURVEY OF CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH. V. EVOLUTION AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SUB-MILLIJANSKY RADIO SOURCES AND THE ISSUE OF RADIO EMISSION IN RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Padovani, P.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-10

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 {mu}Jy at the field center and redshift {approx}5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P {approx}> 3 x 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1}) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for {approx}30% of the sample and {approx}60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at {approx}< 0.1 mJy. This implies that future, large area sub-millijansky surveys, given the appropriate ancillary multiwavelength data, have the potential of being able to assemble vast samples of radio-quiet AGNs, bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  11. The VLA Survey of Chandra Deep Field South. V. Evolution and Luminosity Functions of Sub-millijansky Radio Sources and the Issue of Radio Emission in Radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-01

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 μJy at the field center and redshift ~5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P >~ 3 × 1024 W Hz-1) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for ~30% of the sample and ~60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at <~ 0.1 mJy. This implies that future, large area sub-millijansky surveys, given the appropriate ancillary multiwavelength data, have the potential of being able to assemble vast samples of radio-quiet AGNs, bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  12. High luminosity muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  13. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF VIRIAL BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES OF MODERATE-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI USING SUBARU/FMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, K.; Silverman, J. D.; Schramm, M.; Steinhardt, C. L.; Nagao, T.; Kartaltepe, J.; Sanders, D. B.; Hasinger, G.; Treister, E.; Akiyama, M.; Ohta, K.; Ueda, Y.; Bongiorno, A.; Brandt, W. N.; Brusa, M.; Capak, P.; Comastri, A.; Lilly, S. J.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We present an analysis of broad emission lines observed in moderate-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs), typical of those found in X-ray surveys of deep fields, with the goal of testing the validity of single-epoch virial black hole mass estimates. We have acquired near-infrared spectra of AGNs up to z {approx} 1.8 in the COSMOS and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey, with the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph mounted on the Subaru telescope. These near-infrared spectra provide a significant detection of the broad H{alpha} line, shown to be a reliable probe of black hole mass at low redshift. Our sample has existing optical spectroscopy that provides a detection of Mg II, typically used for black hole mass estimation at z {approx}> 1. We carry out a spectral-line fitting procedure using both H{alpha} and Mg II to determine the virial velocity of gas in the broad-line region, the continuum luminosity at 3000 A, and the total H{alpha} line luminosity. With a sample of 43 AGNs spanning a range of two decades in luminosity, we find a tight correlation between the ultraviolet and emission-line luminosity. There is also a close one-to-one relationship between the full width at half-maximum of H{alpha} and Mg II. Both of these then lead to there being very good agreement between H{alpha}- and Mg II-based masses over a wide range in black hole mass, i.e., M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 7-9} M{sub Sun }. In general, these results demonstrate that local scaling relations, using Mg II or H{alpha}, are applicable for AGNs at moderate luminosities and up to z {approx} 2.

  14. Probing AGN Unification with galaxy neighbours: pitfalls and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarroel, B.

    2015-09-01

    Statistical tests of AGN unification harbour many caveats. One way of constraining the validity of the AGN unification is through studies of close neighbours to Type-1 and Type-2 AGN. Examining thousands of AGN- galaxy pairs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and the Galaxy Zoo project, we found that Type-2 AGN appear to reside in more star-forming environments than Type-1 AGN.

  15. Luminosity determination at proton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafström, P.; Kozanecki, W.

    2015-03-01

    Luminosity is a key parameter in any particle collider, and its precise determination has proven particularly challenging at hadron colliders. After introducing the concept of luminosity in its multiple incarnations and offering a brief survey of the pp and p p bar colliders built to date, this article outlines the various methods that have been developed for relative-luminosity monitoring, as well as the complementary approaches considered for establishing an absolute luminosity scale. This is followed by a survey, from both a historical and a technical perspective, of luminosity determination at the ISR, the S p p ¯ S, the Tevatron, RHIC and the LHC. For each of these, we first delineate the interplay between the experimental context, the specificities of the accelerator, and the precision targets suggested by the physics program. We then detail how the different methods were applied to specific experimental environments and how successfully they meet the precision goals.

  16. The impact of mechanical AGN feedback on the formation of massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ena; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Moster, Benjamin P.

    2015-06-01

    We employ cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the effects of AGN feedback on the formation of massive galaxies with present-day stellar masses of M_stel= 8.8 × 10^{10}-6.0 × 10^{11} M_{⊙}. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations with a pressure-entropy formulation that allows an improved treatment of contact discontinuities and fluid mixing, we run three sets of simulations of 20 haloes with different AGN feedback models: (1) no feedback, (2) thermal feedback, and (3) mechanical and radiation feedback. We assume that seed black holes are present at early cosmic epochs at the centre of emerging dark matter haloes and trace their mass growth via gas accretion and mergers with other black holes. Both feedback models successfully recover the observed MBH-σ relation and black hole-to-stellar mass ratio for simulated central early-type galaxies. The baryonic conversion efficiencies are reduced by a factor of 2 compared to models without any AGN feedback at all halo masses. However, massive galaxies simulated with thermal AGN feedback show a factor of ˜10-100 higher X-ray luminosities than observed. The mechanical/radiation feedback model reproduces the observed correlation between X-ray luminosities and velocity dispersion, e.g. for galaxies with σ = 200 km s- 1, the X-ray luminosity is reduced from 1042 erg s- 1 to 1040 erg s- 1. It also efficiently suppresses late-time star formation, reducing the specific star formation rate from 10-10.5 yr- 1 to 10-14 yr- 1 on average and resulting in quiescent galaxies since z = 2, whereas the thermal feedback model shows higher late-time in situ star formation rates than observed.

  17. Variability Selected Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Paolillo, D. M.; Alexander, F. E.; Bauer, F. E.; Lehmer, B. D.; Luo, B.; Shemmer, O.; Schneider, D. P.; Vignail, C.

    2012-01-01

    The 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) and other deep X-ray surveys have been highly effective at selecting active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, cosmologically distant low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) have remained a challenge to identify due to significant contribution from the host galaxy. We identify long-term X ray variability (approx. month years, observed frame) in 20 of 92 CDF-S galaxies spanning redshifts approx equals 00.8 - 1.02 that do not meet other AGN selection criteria. We show that the observed variability cannot be explained by X-ray binary populations or ultraluminous X-ray sources, so the variability is most likely caused by accretion onto a supermassive black hole. The variable galaxies are not heavily obscured in general, with a stacked effective power-law photon index of Gamma(sub Stack) approx equals 1.93 +/- 0.13, and arc therefore likely LLAGN. The LLAGN tend to lie it factor of approx equal 6-89 below the extrapolated linear variability-luminosity relation measured for luminous AGN. This may he explained by their lower accretion rates. Variability-independent black-hole mass and accretion-rate estimates for variable galaxies show that they sample a significantly different black hole mass-accretion-rate space, with masses a factor of 2.4 lower and accretion rates a factor of 22.5 lower than variable luminous AGNs at the same redshift. We find that an empirical model based on a universal broken power-law power spectral density function, where the break frequency depends on SMBH mass and accretion rate, roughly reproduces the shape, but not the normalization, of the variability-luminosity trends measured for variable galaxies and more luminous AGNs.

  18. Luminosities of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guandalini, R.; Cristallo, S.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Stars evolving along the asymptotic giant branch can become carbon-rich in the final part of their evolution. They replenish the inter-stellar medium with nuclear processed material via strong radiative stellar winds. The determination of the luminosity function of these stars, even if far from being conclusive, is extremely important for testing the reliability of theoretical models. In particular, strong constraints on the mixing treatment and the mass-loss rate can be derived. Aims: We present an updated luminosity function of Galactic carbon stars (LFGCS) obtained from a re-analysis of available data already published in previous papers. Methods: Starting from available near- and mid-infrared photometric data, we re-determined the selection criteria. Moreover, we took advantage of updated distance estimates and period-luminosity relations and we adopted a new formulation for the computation of bolometric corrections (BCs). This led us to collect an improved sample of carbon-rich sources from which we constructed an updated luminosity function. Results: The LFGCS peaks at magnitudes around -4.9, confirming the results obtained in a previous work. Nevertheless, the luminosity function presents two symmetrical tails instead of the larger high-luminosity tail characterizing the former luminosity function. Conclusions: The derived LFCGS matches the indications from recent theoretical evolutionary asymptotic giant branch models, thus confirming the validity of the choices of mixing treatment and mass-loss history. Moreover, we compare our new luminosity function with its counterpart in the Large Magellanic Cloud finding that the two distributions are very similar for dust-enshrouded sources, as expected from stellar evolutionary models. Finally, we derive a new fitting formula aimed to better determine BCs for C-stars. Table 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Self-consistent two-phase AGN torus models⋆. SED library for observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebenmorgen, Ralf; Heymann, Frank; Efstathiou, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    We assume that dust near active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is distributed in a torus-like geometry, which can be described as a clumpy medium or a homogeneous disk, or as a combination of the two (i.e. a two-phase medium). The dust particles considered are fluffy and have higher submillimeter emissivities than grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. The dust-photon interaction is treated in a fully self-consistent three-dimensional radiative transfer code. We provide an AGN library of spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Its purpose is to quickly obtain estimates of the basic parameters of the AGNs, such as the intrinsic luminosity of the central source, the viewing angle, the inner radius, the volume filling factor and optical depth of the clouds, and the optical depth of the disk midplane, and to predict the flux at yet unobserved wavelengths. The procedure is simple and consists of finding an element in the library that matches the observations. We discuss the general properties of the models and in particular the 10 μm silicate band. The AGN library accounts well for the observed scatter of the feature strengths and wavelengths of the peak emission. AGN extinction curves are discussed and we find that there is no direct one-to-one link between the observed extinction and the wavelength dependence of the dust cross sections. We show that objects in the library cover the observed range of mid-infrared colors of known AGNs. The validity of the approach is demonstrated by matching the SEDs of a number of representative objects: Four Seyferts and two quasars for which we present new Herschel photometry, two radio galaxies, and one hyperluminous infrared galaxy. Strikingly, for the five luminous objects we find that pure AGN models fit the SED without needing to postulate starburst activity. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.The SED

  20. Simulations of the OzDES AGN reverberation mapping project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Anthea L.; Martini, Paul; Davis, Tamara M.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Skielboe, Andreas; Vestergaard, Marianne; Huff, Eric; Watson, Darach; Banerji, Manda; McMahon, Richard; Sharp, Rob; Lidman, C.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the Australian spectroscopic dark energy survey (OzDES) we are carrying out a large-scale reverberation mapping study of ≥500 quasars over five years in the 30 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova fields. These quasars have redshifts ranging up to 4 and have apparent AB magnitudes between 16.8 mag < r < 22.5 mag. The aim of the survey is to measure time lags between fluctuations in the quasar continuum and broad emission-line fluxes of individual objects in order to measure black hole masses for a broad range of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and constrain the radius-luminosity (R-L) relationship. Here we investigate the expected efficiency of the OzDES reverberation mapping campaign and its possible extensions. We expect to recover lags for ˜35-45 per cent of the quasars. AGN with shorter lags and greater variability are more likely to yield a lag measurement, and objects with lags ≲6 months or ˜1 yr are expected to be recovered the most accurately. The baseline OzDES reverberation mapping campaign is predicted to produce an unbiased measurement of the R-L relationship parameters for H β, Mg II λ2798, and C IV λ1549. Extending the baseline survey by either increasing the spectroscopic cadence, extending the survey season, or improving the emission-line flux measurement accuracy will significantly improve the R-L parameter constraints for all broad emission lines.

  1. Hot Gas and AGN Feedback in Galaxies and Nearby Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Bogdan, Akos; Randall, Scott; Kraft, Ralph; Churazov, Eugene

    2013-07-01

    Massive galaxies harbor a supermassive black hole at their centers. At high redshifts, these galaxies experienced a very active quasar phase, when, as their black holes grew by accretion, they produced enormous amounts of energy. At the present epoch, these black holes still undergo occasional outbursts, although the mode of their energy release is primarily mechanical rather than radiative. The energy from these outbursts can reheat the cooling gas in the galaxy cores and maintain the red and dead nature of the early-type galaxies. These outbursts also can have dramatic effects on the galaxy-scale hot coronae found in the more massive galaxies. We describe research in three areas related to the hot gas around galaxies and their supermassive black holes. First we present examples of galaxies with AGN outbursts that have been studied in detail. Second, we show that X-ray emitting low-luminosity AGN are present in 80% of the galaxies studied. Third, we discuss the first examples of extensive hot gas and dark matter halos in optically faint galaxies.

  2. Simulations of the OzDES AGN reverberation mapping project

    SciTech Connect

    King, Anthea L.; Martini, Paul; Davis, Tamara M.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Skielboe, Andreas; Vestergaard, Marianne; Huff, Eric; Watson, Darach; Banerji, Manda; McMahon, Richard; Sharp, Rob; Lidman, C.

    2015-08-26

    As part of the Australian spectroscopic dark energy survey (OzDES) we are carrying out a large-scale reverberation mapping study of ~500 quasars over five years in the 30 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova fields. These quasars have redshifts ranging up to 4 and have apparent AB magnitudes between 16.8 mag < r < 22.5 mag. The aim of the survey is to measure time lags between fluctuations in the quasar continuum and broad emission-line fluxes of individual objects in order to measure black hole masses for a broad range of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and constrain the radius–luminosity (R–L) relationship. Here we investigate the expected efficiency of the OzDES reverberation mapping campaign and its possible extensions. We expect to recover lags for ~35–45 % of the quasars. AGN with shorter lags and greater variability are more likely to yield a lag measurement, and objects with lags ≲6 months or ~1 yr are expected to be recovered the most accurately. The baseline OzDES reverberation mapping campaign is predicted to produce an unbiased measurement of the R–L relationship parameters for Hβ, MgIIλ2798, and C IVλ1549. As a result, extending the baseline survey by either increasing the spectroscopic cadence, extending the survey season, or improving the emission-line flux measurement accuracy will significantly improve the R–L parameter constraints for all broad emission lines.

  3. Dramatic long-term X-ray variability in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Edward C.

    2016-04-01

    Dramatic X-ray and optical variability on ˜ 10 year timescales has been discovered recently in a handful of quasars, which may provide important new insight into the issue of how luminous AGNs are fueled. We have assembled a new sample of extremely variable X-ray sources from archival Einstein and ROSAT data that could increase substantially the number of such objects known. The sources in our sample varied in X-ray flux by at least a factor of 7-8 over a 10-year span, and most exhibited significantly larger variability amplitudes (10 to over 100). We present the details of how our sample was assembled and preliminary results regarding the identifications, properties, and X-ray histories of the objects. Although a heterogeneous population is expected, some sources in the sample are associated with broad-line AGNs, including a radio-quiet quasar at z = 1.3 that decreased in X-ray luminosity by a factor of 40.

  4. Radio galaxies in ZFOURGE/NMBS: no difference in the properties of massive galaxies with and without radio-AGN out to z = 2.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, G. A.; Spitler, L. R.; Norris, R. P.; Cowley, M. J.; Papovich, C.; Glazebrook, K.; Quadri, R. F.; Straatman, C. M. S.; Allen, R.; Kacprzak, G. G.; Labbe, I.; Nanayakkara, T.; Tomczak, A. R.; Tran, K.-V.

    2016-01-01

    In order to reproduce the high-mass end of the galaxy mass distribution, some process must be responsible for the suppression of star formation in the most massive of galaxies. Commonly active galactic nuclei (AGN) are invoked to fulfil this role, but the exact means by which they do so is still the topic of much debate, with studies finding evidence for both the suppression and enhancement of star formation in AGN hosts. Using the ZFOURGE (FourStar Galaxy Evolution) and NMBS (Newfirm Medium Band Survey) galaxy surveys, we investigate the host galaxy properties of a mass-limited (M ≥ 1010.5 M⊙), high-luminosity (L1.4 > 1024 W Hz-1) sample of radio-loud AGN to a redshift of z = 2.25. In contrast to low-redshift studies, which associate radio-AGN activity with quiescent hosts, we find that the majority of z > 1.5 radio-AGN are hosted by star-forming galaxies. Indeed, the stellar populations of radio-AGN are found to evolve with redshift in a manner that is consistent with the non-AGN mass-similar galaxy population. Interestingly, we find that the radio-AGN fraction is constant across a redshift range of 0.25 ≤ z < 2.25, perhaps indicating that the radio-AGN duty cycle has little dependence on redshift or galaxy type. We do however see a strong relation between the radio-AGN fraction and stellar mass, with radio-AGN becoming rare below ˜1010.5 M⊙ or a halo mass of 1012 M⊙. This halo-mass threshold is in good agreement with simulations that initiate radio-AGN feedback at this mass limit. Despite this, we find that radio-AGN host star formation rates are consistent with the non-AGN mass-similar galaxy sample, suggesting that while radio-AGN are in the right place to suppress star formation in massive galaxies they are not necessarily responsible for doing so.

  5. Theoretical and Observational Studies of the Central Engines of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivron, Ran

    1995-01-01

    In Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) the luminosity is so intense that the effect of radiation pressure on a particle may exceed the gravitational attraction. It was shown that when such luminosities are reached, relatively cold (not completely ionized) thermal matter clouds may form in the central engines of AGN, where most of the luminosity originates. We show that the spectrum of emission from cold clouds embedded in hot relativistic matter is similar to the observed spectrum. We also show that within the hot relativistic matter, cold matter moves faster than the speed of sound or the Alfven speed, and shocks form. The shocks provide a mechanism by which a localized perturbation can propagate throughout the central engine. The shocked matter can emit the observed luminosity, and can explain the flux and spectral variability. It may also provide an efficient mechanism for the outward transfer of angular momentum and provide the outward flow of winds. With observations from X-ray satellites, emission features from the cold and hot matter may be revealed. Our analysis of X-ray data from the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG - 6-30-15 over five years using detectors on the Ginga and Rosat satellites, revealed some interesting variable features. A source with hot matter emits non-thermal radiation which is Compton reflected from cold matter and then absorbed by warm (partially ionized) absorbing matter in the first model, which can be fit to the data if both the cold and warm absorbers are near the central engine. An alternative model in which the emission from the hot matter is partially covered by very warm matter (in which all elements except Iron are mostly ionized) is also successful. In this model the cold and warm matter may be at distances of up to 100 times the size of the central engine, well within the region where broad optical lines are produced. The flux variability is more naturally explained by the second model. Our results support the existence of cold matter in, or

  6. Gamma-ray luminosity function of BL Lac objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li

    2014-06-01

    The gamma-ray luminosity function (GLF) of BL Lac objects is constructed by using a sample of BL Lac objects with redshifts selected from the Second LAT AGN catalog. The GLFs of BL Lacs in the frame of the pure density evolution (PDE), the pure luminosity evolution (PLE), and the luminosity-dependent density (LDDE) models are determined by using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique, respectively. Our results suggest that the PDE model can give best description for BL Lac GLF based on the combination of constraints of model parameters and good fits to the observed data of Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) BL Lacs, but other two models (PLE and LDDE) cannot be excluded. Based on our constructed GLFs, the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB) from BL Lacs is estimated, and ˜1-5 per cent of the EGRB in the 0.1-100 GeV band is found to come from unresolved BL Lacs (including the cascade emission). In addition, it is found that the BL Lac GLF is very different from flat spectrum radio quasar GLF and then the contribution of blazars to the EGRB should be estimated separately.

  7. Exploring the Connection Between Star Formation and AGN Activity in the Local Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman. T. M.; Ptak, Andrew; Schiminovich, D.; O'Dowd, M.; Bertincourt, B.

    2012-01-01

    We study a combined sample of 264 star-forming, 51 composite, and 73 active galaxies using optical spectra from SDSS and mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. We examine optical and mid-IR spectroscopic diagnostics that probe the amount of star formation and relative energetic con- tributions from star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Overall we find good agreement between optical and mid-IR diagnostics. Misclassifications of galaxies based on the SDSS spectra are rare despite the presence of dust obscuration. The luminosity of the [NeII] 12.8 micron emission-line is well correlated with the star formation rate (SFR) measured from the SDSS spectra, and this holds for the star forming, composite, and AGN-dominated systems. AGN show a clear excess of [NeIII] 15.6 micron emission relative to star forming and composite systems. We find good qualitative agreement between various parameters that probe the relative contributions of the AGN and star formation, including: the mid-IR spectral slope, the ratio of the [NeV] 14.3 micron to [NeII] micron 12.8 fluxes, the equivalent widths of the 7.7, 11.3, and 17 micron PAH features, and the optical "D" parameter which measures the distance a source lies from the locus of star forming galaxies in the optical BPT emission-line diagnostic diagram. We also consider the behavior of the three individual PAH features by examining how their flux ratios depend upon the degree of AGN-dominance. We find that the PAH 11.3 micron feature is significantly suppressed in the most AGN-dominated systems.

  8. A spectral energy distribution analysis of AGN host galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyewon; Civano, Francesca M.; Hasinger, Guenther; Elvis, Martin; Marchesi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We present the host galaxy properties of a large sample of ~ 4000 X-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey to investigate the connection between BH accretion and host galaxy. The COSMOS Legacy survey reaching X-ray fluxes of 2x10-16 (cgs) in the 0.5-2 keV band, bridges the gap between large area shallow surveys and pencil beamed one. Making use of the existing multi-wavelength photometric data available for 96.6% of the sources, COSMOS Legacy survey provides a uniquely large sample to derive host galaxy properties for both obscured and unobscured sources. We perform a multi-component modeling from far-infrared (500 μm) when available to UV (1500 Å) using a 3-component fitting (nuclear hot dust, galaxy and starburst components) for obscured AGN and a 4-component fitting (nuclear hot dust, AGN big blue bump, galaxy, and starburst components) for unobscured AGN. Galaxy templates are from the stellar population synthesis models of Bruzual & Charlot (2003), nuclear hot dust templates are taken from Silva et al. (2004), and AGN big blue bump templates are from Richards et al. (2006). We use the column density information measured in the X-ray to constrain the AGN in the infrared band when available. Through detailed analysis of the broad-band spectral energy distribution, we derive the stellar masses and the star formation rates of the host galaxy as well as the nuclear and galaxy contribution at each frequency. We study the dependence of host galaxy properties on redshifts, luminosities, and black hole masses to infer the growth history of galaxies and black holes and we compare with a sample of inactive galaxies.

  9. The Largest X-ray Selected Sample of z > 3 AGNs: C-COSMOS + ChaMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfountzou, Eleni; Civano, F. M.; Elvis, M.; Trichas, M.

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence that powerful active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are important to the evolution of galaxies. AGN evolution at high redshifts, before the density peak, illuminates the role of AGN in the formation and co-evolution of galaxies and their central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) when rapid SMBH growth took place. Optical surveys (e.g. Glikman et al. 2011; Ikeda et al. 2011) are severely biased against obscuration. In contrast, X-ray surveys detect obscured AGNs up to Compton Thick and are now sensitive enough to sample the bulk of the z > 3 AGN population. The few X-ray studies to date suggest a significant decline at z > 3 (e.g. Brusa et al. 2009; Civano et al. 2011; Vito et al; 2012), but the shape of this decline is still uncertain due to the limited sample size, especially at z > 4. To overcome these limits, we combined the two largest samples of z > 3 X-ray selected AGN with spectroscopic redshifts: the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP) survey (Trichas et al. 2012), and the C-COSMOS survey (Civano et al. 2011). The total of 159 z > 3 AGNs almost doubles the sample size and, most importantly, triples the sample at z > 4, where the uncertainties have been greatest. Our sample includes ~35 sources in the low luminosity range [LX < 1044 erg/s] which gives a first determination of their density evolution. Our sample also contains a both obscured and unobscured AGNs, and their separate evolution has been determined.

  10. RHIC PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and tric beam collisions. In the first seven years of operation there has been a rapid increase in the achieved peak and average luminosity, substantially exceeding design values. Work is presently underway to achieve the Enhanced Design parameters. Planned major upgrades include the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), RHIC-11, and construction of an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). We review the expected RHIC upgrade performance. Electron cooling and its impact on the luminosity both for heavy ions and protons are discussed in detail.

  11. AGN Zoo and Classifications of Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.

    2015-07-01

    We review the variety of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) classes (so-called "AGN zoo") and classification schemes of galaxies by activity types based on their optical emission-line spectrum, as well as other parameters and other than optical wavelength ranges. A historical overview of discoveries of various types of active galaxies is given, including Seyfert galaxies, radio galaxies, QSOs, BL Lacertae objects, Starbursts, LINERs, etc. Various kinds of AGN diagnostics are discussed. All known AGN types and subtypes are presented and described to have a homogeneous classification scheme based on the optical emission-line spectra and in many cases, also other parameters. Problems connected with accurate classifications and open questions related to AGN and their classes are discussed and summarized.

  12. HOT-DUST (690 K) LUMINOSITY DENSITY AND ITS EVOLUTION IN THE LAST 7.5 GYR

    SciTech Connect

    Messias, H.; Afonso, J. M.; Mobasher, B.

    2013-10-20

    We study the contribution of hot-dust to the luminosity density of galaxies and its evolution with cosmic time. Using the Spitzer-IRAC data over an area of 1.8 deg{sup 2} covered by the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field, we estimate the contribution from hot-dust at rest-frame 4.2 μm (from 0 ∼< z ∼< 0.2 up to 0.5 ∼< z ∼< 0.9). This wavelength corresponds to blackbody temperature of ∼690 K. The contribution of stellar emission is estimated from the rest-frame 1.6 μm luminosity (assumed to result from stellar emission alone) and subtracted from the mid-infrared luminosity of galaxies to measure hot-dust emission. To attempt the study of the 3.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature, we use the rest-frame 4.2 μm to infer the hot-dust flux at 3.3 μm. This study is performed for different spectral types of galaxies: early-type, late-type, starburst, and IR-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that (1) the decrease of the hot-dust luminosity density since 0.5 ∼< z ∼< 1 is steeper (by at least 0.5 dex) compared with that of the cold-dust, giving support to the scenario where galaxy obscuration increases with redshift, as proposed in the literature; (2) hot-dust and PAH emission evolution seems to be correlated with stellar mass, where rest-frame 1.6 μm luminous non-AGN galaxies (i.e., massive systems) show a stronger decrement (with decreasing redshift) in hot-dust and PAH emission than the less luminous (less massive) non-AGN galaxies; (3) despite comprising ∼< 3% of the total sample, AGN contribute as much as a third to the hot-dust luminosity density at z < 1 and clearly dominate the bright-end of the total hot-dust luminosity density function at 0.5 ∼< z ∼< 0.9; (4) the average dust-to-total luminosity ratio increases with redshift, while PAH-to-total luminosity ratio remains fairly constant; (5) at M{sub 1.6} > –25, the dust-to-total and PAH-to-total luminosity ratios increase with decreasing luminosity, but

  13. Galaxies, AGN, and Environment at z=1: IRAC observations of DEEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Hickox, Ryan; Bundy, Kevin; Coil, Alison; Cool, Richard; Cooper, Michael; Croton, Darren; Davis, Marc; Eisenhardt, Peter; Eisenstein, Daniel; Faber, Sandy; Forman, William; Koo, David; Murray, Stephen; Papovich, Casey; Stern, Daniel; Weiner, Benjamin; Willmer, Christopher; Willner, Steven

    2008-03-01

    The Spitzer view of the z=1 Universe is spectroscopy starved. Only 5 sq. deg. of the sky have been surveyed with very deep (24th mag) spectroscopy that probes z>1 galaxies, and only about half of this area has been observed with Spitzer. Cosmic variance is severe even at z>1 and limits our ability to measure the evolution of galaxies and AGN at these epochs. DEEP2 is the premier z>1 wide-field survey, but only 1.5 sq. deg. of it has Spitzer coverage. Here we propose to more than double the overlap between Spitzer and DEEP2, with IRAC coverage of two fields that contain ~16,000 high-quality Keck spectra of galaxies at 0.7AGN, across a wide range of environments, as a function of redshift. IRAC data will provide robust stellar masses (especially for blue galaxies) and allow us to identify at least 50% more AGN than are found in the X-ray and optical bands alone, revealing a unbiased view of the AGN population to high levels of obscuration. We will use the dense DEEP2 sampling to determine small-scale environments and clustering of galaxies and AGN as a function of stellar mass, color and luminosity. We will also be able to compare IRAC-based stellar masses with DEEP2 dynamical masses. The proposed observations will increase the overlap between IRAC and DEEP2 by a factor of 2.3. This will greatly increase the statistical power of the survey, reduce cosmic variance, and allow measurements of environment and clustering in multiple bins of AGN luminosity or stellar mass, needed to constrain galaxy and AGN evolution models. DEEP2 is the only survey that provides high-quality galaxy spectra and precise redshifts over a large volume at high redshift; these observations will therefore produce a lasting legacy dataset for

  14. A total and polarized infrared flux view of the AGN clumpy torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Rodriguez, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamical theories consider the torus of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) to be part of an outflow wind moving away from the central engine. In this framework, the torus is a particular region of the wind, where dusty and optically thick clouds are formed. The outflows are strongly related to the accretion rate and magnetic field strength, which play an important role in the creation, morphology and evolution of the torus. Through infrared (IR) imaging and polarimetry observations, this dissertation (1) searches for signatures of dusty tori in low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN); (2) explores the role and strength of magnetic field in the torus; and (3) investigates the nucleus of radio-loud AGN. Recent theoretical models predicted that LLAGN do not host a Seyfert-like torus, since low-luminosities (<1042 erg s-1 ) cannot sustain the required outflow rate. High-spatial resolution mid-IR (MIR) imaging and nuclear spectral energy distribution of 22 LLAGN reveals different IR characteristics by dividing the sample in terms of the Eddington ratio. These galaxies show a diversity of nuclear morphologies and have a high MIR/X-ray luminosity ratio compared to higher-luminosity AGN. Star formation, jets and/or truncated accretion disk can explain the MIR excess. Although several models have been made to account for the outflowing dusty winds from the central engine, the magnetic field strength at the position of the torus remains poorly characterized. Through a novel study using near-IR polarimetry, the magnetic field strength in the clumpy torus was estimated. Specifically, if paramagnetic alignment is assumed in the dusty clouds of the torus, the magnetic field strength of the torus of IC5063 is estimated to be in the range of 12--128 mG. Alternatively, Chandrasekhar-Fermi method suggests a lower-limit magnetic field strength of 13 mG. For the archetypical radio-loud AGN, Cygnus A, MIR polarimetry using CanariCam on the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio de Canarias revealed a high

  15. The CUORE Cryostat: A 1-Ton Scale Setup for Bolometric Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, C.; Alduino, C.; Alessandria, F.; Biassoni, M.; Bucci, C.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cappelli, L.; Chott, N. I.; Copello, S.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dell'Oro, S.; Drobizhev, A.; Franceschi, M. A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Napolitano, T.; Nucciotti, A.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pattavina, L.; Rusconi, C.; Santone, D.; Singh, V.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.; Uttaro, S.

    2015-12-01

    The cryogenic underground observatory for rare events (CUORE) is a 1-ton scale bolometric experiment whose detector consists of an array of 988 TeO_2 crystals arranged in a cylindrical compact structure of 19 towers. This will be the largest bolometric mass ever operated. The experiment will work at a temperature around or below 10 mK. CUORE cryostat consists of a cryogen-free system based on pulse tubes and a custom high power dilution refrigerator, designed to match these specifications. The cryostat has been commissioned in 2014 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories and reached a record temperature of 6 mK on a cubic meter scale. In this paper, we present results of CUORE commissioning runs. Details on the thermal characteristics and cryogenic performances of the system will be also given.

  16. Characterization of Terahertz Single-Photon-Sensitive Bolometric Detectors Using a Pulsed Microwave Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Santavicca, D. F.; Frunzio, L.; Prober, D. E.; Reulet, B.; Karasik, B. S.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Olaya, D.; Gershenson, M. E.

    2009-12-16

    We describe a technique for characterizing bolometric detectors that have sufficient sensitivity to count single terahertz photons. The device is isolated from infrared blackbody radiation and a single terahertz photon is simulated by a fast microwave pulse, where the absorbed energy of the pulse is equal to the photon energy. We have employed this technique to characterize bolometric detectors consisting of a superconducting titanium nanobridge with niobium contacts. Present devices have T{sub c} = 0.3 K and a measured intrinsic energy resolution of approximately 6 terahertz full-width at half-maximum, near the predicted value due to intrinsic thermal fluctuation noise, with a time constant of 2 {mu}s. An intrinsic energy resolution of 1 terahertz should be achievable by reducing the volume of the titanium nanobridge. Such a detector has important applications in future space-based terahertz astronomy missions.

  17. The CUORE Cryostat: A 1-Ton Scale Setup for Bolometric Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, C.; Alduino, C.; Alessandria, F.; Biassoni, M.; Bucci, C.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cappelli, L.; Chott, N. I.; Copello, S.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dell'Oro, S.; Drobizhev, A.; Franceschi, M. A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Napolitano, T.; Nucciotti, A.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pattavina, L.; Rusconi, C.; Santone, D.; Singh, V.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.; Uttaro, S.

    2016-08-01

    The cryogenic underground observatory for rare events (CUORE) is a 1-ton scale bolometric experiment whose detector consists of an array of 988 TeO_2 crystals arranged in a cylindrical compact structure of 19 towers. This will be the largest bolometric mass ever operated. The experiment will work at a temperature around or below 10 mK. CUORE cryostat consists of a cryogen-free system based on pulse tubes and a custom high power dilution refrigerator, designed to match these specifications. The cryostat has been commissioned in 2014 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories and reached a record temperature of 6 mK on a cubic meter scale. In this paper, we present results of CUORE commissioning runs. Details on the thermal characteristics and cryogenic performances of the system will be also given.

  18. Bolometric-Effect-Based Wavelength-Selective Photodetectors Using Sorted Single Chirality Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Wang, Tongyu; Shi, Rongmei; Miao, Jinshui; Wei, Li; Chen, Yuan; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Wang, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper exploits the chirality-dependent optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes for applications in wavelength-selective photodetectors. We demonstrate that thin-film transistors made with networks of carbon nanotubes work effectively as light sensors under laser illumination. Such photoresponse was attributed to photothermal effect instead of photogenerated carriers and the conclusion is further supported by temperature measurements. Additionally, by using different types of carbon nanotubes, including a single chirality (9,8) nanotube, the devices exhibit wavelength-selective response, which coincides well with the absorption spectra of the corresponding carbon nanotubes. This is one of the first reports of controllable and wavelength-selective bolometric photoresponse in macroscale assemblies of chirality-sorted carbon nanotubes. The results presented here provide a viable route for achieving bolometric-effect-based photodetectors with programmable response spanning from visible to near-infrared by using carbon nanotubes with pre-selected chiralities. PMID:26643777

  19. Bolometric detector systems for IR and mm-wave space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, S. E.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Hristov, V.; Bock, J. J.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Griffin, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent developments in bolometric detector systems for millimeter and submillimeter wave space astronomy are described. Current technologies meet all the requirements for the high frequency instrument onboard the cosmic background radiation anisotropy satellite/satellite for the measurement of background anisotropies (COBRAS/SAMBA) platform. It is considered that the technologies that are currently being developed will significantly reduce the effective time constant and/or the cooling requirements of bolometric detectors. These technologies lend themselves to the fabrication of the large format arrays required for the Far Infrared and Submillimeter Space Telescope (FIRST). The scientific goals and detector requirements of the COBRAS/SAMBA platform that will use infrared bolometers are reviewed and the baseline detector system is described, including the feed optics, the infrared filters, the cold amplifiers and the warm readout electronics.

  20. Precision luminosity measurements at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Measuring cross-sections at the LHC requires the luminosity to be determined accurately at each centre-of-mass energy √s. In this paper results are reported from the luminosity calibrations carried out at the LHC interaction point 8 with the LHCb detector for √s = 2.76, 7 and 8 TeV (proton-proton collisions) and for √sNN = 5 TeV (proton-lead collisions). Both the "van der Meer scan" and "beam-gas imaging" luminosity calibration methods were employed. It is observed that the beam density profile cannot always be described by a function that is factorizable in the two transverse coordinates. The introduction of a two-dimensional description of the beams improves significantly the consistency of the results. For proton-proton interactions at √s = 8 TeV a relative precision of the luminosity calibration of 1.47% is obtained using van der Meer scans and 1.43% using beam-gas imaging, resulting in a combined precision of 1.12%. Applying the calibration to the full data set determines the luminosity with a precision of 1.16%. This represents the most precise luminosity measurement achieved so far at a bunched-beam hadron collider.

  1. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS): 38 GHz Detector Array of Bolometric Polarimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, John W.; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Harrington, Kathleen; Kogut, Alan J..; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel H.; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) experiment aims to map the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at angular scales larger than a few degrees. Operating from Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert of Chile, it will observe over 65% of the sky at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. In this paper we discuss the design, construction, and characterization of the CLASS 38 GHz detector focal plane, the first ever Q-band bolometric polarimeter array.

  2. Calibrating Ultracool Dwarfs: Optical Template Spectra, Bolometric Corrections, and χ Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Kielty, Collin

    2014-07-01

    We present optical template spectra, bolometric corrections, and χ values for ultracool dwarfs. The templates are based on spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope. The spectral features and overall shape of the L dwarf templates are consistent with previous spectroscopic standards and the templates have a radial velocity precision of ~10-20 km s-1. We calculate bolometric fluxes (accurate to 10-20%) for 101 late-M and L dwarfs from SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE photometry, SDSS spectra, and BT-Settl model spectra. We find that the z-band and J-band bolometric corrections for late-M and L dwarfs have a strong correlation with z-J and J-KS colors, respectively. The new χ values, which can be used to convert Hα equivalent widths to activity strength, are based on spectrophotometrically calibrated SDSS spectra and the new bolometric fluxes. While the measured χ values have typical uncertainties of ~20%, ultracool dwarf models show the continuum surrounding Hα can vary by up to an order of magnitude with changing surface gravity. Our semiempirical χ values are one to two orders of magnitude larger than previous χ values for mid-to-late L dwarfs, indicating that the upper limits for Hα activity strength on the coolest L dwarfs have been underestimated. This publication is partially based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 meter telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  3. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. 1; Radiation-Hydrodynamics Solution for the Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan. G. S.; Kallman, T.

    2011-01-01

    We construct a radiation-hydrodynamics model for the obscuring toroidal structure in active galactic nuclei. In this model the obscuration is produced at parsec scale by a dense, dusty wind which is supported by infrared radiation pressure on dust grains. To find the distribution of radiation pressure, we numerically solve the 2D radiation transfer problem in a flux limited diffusion approximation. We iteratively couple the solution with calculations of stationary 1D models for the wind, and obtain the z-component of the velocity. Our results demonstrate that for AGN luminosities greater than 0.1 L(sub edd) external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via outflows driven by infrared radiation pressure. The terminal velocity of marginally Compton-thin models (0.2 < tau(sub T) < 0.6), is comparable to or greater than the escape velocity. In Compton thick models the maximum value of the vertical component of the velocity is lower than the escape velocity, suggesting that a significant part of our torus is in the form of failed wind. The results demonstrate that obscuration via normal or failed infrared-driven winds is a viable option for the AGN torus problem and AGN unification models. Such winds can also provide an important channel for AGN feedback.

  4. The host galaxies of X-ray selected AGN: feeding and feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merloni, A.; Bongiorno, A.

    2014-07-01

    Using the rich multi-band photometry in the COSMOS field we explore the host galaxy properties of a large, complete, sample of X-ray and spectroscopically selected AGN. Based on a two-components fit to their Spectral Energy Distribution, we derive rest-frame magnitudes, colors, stellar masses and star formation rates up to z˜3, and we study the connection between these host galaxy properties, accretion luminosity and obscuration in galactic nuclei across more than 2/3 of the age of the Universe. Although AGN activity and star formation appear to have a common triggering mechanism, we do not find any strong evidence signaling the influence of luminous AGN on the global properties of their host galaxies. Conversely, we found that the central black hole activity have profound effects on the surrounding matter on scales comparable to the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole. We discuss the implication of our findings for the nature of the long sough-after 'Quasar mode' feedback from AGN.

  5. Shaping the X-ray spectrum of galaxy clusters with AGN feedback and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.

    2015-07-01

    The hot plasma filling galaxy clusters emits copious X-ray radiation. The classic unheated and unperturbed cooling flow model predicts dramatic cooling rates and an isobaric X-ray spectrum with constant differential luminosity distribution. The observed cores of clusters (and groups) show instead a strong deficit of soft X-ray emission: dLx/dT ∝ (T/Thot)α = 2 ± 1. Using 3D hydrodynamic simulations, we show that such deficit arises from the tight self-regulation between thermal instability condensation and AGN outflow injection: condensing clouds boost the AGN outflows, which quench cooling as they thermalize through the core. The resultant average distribution slope is α ≃ 2, oscillating within the observed 1 < α < 3. In the absence of thermal instability, the X-ray spectrum remains isothermal (α ≳ 8), while unopposed cooling drives a too shallow slope, α < 1. AGN outflows deposit their energy inside-out, releasing more heat in the inner cooler phase; radially distributed heating alone induces a declining spectrum, 1 < α < 2. Turbulence further steepens the spectrum and increases the scatter: the turbulent Mach number in the hot phase is subsonic, while it becomes transonic in the cooler phase, making perturbations to depart from the isobaric mode. Such increase in dln P/dln T leads to α ≈ 3. Self-regulated AGN outflow feedback can address the soft X-ray problem through the interplay of heating and turbulence.

  6. CAN AGN FEEDBACK BREAK THE SELF-SIMILARITY OF GALAXIES, GROUPS, AND CLUSTERS?

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspari, M.; Brighenti, F.; Temi, P.

    2014-03-01

    It is commonly thought that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback can break the self-similar scaling relations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. Using high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we isolate the impact of AGN feedback on the L {sub x}-T {sub x} relation, testing the two archetypal and common regimes, self-regulated mechanical feedback and a quasar thermal blast. We find that AGN feedback has severe difficulty in breaking the relation in a consistent way. The similarity breaking is directly linked to the gas evacuation within R {sub 500}, while the central cooling times are inversely proportional to the core density. Breaking self-similarity thus implies breaking the cool core, morphing all systems to non-cool-core objects, which is in clear contradiction with the observed data populated by several cool-core systems. Self-regulated feedback, which quenches cooling flows and preserves cool cores, prevents dramatic evacuation and similarity breaking at any scale; the relation scatter is also limited. The impulsive thermal blast can break the core-included L {sub x}-T {sub x} at T {sub 500} ≲ 1 keV, but substantially empties and overheats the halo, generating a perennial non-cool-core group, as experienced by cosmological simulations. Even with partial evacuation, massive systems remain overheated. We show that the action of purely AGN feedback is to lower the luminosity and heat the gas, perpendicular to the fit.

  7. Dichotomy in the population of young AGN: Optical, radio, and X-ray properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.

    2016-02-01

    There are numerous examples of radio sources with various sizes which surprisingly exhibit very similar morphology. This observational fact helped to create a standard evolutionary model in which young and small radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN), called gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) sources and compact steep spectrum (CSS) sources, become large-scale radio objects. However, many details of this evolutionary process are still unclear. We explored evolution scenarios of radio-loud AGN using new radio, optical and X-ray data of so far unstudied low luminosity compact (LLC) sources and we summarize the results in this paper. Our studies show that the evolutionary track is very ``individualized'' although we can mention common factors affecting it. These are interaction with the ambient medium and AGN power. The second feature affects the production of the radio jets which, if they are weak, are more vulnerable for instabilities and disruption. Thus not all GPS and CSS sources will be able to develop large scale morphologies. Many will fade away being middle-aged (105 yr). It seems that only radio strong, high excitation compact AGN can be progenitors of large-scale FR II radio sources.

  8. Effects of AGN feedback on ΛCDM galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia Del P.; Cora, Sofía A.; Padilla, Nelson D.

    2008-08-01

    We study the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback on the formation and evolution of galaxies by using a combination of a cosmological N-body simulation of the concordance Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) paradigm and a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. This model is an improved version of the one described by Cora (2006), which now considers the growth of black holes (BHs) as driven by (i) gas accretion during merger-driven starbursts and mergers with other BHs, (ii) accretion during starbursts triggered by disc instabilities and (iii) accretion of gas cooled from quasi-hydrostatic hot gas haloes. It is assumed that feedback from AGN operates in the last case. The model has been calibrated in order to reproduce observational correlations between BH mass and mass, velocity dispersion and absolute magnitudes of the galaxy bulge. AGN feedback has a strong impact on reducing or even suppressing gas cooling, an effect that becomes important at lower redshifts. This phenomenon helps to reproduce the observed galaxy luminosity function (LF) in the optical and near-infrared bands at z = 0, and the cosmic star formation rate and stellar mass functions over a wide redshift range (0 <~ z <~ 5). It also allows us to have a population of massive galaxies already in place at z >~ 1, which are mostly early-type and have older and redder stellar populations than lower mass galaxies, reproducing the observed bimodality in the galaxy colour distribution, and the morphological fractions. The evolution of the optical QSO LF is also reproduced, provided that the presence of a significant fraction of obscured QSOs is assumed. We explore the effects of AGN feedback during starbursts finding that, in order to obtain a good agreement with observations, these need to be strong enough to expel the reheated gas away from the galaxy halo. We also test new, recent prescriptions for dynamical friction time-scales, and find that they produce an earlier formation of elliptical

  9. Faint COSMOS AGNs at z∼3.3. I. Black Hole Properties and Constraints on Early Black Hole Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhtenbrot, B.; Civano, F.; Urry, C. Megan; Schawinski, K.; Marchesi, S.; Elvis, M.; Rosario, D. J.; Suh, H.; Mejia-Restrepo, J. E.; Simmons, B. D.; Faisst, A. L.; Onodera, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present new Keck/MOSFIRE K-band spectroscopy for a sample of 14 faint, X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the COSMOS field. The data cover the spectral region surrounding the broad Balmer emission lines, which enables the estimation of black hole masses ({M}{BH}) and accretion rates (in terms of L/{L}{Edd}). We focus on 10 AGNs at z ≃ 3.3, where we observe the Hβ spectral region, while for the other four z ≃ 2.4 sources we use the {{H}}α broad emission line. Compared with previous detailed studies of unobscured AGNs at these high redshifts, our sources are fainter by an order of magnitude, corresponding to number densities of order ∼10‑6–10‑5 {{Mpc}}-3. The lower AGN luminosities also allow for a robust identification of the host galaxy emission, necessary to obtain reliable intrinsic AGN luminosities, BH masses and accretion rates. We find the AGNs in our sample to be powered by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with a typical mass of {M}{BH}≃ 5× {10}8 {M}ȯ —significantly lower than the higher-luminosity, rarer quasars reported in earlier studies. The accretion rates are in the range L/{L}{Edd} ∼ 0.1–0.4, with an evident lack of sources with lower L/{L}{Edd} (and higher {M}{BH}), as found in several studies of faint AGNs at intermediate redshifts. Based on the early growth expected for the SMBHs in our sample, we argue that a significant population of faint z ∼ 5‑6 AGNs, with {M}{BH}∼ {10}6 {M}ȯ , should be detectable in the deepest X-ray surveys available, but this is not observed. We discuss several possible explanations for the apparent absence of such a population, concluding that the most probable scenario involves an evolution in source obscuration and/or radiative efficiencies.

  10. Exploring the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in the Inverted Neutrino Hierarchy with Bolometric Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Artusa, D. R.; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Cai, X. Z.; Camacho, A.; Canonica, L.; Cao, X. G.; Capelli, S.; Carbone, L.; Cardani, L.; Carrettoni, M.; Casali, N.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Dafinei, I.; Dally, A.; Datskov, V.; Biasi, A. De; Deninno, M. M.; Domizio, S. Di; Vacri, M. L. di; Ejzak, L.; Fang, D. Q.; Farach, H. A.; Faverzani, M.; Fernandes, G.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Goett, J.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Heeger, K. M.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Huang, H. Z.; Kadel, R.; Kazkaz, K.; Keppel, G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Li, Y. L.; Ligi, C.; Liu, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Napolitano, T.; Nisi, S.; Norman, E. B.; Nucciotti, A.; O'Donnell, T.; Orio, F.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pettinacci, V.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Rampazzo, V.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sala, E.; Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N. D.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Taffarello, L.; Tenconi, M.; Terranova, F.; Tian, W. D.; Tomei, C.; Trentalange, S.; Ventura, G.; Vignati, M.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Wielgus, L.; Wilson, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Zanotti, L.; Zarra, C.; Zhu, B. X.

    2014-10-15

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) is one of the most sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model, providing unique information on the nature of neutrinos. In this paper we review the status and outlook for bolometric 0νββ decay searches. We summarize recent advances in background suppression demonstrated using bolometers with simultaneous readout of heat and light signals. We simulate several configurations of a future CUORE-like bolometer array which would utilize these improvements and present the sensitivity reach of a hypothetical next-generation bolometric0νββ experiment. We demonstrate that a bolometric experiment with the isotope mass of about 1 ton is capable of reaching the sensitivity to the effective Majorana neutrino mass (|mee|) of order 10-20 meV, thus completely exploring the so-called inverted neutrino mass hierarchy region. In conclusion, we highlight the main challenges and identify priorities for an R&D program addressing them.

  11. Exploring the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in the Inverted Neutrino Hierarchy with Bolometric Detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Artusa, D. R.; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; et al

    2014-10-15

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) is one of the most sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model, providing unique information on the nature of neutrinos. In this paper we review the status and outlook for bolometric 0νββ decay searches. We summarize recent advances in background suppression demonstrated using bolometers with simultaneous readout of heat and light signals. We simulate several configurations of a future CUORE-like bolometer array which would utilize these improvements and present the sensitivity reach of a hypothetical next-generation bolometric0νββ experiment. We demonstrate that a bolometric experiment with the isotope mass of about 1 ton is capablemore » of reaching the sensitivity to the effective Majorana neutrino mass (|mee|) of order 10-20 meV, thus completely exploring the so-called inverted neutrino mass hierarchy region. In conclusion, we highlight the main challenges and identify priorities for an R&D program addressing them.« less

  12. The radio-loud AGN population at z ≳ 1 in the COSMOS field. I. selection and spectral energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Capetti, Alessandro; Chiaberge, Marco; Celotti, Annalisa

    2014-07-01

    We select a sample of radio galaxies at high redshifts (z ≳ 1) in the COSMOS field by cross-matching optical and infrared (IR) images with the FIRST radio data. The aim of this study is to explore the high-z radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) population at much lower luminosities than the classical samples of distant radio sources, which are similar to those of the local population of radio galaxies. Precisely, we extended a previous analysis focused on low-luminosity radio galaxies. The wide multiwavelength coverage provided by the COSMOS survey allows us to derive their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We model them with our own developed technique 2SPD that includes old and young stellar populations and dust emission. When added to those previously selected, we obtain a sample of 74 RL AGN. The SED modeling returns several important quantities associated with the AGN and host properties. The resulting photometric redshifts range from z ~ 0.7 to 3. The sample mostly includes compact radio sources but also 21 FR IIs sources; the radio power distribution of the sample covers ~1031.5 - 1034.3 erg s-1 Hz-1, thus straddling the local FR I/FR II break. The inferred range of stellar mass of the hosts is ~1010 - 1011.5M⊙. The SEDs are dominated by the contribution from an old stellar population with an age of ~1 - 3 Gyr for most of the sources. However, UV and mid-IR (MIR) excesses are observed for half of the sample. The dust luminosities inferred from the MIR excesses are in the range, Ldust ~ 1043 - 1045.5 erg s-1, which are associated with temperatures approximately of 350-1200 K. Estimates of the UV component yield values of ~1041.5 - 1045.5 erg s-1 at 2000 Å. The UV emission is significantly correlated with both IR and radio luminosities; the former being the stronger link. However, the origin of UV and dust emission, whether it is produced by the AGN of by star formation, is still unclear. Our results show that this RL AGN population at high

  13. The effect of AGN feedback on the X-ray morphologies of clusters: Simulations vs. observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung; Puchwein, Ewald; Böhringer, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Clusters of galaxies probe the large-scale distribution of matter and are a useful tool to test the cosmological models by constraining cosmic structure growth and the expansion of the Universe. It is the scaling relations between mass observables and the true mass of a cluster through which we obtain the cosmological constraints by comparing to theoretical cluster mass functions. These scaling relations are, however, heavily influenced by cluster morphology. The presence of the slight tension in recent cosmological constraints on Ωm and σ8 based on the CMB and clusters has boosted the interests in looking for possible sources for the discrepancy. Therefore we study here the effect of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback as one of the major mechanisms modifying the cluster morphology influencing scaling relations. It is known that AGN feedback injects energies up to 1062 erg into the intracluster medium, controls the heating and cooling of a cluster, and re-distributes cold gas from the centre to outer radii. We have also learned that cluster simulations with AGN feedback can reproduce observed cluster properties, for example, the X-ray luminosity, temperature, and cooling rate at the centre better than without the AGN feedback. In this paper using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations we investigate how the AGN feedback changes the X-ray morphology of the simulated systems, and compare this to the observed Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) clusters. We apply two substructure measures, centre shifts (w) and power ratios (e.g. P3/P0), to characterise the cluster morphology, and find that our simulated clusters are more substructured than the observed clusters based on the values of w and P3/P0. We also show that the degree of this discrepancy is affected by the inclusion of AGN feedback. While the clusters simulated with the AGN feedback are in much better agreement with the REXCESS LX-T relation, they are also more substructured

  14. NGC1266: Compton-thick AGN or Ultra-compact Starburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Lauranne; Alatalo, Katherine A.; Brightman, Murray; Ogle, Patrick M.; Appleton, Philip N.

    2016-01-01

    NGC1266 is a nearby lenticular galaxy hosting a massive molecular outflow driven by its active galactic nucleus (AGN). The turbulence injected into its ISM by the outflow may account for the suppression of its star formation by a factor of 50-150. ALMA and CARMA measurements of dense gas tracers had shown that its nuclear region lies behind a column of N(H2) = 3 x 10^24 cm^-2, and ALMA barely resolved a region of continuum FIR emission contained within 30pc of the nucleus emitting L(IR)>10^10 solar luminosities. With out recent NuSTAR observation of this galaxies, we determine whether the dust is heated by a Compton-thick AGN or an ultra-compact central starburst.

  15. GOODS-Herschel: ultra-deep XMM-Newton observations reveal AGN/star-formation connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovilos, E.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Ranalli, P.; Vignali, C.; Lusso, E.; Cappelluti, N.; Zamorani, G.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Hwang, H. S.; Charmandaris, V.; Ivison, R. J.; Merloni, A.; Daddi, E.; Carrera, F. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Mullaney, J. R.; Scott, D.; Alexander, D. M.; Del Moro, A.; Morrison, G.; Murphy, E. J.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Dannerbauer, H.; Kartaltepe, J.; Leiton, R.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Valtchanov, I.

    2012-10-01

    Models of galaxy evolution assume some connection between the AGN and star formation activity in galaxies. We use the multi-wavelength information of the CDFS to assess this issue. We select the AGNs from the 3 Ms XMM-Newton survey and measure the star-formation rates of their hosts using data that probe rest-frame wavelengths longward of 20 μm, predominantly from deep 100 μm and 160 μm Herschel observations, but also from Spitzer-MIPS-70 μm. Star-formation rates are obtained from spectral energy distribution fits, identifying and subtracting an AGN component. Our sample consists of sources in the z ≈ 0.5-4 redshift range, with star-formation rates SFR ≈ 101-103 M⊙ yr-1 and stellar masses M⋆ ≈ 1010-1011.5 M⊙. We divide the star-formation rates by the stellar masses of the hosts to derive specific star-formation rates (sSFR) and find evidence for a positive correlation between the AGN activity (proxied by the X-ray luminosity) and the sSFR for themost active systems with X-ray luminosities exceeding Lx ≃ 1043 erg s-1 and redshifts z ≳ 1. We do not find evidence for such a correlation for lower luminosity systems or those at lower redshifts, consistent with previous studies. We do not find any correlation between the SFR (or the sSFR) and the X-ray absorption derived from high-quality XMM-Newton spectra either, showing that the absorption is likely to be linked to the nuclear region rather than the host, while the star-formation is not nuclear. Comparing the sSFR of the hosts to the characteristic sSFR of star-forming galaxies at the same redshift (the so-called "main sequence") we find that the AGNs reside mostly in main-sequence and starburst hosts, reflecting the AGN-sSFR connection; however the infrared selection might bias this result. Limiting our analysis to the highest X-ray luminosity AGNs (X-ray QSOs with Lx > 1044 erg s-1), we find that the highest-redshift QSOs (with z ≳ 2) reside predominantly in starburst hosts, with an average s

  16. Chemical and luminosity evolution, and counts of galaxies in a merger model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colin, P.; Schramm, D. N.

    1993-01-01

    A merger model is applied to the chemical and luminosity evolution of galaxies. Two aspects are focused on. The first is the problem of abundance ratios as a function of metallicity. The second is related to the luminosity evolution of galaxies. In relation to the former, we calculate the evolution of several chemical elements exploring a broad space of possible star formation rates, including those derived using phenomenological arguments from a multiple merger galaxy formation scenario. We are able to reproduce the observed plateau in the ratio of the abundances of oxygen to iron versus metallicity as a direct consequence of one of the merging SFR used; we have utilized a standard Type II supernovae nucleosynthesis scenario coupled with a reasonable binary model for Type Ia supernovae and its consequent nucleosynthetic yields. Following the consequent luminosity effects in a straightforward way enables the estimation of the evolution of bolometric luminosity. We have used our recently developed code for photometric evolution of galaxies to make a preliminary computation of the number-magnitude relationship, assuming a standard picture of galaxy evolution, in the B and K bands.

  17. Towards A Complete Census of Compton-thick AGN and N_H Distribution in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annuar, A.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D.; Asmus, D.; Goulding, A.; Harrison, C.; Lansbury, G.

    2014-07-01

    Many studies have shown that Compton-thick AGNs (CTAGNs) provide important contribution to the cosmic X-ray background spectrum (˜25% at 20keV). They are expected to dominate the Seyfert 2 population in the local universe, yet only ˜20 bona fide CTAGNs are known. We present an updated census of CTAGN population in the local universe using a volume-limited AGN sample complete to D=15Mpc. Intrinsic relations between 2-10keV X-ray luminosity and mid-IR emission at 12μm, [OIV]λ25.68μm and [NeV]λ14.32μm are investigated, and it is found that the emission at 12μm has the tightest correlation with the X-ray luminosity.Candidates for CTAGN are then selected using this relation and by comparing their 12μm luminosity with the observed X-ray luminosity.We also investigate the Compton-thick nature of these sources using the optical [OIII]λ5007{A}:X-ray diagnostic for comparison, and find that 35-50% of the sample are Compton-thick,of which 10-20% would be missed with the optical approach.Finally, we estimate the intrinsic N_{H} distribution of AGN population in the local universe from this analysis, and show that up to 70% of the sources are heavily obscured (N_{H}>10^{23} cm^{-2}), with ≥50% lying in the Compton-thick regime (N_{H}>10^{24} cm^{-2}).This work provides a well-defined local benchmark for AGN obscuration studies.

  18. Star Formation Black Hole Growth and Dusty Tori in the Most Luminous AGNs at z=2-3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzer, Hagai; Lani, Caterina; Nordon, Raanan; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Lira, Paulina; Shemmer, Ohad

    2016-03-01

    We report Herschel/SPIRE observations of 100 very luminous, optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z=2{--}3.5 with {log} {L}{{1350}} (erg s-1) ≥ 46.5 , where {L}{{1350}} is λLλ at 1350 Å. The distribution in {L}{{1350}} is similar to the general distribution of Sloan Digital Sky Survey AGNs in this redshift and luminosity interval. We measured star-formation (SF) luminosity, {L}{{SF}}, and SF rate (SFR) in 34 detected sources by fitting combined SF and torus templates, where the torus emission is based on Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer observations. We also obtained statistically significant stacks for the undetected sources in two luminosity groups. The sample properties are compared with those of very luminous AGNs at z\\gt 4.5. The main findings are: (1) The mean and the median SFRs of the detected sources are {1176}-339+476 and {1010}-503+706 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. The mean SFR of the undetected sources is 148 M⊙ yr-1. The ratio of SFR to the black hole accretion rate is ≈80 for the detected sources and less than 10 for the undetected sources. Unlike a sample of sources at z ≃ 4.8 that we studied recently, there is no difference in {L}{{AGN}} and only a very small difference in {L}{{torus}} between the detected and undetected sources. (2) The redshift distribution of {L}{{SF}} and {L}{{AGN}} for the most luminous, redshift 2-7 AGNs are different. Similar to previous studies, the highest {L}{{AGN}} are found at z ≈ 3. However, the {L}{{SF}} of such sources peaks at z ≈ 5. Assuming the objects in our sample are hosted by the most massive galaxies at those redshifts, we find that approximately 2/3 of the hosts are already below the main sequence of SF galaxies at z = 2-3.5. (3) The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of dusty tori at high redshift are similar to the shapes found in low redshift, low luminosity AGNs. Herschel upper limits put strong constraints on the long wavelength shape of the SED, ruling out several earlier

  19. The CMS pixel luminosity telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmayer, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a new complement to the CMS detector for the LHC Run II data taking period. It consists of eight 3-layer telescopes based on silicon pixel detectors that are placed around the beam pipe on each end of CMS viewing the interaction point at small angle. A fast 3-fold coincidence of the pixel planes in each telescope will provide a bunch-by-bunch measurement of the luminosity. Particle tracking allows collision products to be distinguished from beam background, provides a self-alignment of the detectors, and a continuous in-time monitoring of the efficiency of each telescope plane. The PLT is an independent luminometer, essential to enhance the robustness on the measurement of the delivered luminosity and to reduce its systematic uncertainties. This will allow to determine production cross-sections, and hence couplings, with high precision and to set more stringent limits on new particle production.

  20. HST-COS OBSERVATIONS OF AGNs. I. ULTRAVIOLET COMPOSITE SPECTRA OF THE IONIZING CONTINUUM AND EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, J. Michael; Stevans, Matthew; Danforth, Charles W. E-mail: matthew.stevans@colorado.edu

    2012-06-20

    The ionizing fluxes from quasars and other active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are critical for interpreting the emission-line spectra of AGNs and for photoionization and heating of the intergalactic medium. Using ultraviolet spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have directly measured the rest-frame ionizing continua and emission lines for 22 AGNs. Over the redshift range 0.026 < z < 1.44, COS samples the Lyman continuum and many far-UV emission lines (Ly{alpha} {lambda}1216, C IV {lambda}1549, Si IV/O IV] {lambda}1400, N V {lambda}1240, O VI {lambda}1035). Strong EUV emission lines with 14-22 eV excitation energies (Ne VIII {lambda}{lambda}770, 780, Ne V {lambda}569, O II {lambda}834, O III {lambda}833, {lambda}702, O IV {lambda}788, 608, 554, O V {lambda}630, N III {lambda}685) suggest the presence of hot gas in the broad emission-line region. The rest-frame continuum, F{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}{sub {nu}}}, shows a break at wavelengths {lambda} < 1000 A, with spectral index {alpha}{sub {nu}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.14 in the FUV (1200-2000 A) steepening to {alpha}{sub {nu}} = -1.41 {+-} 0.21 in the EUV (500-1000 A). The COS EUV index is similar to that of radio-quiet AGNs in the 2002 HST/FOS survey ({alpha}{sub {nu}} = -1.57 {+-} 0.17). We see no Lyman edge ({tau}{sub HI} < 0.03) or He I {lambda}584 emission in the AGN composite. Our 22 AGNs exhibit a substantial range of FUV/EUV spectral indices and a correlation with AGN luminosity and redshift, likely due to observing below the 1000 A spectral break.

  1. Panchromatic observations of dwarf starburst galaxies: Infant super star clusters and a low-luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Globular star clusters and supermassive black holes are fundamental components of today's massive galaxies, with origins dating back to the very early universe. Both globular clusters and the seeds of supermassive black holes are believed to have formed in the progenitors of modern massive galaxies, although the details are poorly understood. Direct observations of these low-mass, distant, and hence faint systems are unobtainable with current capabilities. However, gas-rich dwarf starburst galaxies in the local universe, analogous in many ways to protogalaxies at high-redshift, can provide critical insight into the early stages of galaxy evolution including the formation of globular clusters and massive black holes. This thesis presents a panchromatic study of nearby dwarf starburst galaxies harboring nascent globular clusters still embedded in their birth material. Infant clusters are identified via their production of thermal radio emission at centimeter wavelengths, which comes from dense gas ionized by young massive stars. By combining radio observations with complementary data at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths, we obtain a comprehensive view of massive clusters emerging from their gaseous and dusty birth cocoons. This thesis also presents the first example of a nearby dwarf starburst galaxy hosting an actively accreting massive central black hole. The black hole in this dwarf galaxy is unusual in that it is not associated with a bulge, a nuclear star cluster, or any other well-defined nucleus, likely reflecting an early phase of black hole and galaxy evolution that has not been previously observed.

  2. Evolutionary variations of solar luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.

    1982-01-01

    The Theoretical arguments for a 30% increase in the solar luminosity over the past 4.7 billion years are reviewed. A scaling argument shows that this increase can be predicted without detailed numerical calculations. The magnitude of the increase is independent of nuclear reaction rates, as long as conversion of hydrogen to helium provides the basic energy source of the Sun. The effect of the solar luminosity increase on the terrestrial climate is briefly considered. It appears unlikely that an enhanced greenhouse effect, due to reduced gases (NH3, CH4), can account for the long-term paleoclimatic trends.

  3. The Abundance of Distant and Extremely Red Galaxies: The Role of AGN Feedback in Hierarchical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Fontana, A.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Salimbeni, S.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the effect of AGN feedback associated with the bright QSO phase on the color distribution of galaxies from z=0 up to z=4. To this aim, we insert a blast-wave model of AGN feedback in our semianalytic model of galaxy formation, which includes the growth of supermassive black holes and the AGN activity triggered by interactions of the host galaxies. The AGN feedback is directly related to the impulsive, luminous quasar phase. We test our model by checking the consistency of its results against (1) the QSO luminosity functions from z=0 to 4, and (2) the observed local relation between the black hole mass mBH and the mass of the host galaxy. At low redshift the inclusion of AGN feedback enhances the number of red bright galaxies so that the color distribution of Mr<-22 objects is entirely dominated by red (u-r>1.5) galaxies; at 0.52.5.

  4. Chandra X-Ray and Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Optically Selected Kiloparsec-scale Binary Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Host Galaxy Morphology and AGN Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Jinyi; Liu, Xin; Ho, Luis C.; Shen, Yue; Peng, Chien Y.; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provide clues to how gas-rich mergers trigger and fuel AGNs and how supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs evolve in a gas-rich environment. While significant effort has been invested in their identification, the detailed properties of binary AGNs and their host galaxies are still poorly constrained. In a companion paper, we examined the nature of ionizing sources in the double nuclei of four kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs with redshifts between 0.1 and 0.2. Here, we present their host galaxy morphology based on F336W (U-band) and F105W (Y-band) images taken by the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our targets have double-peaked narrow emission lines and were confirmed to host binary AGNs with follow-up observations. We find that kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs occur in galaxy mergers with diverse morphological types. There are three major mergers with intermediate morphologies and a minor merger with a dominant disk component. We estimate the masses of the SMBHs from their host bulge stellar masses and obtain Eddington ratios for each AGN. Compared with a representative control sample drawn at the same redshift and stellar mass, the AGN luminosities and Eddington ratios of our binary AGNs are similar to those of single AGNs. The U ‑ Y color maps indicate that clumpy star-forming regions could significantly affect the X-ray detection of binary AGNs, e.g., the hardness ratio. Considering the weak X-ray emission in AGNs triggered in merger systems, we suggest that samples of X-ray-selected AGNs may be biased against gas-rich mergers. Based, in part, on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program number GO 12363.

  5. Artificial neural network based calibrations for the prediction of galactic [N II] λ6584 and Hα line luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimoorinia, Hossein; Ellison, Sara L.

    2014-04-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN) is a well-established mathematical technique for data prediction, based on the identification of correlations and pattern recognition in input training sets. We present the application of ANNs to predict the emission line luminosities of Hα and [N II] λ6584 in galaxies. These important spectral diagnostics are used for metallicities, active galactic nuclei (AGN) classification and star formation rates, yet are shifted into the infrared for galaxies above z ˜ 0.5, or may not be covered in spectra with limited wavelength coverage. The ANN is trained with a large sample of emission line galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using various combinations of emission lines and stellar mass. The ANN is tested for galaxies dominated by both star formation and AGN; in both cases the Hα and [N II] λ6584 line luminosities can be predicted with a scatter σ < 0.1 dex. We also show that the performance of the ANN does not depend significantly on the covering fraction, mass or metallicity of the data. Polynomial functions are derived that allow easy application of the ANN predictions to determine Hα and [N II] λ6584 line luminosities. An ANN calibration for the Balmer decrement (Hα/Hβ) based on line equivalent widths and colours is also presented. The effectiveness of the ANN calibration is demonstrated with an independent data set (the Galaxy Mass and Assembly Survey). We demonstrate the application of our line luminosities to the determination of gas-phase metallicities and AGN classification. The ANN technique yields a significant improvement in the measurement of metallicities that require [N II] and Hα when compared with the function-based conversions of Kewley & Ellison. The AGN classification is successful for 86 per cent of SDSS galaxies.

  6. VARIATIONS OF MID- AND FAR-INFRARED LUMINOSITIES AMONG EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: RELATION TO STELLAR METALLICITY AND COLD DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, William G.; Brighenti, Fabrizio

    2013-05-01

    The Hubble morphological sequence from early to late galaxies corresponds to an increasing rate of specific star formation. The Hubble sequence also follows a banana-shaped correlation between 24 and 70 {mu}m luminosities, both normalized with the K-band luminosity. We show that this correlation is significantly tightened if galaxies with central active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission are removed, but the cosmic scatter of elliptical galaxies in both 24 and 70 {mu}m luminosities remains significant along the correlation. We find that the 24 {mu}m variation among ellipticals correlates with stellar metallicity, reflecting emission from hot dust in winds from asymptotic giant branch stars of varying metallicity. Infrared surface brightness variations in elliptical galaxies indicate that the K - 24 color profile is U-shaped for reasons that are unclear. In some elliptical galaxies, cold interstellar dust emitting at 70 and 160 {mu}m may arise from recent gas-rich mergers. However, we argue that most of the large range of 70 {mu}m luminosity in elliptical galaxies is due to dust transported from galactic cores by feedback events in (currently IR-quiet) AGNs. Cooler dusty gas naturally accumulates in the cores of elliptical galaxies due to dust-cooled local stellar mass loss and may accrete onto the central black hole, releasing energy. AGN-heated gas can transport dust in cores 5-10 kpc out into the hot gas atmospheres where it radiates extended 70 {mu}m emission but is eventually destroyed by sputtering. This, and some modest star formation, defines a cycle of dust creation and destruction. Elliptical galaxies evidently undergo large transient excursions in the banana plot in times comparable to the sputtering time or AGN duty cycle, 10 Myr. Normally regarded as passive, elliptical galaxies are the most active galaxies in the IR color-color correlation.

  7. A method for determining AGN accretion phase in field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micic, Miroslav; Martinović, Nemanja; Sinha, Manodeep

    2016-09-01

    Recent observations of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in massive galaxies (log M*/ M⊙ > 10.4) show the following: (1) at z < 1, AGN-hosting galaxies do not show enhanced merger signatures compared with normal galaxies, (2) also at z < 1, most AGNs are hosted by quiescent galaxies and (3) at z > 1, the percentage of AGNs in star-forming galaxies increases and becomes comparable to the AGN percentage in quiescent galaxies at z ˜ 2. How can major mergers explain AGN activity in massive quiescent galaxies that have no merger features and no star formation to indicate a recent galaxy merger? By matching merger events in a cosmological N-body simulation to the observed AGN incidence probability in the COSMOS survey, we show that major merger-triggered AGN activity is consistent with the observations. By distinguishing between `peak' AGNs (recently merger-triggered and hosted by star-forming galaxies) and `faded' AGNs (merger-triggered a long time ago and now residing in quiescent galaxies), we show that the AGN occupation fraction in star-forming and quiescent galaxies simply follows the evolution of the galaxy merger rate. Since the galaxy merger rate drops dramatically at z < 1, the only AGNs left to be observed are the ones triggered by old mergers that are now in the declining phase of their nuclear activity, hosted by quiescent galaxies. As we go towards higher redshifts, the galaxy merger rate increases and the percentages of `peak' AGNs and `faded' AGNs become comparable.

  8. THE MID-INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z < 0.3 FROM 5MUSES: UNDERSTANDING THE STAR FORMATION/ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS BALANCE FROM A SPECTROSCOPIC VIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yanling; Shi Yong; Helou, George; Armus, Lee; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Dale, Daniel A.; Papovich, Casey; Rahman, Nurur; Dasyra, Kalliopi E-mail: yong@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: lee@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu

    2011-06-10

    We present rest-frame 15 and 24 {mu}m luminosity functions (LFs) and the corresponding star-forming LFs at z < 0.3 derived from the 5MUSES sample. Spectroscopic redshifts have been obtained for {approx}98% of the objects and the median redshift is {approx}0.12. The 5-35 {mu}m Infrared Spectrograph spectra allow us to estimate accurately the luminosities and build the LFs. Using a combination of starburst and quasar templates, we quantify the star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributions in the mid-IR spectral energy distribution. We then compute the SF LFs at 15 and 24 {mu}m, and compare with the total 15 and 24 {mu}m LFs. When we remove the contribution of AGNs, the bright end of the LF exhibits a strong decline, consistent with the exponential cutoff of a Schechter function. Integrating the differential LF, we find that the fractional contribution by SF to the energy density is 58% at 15 {mu}m and 78% at 24 {mu}m, while it goes up to {approx}86% when we extrapolate our mid-IR results to the total IR luminosity density. We confirm that the AGNs play more important roles energetically at high luminosities. Finally, we compare our results with work at z {approx} 0.7 and confirm that evolution on both luminosity and density is required to explain the difference in the LFs at different redshifts.

  9. Model atmospheres broad-band colors, bolometric corrections and temperature calibrations for O - M stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessell, M. S.; Castelli, F.; Plez, B.

    1998-05-01

    Broad band colors and bolometric corrections in the Johnson-Cousins-Glass system (Bessell, 1990; Bessell & Brett, 1988) have been computed from synthetic spectra from new model atmospheres of Kurucz (1995a), Castelli (1997), Plez, Brett & Nordlund (1992), Plez (1995-97), and Brett (1995a,b). These atmospheres are representative of larger grids that are currently being completed. We discuss differences between the different grids and compare theoretical color-temperature relations and the fundamental color temperature relations derived from: (a) the infrared-flux method (IRFM) for A-K stars (Blackwell & Lynas-Gray 1994; Alonso et al. 1996) and M dwarfs (Tsuji et al. 1996a); (b) lunar occultations (Ridgway et al. 1980) and (c) Michelson interferometry (Di Benedetto & Rabbia 1987; Dyck et al. 1996; Perrin et al. 1997) for K-M giants, and (d) eclipsing binaries for M dwarfs. We also compare color - color relations and color - bolometric correction relations and find good agreement except for a few colors. The more realistic fluxes and spectra of the new model grids should enable accurate population synthesis models to be derived and permit the ready calibration of non-standard photometric passbands. As well, the theoretical bolometric corrections and temperature - color relations will permit reliable transformation from observed color magnitude diagrams to theoretical HR diagrams. Tables 1-6 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  10. Bolometric properties of reactively sputtered TiO2-x films for thermal infrared image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Y. Ashok Kumar; Kang, In-Ku; Shin, Young Bong; Lee, Hee Chul

    2015-09-01

    A heat-sensitive layer (TiO2-x ) was successfully deposited by RF reactive magnetron sputtering for infrared (IR) image sensors at different relative mass flow of oxygen gas (R O2) levels. The deposition rate was decreased with an increase in the percentage of R O2 from 3.4% to 3.7%. TiO2-x samples deposited at room temperature exhibited amorphous characteristics. Oxygen deficiency causes a change in the oxidation state and is assumed to decrease the Ti4+ component on the surfaces of TiO2-x films. The oxygen stoichiometry (x) in TiO2-x films decreased from 0.35 to 0.05 with increasing the R O2 level from 3.4% to 3.7%, respectively. In TiO2-x -test-patterned samples, the resistivity decreased with the temperature, confirming the typical semiconducting property. The bolometric properties of the resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), and the flicker (1/ f) noise parameter were determined at different x values in TiO2-x samples. The rate of TCR dependency with regard to the 1/ f noise parameter is a universal bolometric parameter (β), acting as the dynamic element in a bolometer. It is high when a sample has a relatively low resistivity (0.82 Ω·cm) and a lower 1/ f noise parameter (3.16   ×   10-12). The results of this study indicate that reactively sputtered TiO2-x is a viable bolometric material for uncooled IR image sensor devices.

  11. Bolometric detector on the basis of single-wall carbon nanotube/polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Ali E.

    2008-10-01

    Infrared imaging sensors that operate without cryogenic cooling have the potential to provide the military or civilian users with infrared vision capabilities packaged in a camera of extremely small size, weight and power consumption. We present here the uncooled bolometric sensor on the basis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) polymer composite with enhanced sensitivity. The voltage responsivity of device working at room temperatures exceeds 150 V/W. The absorption coefficient of single-wall carbon nanotubes was increased by involving Forster type energy transfer from polymer film to dispersed SWNT. The temperature gradient of resistivity was substantially improved by chemical functionalization of SWNT.

  12. Empirical effective temperatures and bolometric corrections for early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Code, A. D.; Bless, R. C.; Davis, J.; Brown, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    An empirical effective temperature for a star can be found by measuring its apparent angular diameter and absolute flux distribution. The angular diameters of 32 bright stars in the spectral range O5f to F8 have recently been measured with the stellar interferometer at Narrabri Observatory, and their absolute flux distributions have been found by combining observations of ultraviolet flux from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-2) with ground-based photometry. In this paper, these data have been combined to derive empirical effective temperatures and bolometric corrections for these 32 stars.

  13. They Call Me Agnes: A Crow Narrative Based on the Life of Agnes Yellowtail Deernose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voget, Fred W.; Mee, Mary K.

    This book is about life on the Crow Indian Reservation from around 1910 to the present and is based on the personal experiences of Donnie and Agnes Deernose. Following Donnie's death, Agnes became the principal narrator of the book. The Crow Indian Reservation is situated between Billings, Montana, and Sheridan, Wyoming. More so than any other…

  14. SurveySim: a new MCMC code to explore the evolution of the IR luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonato, Matteo; Kurinsky, Noah; Sajina, Anna; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Silva, Andrea; Yan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel and Spitzer space telescopes have been crucial in furthering our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies. However key questions, such as the role of SF and AGN in powering the IR output of galaxies remain unanswered. The large numbers of high redshift galaxies detected by recent IR surveys make individual spectroscopic follow-up impractical. However statistical trends in SED and luminosity function evolution in an entire population can be realized. We present a new open source Markov-Chain Monte Carlo code, SurveySim. It is built to constrain the spectral energy distribution and luminosity function evolution required to produce a given multi-wavelength survey. Its very general design allow us to use a wide range of different dusty galaxy populations (including SFGs, AGNs and Composites), luminosity function forms and SED templates. The code employs a multidimensional color-color diagnostic to determine goodness of fit. It simulates observational errors and takes into account incompleteness. Here, dusty high-z galaxies at different parts of the IR SED have been considered to analyze the relative selection biases.

  15. MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR TO AGN FEEDBACK: VLT X-SHOOTER OBSERVATIONS OF S IV BALQSO OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Arav, Nahum; Edmonds, Doug; Chamberlain, Carter; Benn, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We present the most energetic BALQSO outflow measured to date, with a kinetic luminosity of at least 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, which is 5% of the bolometric luminosity of this high Eddington ratio quasar. The associated mass-flow rate is 400 solar masses per year. Such kinetic luminosity and mass-flow rate should provide strong active galactic nucleus feedback effects. The outflow is located at about 300 pc from the quasar and has a velocity of roughly 8000 km s{sup -1}. Our distance and energetic measurements are based in large part on the identification and measurement of S IV and S IV* broad absorption lines (BALs). The use of this high-ionization species allows us to generalize the result to the majority of high-ionization BALQSOs that are identified by their C IV absorption. We also report the energetics of two other outflows seen in another object using the same technique. The distances of all three outflows from the central source (100-2000 pc) suggest that we observe BAL troughs much farther away from the central source than the assumed acceleration region of these outflows (0.01-0.1 pc).

  16. Major Contributor to AGN Feedback: VLT X-shooter Observations of S IV BALQSO Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Arav, Nahum; Edmonds, Doug; Chamberlain, Carter; Benn, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We present the most energetic BALQSO outflow measured to date, with a kinetic luminosity of at least 1046 erg s-1, which is 5% of the bolometric luminosity of this high Eddington ratio quasar. The associated mass-flow rate is 400 solar masses per year. Such kinetic luminosity and mass-flow rate should provide strong active galactic nucleus feedback effects. The outflow is located at about 300 pc from the quasar and has a velocity of roughly 8000 km s-1. Our distance and energetic measurements are based in large part on the identification and measurement of S IV and S IV* broad absorption lines (BALs). The use of this high-ionization species allows us to generalize the result to the majority of high-ionization BALQSOs that are identified by their C IV absorption. We also report the energetics of two other outflows seen in another object using the same technique. The distances of all three outflows from the central source (100-2000 pc) suggest that we observe BAL troughs much farther away from the central source than the assumed acceleration region of these outflows (0.01-0.1 pc). Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, PID: 87.B-0229.

  17. X-ray variability in AGN: LINER vs. Seyfert 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Lorena; Masegosa, Josefa; Gonzalez-Martin, Omaira; Marquez, Isabel

    2015-09-01

    Although variability is a general property characterizing active galactic nuclei (AGN), it is not well stablished if the changes occur in the same way in every nuclei . The main purpose of this work is to study the X-ray variability pattern(s) in low luminosity AGN in a large sample, including 18 low ionization nuclear emission line regions (LINERs) and 26 type 2 Seyferts (Sy2), using the public archives in Chandra and/or XMM-Newton. Spectra of the same source gathered at different epochs were simultaneously fitted to study long term variations, whereas the variability patterns were studied allowing different parameters to vary during the spectral fit. Whenever possible, short term variations from the analysis of the light curves and long term UV flux variability were studied. Short term variations are not found at X-rays, but variations in timescales of months/years is very common in both families. The main driver of the long term X-ray variations seems to be related to changes in the nuclear power in both LINERs and Sy2, but other variability patterns cannot be discarded in a few cases, because changes of the column density or at soft energies are also found. The X-ray variations occur in the same way in LINERs and type 2 Seyferts, i.e., related to the nuclear continuum, but they might have different accretion mechanisms. As absorption variations and changing-look sources are not observed in LINERs, but UV nuclear variations are common, we speculate that the BLR and the torus might disappear in these sources.

  18. Simulations of the OzDES AGN reverberation mapping project

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, Anthea L.; Martini, Paul; Davis, Tamara M.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Skielboe, Andreas; Vestergaard, Marianne; Huff, Eric; Watson, Darach; et al

    2015-08-26

    As part of the Australian spectroscopic dark energy survey (OzDES) we are carrying out a large-scale reverberation mapping study of ~500 quasars over five years in the 30 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova fields. These quasars have redshifts ranging up to 4 and have apparent AB magnitudes between 16.8 mag < r < 22.5 mag. The aim of the survey is to measure time lags between fluctuations in the quasar continuum and broad emission-line fluxes of individual objects in order to measure black hole masses for a broad range of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and constrainmore » the radius–luminosity (R–L) relationship. Here we investigate the expected efficiency of the OzDES reverberation mapping campaign and its possible extensions. We expect to recover lags for ~35–45 % of the quasars. AGN with shorter lags and greater variability are more likely to yield a lag measurement, and objects with lags ≲6 months or ~1 yr are expected to be recovered the most accurately. The baseline OzDES reverberation mapping campaign is predicted to produce an unbiased measurement of the R–L relationship parameters for Hβ, MgIIλ2798, and C IVλ1549. As a result, extending the baseline survey by either increasing the spectroscopic cadence, extending the survey season, or improving the emission-line flux measurement accuracy will significantly improve the R–L parameter constraints for all broad emission lines.« less

  19. ALMA 0.1–0.2 arcsec Resolution Imaging of the NGC 1068 Nucleus: Compact Dense Molecular Gas Emission at the Putative AGN Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    俊, Masatoshi Imanishi (今 西 昌; 郎, Kouichiro Nakanishi (中 西 康 一; 磨, Takuma Izumi (泉 拓

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of our ALMA Cycle 2 high angular resolution (0.″1–0.″2) observations of the nuclear region of the nearby well-studied type-2 active galactic nucleus (AGN), NGC 1068, at HCN J = 3–2 and HCO+ J = 3–2 emission lines. For the first time, due to a higher angular resolution than previous studies, we clearly detected dense molecular gas emission at the putative AGN location, identified as a ˜1.1 mm (˜266 GHz) continuum emission peak, by separating this emission from brighter emission located at 0.″5–2.″0 on the eastern and western sides of the AGN. The estimated intrinsic molecular emission size and dense molecular mass, which are thought to be associated with the putative dusty molecular torus around an AGN, were ˜10 pc and ˜several × 105 M ⊙, respectively. HCN-to-HCO+ J = 3–2 flux ratios substantially higher than unity were found throughout the nuclear region of NGC 1068. The continuum emission displayed an elongated morphology along the direction of the radio jet located at the northern side of the AGN, as well as a weak spatially-resolved component at ˜2.″0 on the southwestern side of the AGN. The latter component most likely originated from star formation, with the estimated luminosity more than one order of magnitude lower than the luminosity of the central AGN. No vibrationally excited (v 2 = 1f) J = 3–2 emission lines were detected for HCN and HCO+ across the field of view.

  20. ALMA 0.1-0.2 arcsec Resolution Imaging of the NGC 1068 Nucleus: Compact Dense Molecular Gas Emission at the Putative AGN Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Izumi, Takuma

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of our ALMA Cycle 2 high angular resolution (0.″1-0.″2) observations of the nuclear region of the nearby well-studied type-2 active galactic nucleus (AGN), NGC 1068, at HCN J = 3-2 and HCO+ J = 3-2 emission lines. For the first time, due to a higher angular resolution than previous studies, we clearly detected dense molecular gas emission at the putative AGN location, identified as a ˜1.1 mm (˜266 GHz) continuum emission peak, by separating this emission from brighter emission located at 0.″5-2.″0 on the eastern and western sides of the AGN. The estimated intrinsic molecular emission size and dense molecular mass, which are thought to be associated with the putative dusty molecular torus around an AGN, were ˜10 pc and ˜several × 105 M ⊙, respectively. HCN-to-HCO+ J = 3-2 flux ratios substantially higher than unity were found throughout the nuclear region of NGC 1068. The continuum emission displayed an elongated morphology along the direction of the radio jet located at the northern side of the AGN, as well as a weak spatially-resolved component at ˜2.″0 on the southwestern side of the AGN. The latter component most likely originated from star formation, with the estimated luminosity more than one order of magnitude lower than the luminosity of the central AGN. No vibrationally excited (v 2 = 1f) J = 3-2 emission lines were detected for HCN and HCO+ across the field of view.

  1. The PEP survey: evidence for intense star-forming activity in the majority of radio-selected AGN at z ≳ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Lutz, D.; Santini, P.; Salvato, M.; Popesso, P.; Berta, S.; Pozzi, F.

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the far-infrared (FIR) properties of radio-active active galactic nuclei (AGN), we have considered three different fields where both radio and FIR observations are the deepest to date: GOODS-South, GOODS-North and the Lockman Hole. Out of a total of 92 radio-selected AGN, ˜64 per cent are found to have a counterpart in Herschel maps. The percentage is maximum in the GOODS-North (72 per cent) and minimum (˜50 per cent) in the Lockman Hole, where FIR observations are shallower. Our study shows that in all cases FIR emission is associated with star-forming activity within the host galaxy. Such an activity can even be extremely intense, with star-forming rates as high as ˜103-104 M⊙ yr-1. AGN activity does not inhibit star formation in the host galaxy, just as on-site star formation does not seem to affect AGN properties, at least those detected at radio wavelengths and for z ≳ 1. Given the very high rate of FIR detections, we stress that this refers to the majority of the sample: most radio-active AGN are associated with intense episodes of star formation. However, the two processes proceed independently within the same galaxy, at all redshifts but in the local universe, where powerful enough radio activity reaches the necessary strength to switch off the on-site star formation. Our data also show that for z ≳ 1 the hosts of radio-selected star-forming galaxies and AGN are indistinguishable from each other in terms of both mass and IR luminosity distributions. The two populations only differentiate in the very local universe, whereby the few AGN which are still FIR-active are found in galaxies with much higher masses and luminosities.

  2. Calibrating AGN Feedback in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    Whether caused by AGN jets, shocks, or mergers, the most definitive evidence for heating in cluster cores comes from X-ray spectroscopy. Unfortunately such spectra are essentially limited to studying the emission spectrum from the cluster as a whole. However since the same underlying emission measure distribution produces both the observed CCD and RGS spectra, X-ray imaging can still provide spatial information on the heating process. Using Chandra archival data for a sample of 9 clusters, we demonstrate how imaging data can be used to constrain departures from a canonical, isobaric cooling flow model as a function of position in a given cluster. The results of this analysis are also shown for the deep archival exposure of the Perseus cluster. Such ``heating maps'' can provide constraints on both the location and magnitude of the heating in the cores of clusters. When combined with detections and spectral index maps from low-frequency radio observations, these maps can be used to distinguish between different models for heating in these objects.

  3. The Angular Clustering of WISE-Selected AGN: Different Haloes for Obscured and Unobscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin

    2015-08-01

    We calculate the angular correlation function for a sample of 170,000 AGN extracted from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalog, selected to have red mid-IR colors (W1 - W2 > 0.8) and 4.6 micron flux densities brighter than 0.14 mJy). The sample is expected to be >90% reliable at identifying AGN, and to have a mean redshift of z=1.1. In total, the angular clustering of WISE-AGN is roughly similar to that of optical AGN. We cross-match these objects with the photometric SDSS catalog and distinguish obscured sources with (r - W2) > 6 from bluer, unobscured AGN. Obscured sources present a higher clustering signal than unobscured sources. Since the host galaxy morphologies of obscured AGN are not typical red sequence elliptical galaxies and show disks in many cases, it is unlikely that the increased clustering strength of the obscured population is driven by a host galaxy segregation bias. By using relatively complete redshift distributions from the COSMOS survey, we find obscured sources at mean redshift z=0.9 have a bias of b = 2.9 \\pm 0.6 and are hosted in dark matter halos with a typical mass of log(M/M_odot)~13.5. In contrast, unobscured AGN at z~1.1 have a bias of b = 1.6 \\pm 0.6 and inhabit halos of log(M/M_odot)~12.4. These findings suggest that obscured AGN inhabit denser environments than unobscured AGN, and are difficult to reconcile with the simplest AGN unification models, where obscuration is driven solely by orientation.

  4. The most luminous H α emitters at z ˜ 0.8-2.23 from HiZELS: evolution of AGN and star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, David; Kohn, Saul A.; Best, Philip N.; Smail, Ian; Harrison, Chris M.; Stott, John; Calhau, João; Matthee, Jorryt

    2016-04-01

    We use new near-infrared spectroscopic observations to investigate the nature and evolution of the most luminous Hα emitters at z ˜ 0.8-2.23, which evolve strongly in number density over this period, and compare them to more typical Hα emitters. We study 59 luminous Hα emitters with LHα > L_{Hα }^{ast }, roughly equally split per redshift slice at z ˜ 0.8, 1.47 and 2.23 from the HiZELS and CF-HiZELS surveys. We find that, overall, 30 ± 8 per cent are active galactic nuclei [AGNs; 80 ± 30 per cent of these AGNs are broad-line AGNs, BL-AGNs], and we find little to no evolution in the AGN fraction with redshift, within the errors. However, the AGN fraction increases strongly with Hα luminosity and correlates best with LHα/L_{Hα }^{ast }(z). While LHα ≤ L_{Hα }^{ast }(z) Hα emitters are largely dominated by star-forming galaxies (>80 per cent), the most luminous Hα emitters (L_{Hα }>10L_{Hα }^{ast }(z)) at any cosmic time are essentially all BL-AGN. Using our AGN-decontaminated sample of luminous star-forming galaxies, and integrating down to a fixed Hα luminosity, we find a factor of ˜1300 evolution in the star formation rate density from z = 0 to 2.23. This is much stronger than the evolution from typical Hα star-forming galaxies and in line with the evolution seen for constant luminosity cuts used to select `ultraluminous' infrared galaxies and/or sub-millimetre galaxies. By taking into account the evolution in the typical Hα luminosity, we show that the most strongly star-forming Hα-selected galaxies at any epoch (L_{Hα }>L^{ast }_{Hα }(z)) contribute the same fractional amount of ≈15 per cent to the total star formation rate density, at least up to z = 2.23.

  5. The space density of Compton-thick AGN at z ≈ 0.8 in the zCOSMOS-Bright Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignali, C.; Mignoli, M.; Gilli, R.; Comastri, A.; Iwasawa, K.; Zamorani, G.; Mainieri, V.; Bongiorno, A.

    2014-11-01

    Context. The obscured accretion phase in black hole growth is a crucial ingredient in many models linking the active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity with the evolution of their host galaxy. At present, a complete census of obscured AGN is still missing, although several attempts in this direction have been carried out recently, mostly in the hard X-rays and at mid-infrared wavelengths. Aims: The purpose of this work is to assess whether the [Ne v] emission line at 3426 Å can reliably pick up obscured AGN up to z ≈ 1 by assuming that it is a reliable proxy of the intrinsic AGN luminosity and using moderately deep X-ray data to characterize the amount of obscuration. Methods: A sample of 69 narrow-line (Type 2) AGN at z ≈ 0.65-1.20 were selected from the 20k-zCOSMOS Bright galaxy sample on the basis of the presence of the [Ne v]3426 Å emission. The X-ray properties of these galaxies were then derived using the Chandra-COSMOS coverage of the field; the X-ray-to-[Ne v] flux ratio, coupled with X-ray spectral and stacking analyses, was then used to infer whether Compton-thin or Compton-thick absorption is present in these sources. Then the [Ne v] luminosity function was computed to estimate the space density of Compton-thick AGN at z ≈ 0.8. Results: Twenty-three sources were detected by Chandra, and their properties are consistent with moderate obscuration (on average, ≈a few × 1022 cm-2). The X-ray properties of the remaining 46 X-ray undetected Type 2 AGN (among which we expect to find the most heavily obscured objects) were derived using X-ray stacking analysis. Current data, supported by Monte Carlo simulations, indicate that a fraction as high as ≈40% of the present sample is likely to be Compton thick. The space density of Compton-thick AGN with logL2-10 keV> 43.5 at z = 0.83 is ΦThick = (9.1 ± 2.1) × 10-6 Mpc-3, in good agreement with both X-ray background model expectations and the previously measured space density for objects in a similar

  6. Nonlinear vs. bolometric radiation response and phonon thermal conductance in graphene-superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Vora, Heli; Nielsen, Bent; Du, Xu

    2014-02-21

    Graphene is a promising candidate for building fast and ultra-sensitive bolometric detectors due to its weak electron-phonon coupling and low heat capacity. In order to realize a practical graphene-based bolometer, several important issues, including the nature of radiation response, coupling efficiency to the radiation and the thermal conductance need to be carefully studied. Addressing these issues, we present graphene-superconductor junctions as a viable option to achieve efficient and sensitive bolometers, with the superconductor contacts serving as hot electron barriers. For a graphene-superconductor device with highly transparent interfaces, the resistance readout in the presence of radio frequency radiation is dominated by non-linear response. On the other hand, a graphene-superconductor tunnel device shows dominantly bolometric response to radiation. For graphene devices fabricated on SiO{sub 2} substrates, we confirm recent theoretical predictions of T{sup 2} temperature dependence of phonon thermal conductance in the presence of disorder in the graphene channel at low temperatures.

  7. Nonlinear vs. bolometric radiation response and phonon thermal conductance in graphene-superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Heli; Nielsen, Bent; Du, Xu

    2014-02-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate for building fast and ultra-sensitive bolometric detectors due to its weak electron-phonon coupling and low heat capacity. In order to realize a practical graphene-based bolometer, several important issues, including the nature of radiation response, coupling efficiency to the radiation and the thermal conductance need to be carefully studied. Addressing these issues, we present graphene-superconductor junctions as a viable option to achieve efficient and sensitive bolometers, with the superconductor contacts serving as hot electron barriers. For a graphene-superconductor device with highly transparent interfaces, the resistance readout in the presence of radio frequency radiation is dominated by non-linear response. On the other hand, a graphene-superconductor tunnel device shows dominantly bolometric response to radiation. For graphene devices fabricated on SiO2 substrates, we confirm recent theoretical predictions of T2 temperature dependence of phonon thermal conductance in the presence of disorder in the graphene channel at low temperatures.

  8. Long Timescale Variability of AGN with RXTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHardy, I. M.; Uttley, P.; Taylor, R. D.; Seymour, N.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper we review the very large contribution made by RXTE to our understanding of Active Galaxies (AGN). We discuss the relationship between AGN and Galactic Black Hole X-ray binary systems (GBHs) and show, by comparison of their powerspectral densities (PSDs) that some AGN are the equivalent of GBHs in their `high' state, rather than in their `low' state as has previously been assumed. We plot the timescale at which the PSD slope steepens from -1 to -2 against the black hole mass for a sample of AGN, and for Cyg X-1 in its high and low states. We find it is not possible to fit all AGN to the same linear scaling of break timescale with black hole mass. However broad line AGN are consistent with a linear scaling of break timescale with mass from Cyg X-1 in its low state and NLS1 galaxies scale better with Cyg X-1 in its high state, although there is an exception, NGC3227. We suggest that the relationship between black hole mass and break timescale is a function of another underlying parameter which may be accretion rate or black hole spin or, probably, both. We examine X-ray spectral variability and show how simple `flux-flux' plots can distinguish between `two-component' and `spectral pivoting' models. We also examine the relationship between the X-ray emission and that in other wavebands. In the case of X-ray/optical variability we show how cooler discs in AGN with larger mass black holes lead to greater proximity of the X-ray and optical emission regions and hence to more highly correlated variability. The very large amplitude of optical variability then rules out reprocessing as the origin of the optical emission. We show how the radio emission in NGC 4051 is strongly correlated with the X-ray emission, implying some contribution to the X-ray emission from a jet for which there is some evidence in radio images. We point out, however, that we have only studied in detail the X-ray variability of a handful of AGN. There is a strong requirement to extend such

  9. The luminosity function of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model for the optical luminosity function of quasars. Our analytical model is derived from fits to the empirical luminosity function estimated by Hartwick and Schade and Warren, Hewett, and Osmer on the basis of more than 1200 quasars over the range of redshifts 0 approximately less than z approximately less than 4.5. We find that the evolution of quasars over this entire redshift range can be well fitted by a Gaussian distribution, while the shape of the luminosity function can be well fitted by either a double power law or an exponential L(exp 1/4) law. The predicted number counts of quasars, as a function of either apparent magnitude or redshift, are fully consistent with the observed ones. Our model indicates that the evolution of quasars reaches its maximum at z approximately = 2.8 and declines at higher redshifts. An extrapolation of the evolution to z approximately greater than 4.5 implies that quasars may have started their cosmic fireworks at z(sub f) approximately = 5.2-5.5. Forthcoming surveys of quasars at these redshifts will be critical to constrain the epoch of quasar formation. All the results we derived are based on observed quasars and are therefore subject to the bias of obscuration by dust in damped Ly alpha systems. Future surveys of these absorption systems at z approximately greater than 3 will also be important if the formation epoch of quasars is to be known unambiguously.

  10. X-ray Spectroscopy of Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei with XMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiMatteo, Tiziana; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of black hole masses in nearby galaxies has transformed our understanding of these systems, allowing us to quantify the relevant scales of power, length and time and explore how the activity of black holes is linked to their environments and to the evolution of their host galaxies. In this project, Dr. Tiziana Di Matteo has the primary responsibility for developing and investigating theoretical models for the origin of the X-ray emission observed in low-luminosity AGN. Dr. Di Matteo has been involved in interpreting X-ray data and assessing accretion models throughout the project.

  11. Radio spectra of intermediate-luminosity broad-line radio galaxies .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelakis, E.; Kadler, M.; Lewis, K.; Sambruna, R. M.; Eracleous, M.; Zensus, J. A.

    Within the context of investigating possible differences between the mechanisms at play in Radio Loud AGN and those in Radio Quiet ones, we study the spectral characteristics of a selected sample of Intermediate-Luminosity Broad-Line Radio Galaxies in X-rays, optical, IR and radio. Here, we present the radio spectra acquired with the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg between 2.6 and 32 GHz. These measurements reveal a large variety of spectral shapes urging for radio imaging that would disclose the source morphology. Such studies could potentially discriminate between different mechanisms.

  12. Constraints on the neutrino magnetic dipole moment: The tip-RGB luminosity of globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arceo-Díaz, S.; Schröder, K.-P.; Zuber, K.; Jack, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this work we compared the predictions about the tip-RGB bolometric luminosity of low-mass stars in stellar models built with the Cambridge-STARS code for stellar evolution, with the evidence provided by the observational data of 25 globular clusters from the largest homogeneous database in the NIR. We found that 12 well populated globular clusters (headed up by omega Centauri, the largest globular cluster in the galaxy) suggest mu_{nu}≤ 2.2× 10(-12}mu_{B) , while the uncertainties of both the stellar models and the observations require the more robust constraint mu_{nu}≤ 2.6× 10(-12}mu_{B) . Finally, using synthetic spectra constructed with the PHOENIX code for stellar atmospheres, we qualitatively estimated the effect on the brightness of specific NIR-bands.

  13. Period-luminosity-colour relation for early-type contact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Michał

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the analysis of 64 early-type, massive contact or near-contact eclipsing systems from the Large Magellanic Cloud discovered by the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III). It presents the determination of the period-luminosity-colour relation followed by these objects, that is different from the one previously known for late-type W UMa stars. The relation for massive stars has a significantly steeper dependence on the colour, which is related to a much higher bolometric correction, however it is shallower in the period term. This leads to the conclusion, that the relation for the total population of main-sequence contact binaries is non-linear. When studied separately, genuinely contact and near-contact systems follow two slightly different relations.

  14. A bolometric millimeter-wave system for observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on medium angular scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. L.; Alsop, D. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Clapp, A. C.; Cottingham, D. A.; Gundersen, J. O.; Koch, T. C.; Kreysa, E.; Meinhold, P. R.; Lange, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    We report the performance of a bolometric system designed to measure the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales from 0 deg 3 min to 3 deg. The system represents a collaborative effort combining a low-background 1 m diameter balloon-borne telescope with new multimode feed optics, a beam modulation mechanism with high stability, and a four-channel bolometric receiver with passbands centered near frequencies of 3 (90), 6 (180), 9 (270), and 12 (360) cm(exp -1) (GHz). The telescope was flown three times with the bolometric receiver and has demonstrated detector noise limited performance capable of reaching sensitivity levels of Delta(T)/T(sub CMB) is approximately equal to 10(exp -5) with detectors operated at T = 0.3 K.

  15. A bolometric millimeter-wave system for observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on medium angular scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. L.; Alsop, D. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Clapp, A. C.; Cottingham, D. A.; Gundersen, J. O.; Koch, T. C.; Kreysa, E.; Meinhold, P. R.; Lange, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of a bolometric system designed to measure the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales from 0.3 to 3 deg is presented. The system represents a collaborative effort combining a low-background 1-m diameter balloon-borne telescope with new multimode feed optics, a beam modulation mechanism with high stability, and a four-channel bolometric receiver with passbands centered near frequencies of 3, 6, 9, and 12/cm (90, 180, 270, and 360 GHz). The telescope has been flown three times with the bolometric receiver and has demonstrated detector noise limited performance capable of reaching sensitivity levels of about 0.00001 with detectors operated at 0.3 K.

  16. A bolometric millimeter-wave system for observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on medium angular scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M. L.; Alsop, D. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Clapp, A. C.; Cottingham, D. A.; Gundersen, J. O.; Koch, T. C.; Kreysa, E.; Meinhold, P. R.; Lange, A. E.

    1992-12-01

    We report the performance of a bolometric system designed to measure the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales from 0 deg 3 min to 3 deg. The system represents a collaborative effort combining a low-background 1 m diameter balloon-borne telescope with new multimode feed optics, a beam modulation mechanism with high stability, and a four-channel bolometric receiver with passbands centered near frequencies of 3 (90), 6 (180), 9 (270), and 12 (360) cm-1 (GHz). The telescope was flown three times with the bolometric receiver and has demonstrated detector noise limited performance capable of reaching sensitivity levels of Delta(T)/TCMB is approximately equal to 10-5 with detectors operated at T = 0.3 K.

  17. A bolometric millimeter-wave system for observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on medium angular scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M. L.; Alsop, D. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Clapp, A. C.; Cottingham, D. A.; Gundersen, J. O.; Koch, T. C.; Kreysa, E.; Meinhold, P. R.; Lange, A. E.; Lubin, P. M.; Richards, P. L.; Smoot, G. F.

    1992-04-01

    The performance of a bolometric system designed to measure the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales from 0.3 to 3 deg is presented. The system represents a collaborative effort combining a low-background 1-m diameter balloon-borne telescope with new multimode feed optics, a beam modulation mechanism with high stability, and a four-channel bolometric receiver with passbands centered near frequencies of 3, 6, 9, and 12/cm (90, 180, 270, and 360 GHz). The telescope has been flown three times with the bolometric receiver and has demonstrated detector noise limited performance capable of reaching sensitivity levels of about 0.00001 with detectors operated at 0.3 K.

  18. Quasar clustering at intermediate redshift - Analysis of systematics and of luminosity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Kourkchi, Ehsan; DiPompeo, Michael A.; White, Martin; Weinberg, David, H.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Paris, Isabelle; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Streblyanska, Alina

    2016-01-01

    We measure the clustering of over 55,000 quasars at redshifts 2.2 < z < 3.4 drawn from the final sample of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This is by far the largest sample ever used to study quasar clustering at "intermediate" redshifts. We ameliorate the effect of observational systematics on our clustering analyses by weighting our control catalogues of random points by maps of how observational systematics correlate with the BOSS quasar target density. We find that there is no significant evolution in the quasar correlation length and bias over our studied redshift range, implying that the masses of the dark matter halos that host quasars decreases slightly from z~2.2 to z~3.4. Our result also contradicts a monotonic relation between the optical luminosity of quasars near redshift 2.5 and their host halo masses. To begin to study whether this contradiction holds for quasars' bolometric luminosity, we use data from the Wide-field Infra red Survey Explorer (WISE) to study whether the luminosity or detection of BOSS quasars in the mid-IR is correlated with the masses of quasars' host halos. This work was partially supported by NSF award 1211112.

  19. The Mass-Radius-Luminosity-Rotation Relationship for M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Eunkyu; Muirhead, Philip Steven; Swift, Jonathan; Isaacson, Howard T.; DeFelippis, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    NASA's future Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission is expected to discover hundreds of terrestrial exoplanets orbiting around M dwarf stars, which will be nearby and amenable to detailed characterization. To accurately measure radii and equilibrium temperatures of these exoplanets, we need to know the host star properties, specifically mass, radius and luminosity, to equal accuracy. However, relationships for M dwarf stellar properties are poorly constrained, which leaves us unprepared to characterize exoplanets to be discovered by the TESS mission. The best way to determine relationships for M dwarf stars is to study mutually eclipsing binaries because the photometric and spectroscopic data empirically determine the physical parameters of the stars. We are conducting an on-going survey to measure infrared eclipses and individual spectra of carefully selected M dwarf eclipsing binary targets. We are using Mimir, a near-infrared wide-field imager, on the 72-inch Perkins Telescope near Flagstaff, Arizona, to determine the J, H, and K band magnitudes of the individual stars, and we are using Keck HIRES to measure the radial velocities of each component. Combining the observations, we determine the masses, radii and the semi-major axes of each component to an accuracy of 1%. We are also using measured parallaxes to determine the individual components' absolute infrared magnitudes and bolometric luminosities. The ultimate goal is to combine the measurements to determine the mass-radius-luminosity-rotation relationship for M dwarf stars. The relationship is critical for choosing the best TESS M dwarf exoplanets for detailed characterization.

  20. On the Correlation of Torque and Luminosity in GX 1+4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, D.; Bildsten, L.; Finger, M. H.; Grunsfeld, J. M.; Koh, D. T.; Nelson, R. W.; Prince, T. A.; Vaughan, B. A.; Wilson, R. B.

    1997-01-01

    Over 5 years of daily hard X-ray (>20 keV) monitoring of the 2 minute accretion-powered pulsar GX 1+4 with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/BATSE large-area detectors has found nearly continuous rapid spin-down, interrupted by a bright 200 day spin-up episode. During spin-down, the torque becomes more negative as the luminosity increases (assuming that the 20-60 keV pulsed flux traces bolometric luminosity), the opposite of what is predicted by standard accretion torque theory. No changes in the shape of the 20-100 keV pulsed energy spectrum were detected, so that a very drastic change in the spectrum below 20 keV or the pulsed fraction would be required to make the 20-60 keV pulsed flux a poor luminosity tracer. These are the first observations that flatly contradict standard magnetic disk accretion theory, and they may have important implications for understanding the spin evolution of X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, and protostars. We briefly discuss the possibility that GX 1+4 may be accreting from a retrograde disk during spin-down, as previously suggested.

  1. Extending ROSAT Light Curves of Ecliptic Pole AGN Formation and Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malkan, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    In collaboration with UCLA graduate student Fred Baganoff, Professor Malkan has obtained the longest continuous light curves ever available for a large sample (# = 60) of active galactic nuclei. This was accomplished by using the ROSATAII-Sky Survey, which covered the ecliptic pole regions once every 9O-minute orbit. Using this Astrophysics Data Processing grant from NASA, we extended these light curves by combining the RASS data with pointed observations over the next several years of operation of the ROSAT PSPC. This lengthens the baselines of about half of the light curves from a few months up to a few years. The proportion of AGN showing variability increases substantially with this improvement. In fact most AGN in this representative sample are now shown to be significantly variable in the X-rays. We are also able to say something about the amplitudes of variability on timescales from days to years, with more detail than previously has been possible. We have also identified some dependence of the X-ray variability properties on a) the luminosity of the AGN; and b) The presence of a "Blazar" nucleus. By extending the ROSAT light curves, we are also able to learn more about the correlation of X-ray and optical emission on longer time-scales. It appears to be very weak, at best.

  2. Characterizing quasar ionization echoes - towards long-term AGN light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, Mischa; Davies, Rebecca; Keel, William; Turner, James; Nagao, Tohru; Fu, Hai; Levenson, Nancy; Diaz, Ruben

    2014-08-01

    Green Bean galaxies (GBs) are rare type-2 quasars featuring ultra-luminous emission line regions extending over 20-40 kpc. Due to different light travel times from the AGN into the ionized gas, the latter retains a memory of the AGN's X-ray luminosity over the past several 10,000 years. Evidence from X-ray, optical and mid-IR data shows that the nuclear energy output in GBs must have dropped recently by several orders of magnitude. We are witnessing the final stages in the lives of the most luminous type-2 quasars. The ionization echoes allow us to study SMBH growth, massive outflows, and the co-evolution of the host galaxies from a new perspective. Using GMOS-N/S, we want to complete our imaging survey of all 17 known GBs, obtain a shallow IFU survey, and study one particularly exciting galaxy in greater depth. For the latter, we want to demonstrate that individual AGN light curves, extending over several 10,000 years, can be reconstructed from GBs. Hence this study is complementary to classical monitoring and reverberation mapping.

  3. Baldwin Effect and Additional BLR Component in AGN with Superluminal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño Álvarez, Víctor; Torrealba, Janet; Chavushyan, Vahram; Cruz González, Irene; Arshakian, Tigran; León Tavares, Jonathan; Popovic, Luka

    2016-06-01

    We study the Baldwin Effect (BE) in 96 core-jet blazars with optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic data from a radio-loud AGN sample obtained from the MOJAVE 2cm survey. A statistical analysis is presented of the equivalent widths W_lambda of emission lines H beta 4861, Mg II 2798, C IV 1549, and continuum luminosities at 5100, 3000, and 1350 angstroms. The BE is found statistically significant (with confidence level c.l. > 95%) in H beta and C IV emission lines, while for Mg II the trend is slightly less significant (c.l. = 94.5%). The slopes of the BE in the studied samples for H beta and Mg II are found steeper and with statistically significant difference than those of a comparison radio-quiet sample. We present simulations of the expected BE slopes produced by the contribution to the total continuum of the non-thermal boosted emission from the relativistic jet, and by variability of the continuum components. We find that the slopes of the BE between radio-quiet and radio-loud AGN should not be different, under the assumption that the broad line is only being emitted by the canonical broad line region around the black hole. We discuss that the BE slope steepening in radio AGN is due to a jet associated broad-line region.

  4. Star Formation and AGN Activity in Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2015-08-01

    In the local universe, Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs, L_IR > 10^12 L⊙) are all interacting and merging systems. We explore the evolution of the morphological and nuclear properties of (U)LIRGs over cosmic time using a large sample of galaxies from Her- schel observations of the CANDELS fields (including GOODS, COSMOS, and UDS). In particular, we investigate whether the role of galaxy mergers has changed between z ˜ 2 and now using the extensive visual classification catalogs produced by the CANDELS team. The combination of a selection from Herschel, near the peak of IR emission, and rest-frame optical morphologies from CANDELS, provides the ideal comparison to nearby (U)LIRGs. We also use rest-frame optical emission line diagnostics, X-ray luminosity, and MIR colors to separate AGN from star-formation dominated galaxies. We then study the how role of galaxy mergers and the presence of AGN activity correspond to the galaxy’s position in the star formation rate - stellar mass plane. Are galaxies that have specific star formation rates elevated above the main sequence more likely to be mergers? We investigate how AGN identified with different methods correspond to different morphologies and merger stages as well as position on the star formation rate - stellar mass plane.

  5. Observational evidence for thin AGN disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai

    1992-01-01

    AGN spectrum and spectral features, polarization, inclination, and X-ray line and continuum reflection features are discussed in a critical way in order to determine the ones that are the least model-dependent. The sign and strength of absorption and emission edges are found to be model-dependent, and relativistic broadening and shifting makes them hard to detect. The presence or absence of the predicted Lyman edge polarization feature may be used as a decisive test for thin, bare AGN disks. Other good model-independent tests are several inclination-related line and continuum correlations in big AGN samples. It is shown that electron temperature near the surface of the disk can greatly exceed the disk equilibrium temperature, which causes deviations from LTE. This effect must be incorporated into realistic disk models.

  6. HST-COS observations of AGNs. II. Extended survey of ultraviolet composite spectra from 159 active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stevans, Matthew L.; Shull, J. Michael; Danforth, Charles W.; Tilton, Evan M. E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu E-mail: evan.tilton@colorado.edu

    2014-10-10

    The ionizing fluxes from quasars and other active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are critical for interpreting their emission-line spectra and for photoionizing and heating the intergalactic medium. Using far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we directly measure the rest-frame ionizing continua and emission lines for 159 AGNs at redshifts 0.001 < z {sub AGN} < 1.476 and construct a composite spectrum from 475 to 1875 Å. We identify the underlying AGN continuum and strong extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission lines from ions of oxygen, neon, and nitrogen after masking out absorption lines from the H I Lyα forest, 7 Lyman-limit systems (N{sub H} {sub I}≥10{sup 17.2} cm{sup –2}) and 214 partial Lyman-limit systems (14.5AGNs exhibit a wide range of FUV/EUV spectral shapes, F{sub ν}∝ν{sup α{sub ν}}, typically with –2 ≤ α{sub ν} ≤ 0 and no discernible continuum edges at 912 Å (H I) or 504 Å (He I). The composite rest-frame continuum shows a gradual break at λ{sub br} ≈ 1000 Å, with mean spectral index α{sub ν} = –0.83 ± 0.09 in the FUV (1200-2000 Å) steepening to α{sub ν} = –1.41 ± 0.15 in the EUV (500-1000 Å). We discuss the implications of the UV flux turnovers and lack of continuum edges for the structure of accretion disks, AGN mass inflow rates, and luminosities relative to Eddington values.

  7. A multi-wavelength survey of AGN in massive clusters: AGN distribution and host galaxy properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klesman, Alison J.; Sarajedini, Vicki L.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the effect of environment on the presence and fuelling of active galactic nuclei (AGN) by identifying galaxies hosting AGN in massive galaxy clusters and the fields around them. We have identified AGN candidates via optical variability (178), X-ray emission (74), and mid-IR SEDs (64) in multi-wavelength surveys covering regions centred on 12 galaxy clusters at redshifts 0.5 < z < 0.9. In this paper, we present the radial distribution of AGN in clusters to examine how local environment affects the presence of an AGN and its host galaxy. While distributions vary from cluster to cluster, we find that the radial distribution of AGN generally differs from that of normal galaxies. X-ray-selected AGN candidates appear to be more centrally concentrated than normal galaxies in the inner 20 per cent of the virial radius, while becoming less centrally concentrated in the outer regions. Mid-IR-selected AGN are less centrally concentrated overall. Optical variables have a similar distribution to normal galaxies in the inner regions, then become somewhat less centrally concentrated farther from the cluster centre. The host galaxies of AGN reveal a different colour distribution than normal galaxies, with many AGN hosts displaying galaxy colours in the `green valley' between the red sequence and blue star-forming normal galaxies. This result is similar to those found in field galaxy studies. The colour distribution of AGN hosts is more pronounced in disturbed clusters where minor mergers, galaxy harassment, and interactions with cluster substructure may continue to prompt star formation in the hosts. Among normal galaxies, we find that galaxy colours become generally bluer with increasing cluster radius, as is expected. However, we find no relationship between host galaxy colour and cluster radius among AGN hosts, which may indicate that processes related to the accreting supermassive black hole have a greater impact on the star-forming properties of the host galaxy

  8. γ-Ray Generation in Microquasars: the link with AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, I. J.; Aye, K.-M.; Brown, A. M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Hadjichristidis, C. N.; Le Gallou, R.; McComb, T. J. L.; Nolan, S. J.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Noutsos, A.; Rayner, S. M.

    2005-02-01

    The link between the physical processes responsible for high energy emission from relativistic jets in AGN and microquasars is investigated. A Fortran code based on an existing inhomogeneous, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, for AGN is presented. The code is then applied to the AGN 3C 279 and the microquasar LS5039. Spectral energy distributions (SED's) are presented.

  9. FE Features in Highly Obscured AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schachter, Jonathan F.

    1999-01-01

    This final report is a summary of the combined study of ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) observations of NGC 7582 with archival ROSAT HRI (High Resolution Imager) and PSPC (Position Sensitive Proportional Counter) data. These observations were important in that they established that X-ray emission in NGC 7582, the most narrow-line of NLXGs (narrow-line X-ray galaxies), is associated with an AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei). Thus implying that all NLXGs are obscured AGN, as has been hypothesized to explain the X-ray spectral background paradox.

  10. X-Ray Emission from the Host Clusters of Powerful AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Patrick B.; Ellingson, Erica; Green, Richard F.

    1997-04-01

    We report the detection of X-ray emission from the host cluster of the unusual radio-quiet quasar \\1821\\ using the ROSAT HRI, and the non-detection of X-ray emission from the host cluster of the radio-loud quasar 3C 206 (3sigma \\ upper limit of 1.63 10(44) ergs s(-1) ) using the EINSTEIN HRI. The host cluster of \\1821\\ is one of the most X-ray luminous clusters known, with a rest-frame 0.1-2.4 keV luminosity of 3.74+/-0.57 h50(-2) 10(45) ergs s(-1) , %(\\qo=0.5), 38% of which is from a barely resolved cooling flow component. The cluster emission complicates interpretation of previous X-ray spectra of this field. In particular, the observed Fe Kalpha emission can probably be attributed entirely to the cluster and either the quasar is relatively X-ray quiet for its optical luminosity or the cluster has a relatively low temperature for its luminosity. We combine these data with the recent detection of X-ray emission from the host cluster of the `buried' radio-quiet quasar \\9104 (\\cite{fc95}), our previous upper limits for the host clusters of two z ~ 0.7 radio-loud quasars, and literature data on FR II radio galaxies. We compare this dataset to the predictions of three models for the presence and evolution of powerful AGN in clusters: the low-velocity-dispersion model, the low-ICM-density model, and the cooling flow model. Neither the low-ICM-density model nor the cooling flow model can explain all the observations. We suggest that strong interactions with gas-containing galaxies may be the only mechanism needed to explain the presence and evolution of powerful AGN in clusters, a scenario consistent with the far-IR and optical properties of the host galaxies studied here, all of which show some evidence for past interactions. However, the cooling flow model cannot be ruled out for at least some objects, and it is likely that both processes are at work in creating and fueling powerful AGN in clusters. Each scenario makes testable predictions for future

  11. On the effect of cosmic rays in bolometric cosmic microwave background measurements from the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, S.; Battistelli, E.; de Bernardis, P.; Lamagna, L.; Nati, F.; Nati, L.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.; Schillaci, A.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Precision measurements of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are able to detect low-level non-Gaussian features caused by either topological defects or the inflation process. These measurements are becoming feasable with the development of large arrays of ultra-sensitive bolometric detectors and their use in balloon-borne or satellite missions. However, the space environment includes a population of cosmic rays (CRs), which produce spurious spikes in bolometric signals. Aims: We analyze the effect of CRs on the measurement of CMB anisotropy maps and the estimate of cosmological non-Gaussianity and angular power spectra of the CMB. Methods: Using accurate simulations of noise and CR events in bolometric detectors, and de-spiking techniques, we produce simulated measured maps and analyze the Gaussianity and power spectrum of the maps for different levels and rates of CR events. Results: We find that a de-spiking technique based on outlier removal in the detector signals contributing to the same sky pixel is effective in removing CR events larger than the noise. However, low level events hidden in the noise produce a positive shift of the average power signal measured by a bolometer, and increase its variance. If the number of hits per pixel is large enough, the data distribution for each sky pixel is approximately Gaussian, but the skewness and the kurtosis of the temperatures of the pixels indicate the presence of some low-level non-Gaussianity. The standard noise estimation pipeline produces a positive bias in the power spectrum at high multipoles. Conclusions: In the case of a typical balloon-borne survey, the CR-induced non-Gaussianity will be marginally detectable in the membrane bolometer channels, but be negligible in the spider-web bolometer channels. In experiments with detector sensitivity better than 100 μK/√{Hz}, in an environment less favorable than the earth stratosphere, the CR-induced non-Gaussianity is likely to

  12. A new method for estimating the bolometric properties of Ibc supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Zach

    2013-09-01

    The bolometric properties (nickel mass, ejecta mass and kinetic energies) of 61 Ibc supernovae (SNe), including 20 gamma-ray burst and X-ray flash (GRB/XRF), 19 Ib, 13 Ic and nine Ic-BL (broad-lined) SNe are presented. All of the available BVRI photometry in the literature have been collected and used in a new method that utilizes a template supernova (SN 1998bw) and an analytical model to accurately estimate the bolometric properties of each SN. A statistical analysis of the bolometric properties is then performed, where it is found that GRB/XRF SNe are the most energetic, and eject more mass (including nickel content) than Ib, Ic and Ic-BL SNe. The results are then compared to the existing progenitor models of Ibc SNe, where it is concluded that it is highly likely that at least two progenitor channels exist for producing a Ibc SN: most Ibc SNe arise via binary interactions, where the mass of the stellar progenitor is less than what is attributed to a Wolf-Rayet star. Conversely, the progenitors of Ic-BL and GRB/XRF are more massive than those of Ib and Ic SNe, and a key difference between GRB/XRF SNe and Ic-BL SNe is progenitor metallicity, where it is observed that the latter arise from more metal-rich progenitors. As mass loss in massive stars is influenced by metal content, the progenitors of Ic-BL SNe lose more mass, and therefore more angular momentum, before exploding. It is expected that the explosion mechanism in Ic-BL and GRB/XRF SNe is `engine-driven' (i.e. an accreting black hole, or a millisecond magnetar), but the increased mass loss of Ic-BL SNe means the central engine is less powerful than in GRB/XRF SNe. Finally, it is found that the SNe that accompany GRBs and XRFs are statistically indistinguishable, and some mechanism other than metallicity is needed to explain the differences in the high-energy components in these events.

  13. Integral Field Spectroscopy of AGN Absorption Outflows: Mrk 509 and IRAS F04250-5718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guilin; Arav, Nahum; Rupke, David S. N.

    2015-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption lines provide abundant spectroscopic information enabling the probe of the physical conditions in active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows, but the outflow radii (and the energetics consequently) can only be determined indirectly. We present the first direct test of these determinations using integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy. We have conducted Gemini IFU mapping of the ionized gas nebulae surrounding two AGNs, whose outflow radii have been constrained by UV absorption line analyses. In Mrk 509, we find a quasi-spherical outflow with a radius of 1.2 kpc and a velocity of ˜290 km s-1, while IRAS F04250-5718 is driving a biconical outflow extending out to 2.9 kpc, with a velocity of ˜580 km s-1 and an opening angle of ˜70°. The derived mass flow rate ˜5 and >1 M⊙ yr-1, respectively, and the kinetic luminosity ≳1 × 1041 erg s-1 for both. Adopting the outflow radii and geometric parameters measured from IFU, absorption line analyses would yield mass flow rates and kinetic luminosities in agreement with the above results within a factor of ˜2. We conclude that the spatial locations, kinematics, and energetics reve