Science.gov

Sample records for agn feedback models

  1. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; MaNGA-GMOS Team

    2017-01-01

    Feedback from actively accreting SMBHs (Active Galactic Nuclei, AGN) is now widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. Many attempts at finding a conclusive observational proof that AGN may be able to quench star formation and regulate the host galaxies' growth have shown that this problem is highly complex.I will present results from several projects that focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN. I will describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history (Wylezalek+2016a,b). Furthermore, I will show that powerful AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of the galaxy. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and outflows that are potentially very relevant for understanding the role of AGN in galaxy evolution (Wylezalek+2016c)!

  2. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, D.; Zakamska, N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. It operates by either heating or driving the gas that would otherwise be available for star formation out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. We have assembled a large sample of 133 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1AGN-ionized gas, the stellar masses of the host galaxies and their star formation rates. We then investigate the relationships between AGN luminosities, specific star formation rates (sSFR) and outflow strengths W_{90} - the 90% velocity width of the [OIII]λ5007Å line power and a proxy for the AGN-driven outflow speed. Outflow strength W_{90} is independent of sSFR for AGN selected based on their mid-IR luminosity. This is in agreement with previous work that demonstrates that star formation is not sufficient to produce the observed ionized gas outflows which have to be powered by AGN activity. More importantly, we find a negative correlation between W_{90} and sSFR in the AGN hosts with the highest star formation rates, i.e., with the highest gas content. This relationship implies that AGN with strong outflow signatures are hosted in galaxies that are more `quenched' considering their stellar mass than galaxies with weaker outflow signatures. This correlation is only seen in AGN host galaxies with SFR >100 M_{⊙} yr^{-1} where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, or `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  3. How to model AGN feedback in cosmological simulations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijacki, Debora

    2015-08-01

    Hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are one of the most powerful tools to study the formation and evolution of galaxies in the fully non-linear regime. Despite several recent successes in simulating Milky Way look-alikes, self-consistent, ab-initio models are still a long way off. In this talk I will review numerical and physical uncertainties plaguing current state-of-the-art cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. I will then discuss which feedback mechanisms are needed to reproduce realistic stellar masses and galaxy morphologies in the present day Universe and argue that the black hole feedback is necessary for the quenching of massive galaxies. I will then demonstrate how black hole - host galaxy scaling relations depend on galaxy morphology and colour, highlighting the implications for the co-evolutionary picture between galaxies and their central black holes. In the second part of the talk I will present a novel method that permits to resolve gas flows around black holes all the way from large cosmological scales to the Bondi radii of black holes themselves. I will demonstrate that with this new numerical technique it is possible to estimate much more accurately gas properties in the vicinity of black holes than has been feasible before in galaxy and cosmological simulations, allowing to track reliably gas angular momentum transport from Mpc to pc scales. Finally, I will also discuss if AGN-driven outflows are more likely to be energy- or momentum-driven and what implications this has for the redshift evolution of black hole - host galaxy scaling relations.

  4. Comparing Simulations of AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Thacker, Robert J.; Dubois, Yohan; Wurster, James; Silk, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological zoom simulations of a region around a forming galaxy cluster, comparing the ability of the methods to handle successively more complex baryonic physics. In the simplest, non-radiative case, the two methods are in good agreement with each other, but the SPH simulations generate central cores with slightly lower entropies and virial shocks at slightly larger radii, consistent with what has been seen in previous studies. The inclusion of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback leads to much larger differences between the two methods. Most dramatically, at z=5, rapid cooling in the AMR case moves the accretion shock to well within the virial radius, while this shock remains near the virial radius in the SPH case, due to excess heating, coupled with poorer capturing of the shock width. On the other hand, the addition of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to the simulations results in much better agreement between the methods. For our AGN model, both simulations display halo gas entropies of 100 keV cm2, similar decrements in the star formation rate, and a drop in the halo baryon content of roughly 30%. This is consistent with the AGN growth being self-regulated, regardless of the numerical method. However, the simulations with AGN feedback continue to differ in aspects that are not self-regulated, such that in SPH a larger volume of gas is impacted by feedback, and the cluster still has a lower entropy central core.

  5. Cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes and AGN: a synthesis model for accretion and feedback .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merloni, A.

    The growth of supermassive black holes (SMBH) through accretion is accompanied by the release of enormous amounts of energy which can either be radiated away, as happens in quasars, advected into the black hole, or disposed of in kinetic form through powerful jets, as is observed, for example, in radio galaxies. Here, I will present new constraints on the evolution of the SMBH mass function and Eddington ratio distribution, obtained from a study of AGN luminosity functions aimed at accounting for both radiative and kinetic energy output of AGN in a systematic way. First, I discuss how a refined Soltan argument leads to joint constraints on the mass-weighted average spin of SMBH and of the total mass density of high redshift (z˜ 5) and ``wandering'' black holes. Then, I will show how to describe the ``downsizing'' trend observed in the AGN population in terms of cosmological evolution of physical quantities (black hole mass, accretion rate, radiative and kinetic energy output). Finally, the redshift evolution of the AGN kinetic feedback will be briefly discussed and compared with the radiative output of the evolving SMBH population, thus providing a robust physical framework for phenomenological models of AGN feedback within structure formation.

  6. Measuring Feedback in Nearby AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Fischer, T. C.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.; Turner, T. J.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the impact of feedback from outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in nearby (z < 0.04) AGN. From studies of the kinematics, physical conditions, and variability of the absorbers in the literature, we calculate the possible ranges in total mass outflow rate (Ṁout) and kinetic luminosity (LK) for each AGN, summed over all of the absorbers. These calculations make use of values (or limits) for the radial locations of the absorbers determined from variability, excited-state absorption, or other considerations. From a sample of 10 Seyfert 1 galaxies with detailed photoionization models for their absorbers, we find that 7 have sufficient constraints on the absorber locations to determine Ṁout and LK. The 6 Seyfert 1s with moderate bolometric luminosities (Lbol = 1043 - 1045 ergs s-1) all have mass outflow rates that are 10 - 1000 times the mass accretion rates needed to generate their observed luminosities, indicating that most of the mass outflow originates from outside the inner accretion disk. Three of these (NGC 4051, NGC 3516, and NGC 3783) have LK in the range 0.5 - 5% Lbol, which is the range typically required by feedback models for efficient self-regulation of black-hole and galactic bulge growth. The other three (NGC 5548, NGC 4151, and NGC 7469) have LK > 0.1%Lbol, although these values may increase if radial locations can be determined for more of the absorbers. We conclude that the outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in moderate-luminosity AGN have the potential to deliver significant feedback to their environments.

  7. Kinetic Modeling of Electron Conduction-Driven Microinstabilities and Their Relevance for AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberg-Clark, Gareth; Swisdak, M.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Drake, James

    2016-04-01

    Since the Intracluster Medium (ICM) is a weakly collisional plasma, the standard Spitzer conduction rate (which relies on collisionality) does not necessarily describe the transport of heat in clusters. In addition, many plasma microinstabilities become unstable at high beta since the magnetic field is easily pliable in the presence of induced pressure anisotropies. These properties imply that the true rate of conduction in an ICM-like plasma could be highly dependent on small-scale effects. We perform 2D kinetic Particle-In-Cell simulations and derive an analytic theory of a conduction-driven electron microinstability present in high-beta collisionless plasmas. We find that scattering by electromagnetic waves significantly reduces the conductive heat flux of electrons in our model. Our results have implications for 1) cool-core clusters in which AGN feedback may play a crucial role in maintaing overall thermodynamic stability, 2) heat flux suppression and scattering by other microinstabilities and 3) basic plasma physics questions that up until this point have not been explored fully.

  8. The Importance of Winds for AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.; Fischer, T. C.; Gagne, J.

    2014-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are fed by accretion of matter onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs), generating huge amounts of radiation from very small volumes. AGN also provide feedback to their environments via mass outflows of ionized gas, which could play a critical role in the formation of large-scale structure in the early Universe, chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium, and self-regulation of SMBH and galactic bulge growth. We provide an update on our research on the winds in nearby moderate-luminosity AGN, In particular, we concentrate on winds that occur on relatively large scales (hundreds of parsecs) that are revealed through spatially resolved HST spectra of emission-line gas in the narrow line regions (NLRs) of nearby AGN. We discuss the techniques for measuring the mass outflow rates and kinetic luminosities of these AGN winds and gauge their importance for providing significant AGN feedback.

  9. AGN feedback and the origin of the α enhancement in early-type galaxies – insights from the GAEA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Gabriella; Fontanot, Fabio; Hirschmann, Michaela

    2017-03-01

    We take advantage of our recently published model for GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (GAEA) to study the origin of the observed correlation between [α/Fe] and galaxy stellar mass. In particular, we analyse the role of radio-mode active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, which recent work has identified as a crucial ingredient to reproduce observations. In GAEA, this process introduces the observed trend of star formation histories extending over shorter time-scales for more massive galaxies, but does not provide a sufficient condition to reproduce the observed α enhancements of massive galaxies. In the framework of our model, this is possible only by assuming that any residual star formation is truncated for galaxies more massive than 1010.5 M⊙. This results, however, in even shorter star formation time-scales for the most massive galaxies, which translate in total stellar metallicities significantly lower than observed. Our results demonstrate that (i) trends of [α/Fe] ratios cannot be simply converted into relative time-scale indicators; and (ii) AGN feedback cannot explain alone the positive correlation between [α/Fe] and galaxy mass/velocity dispersion. Reproducing simultaneously the mass-metallicity relation and the α enhancements observed pose a challenge for hierarchical models, unless more exotic solutions are adopted such as metal-rich winds or a variable initial mass function.

  10. AGN feedback in the Perseus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendron-Marsolais, Marie-Lou; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; Clarke, Tracy E.; Intema, Huib; Fabian, Andrew C.; Taylor, Gregory B.; Blundell, Katherine

    2016-04-01

    Deep Chandra images of the Perseus cluster of galaxies have revealed a succession of cavities created by the jets of the central supermassive black hole, pushing away the X-ray emitting gas and leaving bubbles filled with radio emission. Perseus is one of the rare examples showing buoyantly rising lobes from past radio outbursts, characterized by a steep spectral index and known as ghost cavities. All of these structures trace the complete history of mechanical AGN feedback over the past 500 Myrs. I will present results on new, ultra deep 230-470 MHz JVLA data. This low-frequency view of the Perseus cluster will probe the old radio-emitting electron population and will allow us to build the most detailed map of AGN feedback in a cluster thus far.

  11. Triggering star formation by both radiative and mechanical AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Gan, Zhao-Ming; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2013-08-01

    We perform two dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations to study the positive active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback which triggers, rather than suppresses, star formation. Recently, it was shown by Nayakshin et al. and Ishibashi et al. that star formation occurs when the cold interstellar medium (ISM) is squeezed by the impact of mass outflow or radiation pressure, respectively. Mass outflow is ubiquitous in this astrophysical context, and radiation pressure is also important if the AGN is luminous. For the first time in this subject, we incorporate both mass outflow feedback and radiative feedback into our model. Consequently, the ISM is shocked into shells by the AGN feedback, and these shells soon fragment into clumps and filaments because of Rayleigh-Taylor and thermal instabilities. We have two major findings: (1) the star formation rate can indeed be very large in the clumps and filaments. However, the resultant star formation rate density is too large compared with previous works, which is mainly because we ignore the fact that most of the stars that are formed would be disrupted when they move away from the galactic center. (2) Although radiation pressure feedback has a limited effect, when mass outflow feedback is also included, they reinforce each other. Specifically, in the gas-poor case, mass outflow is always the dominant contributor to feedback.

  12. Inverse Compton X-ray signature of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2013-12-01

    Bright AGN frequently show ultrafast outflows (UFOs) with outflow velocities vout ˜ 0.1c. These outflows may be the source of AGN feedback on their host galaxies sought by galaxy formation modellers. The exact effect of the outflows on the ambient galaxy gas strongly depends on whether the shocked UFOs cool rapidly or not. This in turn depends on whether the shocked electrons share the same temperature as ions (one-temperature regime, 1T) or decouple (2T), as has been recently suggested. Here we calculate the inverse Compton spectrum emitted by such shocks, finding a broad feature potentially detectable either in mid-to-high energy X-rays (1T case) or only in the soft X-rays (2T). We argue that current observations of AGN do not seem to show evidence for the 1T component. The limits on the 2T emission are far weaker, and in fact it is possible that the observed soft X-ray excess of AGN is partially or fully due to the 2T shock emission. This suggests that UFOs are in the energy-driven regime outside the central few pc, and must pump considerable amounts of not only momentum but also energy into the ambient gas. We encourage X-ray observers to look for the inverse Compton components calculated here in order to constrain AGN feedback models further.

  13. Impact of AGN and stellar feedback on the gas of a simulated z~2 star-forming galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Orianne; Bournaud, Frédéric; Juneau, Stephanie; Gabor, Jared

    2015-08-01

    With high-resolution simulations of star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift, we study the effects of combined AGN and stellar feedback models on the gas of the host-galaxy. AGN feedback is modeled using a standard thermal recipe of feedback (gas is heated and pushed away) plus a post-processing method to compute AGN ionization. We first consider AGN feedback only and show that, even though the AGN generates powerful outflows, the effects of AGN feedback on star formation is relatively weak on time-scales up to a few 100s of Myrs, even when long-range radiative feedback is accounted for. Furthermore, as the combination of stellar feedback models generates outflows that are more powerful than the sum of the models taken separately, we check whether combined AGN and stellar feedback also couple non-linearly. We then include several stellar feedback sources on top of AGN feedback, such as young stars creating HII regions through radiative pressure and supernovae releasing thermal and kinetic energy in the ISM. We follow their impact on the gas of high-resolution simulations and study the coupling between the different sources of outflows (AGN, young stars, supernovae) , which could produce very fast outflows, with important outflow rates. How do these feedback-driven winds affect the host? What is the amount of expelled gas? What is its density and temperature and what is the consequence for in place and future star formation? Can such outflows change the distribution of existing stars?

  14. AGN feedback in action? - outflows and star formation in type 2 AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jong-Hak

    2017-01-01

    We present the statistical constraints on the ionized gas outflows and their connection to star formation, using a large sample of ~110,000 AGNs and star-forming galaxies at z < 0.3. First, we find a dramatic difference of the outflow signatures between AGNs and star-forming galaxies based on the [OIII] emission line kinematics. While the [OIII] velocity and velocity dispersion of star forming galaxies can be entirely accounted by the gravitational potential of host galaxies, AGNs clearly show non-gravitational kinematics, which is comparable to or stronger than the virial motion caused by the gravitational potential. Second, the distribution in the [OIII] velocity - velocity dispersion diagram dramatically expands toward large values with increasing AGN luminosity, implying that the outflows are AGN-driven. Third, the fraction of AGNs with a signature of outflow kinematics, steeply increases with AGN luminosity and Eddington ratio. In particular, the majority of luminous AGNs presents strong non-gravitational kinematics in the [OIII] profile. Interestingly, we find that the specific star formation of non-outflow AGNs is much lower than that of strong outflow AGNs, while the star formation rate of strong outflow AGNs is comparable to that of star forming galaxies. We interpret this trend as a delayed AGN feedback as it takes dynamical time for the outflows to suppress star formation in galactic scales.

  15. Feedback from AGN: The Kinetic/Radio Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melini, Gabriele; La Franca, Fabio; Fiore, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    We have measured the probability distribution function of the ratio RX = log L1.4/LX, where L1.4/LX = ν Lν(1.4 GHz)/LX(2-10 keV), between the 1.4 GHz and the unabsorbed 2-10 keV luminosities and its dependence on LX and z. We have used a complete sample of ~1800 hard X-ray selected AGN, observed in the 1.4 GHz band, cross-correlated in order to exclude FR II-type objects, and thus obtain a contemporaneous measure of the radio and X-ray emission. The distribution P(RX|LX,z) is shown in Figure 1. Convolution of the distribution P(RX|LX,z) with the 2-10 keV X-ray AGN luminosity function from La Franca et al. (2005) and the relations between radio power and kinetic energy from Best et al. (2006) and Willott et al. (1999) allows us to derive the AGN kinetic power and its evolution. As shown in Figure 1, our results are in good agreement with the predictions of the most recent models of galaxy formation and evolution (e.g., Croton et al. 2006), where AGN radio feedback is required to quench the star formation.

  16. Towards an understanding of the Radio-mode AGN Feedback at higher redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bîrzan, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Direct evidence for feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGN) on the intra-cluster medium (ICM) of nearby groups and clusters has been provided by Chandra X-ray images. They show that the radio lobes emitted by the AGN create cavities in the hot cluster atmosphere, whichaffects the cooling gas that leads to star formation and galaxy growth and allow a direct measurement of the bulk of the AGN's power. Consequently, AGN feedback is now recognized as a necessary ingredient for galaxy formation models to prevent overcooling in massive halos. It is therefore important to study AGN feedback at redshifts where clusters are known to form (z ~ 1) and AGN feedback is predicted to regulate star formation in the most massive galaxies. Together with radio data, the cavities allow us to derive scaling relations that can be used to estimate the AGN feedback power using only radio data. I will review the importance of such relations for extending current studies of feedback with new and upcoming radio telescopes such as LOFAR and SKA, and I will present preliminary results from deep low-frequency LOFAR observations of the NEP field to understand if the local cooling-to-heating balance and the corresponding scaling relations (between jet power and radio luminosity) hold at these redshifts (z > 0.5).

  17. AGN Feedback in Clusters of Galaxies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    bubbles created by the radio lobes evacuating regions of the ICM vary widely from a few kpc (e.g. Abell 262 [21, 22]) to hundreds of kpc (e.g. MS0735.6...diameters of approximately 200 kpc . The total energy injection required to inflate the cavities and produce the ob- served shocks is 6 × 1061 erg...cluster center, and these are modeled as shocks in [32] based on the earlier 163 ksec dataset. These features are at 31 and 46 kpc from the AGN and the

  18. The HORIZON-AGN simulation: morphological diversity of galaxies promoted by AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien; Pichon, Christophe; Devriendt, Julien; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Welker, Charlotte; Volonteri, Marta

    2016-12-01

    The interplay between cosmic gas accretion on to galaxies and galaxy mergers drives the observed morphological diversity of galaxies. By comparing the state-of-the-art hydrodynamical cosmological simulations HORIZON-AGN and HORIZON-NOAGN, we unambiguously identify the critical role of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in setting up the correct galaxy morphology for the massive end of the population. With AGN feedback, typical kinematic and morpho-metric properties of galaxy populations as well as the galaxy-halo mass relation are in much better agreement with observations. Only AGN feedback allows massive galaxies at the centre of groups and clusters to become ellipticals, while without AGN feedback those galaxies reform discs. It is the merger-enhanced AGN activity that is able to freeze the morphological type of the post-merger remnant by durably quenching its quiescent star formation. Hence morphology is shown to be driven not only by mass but also by the nature of cosmic accretion: at constant galaxy mass, ellipticals are galaxies that are mainly assembled through mergers, while discs are preferentially built from the in situ star formation fed by smooth cosmic gas infall.

  19. Satellites of radio AGN in SDSS: Insights into agn triggering and feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, Cameron; Salim, Samir E-mail: salims@indiana.edu

    2014-04-10

    We study the effects of radio jets on galaxies in their vicinity (satellites) and the role of satellites in triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The study compares the aggregate properties of satellites of a sample of 7220 radio AGNs at z < 0.3 (identified by Best and Heckman from the SDSS and NVSS+FIRST surveys) to the satellites of a control sample of radio-quiet galaxies, which are matched in redshift, color, luminosity, and axis ratio, as well as by environment type: field galaxies, cluster members, and brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Remarkably, we find that radio AGNs exhibit on average a 50% excess (17σ significance) in the number of satellites within 100 kpc even though the cluster membership was controlled (e.g., radio BCGs have more satellites than radio-quiet BCGs, etc.). Satellite excess is not confirmed for high-excitation sources, which are only 2% of radio AGN. Extra satellites may be responsible for raising the probability for hot gas AGN accretion via tidal effects or may otherwise enhance the intensity or duration of the radio-emitting phase. Furthermore, we find that the incidence of radio AGNs among potential hosts (massive ellipticals) is similar for field galaxies and for non-BCG cluster members, suggesting that AGN fueling depends primarily on conditions in the host halo rather than the parent, cluster halo. Regarding feedback, we find that radio AGNs, either high or low excitation, have no detectable effect on star formation in their satellites, as neither induced star formation nor star formation quenching is present in more than ∼1% of radio AGN.

  20. Satellites of Radio AGN in SDSS: Insights into AGN Triggering and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Cameron; Salim, Samir

    2014-04-01

    We study the effects of radio jets on galaxies in their vicinity (satellites) and the role of satellites in triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The study compares the aggregate properties of satellites of a sample of 7220 radio AGNs at z < 0.3 (identified by Best & Heckman from the SDSS and NVSS+FIRST surveys) to the satellites of a control sample of radio-quiet galaxies, which are matched in redshift, color, luminosity, and axis ratio, as well as by environment type: field galaxies, cluster members, and brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Remarkably, we find that radio AGNs exhibit on average a 50% excess (17σ significance) in the number of satellites within 100 kpc even though the cluster membership was controlled (e.g., radio BCGs have more satellites than radio-quiet BCGs, etc.). Satellite excess is not confirmed for high-excitation sources, which are only 2% of radio AGN. Extra satellites may be responsible for raising the probability for hot gas AGN accretion via tidal effects or may otherwise enhance the intensity or duration of the radio-emitting phase. Furthermore, we find that the incidence of radio AGNs among potential hosts (massive ellipticals) is similar for field galaxies and for non-BCG cluster members, suggesting that AGN fueling depends primarily on conditions in the host halo rather than the parent, cluster halo. Regarding feedback, we find that radio AGNs, either high or low excitation, have no detectable effect on star formation in their satellites, as neither induced star formation nor star formation quenching is present in more than ~1% of radio AGN.

  1. AGN host galaxy mass function in COSMOS. Is AGN feedback responsible for the mass-quenching of galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, A.; Schulze, A.; Merloni, A.; Zamorani, G.; Ilbert, O.; La Franca, F.; Peng, Y.; Piconcelli, E.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Brusa, M.; Fiore, F.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the role of supermassive black holes in the global context of galaxy evolution by measuring the host galaxy stellar mass function (HGMF) and the specific accretion rate, that is, λSAR, the distribution function (SARDF), up to z ~ 2.5 with ~1000 X-ray selected AGN from XMM-COSMOS. Using a maximum likelihood approach, we jointly fit the stellar mass function and specific accretion rate distribution function, with the X-ray luminosity function as an additional constraint. Our best-fit model characterizes the SARDF as a double power-law with mass-dependent but redshift-independent break, whose low λSAR slope flattens with increasing redshift while the normalization increases. This implies that for a given stellar mass, higher λSAR objects have a peak in their space density at earlier epoch than the lower λSAR objects, following and mimicking the well-known AGN cosmic downsizing as observed in the AGN luminosity function. The mass function of active galaxies is described by a Schechter function with an almost constant M∗⋆ and a low-mass slope α that flattens with redshift. Compared to the stellar mass function, we find that the HGMF has a similar shape and that up to log (M⋆/M⊙) ~ 11.5, the ratio of AGN host galaxies to star-forming galaxies is basically constant (~10%). Finally, the comparison of the AGN HGMF for different luminosity and specific accretion rate subclasses with a previously published phenomenological model prediction for the "transient" population, which are galaxies in the process of being mass-quenched, reveals that low-luminosity AGN do not appear to be able to contribute significantly to the quenching and that at least at high masses, that is, M⋆ > 1010.7 M⊙, feedback from luminous AGN (log Lbol ≳ 46 [erg/s]) may be responsible for the quenching of star formation in the host galaxy.

  2. The impact of mechanical AGN feedback on the formation of massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ena; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Moster, Benjamin P.

    2015-06-01

    We employ cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the effects of AGN feedback on the formation of massive galaxies with present-day stellar masses of M_stel= 8.8 × 10^{10}-6.0 × 10^{11} M_{⊙}. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations with a pressure-entropy formulation that allows an improved treatment of contact discontinuities and fluid mixing, we run three sets of simulations of 20 haloes with different AGN feedback models: (1) no feedback, (2) thermal feedback, and (3) mechanical and radiation feedback. We assume that seed black holes are present at early cosmic epochs at the centre of emerging dark matter haloes and trace their mass growth via gas accretion and mergers with other black holes. Both feedback models successfully recover the observed MBH-σ relation and black hole-to-stellar mass ratio for simulated central early-type galaxies. The baryonic conversion efficiencies are reduced by a factor of 2 compared to models without any AGN feedback at all halo masses. However, massive galaxies simulated with thermal AGN feedback show a factor of ˜10-100 higher X-ray luminosities than observed. The mechanical/radiation feedback model reproduces the observed correlation between X-ray luminosities and velocity dispersion, e.g. for galaxies with σ = 200 km s- 1, the X-ray luminosity is reduced from 1042 erg s- 1 to 1040 erg s- 1. It also efficiently suppresses late-time star formation, reducing the specific star formation rate from 10-10.5 yr- 1 to 10-14 yr- 1 on average and resulting in quiescent galaxies since z = 2, whereas the thermal feedback model shows higher late-time in situ star formation rates than observed.

  3. A simple way to improve AGN feedback prescription in SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubovas, Kastytis; Bourne, Martin A.; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2016-03-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback is an important ingredient in galaxy evolution, however its treatment in numerical simulations is necessarily approximate, requiring subgrid prescriptions due to the dynamical range involved in the calculations. We present a suite of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations designed to showcase the importance of the choice of a particular subgrid prescription for AGN feedback. We concentrate on two approaches to treating wide-angle AGN outflows: thermal feedback, where thermal and kinetic energy is injected into the gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH) particle, and virtual particle feedback, where energy is carried by tracer particles radially away from the AGN. We show that the latter model produces a far more complex structure around the SMBH, which we argue is a more physically correct outcome. We suggest a simple improvement to the thermal feedback model - injecting the energy into a cone, rather than spherically symmetrically - and show that this markedly improves the agreement between the two prescriptions, without requiring any noticeable increase in the computational cost of the simulation.

  4. The effect of AGN feedback on the X-ray morphologies of clusters: Simulations vs. observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung; Puchwein, Ewald; Böhringer, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Clusters of galaxies probe the large-scale distribution of matter and are a useful tool to test the cosmological models by constraining cosmic structure growth and the expansion of the Universe. It is the scaling relations between mass observables and the true mass of a cluster through which we obtain the cosmological constraints by comparing to theoretical cluster mass functions. These scaling relations are, however, heavily influenced by cluster morphology. The presence of the slight tension in recent cosmological constraints on Ωm and σ8 based on the CMB and clusters has boosted the interests in looking for possible sources for the discrepancy. Therefore we study here the effect of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback as one of the major mechanisms modifying the cluster morphology influencing scaling relations. It is known that AGN feedback injects energies up to 1062 erg into the intracluster medium, controls the heating and cooling of a cluster, and re-distributes cold gas from the centre to outer radii. We have also learned that cluster simulations with AGN feedback can reproduce observed cluster properties, for example, the X-ray luminosity, temperature, and cooling rate at the centre better than without the AGN feedback. In this paper using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations we investigate how the AGN feedback changes the X-ray morphology of the simulated systems, and compare this to the observed Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) clusters. We apply two substructure measures, centre shifts (w) and power ratios (e.g. P3/P0), to characterise the cluster morphology, and find that our simulated clusters are more substructured than the observed clusters based on the values of w and P3/P0. We also show that the degree of this discrepancy is affected by the inclusion of AGN feedback. While the clusters simulated with the AGN feedback are in much better agreement with the REXCESS LX-T relation, they are also more substructured

  5. Quenching histories of galaxies and the role of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethurst, Rebecca Jane; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke; Galaxy Zoo Team

    2016-01-01

    Two open issues in modern astrophysics are: (i) how do galaxies fully quench their star formation and (ii) how is this affected - or not - by AGN feedback? I present the results of a new Bayesian-MCMC analysis of the star formation histories of over 126,000 galaxies across the colour magnitude diagram showing that diverse quenching mechanisms are instrumental in the formation of the present day red sequence. Using classifications from Galaxy Zoo we show that the rate at which quenching can occur is morphologically dependent in each of the blue cloud, green valley and red sequence. We discuss the nature of these possible quenching mechanisms, considering the influence of secular evolution, galaxy interactions and mergers, both with and without black hole activity. We focus particularly on the relationship between these quenched star formation histories and the presence of an AGN by using this new Bayesian method to show a population of type 2 AGN host galaxies have recently (within 2 Gyr) undergone a rapid (τ < 1 Gyr) drop in their star formation rate. With this result we therefore present the first statistically supported observational evidence that AGN feedback is an important mechanism for the cessation of star formation in this population of galaxies. The diversity of this new method also highlights that such rapid quenching histories cannot account fully for all the quenching across the current AGN host population. We demonstrate that slower (τ > 2 Gyr) quenching rates dominate for high stellar mass (log10[M*/M⊙] > 10.75) hosts of AGN with both early- and late-type morphology. We discuss how these results show that both merger-driven and non-merger processes are contributing to the co-evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes across the entirety of the colour magnitude diagram.

  6. AGN feedback in the nucleus of M 51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querejeta, M.; Schinnerer, E.; García-Burillo, S.; Bigiel, F.; Blanc, G. A.; Colombo, D.; Hughes, A.; Kreckel, K.; Leroy, A. K.; Meidt, S. E.; Meier, D. S.; Pety, J.; Sliwa, K.

    2016-10-01

    AGN feedback is invoked as one of the most relevant mechanisms that shape the evolution of galaxies. Our goal is to understand the interplay between AGN feedback and the interstellar medium in M 51, a nearby spiral galaxy with a modest AGN and a kpc-scale radio jet expanding through the disc of the galaxy. For this purpose, we combine molecular gas observations in the CO(1-0) and HCN(1-0) lines from the Plateau de Bure interferometer with archival radio, X-ray, and optical data. We show that there is a significant scarcity of CO emission in the ionisation cone, while molecular gas emission tends to accumulate towards the edges of the cone. The distribution and kinematics of CO and HCN line emission reveal AGN feedback effects out to r ~ 500 pc, covering the whole extent of the radio jet, with complex kinematics in the molecular gas which displays strong local variations. We propose that this is the result of the almost coplanar jet pushing on molecular gas in different directions as it expands; the effects are more pronounced in HCN than in CO emission, probably as the result of radiative shocks. Following previous interpretation of the redshifted molecular line in the central 5'' as caused by a molecular outflow, we estimate the outflow rates to be ṀH2 ~ 0.9 M⊙/ yr and Ṁdense ~ 0.6 M⊙/ yr, which are comparable to the molecular inflow rates (~1 M⊙/ yr); gas inflow and AGN feedback could be mutually regulated processes. The agreement with findings in other nearby radio galaxies suggests that this is not an isolated case, and is probably the paradigm of AGN feedback through radio jets, at least for galaxies hosting low-luminosity active nuclei. The reduced HCN(1-0) datacube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/593/A118

  7. Radio-AGN feedback: when the little ones were monsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, W. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2015-06-01

    We present a study of the evolution of the fraction of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of their host stellar mass. We make use of two samples of radio galaxies: one in the local Universe, 0.01 < z ≤ 0.3, using a combined SDSS-NVSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey) sample and the other at higher redshifts, 0.5 < z ≤ 2, constructed from the VLA-COSMOS_DEEP Radio Survey at 1.4 GHz and a Ks-selected catalogue of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. We observe an increase of more than an order of magnitude in the fraction of lower mass galaxies (M* < 1010.75 M⊙) which host radio-loud AGN with radio powers P1.4 GHz > 1024 W Hz-1 at z ˜ 1-2 while the radio-loud fraction for higher mass galaxies (M* > 1011.25 M⊙) remains the same. We argue that this increase is driven largely by the increase in cold or radiative mode accretion with increasing cold gas supply at earlier epochs. The increasing population of low-mass radio-loud AGN can thus explain the upturn in the radio luminosity function at high redshift which is important for understanding the impact of AGN feedback in galaxy evolution.

  8. Non-thermal AGN models

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.L.

    1986-12-01

    The infrared, optical and x-ray continua from radio quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN) are explained by a compact non-thermal source surrounding a thermal ultraviolet emitter, presumably the accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The ultraviolet source is observed as the ''big blue bump.'' The flat (..cap alpha.. approx. = .7) hard x-ray spectrum results from the scattering of thermal ultraviolet photons by the flat, low energy end of an electron distribution ''broken'' by Compton losses; the infrared through soft x-ray continuum is the synchrotron radiation of the steep, high energy end of the electron distribution. Quantitative fits to specific AGN result in models which satisfy the variability constraints but require electron (re)acceleration throughout the source. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  9. AGN feedback and star formation in ETGs: negative and positive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotti, Luca; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Novak, Greg; Negri, Andrea; Pellegrini, Silvia; Posacki, Silvia

    2015-08-01

    AGN feedback from supermassive black holes at the center of Early Type Galaxies is commonly invoked as the explanation for the quenching of star formation in these systems, that after this phase are considered “red and dead”. The situation is by far more complicated, due to the significant amount of mass injected in the galaxy by the evolving stellar population over cosmological times. In absence of feedback, this mass would lead to unobserved galactic cooling flows, and to central black holes two orders of magnitude more massive than observed. I will present the results of state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations with radiative transport and star formation of the “passive” evolution of ETGs, focusing in particular on highly structured spatial and temporal nature of the intermittent AGN feedback, that is not only negative (shutting down the cooling episodes of the ISM), but also positive, inducing star formation in the inner regions of the host galaxy.

  10. The Universal Unification Model of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkoviskij, E. Y.

    1998-12-01

    It is shown, that the model calculations of the absorption line profiles are possible in the framework of a common model both for BAL QSOs and the Seyfert galaxies with BAL. We suppose that in both cases the BAL-clouds move in the space between two conic surface, starting in the internal surface of the absorbing torus. We argue that the common nature of the intrinsic line absorption in these objects can be explained in an universal unified AGN model, where BAL AGNs are objects intermediate between AGN1 and AGN2

  11. On the Importance of Very Light Internally Subsonic AGN Jets in Radio-mode AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai

    2016-07-01

    Radio-mode active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in the evolution of galaxy groups and clusters. Its physical origin lies in the kiloparsec-scale interaction of AGN jets with the intracluster medium. Large-scale jet simulations often initiate light internally supersonic jets with density contrast 0.01 < η < 1. Here we argue for the first time for the importance of very light (η < 0.01) internally subsonic jets. We investigated the shapes of young X-ray cavities produced in a suite of hydrodynamic simulations, and found that bottom-wide cavities are always produced by internally subsonic jets, while internally supersonic jets inflate cylindrical, center-wide, or top-wide cavities. We found examples of real cavities with shapes analogous to those inflated in our simulations by internally subsonic and internally supersonic jets, suggesting a dichotomy of AGN jets according to their internal Mach numbers. We further studied the long-term cavity evolution, and found that old cavities resulted from light jets spread along the jet direction, while those produced by very light jets are significantly elongated along the perpendicular direction. The northwestern ghost cavity in Perseus is pancake shaped, providing tentative evidence for the existence of very light jets. Our simulations show that very light internally subsonic jets decelerate faster and rise much slower in the intracluster medium than light internally supersonic jets, possibly depositing a larger fraction of jet energy to cluster cores and alleviating the problem of low coupling efficiencies found previously. The internal Mach number points to the jet’s energy content, and internally subsonic jets are energetically dominated by non-kinetic energy, such as thermal energy, cosmic rays, or magnetic fields.

  12. Shaping the X-ray spectrum of galaxy clusters with AGN feedback and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.

    2015-07-01

    The hot plasma filling galaxy clusters emits copious X-ray radiation. The classic unheated and unperturbed cooling flow model predicts dramatic cooling rates and an isobaric X-ray spectrum with constant differential luminosity distribution. The observed cores of clusters (and groups) show instead a strong deficit of soft X-ray emission: dLx/dT ∝ (T/Thot)α = 2 ± 1. Using 3D hydrodynamic simulations, we show that such deficit arises from the tight self-regulation between thermal instability condensation and AGN outflow injection: condensing clouds boost the AGN outflows, which quench cooling as they thermalize through the core. The resultant average distribution slope is α ≃ 2, oscillating within the observed 1 < α < 3. In the absence of thermal instability, the X-ray spectrum remains isothermal (α ≳ 8), while unopposed cooling drives a too shallow slope, α < 1. AGN outflows deposit their energy inside-out, releasing more heat in the inner cooler phase; radially distributed heating alone induces a declining spectrum, 1 < α < 2. Turbulence further steepens the spectrum and increases the scatter: the turbulent Mach number in the hot phase is subsonic, while it becomes transonic in the cooler phase, making perturbations to depart from the isobaric mode. Such increase in dln P/dln T leads to α ≈ 3. Self-regulated AGN outflow feedback can address the soft X-ray problem through the interplay of heating and turbulence.

  13. The impact of AGN feedback and baryonic cooling on galaxy clusters as gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, James M. G.; King, Lindsay J.; Sijacki, Debora; Leonard, Adrienne; Puchwein, Ewald; McCarthy, Ian G.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the impact of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback on the gravitational lensing properties of a sample of galaxy clusters with masses in the range 1014-1015 Msolar, using state-of-the-art simulations. Adopting a ray-tracing algorithm, we compute the cross-section of giant arcs from clusters simulated with dark matter (DM) only physics, DM plus gas with cooling and star formation (CSF) and DM plus gas with cooling, star formation and AGN feedback (CSFBH). Once AGN feedback is included, baryonic physics boosts the strong-lensing cross-section by much less than previously estimated using clusters simulated with only CSF. For a cluster with a virial mass of 7.4 × 1014 Msolar, inclusion of baryonic physics without feedback can boost the cross-section by as much as a factor of 3, in agreement with previous studies, whereas once AGN feedback is included this maximal figure falls to a factor of 2 at most. Typically, clusters simulated with DM and CSFBH physics have similar cross-sections for the production of giant arcs. We also investigate how baryonic physics affects the weak-lensing properties of the simulated clusters by fitting NFW profiles to synthetic weak-lensing data sets using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach, and by performing non-parametric mass reconstructions. Without the inclusion of AGN feedback, measured concentration parameters can be much larger than those obtained with AGN feedback, which are similar to the DM-only case.

  14. Kinetic AGN feedback effects on cluster cool cores simulated using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, Paramita; Murante, Giuseppe; Borgani, Stefano; Gaspari, Massimo; Granato, Gian Luigi; Monaco, Pierluigi; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia

    2016-09-01

    We implement novel numerical models of AGN feedback in the SPH code GADGET-3, where the energy from a supermassive black hole (BH) is coupled to the surrounding gas in the kinetic form. Gas particles lying inside a bi-conical volume around the BH are imparted a one-time velocity (10 000 km s-1) increment. We perform hydrodynamical simulations of isolated cluster (total mass 1014 h-1 M⊙), which is initially evolved to form a dense cool core, having central T ≤ 106 K. A BH resides at the cluster centre, and ejects energy. The feedback-driven fast wind undergoes shock with the slower moving gas, which causes the imparted kinetic energy to be thermalized. Bipolar bubble-like outflows form propagating radially outward to a distance of a few 100 kpc. The radial profiles of median gas properties are influenced by BH feedback in the inner regions (r < 20-50 kpc). BH kinetic feedback, with a large value of the feedback efficiency, depletes the inner cool gas and reduces the hot gas content, such that the initial cool core of the cluster is heated up within a time 1.9 Gyr, whereby the core median temperature rises to above 107 K, and the central entropy flattens. Our implementation of BH thermal feedback (using the same efficiency as kinetic), within the star formation model, cannot do this heating, where the cool core remains. The inclusion of cold gas accretion in the simulations produces naturally a duty cycle of the AGN with a periodicity of 100 Myr.

  15. The Role of AGN Feedback in the Evolution of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Sanchez, F.; Malkan, M.; Hicks, E.; Davies, R.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptive optics integral-field observations of Seyfert Galaxies have recently revealed clear evidence of AGN-driven outflows of ionized gas. By resolving the inner 10-20 parsecs, we are successfully modeling the geometry and kinematics of the outflows in 3D. The model parameters are used to estimate mechanical feedback from the AGN and test unification models. The mass outflow rates are 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the accretion rates, but they are comparable to the estimated inflow rates to the central 10-25 pc, suggesting that the outflows may remove a considerable amount of the infalling gas before it reaches the accretion disk. The outflows seem to form two distinct groups which differ by outflow power variations with radio flux. While powerful outflows (with kinetic powers > 1.0% Lbol) are observed in objects with extended radio jets, in the other AGN - in which the outflow power is less than 0.1% Lbol - the radio jet is weak and compact.

  16. The ``entropy floor'' is porous - remarks on the coexistence of star formation and kinetic AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant R.

    2014-07-01

    We discuss the morphology of star forming clouds and filaments in the central (<~ 50 kpc) regions of 16 low redshift (z<0.3) cool core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The sample spans decades-wide ranges of X-ray mass deposition and star formation rates as well as active galactic nucleus (AGN) mechanical power, encompassing both high and low extremes of the supposed intracluster medium (ICM) cooling and AGN heating feedback cycle. Amid evidence that the gas fueling both star formation and AGN activity has condensed from the hot atmosphere, we present new and archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of far ultraviolet (FUV) continuum emission directly associated with young stars, acting as a calorimeter for the degree to which the suppression of star formation by AGN mechanical feedback may be spatially or temporally inefficient. We discuss evidence for temporal and possibly cyclical variation in star formation rate, wherein elevated cooling episodes are permitted when AGN feedback is in a low-power state, and vice-versa. Several sources exhibit strong morphological evidence that low levels of star formation can survive and may indeed be triggered by the passage of a propagating radio source. We conclude by discussing the apparent coexistence of feedback and star formation. If AGN mechanical power does establish an ``entropy floor'', this floor must be porous, or raise and lower as the AGN varies in power.

  17. The Evolution of the AGN population in the MORGANA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanot, F.; Monaco, P.; Cristiani, S.; Tozzi, P.

    2008-10-01

    We present the results of the MOdel for the Rise of Galaxies aNd Agns (MORGANA), that includes in a self-consistent way the accretion of matter onto Super-Massive Black Holes. We compare MORGANA predictions to the observed evolution of the AGN space density (inferred from optical and X-ray surveys) and we find that that it is possible to reproduce the apparent downsizing of the AGN population in the framework of concordance cosmology. We will show that this result is likely due to the improved treatment of gas cooling and feedback in MORGANA, and in particular to the modeling of the stellar kinetic feedback, arising in star-forming bulges as a consequence of the level of turbolence. On the other hand, the predicted low-mass end of BH-bulge relation is steeper than observed: we discuss this disagreement on the light of the predicted excess of small bulges, which is common to several models of galaxy formation and evolution. Finally we will show that a stronger constrain on the relative importance of the physical processes involved in the build up of the AGN population move from the observed redshift evolution of the BH-Bulge relation.

  18. Constraining Feedback in Galaxy Formation: Using Galaxy and AGN Surveys to Shed Light on ``Gastrophysics"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, P.

    2007-12-01

    We present some results of the new MORGANA model for the rise of galaxies and active nuclei, and show that the improved physical motivation of the description of star formation and feedback allows to get hints on the physical processes at play. We propose that the high level of turbulence in star-forming bulges is at the base of the observed downsizing of AGNs. In this framework it is also possible to reproduce the recently obtained evidence that most low-redshift accretion is powered by relatively massive, slowly accreting black holes. Besides, we notice that many galaxy formation models (including MORGANA) fail to reproduce a basic observable, namely the number density of 10^{11} M_⊙ galaxies at z˜1, as traced by the GOODS-MUSIC sample. This points to a possibly missing ingredient in the modeling of stellar feedback.

  19. AGN-starburst evolutionary connection: a physical interpretation based on radiative feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, W.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Observations point towards a close connection between nuclear starbursts, active galactic nuclei (AGN), and outflow phenomena. An evolutionary sequence, starting from a dust-obscured ultra-luminous infrared galaxy and eventually leading to an unobscured optical quasar, has been proposed and discussed in the literature. AGN feedback is usually invoked to expel the obscuring gas and dust in a blow-out event, but the underlying physical mechanism remains unclear. We consider AGN feedback driven by radiation pressure on dust, which directly acts on the obscuring dusty gas. We obtain that radiative feedback can potentially disrupt dense gas in the infrared-optically thick regime, and that an increase in the dust-to-gas fraction leads to an increase in the effective Eddington ratio. Thus, the more dusty gas is preferentially expelled by radiative feedback, and the central AGN is prone to efficiently remove its own obscuring dust cocoon. Large amounts of dust imply heavy obscuration but also powerful feedback, suggesting a causal link between dust obscuration and blow-out. In this picture, AGN feedback and starburst phenomena are intrinsically coupled through the production of dust in supernova explosions, leading to a natural interpretation of the observed evolutionary path.

  20. Ultra-fast outflows (aka UFOs) in AGNs and their relevance for feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappi, Massimo; Tombesi, F.; Giustini, M.; Dadina, M.; Braito, V.; Kaastra, J.; Reeves, J.; Chartas, G.; Gaspari, M.; Vignali, C.; Gofford, J.; Lanzuisi, G.

    2012-09-01

    During the last decade, several observational evidences have been accumulated for the existence of massive, high velocity winds/outflows (aka UFOs) in nearby AGNs and, possibly, distant quasars. I will review here such evidences, present some of the latest results in this field, and discuss the relevance of UFOs for both understanding the physics of accretion/ejection flows on supermassive black holes, and for quantifying the amount of AGN feedback.

  1. Theoretical uncertainties due to AGN subgrid models in predictions of galaxy cluster observable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.-Y. Karen; Sutter, P. M.; Ricker, Paul M.

    2012-12-01

    Cosmological constraints derived from galaxy clusters rely on accurate predictions of cluster observable properties, in which feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is a critical component. In order to model the physical effects due to supermassive black holes (SMBH) on cosmological scales, subgrid modelling is required, and a variety of implementations have been developed in the literature. However, theoretical uncertainties due to model and parameter variations are not yet well understood, limiting the predictive power of simulations including AGN feedback. By performing a detailed parameter-sensitivity study in a single cluster using several commonly adopted AGN accretion and feedback models with FLASH, we quantify the model uncertainties in predictions of cluster integrated properties. We find that quantities that are more sensitive to gas density have larger uncertainties (˜20 per cent for Mgas and a factor of ˜2 for LX at R500), whereas TX, YSZ and YX are more robust (˜10-20 per cent at R500). To make predictions beyond this level of accuracy would require more constraints on the most relevant parameters: the accretion model, mechanical heating efficiency and size of feedback region. By studying the impact of AGN feedback on the scaling relations, we find that an anti-correlation exists between Mgas and TX, which is another reason why YSZ and YX are excellent mass proxies. This anti-correlation also implies that AGN feedback is likely to be an important source of intrinsic scatter in the Mgas-TX and LX-TX relations.

  2. The self-regulated AGN feedback loop: the role of chaotic cold accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    Accretion and feedback tied to supermassive black holes are known to play central role in the cosmic evolution of galaxies, groups, and clusters of galaxies. The self-regulation mechanism, that is how to link feedback and accretion, is matter of intense debate.Using high-resolution 3D hydrodynamic simulations, I discuss how the AGN feedback is tightly coupled with the formation of multiphase gas and the newly probed chaotic cold accretion. In a turbulent atmosphere heated by AGN feedback, cold clouds and filaments condense out of the hot plasma via nonlinear thermal instability, up to radii of 10s kpc, and rain toward the black hole. In the inner core, the recurrent chaotic collisions between the cold clouds, filaments, and central torus promote angular momentum cancellation, boosting the accretion rate up to 100 times the Bondi rate, which is comparable to the cooling rate.Such rapid variability triggers powerful AGN outflows, which quench the cooling flow and star formation without destroying the cool core. I highlight the major imprints of mechanical AGN feedback, such as buoyant bubbles, shocks, turbulence, and uplifted gas, with a critical eye toward concordance with X-ray observations. The tight self-regulation has key implications for the group/cluster scaling relations, such as Lx-Tx, in agreement with a recent X-ray stacking analysis of 250000 central galaxies.The AGN heating stifles the formation of multiphase gas, and thus accretion. Lacking the main fuel, AGN feedback subsides and the hot halo is allowed to cool again, restarting a new cycle. Ultimately, chaotic cold accretion creates a symbiotic link between the black hole and the whole host galaxy, leading to a tight self-regulated feedback loop which preserves the cores of groups and clusters in quasi thermal equilibrium throughout cosmic time.

  3. The self-regulated AGN feedback loop: the role of chaotic cold accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    Accretion and feedback tied to supermassive black holes are known to play central role in the cosmic evolution of galaxies, groups, and clusters of galaxies. The self-regulation mechanism, that is how to link feedback and accretion, is matter of intense debate.Using high-resolution 3D hydrodynamic simulations, I discuss how the AGN feedback is tightly coupled with the formation of multiphase gas and the newly probed chaotic cold accretion. In a turbulent atmosphere heated by AGN feedback, cold clouds and filaments condense out of the hot plasma via nonlinear thermal instability, up to radii of 10s kpc, and rain toward the black hole. In the inner core, the recurrent chaotic collisions between the cold clouds, filaments, and central torus promote angular momentum cancellation, boosting the accretion rate up to 100 times the Bondi rate, which is comparable to the cooling rate.Such rapid variability triggers powerful AGN outflows, which quench the cooling flow and star formation without destroying the cool core. I highlight the major imprints of mechanical AGN feedback, such as buoyant bubbles, shocks, turbulence, and uplifted gas, with a critical eye toward observational concordance. The tight self-regulation has key implications for the group/cluster scaling relations, such as Lx-Tx, in agreement with a recent X-ray stacking analysis of 250000 central galaxies.The AGN heating stifles the formation of multiphase gas, and thus accretion. Lacking the main fuel, AGN feedback subsides and the hot halo is allowed to cool again, restarting a new cycle. Ultimately, chaotic cold accretion creates a symbiotic link between the black hole and the whole host galaxy, leading to a tight self-regulated feedback loop which preserves the cores of groups and clusters in quasi thermal equilibrium throughout cosmic time.

  4. The self-regulated AGN feedback loop: the role of chaotic cold accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    Accretion and feedback tied to supermassive black holes are known to play central role in the cosmic evolution of galaxies, groups, and clusters of galaxies. The self-regulation mechanism, that is how to link feedback and accretion, is matter of intense debate.Using high-resolution 3D hydrodynamic simulations, I discuss how the AGN feedback is tightly coupled with the formation of multiphase gas and the newly probed chaotic cold accretion. In a turbulent atmosphere heated by AGN feedback, cold clouds and filaments condense out of the hot plasma via nonlinear thermal instability, up to radii of 10s kpc, and rain toward the black hole. In the inner core, the recurrent chaotic collisions between the cold clouds, filaments, and central torus promote angular momentum cancellation, boosting the accretion rate up to 100 times the Bondi rate, which is comparable to the cooling rate.Such rapid variability triggers powerful AGN outflows, which quench the cooling flow and star formation without destroying the cool core. I highlight the major imprints of mechanical AGN feedback, such as buoyant bubbles, shocks, turbulence, and uplifted gas, with a critical eye toward observational concordance. The tight self-regulation has key implications for the scaling relations, such as Lx-Tx, and the X-ray spectrum of hot halos.The AGN heating stifles the formation of multiphase gas, and thus accretion. Lacking the main fuel, AGN feedback subsides and the hot halo is allowed to cool again, restarting a new cycle. Ultimately, chaotic cold accretion creates a symbiotic link between the black hole and the whole host galaxy, leading to a tight self-regulated feedback loop which preserves the cores of groups and clusters in quasi thermal equilibrium throughout cosmic time.

  5. CAN AGN FEEDBACK BREAK THE SELF-SIMILARITY OF GALAXIES, GROUPS, AND CLUSTERS?

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspari, M.; Brighenti, F.; Temi, P.

    2014-03-01

    It is commonly thought that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback can break the self-similar scaling relations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. Using high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we isolate the impact of AGN feedback on the L {sub x}-T {sub x} relation, testing the two archetypal and common regimes, self-regulated mechanical feedback and a quasar thermal blast. We find that AGN feedback has severe difficulty in breaking the relation in a consistent way. The similarity breaking is directly linked to the gas evacuation within R {sub 500}, while the central cooling times are inversely proportional to the core density. Breaking self-similarity thus implies breaking the cool core, morphing all systems to non-cool-core objects, which is in clear contradiction with the observed data populated by several cool-core systems. Self-regulated feedback, which quenches cooling flows and preserves cool cores, prevents dramatic evacuation and similarity breaking at any scale; the relation scatter is also limited. The impulsive thermal blast can break the core-included L {sub x}-T {sub x} at T {sub 500} ≲ 1 keV, but substantially empties and overheats the halo, generating a perennial non-cool-core group, as experienced by cosmological simulations. Even with partial evacuation, massive systems remain overheated. We show that the action of purely AGN feedback is to lower the luminosity and heat the gas, perpendicular to the fit.

  6. Kinematic signatures of AGN feedback in moderately powerful radio galaxies at z ~ 2 observed with SINFONI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, C.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; De Breuck, C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Best, P.; Bryant, J. J.; Hunstead, R.; Dicken, D.; Johnston, H.

    2016-02-01

    Most successful galaxy formation scenarios now postulate that the intense star formation in massive, high-redshift galaxies during their major growth period was truncated when powerful AGNs launched galaxy-wide outflows of gas that removed large parts of the interstellar medium. SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the most powerful radio galaxies at z ~ 2 show clear signatures of such winds, but are too rare to be good representatives of a generic phase in the evolution of all massive galaxies at high redshift. Here we present SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the rest-frame optical emission-line gas in 12 radio galaxies at redshifts ~2. Our sample spans a range in radio power that is intermediate between the most powerful radio galaxies with known wind signatures at these redshifts and vigorous starburst galaxies, and are about two orders of magnitude more common than the most powerful radio galaxies. Thus, if AGN feedback is a generic phase of massive galaxy evolution for reasonable values of the AGN duty cycle, these are just the sources where AGN feedback should be most important. Our sources show a diverse set of gas kinematics ranging from regular velocity gradients with amplitudes of Δv = 200-400 km s-1 consistent with rotating disks to very irregular kinematics with multiple velocity jumps of a few 100 km s-1. Line widths are generally high, typically around FWHM = 800 km s-1, more similar to the more powerful high-z radio galaxies than mass-selected samples of massive high-z galaxies without bright AGNs, and consistent with the velocity range expected from recent hydrodynamic models. A broad Hα line in one target implies a black hole mass of a few 109 M⊙. Velocity offsets of putative satellite galaxies near a few targets suggest dynamical masses of a few 1011 M⊙ for our sources, akin to the most powerful high-z radio galaxies. Ionized gas masses are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than in the most powerful radio galaxies, and the extinction in the gas is

  7. The Keck OSIRIS Nearby AGN (KONA) Survey: AGN Fueling and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Erin K. S.; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Malkan, Matthew A.; Yu, Po-Chieh

    In an effort to better constrain the relevant physical processes dictating the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and the galaxies in which they reside we turn to local Seyfert AGN. It is only with these local AGN that we can reach the spatial resolution needed to adequately characterize the inflow and outflow mechanisms thought to be the driving forces in establishing the relationship between black holes and their host galaxies at higher redshift. We present the first results from the KONA (Keck OSIRIS Nearby AGN) survey, which takes advantage of the integral field unit OSIRIS plus laser and natural guide star adaptive optics to probe down to scales of 5-30 parsecs in a sample of 40 local Seyfert galaxies. With these K-band data we measure the two-dimensional distribution and kinematics of the nuclear stars, molecular gas, and ionized gas within the central few hundred parsecs.

  8. Role of feedback in AGN-host coevolution: A study from partially obscured active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2015-05-01

    Partially obscured AGNs within a redshift range z = 0.011 ∼ 0.256 are used to re-study the role of feedback in the AGN-host coevolution issue in terms of their [OIII] λ 5007 emission line profile. The spectra of these objects enable us to determine the AGN's accretion properties directly from their broad H α emission. This is essential for getting rid of the "circular reasoning" in our previous study of narrow emission-line galaxies, in which the [OIII] emission line was used not only as a proxy of AGN's bolometric luminosity, but also as a diagnostic of outflow. In addition, the measurement of Dn (4000) index is improved by removing an underlying AGN's continuum according to the corresponding broad H α emission. With these improvements, we confirm and reinforce the correlation between L /LEdd and stellar population age. More important is that this correlation is found to be related to both [OIII] line blue asymmetry and bulk blueshift velocity, which suggests a linkage between SMBH growth and host star formation through the feedback process. The current sample of partially obscured AGNs shows that the composite galaxies have younger host stellar population, higher Eddington ratio, less significant [OIII] blue wing and smaller bulk [OIII] line shift than do the Seyfert galaxies.

  9. NGC 741: Mergers and AGN feedback at the group scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, Jan

    2014-09-01

    While AGN and mergers are thought to play important roles in group and cluster evolution, their effects in galaxy groups are poorly understood. We propose to observe the NGC 741 group, which hosts both an old central radio galaxy, and a spectacular infalling head-tail source. Strongly-bent jets, a 100kpc radio trail and intriguing narrow X-ray filaments suggest that NGC 742 is moving trans-sonically, undergoing stripping and shock heating. NGC 741 possesses both an old, faint radio lobe and an X-ray cavity, whose inflating plasma may have unusual properties. We request Chandra and XMM observations of the group with the goal of examining the roles of the central AGN and infalling galaxy in heating the intra-group medium, and determining the origin of the intriguing X-ray filaments.

  10. Kinematic Measurements of AGN Feedback in the Era of the International X-ray Observatory IXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sebastian; Brueggen, M.

    2009-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory (IXO) will open a new window into the study of AGN feedback in galaxy clusters. Its high spectral resolution and throughput will allow us, for the first time, to directly detect the large scale motions induced by expanding radio lobes/X-ray cavities of powerful AGN (like Cygnus A), thereby calibrating their power without the need for additional hydrodynamic assumptions. Such a measurement will allow us to calibrate the AGN feedback efficiency in clusters. We present detailed numerical simulations of AGN feedback in clusters that verify IXO's ability to deliver on this promise. In order to accurately predict IXO's performance, we developed a simulator, called XIM, that is publically available. XIM has two parts: It self-consistently calculates the thermal X-ray emission from a gas-dynamical simulation (taking data cubes of velocity, temperature, and density as input from any cosmological simulation). It then convolves the output spectro-image with the resonse functions for an X-ray telescope of choice, with an emphasis on IXO and Chandra. It can operate independently or in concert with the Chandra simulator MARX (and future IXO simulators). Its main purpose is for numerical simulators to easily predict accurately the X-ray signal of a simulated cluster detected by different telescopes.

  11. Large-scale outflows in luminous QSOs revisited. The impact of beam smearing on AGN feedback efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husemann, B.; Scharwächter, J.; Bennert, V. N.; Mainieri, V.; Woo, J.-H.; Kakkad, D.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to play an important role in quenching star formation in galaxies. However, the efficiency with which AGN dissipate their radiative energy into the ambient medium remains strongly debated. Aims: Enormous observational efforts have been made to constrain the energetics of AGN feedback by mapping the kinematics of the ionized gas on kpc scale. We study how the observed kinematics and inferred energetics are affected by beam smearing of a bright unresolved narrow-line region (NLR) due to seeing. Methods: We re-analyse optical integral-field spectroscopy of a sample of twelve luminous unobscured quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) (0.4 model is reduced by two orders of magnitude for a conical outflow and one order of magnitude for the unresolved NLR after PSF deblending. This reduced kinetic power corresponds to only 0.01-0.1 per cent of the bolometric AGN luminosity. This is smaller than the 5-10% feedback efficiency required by some cosmological simulations to reproduce the massive galaxy population. The injected momentum fluxes are close or below the simple radiation-pressure limit Lbol/c for the conical outflow model for the NLR and ENLR

  12. XMM-Newton, powerful AGN winds and galaxy feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K.; King, A.

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that ultra-fast ionized winds - sufficiently powerful to disrupt growth of the host galaxy - are a common feature of luminous AGN is major scientific breakthrough led by XMM-Newton. An extended observation in 2014 of the prototype UFO, PG1211+143, has revealed an unusually complex outflow, with distinct and persisting velocities detected in both hard and soft X-ray spectra. While the general properties of UFOs are consistent with being launched - at the local escape velocity - from the inner disc where the accretion rate is modestly super-Eddington (King and Pounds, Ann Rev Astron Astro- phys 2015), these more complex flows have raised questions about the outflow geometry and the importance of shocks and enhanced cooling. XMM-Newton seems likely to remain the best Observatory to study UFOs prior to Athena, and further extended observations, of PG1211+143 and other bright AGN, have the exciting potential to establish the typical wind dynamics, while providing new insights on the accretion geometry and continuum source structure. An emphasis on such large, coordinated observing programmes with XMM-Newton over the next decade will continue the successful philosophy pioneered by EXOSAT, while helping to inform the optimum planning for Athena

  13. A New Catalog of Type 1 AGNs and its Implications on the AGN Unified Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyuseok; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Schawinski, Kevin; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Soto, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    We have recently identified a substantial number of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) featuring weak broad-line regions (BLRs) at z\\lt 0.2 from detailed analysis of galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. These objects predominantly show a stellar continuum but also a broad Hα emission line, indicating the presence of a low-luminosity AGN oriented so that we are viewing the central engine directly without significant obscuration. These accreting black holes have previously eluded detection due to their weak nature. The newly discovered BLR AGNs have increased the number of known type 1 AGNs by 49%. Some of these new BLR AGNs were detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and their X-ray properties confirm that they are indeed type 1 AGNs. Based on our new and more complete catalog of type 1 AGNs, we derived the type 1 fraction of AGNs as a function of [O iii] λ 5007 emission luminosity and explored the possible dilution effect on obscured AGNs due to star formation. The new type 1 AGN fraction shows much more complex behavior with respect to black hole mass and bolometric luminosity than has been suggested previously by the existing receding torus model. The type 1 AGN fraction is sensitive to both of these factors, and there seems to be a sweet spot (ridge) in the diagram of black hole mass and bolometric luminosity. Furthermore, we present the possibility that the Eddington ratio plays a role in determining opening angles.

  14. Magnetic Draping as a Possible Solution to Turbulent Heating of the ICM in Kinetic Mode AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambic, Christopher; Reynolds, Christopher; Morsony, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Recent x-ray measurements of the Perseus Cluster intracluster medium (ICM) by the Hitomi Mission found a velocity dispersion measure of σ 150 km/s, indicating a large-scale turbulent energy of approximately 4 % of the thermal energy. If this energy is transferred to small scales via a turbulent cascade and dissipated as heat, radiative cooling can be offset and the cluster can remain in its observed thermal equilibrium. We investigate the role of AGN feedback, specifically the production of turbulence by g-modes generated by the supersonic expansion and buoyant rise of AGN-driven bubbles, in a plane-parallel model of the ICM using 3D ideal MHD simulations. We present results for a magnetic field perpendicular to the gravitational field as well as a helical field. We find that, while magnetic draping is able to better preserve AGN-driven bubbles and excite stronger g-modes, the production of turbulence is still inefficient. This fact is likely due to the magnetic tension force preventing the production of vortices in the ICM plasma. Our work shows that ideal MHD is an insufficient description for the cluster feedback process and we discuss future work such as the inclusion of anisotropic viscosity as a means of simulating high β plasma kinetic effects. NSF grant AST1333514

  15. INTERPLAY AMONG COOLING, AGN FEEDBACK, AND ANISOTROPIC CONDUCTION IN THE COOL CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Karen Yang, H.-Y.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-02-20

    Feedback from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is one of the most promising heating mechanisms to circumvent the cooling-flow problem in galaxy clusters. However, the role of thermal conduction remains unclear. Previous studies have shown that anisotropic thermal conduction in cluster cool cores (CCs) could drive the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities (HBIs) that reorient the field lines in the azimuthal directions and isolate the cores from conductive heating from the outskirts. However, how the AGN interacts with the HBI is still unknown. To understand these interwined processes, we perform the first 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of isolated CC clusters that include anisotropic conduction, radiative cooling, and AGN feedback. We find the following: (1) For realistic magnetic field strengths in clusters, magnetic tension can suppress a significant portion of HBI-unstable modes, and thus the HBI is either completely inhibited or significantly impaired, depending on the unknown magnetic field coherence length. (2) Turbulence driven by AGN jets can effectively randomize magnetic field lines and sustain conductivity at ∼1/3 of the Spitzer value; however, the AGN-driven turbulence is not volume filling. (3) Conductive heating within the cores could contribute to ∼10% of the radiative losses in Perseus-like clusters and up to ∼50% for clusters twice the mass of Perseus. (4) Thermal conduction has various impacts on the AGN activity and intracluster medium properties for the hottest clusters, which may be searched by future observations to constrain the level of conductivity in clusters. The distribution of cold gas and the implications are also discussed.

  16. A tale of two feedbacks: Star formation in the host galaxies of radio AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Kim, Ji Hoon; Trichas, Markos; Goto, Tomo; Malkan, Matt; Ruiz, Angel; Lee, Hyung Mok; Kim, Seong Jin; Oi, Nagisa; Matsuhara, Hideo; Takagi, Toshinobu; Murata, K.; Wada, Takehiko; Wada, Kensuke; Shim, Hyunjin; Hanami, Hitoshi; Serjeant, Stephen; White, Glenn J.; and others

    2014-04-01

    Several lines of argument support the existence of a link between activity at the nuclei of galaxies, in the form of an accreting supermassive black hole, and star formation activity in these galaxies. Radio jets have long been argued to be an ideal mechanism that allows active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to interact with their host galaxies and affect star formation. We use a sample of radio sources in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) field to study the nature of this putative link, by means of spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We employ the excellent spectral coverage of the AKARI infrared space telescope and the rich ancillary data available in the NEP to build SEDs extending from UV to far-IR wavelengths. We find a significant AGN component in our sample of relatively faint radio sources (AGN component and that of star formation in the host galaxy, independent of the radio luminosity. In contrast, for narrow redshift and AGN luminosity ranges, we find that increasing radio luminosity leads to a decrease in the specific star formation rate. The most radio-loud AGNs are found to lie on the main sequence of star formation for their respective redshifts. For the first time, we potentially see such a two-sided feedback process in the same sample. We discuss the possible suppression of star formation, but not total quenching, in systems with strong radio jets, that supports the maintenance nature of feedback from radio AGN jets.

  17. The self-regulated AGN feedback loop: the role of chaotic cold accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.

    Supermassive black hole accretion and feedback play central role in the evolution of galaxies, groups, and clusters. I review how AGN feedback is tightly coupled with the formation of multiphase gas and the newly probed chaotic cold accretion (CCA). In a turbulent and heated atmosphere, cold clouds and kpc-scale filaments condense out of the plasma via thermal instability and rain toward the black hole. In the nucleus, the recurrent chaotic collisions between the cold clouds, filaments, and central torus promote angular momentum cancellation or mixing, boosting the accretion rate up to 100 times the Bondi rate. The rapid variability triggers powerful AGN outflows, which quench the cooling flow and star formation without destroying the cool core. The AGN heating stifles the formation of multiphase gas and accretion, the feedback subsides and the hot halo is allowed to cool again, restarting a new cycle. Ultimately, CCA creates a symbiotic link between the black hole and the whole host via a tight self-regulated feedback which preserves the gaseous halo in global thermal equilibrium throughout cosmic time.

  18. Massive Molecular Outflows and Evidence for AGN Feedback from CO Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-13

    study the properties of massive, galactic-scale outflows of molecular gas and investigate their impact on galaxy evolution . We present new IRAM PdBI...AGN may strongly enhance such outflows and, therefore, have a profound feedback effect on the evolution of galaxies, by efficiently removing fuel for...star formation, hence quenching star formation. Key words. Galaxies: active – Galaxies: evolution – quasars: general – Radio lines:ISM – ISM

  19. The CoNFIG FRI sample: evolution of FRI galaxies and their role in AGN feedback.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendre, Melanie; Ricci, Roberto; Wall, Jasper; Feain, Ilana; Best, Philip; Dunlop, James; Grant, Julie; Taylor, Russ; Stil, Jeroen

    2008-10-01

    The proposal is to examine two major AGN aspects: (1) detailed testing and analysis of the FRI-galaxy space density evolution, (2) to study the polarization properties of AGN cores as a function of flux and redshift and (3) a precise history of cosmic downsizing ('differential evolution') in radio AGN to examine the importance of FRI versus FRII sources in the AGN feedback process now appearing to govern galaxy formation. The investigation is based on the CoNFIG FRI sub-samples (obtained from the 1.4-GHz NVSS in regions of FIRST) and the CENSORS sample (obtained from the NVSS and the deep EIS optical survey in a small region of southern sky). From these we have a total of 206 extragalactic sources for which we desire unambiguous morphologies and FRI/FRII classification in particular. Of the 206 sources, we request ATCA 6km array observations at 3 cm for 40 sources which, from our previous observations and analysis, remain ambiguous in classification. This sample can at last define the detailed cosmic evolution of FRI radio sources together with the 'transition region' to FRII sources.

  20. Unifying the Micro and Macro Properties of AGN Feeding and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, Massimo; Sądowski, Aleksander

    2017-03-01

    We unify the feeding and feedback of supermassive black holes with the global properties of galaxies, groups, and clusters by linking for the first time the physical mechanical efficiency at the horizon and megaparsec scale. The macro hot halo is tightly constrained by the absence of overheating and overcooling as probed by X-ray data and hydrodynamic simulations ({\\varepsilon }{BH}≃ {10}-3 {T}{{x},7.4}). The micro flow is shaped by general-relativistic effects tracked by state-of-the-art GR-RMHD simulations ({\\varepsilon }\\bullet ≃ 0.03). The supermassive black hole properties are tied to the X-ray halo temperature {T}{{x}}, or related cosmic scaling relation (as {L}{{x}}). The model is minimally based on first principles, such as conservation of energy and mass recycling. The inflow occurs via chaotic cold accretion (CCA), the rain of cold clouds condensing out of the quenched cooling flow and then recurrently funneled via inelastic collisions. Within 100s gravitational radii, the accretion energy is transformed into ultrafast 104 km s‑1 outflows (UFOs) ejecting most of the inflowing mass. At larger radii, the energy-driven outflow entrains progressively more mass: at roughly kiloparsec scale, the velocities of the hot/warm/cold outflows are a few 103, 1000, and 500 km s‑1, with median mass rates ∼ 10, 100, and several 100 {M}ȯ yr‑1, respectively. The unified CCA model is consistent with the observations of nuclear UFOs and ionized, neutral, and molecular macro outflows. We provide step-by-step implementation for subgrid simulations, (semi)analytic works, or observational interpretations that require self-regulated AGN feedback at coarse scales, avoiding the a-posteriori fine-tuning of efficiencies.

  1. Relativistic HD and MHD modelling for AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, R.; Porth, O.; Monceau-Baroux, R.; Walg, S.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic hydro and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provide a continuum fluid description for plasma dynamics characterized by shock-dominated flows approaching the speed of light. Significant progress in its numerical modelling emerged in the last two decades; we highlight selected examples of modern grid-adaptive, massively parallel simulations realized by our open-source software MPI-AMRVAC (Keppens et al 2012 J. Comput. Phys. 231 718). Hydrodynamical models quantify how energy transfer from active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets to their surrounding interstellar/intergalactic medium (ISM/IGM) gets mediated through shocks and various fluid instability mechanisms (Monceau-Baroux et al 2012 Astron. Astrophys. 545 A62). With jet parameters representative for Fanaroff-Riley type-II jets with finite opening angles, we can quantify the ISM volumes affected by jet injection and distinguish the roles of mixing versus shock-heating in cocoon regions. This provides insight in energy feedback by AGN jets, usually incorporated parametrically in cosmological evolution scenarios. We discuss recent axisymmetric studies up to full 3D simulations for precessing relativistic jets, where synthetic radio maps can confront observations. While relativistic hydrodynamic models allow one to better constrain dynamical parameters like the Lorentz factor and density contrast between jets and their surroundings, the role of magnetic fields in AGN jet dynamics and propagation characteristics needs full relativistic MHD treatments. Then, we can demonstrate the collimating properties of an overal helical magnetic field backbone and study differences between poloidal versus toroidal field dominated scenarios (Keppens et al 2008 Astron. Astrophys. 486 663). Full 3D simulations allow one to consider the fate of non-axisymmetric perturbations on relativistic jet propagation from rotating magnetospheres (Porth 2013 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 429 2482). Self-stabilization mechanisms related to the detailed

  2. GAS OUTFLOWS IN SEYFERT GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF STAR FORMATION VERSUS AGN FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Melioli, C.; Pino, E. M. de Gouveia Dal E-mail: dalpino@iag.usp.br

    2015-10-20

    Large-scale, weakly collimated outflows are very common in galaxies with large infrared luminosities. In complex systems in particular, where intense star formation (SF) coexists with an active galactic nucleus (AGN), it is not clear yet from observations whether the SF, the AGN, or both are driving these outflows. Accreting supermassive black holes are expected to influence their host galaxies through kinetic and radiative feedback processes, but in a Seyfert galaxy, where the energy emitted in the nuclear region is comparable to that of the body of the galaxy, it is possible that stellar activity is also playing a key role in these processes. In order to achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms driving the gas evolution especially at the nuclear regions of these galaxies, we have performed high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with radiative cooling considering the feedback from both SF regions, including supernova (Type I and II) explosions and an AGN jet emerging from the central region of the active spiral galaxy. We computed the gas mass lost by the system, separating the role of each of these injection energy sources on the galaxy evolution, and found that at scales within 1 kpc an outflow can be generally established considering intense nuclear SF only. The jet alone is unable to drive a massive gas outflow, although it can sporadically drag and accelerate clumps of the underlying outflow to very high velocities.

  3. NGC 3393: multi-component AGN feedback as seen by CHEERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksym, W. Peter; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Elvis, Martin; Karovska, Margarita; Raymond, John C.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Paggi, Alessandro; Wang, Junfeng; Risaliti, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Due to its low density, moderate ionization, and weak kinematics, the narrow line region (NLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) provides poweful diagnostics for investigating AGN feedback. The CHandra Extended Emission line Region Survey (CHEERS) is the ultimate investigation into resolved feedback in the NLR. We present results from our CHEERS investigations of NGC 3393. By imaging extended X-ray line emission of NGC 3393 with Chandra and optical line emission with Hubble's narrow-band filters, we are able to map out the simultaneous impact of photoionization, jets and an AGN disk-wind. When resolved on scales of ~10s of parsecs, the NLR of NGC 3393 shows a complex multi-component medium. Diagnostic line mapping indicates a Low-ionization Emmision Line Region (LINER) cocoon surrounding the outflow-evacuated cavities (in optical) and surrounding the supports the presence of collisional plasma (in X-rays). These physically distinct constituent regions can only be resolved by the high-resolution imaging that Chandra and HST enable.

  4. Feedback in the local Universe: Relation between star formation and AGN activity in early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Whitmore, Samantha; Ahmed, Rabeea; Pierce, Katherine; Leary, Sara

    2015-08-01

    Aim: We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a large sample of nearby early type (E and S0) galaxies. The redshift range of the galaxies is 0.0002Feedback from the AGN is believed to play an important role in regulating star formation and thus the process of galaxy evolution and formation. Evidence of AGN feedback is found in massive galaxies in galaxy clusters. However, how common AGN feedback is in the local universe and in small scale systems is still not evident.Methods: To answer this question, we carried out a multiple wavelength study of a sample of 231 early type galaxies which were selected to have an apparent K-band magnitude brighter than 13.5 and whose positions correlate with Chandra ACIS-I and ACIS-S sources. The galaxies in the sample are unbiased regarding their star formation and radio source properties. Using the archival observations at radio, IR and UV from VLA, WISE and GALEX respectively, we obtained the radio power, estimate FUV star formation rate (SFR) and other galaxy properties to study AGN activity and ongoing star formation.Results: The relationship between radio power and stellar mass shows that there is an upper envelope of radio power that is a steep function of stellar luminosity. This suggests that less massive galaxies have low radio power while massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources. The Radio-MIR relation shows that galaxies with P>=1022 WHz-1 are potential candidates for being AGN. About ~ 7% of the sample show evidence of ongoing star formation with SFR ranging from 10-3 to 1 M⊙yr-1. These are also less massive and radio faint suggesting the absence of active accretion. There is nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P<1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P>=1022 WHz-1) . Only ~ 5% of the galaxies in our sample have P>=1022 WHz-1 and most of them do not show evidence of bright accretion disks. We see a weak correlation and a dispersion of

  5. Cause and Effect of Feedback: Multiphase Gas in Cluster Cores Heated by AGN Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Ruszkowski, M.; Sharma, P.

    2012-02-01

    Multiwavelength data indicate that the X-ray-emitting plasma in the cores of galaxy clusters is not cooling catastrophically. To a large extent, cooling is offset by heating due to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) via jets. The cool-core clusters, with cooler/denser plasmas, show multiphase gas and signs of some cooling in their cores. These observations suggest that the cool core is locally thermally unstable while maintaining global thermal equilibrium. Using high-resolution, three-dimensional simulations we study the formation of multiphase gas in cluster cores heated by collimated bipolar AGN jets. Our key conclusion is that spatially extended multiphase filaments form only when the instantaneous ratio of the thermal instability and free-fall timescales (t TI/t ff) falls below a critical threshold of ≈10. When this happens, dense cold gas decouples from the hot intracluster medium (ICM) phase and generates inhomogeneous and spatially extended Hα filaments. These cold gas clumps and filaments "rain" down onto the central regions of the core, forming a cold rotating torus and in part feeding the supermassive black hole. Consequently, the self-regulated feedback enhances AGN heating and the core returns to a higher entropy level with t TI/t ff > 10. Eventually, the core reaches quasi-stable global thermal equilibrium, and cold filaments condense out of the hot ICM whenever t TI/t ff <~ 10. This occurs despite the fact that the energy from AGN jets is supplied to the core in a highly anisotropic fashion. The effective spatial redistribution of heat is enabled in part by the turbulent motions in the wake of freely falling cold filaments. Increased AGN activity can locally reverse the cold gas flow, launching cold filamentary gas away from the cluster center. Our criterion for the condensation of spatially extended cold gas is in agreement with observations and previous idealized simulations.

  6. Magnetic Draping as a Possible Solution to Turbulent Heating of the ICM in Kinetic Mode AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambic, Christopher John; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Morsony, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Recent x-ray measurements of the Perseus Cluster intracluster medium (ICM) by the Hitomi Mission found a velocity dispersion measure of σ ˜ 150 km/s, indicating a large-scale turbulent energy of approximately 4% of the thermal energy. If this energy is transferred to small scales via a turbulent cascade and dissipated as heat, radiative cooling can be offset and the cluster can remain in its observed thermal equilibrium. We investigate the role of AGN feedback in turbulent heating of galaxy clusters. Specifically, we analyze the production of turbulence by g-modes generated by the supersonic expansion and buoyant rise of AGN-driven bubbles. Previous work has shown that this process is inefficient, with less that 1% of the injected energy ending up in turbulence. This inefficiency is primarily due to the fact that the bubbles are shredded apart by hydrodynamic instabilies before they can excite sufficiently strong g-modes. Using a plane-parallel model of the ICM and 3D ideal MHD simulations, we examine the role of a large-scale magnetic field which is able to drape around these rising bubbles, preserving them from hydrodynamic instabilities. We present results for a magnetic field perpendicular to our gravitational field as well as for a helical field geometry. We find that, while magnetic draping is able to better preserve AGN-driven bubbles and excite stronger g-modes, the production of turbulence is still inefficient. This fact is likely due to the magnetic tension force preventing the production of vortices in the ICM plasma. Our work shows that ideal MHD is an insufficient description for the cluster feedback process, and we discuss future work such as the inclusion of anisotropic viscosity as a means of simulating high β plasma kinetic effects.

  7. Black hole growth and AGN feedback under clumpy accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraf, C.; Dekel, A.; Gabor, J.; Bournaud, F.

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution simulations of supermassive black holes in isolated galaxies have suggested the importance of short (∼10 Myr) episodes of rapid accretion caused by interactions between the black hole and massive dense clouds within the host. Accretion of such clouds could potentially provide the dominant source for black hole growth in high-z galaxies, but it remains unresolved in cosmological simulations. Using a stochastic subgrid model calibrated by high-resolution isolated galaxy simulations, we investigate the impact that variability in black hole accretion rates has on black hole growth and the evolution of the host galaxy. We find this clumpy accretion to more efficiently fuel high-redshift black hole growth. This increased mass allows for more rapid accretion even in the absence of high-density clumps, compounding the effect and resulting in substantially faster overall black hole growth. This increased growth allows the black hole to efficiently evacuate gas from the central region of the galaxy, driving strong winds up to ∼2500 km s-1, producing outflows ∼10 × stronger than the smooth accretion case, suppressing the inflow of gas on to the host galaxy, and suppressing the star formation within the galaxy by as much as a factor of 2. This suggests that the proper incorporation of variability is a key factor in the co-evolution between black holes and their hosts.

  8. Accretion-ejection models for AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanni, C.

    2008-10-01

    It is likely that jets from Active Galactic Nuclei derive their energy from accretion onto the central black hole. It is actually possible to fuel the jets by extracting energy and angular momentum from the accretion disk and/or the rotating black hole via the action of large-scale magnetic fields. In this talk I will first present results of analytical and numerical models of the launching process of jets from magnetized accretion disks: I will show that, although a sizeable fraction of the accretion power goes into the jets, these outflows are presumably only mildly relativistic. In the second place, I will therefore suggest that the strongly relativistic components observed at the VLBI scales are accelerated in the innermost parts of the AGNs by Blandford-Znajek and/or Compton-rocket processes. Nonetheless, the non-relativistic disk-wind is needed to collimate the relativistic component and to reproduce the total power of extragalactic jets.

  9. Chandra Evidence for AGN Feedback in the Spiral Galaxy NGC 6764

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Kharb, P.; Kraft, R. P.; Hota, A.

    2008-11-01

    We report the Chandra detection of X-ray emission spatially coincident with the kiloparsec-scale radio bubbles in the nearby (DL ~ 31 Mpc) AGN-starburst galaxy NGC 6764. The X-ray emission originates in hot gas (kT ~ 0.75 keV), which may either be contained within the radio bubbles, or in a shell of hot gas surrounding them. We consider three models for the origin of the hot gas: (1) a starburst-driven galactic wind, (2) shocked gas associated with the expanding radio bubbles, and (3) gas heated and entrained into the bubbles by jet/ISM interactions in the inner AGN outflow. We rule out a galactic wind based on significant differences from known galactic wind systems. The tight correspondence between the brightest X-ray emission and the radio emission in the inner outflow from the Seyfert nucleus, as well as a correlation between X-ray and radio spectral features suggestive of shocks and particle acceleration, lead us to favor the third model; however, we cannot firmly rule out a model in which the bubbles are driving large-scale shocks into the galaxy ISM. In either AGN-driven heating scenario, the total energy stored in the hot gas is high, ~1056 ergs, comparable to the energetic impact of low-power radio galaxies such as Centaurus A, and will have a dramatic impact on the galaxy and its surroundings.

  10. How AGN and SN Feedback Affect Mass Transport and Black Hole Growth in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Escala, Andrés; Volonteri, Marta; Dubois, Yohan

    2017-02-01

    Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we study the effect of supernova (SN) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback on the mass transport (MT) of gas onto galactic nuclei and the black hole (BH) growth down to redshift z∼ 6. We study the BH growth in relation to the MT processes associated with gravity and pressure torques and how they are modified by feedback. Cosmological gas funneled through cold flows reaches the galactic outer region close to freefall. Then torques associated with pressure triggered by gas turbulent motions produced in the circumgalactic medium by shocks and explosions from SNe are the main source of MT beyond the central ∼100 pc. Due to high concentrations of mass in the central galactic region, gravitational torques tend to be more important at high redshift. The combined effect of almost freefalling material and both gravity and pressure torques produces a mass accretion rate of order ∼ 1 {M}ȯ yr‑1 at approximately parsec scales. In the absence of SN feedback, AGN feedback alone does not affect significantly either star formation or BH growth until the BH reaches a sufficiently high mass of ∼ {10}6 {M}ȯ to self-regulate. SN feedback alone, instead, decreases both stellar and BH growth. Finally, SN and AGN feedback in tandem efficiently quench the BH growth, while star formation remains at the levels set by SN feedback alone, due to the small final BH mass, ∼few times {10}5 {M}ȯ . SNe create a more rarefied and hot environment where energy injection from the central AGN can accelerate the gas further.

  11. Extreme Gas Kinematics in the z=2.2 Powerful Radio Galaxy MRC1138-262: Evidence for Efficient AGN Feedback in the Early Universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvadba, N H; Lehnert, M D; Eisenhauer, F; Gilbert, A M; Tecza, M; Abuter, R

    2007-06-26

    To explain the properties of the most massive low-redshift galaxies and the shape of their mass function, recent models of galaxy evolution include strong AGN feedback to complement starburst-driven feedback in massive galaxies. Using the near-infrared integral-field spectrograph SPIFFI on the VLT, we searched for direct evidence for such a feedback in the optical emission line gas around the z = 2.16 powerful radio galaxy MRC1138-262, likely a massive galaxy in formation. The kpc-scale kinematics, with FWHMs and relative velocities {approx}< 2400 km s{sup -1} and nearly spherical spatial distribution, do not resemble large-scale gravitational motion or starburst-driven winds. Order-of-magnitude timescale and energy arguments favor the AGN as the only plausible candidate to accelerate the gas, with a total energy injection of {approx} few x 10{sup 60} ergs or more, necessary to power the outflow, and relatively efficient coupling between radio jet and ISM. Observed outflow properties are in gross agreement with the models, and suggest that AGN winds might have a similar, or perhaps larger, cosmological significance than starburst-driven winds, if MRC1138-262 is indeed archetypal. Moreover, the outflow has the potential to remove significant gas fractions ({approx}< 50%) from a > L* galaxy within a few 10 to 100 Myrs, fast enough to preserve the observed [{alpha}/Fe] overabundance in massive galaxies at low redshift. Using simple arguments, it appears that feedback like that observed in MRC1138-262 may have sufficient energy to inhibit material from infalling into the dark matter halo and thus regulate galaxy growth as required in some recent models of hierarchical structure formation.

  12. The XMM Cluster Survey: the interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy and the intracluster medium via AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, John P.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Edge, Alastair C.; Collins, Chris A.; Hilton, Matt; Harrison, Craig D.; Romer, A. Kathy; Rooney, Philip J.; Kay, Scott T.; Miller, Christopher J.; Sahlén, Martin; Lloyd-Davies, Ed J.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Hoyle, Ben; Liddle, Andrew R.; Viana, Pedro T. P.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C. M.

    2012-05-01

    Using a sample of 123 X-ray clusters and groups drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey first data release, we investigate the interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), its black hole and the intracluster/group medium (ICM). It appears that for groups and clusters with a BCG likely to host significant active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, gas cooling dominates in those with TX > 2 keV while AGN feedback dominates below. This may be understood through the subunity exponent found in the scaling relation we derive between the BCG mass and cluster mass over the halo mass range 1013 < M500 < 1015 M⊙ and the lack of correlation between radio luminosity and cluster mass, such that BCG AGN in groups can have relatively more energetic influence on the ICM. The LX-TX relation for systems with the most massive BCGs, or those with BCGs co-located with the peak of the ICM emission, is steeper than that for those with the least massive and most offset, which instead follows self-similarity. This is evidence that a combination of central gas cooling and powerful, well fuelled AGN causes the departure of the ICM from pure gravitational heating, with the steepened relation crossing self-similarity at TX= 2 keV. Importantly, regardless of their black hole mass, BCGs are more likely to host radio-loud AGN if they are in a massive cluster (TX≳ 2 keV) and again co-located with an effective fuel supply of dense, cooling gas. This demonstrates that the most massive black holes appear to know more about their host cluster than they do about their host galaxy. The results lead us to propose a physically motivated, empirical definition of 'cluster' and 'group', delineated at 2 keV.

  13. CO-EVOLUTION OF GALAXIES AND CENTRAL BLACK HOLES: OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE ON THE TRIGGER OF AGN FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Y.

    2012-05-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the extended emission-line region (EELR) around quasars is presented. A new Subaru/Suprime-Cam observation is combined with a literature search, resulting in a compilation of 81 EELR measurements for type-1 and type-2 quasars with an associated active galactic nucleus (AGN) and host galaxy properties. It is found that the EELR phenomenon shows clear correlation with the Eddington ratio, which links EELR to the constituents of principal component 1, or eigenvector 1, of the AGN emission correlations. We also find that EELR is preferentially associated with gas-rich, massive blue galaxies. This supports the idea that the primary determinant of EELR creation is gas availability and that the gas may be brought in by galaxy merger, triggering the current star formation as well as AGN activity, and also gives an explanation for the fact that most luminous EELRs are found around radio-loud sources with low Eddington ratio. By combining all the observations, it is suggested that EELR quasars occupy the massive blue corner of the green valley, the AGN realm, on the galaxy color-stellar mass diagram. Once a galaxy is pushed to this corner, an activated AGN would create an EELR by energy injection into the interstellar gas and eventually blow it away, leading to star formation quenching. The results presented here provide a piece of evidence for the presence of such an AGN feedback process, which may play a leading role in the co-evolution of galaxies and central super-massive black holes.

  14. Fueling the central engine of radio galaxies. II. The footprints of AGN feedback on the ISM of 3C 236

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labiano, A.; García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Usero, A.; Soria-Ruiz, R.; Tremblay, G.; Neri, R.; Fuente, A.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T.

    2013-01-01

    Context. There is growing observational evidence of active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback on the interstellar medium (ISM) of radio-quiet and radio-loud galaxies. While AGN feedback is expected to be more common at high-redshift objects, studying local universe galaxies helps to better characterize the different manifestations of AGN feedback. Aims: Molecular line observations can be used to quantify the mass and energy budget of the gas affected by AGN feedback. We study the emission of molecular gas in 3C 236, a Faranoff-Riley type 2 (FR II) radio source at z ~ 0.1, and search for the footprints of AGN feedback. The source 3C 236 shows signs of a reactivation of its AGN triggered by a recent minor merger episode. Observations have also previously identified an extreme H i outflow in this source. Methods: The IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) was used to study the distribution and kinematics of molecular gas in 3C 236 by imaging with high spatial resolution (0.6″) the emission of the 2-1 line of 12CO in the nucleus of the galaxy. We searched for outflow signatures in the CO map. We also derived the star-formation rate (SFR) in 3C 236 using data available from the literature at UV, optical, and IR wavelengths, to determine the star-formation efficiency (SFE) of molecular gas. Results: The CO emission in 3C 236 comes from a spatially resolved ~1.4″(2.6 kpc-) diameter disk characterized by a regular rotating pattern. Within the limits imposed by the sensitivity and velocity coverage of the CO data, we do not detect any outflow signatures in the cold molecular gas. The disk has a cold gas mass M(H2) ~ 2.1 × 109 M⊙. Based on CO we determine a new value for the redshift of the source zCO = 0.09927 ± 0.0002. The similarity between the CO and H i profiles indicates that the deep H i absorption in 3C 236 can be accounted for by a rotating H i structure. This restricts the evidence of H i outflow to only the most extreme velocities. In the light of the new

  15. Accretion disk modeling of AGN continuum using non-LTE stellar atmospheres. [active galactic nuclei (AGN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Wei-Hsin; Malkan, Matthew A.

    1988-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) accretion disk spectra were calculated using non-LTE stellar atmosphere models for Kerr and Schwarzschild geometries. It is found that the Lyman limit absorption edge, probably the most conclusive observational evidence for the accretion disk, would be drastically distorted and displaced by the relativistic effects from the large gravitational field of the central black hole and strong Doppler motion of emitting material on the disk surface. These effects are especially pronounced in the Kerr geometry. The strength of the Lyman limit absorption is very sensitive to the surface gravity in the stellar atmosphere models used. For models at the same temperature but different surface gravities, the strength of the Lyman edge exhibits an almost exponential decrease as the surface gravity approach the Eddington limit, which should approximate the thin disk atmosphere. The relativistic effects as well as the vanishing of the Lyman edge at the Eddington gravity may be the reasons that not many Lyman edges in the rest frames of AGNs and quasars are found.

  16. Modeling the reverberation of optical polarization in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R.; Marin, F.

    2016-12-01

    According to the standard paradigm, the strong and compact luminosity of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is due to multi-temperature black body emission originating from an accretion disk formed around a supermassive black hole. This central engine is thought to be surrounded by a dusty region along the equatorial plane and by ionized winds along the poles. The innermost regions cannot yet be resolved neither in the optical nor in the infrared and it is fair to say that we still lack a satisfactory understanding of the physical processes, geometry and composition of the central (sub-parsec) components of AGN. Like spectral or polarimetric observations, the reverberation data needs to be modeled in order to infer constraints on the AGN geometry (such as the inner radius or the half-opening angle of the dusty torus). In this research note, we present preliminary modeling results using a time-dependent Monte Carlo method to solve the radiative transfer in a simplified AGN set up. We investigate different model configurations using both polarization and time lags and find a high dependency on the geometry to the time-lag response. For all models there is a clear distinction between edge-on or face-on viewing angles for fluxes and time lags, the later showing a higher wavelength-dependence than the former. Time lags, polarization and fluxes point toward a clear dichotomy between the different inclinations of AGN, a method that could help us to determine the true orientation of the nucleus in Seyfert galaxies.

  17. The Effect of the AGN Feedback on the Interstellar Medium of Early-Type Galaxies:2D Hydrodynamical Simulations of the Low-Rotation Case.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotti, Luca; Pellegrini, Silvia; Negri, Andrea; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2017-01-01

    We present two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations for the evolution of early-type galaxies containing central massive black holes (MBHs), starting at an age of ≃ 2 {Gyr}. The code contains accurate and physically consistent radiative and mechanical active galactic nucleus (AGN) wind feedback, with parsec-scale central resolution. Mass input comes from stellar evolution; energy input includes Type Ia (SNIa) and II supernovae and stellar heating; star formation (SF) is included. Realistic, axisymmetric dynamical galaxy models are built solving the Jeans’ equations. The lowest mass models ({M}\\star =8 {10}10 {M}ȯ ) develop global outflows sustained by SNIa heating, ending with a lower amount of hot gas and new stars. In more massive models, nuclear outbursts last to the present epoch, with large and frequent fluctuations in nuclear emission and from the gas ({L}{{X}}). Each burst lasts ∼ {10}7.5 years, during which cold, inflowing, and hot, outflowing gas phases coexist. The {L}{{X}}{--}{T}{{X}} relation for the gas matches that of local galaxies. AGN activity causes positive feedback for SF. Roughly half of the total mass loss is recycled into new stars ({{Δ }}{M}\\star ), just ≃3% of it is accreted on the MBH, the remainder being ejected from the galaxy. The ratio between the mass of gas expelled to that in new stars, the load factor, is ≃ 0.6. Rounder galaxy shapes lead to larger final MBH masses, {{Δ }}{M}\\star , and {L}{{X}}. Almost all of the time is spent at very low nuclear luminosities, yet one quarter of the total energy is emitted at an Eddington ratio > 0.1. The duty-cycle of AGN activity is approximately 4%.

  18. AGN feedback in X-ray luminous galaxy cluster: PKS 0745-191

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkamble, Satish Shripati; Vagshette, Nilkanth Dattatray; Patil, Madhav Khushalrao

    2015-08-01

    We present 117 ks Chandra observation of the cooling flow cluster PKS 0745-191 providing evidence of the strong interaction between the radio source associated with the center dominant galaxy PGC 021813 and the intra-cluster gas. This system is one of the strongest cool core cluster, requiring extreme mechanical feedback from its central AGN to offset cooling of the ICM. This analysis has enabled us to detect two pairs of X-ray cavities in the central ˜ 20 kpc region. In addition to the cavities, we have also evidenced relatively cooler X-ray arc and a temperature jump due to the shock front at 92'' (184 kpc) on the western side. 2D temperature maps as well as spectral analysis of X-ray photons extracted from wedge shaped reigns revealed six different cold fronts, 3 along the eastern direction, 2 on the west direction and one in the south direction of the X-ray peak. The apparent positions of cold fronts are found to match with the spiral structure apparent in the X-ray surface brightness distribution of PKS 0745-191 that is probably due to the gas sloshing. The Mach number for this shock is found to be ˜ 1.36. Systematic study of the X-ray cavities revealed a mechanical power of ˜ 2.95 X 1045 erg s-1 and is sufficient to offset the cooling due to radiative loss. We found that the radio source associated with the center dominant galaxy of this cluster is efficient enough to carve the observed cavities. The ratio of radio luminosity to mechanical cavity power is ˜ 10-3 .

  19. Obscured accretion from AGN surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignali, Cristian

    2014-07-01

    Recent models of super-massive black hole (SMBH) and host galaxy joint evolution predict the presence of a key phase where accretion, traced by obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) emission, is coupled with powerful star formation. Then feedback processes likely self-regulate the SMBH growth and quench the star-formation activity. AGN in this important evolutionary phase have been revealed in the last decade via surveys at different wavelengths. On the one hand, moderate-to-deep X-ray surveys have allowed a systematic search for heavily obscured AGN, up to very high redshifts (z~5). On the other hand, infrared/optical surveys have been invaluable in offering complementary methods to select obscured AGN also in cases where the nuclear X-ray emission below 10 keV is largely hidden to our view. In this review I will present my personal perspective of the field of obscured accretion from AGN surveys.

  20. AGN feedback in action: a new powerful wind in 1SXPS J050819.8+172149?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballo, L.; Severgnini, P.; Braito, V.; Campana, S.; Della Ceca, R.; Moretti, A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Galaxy merging is widely accepted to be a driving factor in galaxy formation and evolution, while the feedback from actively accreting nuclei is thought to regulate the black hole-bulge coevolution and the star formation process. Aims: In this context, we focused on 1SXPS J050819.8+172149, a local (z = 0.0175) Seyfert 1.9 galaxy (L bol ~ 4 × 1043 erg s-1). The source belongs to an infrared-luminous interacting pair of galaxies, characterized by a luminosity for the whole system (due to the combination of star formation and accretion) of log (L IR/L⊙) = 11.2. We present here the first detailed description of the 0.3-10 keV spectrum of 1SXPS J050819.8+172149, monitored by Swift with nine pointings performed in less than one month. Methods: The X-ray emission of 1SXPS J050819.8+172149 is analysed by combining all the Swift pointings, for a total of ~72 ks XRT net exposure. The averaged Swift-BAT spectrum from the 70-month survey is also analysed. Results: The slope of the continuum is Γ ~ 1.8, with an intrinsic column density of ~2.4 × 1022cm-2, and a de-absorbed luminosity of ~4 × 1042 erg s-1 in the 2-10 keV band. Our observations provide a tentative (2.1σ) detection of a blueshifted Fe xxvi absorption line (rest-frame E ~ 7.8 keV), thus suggesting the discovery of a new candidate powerful wind in 1SXPS J050819.8+172149. The physical properties of the outflow cannot be firmly assessed owing to the low statistics of the spectrum and to the observed energy of the line, too close to the higher boundary of the Swift-XRT bandpass. However, our analysis suggests that, if the detection is confirmed, the line could be associated with a high-velocity (v out ~ 0.1c) outflow most likely launched within 80 r S. To our knowledge this is the first detection of a previously unknown ultrafast wind with Swift. The high column density suggested by the observed equivalent width of the line (EW ~ -230 eV, although with large uncertainties) would imply a kinetic output

  1. Supermassive Black Holes, AGN Feedback, and Hot X-ray Coronae in Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, William R.; Anderson, Michael E.; Churazov, Eugene; Nulsen, Paul; Jones, Christine; Kraft, Ralph P.

    2016-06-01

    We present the analysis of a sample of more than 200 nearby, early type galaxies observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We exclude resolved point sources, and model the emission from both unresolved X-ray binaries and CVs and ABs to derive the residual thermal emission from the hot atmosphere around each galaxy. We compute the X-ray luminosity of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Using galaxy velocity dispersion (or stellar mass) as a proxy for SMBH mass, we derive the Eddington ratios for these low luminosity AGN. We present the X-ray luminosity and gas temperature of the hot coronae as a function of stellar mass (a proxy for dark matter halo mass) and central velocity dispersion to look for anomalously X-ray bright gaseous coronae and to determine the stellar (or halo) mass, below which galactic winds may be important. For hot coronae with X-ray cavities, we derive the "mechanical" power of SMBHs and compare these to their radiative luminosities.

  2. Modeling climate related feedback processes

    SciTech Connect

    Elzen, M.G.J. den; Rotmans, J. )

    1993-11-01

    In order to assess their impact, the feedbacks which at present can be quantified reasonably are built into the Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect (IMAGE). Unlike previous studies, this study describes the scenario- and time-dependent role of biogeochemical feedbacks. A number of simulation experiments are performed with IMAGE to project climate changes. Besides estimates of their absolute importance, the relative importance of individual biogeochemical feedbacks is considered by calculating the gain for each feedback process. This study focuses on feedback processes in the carbon cycle and the methane (semi-) cycle. Modeled feedbacks are then used to balance the past and present carbon budget. This results in substantially lower projections for atmospheric carbon dioxide than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates. The difference is approximately 18% from the 1990 level for the IPCC [open quotes]Business-as-Usual[close quotes] scenario. Furthermore, the IPCC's [open quotes]best guess[close quotes] value of the CO[sub 2] concentration in the year 2100 falls outside the uncertainty range estimated with our balanced modeling approach. For the IPCC [open quotes]Business-as-Usual[close quotes] scenario, the calculated total gain of the feedbacks within the carbon cycle appears to be negative, a result of the dominant role of the fertilization feedback. This study also shows that if temperature feedbacks on methane emissions from wetlands, rice paddies, and hydrates do materialize, methane concentrations might be increased by 30% by 2100. 70 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. FEEDBACK FROM CENTRAL BLACK HOLES IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. CAN PURELY MECHANICAL ENERGY FEEDBACK MODELS WORK?

    SciTech Connect

    Shin Minsu; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ciotti, Luca

    2010-03-01

    By using high-resolution one-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, we investigate the effects of purely mechanical feedback from super massive black holes (SMBHs) in the evolution of elliptical galaxies for a broad range of feedback efficiencies and compare the results to four major observational constraints. In particular, we focus on (1) the central black hole to stellar mass ratio of the host galaxy, (2) the lifetime of the luminous quasar phase, (3) the mass of stars formed in the host galaxy within the last Gyr, and (4) the X-ray luminosity of the hot diffuse gas. As a result, we try to pin down the most successful range of mechanical feedback efficiencies. We find that while low feedback efficiencies result in too much growth of the SMBH, high efficiencies totally blow out the hot interstellar gas, and the models are characterized by very low thermal X-ray luminosity well below the observed range. The net lifetime of the quasar phase is strongly coupled to the mass ratio between SMBH and its host galaxy, while the X-ray luminosity is generally correlated to the recent star formation within the last Gyr. When considering the popularly adopted model of the constant feedback efficiency, the feedback energy deposited into the ambient medium should be more than 0.01% of the SMBH accretion energy to be consistent with the SMBH mass to stellar mass ratio in the local universe. Yet, the X-ray luminosity of the hot gas favors about 0.005% of the accretion energy as the mechanical active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback energy. We conclude that the purely mechanical feedback mode is unlikely to be simultaneously compatible with all four observable tests, even allowing a broad range of feedback efficiencies, and that including both radiative and mechanical feedback together may be a solution to comply with the observational constraints. In addition to the adopted observational constraints, our simulations also show that the ratio of SMBH growth rate over its current

  4. NGC 3801 caught in the act: a post-merger star-forming early-type galaxy with AGN-jet feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hota, Ananda; Rey, Soo-Chang; Kang, Yongbeom; Kim, Suk; Matsushita, Satoki; Chung, Jiwon

    2012-05-01

    In the current models of galaxy formation and evolution, AGN feedback is crucial to reproduce galaxy luminosity function, colour-magnitude relation and M•-σ relation. However, whether AGN feedback can indeed expel and heat up significant amount of cool molecular gas and consequently quench star formation is yet to be demonstrated observationally. Only in four cases so far (Cen A, NGC 3801, NGC 6764 and Mrk 6), X-ray observations have found evidences of jet-driven shocks heating the ISM. We chose the least explored galaxy NGC 3801, and present the first ultraviolet imaging and stellar population analysis of this galaxy from GALEX data. We find this merger-remnant early-type galaxy to have an intriguing spiral wisp of young star-forming regions (age ranging from 100 to 500 Myr). Taking clues from dust/PAH, H I and CO emission images, we interpret NGC 3801 to have a kinematically decoupled core or an extremely warped gas disc. From the HST data, we also show evidence of ionized gas outflow similar to that observed in H I and molecular gas (CO) data, which may have caused the decline of star formation leading to the red optical colour of the galaxy. However, from these panchromatic data, we interpret that the expanding shock shells from the young (˜2.4 Myr) radio jets are yet to reach the outer gaseous regions of the galaxy. It seems we observe this galaxy at a rare stage of its evolutionary sequence where post-merger star formation has already declined and new powerful jet feedback is about to affect the gaseous star-forming outer disc within the next 10 Myr, to further transform it into a red-and-dead early-type galaxy.

  5. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AS MAIN CONTRIBUTORS TO THE ULTRAVIOLET IONIZING EMISSIVITY AT HIGH REDSHIFTS: PREDICTIONS FROM A {Lambda}-CDM MODEL WITH LINKED AGN/GALAXY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Fiore, F.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Grazian, A.; Pentericci, L.

    2012-08-20

    We have evaluated the contribution of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) population to the ionization history of the universe based on a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation and evolution in the cold dark matter cosmological scenario. The model connects the growth of black holes and of the ensuing AGN activity to galaxy interactions. In the model we have included a self-consistent physical description of the escape of ionizing UV photons; this is based on the blast-wave model for the AGN feedback we developed in a previous paper to explain the distribution of hydrogen column densities in AGNs of various redshifts and luminosities, due to absorption by the host galaxy gas. The model predicts UV luminosity functions for AGNs that are in good agreement with those derived from the observations especially at low and intermediate redshifts (z {approx} 3). At higher redshifts (z > 5), the model tends to overestimate the data at faint luminosities. Critical biases in both the data and in the model are discussed to explain such apparent discrepancies. The predicted hydrogen photoionization rate as a function of redshift is found to be consistent with that derived from the observations. All of the above suggests that we should reconsider the role of the AGNs as the main driver of the ionization history of the universe.

  6. The AGN Jet Model of the Fermi Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai

    2017-01-01

    The nature and origin of the Fermi bubbles detected in the inner Galaxy remain elusive. In this paper, we briefly discuss some recent theoretical and observational developments, with a focus on the AGN jet model. Analogous to radio lobes observed in massive galaxies, the Fermi bubbles could be naturally produced by a pair of opposing jets emanating nearly along the Galaxy's rotation axis from the Galactic center. Our two-fluid hydrodynamic simulations reproduce quite well the bubble location and shape, and interface instabilities at the bubble surface could be effectively suppressed by shear viscosity. We briefly comment on some potential issues related to our model, which may lead to future progress.

  7. Constraining the properties of AGN host galaxies with spectral energy distribution modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Georgakakis, A.; Bernhard, E.; Mitchell, P. D.; Buat, V.; Elbaz, D.; LeFloc'h, E.; Lacey, C. G.; Magdis, G. E.; Xilouris, M.

    2015-04-01

    Detailed studies of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of normal galaxies have increasingly been used to understand the physical mechanism dominating their integrated emission, mainly owing to the availability of high quality multi-wavelength data from the UV to the far-infrared (FIR). However, systems hosting dust-enshrouded nuclear starbursts and/or an accreting supermassive black hole (an active galactic nucleus or AGN) are especially challenging to study. This is due to the complex interplay between the heating by massive stars and the AGN, the absorption and emission of radiation from dust, as well as the presence of the underlying old stellar population. We used the latest release of CIGALE, a fast state-of-the-art galaxy SED-fitting model relying on energy balance, to study the influence of an AGN in a self consistent manner in estimating both the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass in galaxies, as well as to calculate the contribution of the AGN to the power output of the host. Using the semi-analytical galaxy formation model galform, we created a suite of mock galaxy SEDs using realistic star formation histories (SFH). We also added an AGN of Type-1, Type-2, or intermediate-type whose contribution to the bolometric luminosity can be variable. We performed an SED-fitting of these catalogues with CIGALE, assuming three different SFHs: a single-exponentially-decreasing (1τ-dec), a double-exponentially-decreasing (2τ-dec), and a delayed SFH. Constraining the overall contribution of an AGN to the total infrared luminosity (fracAGN) is very challenging for fracAGN< 20%, with uncertainties of ~5-30% for higher fractions depending on the AGN type, while FIR and sub-mm are essential. The AGN power has an impact on the estimation of M∗ in Type-1 and intermediate-type AGNs but has no effect on galaxies hosting Type-2 AGNs. We find that in the absence of AGN emission, the best estimates of M∗ are obtained using the 2τ-dec model but at the expense of

  8. Searching for Fossil Evidence of AGN Feedback in WISE-selected Stripe-82 Galaxies by Measuring the Thermal Sunyaev–Zel’dovich Effect with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spacek, Alexander; Scannapieco, Evan; Cohen, Seth; Joshi, Bhavin; Mauskopf, Philip

    2017-01-01

    We directly measure the thermal energy of the gas surrounding galaxies through the thermal Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (tSZ) effect. We perform a stacking analysis of microwave background images from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, around 1179 massive quiescent elliptical galaxies at 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.0 (“low-z”) and 3274 galaxies at 1.0 ≤ z ≤ 1.5 (“high-z”), selected using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All-Sky Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) within the SDSS Stripe-82 field. The gas surrounding these galaxies is expected to contain energy from past episodes of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, and after using modeling to subtract undetected contaminants, we detect a tSZ signal at a significance of 0.9σ for our low-z galaxies and 1.8σ for our high-z galaxies. We then include data from the high-frequency Planck bands for a subset of 227 low-z galaxies and 529 high-z galaxies and find low-z and high-z tSZ detections of 1.0σ and 1.5σ , respectively. These results indicate an average thermal heating around these galaxies of ({5.6}-5.6+5.9)× {10}60 erg for our low-z galaxies and ({7.0}-4.4+4.7)× {10}60 erg for our high-z galaxies. Based on simple heating models, these results are consistent with gravitational heating without additional heating due to AGN feedback.

  9. Constraints on Feedback in the Local Universe: The Relation Between Star Formation and AGN Activity in Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi Alison

    2016-01-01

    We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a sample of 231 nearby (0.0002 < z < 0.0358) early type galaxies by carrying out a multi-wavelength study using archival observations in the UV, IR and radio. Our results indicate that early type galaxies in the current epoch are rarely powerful AGNs, with P < 1022 WHz-1 for a majority of the galaxies. Only massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources while less massive galaxies are hosts to lower radio power sources. Evidence of ongoing star formation is seen in approximately 7% of the sample. The SFR of these galaxies is less than 0.1 M⊙yr-1. They also tend to be radio faint (P < 1022 WHz-1). There is a nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P < 1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P ≥ 1022 WHz-1) suggesting that both star formation and radio mode feedback are constrained to be very low in our sample. We notice that our galaxy sample and the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) follow similar trends in radio power versus SFR. This may be produced if both radio power and SFR are related to stellar mass.

  10. AGN Feedback And Evolution of Radio Sources: Discovery of An X-Ray Cluster Associated With Z=1 Quasar

    SciTech Connect

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Cheung, C.C.; LaMassa, S.; Burke, D.; Aldcroft, T.L.; Bechtold, J.; Elvis, M.; Worrall, D.M.; /Bristol U.

    2006-01-11

    We report the first significant detection of an X-ray cluster associated with a powerful (L{sub bol} {approx} 10{sup 47} erg sec{sup -1}) radio-loud quasar at high redshift (z=1.06). Diffuse X-ray emission is detected out to {approx} 120 kpc from the CSS quasar 3C 186. A strong Fe-line emission at the z{sub rest} = 1.06 confirms its thermal nature. We find that the CSS radio source is highly overpressured with respect to the thermal cluster medium by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This provides direct observational evidence that the radio source is not thermally confined as posited in the ''frustrated'' scenario for CSS sources. Instead, the radio source may be young and at an early stage of its evolution. This source provides the first detection of the AGN in outburst in the center of a cooling flow cluster. Powerful radio sources are thought to be triggered by the cooling flows. The evidence for the AGN activity and intermittent outbursts comes from the X-ray morphology of low redshift clusters, which usually do not harbour quasars. 3C186 is a young active radio source which can supply the energy into the cluster and potentially prevent its cooling. We discuss energetics related to the quasar activity and the cluster cooling flow, and possible feedback between the evolving radio source and the cluster.

  11. THE QUASAR OUTFLOW CONTRIBUTION TO AGN FEEDBACK: VLT MEASUREMENTS OF SDSS J0318-0600

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Jay P.; Bautista, Manuel; Arav, Nahum; Edmonds, Doug; Moe, Max; Korista, Kirk; Costantini, Elisa; Benn, Chris; Ellison, Sara E-mail: arav@vt.ed E-mail: kirk.korista@wmich.ed E-mail: mmoe@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-02-01

    We present high spectral resolution Very Large Telescope observations of the broad absorption line quasar SDSS J0318 - 0600. This high-quality data set allows us to extract accurate ionic column densities and determine an electron number density of n{sub e} = 10{sup 3.3+}-{sup 0.2} cm{sup -3} for the main outflow absorption component. The heavily reddened spectrum of SDSS J0318-0600 requires purely silicate dust with a reddening curve characteristic of predominately large grains, from which we estimate the bolometric luminosity. We carry out photoionization modeling to determine the total column density, ionization parameter, and distance of the gas and find that the photoionization models suggest abundances greater than solar. Due to the uncertainty in the location of the dust extinction, we arrive at two viable distances for the main ouflow component from the central source, 6 and 17 kpc, where we consider the 6 kpc location as somewhat more physically plausible. Assuming the canonical global covering of 20% for the outflow and a distance of 6 kpc, our analysis yields a mass flux of 120 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a kinetic luminosity that is approx0.1% of the bolometric luminosity of the object. Should the dust be part of the outflow, then these values are approx4x larger. The large mass flux and kinetic luminosity make this outflow a significant contributor to active galactic nucleus feedback processes.

  12. A Mechanism for Stimulating AGN Feedback by Lifting Gas in Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, B. R.; Russell, H. R.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Hogan, M. T.; Fabian, A. C.; Pulido, F.; Edge, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    Observation shows that nebular emission, molecular gas, and young stars in giant galaxies are associated with rising X-ray bubbles inflated by radio jets launched from nuclear black holes. We propose a model where molecular clouds condense from low-entropy gas caught in the updraft of rising X-ray bubbles. The low-entropy gas becomes thermally unstable when it is lifted to an altitude where its cooling time is shorter than the time required to fall to its equilibrium location in the galaxy, i.e., {t}{{c}}/{t}{{I}}≲ 1. The infall speed of a cloud is bounded by the lesser of its free-fall and terminal speeds, so that the infall time here can exceed the free-fall time by a significant factor. This mechanism is motivated by Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations revealing molecular clouds lying in the wakes of rising X-ray bubbles with velocities well below their free-fall speeds. Our mechanism would provide cold gas needed to fuel a feedback loop while stabilizing the atmosphere on larger scales. The observed cooling time threshold of ∼ 5× {10}8 {yr}—the clear-cut signature of thermal instability and the onset of nebular emission and star formation—may result from the limited ability of radio bubbles to lift low-entropy gas to altitudes where thermal instabilities can ensue. Outflowing molecular clouds are unlikely to escape, but instead return to the central galaxy in a circulating flow. We contrast our mechanism to precipitation models where the minimum value of {t}{{c}}/{t}{{ff}}≲ 10 triggers thermal instability, which we find to be inconsistent with observation.

  13. HIGH-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS WITHOUT AGN FEEDBACK: EDDINGTON-LIMITED STAR FORMATION IN COMPACT MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Moustakas, John; Coil, Alison L.; Tremonti, Christy A.; Sell, Paul H.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Robaina, Aday R.; Rudnick, Gregory H.

    2012-08-20

    We present the discovery of compact, obscured star formation in galaxies at z {approx} 0.6 that exhibit {approx}> 1000 km s{sup -1} outflows. Using optical morphologies from the Hubble Space Telescope and infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we estimate star formation rate (SFR) surface densities that approach {Sigma}{sub SFR} Almost-Equal-To 3000 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, comparable to the Eddington limit from radiation pressure on dust grains. We argue that feedback associated with a compact starburst in the form of radiation pressure from massive stars and ram pressure from supernovae and stellar winds is sufficient to produce the high-velocity outflows we observe, without the need to invoke feedback from an active galactic nucleus.

  14. Intracluster medium cooling, AGN feedback, and brightest cluster galaxy properties of galaxy groups. Five properties where groups differ from clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Reiprich, T. H.; Schellenberger, G.; Eckmiller, H. J.; Mittal, R.; Israel, H.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We aim to investigate cool-core and non-cool-core properties of galaxy groups through X-ray data and compare them to the AGN radio output to understand the network of intracluster medium (ICM) cooling and feedback by supermassive black holes. We also aim to investigate the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) to see how they are affected by cooling and heating processes, and compare the properties of groups to those of clusters. Methods: Using Chandra data for a sample of 26 galaxy groups, we constrained the central cooling times (CCTs) of the ICM and classified the groups as strong cool-core (SCC), weak cool-core (WCC), and non-cool-core (NCC) based on their CCTs. The total radio luminosity of the BCG was obtained using radio catalogue data and/or literature, which in turn was compared to the cooling time of the ICM to understand the link between gas cooling and radio output. We determined K-band luminosities of the BCG with 2MASS data, and used a scaling relation to constrain the masses of the supermassive black holes, which were then compared to the radio output. We also tested for correlations between the BCG luminosity and the overall X-ray luminosity and mass of the group. The results obtained for the group sample were also compared to previous results for clusters. Results: The observed cool-core/non-cool-core fractions for groups are comparable to those of clusters. However, notable differences are seen: 1) for clusters, all SCCs have a central temperature drop, but for groups this is not the case as some have centrally rising temperature profiles despite very short cooling times; 2) while for the cluster sample, all SCC clusters have a central radio source as opposed to only 45% of the NCCs, for the group sample, all NCC groups have a central radio source as opposed to 77% of the SCC groups; 3) for clusters, there are indications of an anticorrelation trend between radio luminosity and CCT. However, for groups this trend is absent; 4) the indication of

  15. Massive Molecular Outflows and Evidence for AGN Feedback from CO Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    study the properties of massive, galactic-scale outflows of molecular gas and investigate their impact on galaxy evolution . We present new IRAM PdBI CO...profound feedback effect on the evolution of galaxies by efficiently removing fuel for star formation, hence quenching star formation. Key words...galaxies: active – galaxies: evolution – quasars: general – radio lines: ISM – ISM: molecules – galaxies: ISM 1. Introduction The recent discovery of

  16. Probabilistic models for feedback systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2011-02-01

    In previous work, we developed a Bayesian-based methodology to analyze the reliability of hierarchical systems. The output of the procedure is a statistical distribution of the reliability, thus allowing many questions to be answered. The principal advantage of the approach is that along with an estimate of the reliability, we also can provide statements of confidence in the results. The model is quite general in that it allows general representations of all of the distributions involved, it incorporates prior knowledge into the models, it allows errors in the 'engineered' nodes of a system to be determined by the data, and leads to the ability to determine optimal testing strategies. In this report, we provide the preliminary steps necessary to extend this approach to systems with feedback. Feedback is an essential component of 'complexity' and provides interesting challenges in modeling the time-dependent action of a feedback loop. We provide a mechanism for doing this and analyze a simple case. We then consider some extensions to more interesting examples with local control affecting the entire system. Finally, a discussion of the status of the research is also included.

  17. Modeling production of e+/--pair plasma in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alex; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2016-10-01

    Processes around spinning supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to determine how relativistic jets are launched and how the black hole energy is extracted. The key question in these processes is the origin of plasma in black hole magnetospheres. The only reasonable mechanism is believed to be the electron-position cascade - the multistage process involving seed photons from an accretion disk, which are Compton up-scattered by charges accelerated in a gap region of a force-free magnetosphere with subsequent photon-photon pair production. In order to explore the process of the e+/- plasma production, we developed a numerical code which models the dynamics of the cascade along magnetic field lines. We demonstrate that plasma production is sensitive to the spectrum of the ambient photon and magnetic fields, the black hole mass and spin, and other parameters. We discuss the results and observational predictions. Supported by KU CLAS and DOE Grant ID0000225143 (07/01/16).

  18. Physical properties of simulated galaxy populations at z = 2 - I. Effect of metal-line cooling and feedback from star formation and AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Marcel R.; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C. M.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Springel, Volker; Theuns, Tom; Wiersma, Robert P. C.

    2013-11-01

    We use hydrodynamical simulations from the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project to investigate the dependence of the physical properties of galaxy populations at redshift 2 on metal-line cooling and feedback from star formation and active galactic nuclei (AGN). We find that if the sub-grid feedback from star formation is implemented kinetically, the feedback is only efficient if the initial wind velocity exceeds a critical value. This critical velocity increases with galaxy mass and also if metal-line cooling is included. This suggests that radiative losses quench the winds if their initial velocity is too low. If the feedback is efficient, then the star formation rate is inversely proportional to the amount of energy injected per unit stellar mass formed (which is proportional to the initial mass loading for a fixed wind velocity). This can be understood if the star formation is self-regulating, i.e. if the star formation rate (and thus the gas fraction) increases until the outflow rate balances the inflow rate. Feedback from AGN is efficient at high masses, while increasing the initial wind velocity with gas pressure or halo mass allows one to generate galaxy-wide outflows at all masses. Matching the observed galaxy mass function requires efficient feedback. In particular, the predicted faint-end slope is too steep unless we resort to highly mass loaded winds for low-mass objects. Such efficient feedback from low-mass galaxies (M* ≪ 1010 M⊙) also reduces the discrepancy with the observed specific star formation rates, which are higher than predicted unless the feedback transitions from highly efficient to inefficient just below M* ˜ 5 × 109 M⊙.

  19. Generative model for feedback networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Douglas R.; Kejžar, Nataša; Tsallis, Constantino; Farmer, Doyne; White, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We propose a model for network formation and study some of its statistical properties. The motivation for the model comes from the growth of several kinds of real networks (i.e., kinship and trading networks, networks of corporate alliances, networks of autocatalytic chemical reactions). These networks grow either by establishing closer connections by adding links in the existing network or by adding new nodes. A node in these networks lacks the information of the entire network. In order to establish a closer connection to other nodes it starts a search in the neighboring part of the network and waits for a possible feedback from a distant node that received the “searching signal.” Our model imitates this behavior by growing the network via the addition of a link that creates a cycle in the network or via the addition of a new node with a link to the network. The forming of a cycle creates feedback between the two ending nodes. After choosing a starting node, a search is made for another node at a suitable distance; if such a node is found, a link is established between this and the starting node, otherwise (such a node cannot be found) a new node is added and is linked to the starting node. We simulate this algorithm and find that we cannot reject the hypothesis that the empirical degree distribution is a q -exponential function, which has been used to model long-range processes in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

  20. Major Contributor to AGN Feedback: VLT X-shooter Observations of S IV BALQSO Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Arav, Nahum; Edmonds, Doug; Chamberlain, Carter; Benn, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We present the most energetic BALQSO outflow measured to date, with a kinetic luminosity of at least 1046 erg s-1, which is 5% of the bolometric luminosity of this high Eddington ratio quasar. The associated mass-flow rate is 400 solar masses per year. Such kinetic luminosity and mass-flow rate should provide strong active galactic nucleus feedback effects. The outflow is located at about 300 pc from the quasar and has a velocity of roughly 8000 km s-1. Our distance and energetic measurements are based in large part on the identification and measurement of S IV and S IV* broad absorption lines (BALs). The use of this high-ionization species allows us to generalize the result to the majority of high-ionization BALQSOs that are identified by their C IV absorption. We also report the energetics of two other outflows seen in another object using the same technique. The distances of all three outflows from the central source (100-2000 pc) suggest that we observe BAL troughs much farther away from the central source than the assumed acceleration region of these outflows (0.01-0.1 pc). Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, PID: 87.B-0229.

  1. MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR TO AGN FEEDBACK: VLT X-SHOOTER OBSERVATIONS OF S IV BALQSO OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Arav, Nahum; Edmonds, Doug; Chamberlain, Carter; Benn, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We present the most energetic BALQSO outflow measured to date, with a kinetic luminosity of at least 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, which is 5% of the bolometric luminosity of this high Eddington ratio quasar. The associated mass-flow rate is 400 solar masses per year. Such kinetic luminosity and mass-flow rate should provide strong active galactic nucleus feedback effects. The outflow is located at about 300 pc from the quasar and has a velocity of roughly 8000 km s{sup -1}. Our distance and energetic measurements are based in large part on the identification and measurement of S IV and S IV* broad absorption lines (BALs). The use of this high-ionization species allows us to generalize the result to the majority of high-ionization BALQSOs that are identified by their C IV absorption. We also report the energetics of two other outflows seen in another object using the same technique. The distances of all three outflows from the central source (100-2000 pc) suggest that we observe BAL troughs much farther away from the central source than the assumed acceleration region of these outflows (0.01-0.1 pc).

  2. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.; Gaskell, C. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. A growing body of evidence suggests that some, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. The inner AGN components cannot be spatially resolved with current instruments and must be studied by numerical simulations of observed spectroscopy and polarization data. Aims: We run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We obtain geometry-sensitive polarization spectra and images to improve our previous AGN models and their comparison with the observations. Methods: We use the latest public version 1.2 of the Monte Carlo code stokes presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate the importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. Results: In comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectra and show a decrease in the net polarization percentage at all lines of sight. The resulting polarization position angle depends on the morphology of the clumpy structure, with extended tori favoring parallel polarization while compact tori produce orthogonal polarization position angles. In the case of polar scattering regions, fragmentation increases the net polarization unless the cloud filling factor is small. A complete AGN model constructed from the individual, fragmented regions can produce low polarization percentages (<2%), with a parallel polarization angle for observer inclinations up to 70° for a torus half opening angle of 60°. For

  3. Photoionization modeling of GRO 1655-40: A scaled down AGN Warm Absrobers!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; Fukumura, Keigo; Shrader, Chris R.; Behar, Ehud; Tombesi, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    We present photoinization models of the absorption features Galactic X-ray Binary (XRB) by implementing the MHD accretion disk wind models employed to account for the ionization properties of the AGN Warm Absorbers (WA)(Fukumura et a. 2010). The implementation of the same models rests on the fact that the radial density profiles of these winds, n(r)~1/r, guarantees the correct values of the hydrogen equivalent column NH of the most important ionic species at the correct values of their ionization parameter ξ and velocity v. The similarity of the winds' ionization properties is broken only by the peak frequency of the ionizing SED, which is in the UV in AGN and in X-rays in XRBs. This difference implies that the inner regions of the XRB winds are far more ionized than those of AGN, resulting in much smaller velocities for the same ionic species (e.g. Fe XXV) in XRB (v~1,000 km/s) than in AGN (v~10,000 km/s), in agreement with observation. Estimates of the wind mass flux deduced from our photonization modeling, imply that the latter is much larger than that needed to power the observed X-ray emission, a property that appears to be generic from the Galactic to the AGN black hole mass range suggesting a common underlying structure.

  4. The SINFONI survey of powerful radio galaxies at z 2: Jet-driven AGN feedback during the Quasar Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvadba, N. P. H.; De Breuck, C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Best, P. N.; Collet, C.

    2017-03-01

    We present VLT/SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the rest-frame optical emission lines of warm ionized gas in 33 powerful radio galaxies at redshifts z ≳ 2, which are excellent sites to study the interplay of rapidly accreting active galactic nuclei and the interstellar medium of the host galaxy in the very late formation stages of massive galaxies. Our targets span two orders of magnitude in radio size (2-400 kpc) and kinetic jet energy (a few 1046- almost 1048 erg s-1). All sources have complex gas kinematics with broad line widths up to 1300 km s-1. About half have bipolar velocity fields with offsets up to 1500 km s-1 and are consistent with global back-to-back outflows. The others have complex velocity distributions, often with multiple abrupt velocity jumps far from the nucleus of the galaxy, and are not associated with a major merger in any obvious way. We present several empirical constraints that show why gas kinematics and radio jets seem to be physically related in all galaxies of the sample. The kinetic energy in the gas from large scale bulk and local outflow or turbulent motion corresponds to a few 10-3 to 10-2 of the kinetic energy output of the radio jet. In galaxies with radio jet power ≳ 1047 erg s-1, the kinetic energy in global back-to-back outflows dominates the total energy budget of the gas, suggesting that bulk motion of outflowing gas encompasses the global interstellar medium. This might be facilitated by the strong gas turbulence, as suggested by recent analytical work. We compare our findings with recent hydrodynamic simulations, and discuss the potential consequences for the subsequent evolution of massive galaxies at high redshift. Compared with recent models of metal enrichment in high-z AGN hosts, we find that the gas-phase metallicities in our galaxies are lower than in most low-z AGN, but nonetheless solar or even super-solar, suggesting that the ISM we see in these galaxies is very similar to the gas from which massive low

  5. Modelling reverberation mapping data - II. Dynamical modelling of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2008 data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancoast, Anna; Brewer, Brendon J.; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong; Barth, Aaron J.; Bentz, Misty C.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2014-12-01

    We present dynamical modelling of the broad-line region (BLR) for a sample of five Seyfert 1 galaxies using reverberation mapping data taken by the Lick AGN Monitoring Project in 2008. By modelling the AGN continuum light curve and Hβ line profiles directly, we are able to constrain the geometry and kinematics of the BLR and make a measurement of the black hole mass that does not depend upon the virial factor, f, needed in traditional reverberation mapping analysis. We find that the geometry of the BLR is generally a thick disc viewed close to face-on. While the Hβ emission is found to come preferentially from the far side of the BLR, the mean size of the BLR is consistent with the lags measured with cross-correlation analysis. The BLR kinematics are found to be consistent with either inflowing motions or elliptical orbits, often with some combination of the two. We measure black hole masses of log _{10}(M_ BH/M_{odot })=6.62^{+0.10}_{-0.13} for Arp 151, 7.42^{+0.26}_{-0.27} for Mrk 1310, 7.59^{+0.24}_{-0.21} for NGC 5548, 6.37^{+0.21}_{-0.16} for NGC 6814, and 6.99^{+0.32}_{-0.25} for SBS 1116+583A. The f factors measured individually for each AGN are found to correlate with inclination angle, although not with M BH, L5100, or FWHM/σ of the emission line profile.

  6. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. II. Multidimensional, Radiation-Hydrodynamics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, Anton; Kallman, Tim; Bisno\\vatyiI-Kogan, Gennadyi

    2011-01-01

    We explore a detailed model in which the active galactic nucleus (AGN) obscuration results from the extinction of AGN radiation in a global ow driven by the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains. We assume that external illumination by UV and soft X-rays of the dusty gas located at approximately 1pc away from the supermassive black hole is followed by a conversion of such radiation into IR. Using 2.5D, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulations in a ux-limited di usion approximation we nd that the external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via out ows driven by infrared radiation pressure in AGN with luminosities greater than 0:05 L(sub edd) and Compton optical depth, Tau(sub T) approx > & 1.

  7. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  8. Co-Evolution Model of AGNs and Nuclear Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatu, N.; Wada, K.

    2009-10-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and a circumnuclear disk (CND), taking into account the mass-supply from a host galaxy and the physical states of CND. In the model, two distinct accretion modes depending on gravitational stability of the CND play a key role on accreting gas to a SMBH. (i) If the CND is gravitationally unstable, energy feedback from supernovae (SNe) supports a geometrically thick, turbulent gas disk. The accretion in this mode is dominated by turbulent viscosity, and it is significantly larger than that in the mode (ii), i.e., the CND is supported by gas pressure. Once the gas supply from the host is stopped, the high accretion phase changes to the low one (mode (ii)), but there is a delay with ˜ 108 yr. Through this evolution, the gas-rich CND turns into the gas poor stellar disk. We found that not all the gas supplied from the host galaxy to the central 100 pc region accrete onto the SMBH even in the high accretion phase (mode (i)), because the part of gas is used to form stars. Moreover, a super-Eddington accretion is possible in the high accretion phase and thus the its condition is briefly discussed.

  9. Testing the AGN unification model in the infrared. First results with GTC/CanariCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Almeida, C.

    2015-05-01

    The unified model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) accounts for a variety of observational differences in terms of viewing geometry alone. However, from the fitting of high spatial resolution infrared (IR) data with clumpy torus models, it has been hinted that the immediate dusty surroundings of Type-1 and 2 Seyfert nuclei might be intrinsically different in terms of covering factor (torus width and number of clouds). Moreover, these torus covering factors also showed variations among objects belonging to the same type, in contradiction with simple unification. Interestingly, these intrinsic differences in Seyfert tori could explain, for example, the lack of broad optical lines in the polarized spectra of about half of the brightest Seyfert 2 galaxies. On the other hand, recent IR interferometry studies have revealed that, in at least four Seyfert galaxies, the mid-IR emission is elongated in the polar direction. These results are difficult to reconcile with unified models, which claim that the bulk of the mid-IR emission comes from the torus. In this invited contribution I summarize the latest results on high angular resolution IR studies of AGN, which constitute a crucial test for AGN unification. These results include those from the mid-infrared instrument CanariCam on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC), which are starting to be published by the CanariCam AGN team, Los Piratas (https://sites.google.com/site/piratasrelatedpublications).

  10. The Prevalence of Gas Outflows in Type 2 AGNs. II. 3D Biconical Outflow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyun-Jin; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2016-09-01

    We present 3D models of biconical outflows combined with a thin dust plane for investigating the physical properties of the ionized gas outflows and their effect on the observed gas kinematics in type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using a set of input parameters, we construct a number of models in 3D and calculate the spatially integrated velocity and velocity dispersion for each model. We find that three primary parameters, i.e., intrinsic velocity, bicone inclination, and the amount of dust extinction, mainly determine the simulated velocity and velocity dispersion. Velocity dispersion increases as the intrinsic velocity or the bicone inclination increases, while velocity (i.e., velocity shifts with respect to systemic velocity) increases as the amount of dust extinction increases. Simulated emission-line profiles well reproduce the observed [O iii] line profiles, e.g., narrow core and broad wing components. By comparing model grids and Monte Carlo simulations with the observed [O iii] velocity-velocity dispersion distribution of ˜39,000 type 2 AGNs, we constrain the intrinsic velocity of gas outflows ranging from ˜500 to ˜1000 km s-1 for the majority of AGNs, and up to ˜1500-2000 km s-1 for extreme cases. The Monte Carlo simulations show that the number ratio of AGNs with negative [O iii] velocity to AGNs with positive [O iii] velocity correlates with the outflow opening angle, suggesting that outflows with higher intrinsic velocity tend to have wider opening angles. These results demonstrate the potential of our 3D models for studying the physical properties of gas outflows, applicable to various observations, including spatially integrated and resolved gas kinematics.

  11. Limitations on the recovery of the true AGN variability parameters using damped random walk modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Szymon

    2017-01-01

    Context. The damped random walk (DRW) stochastic process is nowadays frequently used to model aperiodic light curves of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A number of correlations between the DRW model parameters, the signal decorrelation timescale and amplitude, and the physical AGN parameters, such as the black hole mass or luminosity, have been reported. Aims: We are interested in whether or not it is plausible to correctly measure the DRW parameters from a typical ground-based survey, and, in particular, in how accurate the recovered DRW parameters are compared to the input ones. Methods: By means of Monte Carlo simulations of AGN light curves, we studied the impact of the light curve length, the source magnitude (the photometric properties of a survey), cadence, and additional light (e.g., from a host galaxy) on the DRW model parameters. Results: The most significant finding is that currently existing surveys are going to return unconstrained DRW decorrelation timescales, because typical rest-frame data do not probe long enough timescales or the white noise part of the power spectral density for DRW. The experiment length must be at least ten times longer than the true DRW decorrelation timescale, being presumably in the vicinity of one year, thus meaning the necessity for AGN light curves measuring a minimum of 10 years (rest-frame). The DRW timescales for sufficiently long light curves are typically weakly biased, and the exact bias depends on the fitting method and used priors. The DRW amplitude is mostly affected by the photometric noise (the source magnitude or the signal-to-noise ratio), cadence, and the AGN host light. Conclusions: Because the DRW parameters appear to be incorrectly determined from typically existing data, the reported correlations of the DRW variability and physical AGN parameters from other works seem unlikely to be correct. In particular, the anti-correlation of the DRW decorrelation timescale with redshift is a manifestation of the

  12. Modelling the cosmological co-evolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies - I. BH scaling relations and the AGN luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, Federico; Bonoli, Silvia; Branchini, Enzo; Moscardini, Lauro; Springel, Volker

    2008-04-01

    We model the cosmological co-evolution of galaxies and their central supermassive black holes (BHs) within a semi-analytical framework developed on the outputs of the Millennium Simulation. This model, described in detail by Croton et al. and De Lucia and Blaizot, introduces a `radio mode' feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) at the centre of X-ray emitting atmospheres in galaxy groups and clusters. Thanks to this mechanism, the model can simultaneously explain: (i) the low observed mass dropout rate in cooling flows; (ii) the exponential cut-off in the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function and (iii) the bulge-dominated morphologies and old stellar ages of the most massive galaxies in clusters. This paper is the first of a series in which we investigate how well this model can also reproduce the physical properties of BHs and AGN. Here we analyse the scaling relations, the fundamental plane and the mass function of BHs, and compare them with the most recent observational data. Moreover, we extend the semi-analytic model to follow the evolution of the BH mass accretion and its conversion into radiation, and compare the derived AGN bolometric luminosity function with the observed one. While we find for the most part a very good agreement between predicted and observed BH properties, the semi-analytic model underestimates the number density of luminous AGN at high redshifts, independently of the adopted Eddington factor and accretion efficiency. However, an agreement with the observations is possible within the framework of our model, provided it is assumed that the cold gas fraction accreted by BHs at high redshifts is larger than at low redshifts.

  13. First systematic search for oxygen-line blobs at high redshift: Uncovering AGN feedback and star formation quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Yuma, Suraphong; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Momose, Rieko; Drake, Alyssa B.; Simpson, Chris; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Akiyama, Masayuki; Mori, Masao; Umemura, Masayuki

    2013-12-10

    We present the first systematic search for extended metal-line [O II] λλ3726, 3729 nebulae, or [O II] blobs (O IIBs), at z = 1.2 using deep narrowband imaging with a survey volume of 1.9 × 10{sup 5} Mpc{sup 3} on the 0.62 deg{sup 2} sky of Subaru-XMM Deep Survey (SXDS) field. We discover a giant O IIB, called 'O IIB 1', with a spatial extent over ∼75 kpc at a spectroscopic redshift of z = 1.18, and also identify a total of 12 O IIBs with a size of >30 kpc. Our optical spectrum of O IIB 1 presents [Ne V] λ3426 line at the 6σ level, indicating that this object harbors an obscured type-2 active galactic nucleus (AGN). The presence of gas outflows in this object is suggested by two marginal detections of Fe II λ2587 absorption and Fe II* λ2613 emission lines both of which are blueshifted at as large as 500-600 km s{sup –1}, indicating that the heating source of O IIB 1 is AGN or associated shock excitation rather than supernovae produced by starbursts. The number density of O IIB 1-type giant blobs is estimated to be ∼5 × 10{sup –6} Mpc{sup –3} at z ∼ 1.2, which is comparable with that of AGNs driving outflow at a similar redshift, suggesting that giant O IIBs are produced only by AGN activity. On the other hand, the number density of small O IIBs, 6 × 10{sup –5} Mpc{sup –3}, compared to that of z ∼ 1 galaxies in the blue cloud in the same M{sub B} range, may imply that 3% of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1 are quenching star formation through outflows involving extended [O II] emission.

  14. Distinguishing Feedback Mechanisms in Clock Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Alexander; Lubensky, David

    Biological oscillators are very diverse but can be classified based on dynamical motifs such as type of feedback. The S. Elongatus circadian oscillator is a novel circadian oscillator that can operate at constant protein number by modifying covalent states. It can be reproduced in vitro with only 3 different purified proteins: KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. We use computational and analytic techniques to compare models of the S. Elongatus post-translational oscillator that rely on positive feedback with models that rely on negative feedback. We show that introducing a protein that binds competitively with KaiA to the KaiB-KaiC complex can distinguish between positive and negative feedback as the primary driver of the rhythm, which has so far been difficult to address experimentally. NSF Grant DMR-1056456.

  15. NuSTAR Survey of Swift/BAT AGN as a Probe of the Unified Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balokovic, M.

    2015-09-01

    NuSTAR has enabled studies of the local AGN to extend into the spectral window above 10 keV with unprecedented spatial resolution and two orders of magnitude better sensitivity than any other instrument operating in that energy range. As a part of its long-term extragalactic program NuSTAR is surveying the nearby population of AGN detected at hard X-ray energies by the Swift/BAT instrument. We present results based on observations of ~100 Swift/BAT-selected Type-2 Seyferts surveyed in the first three years of NuSTAR operation. This large sample forms an atlas of the highest quality hard X-ray spectra available to date. Assuming a range of hard X-ray spectral models, phenomenological as well as physically motivated, we constrain the main spectral parameters for each source individually and test the applicability of the models on a large sample for the first time. This analysis allows us to determine distributions of the main spectral parameters related to the torus, such as the absorption column, reflection strength, and iron line equivalent width, in a well-defined population of nearby obscured AGN. More advanced models for the AGN torus allow us to investigate differences between various subsamples and interpret them within the unified model paradigm. We will discuss the implications for the structure of the torus in the local population of Type-2 Seyferts and present a comprehensive comparison of constraints derived from X-ray data and constraints from observations at other wavelengths for a relatively large sample.

  16. Constraining the fraction of Compton-thick AGN in the Universe by modelling the diffuse X-ray background spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Brightman, M.; Nandra, K.

    2012-10-01

    This paper investigates which constraints can be placed on the fraction of Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the Universe from modelling the spectrum of the diffuse X-ray background (XRB). We present a model for the synthesis of the XRB that uses as input a library of AGN X-ray spectra generated by Monte Carlo simulations. This is essential to account for the Compton scattering of X-ray photons in a dense medium and the impact of that process on the spectra of heavily obscured AGN. We identify a small number of input parameters to the XRB synthesis code that encapsulate the minimum level of uncertainty in reconstructing the XRB spectrum. These are the power-law index and high-energy cutoff of the intrinsic X-ray spectra of AGN, the level of the reflection component in AGN spectra, and the fraction of Compton-thick AGN in the Universe. We then map the volume of the space allowed to these parameters by current observational determinations of the XRB spectrum in the range 3-100 keV. One of the least-constrained parameters is the fraction of Compton-thick AGN. Statistically acceptable fits to the XRB spectrum at the 68% confidence level can be obtained for Compton-thick AGN fractions in the range 5-50%. This is because of degeneracies among input parameters to the XRB synthesis code and uncertainties in the modelling of AGN spectra (e.g. level of reflection fraction). The most promising route for constraining the fraction of Compton-thick AGN in the Universe is via the direct detection of those sources in high-energy (≳ 10 keV) surveys. We show that the observed fraction of Compton-thick sources identified in the Swift/BAT serendipitous survey limits the intrinsic fraction of Compton-thick AGN, at least at low redshift, to 10-20% (68% confidence level). We also make predictions on the number density of Compton-thick sources that current and future X-ray missions are expected to discover. Testing those predictions with data will place tight constraints on

  17. Fading AGN Candidates: AGN Histories and Outflow Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Maksym, W. Peter; Bennert, Vardha N.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Moiseev, Alexei; Smirnova, Aleksandrina; Schawinski, Kevin; Sartori, Lia F.; Urry, C. Megan; Pancoast, Anna; Schirmer, Mischa; Scott, Bryan; Showley, Charles; Flatland, Kelsi

    2017-02-01

    We consider the energy budgets and radiative history of eight fading active galactic nuclei (AGNs), identified from an energy shortfall between the requirements to ionize very extended (radius > 10 kpc) ionized clouds and the luminosity of the nucleus as we view it directly. All show evidence of significant fading on timescales of ≈50,000 yr. We explore the use of minimum ionizing luminosity Qion derived from photoionization balance in the brightest pixels in Hα at each projected radius. Tests using presumably constant Palomar–Green QSOs, and one of our targets with detailed photoionization modeling, suggest that we can derive useful histories of individual AGNs, with the caveat that the minimum ionizing luminosity is always an underestimate and subject to uncertainties about fine structure in the ionized material. These consistency tests suggest that the degree of underestimation from the upper envelope of reconstructed Qion values is roughly constant for a given object and therefore does not prevent such derivation. The AGNs in our sample show a range of behaviors, with rapid drops and standstills; the common feature is a rapid drop in the last ≈2 × 104 yr before the direct view of the nucleus. The e-folding timescales for ionizing luminosity are mostly in the thousands of years, with a few episodes as short as 400 yr. In the limit of largely obscured AGNs, we find additional evidence for fading from the shortfall between even the lower limits from recombination balance and the maximum luminosities derived from far-infrared fluxes. We compare these long-term light curves, and the occurrence of these fading objects among all optically identified AGNs, to simulations of AGN accretion; the strongest variations over these timespans are seen in models with strong and local (parsec-scale) feedback. We present Gemini integral-field optical spectroscopy, which shows a very limited role for outflows in these ionized structures. While rings and loops of emission

  18. The origin of cold gas in giant elliptical galaxies and its role in fuelling radio-mode AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, N.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Sun, M.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Allen, S. W.; Canning, R. E. A.; Simionescu, A.; Hoffer, A.; Connor, T.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; von der Linden, A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Ruszkowski, M.

    2014-04-01

    these systems may result in variable power output of the AGN jets, potentially triggering sporadic, larger outbursts. In the two cold-gas-poor, X-ray morphologically relaxed galaxies of our sample, NGC 1399 and NGC 4472, powerful AGN outbursts may have destroyed or removed most of the cold gas from the cores, allowing the jets to propagate and deposit most of their energy further out, increasing the entropy of the hot galactic atmospheres and leaving their cores relatively undisturbed.

  19. The evolution of obscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightman, Murray

    2012-09-01

    We present results on the evolution of Compton thick AGN with redshift, and the nature of this obscuration, important for understanding the accretion history of the universe and for AGN unification schemes. We use lessons learned from spectral complexity of local AGN (Brightman & Nandra 2012) and up to date spectral models of heavily absorbed AGN, which take into account Compton scattering, self consistent Fe Ka modeling and the geometry of the circumnuclear material (Brightman & Nandra 2011), to optimise our identification of Compton thick AGN and understanding of the obscuring material. Results from the Chandra Deep Field South are presented (Brightman & Ueda, 2012), which show an increasing fraction of CTAGN with redshift and that most heavily obscured AGN are geometrically deeply buried in material, as well as new results from and extension of this study to AEGIS-XD and Chandra-COSMOS survey, which aim to fully characterise the dependence of heavy AGN obscuration on redshift and luminosity.

  20. Modeling heart rate variability by stochastic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amaral, L. A.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the question of how the cardiac rhythm spontaneously self-regulates and propose a new mechanism as a possible answer. We model the neuroautonomic regulation of the heart rate as a stochastic feedback system and find that the model successfully accounts for key characteristics of cardiac variability, including the 1/f power spectrum, the functional form and scaling of the distribution of variations of the interbeat intervals, and the correlations in the Fourier phases which indicate nonlinear dynamics.

  1. JetCurry: Modeling 3D geometry of AGN jets from 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kunyang; Kosak, Katie; Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2017-02-01

    Written in Python, JetCurry models the 3D geometry of AGN jets from 2-D images. JetCurry requires NumPy and SciPy and incorporates emcee (ascl:1303.002) and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002), and optionally uses VPython. From a defined initial part of the jet that serves as a reference point, JetCurry finds the position of highest flux within a bin of data in the image matrix and fits along the x axis for the general location of the bends in the jet. A spline fitting is used to smooth out the resulted jet stream.

  2. Nebular Emission From AGN In The Ultraviolet/Optical: Linking Observations and Theory With New Generation Spectral Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltre, Anna; Charlot, S.; Gutkin, J.; Hirschmann, M.; Mignoli, M.; Calura, F.; Gilli, R.; Bongiorno, A.; NEOGAL Team

    2016-10-01

    Spectroscopic studies of AGN are powerful means of probing the physical properties of the ionized gas within them. In particular, forthcoming facilities such as JWST and the E-ELT, will provide rest-frame ultraviolet and optical spectra of the very distant AGN. To lay the groundwork for the interpretation of the revolutionary datasets, we have recently computed new photoionization models of the narrow-line emitting regions (NLR) of AGN and combined them with similar models of the nebular emission from star-forming galaxies. In this talk, I will first describe how new ultraviolet and standard optical spectral diagnostics allow one to distinguish between nuclear activity and star formation. I will then present how the nebular emission from both young stars and AGN can be coupled with a new set of cosmological hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations of massive galaxies to achieve a better understanding of black hole growth and galaxy evolution with cosmic time. I will also present an innovative Bayesian fitting code that can help us best interpret current, and future, spectro-photometric data on active galaxies. In particular, the implementation of AGN photoionization calculations within this fitting tool allows us to better understand the physical properties of the AGN NLR gas. I will conclude showing some results from a recent analysis on one of the most comprehensive set of optical spectra (from VIMOS/VLT) sampling the rest-frame ultraviolet range of 90 type 2 AGN (1.5 < z < 3), drawn from the z-COSMOS deep survey.

  3. Support for an Evolutionary Model of AGN Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dultzin, D.

    2015-09-01

    I will present our recent results (2013-2015) on the role of the environment in the nuclear activity of interacting Galaxies, all of which support an evolutionary sequence in the nuclear activity. We studied close galactic pairs of similar mass in the local Universe. We analyzed 385 spectra of S S, E E, and E S pairs, and try to disentangle the role of morphology on induced activity . We compare with our own sample of bona fide isolated galaxies containing a statistically significant number of all morphological types. Our main results are in conflict with the simplest version of the so called Unified Model (UM), and suggest that high accretion rates are essential to form the Broad Line Region in active galaxies. We also investigated the structure of the dusty torus surrounding Syfert 1 and 2 nuclei, both in pairs and isolated. The results also lead to a disagreement with the UM. Finally, we present our results on the Nuclear Activity in the context of the evolution of Compact Groups of galaxies over the past 3 Gyrs. Our analysis is based on the largest multiwavelength compact group sample to-date, and the results are also in conflict with an orientation obscuration effect alone.

  4. The Close AGN Reference Survey (CARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Barry; Husemann, Bernd; Busch, Gerold; Dierkes, Jens; Eckart, Andreas; Krajnovic, Davor; Scharwaechter, Julia; Tremblay, Grant R.; Urrutia, Tanya

    2015-08-01

    We present the first science results from the Close AGN Reference Survey (CARS). This program is a snapshot survey of 39 local type 1 AGN (0.01 < z <0.06) designed to address the issue of AGN-driven star formation quenching by characterizing the condition for star formation in AGN host galaxies. The primary sample was observed with Multi Unit Spectrscopic Explorer (MUSE), an optical wavelength integral field unit (IFU) with a 1'x1' field of view on the VLT. The optical 3D spectroscopy complements existing sub-mm CO(1-0) data and near-IR imaging to establish a unique dataset combining molecular and stellar masses with star formation rates, gas, stellar kinematics and AGN properties. The primary goals of CARS are to:1) investigate if the star formation efficiency and gas depletion time scales are suppressed as a consequence of AGN feedback; 2) identify AGN-driven outflows and their relation to the molecular gas reservoir of the host galaxy; 3) investigate the the balance of AGN feeding and feedback through the ratio of the gas reservoir to the AGN luminosity; and 4) provide the community with a reference survey of local AGN with a high legacy value. Future work will incorporate near-infrared IFU observations to present a complete spatially resolved picture of the interplay among AGN, star-formation, stellar populations, and the ISM.

  5. Resolving the AGN and Host Emission in the Mid-infrared Using a Model-independent Spectral Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Spoon, Henrik W. W.; Ramos Almeida, Cristina; Díaz Santos, Tanio; Hönig, Sebastian F.; González-Martín, Omaira; Esquej, Pilar

    2015-04-01

    We present results on the spectral decomposition of 118 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra from local active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using a large set of Spitzer/IRS spectra as templates. The templates are themselves IRS spectra from extreme cases where a single physical component (stellar, interstellar, or AGN) completely dominates the integrated mid-infrared emission. We show that a linear combination of one template for each physical component reproduces the observed IRS spectra of AGN hosts with unprecedented fidelity for a template fitting method with no need to model extinction separately. We use full probability distribution functions to estimate expectation values and uncertainties for observables, and find that the decomposition results are robust against degeneracies. Furthermore, we compare the AGN spectra derived from the spectral decomposition with sub-arcsecond resolution nuclear photometry and spectroscopy from ground-based observations. We find that the AGN component derived from the decomposition closely matches the nuclear spectrum with a 1σ dispersion of 0.12 dex in luminosity and typical uncertainties of ∼0.19 in the spectral index and ∼0.1 in the silicate strength. We conclude that the emission from the host galaxy can be reliably removed from the IRS spectra of AGNs. This allows for unbiased studies of the AGN emission in intermediate- and high-redshift galaxies—currently inaccesible to ground-based observations—with archival Spitzer/IRS data and in the future with the Mid-InfraRed Instrument of the James Webb Space Telescope. The decomposition code and templates are available at http://denebola.org/ahc/deblendIRS.

  6. Xray cavities in a sample of 83 SPT-selected clusters galaxies. Tracing the evolution of AGN feedback in clusters of galaxies out to z=1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Forman, W. R.; Allen, S. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Dietrich, J. P.; Jones, C.; Liu, J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Song, J.; Stalder, B.; Vikhlinin, A.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-05-18

    X-ray cavities are key tracers of mechanical (or radio mode) heating arising from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We report on a survey for X-ray cavities in 83 massive, high-redshift ($0.4\\lt z\\lt 1.2$) clusters of galaxies selected by their Sunyaev-Zel’dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. Based on Chandra X-ray images, we find a total of six clusters having symmetric pairs of surface brightness depressions consistent with the picture of radio jets inflating X-ray cavities in the intracluster medium (ICM). The majority of these detections are of relatively low significance and require deeper follow-up data in order to be confirmed. Further, this search will miss small (<10 kpc) X-ray cavities that are unresolved by Chandra at high ($z\\gtrsim 0.5$) redshift. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the power generated by AGN feedback in BCGs has remained unchanged for over half of the age of the universe ($\\gt 7$ Gyr at $z\\sim 0.8$). On average, the detected X-ray cavities have powers of $(0.8-5)\\times {{10}^{45}}\\ {\\rm erg}\\ {{{\\rm s}}^{-1}}$, enthalpies of $(3-6)\\times {{10}^{59}}\\ {\\rm erg}$, and radii of ~17 kpc. Integrating over 7 Gyr, we find that the supermassive black holes in BCGs may have accreted 10(8) to several ${{10}^{9}}\\,{{M}_{\\odot }}$ of material to power these outflows. This level of accretion indicates that significant supermassive black hole growth may occur not only at early times, in the quasar era, but at late times as well. We also find that X-ray cavities at high redshift may inject an excess heat of 0.1–1.0 keV per particle into the hot ICM above and beyond the energy needed to offset cooling. Although this result needs to be confirmed, we note that the magnitude of excess heating is similar to the energy needed to preheat clusters, break self-similarity, and explain the excess entropy in hot atmospheres.

  7. Models of the Molecular Interstellar Medium in Starbursts and AGN from z=0-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Desika T.; Cox, T.; Chakrabarti, S.; Dave, R.; Di Matteo, T.; Kelly, B.; Hernquist, L.; Hopkins, P.; Kulesa, C.; Li, Y.; Robertson, B.; Walker, C.

    2006-12-01

    Recent pioneering CO observations of infrared luminous galaxies and AGN at high-z allow us to study coevolution of black hole growth and star formation in galaxies during the heydey of massive galaxy formation. However, little is known concerning the physical nature of these crucial galaxies, and the relationship between the central AGN, ISM, and host galaxy properties to the observed CO emission. In order to provide a framework for an interpretation of these observations, I investigate the nature of the CO emission in starburst galaxies and quasars by combining a 3D non-LTE radiative transfer code with cosmological and galaxy merger hydrodynamic simulations. Here, I highlight recent results from these simulations. Specifically, I will discuss the following: 1. The effect of black hole growth and starbursts on CO emission patterns; 2. The role of galactic winds on CO emission morphologies and line profiles; 3. The nature of CO emission in z 6 Quasars, and how we might use this to constrain models of primordial galaxy formation.

  8. The cosmic evolution of massive black holes in the Horizon-AGN simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, M.; Dubois, Y.; Pichon, C.; Devriendt, J.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the demographics of black holes (BHs) in the large-volume cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Horizon-AGN. This simulation statistically models how much gas is accreted on to BHs, traces the energy deposited into their environment and, consequently, the back-reaction of the ambient medium on BH growth. The synthetic BHs reproduce a variety of observational constraints such as the redshift evolution of the BH mass density and the mass function. Strong self-regulation via AGN feedback, weak supernova feedback, and unresolved internal processes result in a tight BH-galaxy mass correlation. Starting at z ˜ 2, tidal stripping creates a small population of BHs over-massive with respect to the halo. The fraction of galaxies hosting a central BH or an AGN increases with stellar mass. The AGN fraction agrees better with multi-wavelength studies, than single-wavelength ones, unless obscuration is taken into account. The most massive haloes present BH multiplicity, with additional BHs gained by ongoing or past mergers. In some cases, both a central and an off-centre AGN shine concurrently, producing a dual AGN. This dual AGN population dwindles with decreasing redshift, as found in observations. Specific accretion rate and Eddington ratio distributions are in good agreement with observational estimates. The BH population is dominated in turn by fast, slow, and very slow accretors, with transitions occurring at z = 3 and z = 2, respectively.

  9. Model feedback in Bayesian propensity score estimation.

    PubMed

    Zigler, Corwin M; Watts, Krista; Yeh, Robert W; Wang, Yun; Coull, Brent A; Dominici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Methods based on the propensity score comprise one set of valuable tools for comparative effectiveness research and for estimating causal effects more generally. These methods typically consist of two distinct stages: (1) a propensity score stage where a model is fit to predict the propensity to receive treatment (the propensity score), and (2) an outcome stage where responses are compared in treated and untreated units having similar values of the estimated propensity score. Traditional techniques conduct estimation in these two stages separately; estimates from the first stage are treated as fixed and known for use in the second stage. Bayesian methods have natural appeal in these settings because separate likelihoods for the two stages can be combined into a single joint likelihood, with estimation of the two stages carried out simultaneously. One key feature of joint estimation in this context is "feedback" between the outcome stage and the propensity score stage, meaning that quantities in a model for the outcome contribute information to posterior distributions of quantities in the model for the propensity score. We provide a rigorous assessment of Bayesian propensity score estimation to show that model feedback can produce poor estimates of causal effects absent strategies that augment propensity score adjustment with adjustment for individual covariates. We illustrate this phenomenon with a simulation study and with a comparative effectiveness investigation of carotid artery stenting versus carotid endarterectomy among 123,286 Medicare beneficiaries hospitlized for stroke in 2006 and 2007.

  10. Cloud Feedback in Atmospheric General Circulation Models: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, M. H.; Ingram, W. J.; Potter, G. L.; Alekseev, V.; Barker, H. W.; Cohen-Solal, E.; Colman, R. A.; Dazlich, D. A.; DelGenio, A. D.; Dix, M. R.; Dymnikov, V.; Esch, M.; Fowler, L. D.; Fraser, J. R.; Galin, V.; Gates, W. L.; Hack, J. J.; Kiehl, J. T.; LeTreut, H.

    1996-01-01

    Six years ago, we compared the climate sensitivity of 19 atmospheric general circulation models and found a roughly threefold variation among the models; most of this variation was attributed to differences in the models' depictions of cloud feedback. In an update of this comparison, current models showed considerably smaller differences in net cloud feedback, with most producing modest values. There are, however, substantial differences in the feedback components, indicating that the models still have physical disagreements.

  11. Evidence for Ultra-Fast Outflows in Radio-Quiet AGNs. 2; Detailed Photoionization Modeling of Fe K-Shell Absorption Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Clapp, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet AGNs. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000km/s and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blue shifted FeK absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. In the present paper we report a detailed curve of growth analysis and directly model the FeK absorbers with the Xstar photo-ionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35%. The outflow velocity distribution spans from \\sim10,000km/s (\\sim0.03c) up to \\siml00,000kmis (\\sim0.3c), with a peak and mean value of\\sim42,000km/s (\\sim0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log\\xi 3-6 erg s/cm, with a mean value of log\\xi 4.2 erg s/cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N_H\\siml0(exp 22)-10(exp 24)/sq cm, with a mean value of N_H\\siml0(exp23)/sq cm. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the expected cosmological feedback from AGNs and their study can provide important clues on the connection between accretion disks, winds and jets.

  12. Evolution model with a cumulative feedback coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimper, Steffen; Zabrocki, Knud; Schulz, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The paper is concerned with a toy model that generalizes the standard Lotka-Volterra equation for a certain population by introducing a competition between instantaneous and accumulative, history-dependent nonlinear feedback the origin of which could be a contribution from any kind of mismanagement in the past. The results depend on the sign of that additional cumulative loss or gain term of strength λ. In case of a positive coupling the system offers a maximum gain achieved after a finite time but the population will die out in the long time limit. In this case the instantaneous loss term of strength u is irrelevant and the model exhibits an exact solution. In the opposite case λ<0 the time evolution of the system is terminated in a crash after ts provided u=0. This singularity after a finite time can be avoided if u≠0. The approach may well be of relevance for the qualitative understanding of more realistic descriptions.

  13. Interferometric IR observations: a diversity of dusty AGN tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtscher, Leonard

    Interferometric observations in the infrared have resolved dusty structures on parsec and sub-parsec scales in more than two dozen AGNs by now -- a giant leap when considering that the first infrared interferometric observation of an extragalactic object is only about 10 years old. Since then, studies have confirmed the existence of dust in AGNs at its sublimation radius and have clearly dismissed models of very extended tori. Individual, well studied sources have been instrumental to reveal the complexity of these parsec-scale structures and statistical studies have shown a perplexing diversity in the population as a whole. Surprisingly, the diversity does not seem to follow the expected bimodality between optical type 1 and type 2 AGNs -- which are thought to be just face-on and edge-on tori. This central premise of viewing-angle dependent unified models is challenged if not dismissed by interferometric observations. The next step in understanding the AGN phenomenon -- beyond unification aspects -- is now to combine multi-scale observations with multi-scale simulations to constrain the physical processes driving the feeding and feedback of AGNs.

  14. The role of turbulence in cosmic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggen, Marcus

    Cool cores of galaxy clusters are thought to be heated by low-power active galactic nuclei (AGN), whose accretion is regulated by feedback. However, the interaction between the hot gas ejected by the AGN and the ambient intracluster medium is extremely difficult to simulate as it involves a wide range of spatial scales and gas that is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable. Here, we present a series of three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of a self-regulating AGN in a galaxy cluster. Our adaptive-mesh simulations include prescriptions for radiative cooling, AGN heating and a subgrid model for RT-driven turbulence, which is crucial to simulate this evolution. AGN heating is taken to be proportional to the rest-mass energy that is accreted on to the central region of the cluster. For a wide range of feedback efficiencies, the cluster regulates itself for at least several billion years. Heating balances cooling through a string of outbursts with typical recurrence times of around 80 Myr, a time-scale that depends only on global cluster properties. Under certain conditions, we find central dips in the metallicity of the intracluster medium. Provided the subgrid model used here captures all its key properties, turbulence plays an essential role in the AGN self-regulation in cluster cores.

  15. Modeling the Accretion and Feedback Processes of Galaxies Similar to the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Steven; Arielle Phillips, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Composed of sheets, walls, and filaments, the cosmic web connects clusters of galaxies together and is responsible for regulating galaxy evolution by the accreting mass into galaxies via filaments. In an effort to further understand the evolution of galaxies, we first study filaments and devise an interactive analytical model for disk galaxies with accurate inflow and outflow rates of matter. Using accretion rates and feedback rates from different regions in the Galaxy, it is now possible to model and predict galactic behavior for a galaxy with similar mass and morphology as the Milky Way. Other models simulate feedback or accretion processes numerically and in greater detail. Here we consolidate the rates to make one single model for the galaxy as a whole. In this model, we take the rates from other papers and use them to calculate the total mass flowed, energy used, distance travelled, and current location of the gas from the following parameters: change in time, redshift value, morphology of the galaxy, and type of active galactic nuclei (AGN) the galaxy has at its center. Although, we have just begun to make this detailed model, it will serve as the foundation for future work to be done to further understand galaxy evolution.

  16. Detecting Dual AGN at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The existence of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in most, if not all, galaxies, along with observations of galaxy mergers, suggests that pairs of SMBHs should exist for some time in the merger remnant. Observational evidence for these systems at kpc-scale separations (i.e. dual AGN) has dramatically increased recently through a combination of spectral and morphological selections. I discuss observations of CXOXBJ142607.6+353351 (CXOJ1426+35), a candidate dual AGN at z=1.175, and put its properties, including significant obscuration, within the context of other candidate/confirmed dual AGN at lower redshifts. Though dual AGN are expected to be more common at higher redshifts, they are more difficult to detect. Furthermore, adding to the difficulties of detection are a number of other physical mechanisms which can mimic the spectroscopic signature of two Type 2 AGN. In particular, I will discuss the possibility of strong outflows from an AGN. These outflow phenomena can be an important feedback mechanism in galaxies and are apparently common in AGN, making them a viable alternative to the dual AGN scenario. Based on our candidate's luminosity and emission line intensities, we find that an outflow is a possibility. If this is the case, such an outflow would be especially strong and has implications for AGN feedback in galaxies. However, the dual AGN scenario cannot be ruled out, and at z=1.175, the two putative AGN could potentially be resolved with Chandra. Other candidate dual AGN at similar redshifts and with significant obscuration could also be confirmed this way. This research was sponsored by the Strategic University Research Partnership Program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Arkansas NASA EPSCoR program.

  17. The Changing Looks of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMassa, S.

    2015-09-01

    According to the AGN unification model, the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 AGN is explained by the orientation of a circumnuclear obscuring torus to the observer's line of sight. Observations of seemingly anomalous sources challenge this theory. A handful of AGN have been discovered which have transitioned from Type 1, with strong, prominent broad-emission lines, to Type 1.8 or 1.9, with weak broad components to only H-alpha and/or H-beta, or vice versa. The rate of discovery of these objects has increased this past year thanks to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey BOSS and TDSS surveys which have repeated spectroscopic observations of AGN. While in some cases this transition can be explained by circumnuclear clouds eclipsing the broad line region, it seems clear that stochastic accretion is responsible for other changing-look AGN. In this talk, I will discuss the changing-look AGN discovered thus far and the implications these objects have for AGN unification and the intermittency of AGN activity.

  18. Feedback Model to Support Designers of Blended-Learning Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Hans G. K.

    2006-01-01

    Although extensive research has been carried out, describing the role of feedback in education, and many theoretical models are yet available, procedures and guidelines for actually designing and implementing feedback in practice have remained scarce so far. This explorative study presents a preliminary six-phase design model for feedback…

  19. Designing and Evaluating Tutoring Feedback Strategies for Digital Learning Environments on the Basis of the Interactive Tutoring Feedback Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narciss, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the interactive tutoring feedback model (ITF-model; Narciss, 2006; 2008), and how it can be applied to the design and evaluation of feedback strategies for digital learning environments. The ITF-model conceptualizes formative tutoring feedback as a multidimensional instructional activity that aims at contributing to the…

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGN torus models. SED library (Siebenmorgen+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebenmorgen, R.; Heymann, F.; Efstathiou, A.

    2015-08-01

    There are 3600 ASCII tables files in two columns format. The first is the wavelength in microns, the second column is the flux in Jy. SEDs are computed for AGNs at a distance of 50Mpc and a luminosity of 1011L⊙. The file names include the five basic model parameters: a) th: The viewing angle corresponding to bins at 86, 80, 73, 67, 60, 52, 43, 33, and 19 degree measured from the pole (z-axis). thx= th1 ,.., th9 b) R : The inner radius of the dusty torus. R= 300, 514, 772, 1000, 1545 in units: (10^15 cm) c) Vc: The cloud volume filling factor. Vc= 1.5, 7.7, 38.5, 77.7 (%). d) Ac: The optical depth (in V) of the individual clouds. Ac= 0, 4.5, 13.5, 45. e) Ad: The optical depth (in V) of the disk midplane. Ad= 0, 30, 100, 300, 1000. Example: File notation. RxxxxVcxxxAcxxxx_Adxxxx.thx R1545Vc777Ac0135_Ad1000.th9 (2 data files).

  1. The Effect of AGN Heating on the Low-redshift Lyα Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvich, Alex; Burkhart, Blakesley; Bird, Simeon

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the effects of AGN heating and the ultraviolet background on the low-redshift Lyα forest column density distribution (CDD) using the Illustris simulation. We show that Illustris reproduces observations at z = 0.1 in the column density range {10}12.5{--}{10}13.5 cm‑2, relevant for the “photon underproduction crisis.” We attribute this to the inclusion of AGN feedback, which changes the gas distribution so as to mimic the effect of extra photons, as well as the use of the Faucher-Giguère ultraviolet background, which is more ionizing at z = 0.1 than the Haardt & Madau background previously considered. We show that the difference between simulations run with smoothed particle hydrodynamics and simulations using a moving mesh is small in this column density range but can be more significant at larger column densities. We further consider the effect of supernova feedback, Voigt profile fitting, and finite resolution, all of which we show to have little influence on the CDD. Finally, we identify a discrepancy between our simulations and observations at column densities {10}14{--}{10}16 cm‑2, where Illustris produces too few absorbers, which suggests the AGN feedback model should be further refined. Since the “photon underproduction crisis” primarily affects lower column density systems, we conclude that AGN feedback and standard ionizing background models can resolve the crisis.

  2. Delayed-feedback control in a Lattice hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhu, Poonam; Gupta, Arvind Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The delayed-feedback control (DFC) method for lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model is investigated on a unidirectional road. By using the Hurwitz criteria and the condition for transfer function in term of H∞ -norm, we designed the feedback gain and delay time to stabilize the traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam. The Bode-plot of transfer function have been plotted and discussed that the stability region enhances with delayed-feedback control. It is shown that the delayed-feedback control method stabilizes the traffic flow and suppresses the traffic jam efficiently. The simulation results are in good agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  3. HIGHER EDUCATION--A POPULATION FLOW FEEDBACK MODEL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REISMAN, ARNOLD

    A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IS DEVELOPED TO STUDY THE PRODUCTION OF DOCTORAL, MASTER'S, AND BACHELOR'S DEGREES AND THEIR FEEDBACK INTO HIGHER EDUCATION. FEEDBACK IS DETERMINED BY A SET OF "BASIC BALANCE EQUATIONS" WHICH STATE THAT THE TOTAL RATE OF FLOW INTO A CATEGORY LESS THE RATE OF OUTFLOW IS EQUAL TO THE RATE OF ACCUMULATION OR GROWTH IN A GIVEN…

  4. Deep Chandra , HST-COS, and megacam observations of the Phoenix cluster: Extreme star formation and AGN feedback on hundred kiloparsec scales

    DOE PAGES

    McDonald, Michael; McNamara, Brian R.; Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo; ...

    2015-09-28

    In this study, we present new ultraviolet, optical, and X-ray data on the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). Deep optical imaging reveals previously undetected filaments of star formation, extending to radii of ~50–100 kpc in multiple directions. Combined UV-optical spectroscopy of the central galaxy reveals a massive (2 × 109 M⊙), young (~4.5 Myr) population of stars, consistent with a time-averaged star formation rate of 610 ± 50 M⊙ yr–1. We report a strong detection of O vi λλ1032,1038, which appears to originate primarily in shock-heated gas, but may contain a substantial contribution (>1000 M⊙ yr–1) from the cooling intracluster mediummore » (ICM). We confirm the presence of deep X-ray cavities in the inner ~10 kpc, which are among the most extreme examples of radio-mode feedback detected to date, implying jet powers of 2 – 7 × 1045 erg s–1. We provide evidence that the active galactic nucleus inflating these cavities may have only recently transitioned from "quasar-mode" to "radio-mode," and may currently be insufficient to completely offset cooling. A model-subtracted residual X-ray image reveals evidence for prior episodes of strong radio-mode feedback at radii of ~100 kpc, with extended "ghost" cavities indicating a prior epoch of feedback roughly 100 Myr ago. This residual image also exhibits significant asymmetry in the inner ~200 kpc (0.15R500), reminiscent of infalling cool clouds, either due to minor mergers or fragmentation of the cooling ICM. Taken together, these data reveal a rapidly evolving cool core which is rich with structure (both spatially and in temperature), is subject to a variety of highly energetic processes, and yet is cooling rapidly and forming stars along thin, narrow filaments.« less

  5. Deep Chandra, HST-COS, and Megacam Observations of the Phoenix Cluster: Extreme Star Formation and AGN Feedback on Hundred Kiloparsec Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael; McNamara, Brian R.; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Applegate, Douglas E.; Bayliss, Matthew; Bautz, Marshall W.; Benson, Bradford A.; Carlstrom, John E.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Edge, Alastair C.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; Jones-Forman, Christine; Mantz, Adam B.; Miller, Eric D.; Stalder, Brian; Veilleux, Sylvain; ZuHone, John A.

    2015-10-01

    We present new ultraviolet, optical, and X-ray data on the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). Deep optical imaging reveals previously undetected filaments of star formation, extending to radii of ˜50-100 kpc in multiple directions. Combined UV-optical spectroscopy of the central galaxy reveals a massive (2 × 109 M⊙), young (˜4.5 Myr) population of stars, consistent with a time-averaged star formation rate of 610 ± 50 M⊙ yr-1. We report a strong detection of O vi λλ1032,1038, which appears to originate primarily in shock-heated gas, but may contain a substantial contribution (>1000 M⊙ yr-1) from the cooling intracluster medium (ICM). We confirm the presence of deep X-ray cavities in the inner ˜10 kpc, which are among the most extreme examples of radio-mode feedback detected to date, implying jet powers of 2-7 × 1045 erg s-1. We provide evidence that the active galactic nucleus inflating these cavities may have only recently transitioned from “quasar-mode” to “radio-mode,” and may currently be insufficient to completely offset cooling. A model-subtracted residual X-ray image reveals evidence for prior episodes of strong radio-mode feedback at radii of ˜100 kpc, with extended “ghost” cavities indicating a prior epoch of feedback roughly 100 Myr ago. This residual image also exhibits significant asymmetry in the inner ˜200 kpc (0.15R500), reminiscent of infalling cool clouds, either due to minor mergers or fragmentation of the cooling ICM. Taken together, these data reveal a rapidly evolving cool core which is rich with structure (both spatially and in temperature), is subject to a variety of highly energetic processes, and yet is cooling rapidly and forming stars along thin, narrow filaments.

  6. THE SPATIAL CLUSTERING OF ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY AGNs. II. HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION MODELING OF THE CROSS-CORRELATION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Aceves, Hector; Krumpe, Mirko; Coil, Alison L.

    2011-01-10

    This is the second paper of a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. In this paper, we apply the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model to the CCFs between the RASS broad-line AGNs with SDSS luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.16 < z < 0.36 that was calculated in Paper I. In our HOD modeling approach, we use the known HOD of LRGs and constrain the HOD of the AGNs by a model fit to the CCF. For the first time, we are able to go beyond quoting merely a 'typical' AGN host halo mass, M{sub h}, and model the full distribution function of AGN host dark matter halos. In addition, we are able to determine the large-scale bias and the mean M{sub h} more accurately. We explore the behavior of three simple HOD models. Our first model (Model A) is a truncated power-law HOD model in which all AGNs are satellites. With this model, we find an upper limit to the slope ({alpha}) of the AGN HOD that is far below unity. The other two models have a central component, which has a step function form, where the HOD is constant above a minimum mass, without (Model B) or with (Model C) an upper mass cutoff, in addition to the truncated power-law satellite component, similar to the HOD that is found for galaxies. In these two models we find that the upper limits on {alpha} are still below unity, with {alpha} {approx}< 0.95 and {alpha} {approx}< 0.84 for Models B and C, respectively. Our analysis suggests that the satellite AGN occupation increases slower than, or may even decrease with, M{sub h}, in contrast to the satellite HODs of luminosity-threshold samples of galaxies, which, in contrast, grow approximately as (N{sub s}) {proportional_to} M{sup {alpha}}{sub h} with {alpha} {approx} 1. These results are consistent with observations that the AGN fraction in groups and clusters

  7. The dusty heart of nearby active galaxies. II. From clumpy torus models to physical properties of dust around AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönig, S. F.; Kishimoto, M.

    2010-11-01

    With the possibilities of high spatial resolution imaging and spectroscopy as well as infrared (IR) interferometry, the dusty environments (= “dusty torus”) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are now in reach of observations. Following our Paper I on ground-based mid-IR spectro-photometry, we present an upgrade to our radiative transfer model of three-dimensional clumpy dust tori. The upgrade with respect to earlier work concerns an improved handling of the diffuse radiation field in the torus, which is approximated by a statistical approach. The models are presented as tools to translate classical and interferometric observations into characteristic properties of the dust distribution. We compare model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for different chemical and grain-size compositions of the dust and find that clouds with standard interstellar matter (ISM) dust and optical depth τV ~ 50 appear in overall agreement with observed IR SEDs. By studying parameter dependencies, it is shown that type 1 AGN SEDs, in particular the mid-IR spectral index, can be used to constrain the radial dust cloud distribution power law index a, while other parameters are more difficult to assess using SEDs only. Interferometry adds important additional information for modeling when it is interpreted concurrently with the SED. Although type 2 AGN can in principle be used to constrain model parameters as well, obscuration effects make the analysis more ambiguous. We propose a simple, interferometry-based method to distinguish between “compact” and “extended” radial dust distributions without detailed modeling of the data and introduce a way to easily determine individual or sample average model parameters using the observed optical depth in the silicate feature and the mid-IR spectral index.

  8. Cybernetics: A Model for Feedback in the ESL Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamel, Vivian

    1981-01-01

    Examines cybernetics as a model which provides framework with which to view communicators and the communications in the ESL classroom because it implies the kind of feedback the learner can assimilate and act upon. (Author/BK)

  9. Feedbacks, climate sensitivity, and the limits of linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugenstein, M.; Knutti, R.

    2015-12-01

    The term "feedback" is used ubiquitously in climate research, but implies varied meanings in different contexts. From a specific process that locally affects a quantity, to a formal framework that attempts to determine a global response to a forcing, researchers use this term to separate, simplify, and quantify parts of the complex Earth system. We combine large (>120 member) ensemble GCM and EMIC step forcing simulations over a broad range of forcing levels with a historical and educational perspective to organize existing ideas around feedbacks and linear forcing-feedback models. With a new method overcoming internal variability and initial condition problems we quantify the non-constancy of the climate feedback parameter. Our results suggest a strong state- and forcing-dependency of feedbacks, which is not considered appropriately in many studies. A non-constant feedback factor likely explains some of the differences in estimates of equilibrium climate sensitivity from different methods and types of data. We discuss implications for the definition of the forcing term and its various adjustments. Clarifying the value and applicability of the linear forcing feedback framework and a better quantification of feedbacks on various timescales and spatial scales remains a high priority in order to better understand past and predict future changes in the climate system.

  10. Feedback network models for quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, John

    2014-12-01

    Quantum feedback networks have been introduced in quantum optics as a framework for constructing arbitrary networks of quantum mechanical systems connected by unidirectional quantum optical fields, and has allowed for a system theoretic approach to open quantum optics systems. Our aim here is to establish a network theory for quantum transport systems where typically the mediating fields between systems are bidirectional. Mathematically, this leads us to study quantum feedback networks where fields arrive at ports in input-output pairs, making it a special case of the unidirectional theory where inputs and outputs are paired. However, it is conceptually important to develop this theory in the context of quantum transport theory—the resulting theory extends traditional approaches which tend to view the components in quantum transport as scatterers for the various fields, in the process allowing us to consider emission and absorption of field quanta by these components. The quantum feedback network theory is applicable to both Bose and Fermi fields, moreover, it applies to nonlinear dynamics for the component systems. We advance the general theory, but study the case of linear passive quantum components in some detail.

  11. Feedback network models for quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Gough, John

    2014-12-01

    Quantum feedback networks have been introduced in quantum optics as a framework for constructing arbitrary networks of quantum mechanical systems connected by unidirectional quantum optical fields, and has allowed for a system theoretic approach to open quantum optics systems. Our aim here is to establish a network theory for quantum transport systems where typically the mediating fields between systems are bidirectional. Mathematically, this leads us to study quantum feedback networks where fields arrive at ports in input-output pairs, making it a special case of the unidirectional theory where inputs and outputs are paired. However, it is conceptually important to develop this theory in the context of quantum transport theory-the resulting theory extends traditional approaches which tend to view the components in quantum transport as scatterers for the various fields, in the process allowing us to consider emission and absorption of field quanta by these components. The quantum feedback network theory is applicable to both Bose and Fermi fields, moreover, it applies to nonlinear dynamics for the component systems. We advance the general theory, but study the case of linear passive quantum components in some detail.

  12. Deep Chandra , HST-COS, and megacam observations of the Phoenix cluster: Extreme star formation and AGN feedback on hundred kiloparsec scales

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; McNamara, Brian R.; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Applegate, Douglas E.; Bayliss, Matthew; Bautz, Marshall W.; Benson, Bradford A.; Carlstrom, John E.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Edge, Alastair C.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; Jones-Forman, Christine; Mantz, Adam B.; Miller, Eric D.; Stalder, Brian; Veilleux, Sylvain; ZuHone, John A.

    2015-09-28

    In this study, we present new ultraviolet, optical, and X-ray data on the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). Deep optical imaging reveals previously undetected filaments of star formation, extending to radii of ~50–100 kpc in multiple directions. Combined UV-optical spectroscopy of the central galaxy reveals a massive (2 × 109 M), young (~4.5 Myr) population of stars, consistent with a time-averaged star formation rate of 610 ± 50 M yr–1. We report a strong detection of O vi λλ1032,1038, which appears to originate primarily in shock-heated gas, but may contain a substantial contribution (>1000 M yr–1) from the cooling intracluster medium (ICM). We confirm the presence of deep X-ray cavities in the inner ~10 kpc, which are among the most extreme examples of radio-mode feedback detected to date, implying jet powers of 2 – 7 × 1045 erg s–1. We provide evidence that the active galactic nucleus inflating these cavities may have only recently transitioned from "quasar-mode" to "radio-mode," and may currently be insufficient to completely offset cooling. A model-subtracted residual X-ray image reveals evidence for prior episodes of strong radio-mode feedback at radii of ~100 kpc, with extended "ghost" cavities indicating a prior epoch of feedback roughly 100 Myr ago. This residual image also exhibits significant asymmetry in the inner ~200 kpc (0.15R500), reminiscent of infalling cool clouds, either due to minor mergers or fragmentation of the cooling ICM. Taken together, these data reveal a rapidly evolving cool core which is rich with structure (both spatially and in temperature), is subject to a variety of highly energetic processes, and yet is cooling rapidly and forming stars along thin, narrow filaments.

  13. DEEP CHANDRA, HST-COS, AND MEGACAM OBSERVATIONS OF THE PHOENIX CLUSTER: EXTREME STAR FORMATION AND AGN FEEDBACK ON HUNDRED KILOPARSEC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Marshall W.; Miller, Eric D.; ZuHone, John A.; McNamara, Brian R.; Weeren, Reinout J. van; Bayliss, Matthew; Jones-Forman, Christine; Applegate, Douglas E.; Benson, Bradford A.; Carlstrom, John E.; Mantz, Adam B.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Edge, Alastair C.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; Stalder, Brian; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2015-10-01

    We present new ultraviolet, optical, and X-ray data on the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). Deep optical imaging reveals previously undetected filaments of star formation, extending to radii of ∼50–100 kpc in multiple directions. Combined UV-optical spectroscopy of the central galaxy reveals a massive (2 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}), young (∼4.5 Myr) population of stars, consistent with a time-averaged star formation rate of 610 ± 50 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. We report a strong detection of O vi λλ1032,1038, which appears to originate primarily in shock-heated gas, but may contain a substantial contribution (>1000 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) from the cooling intracluster medium (ICM). We confirm the presence of deep X-ray cavities in the inner ∼10 kpc, which are among the most extreme examples of radio-mode feedback detected to date, implying jet powers of 2–7 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup −1}. We provide evidence that the active galactic nucleus inflating these cavities may have only recently transitioned from “quasar-mode” to “radio-mode,” and may currently be insufficient to completely offset cooling. A model-subtracted residual X-ray image reveals evidence for prior episodes of strong radio-mode feedback at radii of ∼100 kpc, with extended “ghost” cavities indicating a prior epoch of feedback roughly 100 Myr ago. This residual image also exhibits significant asymmetry in the inner ∼200 kpc (0.15R{sub 500}), reminiscent of infalling cool clouds, either due to minor mergers or fragmentation of the cooling ICM. Taken together, these data reveal a rapidly evolving cool core which is rich with structure (both spatially and in temperature), is subject to a variety of highly energetic processes, and yet is cooling rapidly and forming stars along thin, narrow filaments.

  14. Accretion Timescales from Kepler AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-01-01

    We constrain AGN accretion disk variability mechanisms using the optical light curves of AGN observed by Kepler. AGN optical fluxes are known to exhibit stochastic variations on timescales of hours, days, months and years. The excellent sampling properties of the original Kepler mission - high S/N ratio (105), short sampling interval (30 minutes), and long sampling duration (~ 3.5 years) - allow for a detailed examination of the differences between the variability processes present in various sub-types of AGN such as Type I and II Seyferts, QSOs, and Blazars. We model the flux data using the Auto-Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) representation from the field of time series analysis. We use the Kalman filter to determine optimal mode parameters and use the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) to select the optimal model. We find that optical light curves from Kepler AGN cannot be fit by low order statistical models such as the popular AR(1) process or damped random walk. Kepler light curves exhibit complicated power spectra and are better modeled by higher order ARMA processes. We find that Kepler AGN typically exhibit power spectra that change from a bending power law (PSD ~ 1/fa) to a flat power spectrum on timescales in the range of ~ 5 - 100 days consistent with the orbital and thermal timescales of a typical 107 solar mass black hole.

  15. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  16. Ultra-fast outflows (aka UFOs) from AGNs and QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappi, M.; Tombesi, F.; Giustini, M.

    During the last decade, strong observational evidence has been accumulated for the existence of massive, high velocity winds/outflows (aka Ultra Fast Outflows, UFOs) in nearby AGNs and in more distant quasars. Here we briefly review some of the most recent developments in this field and discuss the relevance of UFOs for both understanding the physics of accretion disk winds in AGNs, and for quantifying the global amount of AGN feedback on the surrounding medium.

  17. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  18. Accretion Rate: An Axis Of Agn Unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, C. D.; Kelly, B. C.

    2011-01-01

    We show how accretion rate governs the physical properties of broad-line, narrow-line, and lineless active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We avoid the systematic errors plaguing previous studies of AGN accretion rate by using accurate accretion luminosities from well-sampled multiwavelength SEDs from the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), and accurate black hole masses derived from virial scaling relations (for broad-line AGNs) or host-AGN relations (for narrow-line and lineless AGNs). In general, broad emission lines are present only at the highest accretion rates (L/L_Edd>0.01), and these rapidly accreting AGNs are observed as broad-line AGNs or possibly as obscured narrow-line AGNs. Narrow-line and lineless AGNs at lower specific accretion rates (L/L_Edd<0.01) are unobscured and yet lack a broad line region. The disappearance of the broad emission lines is caused by an expanding radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) at the inner radius of the accretion disk. The presence of the RIAF also drives L/L_Edd<0.01 narrow-line and lineless AGNs to be 10-100 times more radio-luminous than broad-line AGNs, since the unbound nature of the RIAF means it is easier to form a radio outflow. The IR torus signature also tends to become weaker or disappear from L/L_Edd<0.01 AGNs, although there may be additional mid-IR synchrotron emission associated with the RIAF. Together these results suggest that specific accretion rate is an important physical "axis" of AGN unification, described by a simple model.

  19. System and method of designing models in a feedback loop

    DOEpatents

    Gosink, Luke C.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Sego, Landon H.

    2017-02-14

    A method and system for designing models is disclosed. The method includes selecting a plurality of models for modeling a common event of interest. The method further includes aggregating the results of the models and analyzing each model compared to the aggregate result to obtain comparative information. The method also includes providing the information back to the plurality of models to design more accurate models through a feedback loop.

  20. Microscale Heat Conduction Models and Doppler Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2015-01-22

    The objective of this project is to establish an approach for providing the fundamental input that is needed to estimate the magnitude and time-dependence of the Doppler feedback mechanism in Very High Temperature reactors. This mechanism is the foremost contributor to the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature reactors that use fuel based on Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) coated particles. Therefore, its correct prediction is essential to the conduct of safety analyses for these reactors. Since the effect is directly dependent on the actual temperature reached by the fuel during transients, the underlying phenomena of heat deposition, heat transfer and temperature rise must be correctly predicted. To achieve the above objective, this project will explore an approach that accounts for lattice effects as well as local temperature variations and the correct definition of temperature and related local effects.

  1. Probing AGN Accretion Physics through AGN Variability: Insights from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal Pramod

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) exhibit large luminosity variations over the entire electromagnetic spectrum on timescales ranging from hours to years. The variations in luminosity are devoid of any periodic character and appear stochastic. While complex correlations exist between the variability observed in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, no frequency band appears to be completely dominant, suggesting that the physical processes producing the variability are exceedingly rich and complex. In the absence of a clear theoretical explanation of the variability, phenomenological models are used to study AGN variability. The stochastic behavior of AGN variability makes formulating such models difficult and connecting them to the underlying physics exceedingly hard. We study AGN light curves serendipitously observed by the NASA Kepler planet-finding mission. Compared to previous ground-based observations, Kepler offers higher precision and a smaller sampling interval resulting in potentially higher quality light curves. Using structure functions, we demonstrate that (1) the simplest statistical model of AGN variability, the damped random walk (DRW), is insufficient to characterize the observed behavior of AGN light curves; and (2) variability begins to occur in AGN on time-scales as short as hours. Of the 20 light curves studied by us, only 3-8 may be consistent with the DRW. The structure functions of the AGN in our sample exhibit complex behavior with pronounced dips on time-scales of 10-100 d suggesting that AGN variability can be very complex and merits further analysis. We examine the accuracy of the Kepler pipeline-generated light curves and find that the publicly available light curves may require re-processing to reduce contamination from field sources. We show that while the re-processing changes the exact PSD power law slopes inferred by us, it is unlikely to change the conclusion of our structure function study-Kepler AGN light curves indicate

  2. Climatic Feedbacks and Desertification: The Mediterranean Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, M. M.; Estrela, M. J.; Sanz, M. J.; Mantilla, E.; Martín, M.; Pastor, F.; Salvador, R.; Vallejo, R.; Alonso, L.; Gangoiti, G.; Ilardia, J. L.; Navazo, M.; Albizuri, A.; Artíñano, B.; Ciccioli, P.; Kallos, G.; Carvalho, R. A.; Andrés, D.; Hoff, A.; Werhahn, J.; Seufert, G.; Versino, B.

    2005-03-01

    Mesometeorological information obtained in several research projects in southern Europe has been used to analyze perceived changes in the western Mediterranean summer storm regime. A procedure was developed to disaggregate daily precipitation data into three main components: frontal precipitation, summer storms, and Mediterranean cyclogenesis. Working hypotheses were derived on the likely processes involved. The results indicate that the precipitation regime in this Mediterranean region is very sensitive to variations in surface airmass temperature and moisture. Land-use perturbations that accumulated over historical time and greatly accelerated in the last 30 yr may have induced changes from an open, monsoon-type regime with frequent summer storms over the mountains inland to one dominated by closed vertical recirculations where feedback mechanisms favor the loss of storms over the coastal mountains and additional heating of the sea surface temperature during summer. This, in turn, favors Mediterranean cyclogenesis and torrential rains in autumn-winter. Because these intense rains and floods can occur anywhere in the basin, perturbations to the hydrological cycle in any part of the basin can propagate to the whole basin and adjacent regions. Furthermore, present levels of air pollutants can produce greenhouse heating, amplifying the perturbations and pushing the system over critical threshold levels. The questions raised are relevant for the new European Union (EU) water policies in southern Europe and for other regions dominated by monsoon-type weather systems.

  3. A biopsychosocial model based on negative feedback and control

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Timothy A.; Mansell, Warren; Tai, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the biopsychosocial model has been a popular topic of discussion for over four decades it has not had the traction in fields of research that might be expected of such an intuitively appealing idea. One reason for this might be the absence of an identified mechanism or a functional architecture that is authentically biopsychosocial. What is needed is a robust mechanism that is equally important to biochemical processes as it is to psychological and social processes. Negative feedback may be the mechanism that is required. Negative feedback has been implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitters as well as important psychological and social processes such as emotional regulation and the relationship between a psychotherapist and a client. Moreover, negative feedback is purported to also govern the activity of all other organisms as well as humans. Perceptual Control Theory (PCT) describes the way in which negative feedback establishes control at increasing levels of perceptual complexity. Thus, PCT may be the first biopsychosocial model to be articulated in functional terms. In this paper we outline the working model of PCT and explain how PCT provides an embodied hierarchical neural architecture that utilizes negative feedback to control physiological, psychological, and social variables. PCT has major implications for both research and practice and, importantly, provides a guide by which fields of research that are currently separated may be integrated to bring about substantial progress in understanding the way in which the brain alters, and is altered by, its behavioral and environmental context. PMID:24616685

  4. An integrative model linking feedback environment and organizational citizenship behavior.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jei-Chen; Chiu, Su-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Past empirical evidence has suggested that a positive supervisor feedback environment may enhance employees' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). In this study, we aim to extend previous research by proposing and testing an integrative model that examines the mediating processes underlying the relationship between supervisor feedback environment and employee OCB. Data were collected from 259 subordinate-supervisor dyads across a variety of organizations in Taiwan. We used structural equation modeling to test our hypotheses. The results demonstrated that supervisor feedback environment influenced employees' OCB indirectly through (1) both positive affective-cognition and positive attitude (i.e., person-organization fit and organizational commitment), and (2) both negative affective-cognition and negative attitude (i.e., role stressors and job burnout). Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  5. Properties and evolution of radio-AGN hosts since z~4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvecchio, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the multi-wavelength properties of about 6200 radio (3-GHz) selected sources in the COSMOS field to investigate the impact of AGN activity on the integrated properties of their hosts. Two main classes of AGN are identified: radiatively-efficient AGN, by combining X-ray, mid-IR diagnostics and SED decomposition, and radiatively-inefficient AGN, that show up only in radio. Interestingly, we find significantly distinct galaxy properties for the two AGN classes, as a function of redshift. At z<2, radiatively-inefficient AGN are typically found in more massive and less star-forming galaxies than radiatively-efficient AGN, while at higher redshift we observe a possible reversal of their stellar mass distributions. We interpret these trends in the context of the anti-hierarchical growth of AGN host galaxies, with a particular focus on the role of AGN feedback over cosmic time in radio-selected samples.

  6. Properties And Evolution Of Radio-AGN Hosts Since z ~ 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvecchio, Ivan; Smolčić, V.; Zamorani, G.; Del P. Lagos, C.; Berta, S.; Delhaize, J.; Baran, N.; Alexander, D.; Rosario, D.; et al.

    2016-10-01

    We analyse the multi-wavelength properties of about 7500 radio (3-GHz) selected sources in the COSMOS field to investigate the impact of AGN activity on the integrated properties of their hosts. Two main classes of AGN are identified: radiatively- efficient AGN, by combining X-ray, mid-IR diagnostics and SED decomposition, and radiatively-inefficient AGN, that show up only in radio. Interestingly, we find significantly distinct galaxy properties for the two AGN classes, as a function of redshift. At z<1.5, radiatively-inefficient AGN are typically found in more massive and less star-forming galaxies than radiatively-efficient AGN, while at higher redshift we observe a possible reversal of their stellar mass distributions. We interpret these trends in the context of the anti-hierarchical growth of AGN host galaxies, with a particular focus on the role of AGN feedback over cosmic time in radio-selected samples.

  7. Implementing Relevance Feedback in the Bayesian Network Retrieval Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Campos, Luis M.; Fernandez-Luna, Juan M.; Huete, Juan F.

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of relevance feedback in information retrieval focuses on a proposal for the Bayesian Network Retrieval Model. Bases the proposal on the propagation of partial evidences in the Bayesian network, representing new information obtained from the user's relevance judgments to compute the posterior relevance probabilities of the documents…

  8. An Emerging Model for Student Feedback: Electronic Distributed Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunk-Chavez, Beth; Arrigucci, Annette

    2012-01-01

    In this article we address several issues and challenges that the evaluation of writing presents individual instructors and composition programs as a whole. We present electronic distributed evaluation, or EDE, as an emerging model for feedback on student writing and describe how it was integrated into our program's course redesign. Because the…

  9. Effects of Active galactic nuclei feedback in galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, C.; Cora, S.; Padilla, N.

    We analyze the effects of feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) on the formation and evolution of galaxies, which is assumed to quench cooling flows in massive halos. With this aim we use an hybrid model that combines a cosmological Lambda CDM simulation with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. We consider the semi-analytic model described by Cora (2006) (SAMC06) which has been improved by including AGNs, which are associated with the presence of supermassive black holes (BHs). Modellization of BH includes gas accretion during merger-driven starbursts and black hole mergers (Malbon et al., 2006), accretion during starbursts triggered by disk instabilities (Bower et al. 2006), and accretion of cooling gas from quasi-hydrostatically cooling haloes (Croton et al. 2006); Eddington limit is applied in all accretion processes. It is assumed that feedback from AGNs operates in the later case. We show that this new model can simultaneously explain: (i) the bright-end of the galaxy luminosity function (LF); (ii) the observed older population of stars in massive galaxies, thus reproducing the stellar mass function (SMF); (iii) a star formation rate (SFR) seemingly showing an anti-hierarchical galaxy growth. The success of our model is mainly due to the ability of AGN feedback to suppress further cooling and SF in the most massive structures.

  10. A Connectionist Model of Instructional Feedback Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    Connectionist models apply various mathematical rules within neural network computer simulations in an effort, among other things, to mimic and describe human memory associations and learning. Learning involves the interaction of information provided by instruction with existing information already in the learner's memory (Ausubel, 1968; Bruner,…

  11. AGN flickering on 10-100 kyr timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Lia F.; Schawinski, Kevin; Kill, Bill; Maksym, Peter; Koss, Michael; Argo, Megan; Urry, Meg; Wong, Ivy; Lintott, Chris

    2016-08-01

    The study of AGN variability on timescales of 10^4-10^5 years is important in order to understand the BH - host galaxy interaction and coevolution. The discovery of "Hanny's Voorwerp" (HV), an extended emission line region associated with the nearby galaxy IC 2497, provided us with a laboratory to study AGN variability over such timescales. HV was illuminated by a strong quasar in IC 2497, but this quasar significantly shut down in the last 200 kyrs. Thanks to its recent shutdown we can now explore the host galaxy unimpeded by the presence of a quasar dominating the observations, while the Voorwerp preserves the echoes of its past activity. Recent studies on the optical properties of hard X-ray selected AGN suggest that AGN may flicker on and off hundreds or thousands times with each burst lasting ~10^5 yrs. Systems similar to IC 2497 and HV, the so-called Voorwerpjes, allow us to constrain the last stages of the AGN lifecycle. On the other hand, we recently suggested that the switch on phase may be observed in the so-called optically elusive AGN. In this talk I will review both observational evidence and results from simulation work which support this picture, and explain how optically elusive AGN and Voorwerpjes galaxies can help us to understand different phases of the AGN lifecycle. Moreover, I will discuss possible implications for AGN feedback, BH - host galaxy coevolution, and the analogy between AGN and X-ray binaries accretion physics.

  12. Correlating The Star Formation Histories Of MaNGA Galaxies With Their Past AGN Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Ortiz, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    We investigate active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a primary mechanism affecting star formation in MaNGA galaxies. Using the Pipe3D code, we modeled the stellar population from MaNGA spectra and derived the star formation histories of 53 AGN host galaxies. We seek to compare the star formation histories of the host galaxies of AGN with the ages of their radio lobes to better understand the role of AGN feedback in the star formation histories of MaNGA galaxies. MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO) is one of the three core programs in the fourth generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey(SDSS). MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematics of nearly 10,000 local galaxies through dithered observations using fiber integral field units (IFUs) that vary in diameter from 12" (19 fibers) to 32" (127 fibers). In this poster, we present initial results on the star formation histories of MaNGA AGN host galaxies. This work was supported by the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, which is funded by a grant from Sloan Foundation to the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  13. Modeling terrestrial gamma ray flashes produced by relativistic feedback discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ningyu; Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports a modeling study of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) produced by relativistic feedback discharges. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes are intense energetic radiation originating from the Earth's atmosphere that has been observed by spacecraft. They are produced by bremsstrahlung interactions of energetic electrons, known as runaway electrons, with air atoms. An efficient physical mechanism for producing large fluxes of the runaway electrons to make the TGFs is the relativistic feedback discharge, where seed runaway electrons are generated by positrons and X-rays, products of the discharge itself. Once the relativistic feedback discharge becomes self-sustaining, an exponentially increasing number of relativistic electron avalanches propagate through the same high-field region inside the thundercloud until the electric field is partially discharged by the ionization created by the discharge. The modeling results indicate that the durations of the TGF pulses produced by the relativistic feedback discharge vary from tens of microseconds to several milliseconds, encompassing all durations of the TGFs observed so far. In addition, when a sufficiently large potential difference is available in thunderclouds, a self-propagating discharge known as the relativistic feedback streamer can be formed, which propagates like a conventional positive streamer. For the relativistic feedback streamer, the positive feedback mechanism of runaway electron production by the positrons and X-rays plays a similar role as the photoionization for the conventional positive streamer. The simulation results of the relativistic feedback streamer show that a sequence of TGF pulses with varying durations can be produced by the streamer. The relativistic streamer may initially propagate with a pulsed manner and turn into a continuous propagation mode at a later stage. Milliseconds long TGF pulses can be produced by the feedback streamer during its continuous propagation. However

  14. Model-based feedback control of a microfluidic electroporation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadami, M.; Mahjoob, M. J.; Shagoshtasbi, H.; Lee, Y.-K.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes new model-based feedback control method used for a single-cell microfluidic electroporation (EP) system. For this purpose, a new four-state nonlinear model has been developed to describe dynamics of a micro-channel electroporation system. EP measured current response is then used to verify the efficiency of the proposed new EP model. Consequently, two feedback control methods, namely, proportional-integral-derivative controller and model predictive controller have been applied to regulate the key states (i.e. transmembrane voltage (Vm) and nano-electropore radius (r)) in the EP model. Numerical simulations of static and dynamic responses of the two critical states, Vm and r, show that feedback control can improve the cell viability and EP efficiency compared to the open-loop system. In the experimental phase, a fabricated micro-EP chip with integrated Coulter counter is used to define the cell-size-dependent parameters of the EP model and electroporation of HeLa cells. In this phase, the EP model is also inserted into LabView software's environment to estimate the value of transmembrane voltage during the experiment. Variation of the external applied voltage derived from experimental result was in good adaptation with its equivalent theoretical values.

  15. Star Formation and AGN activity of X-ray selected AGN host galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyewon

    2017-01-01

    One of the ongoing issues for understanding the galaxy formation and evolution is how active galactic nuclei (AGNs) affect the growth of their host galaxies. We investigate the correlations between AGN activity and star formation properties of a large sample of ~3700 X-ray selected AGNs over a wide range of luminosities (42 < log Lx < 45) up to z~5 in the Chandra-COSMOS Legacy Survey. We perform a multi-component modeling from the far-infrared, when available, to the near-UV using AGN emission from the big-blue-bump (for Type 1 AGNs), a nuclear dust torus model, a galaxy model and a starburst component for the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Through detailed analysis of SEDs, we derive AGN host galaxy properties, such as stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and AGN luminosities. We find that AGN host galaxies have, on average, similar SFRs compared to the normal star-forming main sequence galaxies, suggesting no significant enhancement or quenching of star formation. The average SFR of AGN host galaxies shows a flat distribution in bins of AGN luminosity, consistent with recent ideas that the shorter variability timescale of AGN compared to star formation can lead to a flat relationship between the SFR and black hole accretion rates. Our results suggest that both star formation and nuclear activity in the majority of AGN host galaxies might be driven more by internal secular processes at z<3, implying that they have substantially grown at much earlier epoch.

  16. A model for reverberating circuits with controlled feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa de Freitas; de Castro, Maria Clícia Stelling; Wedemann, Roseli Suzi; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2015-12-01

    We studied the behavior of a mathematic-computational model for a reverberating neuronal circuit with controlled feedback, verifying the output pattern of the circuit, by means simulations using a program in language C++. Using values obtained from surveying the literature from animal experiments, we observed that the model was able to reproduce the polissynaptic activity of a neuron group of a vigil rat, with looping time of three neurons of the order of magnitude of 102 ms.

  17. The relativistic feedback discharge model of terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2012-02-01

    As thunderclouds charge, the large-scale fields may approach the relativistic feedback threshold, above which the production of relativistic runaway electron avalanches becomes self-sustaining through the generation of backward propagating runaway positrons and backscattered X-rays. Positive intracloud (IC) lightning may force the large-scale electric fields inside thunderclouds above the relativistic feedback threshold, causing the number of runaway electrons, and the resulting X-ray and gamma ray emission, to grow exponentially, producing very large fluxes of energetic radiation. As the flux of runaway electrons increases, ionization eventually causes the electric field to discharge, bringing the field below the relativistic feedback threshold again and reducing the flux of runaway electrons. These processes are investigated with a new model that includes the production, propagation, diffusion, and avalanche multiplication of runaway electrons; the production and propagation of X-rays and gamma rays; and the production, propagation, and annihilation of runaway positrons. In this model, referred to as the relativistic feedback discharge model, the large-scale electric fields are calculated self-consistently from the charge motion of the drifting low-energy electrons and ions, produced from the ionization of air by the runaway electrons, including two- and three-body attachment and recombination. Simulation results show that when relativistic feedback is considered, bright gamma ray flashes are a natural consequence of upward +IC lightning propagating in large-scale thundercloud fields. Furthermore, these flashes have the same time structures, including both single and multiple pulses, intensities, angular distributions, current moments, and energy spectra as terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and produce large current moments that should be observable in radio waves.

  18. Multi-faceted AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Glennys R.; Chen, Yanping; Dai, Yuxiao; Zaw, Ingyin

    2016-08-01

    An interesting question is how frequently an object is an AGN by multiple different criteria — e.g., is simultaneously a narrow-line optical AGN and an X-ray or radio AGN, possibly as a function of luminosities in the various wavebands and perhaps host galaxy type. Answering such questions quantitatively has been difficult up to now because of the lack of a complete, uniformly selected optical AGN catalog. Here we report first results of such an analysis, using the new, all-sky catalog of uniformly selected optical AGNs from Zaw, Chen and Farrar (2016), the Swift-BAT 70-month catalog of X-ray AGN (Baumgartner et al., 2013), and the van Velzen et al. (2012) catalog of radio AGN.

  19. An energy balance climate model with cloud feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roads, J. O.; Vallis, G. K.

    1984-01-01

    The present two-level global climate model, which is based on the atmosphere-surface energy balance, includes physically based parameterizations for the exchange of heat and moisture across latitude belts and between the surface and the atmosphere, precipitation and cloud formation, and solar and IR radiation. The model field predictions obtained encompass surface and atmospheric temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, and cloudiness. In the model integrations presented, it is noted that cloudiness is generally constant with changing temperature at low latitudes. High altitude cloudiness increases with temperature, although the cloud feedback effect on the radiation field remains small because of compensating effects on thermal and solar radiation. The net global feedback by the cloud field is negative, but small.

  20. Hiding in plain sight - recovering clusters of galaxies with the strongest AGN in their cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Draper, P. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2017-03-01

    A key challenge in understanding the feedback mechanism of active galactic nucleus (AGN) in Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) is the inherent rarity of catching an AGN during its strong outburst phase. This is exacerbated by the ambiguity of differentiating between AGN and clusters in X-ray observations. If there is evidence for an AGN then the X-ray emission is commonly assumed to be dominated by the AGN emission, introducing a selection effect against the detection of AGN in BCGs. In order to recover these 'missing' clusters, we systematically investigate the colour-magnitude relation around some ∼3500 ROSAT All-Sky Survey selected AGN, looking for signs of a cluster red sequence. Amongst our 22 candidate systems, we independently rediscover several confirmed systems, where a strong AGN resides in a central galaxy. We compare the X-ray luminosity to red sequence richness distribution of our AGN candidate systems with that of a similarly selected comparison sample of ∼1000 confirmed clusters and identify seven 'best' candidates (all of which are BL Lac objects), where the X-ray flux is likely to be a comparable mix between cluster and AGN emission. We confirm that the colours of the red sequence are consistent with the redshift of the AGN, that the colours of the AGN host galaxy are consistent with AGN, and, by comparing their luminosities with those from our comparison clusters, confirm that the AGN hosts are consistent with BCGs.

  1. X-ray cavities in a sample of 83 SPT-selected clusters of galaxies: Tracing the evolution of AGN feedback in clusters of galaxies out to z = 1.2

    DOE PAGES

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; ...

    2015-05-18

    X-ray cavities are key tracers of mechanical (or radio mode) heating arising from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Here, we report on a survey for X-ray cavities in 83 massive, high-redshift (more » $$0.4\\lt z\\lt 1.2$$) clusters of galaxies selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. Based on Chandra X-ray images, we find a total of six clusters having symmetric pairs of surface brightness depressions consistent with the picture of radio jets inflating X-ray cavities in the intracluster medium (ICM). Furthermore, the majority of these detections are of relatively low significance and require deeper follow-up data in order to be confirmed. Further, this search will miss small (<10 kpc) X-ray cavities that are unresolved by Chandra at high ($$z\\gtrsim 0.5$$) redshift. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the power generated by AGN feedback in BCGs has remained unchanged for over half of the age of the universe ($$\\gt 7$$ Gyr at $$z\\sim 0.8$$). On average, the detected X-ray cavities have powers of $$(0.8-5)\\times {{10}^{45}}\\ {\\rm erg}\\ {{{\\rm s}}^{-1}}$$, enthalpies of $$(3-6)\\times {{10}^{59}}\\ {\\rm erg}$$, and radii of ~17 kpc. Integrating over 7 Gyr, we find that the supermassive black holes in BCGs may have accreted 108 to several $${{10}^{9}}\\;{{M}_{\\odot }}$$ of material to power these outflows. This level of accretion indicates that significant supermassive black hole growth may occur not only at early times, in the quasar era, but at late times as well. We also find that X-ray cavities at high redshift may inject an excess heat of 0.1–1.0 keV per particle into the hot ICM above and beyond the energy needed to offset cooling. Though our result needs to be confirmed, we note that the magnitude of excess heating is similar to the energy needed to preheat clusters, break self-similarity, and explain the excess entropy in hot atmospheres.« less

  2. X-ray cavities in a sample of 83 SPT-selected clusters of galaxies: Tracing the evolution of AGN feedback in clusters of galaxies out to z = 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Forman, W. R.; Allen, S. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Dietrich, J. P.; Jones, C.; Liu, J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Song, J.; Stalder, B.; Vikhlinin, A.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-05-18

    X-ray cavities are key tracers of mechanical (or radio mode) heating arising from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Here, we report on a survey for X-ray cavities in 83 massive, high-redshift ($0.4\\lt z\\lt 1.2$) clusters of galaxies selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. Based on Chandra X-ray images, we find a total of six clusters having symmetric pairs of surface brightness depressions consistent with the picture of radio jets inflating X-ray cavities in the intracluster medium (ICM). Furthermore, the majority of these detections are of relatively low significance and require deeper follow-up data in order to be confirmed. Further, this search will miss small (<10 kpc) X-ray cavities that are unresolved by Chandra at high ($z\\gtrsim 0.5$) redshift. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the power generated by AGN feedback in BCGs has remained unchanged for over half of the age of the universe ($\\gt 7$ Gyr at $z\\sim 0.8$). On average, the detected X-ray cavities have powers of $(0.8-5)\\times {{10}^{45}}\\ {\\rm erg}\\ {{{\\rm s}}^{-1}}$, enthalpies of $(3-6)\\times {{10}^{59}}\\ {\\rm erg}$, and radii of ~17 kpc. Integrating over 7 Gyr, we find that the supermassive black holes in BCGs may have accreted 108 to several ${{10}^{9}}\\;{{M}_{\\odot }}$ of material to power these outflows. This level of accretion indicates that significant supermassive black hole growth may occur not only at early times, in the quasar era, but at late times as well. We also find that X-ray cavities at high redshift may inject an excess heat of 0.1–1.0 keV per particle into the hot ICM above and beyond the energy needed to offset cooling. Though our result needs to be confirmed, we note that the magnitude of excess heating is similar to the energy needed to preheat clusters, break self-similarity, and explain the excess entropy in hot atmospheres.

  3. X-ray cavities in a sample of 83 SPT-selected clusters of galaxies. Tracing the evolution of AGN feedback in clusters of galaxies out to z = 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Forman, W. R.; Allen, S. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Dietrich, J. P.; Jones, C.; Liu, J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Song, J.; Stalder, B.; Vikhlinin, A.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-05-18

    X-ray cavities are key tracers of mechanical (or radio mode) heating arising from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We report on a survey for X-ray cavities in 83 massive, high-redshift ($0.4\\lt z\\lt 1.2$) clusters of galaxies selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. Based on Chandra X-ray images, we find a total of six clusters having symmetric pairs of surface brightness depressions consistent with the picture of radio jets inflating X-ray cavities in the intracluster medium (ICM). The majority of these detections are of relatively low significance and require deeper follow-up data in order to be confirmed. Further, this search will miss small (<10 kpc) X-ray cavities that are unresolved by Chandra at high ($z\\gtrsim 0.5$) redshift. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the power generated by AGN feedback in BCGs has remained unchanged for over half of the age of the universe ($\\gt 7$ Gyr at $z\\sim 0.8$). On average, the detected X-ray cavities have powers of $(0.8-5)\\times {{10}^{45}}\\ {\\rm erg}\\ {{{\\rm s}}^{-1}}$, enthalpies of $(3-6)\\times {{10}^{59}}\\ {\\rm erg}$, and radii of ~17 kpc. Integrating over 7 Gyr, we find that the supermassive black holes in BCGs may have accreted 108 to several ${{10}^{9}}\\;{{M}_{\\odot }}$ of material to power these outflows. This level of accretion indicates that significant supermassive black hole growth may occur not only at early times, in the quasar era, but at late times as well. We also find that X-ray cavities at high redshift may inject an excess heat of 0.1–1.0 keV per particle into the hot ICM above and beyond the energy needed to offset cooling. Although this result needs to be confirmed, we note that the magnitude of excess heating is similar to the energy needed to preheat clusters, break self-similarity, and explain the excess entropy in hot atmospheres.

  4. How Supermassive Black Hole Feedback Might Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Megan

    2017-01-01

    How black holes regulate their own growth and the growth of their host galaxy is an unsolved problem in galaxy evolution. The problem is particularly acute in the centers of clusters of galaxies, where the largest and most massive galaxies in the universe are found. That is, coincidentally, also where the interaction between the black hole and the surrounding gas is the easiest to study because the gas is sufficiently hot and dense to emit X-rays. The massive central galaxies of clusters of galaxies (BCGs) exhibit striking patterns in their relationships between star formation, radio AGN activity, and the thermodynamic state of the hot, X-ray emitting intracluster gas (ICM) surrounding the galaxies. The AGN jets excavate giant, kpc-scale cavities in the hot gas, in principle, supplying enough heat to the ICM to replace energy lost to radiative cooling. Simulations suggest (by elimination) that AGN feedback must be required to explain the luminosity and colors of these galaxies, but cosmological simulations still struggle with modeling how AGN feedback works in detail. In clusters of galaxies with active AGN and star-forming BCGs, the AGN somehow regulates the gaseous atmosphere to be marginally critical, with a ratio of the cooling time to the free fall time of ~ 5-20. This behavior is also seen in elliptical galaxies, where the feedback is mostly coming from stars. I will discuss the observations that motivated this model. The precipitation model in BCGs is a class of models known as "preventative" feedback, regulated by jets in BCGs. Further, the complex behaviour seen in recent idealized simulations seem to follow emergent patterns predicted by this model, while reproducing the scatter and the time scales inferred from the observations. The link between the thermal instabilities and the depth of the gravitational potential may explain scaling laws such as the black hole mass-velocity dispersion relation, the galaxy mass-metallicity relation and the baryonic

  5. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. 1; Radiation-Hydrodynamics Solution for the Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan. G. S.; Kallman, T.

    2011-01-01

    We construct a radiation-hydrodynamics model for the obscuring toroidal structure in active galactic nuclei. In this model the obscuration is produced at parsec scale by a dense, dusty wind which is supported by infrared radiation pressure on dust grains. To find the distribution of radiation pressure, we numerically solve the 2D radiation transfer problem in a flux limited diffusion approximation. We iteratively couple the solution with calculations of stationary 1D models for the wind, and obtain the z-component of the velocity. Our results demonstrate that for AGN luminosities greater than 0.1 L(sub edd) external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via outflows driven by infrared radiation pressure. The terminal velocity of marginally Compton-thin models (0.2 < tau(sub T) < 0.6), is comparable to or greater than the escape velocity. In Compton thick models the maximum value of the vertical component of the velocity is lower than the escape velocity, suggesting that a significant part of our torus is in the form of failed wind. The results demonstrate that obscuration via normal or failed infrared-driven winds is a viable option for the AGN torus problem and AGN unification models. Such winds can also provide an important channel for AGN feedback.

  6. THERMAL AND RADIATIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK HAVE A LIMITED IMPACT ON STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Orianne; Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Gabor, Jared M.

    2015-02-10

    The effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on their host galaxies depend on the coupling between the injected energy and the interstellar medium (ISM). Here, we model and quantify the impact of long-range AGN ionizing radiation—in addition to the often considered small-scale energy deposition—on the physical state of the multi-phase ISM of the host galaxy and on its total star formation rate (SFR). We formulate an AGN spectral energy distribution matched with observations, which we use with the radiative transfer (RT) code Cloudy to compute AGN ionization in a simulated high-redshift disk galaxy. We use a high-resolution (∼6 pc) simulation including standard thermal AGN feedback and calculate RT in post-processing. Surprisingly, while these models produce significant AGN-driven outflows, we find that AGN ionizing radiation and heating reduce the SFR by a few percent at most for a quasar luminosity (L {sub bol} = 10{sup 46.5} erg s{sup –1}). Although the circumgalactic gaseous halo can be kept almost entirely ionized by the AGN, most star-forming clouds (n ≳ 10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} cm{sup –3}) and even the reservoirs of cool atomic gas (n ∼ 0.3-10 cm{sup –3})—which are the sites of future star formation (SF; 100-200 Myr), are generally too dense to be significantly affected. Our analysis ignores any absorption from a putative torus, making our results upper limits on the effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, while the AGN-driven outflows can remove substantial amounts of gas in the long term, the impact of AGN feedback on the SF efficiency in the interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies is marginal, even when long-range radiative effects are accounted for.

  7. An Axisymmetric Hydrodynamical Model for the Torus Wind in AGN. 2; X-ray Excited Funnel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.; Proga, D.

    2008-01-01

    We have calculated a series of models of outflows from the obscuring torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling assumes that the inner face of a rotationally supported torus is illuminated and heated by the intense X-rays from the inner accretion disk and black hole. As a result of such heating a strong biconical outflow is observed in our simulations. We calculate 3-dimensional hydrodynamical models, assuming axial symmetry, and including the effects of X-ray heating, ionization, and radiation pressure. We discuss the behavior of a large family of these models, their velocity fields, mass fluxes and temperature, as functions of the torus properties and X-ray flux. Synthetic warm absorber spectra are calculated, assuming pure absorption, for sample models at various inclination angles and observing times. We show that these models have mass fluxes and flow speeds which are comparable to those which have been inferred from observations of Seyfert 1 warm absorbers, and that they can produce rich absorption line spectra.

  8. A Formal Analysis of the Feedback Concept in Climate Models. Part I: Exclusive and Inclusive Feedback Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahellec, Alain; Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    2013-12-01

    Climate sensitivity and feedback are key concepts if the complex behavior of climate response to perturbation is to be interpreted in a simple way. They have also become an essential tool for comparing global circulation models and assessing the reason for the spread in their results. The authors introduce a formal basic model to analyze the practical methods used to infer climate feedbacks and sensitivity from GCMs. The tangent linear model is used first to critically review the standard methods of feedback analyses that have been used in the GCM community for 40 years now. This leads the authors to distinguish between exclusive feedback analyses as in the partial radiative perturbation approach and inclusive analyses as in the "feedback suppression" methods. This review explains the hypotheses needed to apply these methods with confidence. Attention is paid to the more recent regression technique applied to the abrupt 2-CO2 experiment. A numerical evaluation of it is given, related to the Lyapunov analysis of the dynamical feature of the regression. It is applied to the Planck response, determined in its most strict definition within the GCM. In this approach, the Planck feedback becomes a dynamical feedback among others and, as such, also has a fast response differing from its steady-state profile.

  9. AGN Host Galaxy Properties And Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, Angela

    2016-10-01

    Supermassive black hole growth, nuclear activity, and galaxy evolution have been found to be closely related. In the context of AGN-galaxy coevolution, I will discuss about the relation found between the host galaxy properties and the central BH and I will present the latest determination of the host galaxy stellar mass function (HGMF), and the specific accretion rate distribution function (SARDF), derived from the XMM-COSMOS sample up to z˜2.5, with particular focus on AGN feedback as possible responsible mechanism for galaxy quenching.

  10. Multi-Frequency View Of Jetted AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroletti, Marcello; Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.; Lico, R.; Giovannini, G.:

    2016-10-01

    I will present a review on the context and the most recent results about radio loud AGNs as seen in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, with an eye also to multi-messenger astrophysics and neutrinos in particular. I will focus on various topics of interest about RL AGNs, such as: the study of the physics of relativistic jets and particle acceleration, in particular through VLBI and gamma ray observations; the feedback to the host galaxy and on galaxy cluster scales; the possibility to probe distant and obscured environments.

  11. Theoretical modelling of the AGN iron line vs. continuum time-lags in the lamp-post geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epitropakis, A.; Papadakis, I. E.; Dovčiak, M.; Pecháček, T.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Karas, V.; McHardy, I. M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Theoretical modelling of time-lags between variations in the Fe Kα emission and the X-ray continuum might shed light on the physics and geometry of the X-ray emitting region in active galaxies (AGN) and X-ray binaries. We here present the results from a systematic analysis of time-lags between variations in two energy bands (5-7 vs. 2-4 keV) for seven X-ray bright and variable AGN. Aims: We estimate time-lags as accurately as possible and fit them with theoretical models in the context of the lamp-post geometry. We also constrain the geometry of the X-ray emitting region in AGN. Methods: We used all available archival XMM-Newton data for the sources in our sample and extracted light curves in the 5-7 and 2-4 keV energy bands. We used these light curves and applied a thoroughly tested (through extensive numerical simulations) recipe to estimate time-lags that have minimal bias, approximately follow a Gaussian distribution, and have known errors. Using traditional χ2 minimisation techniques, we then fitted the observed time-lags with two different models: a phenomenological model where the time-lags have a power-law dependence on frequency, and a physical model, using the reverberation time-lags expected in the lamp-post geometry. The latter were computed assuming a point-like primary X-ray source above a black hole surrounded by a neutral and prograde accretion disc with solar iron abundance. We took all relativistic effects into account for various X-ray source heights, inclination angles, and black hole spin values. Results: Given the available data, time-lags between the two energy bands can only be reliably measured at frequencies between ~5 × 10-5 Hz and ~10-3 Hz. The power-law and reverberation time-lag models can both fit the data well in terms of formal statistical characteristics. When fitting the observed time-lags to the lamp-post reverberation scenario, we can only constrain the height of the X-ray source. The data require, or are consistent

  12. An elbow joint movement control model with visual feedback.

    PubMed

    Xiao, S; Li, X

    1997-01-01

    A motor program generator control model is proposed to simulate neuromuscular control. Three muscles (Biceps, Triceps, Brachialis) driving elbow joint flexion in a plane are simulated by integrating their nonlinear dynamic property and spinal neural circuitry. The motor descending commands are described by a visual feedback signal from the joint and an excitation signal for the motor neuron pool. The visual feedback signal mimics the gamma command whereas the excitation signal mimics another descending co-activation command. The gamma command is expressed as the output of a PID controller with the visual feedback error signal as the input. The gamma command and the motoneuron pool background activity are the inputs to the motoneuron pool model coupled with the Renshaw cell recurrent inhibitions. The output of the motoneuron pool model mimics the alpha command feeding directly to the muscle dynamics. A movement is produced by reducing the error signal between goal position and actual position and altering excitation signal properly. The simulation results show that a burst pattern of excitation signal and a PID controller can accurately trace the terminal goal and generate a smooth movement with a bell shaped velocity profile. The muscle activation signals have the characteristic similar to the smoothed EMG. Changing different parameters of the PID can cause the same effects as the stimulus pulse intensity or duration modulation.

  13. Exploring Quenching, Morphological Transformation and AGN-Driven Winds with Simulations of Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Ryan; CANDELS

    2017-01-01

    We present an examination of the spheroid growth and star formation quenching experienced by galaxies since z~3 by studying the evolution with redshift of the quiescent and spheroid-dominated fractions of galaxies from the CANDELS and GAMA surveys. We compare these fractions with predictions from a semi-analytic model which includes prescriptions for bulge growth and AGN feedback due to mergers and disk instabilities. We then subdivide our population into the four quadrants of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR)-Sersic index plane. We find that the fraction of star forming disks declines steadily while the fraction of quiescent spheroids increases with cosmic time. The fraction of star-forming spheroids and quiescent disks are both non-negligible and remain nearly constant. Our model is qualitatively successful at reproducing these fractions, suggesting a plausible explanation for the observed correlations between star formation activity and galaxy structure.Next, we study the correlation of galaxy structural properties with their location relative to the star-formation rate-stellar mass correlation, or the star forming main sequence. We find that as we move from observed galaxies above the main sequence to those below it, we see a nearly monotonic trend towards higher median Sersic index, smaller radius, lower SFR density and higher stellar mass density. Our model again qualitatively reproduces these trends, supporting a picture in which bulges and black holes co-evolve and AGN feedback plays a critical role in galaxy quenching.Finally, we examine AGN-driven winds in a suite of cosmological zoom simulations including a novel mechanical and radiation-driven AGN feedback prescription and compare the gas cycle with a matched suite of zoom simulations that include only feedback from supernovae and young stars. We find that while stellar feedback can drive mass out of galaxies, it is unlikely to be able to keep the gas from re-accreting, whereas in our AGN runs it

  14. Introduction of the aerosol feedback process in the model BOLCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Felicita; Maurizi, Alberto; D'Isidoro, Massimo; Tampieri, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The effect of aerosols on the climate is still one of the least understood processes in the atmospheric science. The use of models to simulate the interaction between aerosols and climate can help understanding the physical processes that rule this interaction and hopefully predicting the future effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate. In particular regional models can help study the effect of aerosols on the atmospheric dynamics on a local scale. In the work performed here we studied the feedback of aerosols in the radiative transfer calculation using the regional model BOLCHEM. The coupled meteorology-chemistry model BOLCHEM is based on the BOLAM meteorological model. The BOLAM dynamics is based on hydrostatic primitive equations, with wind components u and v, potential temperature ?, specific humidity q, surface pressure ps, as dependent variables. The vertical coordinate σ is terrain-following with variables distributed on a non-uniformly spaced staggered Lorentz grid. In the standard configuration of the model a collection of climatological aerosol optical depth values for each aerosol species is used for the radiative transfer calculation. In the feedback exercise presented here the aerosol optical depth was calculated starting from the modeled aerosol concentrations using an approximate Mie formulation described by Evans and Fournier (Evans, B.T.N. and G.R. Fournier, Applied Optics, 29, 1990). The calculation was done separately for each species and aerosol size distribution. The refractive indexes for the different species were taken from P. Stier's work (P. Stier et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5, 2005) and the aerosol extinction obtained by Mie calculation were compared with the results reported by OPAC (M. Hess et al., Bull. Am. Met. Soc., 79, 1998). Two model runs, with and without the aerosol feedback, were performed to study the effects of the feedback on meteorological parameters. As a first setup of the model runs we selected a domain over the

  15. Climate Change, Feedback-Modelling, and Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, E. G.; Simonovic, S. P.

    2008-05-01

    Global change research has generally followed a driving scenario-complex model approach, in which a set of projections provide input data that force the behaviour of an associated complex model. This approach neglects the role of interconnections -- or feedbacks -- between subsystems in determining the evolution of the system as a whole. However, another approach, called integrated assessment modelling (IAM), is available. In IAM, socio- economic adaptation and mitigation efforts become part of the actual physical process of climate change: changes in one sector lead to changes in another through causal, feedback relationships. The physical basis of connections between climate change and the hydrological cycle is already well-understood. Our research, using an eight-sector model of the global society-biosphere-climate system, demonstrates that hydrological and other elements of the socio-economic system are likewise tightly connected, and that their relationship has important implications for both water resources and for the rest of the system. The three water sectors in the model simulate water withdrawals and consumption at a global level in terms of domestic, industrial, and agricultural use, and incorporate wastewater production, treatment, and reuse. Other model sectors include the global climate, carbon cycle, economic, population, and land-use systems. Experimental results indicate that surface water availability and water quality play critical roles in long-term socio- economic wellbeing. For the presentation, we will demonstrate, in general terms, the effects of climate change and other socio-economic changes on water resources and the feedback effects of water-related changes on the larger model. In particular, we will focus on changing water use over time, and on the influence of wastewater treatment and reuse policies on water scarcity levels.

  16. Modeling mutual feedback between users and recommender systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, An; Yeung, Chi Ho; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Recommender systems daily influence our decisions on the Internet. While considerable attention has been given to issues such as recommendation accuracy and user privacy, the long-term mutual feedback between a recommender system and the decisions of its users has been neglected so far. We propose here a model of network evolution which allows us to study the complex dynamics induced by this feedback, including the hysteresis effect which is typical for systems with non-linear dynamics. Despite the popular belief that recommendation helps users to discover new things, we find that the long-term use of recommendation can contribute to the rise of extremely popular items and thus ultimately narrow the user choice. These results are supported by measurements of the time evolution of item popularity inequality in real systems. We show that this adverse effect of recommendation can be tamed by sacrificing part of short-term recommendation accuracy.

  17. AGN Accretion Physics: Insights from K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogeley, Michael

    We propose to use Kepler K2 mission observations of 1800 supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies (Active Galactic Nuclei; AGN) to test models for accretion physics, to study the relationship between variability and other AGN properties such as accretion rate, and to guide methods for detecting and classifying AGN in future time-domain surveys. AGN exhibit optical brightness fluctuations on timescales from below an hour up to many years. These fluctuations are determined by the physics of accretion of matter onto black holes from their galactic environment. By observing variability on timescales down to below an hour, Kepler probes the accretion region on length scales that are too small to be directly imaged using conventional telescopes. These data allow us to test competing models for accretion physics that make different predictions for the statistics of variability. Our previous work provides strong evidence that models of AGN variability that work on long timescale data are not adequate to describe the full range of fluctuation timescales probed by Kepler. We will analyze the light curves of 1800 AGN that have been monitored by Kepler during recent and ongoing K2 campaigns. These objects span a large range of luminosity and AGN type, thus allowing study of the relationship between variability and other physical properties. We will characterize the statistics of AGN variability using state-of-the-art methods of time series analysis that are appropriate for quantifying the stochastic behavior of AGN. This analysis builds on our previous work in which we developed and tested new analysis software that extracts the full information content of these light curves and will enable several key outcomes: (1) Measurement of the relationship between types of AGN and their variability. (2) Tests for dependence of variability on accretion rate. (3) Investigation of changes in variability behavior that point to changes in the mode of accretion. (4) Correlations

  18. Modelling human balance using switched systems with linear feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Glendinning, Paul; Brown, Martin; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo; Dallali, Houman; Shapiro, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    We are interested in understanding the mechanisms behind and the character of the sway motion of healthy human subjects during quiet standing. We assume that a human body can be modelled as a single-link inverted pendulum, and the balance is achieved using linear feedback control. Using these assumptions, we derive a switched model which we then investigate. Stable periodic motions (limit cycles) about an upright position are found. The existence of these limit cycles is studied as a function of system parameters. The exploration of the parameter space leads to the detection of multi-stability and homoclinic bifurcations. PMID:21697168

  19. Probing Agn Accretion Physics With Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogeley, Michael

    We propose to use Kepler observations of a sample of ~100 supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies (Active Galactic Nuclei; AGN) to test models for accretion physics, to study the relationship between variability and other AGN properties, and to guide methods for detecting and classifying AGN in future time-domain surveys. AGN exhibit optical brightness fluctuations on timescales from below an hour up to many years. These fluctuations are determined by the physics of accretion of matter onto black holes from their galactic environment. By observing variability on timescales down to below an hour, Kepler probes the accretion region on length scales that are too small to be directly imaged using conventional telescopes. Data from this unique time- domain telescope now allow us to test competing models for accretion physics that make different predictions for the statistics of variability. Preliminary work provides strong evidence that models of AGN variability that work on long timescale data are not adequate to describe the full range of fluctuation timescales probed by Kepler. We will analyze the light curves of Kepler AGN that span a large range of luminosity and AGN type, thus allowing study of the relationship between variability and other physical properties. Using methods developed and tested by the Kepler team, we will perform custom post-processing of these light curves to remove known systematics. Statistical analyses of the AGN light curves will include estimation of the Structure Function, which quantifies the correlations of brightness fluctuations, and maximum likelihood light curve reconstruction. Competing models for the stochastic behavior of AGN will be tested to evaluate which models best describe variability of AGN over the full range of timescales probed by Kepler. Correlations between the stochastic model parameters and physical parameters will provide new methods for classification of AGN from their variability and aid in

  20. Comparing the effects of supernovae feedback models on the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Lindsey; Christensen, Charlotte; Keller, Benjamin W.

    2017-01-01

    Stellar feedback affects the state of the interstellar medium and plays an important role in the formation of galaxies. However, different ways of modeling that feedback lead to different galaxy morphologies even when using the same initial conditions. We investigated the differences between two models of supernovae feedback, blastwave feedback and superbubble feedback, using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to simulate the formation of an isolated galaxy. The two feedback models were compared across three different models of the ISM: primordial cooling, metal-line cooling, and metal-line cooling in addition to molecular hydrogen. The simulations run with metal-line cooling indicate that superbubble feedback creates a greater amount of high-density gas than blastwave feedback does while also regulating star formation more efficiently. Galaxies produced with metal-line cooling or H2 physics created cold, dense gas, and the increased cooling efficiency was also linked to more pronounced spiral structure.

  1. Modeling Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Cool-core Clusters: The Formation of Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t TI/t ff < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s-1. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  2. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  3. Modelling terrestrial nitrous oxide emissions and implications for climate feedback.

    PubMed

    Xu-Ri; Prentice, I Colin; Spahni, Renato; Niu, Hai Shan

    2012-10-01

    Ecosystem nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions respond to changes in climate and CO2 concentration as well as anthropogenic nitrogen (N) enhancements. Here, we aimed to quantify the responses of natural ecosystem N2O emissions to multiple environmental drivers using a process-based global vegetation model (DyN-LPJ). We checked that modelled annual N2O emissions from nonagricultural ecosystems could reproduce field measurements worldwide, and experimentally observed responses to step changes in environmental factors. We then simulated global N2O emissions throughout the 20th century and analysed the effects of environmental changes. The model reproduced well the global pattern of N2O emissions and the observed responses of N cycle components to changes in environmental factors. Simulated 20th century global decadal-average soil emissions were c. 8.2-9.5 Tg N yr(-1) (or 8.3-10.3 Tg N yr(-1) with N deposition). Warming and N deposition contributed 0.85±0.41 and 0.80±0.14 Tg N yr(-1), respectively, to an overall upward trend. Rising CO2 also contributed, in part, through a positive interaction with warming. The modelled temperature dependence of N2O emission (c. 1 Tg N yr(-1) K(-1)) implies a positive climate feedback which, over the lifetime of N2O (114 yr), could become as important as the climate-carbon cycle feedback caused by soil CO2 release.

  4. Feedback models for polarized auxin transport: an emerging trend.

    PubMed

    Wabnik, Krzysztof; Govaerts, Willy; Friml, Jiří; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    The phytohormone auxin is vital to plant growth and development. A unique property of auxin among all other plant hormones is its cell-to-cell polar transport that requires activity of polarly localized PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux transporters. Despite the substantial molecular insight into the cellular PIN polarization, the mechanistic understanding for developmentally and environmentally regulated PIN polarization is scarce. The long-standing belief that auxin modulates its own transport by means of a positive feedback mechanism has inspired both experimentalists and theoreticians for more than two decades. Recently, theoretical models for auxin-dependent patterning in plants include the feedback between auxin transport and the PIN protein localization. These computer models aid to assess the complexity of plant development by testing and predicting plausible scenarios for various developmental processes that occur in planta. Although the majority of these models rely on purely heuristic principles, the most recent mechanistic models tentatively integrate biologically testable components into known cellular processes that underlie the PIN polarity regulation. The existing and emerging computational approaches to describe PIN polarization are presented and discussed in the light of recent experimental data on the PIN polar targeting.

  5. Mesoscale modeling of smoke radiative feedback over the Sahel region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Wang, J.; Ichoku, C. M.; Ellison, L.; Zhang, F.; Yue, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This study employs satellite observations and a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) to study the smoke radative feedback on surface energy budget, boundary layer processes, and atmospheric lapse rate in February 2008 over the Sahel region. The smoke emission inventories we use come from various sources, including but not limited to the Fire Locating and Modeling of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) developed by NRL and the Fire Energetic and Emissions Research (FEER) developed by NASA GSFC. Model performance is evaluated using numerous satellite and ground-based datasets: MODIS true color images, ground-based Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) measurements from AERONET, MODIS AOD retrievals, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar data with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) atmospheric backscattering and extinction products. Specification of smoke injection height of 650 m in WRF-Chem yields aerosol vertical profiles that are most consistent with CALIOP observations of aerosol layer height. Statistically, 5% of the CALIPSO valid measurements of aerosols in February 2008 show aerosol layers either above the clouds or between the clouds, reinforcing the importance of the aerosol vertical distribution for quantifying aerosol impact on climate in the Sahel region. The results further show that the smoke radiative feedbacks are sensitive to assumptions of black carbon and organic carbon ratio in the particle emission inventory. Also investigated is the smoke semi-direct effect as a function of cloud fraction.

  6. Minimum X-ray source size for a lamppost corona in light-bending models for AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovciak, M.; Done, C.

    2015-07-01

    The `lamppost' model is often used to describe the X-ray source geometry in AGN, where an infinitesimal point source is located on the black hole spin axis. This is especially invoked for Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies, where an extremely broad iron line seen in episodes of low X-ray flux can be explained by extremely strong relativistic effects as the source approaches the black hole horizon. However, the source must also be large enough to intercept sufficient seed photons from the disc to make the hard X-ray Compton continuum which produces the observed iron line/reflected spectrum. This size scale also sets the minimum height of the corona in order that the source can fit above the event horizon. We calculate this using a fully relativistic ray tracing code, and apply to the most extreme NLS1, 1H0707-495. The inferred source size is too big for it to be at a height of less than one gravitational radius above the horizon.

  7. The origin of UV-optical variability in AGN and test of disc models: XMM-Newton and ground-based observations of NGC 4395

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHardy, I. M.; Connolly, S. D.; Peterson, B. M.; Bieryla, A.; Chand, H.; Elvis, M. S.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Falco, E.; Gandhi, P.; Kaspi, S.; Latham, D.; Lira, P.; McCully, C.; Netzer, H.; Uemura, M.

    2016-05-01

    The origin of short timescale (weeks/months) variability of AGN, whether due to intrinsic disc variations or reprocessing of X-ray emission by a surrounding accretion disc, has been a puzzle for many years. However recently a number of observational programmes, particularly of NGC 5548 with Swift, have shown that the UV/optical variations lag behind the X-ray variations in a manner strongly supportive of X-ray reprocessing. Somewhat surprisingly, the implied size of the accretion disc is ∼3 times greater than expected from a standard, smooth, Shakura-Sunyaev thin disc model. Although the difference may be explained by a clumpy accretion disc, it is not clear whether the difference will occur in all AGN or whether it may change as, eg, a function of black hole mass, accretion rate, or disc temperature. Measurements of interband lags for most AGN require long timescale monitoring, which is hard to arrange. However for low mass (< 106 M⊙) AGN, the combination of XMM-Newton EPIC (X-rays) with the optical monitor in fast readout mode allows an X-ray/UV-optical lag to be measured within a single long observation. Here we summarise previous related observations and report on XMM-Newton observations of NGC 4395 (mass 100 times lower, accretion rate ∼20 times lower than for NGC 5548). We find that the UVW1 lags the X-rays by ∼ 470 s. Simultaneous observations at 6 different ground based observatories also allowed the g-band lag (∼ 800s) to be measured. These observations are in agreement with X-ray reprocessing but initial analysis suggests that, for NGC 4395, they do not differ markedly from the predictions of the standard thin disc model.

  8. Neuromechanical models for insect locomotion: Stability, maneuverability, and proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukillaya, R.; Proctor, J.; Holmes, P.

    2009-06-01

    We describe a hierarchy of models for legged locomotion, emphasizing relationships among feedforward (preflexive) stability, maneuverability, and reflexive feedback. We focus on a hexapedal geometry representative of insect locomotion in the ground plane that includes a neural central pattern generator circuit, nonlinear muscles, and a representative proprioceptive sensory pathway. Although these components of the model are rather complex, neglect of leg mass yields a neuromechanical system with only three degrees of freedom, and numerical simulations coupled with a Poincaré map analysis shows that the feedforward dynamics is strongly stable, apart from one relatively slow mode and a neutral mode in body yaw angle. These modes moderate high frequency perturbations, producing slow heading changes that can be corrected by a stride-to-stride steering strategy. We show that the model's response to a lateral impulsive perturbation closely matches that of a cockroach subject to a similar impulse. We also describe preliminary studies of proprioceptive leg force feedback, showing how a reflexive pathway can reinforce the preflexive stability inherent in the system.

  9. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT 2011: DYNAMICAL MODELING OF THE BROAD-LINE REGION IN Mrk 50

    SciTech Connect

    Pancoast, Anna; Brewer, Brendon J.; Treu, Tommaso; Bennert, Vardha N.; Sand, David J.; Barth, Aaron J.; Cooper, Michael C.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Buehler, Tabitha; and others

    2012-07-20

    We present dynamical modeling of the broad-line region (BLR) in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 50 using reverberation mapping data taken as part of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project (LAMP) 2011. We model the reverberation mapping data directly, constraining the geometry and kinematics of the BLR, as well as deriving a black hole mass estimate that does not depend on a normalizing factor or virial coefficient. We find that the geometry of the BLR in Mrk 50 is a nearly face-on thick disk, with a mean radius of 9.6{sup +1.2}{sub -0.9} light days, a width of the BLR of 6.9{sup +1.2}{sub -1.1} light days, and a disk opening angle of 25 {+-} 10 deg above the plane. We also constrain the inclination angle to be 9{sup +7}{sub -5} deg, close to face-on. Finally, the black hole mass of Mrk 50 is inferred to be log{sub 10}(M{sub BH}/M{sub Sun }) = 7.57{sup +0.44}{sub -0.27}. By comparison to the virial black hole mass estimate from traditional reverberation mapping analysis, we find the normalizing constant (virial coefficient) to be log{sub 10} f = 0.78{sup +0.44}{sub -0.27}, consistent with the commonly adopted mean value of 0.74 based on aligning the M{sub BH}-{sigma}* relation for active galactic nuclei and quiescent galaxies. While our dynamical model includes the possibility of a net inflow or outflow in the BLR, we cannot distinguish between these two scenarios.

  10. Tidal Downsizing model - IV. Destructive feedback in planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2016-09-01

    The role of negative feedback from a massive solid core on its massive gas envelope in the Tidal Downsizing scenario of planet formation is investigated via one-dimensional planet evolution models followed by population synthesis calculations. It is shown that cores more massive than ˜10 M⊕ release enough energy to reverse contraction of their parent gas envelopes, culminating in their destruction. This process may help to explain why observed gas giant planets are so rare, why massive cores are so ubiquitous, and why there is a sharp rollover in the core mass function above ˜20 M⊕. Additionally, the short time-scales with which these massive cores are assembled in TD may help explain formation route of Uranus, Neptune and the suspected HL Tau planets. Given the negative role of cores in assembly of gas giants in the model, an antimony is found between massive cores and gas giants: cores in survived gas giant planets are on average less massive than cores free of massive envelopes. In rare circumstances when core feedback self-regulates, extremely metal-rich gas giants, such as CoRoT-20b, a gas giant made of heavy elements by up to ˜50 per cent, can be made.

  11. Model reduction and feedback control of transitional channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilak, Milos

    This dissertation examines the use of reduced-order models for design of linear feedback controllers for fluid flows. The focus is on transitional channel flow, a canonical shear flow case with a simple geometry yet complex dynamics. Reduced-order models of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, which describe the evolution of perturbations in transitional channel flow, are computed using two methods for snapshot-based balanced truncation, Balanced Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (BPOD) and Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA). The performance of these models in feedback control is evaluated in both linearized and nonlinear Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of channel flow. The first part of the dissertation describes the application of BPOD to very large systems, and the detailed evaluation of the resulting reduced-order models. Exact balanced truncation, a standard method from control theory, is not computationally tractable for very large systems, such as those typically encountered in fluid flow simulations. The BPOD method, introduced by Rowley (2005), provides a close approximation. We first show that the approximation is indeed close by applying the method to a 1-D linear perturbation to channel flow at a single spatial wavenumber pair, for which exact balanced truncation is tractable. Next, as the first application of BPOD to a very high-dimensional linear system, we show that reduced-order BPOD models of a localized 3-D perturbation capture the dynamics very well. Moreover, the BPOD models significantly outperform standard Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) models, as illustrated by a striking example where models using the POD modes that capture most of the perturbation energy fail to capture the perturbation dynamics. Next, reduced-order models of a complete control system for linearized channel flow are obtained using ERA, a computationally efficient method that results in the same reduced-order models as BPOD. Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG

  12. Feedbacks Between Numerical and Analytical Models in Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, V. A.; Cardenas, M. B.; Toundykov, D.; Cohn, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogeology is a relatively young discipline which combines elements of Earth science and engineering. Mature fundamental disciplines (e.g., physics, chemistry, fluid mechanics) have centuries-long history of mathematical modeling even prior to discovery of Darcy's law. Thus, in hydrogeology, relatively few classic analytical models (such those by Theis, Polubarinova-Kochina, Philip, Toth, Henry, Dagan, Neuman) were developed by the early 1970's. The advent of computers and practical demands refocused mathematical models towards numerical techniques. With more diverse but less mathematically-oriented training, most hydrogeologists shifted from analytical methods to use of standardized computational software. Spatial variability in internal properties and external boundary conditions and geometry, and the added complexity of chemical and biological processes will remain major challenges for analytical modeling. Possibly, analytical techniques will play a subordinate role to numerical approaches in many applications. On the other hand, the rise of analytical element modeling of groundwater flow is a strong alternative to numerical models when data demand and computational efficiency is considered. The hallmark of analytical models - transparency and accuracy - will remain indispensable for scientific exploration of complex phenomena and for benchmarking numerical models. Therefore, there will always be feedbacks and complementarities between numerical and analytical techniques, as well as a certain ideological schism among various views to modeling. We illustrate the idea of feedbacks by reviewing evolution of Joszef Toth's analytical model of gravity driven flow systems. Toth's (1963) approach was to reduce the flow domain to a rectangle which allowed for closed-form solution of the governing equations. Succeeding numerical finite-element models by Freeze and Witherspoon (1966-1968) explored the effects of geometry and heterogeneity on regional groundwater flow

  13. Modeling for Stellar Feedback in Galaxy Formation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Alejandro; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Hu, Chia-Yu; Choi, Ena

    2017-02-01

    Various heuristic approaches to model unresolved supernova (SN) feedback in galaxy formation simulations exist to reproduce the formation of spiral galaxies and the overall inefficient conversion of gas into stars. Some models, however, require resolution-dependent scalings. We present a subresolution model representing the three major phases of supernova blast wave evolution—free expansion, energy-conserving Sedov–Taylor, and momentum-conserving snowplow—with energy scalings adopted from high-resolution interstellar-medium simulations in both uniform and multiphase media. We allow for the effects of significantly enhanced SN remnant propagation in a multiphase medium with the cooling radius scaling with the hot volume fraction, {f}{hot}, as {(1-{f}{hot})}-4/5. We also include winds from young massive stars and AGB stars, Strömgren sphere gas heating by massive stars, and a mechanism that limits gas cooling that is driven by radiative recombination of dense H ii regions. We present initial tests for isolated Milky Way-like systems simulated with the Gadget-based code SPHgal with improved SPH prescription. Compared to pure thermal SN input, the model significantly suppresses star formation at early epochs, with star formation extended both in time and space in better accord with observations. Compared to models with pure thermal SN feedback, the age at which half the stellar mass is assembled increases by a factor of 2.4, and the mass-loading parameter and gas outflow rate from the galactic disk increase by a factor of 2. Simulation results are converged for a variation of two orders of magnitude in particle mass in the range (1.3–130) × 104 solar masses.

  14. The Angular Clustering of WISE-Selected AGN: Different Haloes for Obscured and Unobscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin

    2015-08-01

    We calculate the angular correlation function for a sample of 170,000 AGN extracted from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalog, selected to have red mid-IR colors (W1 - W2 > 0.8) and 4.6 micron flux densities brighter than 0.14 mJy). The sample is expected to be >90% reliable at identifying AGN, and to have a mean redshift of z=1.1. In total, the angular clustering of WISE-AGN is roughly similar to that of optical AGN. We cross-match these objects with the photometric SDSS catalog and distinguish obscured sources with (r - W2) > 6 from bluer, unobscured AGN. Obscured sources present a higher clustering signal than unobscured sources. Since the host galaxy morphologies of obscured AGN are not typical red sequence elliptical galaxies and show disks in many cases, it is unlikely that the increased clustering strength of the obscured population is driven by a host galaxy segregation bias. By using relatively complete redshift distributions from the COSMOS survey, we find obscured sources at mean redshift z=0.9 have a bias of b = 2.9 \\pm 0.6 and are hosted in dark matter halos with a typical mass of log(M/M_odot)~13.5. In contrast, unobscured AGN at z~1.1 have a bias of b = 1.6 \\pm 0.6 and inhabit halos of log(M/M_odot)~12.4. These findings suggest that obscured AGN inhabit denser environments than unobscured AGN, and are difficult to reconcile with the simplest AGN unification models, where obscuration is driven solely by orientation.

  15. Identifying Distant AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouille, Laura; Barger, Amy; Tremonti, Christy

    2014-07-01

    The Baldwin, Phillips, and Terlevich emission-line ratio diagnostic ([OIII]/Hβ versus [NII]/Hα, hereafter BPT diagram) efficiently separates galaxies whose signal is dominated by star formation (BPT-SF) from those dominated by AGN activity (BPT-AGN). Yet the BPT diagram is limited to z<0.5, the redshift at which [NII]λ6584 leaves the optical spectral window. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we construct a new diagnostic, or TBT diagram, that is based on rest-frame g-z color, [NeIII]λ3869, and [OII]λλ3726+3729 and can be used for galaxies out to z<1.4. The TBT diagram identifies 98.7% of the SDSS BPT-AGN as TBT-AGN and 97% of the SDSS BPT-SF as TBT-SF. Furthermore, it identifies 97% of the OPTX Chandra X-ray selected AGNs as TBT-AGN. This is in contrast to the BPT diagram, which misidentifies 20% of X-ray selected AGNs as BPT-SF.

  16. Neutrinos from AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The great penetrating power of neutrinos makes them ideal probe of astrophysical sites and conditions inaccessible to other forms of radiation. These are the centers of stars (collapsing or not) and the centers of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). It has been suggested that AGN presented a very promising source of high energy neutrinos, possibly detectable by underwater neutrino detectors. This paper reviews the evolution of ideas concerning the emission of neutrinos from AGN in view of the more recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy and their implications for the neutrino emission from these class of objects.

  17. Steps Toward Unveiling the True Population of AGN: Photometric Selection of Broad-Line AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Evan; Impey, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present an AGN selection technique that enables identification of broad-line AGN using only photometric data. An extension of infrared selection techniques, our method involves fitting a given spectral energy distribution with a model consisting of three physically motivated components: infrared power law emission, optical accretion disk emission, and host galaxy emission. Each component can be varied in intensity, and a reduced chi-square minimization routine is used to determine the optimum parameters for each object. Using this model, both broad- and narrow-line AGN are seen to fall within discrete ranges of parameter space that have plausible bounds, allowing physical trends with luminosity and redshift to be determined. Based on a fiducial sample of AGN from the catalog of Trump et al. (2009), we find the region occupied by broad-line AGN to be distinct from that of quiescent or star-bursting galaxies. Because this technique relies only on photometry, it will allow us to find AGN at fainter magnitudes than are accessible in spectroscopic surveys, and thus probe a population of less luminous and/or higher redshift objects. With the vast availability of photometric data in large surveys, this technique should have broad applicability and result in large samples that will complement X-ray AGN catalogs.

  18. Evidence for Ultra-Fast Outflows in Radio-Quiet AGNs: III - Location and Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2012-01-01

    Using the results of a previous X-ray photo-ionization modelling of blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines on a sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton, in this letter we estimate the location and energetics of the associated ultrafast outflows (UFOs). Due to significant uncertainties, we are essentially able to place only lower/upper limits. On average, their location is in the interval approx.0.0003-0.03pc (approx.10(exp 2)-10(exp 4)tau(sub s) from the central black hole, consistent with what is expected for accretion disk winds/outflows. The mass outflow rates are constrained between approx.0.01- 1 Stellar Mass/y, corresponding to approx. or >5-10% of the accretion rates. The average lower-upper limits on the mechanical power are logE(sub K) approx. or = 42.6-44.6 erg/s. However, the minimum possible value of the ratio between the mechanical power and bolometric luminosity is constrained to be comparable or higher than the minimum required by simulations of feedback induced by winds/outflows. Therefore, this work demonstrates that UFOs are indeed capable to provide a significant contribution to the AGN r.osmological feedback, in agreement with theoretical expectations and the recent observation of interactions between AGN outflows and the interstellar medium in several Seyferts galaxies .

  19. Evidence for ultrafast outflows in radio-quiet AGNs - III. Location and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2012-05-01

    Using the results of a previous X-ray photoionization modelling of blueshifted Fe K absorption lines on a sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton, in this Letter we estimate the location and energetics of the associated ultrafast outflows (UFOs). Due to significant uncertainties, we are essentially able to place only lower/upper limits. On average, their location is in the interval ˜0.0003-0.03 pc (˜ 102-104rs) from the central black hole, consistent with what is expected for accretion disc winds/outflows. The mass outflow rates are constrained between ˜0.01 and 1 M⊙ yr-1, corresponding to >rsim5-10 per cent of the accretion rates. The average lower/upper limits on the mechanical power are log? 42.6-44.6 erg s-1. However, the minimum possible value of the ratio between the mechanical power and bolometric luminosity is constrained to be comparable or higher than the minimum required by simulations of feedback induced by winds/outflows. Therefore, this work demonstrates that UFOs are indeed capable to provide a significant contribution to the AGN cosmological feedback, in agreement with theoretical expectations and the recent observation of interactions between AGN outflows and the interstellar medium in several Seyfert galaxies.

  20. AGN Absorption Linked to Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Stéphanie

    2014-07-01

    Multiwavelength identification of AGN is crucial not only to obtain a more complete census, but also to learn about the physical state of the nuclear activity (obscuration, efficiency, etc.). A panchromatic strategy plays an especially important role when the host galaxies are star-forming. Selecting far-Infrared galaxies at 0.3AGN tracers in the X-ray, optical spectra, mid-infrared, and radio regimes, we found a twice higher AGN fraction than previous studies, thanks to the combined AGN identification methods and in particular the recent Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic diagram. We furthermore find an intriguing relation between AGN X-ray absorption and the specific star formation rate (sSFR) of the host galaxies, indicating a physical link between X-ray absorption and either the gas fraction or the gas geometry in the hosts. These findings have implications for our current understanding of both the AGN unification model and the nature of the black hole-galaxy connection.

  1. Extended nonlinear feedback model for describing episodes of high inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybisz, Martín A.; Szybisz, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    An extension of the nonlinear feedback (NLF) formalism to describe regimes of hyper- and high-inflation in economy is proposed in the present work. In the NLF model the consumer price index (CPI) exhibits a finite time singularity of the type 1 /(tc - t) (1 - β) / β, with β > 0, predicting a blow up of the economy at a critical time tc. However, this model fails in determining tc in the case of weak hyperinflation regimes like, e.g., that occurred in Israel. To overcome this trouble, the NLF model is extended by introducing a parameter γ, which multiplies all terms with past growth rate index (GRI). In this novel approach the solution for CPI is also analytic being proportional to the Gaussian hypergeometric function 2F1(1 / β , 1 / β , 1 + 1 / β ; z) , where z is a function of β, γ, and tc. For z → 1 this hypergeometric function diverges leading to a finite time singularity, from which a value of tc can be determined. This singularity is also present in GRI. It is shown that the interplay between parameters β and γ may produce phenomena of multiple equilibria. An analysis of the severe hyperinflation occurred in Hungary proves that the novel model is robust. When this model is used for examining data of Israel a reasonable tc is got. High-inflation regimes in Mexico and Iceland, which exhibit weaker inflations than that of Israel, are also successfully described.

  2. Output-Feedback Model Predictive Control of a Pasteurization Pilot Plant based on an LPV model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi Pour, Fatemeh; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos; Puig, Vicenç

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a model predictive control (MPC) of a pasteurization pilot plant based on an LPV model. Since not all the states are measured, an observer is also designed, which allows implementing an output-feedback MPC scheme. However, the model of the plant is not completely observable when augmented with the disturbance models. In order to solve this problem, the following strategies are used: (i) the whole system is decoupled into two subsystems, (ii) an inner state-feedback controller is implemented into the MPC control scheme. A real-time example based on the pasteurization pilot plant is simulated as a case study for testing the behavior of the approaches.

  3. Study of the mid-infrared properties of obscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severgnini, P.; Caccianiga, A.; della Ceca, R.

    2008-10-01

    The comprehension of the physical properties of obscured AGNs is one of the main goals of the high energy astronomy given their key role in tracing the accretion history of the Universe. Although X-ray and infrared data of AGN with a different level of absorption could provide a direct tool to test the predictions of the AGN models, only few sparse SED of obscured AGN are available so far. We present here the results obtained from Spitzer observations of a statistically complete sample of obscured AGN drawn from the XMM-Newton Hard Bright Sample. This is the largest hard X-ray sample with a complete spectroscopic identification. The Spitzer data, combined with good X-ray and optical spectroscopic data, has allowed us to define powerful diagnostic plots to select heavily obscured AGNs and to build up their spectral energy distributions.

  4. Optically-selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Gordon

    2016-08-01

    will discuss the selection and properties of optically-selected AGN as contrasted with other multi-wavelength investigations. While optical surveys are able to identify *more* AGNs than other wavelengths, this size comes with a bias towards brighter, unobscured sources. Although optical surveys are not ideal for probing obscured AGNs, I will discuss how they can guide our search for them. The bias towards unobscured sources in the optical is partially mitigated, however, by an increase in information content for the sources that *are* identified---in the form of physics probed by the combination of optical continuum, absorption, and emission. An example is the ability to estimate the mass of AGNs based on the optical/UV emission lines. I will discuss the range of mass (and accretion rate) probed by the optical in addition to serious biases in the black hole mass scaling relations that corrupt these estimates at high redshift.

  5. First X-ray Statistical Tests for Clumpy-Torus Models: Constraints from RXTEmonitoring of Seyfert AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowitz, Alex; Krumpe, Mirko; Nikutta, R.

    2016-06-01

    In two papers (Markowitz, Krumpe, & Nikutta 2014, and Nikutta et al., in prep.), we derive the first X-ray statistical constraints for clumpy-torus models in Seyfert AGN by quantifying multi-timescale variability in line of-sight X-ray absorbing gas as a function of optical classification.We systematically search for discrete absorption events in the vast archive of RXTE monitoring of 55 nearby type Is and Compton-thin type IIs. We are sensitive to discrete absorption events due to clouds of full-covering, neutral/mildly ionized gas transiting the line of sight. Our results apply to both dusty and non-dusty clumpy media, and probe model parameter space complementary to that for eclipses observed with XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra.We detect twelve eclipse events in eight Seyferts, roughly tripling the number previously published from this archive. Event durations span hours to years. Most of our detected clouds are Compton-thin, and most clouds' distances from the black hole are inferred to be commensurate with the outer portions of the BLR or the inner regions of infrared-emitting dusty tori.We present the density profiles of the highest-quality eclipse events; the column density profile for an eclipsing cloud in NGC 3783 is doubly spiked, possibly indicating a cloud that is being tidallysheared. We discuss implications for cloud distributions in the context of clumpy-torus models. We calculate eclipse probabilities for orientation-dependent Type I/II unification schemes.We present constraints on cloud sizes, stability, and radial distribution. We infer that clouds' small angular sizes as seen from the SMBH imply 107 clouds required across the BLR + torus. Cloud size is roughly proportional to distance from the black hole, hinting at the formation processes (e.g., disk fragmentation). All observed clouds are sub-critical with respect to tidal disruption; self-gravity alone cannot contain them. External forces, such as magnetic fields or ambient pressure, are

  6. Modeling X-ray Absorbers in AGNs with MHD-Driven Accretion-Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C. R.; Tombesi, F.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2013-04-01

    We have proposed a systematic view of the observed X-ray absorbers, namely warm absorbers (WAs) in soft X-ray and highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs), in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind models. While potentially complicated by variability and thermal instability in these energetic outflows, in this simplistic model we have calculated 2D kinematic field as well as density and ionization structure of the wind with density profile of 1/r corresponding to a constant column distribution per decade of ionization parameter. In particular we show semi-analytically that the inner layer of the disk-wind manifests itself as the strongly-ionized fast outflows while the outer layer is identified as the moderately-ionized absorbers. The computed characteristics of these two apparently distinct absorbers are consistent with X-ray data (i.e. a factor of ~100 difference in column and ionization parameters as well as low wind velocity vs. near-relativistic flow). With the predicted contour curves for these wind parameters one can constrain allowed regions for the presence of WAs and UFOs.The model further implies that the UFO's gas pressure is comparable to that of the observed radio jet in 3C111 suggesting that the magnetized disk-wind with density profile of 1/r is a viable agent to help sustain such a self-collimated jet at small radii.

  7. The Alpine snow-albedo feedback in regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Kevin J.-P. M.; Kotlarski, Sven; Scherrer, Simon C.; Schär, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the snow-albedo feedback (SAF) on 2m temperatures and their future changes in the European Alps is investigated in the ENSEMBLES regional climate models (RCMs) with a focus on the spring season. A total of 14 re-analysis-driven RCM experiments covering the period 1961-2000 and 10 GCM-driven transient climate change projections for 1950-2099 are analysed. A positive springtime SAF is found in all RCMs, but the range of the diagnosed SAF is large. Results are compared against an observation-based SAF estimate. For some RCMs, values very close to this estimate are found; other models show a considerable overestimation of the SAF. Net shortwave radiation has the largest influence of all components of the energy balance on the diagnosed SAF and can partly explain its spatial variability. Model deficiencies in reproducing 2m temperatures above snow and ice and associated cold temperature biases at high elevations seem to contribute to a SAF overestimation in several RCMs. The diagnosed SAF in the observational period strongly influences the estimated SAF contribution to twenty first century temperature changes in the European Alps. This contribution is subject to a clear elevation dependency that is governed by the elevation-dependent change in the number of snow days. Elevations of maximum SAF contribution range from 1500 to 2000 m in spring and are found above 2000 m in summer. Here, a SAF contribution to the total simulated temperature change between 0 and 0.5 °C until 2099 (multi-model mean in spring: 0.26 °C) or 0 and 14 % (multi-model mean in spring: 8 %) is obtained for models showing a realistic SAF. These numbers represent a well-funded but only approximate estimate of the SAF contribution to future warming, and a remaining contribution of model-specific SAF misrepresentations cannot be ruled out.

  8. JetCurry: Modeling 3D geometry of AGN jets from 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosak, Katie; Li, KunYang; Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2017-02-01

    Written in Python, JetCurry models the 3D geometry of jets from 2-D images. JetCurry requires NumPy and SciPy and incorporates emcee (ascl:1303.002) and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002), and optionally uses VPython. From a defined initial part of the jet that serves as a reference point, JetCurry finds the position of highest flux within a bin of data in the image matrix and fits along the x axis for the general location of the bends in the jet. A spline fitting is used to smooth out the resulted jet stream.

  9. Modeling Feedbacks Between Water and Vegetation in the Climate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James R.; Russell, Gary L.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Not only is water essential for life on earth, but life itself affects the global hydrologic cycle and consequently the climate of the planet. Whether the global feedbacks between life and the hydrologic cycle tend to stabilize the climate system about some equilibrium level is difficult to assess. We use a global climate model to examine how the presence of vegetation can affect the hydrologic cycle in a particular region. A control for the present climate is compared with a model experiment in which the Sahara Desert is replaced by vegetation in the form of trees and shrubs common to the Sahel region. A second model experiment is designed to identify the separate roles of two different effects of vegetation, namely the modified albedo and the presence of roots that can extract moisture from deeper soil layers. The results show that the presence of vegetation leads to increases in precipitation and soil moisture in western Sahara. In eastern Sahara, the changes are less clear. The increase in soil moisture is greater when the desert albedo is replaced by the vegetation albedo than when both the vegetation albedo and roots are added. The effect of roots is to withdraw water from deeper layers during the dry season. One implication of this study is that the insertion of vegetation into the Sahara modifies the hydrologic cycle so that the vegetation is more likely to persist than initially.

  10. Sensory feedback in a bump attractor model of path integration.

    PubMed

    Poll, Daniel B; Nguyen, Khanh; Kilpatrick, Zachary P

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian spatial navigation systems utilize several different sensory information channels. This information is converted into a neural code that represents the animal's current position in space by engaging place cell, grid cell, and head direction cell networks. In particular, sensory landmark (allothetic) cues can be utilized in concert with an animal's knowledge of its own velocity (idiothetic) cues to generate a more accurate representation of position than path integration provides on its own (Battaglia et al. The Journal of Neuroscience 24(19):4541-4550 (2004)). We develop a computational model that merges path integration with feedback from external sensory cues that provide a reliable representation of spatial position along an annular track. Starting with a continuous bump attractor model, we explore the impact of synaptic spatial asymmetry and heterogeneity, which disrupt the position code of the path integration process. We use asymptotic analysis to reduce the bump attractor model to a single scalar equation whose potential represents the impact of asymmetry and heterogeneity. Such imperfections cause errors to build up when the network performs path integration, but these errors can be corrected by an external control signal representing the effects of sensory cues. We demonstrate that there is an optimal strength and decay rate of the control signal when cues appear either periodically or randomly. A similar analysis is performed when errors in path integration arise from dynamic noise fluctuations. Again, there is an optimal strength and decay of discrete control that minimizes the path integration error.

  11. Feedback and sensitivity in an electrical circuit: An analog for climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    2010-07-27

    Earth's climate sensitivity is often interpreted in terms of feedbacks that can alter the sensitivity from that of a no-feedback Stefan-Boltzmann radiator, with the feedback concept and algebra introduced by analogy to the use of this concept in the electronics literature. This analogy is quite valuable in interpreting the sensitivity of the climate system, but usage of this algebra and terminology in the climate literature is often inconsistent, with resultant potential for confusion and loss of physical insight. Here a simple and readily understood electrical resistance circuit is examined in terms of feedback theory to introduce and define the terminology that is used to quantify feedbacks. This formalism is applied to the feedbacks in an energy-balance model of Earth's climate and used to interpret the magnitude of feedback in the climate system that corresponds to present estimates of Earth's climate sensitivity.

  12. Obscured AGN Accretion Across Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coil, Alison

    for the unified model of AGN. Our X-ray absorption study will accurately determine the distribution of AGN absorption column densities. We will measure the dependence of this absorption distribution on both luminosity and redshift to z~3, resolving outstanding discrepancies in the literature. We propose to develop and implement a new Bayesian X-ray spectral fitting technique to obtain unbiased measurements of absorption column densities and their associated uncertainties. By compiling large samples of X-ray sources over a wide range of redshifts and depths and fully propagating the errors in individual measurements of column densities and X-ray luminosities, we will robustly measure the joint evolution of AGN accretion activity and absorption properties. In all of these projects we will adopt advanced methodologies to quantify and correct for selection effects, incompleteness, and biases, which severely hamper such studies if not fully accounted for. Our proposed work will allow us to place strong constraints on the prominence of obscured AGN activity and reveal the true evolution of AGN accretion over the history of the Universe. To ensure the legacy and impact of our findings, we commit to publicly release major, high-level data products. This will build on the substantial archive of public data available from the AEGIS and DEEP survey teams and the forthcoming release from PRIMUS. We will release catalogs providing accurate measurements of X-ray luminosities, column densities, and photometric redshifts with robust error estimates for our large samples of X-ray sources, covering the most prominent extragalactic survey fields.

  13. Computer modelling of bunch-by-bunch feedback for the SLAC B-factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, D.; Fox, J.D.; Hosseini, W.; Klaisner, L.; Morton, P.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Thompson, K.A. ); Lambertson, G. )

    1991-05-01

    The SLAC B-factory design, with over 1600 high current bunches circulating in each ring, will require a feedback system to avoid coupled-bunch instabilities. A computer model of the storage ring, including the RF system, wave fields, synchrotron radiation loss, and the bunch-by-bunch feedback system is presented. The feedback system model represents the performance of a fast phase detector front end (including system noise and imperfections), a digital filter used to generate a correction voltage, and a power amplifier and beam kicker system. The combined ring-feedback system model is used to study the feedback system performance required to suppress instabilities and to quantify the dynamics of the system. Results are presented which show the time development of coupled bunch instabilities and the damping action of the feedback system. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Towards modelling X-ray reverberation in AGN: piecing together the extended corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, D. R.; Cackett, E. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Models of X-ray reverberation from extended coronae are developed from general relativistic ray tracing simulations. Reverberation lags between correlated variability in the directly observed continuum emission and that reflected from the accretion disc arise due to the additional light travel time between the corona and reflecting disc. X-ray reverberation is detected from an increasing sample of Seyfert galaxies and a number of common properties are observed, including a transition from the characteristic reverberation signature at high frequencies to a hard lag within the continuum component at low frequencies, as well as a pronounced dip in the reverberation lag at 3 keV. These features are not trivially explained by the reverberation of X-rays originating from simple point sources. We therefore model reverberation from coronae extended both over the surface of the disc and vertically. Causal propagation through its extent for both the simple case of constant velocity propagation and propagation linked to the viscous time-scale in the underlying accretion disc is included as well as stochastic variability arising due to turbulence locally on the disc. We find that the observed features of X-ray reverberation in Seyfert galaxies can be explained if the long time-scale variability is dominated by the viscous propagation of fluctuations through the corona. The corona extends radially at low height over the surface of the disc but with a bright central region in which fluctuations propagate up the black hole rotation axis driven by more rapid variability arising from the innermost regions of the accretion flow.

  15. An accurate halo model for fitting non-linear cosmological power spectra and baryonic feedback models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Heymans, C.; Joudaki, S.; Heavens, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    We present an optimized variant of the halo model, designed to produce accurate matter power spectra well into the non-linear regime for a wide range of cosmological models. To do this, we introduce physically motivated free parameters into the halo-model formalism and fit these to data from high-resolution N-body simulations. For a variety of Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and wCDM models, the halo-model power is accurate to ≃ 5 per cent for k ≤ 10h Mpc-1 and z ≤ 2. An advantage of our new halo model is that it can be adapted to account for the effects of baryonic feedback on the power spectrum. We demonstrate this by fitting the halo model to power spectra from the OWLS (OverWhelmingly Large Simulations) hydrodynamical simulation suite via parameters that govern halo internal structure. We are able to fit all feedback models investigated at the 5 per cent level using only two free parameters, and we place limits on the range of these halo parameters for feedback models investigated by the OWLS simulations. Accurate predictions to high k are vital for weak-lensing surveys, and these halo parameters could be considered nuisance parameters to marginalize over in future analyses to mitigate uncertainty regarding the details of feedback. Finally, we investigate how lensing observables predicted by our model compare to those from simulations and from HALOFIT for a range of k-cuts and feedback models and quantify the angular scales at which these effects become important. Code to calculate power spectra from the model presented in this paper can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode.

  16. Observational evidence for thin AGN disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai

    1992-01-01

    AGN spectrum and spectral features, polarization, inclination, and X-ray line and continuum reflection features are discussed in a critical way in order to determine the ones that are the least model-dependent. The sign and strength of absorption and emission edges are found to be model-dependent, and relativistic broadening and shifting makes them hard to detect. The presence or absence of the predicted Lyman edge polarization feature may be used as a decisive test for thin, bare AGN disks. Other good model-independent tests are several inclination-related line and continuum correlations in big AGN samples. It is shown that electron temperature near the surface of the disk can greatly exceed the disk equilibrium temperature, which causes deviations from LTE. This effect must be incorporated into realistic disk models.

  17. Soil moisture - precipitation feedbacks in observations and models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C.

    2013-12-01

    There is considerable uncertainty about the strength, geographical extent, and even the sign of feedbacks between soil moisture and precipitation. Whilst precipitation trivially increases soil moisture, the impact of soil moisture, via surface fluxes, on convective rainfall is far from straight-forward, and likely depends on space and time scale, soil and synoptic conditions, and the nature of the convection itself. In considering how daytime convection responds to surface fluxes, large-scale models based on convective parameterisations may not necessarily provide reliable depictions, particularly given their long-standing inability to reproduce a realistic diurnal cycle of convection. On the other hand, long-term satellite data provide the potential to establish robust relationships between soil moisture and precipitation across the world, notwithstanding some fundamental weaknesses and uncertainties in the datasets. Here, results from regional and global satellite-based analyses are presented. Globally, using 3-hourly precipitation and daily soil moisture datasets, a methodology has been developed to compare the statistics of antecedent soil moisture in the region of localised afternoon rain events (Taylor et al 2012). Specifically the analysis tests whether there are any significant differences in pre-event soil moisture between rainfall maxima and nearby (50-100km) minima. The results reveal a clear signal across a number of semi-arid regions, most notably North Africa, indicating a preference for afternoon rain over drier soil. Analysis by continent and by climatic zone reveals that this signal (locally a negative feedback) is evident in other continents and climatic zones, but is somewhat weaker. This may be linked to the inherent geographical differences across the world, as detection of a feedback requires water-stressed surfaces coincident with frequent active convective initiations. The differences also reflect the quality and utility of the soil moisture

  18. A Moral Experience Feedback Loop: Modeling a System of Moral Self-Cultivation in Everyday Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherblom, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    This "systems thinking" model illustrates a common feedback loop by which people engage the moral world and continually reshape their moral sensibility. The model highlights seven processes that collectively form this feedback loop: beginning with (1) one's current moral sensibility which shapes processes of (2) perception, (3)…

  19. Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in an Isolated Elliptical Galaxy: The Effect of Strong Radiative Feedback in the Kinetic Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zhaoming; Yuan, Feng; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ciotti, Luca; Novak, Gregory S.

    2014-07-01

    Based on two-dimensional high-resolution hydrodynamic numerical simulation, we study the mechanical and radiative feedback effects from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) on the cosmological evolution of an isolated elliptical galaxy. The inner boundary of the simulation domain is carefully chosen so that the fiducial Bondi radius is resolved and the accretion rate of the black hole is determined self-consistently. It is well known that when the accretion rates are high and low, the central AGNs will be in cold and hot accretion modes, which correspond to the radiative and kinetic feedback modes, respectively. The emitted spectrum from the hot accretion flows is harder than that from the cold accretion flows, which could result in a higher Compton temperature accompanied by a more efficient radiative heating, according to previous theoretical works. Such a difference of the Compton temperature between the two feedback modes, the focus of this study, has been neglected in previous works. Significant differences in the kinetic feedback mode are found as a result of the stronger Compton heating. More importantly, if we constrain models to correctly predict black hole growth and AGN duty cycle after cosmological evolution, we find that the favored model parameters are constrained: mechanical feedback efficiency diminishes with decreasing luminosity (the maximum efficiency being ~= 10-3.5), and X-ray Compton temperature increases with decreasing luminosity, although models with fixed mechanical efficiency and Compton temperature can be found that are satisfactory as well. We conclude that radiative feedback in the kinetic mode is much more important than previously thought.

  20. Intermittent Activity in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiuk, A.; Czerny, B.; Siemiginowska, A.

    2004-10-01

    There is a growing evidence that the AGN activity could be intermittent. It remains an open question if this behavior is caused by changes in the fuel sup- ply to the supermassive black hole from the large distances, or rather by a processes intrinsic to the active nucleus. We consider the possibility that ac- cretion onto a supermassive black hole is controlled by an accretion disk which is subject to the hydro- gen ionization instability. This drives the observed on-off activity cycle, since periodically the accretion flow becomes inefficient and the disk goes to quies- cence. We consider effects of the MHD turbulence on the viscosity during the evolution of a standard α - disk. We perform a self-consistency check of the α de- scription of the angular momentum transfer. Hav- ing shown that the viscosity parameter is constant throughout the whole instability cycle, as implied by the strength of the MHD turbulence, we calcu- late the time evolution of the disk under the influ- ence of the ionization instability. We demonstrate that if the accretion onto a supermassive black hole proceeds through an outer standard accretion disk and inner, radiatively inefficient and advection dom- inated flow, the modelled amplitudes of disk lumi- nosity variations are sufficiently high to account for the observations. Key words: accretion disks; galaxies: active.

  1. Reduced-order model based feedback control of the modified Hasegawa-Wakatani model

    SciTech Connect

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Ma, Z.; Gates, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; Parker, J. B.

    2013-04-15

    In this work, the development of model-based feedback control that stabilizes an unstable equilibrium is obtained for the Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani (MHW) equations, a classic model in plasma turbulence. First, a balanced truncation (a model reduction technique that has proven successful in flow control design problems) is applied to obtain a low dimensional model of the linearized MHW equation. Then, a model-based feedback controller is designed for the reduced order model using linear quadratic regulators. Finally, a linear quadratic Gaussian controller which is more resistant to disturbances is deduced. The controller is applied on the non-reduced, nonlinear MHW equations to stabilize the equilibrium and suppress the transition to drift-wave induced turbulence.

  2. Diagnostic study of climate feedback processes in atmospheric general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.H.; Cess, R.D.; Hack, J.J.; Kiehl, J.T.

    1994-03-20

    A method is proposed to diagnose climate feedbacks of water vapor, temperature lapse-rate, and cloud variations in atmospheric general circulation models. It is then applied to study differences in sensitivity of the National Center for Atmospheric Research community climate model (CCM2) and two hybrid versions of CCM2 with different cumulus-convection schemes. Water vapor feedback and temperature lapse-rate feedback differ among the models due to different efficiencies of heat and moisture transport by cumulus convections. A large compensation occurs between water vapor feedback and temperature lapse-rate feedback. This leads to similar clear-sky sensitivities in the models. Cloud-radiative feedback is negative in CCM2 with a {delta}SST climate change due to the vigorous cumulus-convective scheme. Stronger convection warms the upper troposphere and reduces its cloudiness more, resulting in negative longwave cloud-radiative feedback. In models where a moist-adiabatic-adjustment scheme and then a decoupling of the atmospheric boundary layer are subsequently used, intensity of cumulus convection is successively reduced and cloud-radiative feedback changes to either neutral or positive. 31 refs., 21 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. Cascading and feedback in interactive models of production: a reflection of forward modeling?

    PubMed

    Dell, Gary S

    2013-08-01

    Interactive theories of lexical retrieval in language production assume that activation cascades from earlier to later processing levels, and feeds back in the reverse direction. This commentary invites Pickering & Garrod (P&G) to consider whether cascading and feedback can be seen as a form of forwarding modeling within a hierarchical production system.

  4. AGN-host galaxy connection: multiwavelength study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, M.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; García, A. M. Pérez; Bongiovanni, A.; Cepa, J.; Cepa

    2013-02-01

    The connection between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and their hosts showed to be important for understanding the formation and evolution of active galaxies. Using X-ray and deep optical data, we study how morphology and colours are related to X-ray properties at redshifts z<=2.0 for a sample of > 300 X-ray detected AGN in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS; Furusawa et al. 2008) and Groth-Westphal Strip (GWS; Pović et al. 2009) fields. We performed our morphological classification using the galSVM code (Huertas-Company et al. 2008), which is a new method that is particularly suited when dealing with high-redshift sources. To separate objects between X-ray unobscured and obscured, we used X-ray hardness ratio HR(0.5-2 keV/2-4.5 keV). Colour-magnitude diagrams were studied in relationship to redshift, morphology, X-ray obscuration, and X-ray-to-optical flux ratio. Around 50% of X-ray detected AGN at z<=2.0 analysed in this work reside in spheroidal and bulge-dominated galaxies, while at least 18% have disk-dominated hosts. This suggests that different mechanisms may be responsible for triggering the nuclear activity. When analysing populations of X-ray detected AGN in both colour-magnitude (CMD) and colour-stellar mass diagrams (Figure 1), the highest number of sources is found to reside in the green valley at redshifts ~ 0.5-1.5. For the first time we studied CMD of these AGN in relation to morphology and X-ray obscuration, finding that they can reside in both early- and late-type hosts, where both morphological types cover similar ranges of X-ray obscuration (Figure 1). Our findings appear to confirm some previous suggestions that X-ray selected AGN residing in the green valley represent a transitional population (e.g. Nandra et al. 2007, Silverman et al. 2008, Treister et al. 2009), quenching star formation by means of different AGN feedback mechanisms and evolving to red-sequence galaxies. More details on analysis and results presented here can be found in

  5. Roles of energy conservation and climate feedback in Bjerknes compensation: a coupled modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Haijin; Yang, Haijun; Yin, Jie

    2016-10-01

    The roles of energy balance and climate feedback in Bjerknes compensation (BJC) are studied through wind-perturbation experiments in a coupled climate model. Shutting down surface winds over the ocean causes significant reductions in both wind-driven and thermohaline overturning circulations, leading to a remarkable decrease in poleward ocean heat transport (OHT). The sea surface temperature (SST) responds with an increasing meridional gradient, resulting in a stronger Hadley Cell, and thus an enhanced atmosphere heat transport (AHT), compensating the OHT decrease. This is the so-called BJC. Coupled model experiments confirm that the occurrence of BJC is an intrinsic requirement of local energy conservation, and local climate feedback determines the degree of BJC, consistent with our previous theoretical results. Negative (positive or zero) local feedback results in AHT change undercompensating (overcompensating or perfectly compensating) OHT change. Using the radiative kernel technique, the general local feedback between the radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere and surface temperature can be partitioned into individual feedbacks that are related to perturbations in temperature, water vapor, surface albedo, and clouds. We find that the overcompensation in the tropics (extratropics) is mainly caused by positive feedbacks related to water vapor and clouds (surface albedo). The longwave feedbacks related to SST and atmospheric temperature are always negative and strong outside the tropics, well offsetting positive feedbacks in most regions and resulting in undercompensation. Different dominant feedbacks give different BJC scenarios at different regions, acting together to maintain the local energy balance.

  6. Modeling RF Feedback in Elegant for Bunch-Lengthening Studies for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Berenc, Tim; Borland, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The proposed Advanced Photon Source (APS) multibend achromat (MBA) lattice includes a passive bunchlengthening cavity to alleviate lifetime and emittance concerns. Feedback in the main radio-frequency (rf) system affects the overall impedance presented to the beam in this double rf system. To aid beam stability studies, a realistic model of rf feedback has been developed and implemented in elegant and Pelegant.

  7. Self-regulated growth of supermassive black holes by a dual jet-heating active galactic nucleus feedback mechanism: methods, tests and implications for cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Teyssier, Romain

    2012-03-01

    We develop a subgrid model for the growth of supermassive black holes (BHs) and their associated active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. This model transposes previous attempts to describe BH accretion and AGN feedback with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique to the adaptive mesh refinement framework. It also furthers their development by implementing a new jet-like outflow treatment of the AGN feedback which we combine with the heating mode traditionally used in the SPH approach. Thus, our approach allows one to test the robustness of the conclusions derived from simulating the impact of self-regulated AGN feedback on galaxy formation vis-à-vis the numerical method. Assuming that BHs are created in the early stages of galaxy formation, they grow by mergers and accretion of gas at a Eddington-limited Bondi accretion rate. However this growth is regulated by AGN feedback which we model using two different modes: a quasar-heating mode when accretion rates on to the BHs are comparable to the Eddington rate, and a radio-jet mode at lower accretion rates which not only deposits energy, but also deposits mass and momentum on the grid. In other words, our feedback model deposits energy as a succession of thermal bursts and jet outflows depending on the properties of the gas surrounding the BHs. We assess the plausibility of such a model by comparing our results to observational measurements of the co-evolution of BHs and their host galaxy properties, and check their robustness with respect to numerical resolution. We show that AGN feedback must be a crucial physical ingredient for the formation of massive galaxies as it appears to be able to efficiently prevent the accumulation of and/or expel cold gas out of haloes/galaxies and significantly suppress star formation. Our model predicts that the relationship between BHs and their host galaxy mass evolves as a function of redshift, because of the vigorous accretion

  8. AGN-2979, an inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase activation, does not affect serotonin synthesis in Flinders Sensitive Line rats, a rat model of depression, but produces a significant effect in Flinders Resistant Line rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanemaru, Kazuya; Nishi, Kyoko; Diksic, Mirko

    2009-01-01

    The neurotransmitter, serotonin, is involved in several brain functions, including both normal, physiological functions, and pathophysiological functions. Alterations in any of the normal parameters of serotonergic neurotransmission can produce several different psychiatric disorders, including major depression. In many instances, brain neurochemical variables are not able to be studied properly in humans, thus making the use of good animal models extremely valuable. One of these animal models is the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) of rats, which has face, predictive and constructive validities in relation to human depression. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activation inhibitor, AGN-2979, on the FSL rats (rats with depression-like behaviour), and compare it to the effect on the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) of rats used as the control rats. The effect was evaluated by measuring changes in regional serotonin synthesis in the vehicle treated rats (FSL-VEH and FRL-VEH) relative to those measured in the AGN-2979 treated rats (FSL-AGN and FRL-AGN). Regional serotonin synthesis was measured autoradiographically in more than thirty brain regions. The measurements were performed using α-[14C]methyl-L-tryptophan as the tracer. The results indicate that AGN-2979 did not produce a significant reduction of TPH activity in the AGN-2979 group relative to the vehicle group (a reduction would have been observed if there had been an activation of TPH by the experimental set up) in the FSL rats. On the other hand, there was a highly significant reduction of synthesis in the FRL rats treated by AGN-2979, relative to the vehicle group. Together, the results demonstrate that in the FSL rats, AGN-2979 does not affect serotonin synthesis. This suggests that there was no activation of TPH in the FSL rats during the experimental procedure, but such activation did occur in the FRL rats. Because of this finding, it could be

  9. A cloud feedback emulator (CFE, version 1.0) for an intermediate complexity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, David J.; Schmittner, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    The dominant source of inter-model differences in comprehensive global climate models (GCMs) are cloud radiative effects on Earth's energy budget. Intermediate complexity models, while able to run more efficiently, often lack cloud feedbacks. Here, we describe and evaluate a method for applying GCM-derived shortwave and longwave cloud feedbacks from 4 × CO2 and Last Glacial Maximum experiments to the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model. The method generally captures the spread in top-of-the-atmosphere radiative feedbacks between the original GCMs, which impacts the magnitude and spatial distribution of surface temperature changes and climate sensitivity. These results suggest that the method is suitable to incorporate multi-model cloud feedback uncertainties in ensemble simulations with a single intermediate complexity model.

  10. On the influence of poleward jet shift on shortwave cloud feedback in global climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Casey J.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments designed to separate the effect of atmospheric warming from the effect of shifts of the eddy-driven jet on shortwave (SW) cloud feedback are performed with three global climate models (GCMs). In each model a warming simulation produces a robust SW cloud feedback dipole, with a negative (positive) feedback in the high-latitudes (subtropics). The cloud brightening in high-latitudes that characterizes warming simulations is not produced by jet shifts alone in any of the models, but is highly sensitive to perturbations of freezing temperature seen by the cloud microphysics scheme, indicating that thermodynamic mechanisms involving the phase of cloud condensate dominate the SW feedback at high-latitudes. In one of the models a poleward jet shift causes significant cloud dimming throughout the midlatitudes, but in two models it does not. Differences in cloud response to jet shifts in two of the models are attributed to differences in the shallow convection parameterizations.

  11. YOUNG AGN OUTBURST RUNNING OVER OLDER X-RAY CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdán, Ákos; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Randall, Scott; Jones, Christine; Giacintucci, Simona; Churazov, Eugene; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Noell-Storr, Jacob

    2014-02-20

    Although the energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is believed to have a profound effect on the evolution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, details of AGN heating remain elusive. Here, we study NGC 193—a nearby lenticular galaxy—based on X-ray (Chandra) and radio (Very Large Array and Giant Meter-wave Radio Telescope) observations. These data reveal the complex AGN outburst history of the galaxy: we detect a pair of inner X-ray cavities, an outer X-ray cavity, a shock front, and radio lobes extending beyond the inner cavities. We suggest that the inner cavities were produced ∼78 Myr ago by a weaker AGN outburst, while the outer cavity, the radio lobes, and the shock front are due to a younger (13-26 Myr) and 4-8 times more powerful outburst. Combining this with the observed morphology of NGC 193, we conclude that NGC 193 likely represents the first example of a second, more powerful, AGN outburst overrunning an older, weaker outburst. These results help us to understand how the outburst energy is dissipated uniformly in the core of galaxies, and therefore may play a crucial role in resolving how AGN outbursts suppress the formation of large cooling flows at cluster centers.

  12. Young AGN Outburst Running over Older X-Ray Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Akos; van Weeren, Reinout Johannes; Kraft, Ralph; Forman, William; Scott, Randall; Giacintucci, Simona; Churazov, Eugene; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Noell-Storr, Jacob; Jones, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Although the energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is believed to have a profound effect on the evolution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, details of AGN heating remain elusive. Here, we study NGC 193 -- a nearby lenticular galaxy in a group -- based on X-ray and radio observations. These data reveal the complex AGN outburst history of the galaxy: we detect a pair of inner X-ray cavities, an outer X-ray cavity, a shock front, and radio lobes extending beyond the inner cavities. We suggest that the inner cavities were produced about 78 Myr ago by a weaker AGN outburst, while the outer cavity, the radio lobes, and the shock front are due to a younger (13-26 Myr) and 4-8 times more powerful outburst. Combining this with the observed morphology of NGC 193, we conclude that NGC 193 likely represents the first example of a second, more powerful, AGN outburst overrunning an older, weaker outburst. These results help us to understand how the outburst energy is dissipated uniformly in the core of galaxies, and therefore may play a crucial role in resolving how AGN outbursts suppress the formation of large cooling flows at cluster centers.

  13. Unwrapping the X-ray Spectra of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C.

    2015-07-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are complex phenomena. At the heart of an AGN is a relativistic accretion disk around the spinning supermassive black hole with a compact, probably pair-regulated, X-ray corona. On larger scales, the outer accretion disk and molecular torus act as the reservoirs of gas for the continuing AGN activity. And on all scales from the black hole outwards, powerful winds (and sometimes jets) are seen and can dominate the source energetics. As I shall review in this talk, each of these components imprints its own characteristic signature into the (time-variable) X-ray spectrum of the AGN. I shall then touch upon a few contemporary topics : (i) the use of new spectral timing techniques for aiding in the decomposition of the spectrum and for probing the geometry of the AGN central engine, (ii) the determination of supermassive black hole spin, (iii) direct confirmation of quasar-mode feedback in some luminous systems. The prospect of AGN observations with Astro-H will be discussed.

  14. How AGN Jets Heat the Intracluster Medium—Insights from Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.-Y. Karen; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-10-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is believed to prevent catastrophic cooling in galaxy clusters. However, how the feedback energy is transformed into heat, and how the AGN jets heat the intracluster medium (ICM) isotropically, still remain elusive. In this work, we gain insights into the relative importance of different heating mechanisms using three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including cold gas accretion and momentum-driven jet feedback, which are the most successful models to date in terms of reproducing the properties of cool cores. We find that there is net heating within two “jet cones” (within ∼30° from the axis of jet precession) where the ICM gains entropy by shock heating and mixing with the hot thermal gas within bubbles. Outside the jet cones, the ambient gas is heated by weak shocks, but not enough to overcome radiative cooling, therefore, forming a “reduced” cooling flow. Consequently, the cluster core is in a process of “gentle circulation” over billions of years. Within the jet cones, there is significant adiabatic cooling as the gas is uplifted by buoyantly rising bubbles; outside the cones, energy is supplied by the inflow of already-heated gas from the jet cones as well as adiabatic compression as the gas moves toward the center. In other words, the fluid dynamics self-adjusts such that it compensates and transports the heat provided by the AGN, and hence no fine-tuning of the heating profile of any process is necessary. Throughout the cluster evolution, turbulent energy is only at the percent level compared to gas thermal energy, and thus turbulent heating is not the main source of heating in our simulation.

  15. A UV to mid-IR study of AGN selection

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stern, Daniel; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Moustakas, John

    2014-07-20

    We classify the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 431,038 sources in the 9 deg{sup 2} Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). There are up to 17 bands of data available per source, including ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (NDWFS), near-IR (NEWFIRM), and mid-infrared (IRAC and MIPS) data, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for ∼20,000 objects, primarily from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. We fit galaxy, active galactic nucleus (AGN), stellar, and brown dwarf templates to the observed SEDs, which yield spectral classes for the Galactic sources and photometric redshifts and galaxy/AGN luminosities for the extragalactic sources. The photometric redshift precision of the galaxy and AGN samples are σ/(1 + z) = 0.040 and σ/(1 + z) = 0.169, respectively, with the worst 5% outliers excluded. On the basis of the χ{sub ν}{sup 2} of the SED fit for each SED model, we are able to distinguish between Galactic and extragalactic sources for sources brighter than I = 23.5 mag. We compare the SED fits for a galaxy-only model and a galaxy-AGN model. Using known X-ray and spectroscopic AGN samples, we confirm that SED fitting can be successfully used as a method to identify large populations of AGNs, including spatially resolved AGNs with significant contributions from the host galaxy and objects with the emission line ratios of 'composite' spectra. We also use our results to compare with the X-ray, mid-IR, optical color, and emission line ratio selection techniques. For an F-ratio threshold of F > 10, we find 16,266 AGN candidates brighter than I = 23.5 mag and a surface density of ∼1900 AGN deg{sup –2}.

  16. Stabilizing PID controllers for a single-link biomechanical model with position, velocity, and force feedback.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Kamran; Roy, Anindo

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we address the problem of PID stabilization of a single-link inverted pendulum-based biomechanical model with force feedback, two levels of position and velocity feedback, and with delays in all the feedback loops. The novelty of the proposed model lies in its physiological relevance, whereby both small and medium latency sensory feedbacks from muscle spindle (MS), and force feedback from Golgi tendon organ (GTO) are included in the formulation. The biomechanical model also includes active and passive viscoelastic feedback from Hill-type muscle model and a second-order low-pass function for muscle activation. The central nervous system (CNS) regulation of postural movement is represented by a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. Padé approximation of delay terms is employed to arrive at an overall rational transfer function of the biomechanical model. The Hermite-Biehler theorem is then used to derive stability results, leading to the existence of stabilizing PID controllers. An algorithm for selection of stabilizing feedback gains is developed using the linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach.

  17. Average Heating Rate of Hot Atmospheres in Distant Galaxy Clusters by Radio AGN: Evidence for Continuous AGN Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cheng-Jiun; McNamara, B.; Nulsen, P.; Schaffer, R.

    2011-09-01

    X-ray observations of nearby clusters and galaxies have shown that energetic feedback from AGN is heating hot atmospheres and is probably the principal agent that is offsetting cooling flows. Here we examine AGN heating in distant X-ray clusters by cross correlating clusters selected from the 400 Square Degree X-ray Cluster survey with radio sources in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. The jet power for each radio source was determined using scaling relations between radio power and cavity power determined for nearby clusters, groups, and galaxies with atmospheres containing X-ray cavities. Roughly 30% of the clusters show radio emission above a flux threshold of 3 mJy within the central 250 kpc that is presumably associated with the brightest cluster galaxy. We find no significant correlation between radio power, hence jet power, and the X-ray luminosities of clusters in redshift range 0.1 -- 0.6. The detection frequency of radio AGN is inconsistent with the presence of strong cooling flows in 400SD, but cannot rule out the presence of weak cooling flows. The average jet power of central radio AGN is approximately 2 10^{44} erg/s. The jet power corresponds to an average heating of approximately 0.2 keV/particle for gas within R_500. Assuming the current AGN heating rate remained constant out to redshifts of about 2, these figures would rise by a factor of two. Our results show that the integrated energy injected from radio AGN outbursts in clusters is statistically significant compared to the excess entropy in hot atmospheres that is required for the breaking of self-similarity in cluster scaling relations. It is not clear that central AGN in 400SD clusters are maintained by a self-regulated feedback loop at the base of a cooling flow. However, they may play a significant role in preventing the development of strong cooling flows at early epochs.

  18. Theoretical modelling of the feedback stabilization of external MHD modes in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism for stabilization of external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools - the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code - have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modelled in θ and phi, albeit with only a single harmonic variation in phi. Time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell are calculated. An optimized configuration based on an idealized model has been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved.

  19. AGN Variability: Probing Black Hole Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jackeline; O'Brien, Jack; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Kasliwal, Vishal P.

    2017-01-01

    We combine the long temporal baseline of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for quasars in Stripe 82 with the high precision photometry of the Kepler/K2 Satellite to study the physics of optical variability in the accretion disk and supermassive black hole engine. We model the lightcurves directly as Continuous-time Auto Regressive Moving Average processes (C-ARMA) with the Kali analysis package (Kasliwal et al. 2016). These models are extremely robust to irregular sampling and can capture aperiodic variability structure on various timescales. We also estimate the power spectral density and structure function of both the model family and the data. A Green's function kernel may also be estimated for the resulting C-ARMA parameter fit, which may be interpreted as the response to driving impulses such as hotspots in the accretion disk. We also examine available spectra for our AGN sample to relate observed and modelled behavior to spectral properties. The objective of this work is twofold: to explore the proper physical interpretation of different families of C-ARMA models applied to AGN optical flux variability and to relate empirical characteristic timescales of our AGN sample to physical theory or to properties estimated from spectra or simulations like the disk viscosity and temperature. We find that AGN with strong variability features on timescales resolved by K2 are well modelled by a low order C-ARMA family while K2 lightcurves with weak amplitude variability are dominated by outliers and measurement errors which force higher order model fits. This work explores a novel approach to combining SDSS and K2 data sets and presents recovered characteristic timescales of AGN variability.

  20. Introducing Subrid-scale Cloud Feedbacks to Radiation for Regional Meteorological and Cllimate Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Convection systems and associated cloudiness directly influence regional and local radiation budgets, and dynamics and thermodynamics through feedbacks. However, most subgrid-scale convective parameterizations in regional weather and climate models do not consider cumulus cloud ...

  1. Career Goal Revision in Response to Negative Feedback: Testing a Longitudinal Cross-Lagged Model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shi; Creed, Peter A; Hood, Michelle

    2017-02-06

    We tested a model based on goal-setting and self-regulation theories of the cross-lagged relationships among negative career-related feedback, negative affect (career-related stress), and career goal revision (downward goal revision and goal disengagement). Participants were 409 Chinese university/college students (Mage 19 years; 58% female), who completed a survey at 2 time points approximately 6 months apart. Consistent with our hypotheses, negative career-related feedback at T1 was related to more career goal disengagement and greater downward goal revision at T2. Career-related stress partially mediated the relationship between negative career-related feedback and downward goal revision. In addition, there were reverse relationships between negative career-related feedback and career-related stress, and between career-related stress and goal disengagement. These findings highlight important roles for negative career-related feedback and negative affect in young peoples' career goal pursuit. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Testing Unification Models in Dual Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller-Sanchez, Francisco

    Dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which are kpc-scale separation AGN pairs in galaxy mergers, are ideal targets for testing unification models and models of galaxy evolution. By definition, the AGN nature of the two nuclei suggests that they must be consistent with standard unification models (i.e, a dusty torus obscures the central engine in type 2 AGN). At the same time, they are the result of merger-induced nuclear activity. Galaxy evolution models suggest that merger-induced AGNs are heavily obscured for long periods by the high gas densities powering them. Eventually, feedback drives away material, creating a brief window in time in which the AGN is not obscured. Therefore, in these models, there is no need for a small-scale torus. We are constructing for the first time the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the two AGNs in dual AGN systems using data from Hubble and Chandra telescopes, in combination with VLA, Keck and VLT data. However, a critical missing component is dust emission at 30-40 microns, which can only be achieved by SOFIA. We propose FORCAST 31.5 and 37.1 microns observations of the complete sample of 5 confirmed dual AGNs with angular separations >3.5". As suggested by current models, the best wavelength to detect thermal emission from a torus would be between 30-40 microns, where both the non-thermal core and the stellar emission sharply decline, and the torus emission peaks. Thus, FORCAST provides 1) the best angular resolution between 30-40 microns of the current suite of instruments, crucial to separate the emission from the two AGNs, and 2) the largest constraining power for torus models, crucial to characterize the properties of the torus in AGNs.

  3. Knowing and acting in the clinical workplace: trainees' perspectives on modelling and feedback.

    PubMed

    Stegeman, J H; Schoten, E J; Terpstra, O T

    2013-10-01

    In this article we discuss clinical workplace learning using a dual approach: a theoretical one and an empirical one. Drawing on the philosophical work of Aristotle, Polanyi and Schön we posit that the 'knowing and acting' underpinning day-to-day medical practice is personal and embraces by nature a tacit dimension. Consequently, imparting and acquiring this knowledge type necessitates personal interaction between trainer and trainee. The tacit dimension particularly influences modelling and feedback. In our empirical exploration we explore these educational routes in two disparate disciplines: surgery and paediatrics. We use a longitudinal design with in-depth interviewing. Our conclusion on modelling is: modelling is a dynamic and fragmented process reflecting discipline bound characteristics and working styles. On feedback it is: 'feedback' serves as vehicle for three distinctive forms of commenting on performance, each holding a specific power of expression for learning. We propose to view clinical workplace learning as: an interactive master-apprenticeship model encompassing modelling and feedback as natural educational routes. We conceptualise modelling and feedback as 'function' of interaction (developing grounded theory). Modelling function and feedback function may serve to study these routes as didactical components of ongoing interaction between trainer and trainee rather than an educator-driven series of unrelated events.

  4. Does the obscured AGN fraction really depend on luminosity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.

    2015-12-01

    We use a sample of 151 local non-blazar active galactic nuclei (AGN) selected from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray survey to investigate if the observed declining trend of the fraction of obscured (i.e. showing X-ray absorption) AGN with increasing luminosity is mostly an intrinsic or selection effect. Using a torus-obscuration model, we demonstrate that in addition to negative bias, due to absorption in the torus, in finding obscured AGN in hard X-ray flux-limited surveys, there is also positive bias in finding unobscured AGN, due to Compton reflection in the torus. These biases can be even stronger taking into account plausible intrinsic collimation of hard X-ray emission along the axis of the obscuring torus. Given the AGN luminosity function, which steepens at high luminosities, these observational biases lead to a decreasing observed fraction of obscured AGN with increasing luminosity even if this fraction has no intrinsic luminosity dependence. We find that if the central hard X-ray source in AGN is isotropic, the intrinsic (i.e. corrected for biases) obscured AGN fraction still shows a declining trend with luminosity, although the intrinsic obscured fraction is significantly larger than the observed one: the actual fraction is larger than ˜85 per cent at L ≲ 1042.5 erg s-1 (17-60 keV), and decreases to ≲60 per cent at L ≳ 1044 erg s-1. In terms of the half-opening angle θ of an obscuring torus, this implies that θ ≲ 30° in lower luminosity AGN, and θ ≳ 45° in higher luminosity ones. If, however, the emission from the central supermassive black hole is collimated as dL/dΩ ∝ cos α, the intrinsic dependence of the obscured AGN fraction is consistent with a luminosity-independent torus half-opening angle θ ˜ 30°.

  5. Influence of Modelling and Feedback Provided by the Supervisors in a Microskills Training Program for Beginning Counsellors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyffe, Anne E.; Oei, Tian P. S.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-four trainee counselors were allocated to three treatment groups: no modeling, no feedback (NMF); modeling and feedback from the supervisor (MF); and feedback from the supervisor (F). Analysis of variance showed that MF was superior to NMF and F in teaching the skill of reflection of feeling. (Editor/SJL)

  6. NuSTAR Observations of Bright AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Martin; Ballantyne, D. R.; Blandford, R. D.; Boggs, S.; Boydstun, K.; Brenneman, L.; Cappi, M.; Christensen, F.; Craig, W.; Fabian, A.; Fuerst, F.; Guainazzi, M.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F.; Madejski, G. M.; Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Nandra, K.; Reynolds, C. S.; Stern, D.; Walton, D.; Zhang, W.; NuSTAR Team

    2013-01-01

    The dramatically improved signal-to-noise provided by NuSTAR up to ~80 keV allows a qualitative change in our understanding of the X-ray emission of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). Despite intensive investigation for over 30 years, during which the 0.1-10 keV spectra and variability of AGNs have been mapped out in detail, we do not know the origin of the X-ray source in AGNs. The "standard model" of supermassive black hole, accretion disk and relativistic jet does not predict an X-ray source in a straightforward way. It is usually assumed that the X-rays were UV photons from the accretion disk that have been Compton up-scattered in a "hot corona", but the temperature, optical depth and geometry of this corona are unknown - if it exists. NuSTAR enables the measurement of the high energy cut-off of the X-ray spectrum, and so the corona temperature, to be measured precisely for the first time, and tests the relativistic Fe-K line and Compton reflection models. If this model is correct then, with Suzaku and XMM-Newton, NuSTAR can measure black hole spins to high accuracy. We outline the NuSTAR GTO program on bright, unobscured, AGNs including simultaneous observations with Suzaku and XMM-Newton, and show early data.

  7. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

    2008-03-31

    Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

  8. A Dynamic Feedback Model for High Repetition Rate LINAC-Driven FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado Munoz, M.; Doolittle, L.; Emma, P.; Huang, G.; Ratti, A.; Serrano, C.; Byrd, J. M.

    2012-05-20

    One of the concepts for the next generation of linacdriven FELs is a CW superconducting linac driving an electron beam with MHz repetition rates. One of the challenges for next generation FELs is improve the stability of the xray pulses by improving the shot-to-shot stability of the energy, charge, peak current, and timing jitter of the electron beam. A high repetition rate FEL with a CW linac presents an opportunity to use a variety of broadband feedbacks to stabilize the beam parameters. To understand the performance of such a feedback system, we are developing a dynamic model of the machine with a focus on the longitudinal beam properties. The model is being developed as an extension of the LITrack code and includes the dynamics of the beam-cavity interaction, RF feedback, beam-based feedback, and multibunch effects. In this paper, we present a detailed description of this model.

  9. A new switching parameter varying optoelectronic delayed feedback model with computer simulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingfeng; Miao, Suoxia; Cheng, Mengfan; Gao, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new switching parameter varying optoelectronic delayed feedback model is proposed and analyzed by computer simulation. This model is switching between two parameter varying optoelectronic delayed feedback models based on chaotic pseudorandom sequences. Complexity performance results show that this model has a high complexity compared to the original model. Furthermore, this model can conceal the time delay effectively against the auto-correlation function, delayed mutual information and permutation information analysis methods, and can extent the key space, which greatly improve its security. PMID:26923101

  10. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of a semiconductor laser subject to double-reflector optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakry, A.; Abdulrhmann, S.; Ahmed, M.

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically model the dynamics of semiconductor lasers subject to the double-reflector feedback. The proposed model is a new modification of the time-delay rate equations of semiconductor lasers under the optical feedback to account for this type of the double-reflector feedback. We examine the influence of adding the second reflector to dynamical states induced by the single-reflector feedback: periodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. Regimes of both short and long external cavities are considered. The present analyses are done using the bifurcation diagram, temporal trajectory, phase portrait, and fast Fourier transform of the laser intensity. We show that adding the second reflector attracts the periodic and perioddoubling oscillations, and chaos induced by the first reflector to a route-to-continuous-wave operation. During this operation, the periodic-oscillation frequency increases with strengthening the optical feedback. We show that the chaos induced by the double-reflector feedback is more irregular than that induced by the single-reflector feedback. The power spectrum of this chaos state does not reflect information on the geometry of the optical system, which then has potential for use in chaotic (secure) optical data encryption.

  11. Ultra-Fast Outflows in Radio-Loud AGN: New Constraints on Jet-Disk Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambruna, Rita

    There is strong observational and theoretical evidence that outflows/jets are coupled to accretion disks in black hole accreting systems, from Galactic to extragalactic sizes. While in radio-quiet AGN there is ample evidence for the presence of Ultra-Fast Outflows (UFOs) from the presence of blue-shifted absorption features in their 4-10~keV spectra, sub-relativistic winds are expected on theoretical basis in radio-loud AGN but have not been observed until now. Our recent Suzaku observations of 5 bright Broad- Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs, the radio-loud counterparts of Seyferts) has started to change this picture. We found strong evidence for UFOs in 3 out of 5 BLRGs, with ionization parameters, column densities, and velocities of the absorber similar to Seyferts. Moreover, the outflows in BLRGs are likely to be energetically very significant: from the Suzaku data of the three sources, outflow masses similar to the accretion masses and kinetic energies of the wind similar to the X-ray luminosity and radio power of the jet are inferred. Clearly, UFOs in radio-loud AGN represent a new key ingredient to understand their central engines and in particular, the jet-disk linkage. Our discovery of UFOs in a handful of BLRGs raises the questions of how common disk winds are in radio-loud AGN, what the absorber physical and dynamical characteristics are, and what is the outflow role in broader picture of galaxy-black hole connection for radio sources, i.e., for large-scale feedback models. To address these and other issues, we propose to use archival XMM-Newton and Suzaku spectra to search for Ultra-Fast Outflows in a large number of radio sources. Over a period of two years, we will conduct a systematic, uniform analysis of the archival X-ray data, building on our extensive experience with a similar previous project for Seyferts, and using robust analysis and statistical methodologies. As an important side product, we will also obtain accurate, self- consistent measurements

  12. Relativistic feedback models of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and gamma-ray glows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic feedback discharges, also known as dark lightning, are capable of explaining many of the observed properties of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) and gamma-ray glows, both created within thunderstorms. During relativistic feedback discharges, the generation of energetic electrons is self-sustained via the production of backward propagating positrons and back-scattered x-rays, resulting in very larges fluxes of energetic radiation. In addition, ionization produces large electric currents that generate LF/VLF radio emissions and eventually discharge the electric field, terminating the gamma-ray production. In this presentation, new relativistic feedback model results will be presented and compared to recent observations.

  13. Signal-Response Modeling of Partial Hormone Feedback Networks

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michael L.; Veldhuis, Paula P.; Evans, William S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Endocrine feedback control networks are typically complex and contain multiple hormones, pools, and compartments. The hormones themselves commonly interact via multiple pathways and targets within the networks, and a complete description of such relationships may involve hundreds of parameters. In addition, it is often difficult, if not impossible, to collect experimental data pertaining to every component within the network. Therefore, the complete simultaneous analysis of such networks is challenging. Nevertheless, an understanding of these networks is critical for furthering our knowledge of hormonal regulation in both physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. Methods We propose a novel approach for the analysis of dose-response relationships of subsets of hormonal feedback networks. The algorithm and signal-response quantification (SRQuant) software is based on convolution integrals, and tests whether several discretely measured input signals can be individually delayed, spread in time, transformed, combined, and discretely convolved with an elimination function to predict the time course of the concentration of an output hormone. Signal-response quantification is applied to examples from the endocrine literature to demonstrate its applicability to the analysis of the different endocrine networks. Results In one example, SRQuant determines the dose-response relationship by which one hormone regulates another, highlighting its advantages over other traditional methods. In a second example, for the first time (to the best of our knowledge), we show that the secretion of glucagon may be jointly controlled by the β and the δ cells. Conclusion We have developed a novel convolution integral-based approach, algorithm, and software (SRQuant) for the analysis of dose-response relationships within subsets of complex endocrine feedback control networks. PMID:20046649

  14. Insights into low-latitude cloud feedbacks from high-resolution models.

    PubMed

    Bretherton, Christopher S

    2015-11-13

    Cloud feedbacks are a leading source of uncertainty in the climate sensitivity simulated by global climate models (GCMs). Low-latitude boundary-layer and cumulus cloud regimes are particularly problematic, because they are sustained by tight interactions between clouds and unresolved turbulent circulations. Turbulence-resolving models better simulate such cloud regimes and support the GCM consensus that they contribute to positive global cloud feedbacks. Large-eddy simulations using sub-100 m grid spacings over small computational domains elucidate marine boundary-layer cloud response to greenhouse warming. Four observationally supported mechanisms contribute: 'thermodynamic' cloudiness reduction from warming of the atmosphere-ocean column, 'radiative' cloudiness reduction from CO2- and H2O-induced increase in atmospheric emissivity aloft, 'stability-induced' cloud increase from increased lower tropospheric stratification, and 'dynamical' cloudiness increase from reduced subsidence. The cloudiness reduction mechanisms typically dominate, giving positive shortwave cloud feedback. Cloud-resolving models with horizontal grid spacings of a few kilometres illuminate how cumulonimbus cloud systems affect climate feedbacks. Limited-area simulations and superparameterized GCMs show upward shift and slight reduction of cloud cover in a warmer climate, implying positive cloud feedbacks. A global cloud-resolving model suggests tropical cirrus increases in a warmer climate, producing positive longwave cloud feedback, but results are sensitive to subgrid turbulence and ice microphysics schemes.

  15. Simulating Cortical Feedback Modulation as Changes in Excitation and Inhibition in a Cortical Circuit Model

    PubMed Central

    Murray, John D.; McCormick, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical feedback pathways are hypothesized to distribute context-dependent signals during flexible behavior. Recent experimental work has attempted to understand the mechanisms by which cortical feedback inputs modulate their target regions. Within the mouse whisker sensorimotor system, cortical feedback stimulation modulates spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness, leading to enhanced sensory representations. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study we use a simplified neural circuit model, which includes two recurrent excitatory populations and global inhibition, to simulate cortical modulation. First, we demonstrate how changes in the strengths of excitation and inhibition alter the input–output processing responses of our model. Second, we compare these responses with experimental findings from cortical feedback stimulation. Our analyses predict that enhanced inhibition underlies the changes in spontaneous and sensory evoked activity observed experimentally. More generally, these analyses provide a framework for relating cellular and synaptic properties to emergent circuit function and dynamic modulation. PMID:27595137

  16. Starburst or AGN dominance in submm-luminous candidate AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppin, Kristen; Alexander, Dave; Aretxaga, Itziar; Blain, Andrew; Chapman, Scott; Clements, Dave; Dunlop, James; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Farrah, Duncan; Hughes, David; Ivison, Rob; Kim, Sungeun; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mat; Pope, Alexandra; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Scott, Douglas; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Vaccari, Mattia; van Kampen, Eelco

    2008-03-01

    It is widely believed that starbursts/ULIRGs and AGN activity are triggered by galaxy interactions and merging; and sub-mm selected galaxies (SMGs) seem to be simply high redshift ULIRGs, observed near the peak of activity. In this evolutionary picture every SMG would host an AGN, which would eventually grow a black hole strong enough to blow off all of the gas and dust leaving an optically luminous QSO. In order to probe this evolutionary sequence, a crucial sub-sample to focus on would be the 'missing link' sources, which demonstrate both strong starburst and AGN signatures and to determine if the starburst is the main power source even in SMGs when we have evidence that an AGN is present. The best way to determine if a dominant AGN is present is to look in the mid-IR for their signatures, since often even deep X-ray observations miss identifying the presence of AGN in heavily dust-obscured SMGs. We have selected a sample of SMGs which are good candidates for harboring powerful AGN on the basis of their IRAC colours (S8um/S4.5um>2). Once we confirm these SMGs are AGN-dominated, we can then perform an audit of the energy balance between star-formation and AGN within this special sub-population of SMGs where the BH has grown appreciably to begin heating the dust emission. The proposed observations with IRS will probe the physics of how SMGs evolve from a cold-dust starburst-dominated ULIRG to an AGN/QSO by measuring the level of the mid-IR continuum, PAH luminosity, and Si absorption in these intermediate `transitory' AGN/SMGs.

  17. The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2016: Extending Reverberation Mapping to Higher Luminosity AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U, Vivian; LAMP2016 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The technique of reverberation mapping has been used to estimate virial black hole masses and, more fundamentally, to probe the broad line region structure in Seyfert I galaxies. Efforts from the previous Lick AGN Monitoring Project (LAMP) campaigns and other studies to date have culminated in a large sample of reverberation mapped AGNs and measurements of their black hole masses, which in turn enabled major improvement to various AGN scaling relations. However, the high-luminosity end of such relations remains poorly constrained; this is because of observational challenges presented by the weaker continuum flux variations and longer time dilation in these sources. To this end, we have initiated a new LAMP2016 campaign to target AGNs with luminosities of 10^44 erg/s, with predicted H-beta lags of ~20 - 60 days or black hole masses of 10^7 - 10^8.5 Msun. Designed to monitor ~20 AGNs biweekly from Spring 2016 through Winter 2017 with the Kast spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope at Lick Observatory, we aim to probe luminosity-dependent trends in broad line region structure and dynamics, improve calibrations for single-epoch estimates of high-redshift quasar black hole masses, and test photoionization models for the radially-stratified structure of the broad line region. In this talk, I will present the overview and scope of LAMP2016 and show preliminary results from our ongoing campaign.

  18. Network interactions underlying mirror feedback in stroke: A dynamic causal modeling study.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Soha; Yarossi, Mathew; Manuweera, Thushini; Adamovich, Sergei; Tunik, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    Mirror visual feedback (MVF) is potentially a powerful tool to facilitate recovery of disordered movement and stimulate activation of under-active brain areas due to stroke. The neural mechanisms underlying MVF have therefore been a focus of recent inquiry. Although it is known that sensorimotor areas can be activated via mirror feedback, the network interactions driving this effect remain unknown. The aim of the current study was to fill this gap by using dynamic causal modeling to test the interactions between regions in the frontal and parietal lobes that may be important for modulating the activation of the ipsilesional motor cortex during mirror visual feedback of unaffected hand movement in stroke patients. Our intent was to distinguish between two theoretical neural mechanisms that might mediate ipsilateral activation in response to mirror-feedback: transfer of information between bilateral motor cortices versus recruitment of regions comprising an action observation network which in turn modulate the motor cortex. In an event-related fMRI design, fourteen chronic stroke subjects performed goal-directed finger flexion movements with their unaffected hand while observing real-time visual feedback of the corresponding (veridical) or opposite (mirror) hand in virtual reality. Among 30 plausible network models that were tested, the winning model revealed significant mirror feedback-based modulation of the ipsilesional motor cortex arising from the contralesional parietal cortex, in a region along the rostral extent of the intraparietal sulcus. No winning model was identified for the veridical feedback condition. We discuss our findings in the context of supporting the latter hypothesis, that mirror feedback-based activation of motor cortex may be attributed to engagement of a contralateral (contralesional) action observation network. These findings may have important implications for identifying putative cortical areas, which may be targeted with non

  19. Using visual cues to enhance haptic feedback for palpation on virtual model of soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Konstantinova, Jelizaveta; Secco, Emanuele L; Jiang, Allen; Liu, Hongbin; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha; Seneviratne, Lakmal D; Dasgupta, Prokar; Althoefer, Kaspar; Wurdemann, Helge A

    2015-11-01

    This paper explores methods that make use of visual cues aimed at generating actual haptic sensation to the user, namely pseudo-haptics. We propose a new pseudo-haptic feedback-based method capable of conveying 3D haptic information and combining visual haptics with force feedback to enhance the user's haptic experience. We focused on an application related to tumor identification during palpation and evaluated the proposed method in an experimental study where users interacted with a haptic device and graphical interface while exploring a virtual model of soft tissue, which represented stiffness distribution of a silicone phantom tissue with embedded hard inclusions. The performance of hard inclusion detection using force feedback only, pseudo-haptic feedback only, and the combination of the two feedbacks was compared with the direct hand touch. The combination method and direct hand touch had no significant difference in the detection results. Compared with the force feedback alone, our method increased the sensitivity by 5%, the positive predictive value by 4%, and decreased detection time by 48.7%. The proposed methodology has great potential for robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery and in all applications where remote haptic feedback is needed.

  20. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation in Soft X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF)) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF))from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF) derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3sigma confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne ii]12.8 micron and [O iv]26 micron lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L(sub x,SF) and L(sub x,AGN) at the 3 sigma level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  1. A Global Picture of AGN Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Fukumura, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present a unified structure for accretion powered sources across their entire luminosity range from accreting galactic black holes to the most luminous quasars, with emphasis on AGN and their phenomenology. Central to this end is the notion of MHD winds launched from the accretion disks that power these objects. This work similar in spirit to that of Elvis of more that a decade ago, provides, on one hand, only the broadest characteristics of these objects, but on the other, also scaling laws that allow one to make contact with objects of different luminosity. The conclusion of this work is that AGN phenomenology can be accounted for in terms of dot(m), the wind mass flux in units of the Eddington value, the observer's inclination angle theta and alpha_OX the logarithmic slope between UV and X-ray flares. However given the well known correlation between alpha(sub ox) and UV Luminosity, we conclude that the AGN structure depends on only two parameters. The small number of model parameters hence suggests that an understanding of the global AGN properties maybe within reach.

  2. The AGN Luminosity Fraction in Galaxy Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Jeremy; Weiner, Aaron; Ashby, Matthew; Martinez-Galarza, Juan Rafael; Smith, Howard Alan

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy mergers are key events in galaxy evolution, generally triggering massive starbursts and AGNs. However, in these chaotic systems, it is not yet known what fraction each of these two mechanisms contributes to the total luminosity. Here we measure and model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the Code for Investigating Galaxy Emission (CIGALE) in up to 33 broad bands from the UV to the far-IR for 23 IR-luminous galaxies to estimate the fraction of the bolometric IR luminosity that can be attributed to the AGN. The galaxies are split nearly evenly into two subsamples: late-stage mergers, found in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample or Faint Source Catalog, and early-stage mergers found in the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Sample. We find that the AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity varies greatly from system to system, from 0% up to ~90%, but is substantially greater in the later-stage and brighter mergers. This is consistent with what is known about galaxy evolution and the triggering of AGNs.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851, and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  3. Toward a Unified AGN Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; Fukumura, Keigo; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulosa, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    We present a unified model for the structure and appearance of accretion powered sources across their entire luminosity range from galactic X-ray binaries (XRB) to luminous quasars, with emphasis on AG N and their phenomenology. Central to this model is the notion of MHD winds launched by the accretion disks that power these objects. These winds provide the matter that manifests as blueshifted absorption features in the UV and X-ray spectra of a large fraction of these sources; furthermore, their density distribution in the poloidal plane determines their "appearance" (i.e. the column and velocity structure of these absorption features and the obscuration of the continuum source) as a function of the observer inclination angle (a feature to which INTEGRAL has made significant contributions). This work focuses on just the broadest characteristics of these objects; nonetheless, it provides scaling laws that allow one to reproduce within this model the properties of objects extending in luminosity from luminous quasars to XRBs. Our general conclusion is that the AGN phenomenology can be accounted for in terms of three parameters: The wind maSS flux in units of the Eddington value, m(dot), the observers' inclination angle Theta and the logarithmic slope between the 0/UV and X-ray fluxes alpha(sub ox); however because of a correlation between alpha(sub ox) and UV luminosity the number of significant parameters is two. The AGN correlations implied by this model appear to extend to and consistent with the XRB phenomenology, suggesting the presence of a truly unified underlying structure for accretion powered sources.

  4. Dimethylsulphide, clouds, and phytoplankton: Insights from a simple plankton ecosystem feedback model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, Roger; Norbury, John; Braddock, Roger

    2007-06-01

    The hypothesis that marine plankton ecosystems may effectively regulate climate by the production of dimethylsulphide (DMS) has attracted substantial research effort over recent years. This hypothesis suggests that DMS produced by marine ecosystems can affect cloud properties and hence the averaged irradiance experienced by the phytoplankton that produce DMS's precursor dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP). This paper describes the use of a simple model to examine the effects of such a biogenic feedback on the ecosystem that initiates it. We compare the responses to perturbation of a simple marine nitrogen-phytoplankton-zooplankton (NPZ) ecosystem model with and without biogenic feedback. Our analysis of this heuristic model reveals that the addition of the feedback can increase the model's resilience to perturbation and hence stabilize the model ecosystem. This result suggests the hypothesis that DMS may play a role in stabilizing marine plankton ecosystem dynamics through its effect on the atmosphere.

  5. A Feedback Learning and Mental Models Perspective on Strategic Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capelo, Carlos; Dias, Joao Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to be a contribution to a theoretical model that explains the effectiveness of the learning and decision-making processes by means of a feedback and mental models perspective. With appropriate mental models, managers should be able to improve their capacity to deal with dynamically complex contexts, in order to achieve long-term…

  6. Computer modeling of endovascular patch welding using temperature feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Glinsky, M.E.; London, R.A.; Zimmerman, G.B.; Jacques, S.L.; Ols, J.D.

    1995-11-01

    A new computer program, LATIS, being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is used to study the effect of pulsed laser irradiation with temperature feedback on endovascular patch welding. Various physical and biophysical effects are included in these simulations: laser light scattering and absorption, tissue heating and heat conduction, vascular cooling, and tissue thermal damage. The geometry of a patch being held against the inner vessel wall (500 {mu}m inner diameter) by a balloon is considered. The system is exposed to light pulsed from an optical fiber inside the balloon. The laser power is adjusted during the course of a pulse. This is done automatically in the simulation by temperature feedback. A minimum in the depth of damage into the vessel wall is found. The minimum damage zone is about the thickness of the patch material that is heated by the laser. The more ordered the tissue the thinner the minimum zone of damage. The pulse length which minimizes the zone of damage is found to be the time for energy to diffuse across the layer. The delay time between the pulses is determined by the time for the heated layer to cool down. An optimal pulse length exists which minimizes the total time needed to weld the patch to the wall while keeping the thickness of the damaged tissue to less than 100 {mu}m. For the case that is considered, a patch dyed with light absorbing ICG on the side next to the vessel (thickness of the dyed layer is 60 {mu}m), the best protocol is found to be 33-600 ms pulses applied over 1.6 min.

  7. Investigating the host galaxies of luminous AGN in the local universe with integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Rebecca; Croom, Scott; Husemann, Bernd; Close AGN Reference Survey; SAMI Galaxy Survey

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates how galaxies and their super massive black holes coevolve. We use integral field spectroscopy to search for evidence of AGN feedback and triggering. We demonstrate that outflows are ubiquitous among luminous local type 2 AGN using observations from the AAT's SPIRAL instrument. Using multiple component Gaussian emission line decomposition we are able to disentangle the kinematic and ionisation properties of these winds. This allows us to argue that the outflows from these AGN are directly impacting the surrounding ISM within the galaxies. We search for evidence of AGN triggering using data from The Close AGN Reference Survey (CARS). CARS aims to provide a detailed multi-wavelength view of 40 nearby (0.01 < z < 0.06) unobscured AGN to study the link between AGN and their host galaxies. The primary CARS observations come from the MUSE integral field unit on the VLT, and complementary multi-wavelength observations have been approved from SOFIA, Chandra, VLA, HST, and others. We compare the stellar kinematics of active galaxies from CARS to similar inactive galaxies. We then use kinemetry to estimate the degree of dynamical disturbance, to determine whether active nuclei are preferentially hosted in dynamically disturbed or merging systems. Finally, we highlight the discovery of an AGN that has changed spectral type not once, but twice. So called ‘changing look’ AGN are an uncommon phenomenon, but twice changed AGN are much rarer. This AGN first transitioned from a narrow line AGN (type 2) to a broad line AGN (type 1) in the 1980s. It was recently observed as part of CARS. Examination of the MUSE data for this particular source showed that it no longer had the spectral features typical of a type 1 AGN. The continuum emission from the accretion disk was no longer visible and the broad lines were dramatically diminished. In this talk we describe the possible reasons for this change, supported by analysis of multi-epoch optical photometry and

  8. The Emission Line AGN Census: Biases of Line Ratio Selection, and Uniform Black Hole Accretion Regardless of Galaxy Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Zeimann, Gregory; Juneau, Stephanie; Sun, Mouyuan; Luck, Cuyler

    2015-01-01

    Optical emission line ratios offer a powerful tool to reveal accretion onto supermassive black holes, with the ability to find both unobscured and obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in extraordinarily large galaxy samples (like the SDSS). I will demonstrate, however, that classic line ratio selection techniques significantly underestimate the AGN fraction by a factor of >10 in low-mass and star-forming galaxies. Previous conclusions that AGNs require massive green-valley hosts are purely a result of this "star formation dilution" bias. Careful treatment of the biases reveals that AGN accretion is uniform across star-forming galaxies of any stellar mass, similar to the results of bias-corrected X-ray AGN studies. This has dramatic implications for AGN feedback in dwarf galaxies and constraints on the black hole seed population.

  9. Host Galaxy Properties of the Swift BAT Ultra Hard X-Ray Selected AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa M.; Baumgartner, Wayne; Tueller, Jack; Gehrels, Neil; Valencic, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    We have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected (14-195 keV) AGN with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z<0.05), moderate luminosity AGN from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample. The BAT AGN host galaxies have intermediate optical colors (u -- r and g -- r) that are bluer than a comparison sample of inactive galaxies and optically selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are chosen to have the same stellar mass. Based on morphological classifications from the RC3 and the Galaxy Zoo, the bluer colors of BAT AGN are mainly due to a higher fraction of mergers and massive spirals than in the comparison samples. BAT AGN in massive galaxies (log Stellar Mass >10.5) have a 5 to 10 times higher rate of spiral morphologies than in SDSS AGN or inactive galaxies. We also see enhanced far-IR emission in BAT AGN suggestive of higher levels of star formation compared to the comparison samples. BAT AGN are preferentially found in the most massive host galaxies with high concentration indexes indicative of large bulge-to-disk ratios and large supermassive black holes. The narrow-line (NL) BAT AGN have similar intrinsic luminosities as the SDSS NL Seyferts based on measurements of [O III] Lambda 5007. There is also a correlation between the stellar mass and X-ray emission. The BAT AGN in mergers have bluer colors and greater ultra hard X-ray emission compared to the BAT sample as whole. In agreement with the Unified Model of AGN, and the relatively unbiased nature of the BAT sources, the host galaxy colors and morphologies are independent of measures of obscuration such as X-ray column density or Seyfert type. The high fraction of massive spiral galaxies and galaxy mergers in BAT AGN suggest that host galaxy morphology is related to the activation and fueling of local AGN.

  10. Regular network model for the sea ice-albedo feedback in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Müller-Stoffels, Marc; Wackerbauer, Renate

    2011-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean and sea ice form a feedback system that plays an important role in the global climate. The complexity of highly parameterized global circulation (climate) models makes it very difficult to assess feedback processes in climate without the concurrent use of simple models where the physics is understood. We introduce a two-dimensional energy-based regular network model to investigate feedback processes in an Arctic ice-ocean layer. The model includes the nonlinear aspect of the ice-water phase transition, a nonlinear diffusive energy transport within a heterogeneous ice-ocean lattice, and spatiotemporal atmospheric and oceanic forcing at the surfaces. First results for a horizontally homogeneous ice-ocean layer show bistability and related hysteresis between perennial ice and perennial open water for varying atmospheric heat influx. Seasonal ice cover exists as a transient phenomenon. We also find that ocean heat fluxes are more efficient than atmospheric heat fluxes to melt Arctic sea ice.

  11. VLF wave growth and discrete emission triggering in the magnetosphere - A feedback model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helliwell, R. A.; Inan, U. S.

    1982-01-01

    A simple nonlinear feedback model is presented to explain VLF wave growth and emission triggering observed in VLF transmission experiments. The model is formulated in terms of the interaction of electrons with a slowly varying wave in an inhomogeneous medium as in an unstable feedback amplifier with a delay line; constant frequency oscillations are generated on the magnetic equator, while risers and fallers are generated on the downstream and upstream sides of the equator, respectively. Quantitative expressions are obtained for the stimulated radiation produced by energy exchanged between energetic electrons and waves by Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance, and feedback between the stimulated radiation and the phase bunched currents is incorporated in terms of a two-port discrete time model. The resulting model is capable of explaining the observed temporal growth and saturation effects, phase advance, retardation or frequency shift during growth in the context of a single parameter depending on the energetic particle distribution function, as well as pretermination triggering.

  12. Modelling feedback mechanisms in the carbon cycle: balancing the carbon budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotmans, J.; den Elzen, M. G. J.

    1993-09-01

    Within the carbon cycle feedback, mechanisms that amplify or dampen the exchange of carbon dioxide between the different reservoirs to enhance concentrations of carbon dioxide and increase temperature from anthropogenic perturbations, play a crucial rôle. Quite a lot of these feedbacks are known, but most of them only potentially. This article evaluates the role of a number of these feedback processes within the carbon cycle. In order to assess their impact, some terrestrial feedbacks have been built into a coupled carbon cycle and climate model, as part of the integrated climate assessment model IMAGE. A number of simulation experiments have been performed with this coupled carbon cycle/climate model to compare historical atmospheric concentration values of carbon dioxide with simulated values. Also global biospheric and oceanic carbon fluxes were validated against other modelling estimates. Based on the assumptions of the IPCC's 1990 Business-as-Usual (BaU-1990) scenario, future projections of the carbon dioxide concentration have been made. A key principle in this is that we have used the modelled feedbacks in order to balance the past and present carbon budget. For atmospheric carbon dioxide, this results in substantially lower projections than the IPCC-estimates: the difference in 2100 is approximately 16% from the 1990 level. Furthermore, the IPCC's 'best guess' or 'central estimate' value of the CO2 concentration in 2100 falls outside the uncertainty range estimated with our balanced modelling approach. Sensitivity experiments with the model have been performed to quantify to what extent the terrestrial feedback processes and oceanic fluxes influence the global carbon balance in the model. It is shown that a historical and present carbon balance can be obtained in many different ways, resulting in different biospheric fluxes and thus in considerably different atmospheric CO2 projections.

  13. Modeling Subducting Slabs: Structural Variations due to Thermal Models, Latent Heat Feedback, and Thermal Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, F. C.

    2001-12-01

    The thermal, mineralogical, and buoyancy structures of thermal-kinetic models of subducting slabs are highly dependent upon a number of parameters, especially if the metastable persistence of olivine in the transition zone is investigated. The choice of starting thermal model for the lithosphere, whether a cooling halfspace (HS) or plate model, can have a significant effect, resulting in metastable wedges of olivine that differ in size by up to two to three times for high values of the thermal parameter (ǎrphi). Moreover, as ǎrphi is the product of the age of the lithosphere at the trench, convergence rate, and dip angle, slabs with similar ǎrphis can show great variations in structures as these constituents change. This is especially true for old lithosphere, as the lithosphere continually cools and thickens with age for HS models, but plate models, with parameters from Parson and Sclater [1977] (PS) or Stein and Stein [1992] (GDH1), achieve a thermal steady-state and constant thickness in about 70 My. In addition, the latent heats (q) of the phase transformations of the Mg2SiO4 polymorphs can also have significant effects in the slabs. Including q feedback in models raises the temperature and reduces the extent of metastable olivine, causing the sizes of the metastable wedges to vary by factors of up to two times. The effects of the choice of thermal model, inclusion and non-inclusion of q feedback, and variations in the constituents of ǎrphi are investigated for several model slabs.

  14. Unravelling the Complex Structure of AGN-driven Outflows. II. Photoionization and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouzos, Marios; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bae, Hyun-Jin

    2016-12-01

    Outflows have been shown to be prevalent in galaxies hosting luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs); they present a physically plausible way to couple the AGN energy output with the interstellar medium of their hosts. Despite their prevalence, accurate characterization of these outflows has been challenging. In the second of a series of papers, we use Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph integral field unit (IFU) data of six local (z < 0.1) and moderate-luminosity Type 2 AGNs to study the ionization properties and energetics of AGN-driven outflows. We find strong evidence connecting the extreme kinematics of the ionized gas to the AGN photoionization. The kinematic component related to the AGN-driven outflow is clearly separated from other kinematic components, such as virial motions or rotation, on the velocity and velocity dispersion diagram. Our spatially resolved kinematic analysis reveals that 30 to 90% of the total mass and kinetic energy of the outflow is contained within the central kpc of the galaxy. The spatially integrated mass and kinetic energy of the gas entrained in the outflow correlate well with the AGN bolometric luminosity and results in energy conversion efficiencies between 0.01% and 1%. Intriguingly, we detect ubiquitous signs of ongoing circumnuclear star formation. Their small size, the centrally contained mass and energy, and the universally detected circumnuclear star formation cast doubts on the potency of these AGN-driven outflows as agents of galaxy-scale negative feedback.

  15. Submillimetre observations of WISE-selected high-redshift, luminous AGN and their surrounding overdense environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Suzy F.

    2016-08-01

    We present JCMT SCUBA-2 850 μm submillimetre (submm) observations of 10 mid-infrared (mid-IR) luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs), detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky IR survey and 30 that have also been detected by the NVSS/FIRST radio survey. These rare sources are selected by their extremely red mid-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Further investigations show that they are highly obscured, have abundant warm AGN-heated dust and are thought to be experiencing intense AGN feedback. When comparing the number of submm galaxies detected serendipitously in the surrounding 1.5 arcmin to those in blank-field submm surveys, there is a very significant overdensity, of order 3-5, but no sign of radial clustering centred at our primary objects. The WISE-selected AGN thus reside in 10-Mpc-scale overdense environments that could be forming in pre-viralized clusters of galaxies. WISE-selected AGNs appear to be the strongest signposts of high-density regions of active, luminous and dusty galaxies. SCUBA-2 850 μm observations indicate that their submm fluxes are low compared to many popular AGN SED templates, hence the WISE/radio-selected AGNs have either less cold and/or more warm dust emission than normally assumed for typical AGN. Most of the targets have total IR luminosities ≥1013 L⊙, with known redshifts of 20 targets between z ˜ 0.44-4.6.

  16. The Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) contribution to CMIP6.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Mark J.; Andrews, Timothy; Bodas-Salcedo, Alejandro; Bony, Sandrine; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Chadwick, Robin; Chepfer, Helene; Douville, Herve; Good, Peter; Kay, Jennifer E.; Tselioudis, George

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of CFMIP is to inform future assessments of cloud feedbacks through improved understanding of cloud-climate feedback mechanisms and better evaluation of cloud processes and cloud feedbacks in climate models. However, the CFMIP approach is also increasingly being used to understand other aspects of climate change, and so a second objective has now been introduced, to improve understanding of circulation, regional-scale precipitation, and non-linear changes. CFMIP is supporting ongoing model inter-comparison activities by coordinating a hierarchy of targeted experiments for CMIP6, along with a set of cloud-related output diagnostics. CFMIP contributes primarily to addressing the CMIP6 questions 'How does the Earth system respond to forcing?' and 'What are the origins and consequences of systematic model biases?' and supports the activities of the WCRP Grand Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity. A compact set of Tier 1 experiments is proposed for CMIP6 to address this question: (1) what are the physical mechanisms underlying the range of cloud feedbacks and cloud adjustments predicted by climate models, and which models have the most credible cloud feedbacks? Additional Tier 2 experiments are proposed to address the following questions. (2) Are cloud feedbacks consistent for climate cooling and warming, and if not, why? (3) How do cloud-radiative effects impact the structure, the strength and the variability of the general atmospheric circulation in present and future climates? (4) How do responses in the climate system due to changes in solar forcing differ from changes due to CO2, and is the response sensitive to the sign of the forcing? (5) To what extent is regional climate change per CO2 doubling state-dependent (non-linear), and why? (6) Are climate feedbacks during the 20th century different to those acting on long-term climate change and climate sensitivity? (7) How do regional climate responses (e.g. in precipitation

  17. Markov model aided decoding for image transmission using soft-decision-feedback.

    PubMed

    Link, R; Kallel, S

    2000-01-01

    Soft-decision-feedback MAP decoders are developed for joint source/channel decoding (JSCD) which uses the residual redundancy in two-dimensional sources. The source redundancy is described by a second order Markov model which is made available to the receiver for row-by-row decoding, wherein the output for one row is used to aid the decoding of the next row. Performance can be improved by generalizing so as to increase the vertical depth of the decoder. This is called sheet decoding, and entails generalizing trellis decoding of one-dimensional data to trellis decoding of two-dimensional data (2-D). The proposed soft-decision-feedback sheet decoder is based on the Bahl algorithm, and it is compared to a hard-decision-feedback sheet decoder which is based on the Viterbi algorithm. The method is applied to 3-bit DPCM picture transmission over a binary symmetric channel, and it is found that the soft-decision-feedback decoder with vertical depth V performs approximately as well as the hard-decision-feedback decoder with vertical depth V+1. Because the computational requirement of the decoders depends exponentially on the vertical depth, the soft-decision-feedbark decoder offers significant reduction in complexity. For standard monochrome Lena, at a channel bit error rate of 0.05, the V=1 and V=2 soft-decision-feedback decoder JSCD gains in RSNR are 5.0 and 6.3 dB, respectively.

  18. A model of a flexible anguilliform swimmer driven by a central pattern generator with proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlet, Christina; Tytell, Eric; Hoffman, Kathleen; Fauci, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The swimming of a simple vertebrate, the lamprey, can shed light on how a flexible body can couple with a fluid environment to swim rapidly and efficiently. Animals use proprioceptive sensory information to sense how their bodies are bending, and then adjust the neural signals to their muscles to improve performance. We will present recent progress in the development of a computational model of a lamprey swimming in a Navier-Stokes fluid where a simple central pattern generator model, based on phase oscillators, is coupled to the evolving body dynamics of the swimmer through curvature and curvature derivative feedback. Such feedback can be positive (frequency decreasing), negative (frequency increasing), or mixed (positive to one side of the body and negative to the other, or vice versa). We will examine how the emergent swimming behavior and cost of transport depends upon these functional forms of proprioceptive feedback chosen in the model.

  19. Approximation techniques for parameter estimation and feedback control for distributed models of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    Approximation ideas are discussed that can be used in parameter estimation and feedback control for Euler-Bernoulli models of elastic systems. Focusing on parameter estimation problems, ways by which one can obtain convergence results for cubic spline based schemes for hybrid models involving an elastic cantilevered beam with tip mass and base acceleration are outlined. Sample numerical findings are also presented.

  20. Starburst or AGN Dominance in Submillimetre-Luminous Candidate AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppin, Kristen; Pope, Alexandra; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Alexander, David M.; Dunlop, James

    2010-06-01

    It is widely believed that ultraluminous infrared (IR) galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity are triggered by galaxy interactions and merging, with the peak of activity occurring at z~2, where submillimetre galaxies are thousands of times more numerous than local ULIRGs. In this evolutionary picture, submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) would host an AGN, which would eventually grow a black hole (BH) strong enough to blow off all of the gas and dust leaving an optically luminous QSO. To probe this evolutionary sequence we have focussed on the `missing link' sources, which demonstrate both strong starburst (SB) and AGN signatures, in order to determine if the SB is the main power source even in SMGs when we have evidence that an AGN is present from their IRAC colours. The best way to determine if a dominant AGN is present is to look for their signatures in the mid-infrared with the Spitzer IRS, since often even deep X-ray observations miss identifying the presence of AGN in heavily dust-obscured SMGs. We present the results of our audit of the energy balance between star-formation and AGN within this special sub-population of SMGs-where the BH has grown appreciably to begin heating the dust emission.

  1. TORUS2015: The AGN unification scheme after 30 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, P.; Hoenig, S. F.

    2015-09-01

    The torus paradigm has proved to be remarkably successful at unifying the observed zoo of active galaxy (AGN) classes, despite having many manifest holes. The field is still data-driven with novel observational results at multiple wavelengths emerging rapidly. We are only now beginning to map out the structure of dusty gas feeding and obscuring AGN, and to model its evolution in galaxy growth. But these have also brought out several apparently contradictory results which must hold the key to future progress. As we celebrate 30 years of the paradigm, this is the perfect time to draw together our current knowledge and reassess the state of the field. This will be an international workshop at the University of Southampton, UK, with the objective of laying out the major challenges to the field and paving future research directions. Our hope is to facilitate plenty of informal discussions between multiwavelength observers and theorists, addressing some key issues: * What is the main driver in the unification scheme? What are the roles of orientation, mass accretion rate and feedback? * What is the nature and structure of gas and dust in the torus? Do we have a self-consistent picture across multiple wavelengths? * How critical is the role of the torus as an interface between small nuclear scales and large galactic scales? Does galaxy evolution necessarily require tori? * How close are we to self-consistently simulating nuclear activity including AGN feeding and nuclear star-formation? Workshop Rationale The three themes of accretion, orientation, and evolution will be covered through invited and solicited contributions. Different to other conferences, we are building each session around some key papers that have shaped the field or those with great future potential to do so. We specifically pit competing ideas against each other to help painting a realistic picture of the state-of-the-art. Each session will end with discussion rounds delving into important future

  2. Multiwavelength Number Counts of AGN in the GOODS Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, C. M.; Treister, E.; Chatzichristou, E. T.; Van Duyne, J.; Bauer, F. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Moustakas, L. A.; Brandt, W. N.; Grogin, N. A.; Bergeron, J.; Stern, D.; Chary, R.-R.; Conselice, C. J.; Cristiani, S.

    2004-05-01

    We model the X-ray, optical, and far-infrared flux distributions of AGN in the GOODS fields, starting from hard X-ray luminosity functions and spectral energy distributions appropriate to the unified scheme for AGN. The deep optical counts measured from HST ACS images can be well explained by a unified scheme that postulates roughly 3 times as many obscured as unobscured AGN. This scenario is consistent with the observed spectroscopic and photometric redshift distributions of the GOODS AGN once selection effects are considered. The previously reported discrepancy between observed spectroscopic redshift distributions and the predictions of population synthesis models for the X-ray background (which include a similarly large number of obscured AGN) is explained by bias against the most heavily obscured AGN in both X-ray surveys and optical spectroscopic samples. We present the model predictions for the number counts of AGN in the Spitzer MIPS 24 micron and IRAC 3.6-8 micron bands. The GOODS Spitzer observations will verify whether large numbers of obscured AGN are indeed present in the early Universe; these will be very bright far-infrared sources, including some, missed by X-ray observations, that look like ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc, under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This work was supported by NASA grants HST-GO-09425(.01-A,.13-A,.26-A); NSF CAREER award AST 99-83783; NASA contract number 1224666 issued by JPL/Caltech under NASA contract 1407; ASI grant I/R/088/02; and a Royal Society University Research Fellowship.

  3. The Robust Software Feedback Model: An Effective Waterfall Model Tailoring for Space SW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipaldi, Massimo; Gotz, Christoph; Ferraguto, Massimo; Troiano, Luigi; Bruenjes, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    The selection of the most suitable software life cycle process is of paramount importance in any space SW project. Despite being the preferred choice, the waterfall model is often exposed to some criticism. As matter of fact, its main assumption of moving to a phase only when the preceding one is completed and perfected (and under the demanding SW schedule constraints) is not easily attainable. In this paper, a tailoring of the software waterfall model (named “Robust Software Feedback Model”) is presented. The proposed methodology sorts out these issues by combining a SW waterfall model with a SW prototyping approach. The former is aligned with the SW main production line and is based on the full ECSS-E-ST-40C life-cycle reviews, whereas the latter is carried out in advance versus the main SW streamline (so as to inject its lessons learnt into the main streamline) and is based on a lightweight approach.

  4. AGN Coronae through a Jet Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ashley L.; Lohfink, Anne; Kara, Erin

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an in-depth look at the jet and coronal properties of 41 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Utilizing the highest quality NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and NRAO VLA Sky Survey 1.4 GHz data, we find that the radio Eddington luminosity inversely scales with X-ray reflection fraction, and positively scales with the distance between the corona and the reflected regions in the disk. We next investigate a model fit to the data that predicts the corona is outflowing and propagates into the large-scale jet. We find this model describes the data well and predicts that the corona has mildly relativistic velocities, 0.04< β < 0.40. We discuss our results in the context of disk–jet connections in AGNs.

  5. Modeling feedbacks between a boreal forest and the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. C.; Williams, M.; Moncrieff, J. B.

    2008-08-01

    The atmosphere and biosphere interact strongly in the planetary boundary layer. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the coupled atmosphere-biosphere system allows improved scaling between observations at the stand scale (e.g., flux towers) and those at larger scales, e.g., airborne or satellite measurements. Simulation of the joint atmosphere-biosphere system permits the study of feedbacks occurring within the coupled system. In this paper, two well-tested models, one a process-based biosphere model (SPA) and the other a planetary boundary layer model (CAPS), were coupled to allow simulation of atmosphere-biosphere feedbacks and interactions with a focus on ecological controls. As part of the validation process, the biosphere model was tested using eddy covariance, surface meteorology, and soil data collected during a 120 day period at a boreal black spruce site during the 1994 BOREAS field campaign. The coupled atmosphere-biosphere model was also validated with radiosonde data above the black spruce site, demonstrating that atmosphere and biosphere models can be coherently combined. We show that negative feedbacks at the black spruce site have strong moderating effects. The feedbacks reduce the mean impact of LAI changes on the atmospheric surface layer by 21% for latent energy, 64% for air temperature, and 44% for water mixing ratio. We show that both radiative and hydraulic limitations imposed by the vegetation structure strongly affected the interactions within the atmosphere-biosphere system, while the impact of the canopy roughness length was weak.

  6. Discrete-event requirements model for sensor fusion to provide real-time diagnostic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokonuzzaman, Mohd; Gosine, Raymond G.

    1998-06-01

    Minimally-invasive surgical techniques reduce the size of the access corridor and affected zones resulting in limited real-time perceptual information available to the practitioners. A real-time feedback system is required to offset deficiencies in perceptual information. This feedback system acquires data from multiple sensors and fuses these data to extract pertinent information within defined time windows. To perform this task, a set of computing components interact with each other resulting in a discrete event dynamic system. In this work, a new discrete event requirements model for sensor fusion has been proposed to ensure logical and temporal correctness of the operation of the real-time diagnostic feedback system. This proposed scheme models system requirements as a Petri net based discrete event dynamic machine. The graphical representation and quantitative analysis of this model has been developed. Having a natural graphical property, this Petri net based model enables the requirements engineer to communicate intuitively with the client to avoid faults in the early phase of the development process. The quantitative analysis helps justify the logical and temporal correctness of the operation of the system. It has been shown that this model can be analyzed to check the presence of deadlock, reachability, and repetitiveness of the operation of the sensor fusion system. This proposed novel technique to model the requirements of sensor fusion as a discrete event dynamic system has the potential to realize highly reliable real-time diagnostic feedback system for many applications, such as minimally invasive instrumentation.

  7. Vegetation controls on northern high latitude snow-albedo feedback: observations and CMIP5 model simulations.

    PubMed

    Loranty, Michael M; Berner, Logan T; Goetz, Scott J; Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T

    2014-02-01

    The snow-masking effect of vegetation exerts strong control on albedo in northern high latitude ecosystems. Large-scale changes in the distribution and stature of vegetation in this region will thus have important feedbacks to climate. The snow-albedo feedback is controlled largely by the contrast between snow-covered and snow-free albedo (Δα), which influences predictions of future warming in coupled climate models, despite being poorly constrained at seasonal and century time scales. Here, we compare satellite observations and coupled climate model representations of albedo and tree cover for the boreal and Arctic region. Our analyses reveal consistent declines in albedo with increasing tree cover, occurring south of latitudinal tree line, that are poorly represented in coupled climate models. Observed relationships between albedo and tree cover differ substantially between snow-covered and snow-free periods, and among plant functional type. Tree cover in models varies widely but surprisingly does not correlate well with model albedo. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a relationship between tree cover and snow-albedo feedback that may be used to accurately constrain high latitude albedo feedbacks in coupled climate models under current and future vegetation distributions.

  8. Stabilization of traffic flow in optimal velocity model via delayed-feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanfei; Hu, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Traffic jams may occur due to various reasons, such as traffic accidents, lane reductions and on-ramps. In order to suppress the traffic congestion in an optimal velocity traffic model without any driver's delay taken into account, a delayed-feedback control of both displacement and velocity differences is proposed in this study. By using the delay-independent stability criteria and the H∞-norm, the delayed-feedback control can be determined to stabilize the unstable traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam. The numerical case studies are given to demonstrate and verify the new control method. Furthermore, a comparison is made between the new control method and the method proposed by Konishi et al. [K. Konishi, M. Hirai, H. Kokame, Decentralized delayed-feedback control of an optimal velocity traffic model, Eur. Phys. J. B 15 (2000) 715-722]. The results show that the new control method makes the traffic flow more stable and improves the control performance.

  9. Development of the force-feedback model for an epidural needle insertion simulator.

    PubMed

    Hiemenz, L; Stredney, D; Schmalbrock, P

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio Supercomputer Center and the Department of Anesthesiology at the OSU Medical Center have developed a computer-based simulation system for use in training anesthesiology residents in the technique of placing a needle for an epidural block. Although the simulator has been well regarded, the fidelity of the haptic feedback is limited because it is based on subjective expert-user evaluation and not on objective model-based or data-based empirical methods. Only a single degree of freedom for force-feedback is required. However, the simulation must be able to accurately portray the force required to puncture each layer of tissue in order to feel realistic. The purpose of the research described in this paper was to devise a methodology for creating empirically based realistic force-feedback models for the epidural needle insertion procedure using MRI data and biomechanical data from materials testing.

  10. The motivating role of positive feedback in sport and physical education: evidence for a motivational model.

    PubMed

    Mouratidis, Athanasios; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Lens, Willy; Sideridis, Georgios

    2008-04-01

    Based on self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), an experimental study with middle school students participating in a physical education task and a correlational study with highly talented sport students investigated the motivating role of positive competence feedback on participants' well-being, performance, and intention to participate. In Study 1, structural equation modeling favored the hypothesized motivational model, in which, after controlling for pretask perceived competence and competence valuation, feedback positively predicted competence satisfaction, which in turn predicted higher levels of vitality and greater intentions to participate, through the mediation of autonomous motivation. No effects on performance were found. Study 2 further showed that autonomous motivation mediated the relation between competence satisfaction and well-being, whereas a motivation mediated the negative relation between competence satisfaction and ill-being and rated performance. The discussion focuses on the motivational role of competence feedback in sports and physical education settings.

  11. Global stability of a population dynamics model with inhibition and negative feedback.

    PubMed

    Vargas-De-Leóon, Cruz; Korobeinikov, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    Reactions or interactions with the rate which is inhibited by the product or a by-product of the reaction are fairly common in biology and chemical kinetics. Biological examples of such interactions include selfpoisoning of bacteria, the non-lytic immune response and the antiviral (and in particular antiretroviral) therapy. As a case study, in this notice, we consider global asymptotic properties for a simple model with negative feedback (the Wodarz model) where the interaction is inhibited by a by-product of the reaction. The objective of this notice is an extending of a technique that was developed during last decade for the global analysis of models with positive feedback to the systems, where the feedback is negative. Using the direct Lyapunov method with Volterra type Lyapunov functions, we establish conditions for the global stability of this model. This result enables us to evaluate the comparative impacts of the lytic and nonlytic components, the efficiency of the antiviral therapy and the possibility of self-poisoning for bacteria. The same approach can be successfully applied to more complex models with negative feedback.

  12. Optical Model Reduction and Robust Feedback Control for Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-29

    the distance minimization (7) is then the minimal distance from T to Hilbert-Schmidt operators of rank n. In other terms, we have min HSs S T s...coefficien chord (su A The NAC rolled flow at the flow t Model E Surface S ction, we co r is a model is

  13. The biological carbon pump in the ocean: Reviewing model representations and its feedbacks on climate perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hülse, Dominik; Arndt, Sandra; Ridgwell, Andy; Wilson, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    The ocean-sediment system, as the biggest carbon reservoir in the Earth's carbon cycle, plays a crucial role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Therefore, it is essential to constrain the importance of marine carbon cycle feedbacks on global warming and ocean acidification. Arguably, the most important single component of the ocean's carbon cycle is the so-called "biological carbon pump". It transports carbon that is fixed in the light-flooded surface layer of the ocean to the deep ocean and the surface sediment, where it is degraded/dissolved or finally buried in the deep sediments. Over the past decade, progress has been made in understanding different factors that control the efficiency of the biological carbon pump and their feedbacks on the global carbon cycle and climate (i.e. ballasting = ocean acidification feedback; temperature dependant organic matter degradation = global warming feedback; organic matter sulphurisation = anoxia/euxinia feedback). Nevertheless, many uncertainties concerning the interplay of these processes and/or their relative significance remain. In addition, current Earth System Models tend to employ empirical and static parameterisations of the biological pump. As these parametric representations are derived from a limited set of present-day observations, their ability to represent carbon cycle feedbacks under changing climate conditions is limited. The aim of my research is to combine past carbon cycling information with a spatially resolved global biogeochemical model to constrain the functioning of the biological pump and to base its mathematical representation on a more mechanistic approach. Here, I will discuss important aspects that control the efficiency of the ocean's biological carbon pump, review how these processes of first order importance are mathematically represented in existing Earth system Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) and distinguish different approaches to approximate

  14. An epidemic spreading model on adaptive scale-free networks with feedback mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Liu, Xiongding; Wu, Jie; Wan, Chen; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Yuanmei

    2016-05-01

    A SIRS epidemic model with feedback mechanism on adaptive scale-free networks is presented. Using the mean field theory the spreading dynamics of the epidemic is studied in detail. The basic reproductive number and equilibriums are derived. Theoretical results indicate that the basic reproductive number is significantly dependent on the topology of the underlying networks. The existence of equilibriums is determined by the basic reproductive number. The global stability of disease-free equilibrium and the epidemic permanence are proved in detail. The feedback mechanism cannot change the basic reproductive number, but it can reduce the endemic level and weaken the epidemic spreading. Numerical simulations confirmed the analytical results.

  15. Frequency modulated cutaneous orientation feedback from artificial arms. [dynamic control model of human arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomonow, M.; Freedy, A.; Lyman, J.

    1975-01-01

    A model of the human arm, emphasizing the neuromuscular mechanisms of feedback control, has been constructed. The various parameters and functions of physiological receptors in the feedback section have been classified into an automated category that can be incorporated in the prosthesis servo loop, and into a sensory category that should be communicated to the operator if control and dynamic performance are to be optimized. A scheme for simultaneous display of two such sensory parameters, i.e., fingertip pressure and elbow position, has been developed, implemented and evaluated. The neurophysiological mechanism of such displays, and the feasibility of sensory transformation, is discussed in this paper.

  16. Immediate Feedback and Opportunity to Revise Answers: Application of a Graded Response IRT Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Attali and Powers investigated the usefulness of providing immediate feedback on the correctness of answers to constructed response questions and the opportunity to revise incorrect answers. This article introduces an item response theory (IRT) model for scoring revised responses to questions when several attempts are allowed. The model…

  17. Learning to Swim Using Video Modelling and Video Feedback within a Self-Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lao, So-An; Furlonger, Brett E.; Moore, Dennis W.; Busacca, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Although many adults who cannot swim are primarily interested in learning by direct coaching there are options that have a focus on self-directed learning. As an alternative a self-management program combined with video modelling, video feedback and high quality and affordable video technology was used to assess its effectiveness to assisting an…

  18. Effects of OCR Errors on Ranking and Feedback Using the Vector Space Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taghva, Kazem; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reports on the performance of the vector space model in the presence of OCR (optical character recognition) errors in information retrieval. Highlights include precision and recall, a full-text test collection, smart vector representation, impact of weighting parameters, ranking variability, and the effect of relevance feedback. (Author/LRW)

  19. Video Modeling by Experts with Video Feedback to Enhance Gymnastics Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Eva; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Batsche, Catherine; Fogel, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The effects of combining video modeling by experts with video feedback were analyzed with 4 female competitive gymnasts (7 to 10 years old) in a multiple baseline design across behaviors. During the intervention, after the gymnast performed a specific gymnastics skill, she viewed a video segment showing an expert gymnast performing the same skill…

  20. Using a Behavior Modeling Approach to Teach Students the Art of Providing and Receiving Verbal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maritz, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a behavior modeling approach, this study examined how students' perceived self-efficacy improved as they developed, delivered, and evaluated professional presentations. Using journal entries and a self-efficacy assessment, students' perceived self-efficacy increased as they learned to provide and receive verbal peer feedback, and to stage…

  1. The Effects of Verbal Instruction, Modeling, Rehearsal, and Feedback on Correct Posture during Flute Playing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dib, Nancy Ellen; Sturmey, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A behavioral skills training package, including verbal instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback, was used to teach children correct posture, defined as keeping feet on the floor, legs parallel to each other, and the back and neck perpendicular to the floor, during flute lessons. Three typically developing girls aged 8 to 9 years…

  2. Coupled atmospheric-hydrological modeling for feedback investigations in the Poyang lake catchment, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, S.; Fersch, B.; Kunstmann, H.; Yang, C.; Yuan, F.; Yu, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Coupling terrestrial hydrological and atmospheric models allows investigations of the role of water in the earth system in a more integrative way. In particular, for the analysis of possible changes of the hydrological cycle due to human-induced climate change, land cover conversions, and water resources management feedback mechanisms among the earth surface, subsurface and atmosphere are crucial. Investigations of such feedback, which is primarily caused by water and energy fluxes, require a cross-compartment two-way coupled atmospheric-hydrological modeling system. For this purpose, we coupled the regional atmospheric model WRF-ARW and the distributed hydrological model HMS. Both models share the same land surface model: the Noah-LSM. This model system enables long term simulations for investigations of land use and/or climate changes on the hydrological cycle. The model system is applied for the Poyang lake basin in China with a catchment size of approximately 160,000 km2 using a spatial resolution of 10x10 km2. In addition to the projected climate change signals, human-induced rapid changes of land use occurred in the past and will likely continue for this region. Prior to the application of the coupled model system, offline simulations of the advanced weather research and forecast model (WRF-ARW) are performed to identify a suited setup for the study area. For this purpose, several configurations of WRF-ARW, using ECMWF's ERA-INTERIM reanalysis data as driving data, are compared and validated with publicly available observational data sets for the period 2003-2005. For the coupled system, the integration of HMS into WRF-ARW required in addition the implementation of an interface between saturated zone (groundwater model) and the LSM which enables the feedback between the different compartments. With this coupled model system, the potential of the integrated WRF-HMS simulations is evaluated by analyzing and comparing first simulation results with and without

  3. A computational model of the temporal dynamics of plasticity in procedural learning: sensitivity to feedback timing

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Vivian V.; Maddox, W. Todd; Ashby, F. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The evidence is now good that different memory systems mediate the learning of different types of category structures. In particular, declarative memory dominates rule-based (RB) category learning and procedural memory dominates information-integration (II) category learning. For example, several studies have reported that feedback timing is critical for II category learning, but not for RB category learning—results that have broad support within the memory systems literature. Specifically, II category learning has been shown to be best with feedback delays of 500 ms compared to delays of 0 and 1000 ms, and highly impaired with delays of 2.5 s or longer. In contrast, RB learning is unaffected by any feedback delay up to 10 s. We propose a neurobiologically detailed theory of procedural learning that is sensitive to different feedback delays. The theory assumes that procedural learning is mediated by plasticity at cortical-striatal synapses that are modified by dopamine-mediated reinforcement learning. The model captures the time-course of the biochemical events in the striatum that cause synaptic plasticity, and thereby accounts for the empirical effects of various feedback delays on II category learning. PMID:25071629

  4. X-Ray Absorption, Nuclear Infrared Emission, and Dust Covering Factors of AGNs: Testing Unification Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Watson, M. G.; Blain, A.; Caccianiga, A.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Ramos Almeida, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present the distributions of the geometrical covering factors of the dusty tori (f2) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGNs drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGNs have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2-10 keV luminosities between 1042 and 1046 erg s-1, and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work, we determined the rest-frame 1-20 μm continuum emission from the torus, which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGNs are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGNs having, on average, tori with higher f2 than type 1 AGNs. Nevertheless, ˜20% of type 1 AGNs have tori with large covering factors, while ˜23%-28% of type 2 AGNs have tori with small covering factors. Low f2 are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGNs the effect is certainly small. f2 increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction and X-ray absorption take place in material that share an overall geometry and most likely belong to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity, and also f2 determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ˜1-20 μm nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.

  5. X-RAY ABSORPTION, NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION, AND DUST COVERING FACTORS OF AGNs: TESTING UNIFICATION SCHEMES

    SciTech Connect

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X.; Ramos, A. Asensio; Almeida, C. Ramos; Watson, M. G.; Blain, A.; Caccianiga, A.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.

    2016-03-10

    We present the distributions of the geometrical covering factors of the dusty tori (f{sub 2}) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGNs drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGNs have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2–10 keV luminosities between 10{sup 42} and 10{sup 46} erg s{sup −1}, and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work, we determined the rest-frame 1–20 μm continuum emission from the torus, which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGNs are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGNs having, on average, tori with higher f{sub 2} than type 1 AGNs. Nevertheless, ∼20% of type 1 AGNs have tori with large covering factors, while ∼23%–28% of type 2 AGNs have tori with small covering factors. Low f{sub 2} are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGNs the effect is certainly small. f{sub 2} increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction and X-ray absorption take place in material that share an overall geometry and most likely belong to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity, and also f{sub 2} determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ∼1–20 μm nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.

  6. Using Video Modeling with Voiceover Instruction Plus Feedback to Train Staff to Implement Direct Teaching Procedures.

    PubMed

    Giannakakos, Antonia R; Vladescu, Jason C; Kisamore, April N; Reeve, Sharon A

    2016-06-01

    Direct teaching procedures are often an important part of early intensive behavioral intervention for consumers with autism spectrum disorder. In the present study, a video model with voiceover (VMVO) instruction plus feedback was evaluated to train three staff trainees to implement a most-to-least direct (MTL) teaching procedure. Probes for generalization were conducted with untrained direct teaching procedures (i.e., least-to-most, prompt delay) and with an actual consumer. The results indicated that VMVO plus feedback was effective in training the staff trainees to implement the MTL procedure. Although additional feedback was required for the staff trainees to show mastery of the untrained direct teaching procedures (i.e., least-to-most and prompt delay) and with an actual consumer, moderate to high levels of generalization were observed.

  7. A feedback model of figure-ground assignment.

    PubMed

    Domijan, Drazen; Setić, Mia

    2008-05-30

    A computational model is proposed in order to explain how bottom-up and top-down signals are combined into a unified perception of figure and background. The model is based on the interaction between the ventral and the dorsal stream. The dorsal stream computes saliency based on boundary signals provided by the simple and the complex cortical cells. Output from the dorsal stream is projected to the surface network which serves as a blackboard on which the surface representation is formed. The surface network is a recurrent network which segregates different surfaces by assigning different firing rates to them. The figure is labeled by the maximal firing rate. Computer simulations showed that the model correctly assigns figural status to the surface with a smaller size, a greater contrast, convexity, surroundedness, horizontal-vertical orientation and a higher spatial frequency content. The simple gradient of activity in the dorsal stream enables the simulation of the new principles of the lower region and the top-bottom polarity. The model also explains how the exogenous attention and the endogenous attention may reverse the figural assignment. Due to the local excitation in the surface network, neural activity at the cued region will spread over the whole surface representation. Therefore, the model implements the object-based attentional selection.

  8. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to regulate the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxies. The most direct evidence of AGN feedback is probably galactic outflows. This thesis addresses the link between SMBHs and their host galaxies from four different observational perspectives. First, I study the local correlation between black hole mass and the galactic halo potential (the MBH - Vc relation) based on Very Large Array (VLA) HI observations of galaxy rotation curves. Although there is a correlation, it is no tighter than the well-studied MBH - sigma* relation between the black hole mass and the potential of the galactic bulge, indicating that physical processes, such as feedback, could link the evolution of the black hole to the baryons in the bulge. In what follows, I thus search for galactic outflows as direct evidence of AGN feedback. Second, I use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe a luminous obscured AGN that hosts an ionized galactic outflow and find a compact but massive molecular outflow that can potentially quench the star formation in 10. 6 years.The third study extends the sample of known ionized outflows with new Magellan long-slit observations of 12 luminous obscured AGN. I find that most luminous obscured AGN (Lbol > 1046 ergs s-1) host ionized outflows on 10 kpc scales, and the size of the outflow correlates strongly with the luminosity of the AGN. Lastly, to capitalize on the power of modern photometric surveys, I experiment with a new broadband imaging technique to study the morphology of AGN emission line regions and outflows. With images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), this method successfully constructs images of the [OIII]lambda5007 emission line and reveals hundreds of extended emission-line systems. When applied to current and future surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), this technique could open a new parameter space for the study of AGN outflows. In

  9. The nature and energetics of AGN-driven perturbations in the hot gas in the Perseus Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Forman, W. R.; Allen, S. W.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2016-03-07

    In this paper, cores of relaxed galaxy clusters are often disturbed by AGN. Their Chandra observations revealed a wealth of structures induced by shocks, subsonic gas motions, bubbles of relativistic plasma, etc. In this paper, we determine the nature and energy content of gas fluctuations in the Perseus core by probing statistical properties of emissivity fluctuations imprinted in the soft- and hard-band X-ray images. About 80 per cent of the total variance of perturbations on ~8–70 kpc scales in the core have an isobaric nature, i.e. are consistent with subsonic displacements of the gas in pressure equilibrium with the ambient medium. The observed variance translates to the ratio of energy in perturbations to thermal energy of ~13 per cent. In the region dominated by weak ‘ripples’, about half of the total variance is associated with isobaric perturbations on scales of a few tens of kpc. If these isobaric perturbations are induced by buoyantly rising bubbles, then these results suggest that most of the AGN-injected energy should first go into bubbles rather than into shocks. Using simulations of a shock propagating through the Perseus atmosphere, we found that models reproducing the observed features of a central shock have more than 50 per cent of the AGN-injected energy associated with the bubble enthalpy and only about 20 per cent is carried away with the shock. Such energy partition is consistent with the AGN-feedback model, mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma, and supports the importance of turbulence in the cooling–heating balance.

  10. The nature and energetics of AGN-driven perturbations in the hot gas in the Perseus Cluster

    DOE PAGES

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; ...

    2016-03-07

    In this paper, cores of relaxed galaxy clusters are often disturbed by AGN. Their Chandra observations revealed a wealth of structures induced by shocks, subsonic gas motions, bubbles of relativistic plasma, etc. In this paper, we determine the nature and energy content of gas fluctuations in the Perseus core by probing statistical properties of emissivity fluctuations imprinted in the soft- and hard-band X-ray images. About 80 per cent of the total variance of perturbations on ~8–70 kpc scales in the core have an isobaric nature, i.e. are consistent with subsonic displacements of the gas in pressure equilibrium with the ambientmore » medium. The observed variance translates to the ratio of energy in perturbations to thermal energy of ~13 per cent. In the region dominated by weak ‘ripples’, about half of the total variance is associated with isobaric perturbations on scales of a few tens of kpc. If these isobaric perturbations are induced by buoyantly rising bubbles, then these results suggest that most of the AGN-injected energy should first go into bubbles rather than into shocks. Using simulations of a shock propagating through the Perseus atmosphere, we found that models reproducing the observed features of a central shock have more than 50 per cent of the AGN-injected energy associated with the bubble enthalpy and only about 20 per cent is carried away with the shock. Such energy partition is consistent with the AGN-feedback model, mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma, and supports the importance of turbulence in the cooling–heating balance.« less

  11. The nature and energetics of AGN-driven perturbations in the hot gas in the Perseus Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arévalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Forman, W. R.; Allen, S. W.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2016-05-01

    Cores of relaxed galaxy clusters are often disturbed by AGN. Their Chandra observations revealed a wealth of structures induced by shocks, subsonic gas motions, bubbles of relativistic plasma, etc. In this paper, we determine the nature and energy content of gas fluctuations in the Perseus core by probing statistical properties of emissivity fluctuations imprinted in the soft- and hard-band X-ray images. About 80 per cent of the total variance of perturbations on ˜8-70 kpc scales in the core have an isobaric nature, i.e. are consistent with subsonic displacements of the gas in pressure equilibrium with the ambient medium. The observed variance translates to the ratio of energy in perturbations to thermal energy of ˜13 per cent. In the region dominated by weak `ripples', about half of the total variance is associated with isobaric perturbations on scales of a few tens of kpc. If these isobaric perturbations are induced by buoyantly rising bubbles, then these results suggest that most of the AGN-injected energy should first go into bubbles rather than into shocks. Using simulations of a shock propagating through the Perseus atmosphere, we found that models reproducing the observed features of a central shock have more than 50 per cent of the AGN-injected energy associated with the bubble enthalpy and only about 20 per cent is carried away with the shock. Such energy partition is consistent with the AGN-feedback model, mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma, and supports the importance of turbulence in the cooling-heating balance.

  12. Effect of ice-albedo feedback on global sensitivity in a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Stone, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feedback between the ice albedo and temperature is included in a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model. The effect of this feedback on global sensitivity to changes in solar constant is studied for the current climate conditions. This ice-albedo feedback amplifies global sensitivity by 26 and 39%, respectively, for assumptions of fixed cloud altitude and fixed cloud temperature. The global sensitivity is not affected significantly if the latitudinal variations of mean solar zenith angle and cloud cover are included in the global model. The differences in global sensitivity between one-dimensional radiative-convective models and energy balance models are examined. It is shown that the models are in close agreement when the same feedback mechanisms are included. The one-dimensional radiative-convective model with ice-albedo feedback included is used to compute the equilibrium ice line as a function of solar constant.

  13. Models as Feedback: Developing Representational Competence in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padalkar, Shamin; Hegarty, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Spatial information in science is often expressed through representations such as diagrams and models. Learning the strengths and limitations of these representations and how to relate them are important aspects of developing scientific understanding, referred to as "representational competence." Diagram translation is particularly…

  14. Thermal Modeling and Feedback Requirements for LIFE Neutronic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Seifried, J E

    2009-07-15

    An initial study is performed to determine how temperature considerations affect LIFE neutronic simulations. Among other figures of merit, the isotopic mass accumulation, thermal power, tritium breeding, and criticality are analyzed. Possible fidelities of thermal modeling and degrees of coupling are explored. Lessons learned from switching and modifying nuclear datasets is communicated.

  15. Exact Distributions for Stochastic Gene Expression Models with Bursting and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Niraj; Platini, Thierry; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2014-12-01

    Stochasticity in gene expression can give rise to fluctuations in protein levels and lead to phenotypic variation across a population of genetically identical cells. Recent experiments indicate that bursting and feedback mechanisms play important roles in controlling noise in gene expression and phenotypic variation. A quantitative understanding of the impact of these factors requires analysis of the corresponding stochastic models. However, for stochastic models of gene expression with feedback and bursting, exact analytical results for protein distributions have not been obtained so far. Here, we analyze a model of gene expression with bursting and feedback regulation and obtain exact results for the corresponding protein steady-state distribution. The results obtained provide new insights into the role of bursting and feedback in noise regulation and optimization. Furthermore, for a specific choice of parameters, the system studied maps on to a two-state biochemical switch driven by a bursty input noise source. The analytical results derived provide quantitative insights into diverse cellular processes involving noise in gene expression and biochemical switching.

  16. Modelling Robust Feedback Control Mechanisms That Ensure Reliable Coordination of Histone Gene Expression with DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Corrigall, Holly; Ebenhöh, Oliver; Müller, Berndt

    2016-01-01

    Histone proteins are key elements in the packing of eukaryotic DNA into chromosomes. A little understood control system ensures that histone gene expression is balanced with DNA replication so that histone proteins are produced in appropriate amounts. Disturbing or disrupting this system affects genome stability and gene expression, and has detrimental consequences for human development and health. It has been proposed that feedback control involving histone proteins contributes to this regulation and there is evidence implicating cell cycle checkpoint molecules activated when DNA synthesis is impaired in this control. We have developed mathematical models that incorporate these control modes in the form of inhibitory feedback of histone gene expression from free histone proteins, and alternatively a direct link that couples histone RNA synthesis to DNA synthesis. Using our experimental evidence and related published data we provide a simplified description of histone protein synthesis during S phase. Both models reproduce the coordination of histone gene expression with DNA replication during S phase and the down-regulation of histone RNA when DNA synthesis is interrupted, but only the model incorporating histone protein feedback control was able to effectively simulate the coordinate expression of a simplified histone gene family. Our combined theoretical and experimental approach supports the hypothesis that the regulation of histone gene expression involves feedback control. PMID:27798685

  17. Modeling Discontinuous Phase Transitions in Gel Membranes: Focus on Hysteresis and Feedback Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksenok, Olga

    Feedback mechanisms are vital in a number of processes in biological systems. For example, feedback loops play an essential role during a limb development in mammals and are responsible for the asymmetric cell division to constrain the growth in plants to the specific regions. An integration of well-controlled feedback loops into the fully synthetic materials is an important step in designing a range of biomimetic functionalities. Herein, we focus on hydrogels functionalized with light-sensitive trisodium salt of copper chlorophyllin and study discontinuous phase transitions in these systems. Prior experimental studies had shown that illumination of these functionalized gels results in their heating and in discontinuous, first order phase transition upon the variation in temperature. Herein, we develop the first computational model for these gels; the framework of the model is based on the gel Lattice Spring Model, in this work we account for the gel heating under the illumination. The results of our simulations are in a good agreement with prior experimental studies. We focus on pattern development during the volume phase transitions in membranes of various thicknesses and show that one can effectively utilize light intensity to remotely control feedback loops in these systems.

  18. Characterizing Feedback Control Mechanisms in Nonlinear Microbial Models of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition by Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, K.; Tang, J.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is regulated by biotic and abiotic processes. Feedback interactions between such processes may act to dampen oscillatory responses to perturbations from equilibrium. Indeed, although biological oscillations have been observed in small-scale laboratory incubations, the overlying behavior at the plot-scale exhibits a relatively stable response to disturbances in input rates and temperature. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of microbial models to capture nonlinear feedbacks in SOM decomposition that linear Century-type models are unable to reproduce, such as soil priming in response to increased carbon input. However, these microbial models often exhibit strong oscillatory behavior that is deemed unrealistic. The inherently nonlinear dynamics of SOM decomposition have important implications for global climate-carbon and carbon-concentration feedbacks. It is therefore imperative to represent these dynamics in Earth System Models (ESMs) by introducing sub-models that accurately represent microbial and abiotic processes. In the present study we explore, both analytically and numerically, four microbe-enabled model structures of varying levels of complexity. The most complex model combines microbial physiology, a non-linear mineral sorption isotherm, and enzyme dynamics. Based on detailed stability analysis of the nonlinear dynamics, we calculate the system modes as functions of model parameters. This dependence provides insight into the source of state oscillations. We find that feedback mechanisms that emerge from careful representation of enzyme and mineral interactions, with parameter values in a prescribed range, are critical for both maintaining system stability and capturing realistic responses to disturbances. Corroborating and expanding upon the results of recent studies, we explain the emergence of oscillatory responses and discuss the appropriate microbe-enabled model structure for inclusion in ESMs.

  19. Modeling jet and outflow feedback during star cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Schrön, Martin; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2014-08-01

    Powerful jets and outflows are launched from the protostellar disks around newborn stars. These outflows carry enough mass and momentum to transform the structure of their parent molecular cloud and to potentially control star formation itself. Despite their importance, we have not been able to fully quantify the impact of jets and outflows during the formation of a star cluster. The main problem lies in limited computing power. We would have to resolve the magnetic jet-launching mechanism close to the protostar and at the same time follow the evolution of a parsec-size cloud for a million years. Current computer power and codes fall orders of magnitude short of achieving this. In order to overcome this problem, we implement a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for launching jets and outflows, which demonstrably converges and reproduces the mass, linear and angular momentum transfer, and the speed of real jets, with ∼1000 times lower resolution than would be required without the SGS model. We apply the new SGS model to turbulent, magnetized star cluster formation and show that jets and outflows (1) eject about one-fourth of their parent molecular clump in high-speed jets, quickly reaching distances of more than a parsec, (2) reduce the star formation rate by about a factor of two, and (3) lead to the formation of ∼1.5 times as many stars compared to the no-outflow case. Most importantly, we find that jets and outflows reduce the average star mass by a factor of ∼ three and may thus be essential for understanding the characteristic mass of the stellar initial mass function.

  20. LQG and direct rate feedback control with model reduction on a flexible laboratory grid structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schamel, G. C., II; Haftka, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and theoretical comparisons of three control laws applied to a complex laboratory structure. A reduced finite element model was generated for designing the control systems and then corrected based on measured mode shapes and frequencies. A standard time-invariant linear quadratic regulator with state estimation was investigated first. Two simple direct rate feedback control laws both guaranteeing stability were also designed using the reduced model. One minimizes the maximum control force and the other minimizes the same quadratic performance index as the linear quadratic regulator. The three control laws have comparable performance indices with the direct rate feedback designs having better spillover properties. Experimental results for all designs were obtained with digital implementation. It was shown that the performance of the control system designed on the basis of the corrected finite element model agreed better with experimental results than the performance of the control system designed on the basis of the uncorrected model.

  1. Optimal velocity model with consideration of the lateral effect and its feedback control research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. Z.; Ge, H. X.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a car-following model with the consideration of lateral effect is constructed. An improved control signal with considering more comprehensive information is introduced according to the feedback control theory. The stability conditions with control signal or not are derived. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the advantage of the modified model with and without the control signal, and the results are consistent with the analytical ones.

  2. Cloud Radiation Forcings and Feedbacks: General Circulation Model Tests and Observational Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee,Wan-Ho; Iacobellis, Sam F.; Somerville, Richard C. J.

    1997-01-01

    Using an atmospheric general circulation model (the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model: CCM2), the effects on climate sensitivity of several different cloud radiation parameterizations have been investigated. In addition to the original cloud radiation scheme of CCM2, four parameterizations incorporating prognostic cloud water were tested: one version with prescribed cloud radiative properties and three other versions with interactive cloud radiative properties. The authors' numerical experiments employ perpetual July integrations driven by globally constant sea surface temperature forcings of two degrees, both positive and negative. A diagnostic radiation calculation has been applied to investigate the partial contributions of high, middle, and low cloud to the total cloud radiative forcing, as well as the contributions of water vapor, temperature, and cloud to the net climate feedback. The high cloud net radiative forcing is positive, and the middle and low cloud net radiative forcings are negative. The total net cloud forcing is negative in all of the model versions. The effect of interactive cloud radiative properties on global climate sensitivity is significant. The net cloud radiative feedbacks consist of quite different shortwave and longwave components between the schemes with interactive cloud radiative properties and the schemes with specified properties. The increase in cloud water content in the warmer climate leads to optically thicker middle- and low-level clouds and in turn to negative shortwave feedbacks for the interactive radiative schemes, while the decrease in cloud amount simply produces a positive shortwave feedback for the schemes with a specified cloud water path. For the longwave feedbacks, the decrease in high effective cloudiness for the schemes without interactive radiative properties leads to a negative feedback, while for the other cases, the longwave feedback is positive. These cloud radiation

  3. Assessment of radiative feedback in climate models using satellite observations of annual flux variation.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Yoko; Manabe, Syukuro

    2013-05-07

    In the climate system, two types of radiative feedback are in operation. The feedback of the first kind involves the radiative damping of the vertically uniform temperature perturbation of the troposphere and Earth's surface that approximately follows the Stefan-Boltzmann law of blackbody radiation. The second kind involves the change in the vertical lapse rate of temperature, water vapor, and clouds in the troposphere and albedo of the Earth's surface. Using satellite observations of the annual variation of the outgoing flux of longwave radiation and that of reflected solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere, this study estimates the so-called "gain factor," which characterizes the strength of radiative feedback of the second kind that operates on the annually varying, global-scale perturbation of temperature at the Earth's surface. The gain factor is computed not only for all sky but also for clear sky. The gain factor of so-called "cloud radiative forcing" is then computed as the difference between the two. The gain factors thus obtained are compared with those obtained from 35 models that were used for the fourth and fifth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment. Here, we show that the gain factors obtained from satellite observations of cloud radiative forcing are effective for identifying systematic biases of the feedback processes that control the sensitivity of simulated climate, providing useful information for validating and improving a climate model.

  4. The highs and lows of cloud radiative feedback: Comparing observational data and CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenney, A.; Randall, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Clouds play a complex role in the climate system, and remain one of the more difficult aspects of the future climate to predict. Over subtropical eastern ocean basins, particularly next to California, Peru, and Southwest Africa, low marine stratocumulus clouds (MSC) help to reduce the amount of solar radiation that reaches the surface by reflecting incident sunlight. The climate feedback associated with these clouds is thought to be positive. This project looks at CMIP5 models and compares them to observational data from CERES and ERA-Interim to try and find observational evidence and model agreement for low, marine stratocumulus cloud feedback. Although current evidence suggests that the low cloud feedback is positive (IPCC, 2014), an analysis of the simulated relationship between July lower tropospheric stability (LTS) and shortwave cloud forcing in MSC regions suggests that this feedback is not due to changes in LTS. IPCC, 2013: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung, A. Nauels, Y. Xia, V. Bex and P.M. Midgley (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, 1535 pp.

  5. Forcing, feedbacks and climate sensitivity in CMIP5 coupled atmosphere-ocean climate models

    DOE PAGES

    Andrews, Timothy; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Webb, Mark J.; ...

    2012-05-15

    We quantify forcing and feedbacks across available CMIP5 coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) by analysing simulations forced by an abrupt quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. This is the first application of the linear forcing-feedback regression analysis of Gregory et al. (2004) to an ensemble of AOGCMs. The range of equilibrium climate sensitivity is 2.1–4.7 K. Differences in cloud feedbacks continue to be important contributors to this range. Some models show small deviations from a linear dependence of top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes on global surface temperature change. We show that this phenomenon largely arises from shortwave cloud radiative effects overmore » the ocean and is consistent with independent estimates of forcing using fixed sea-surface temperature methods. Moreover, we suggest that future research should focus more on understanding transient climate change, including any time-scale dependence of the forcing and/or feedback, rather than on the equilibrium response to large instantaneous forcing.« less

  6. Output feedback robust MPC for LPV system with polytopic model parametric uncertainty and bounded disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Baocang; Pan, Hongguang

    2016-08-01

    The output feedback robust model predictive control (MPC), for the linear parameter varying (LPV) system with norm-bounded disturbance, is addressed, where the model parametric matrices are only known to be bounded within a polytope. The previous techniques of norm-bounding technique, quadratic boundedness (QB), dynamic output feedback, and ellipsoid (true-state bound; TSB) refreshment formula for guaranteeing recursive feasibility, are fused into the newly proposed approaches. In the notion of QB, the full Lyapunov matrix is applied for the first time in this context. The single-step dynamic output feedback robust MPC, where the infinite-horizon control moves are parameterised as a dynamic output feedback law, is the main topic of this paper, while the multi-step method is also suggested. In order to strictly guarantee the physical constraints, the outer bound of the true state replaces the true state itself, so tightness of this bound has a major effect on the control performance. In order to tighten the TSB, a procedure for refreshing the real-time ellipsoid based on that of the last sampling instant is given. This paper is conclusive for the past results and far-reaching for the future researches. Two benchmark examples are given to show the effectiveness of the novel results.

  7. Assessment of radiative feedback in climate models using satellite observations of annual flux variation

    PubMed Central

    Tsushima, Yoko; Manabe, Syukuro

    2013-01-01

    In the climate system, two types of radiative feedback are in operation. The feedback of the first kind involves the radiative damping of the vertically uniform temperature perturbation of the troposphere and Earth’s surface that approximately follows the Stefan–Boltzmann law of blackbody radiation. The second kind involves the change in the vertical lapse rate of temperature, water vapor, and clouds in the troposphere and albedo of the Earth’s surface. Using satellite observations of the annual variation of the outgoing flux of longwave radiation and that of reflected solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere, this study estimates the so-called “gain factor,” which characterizes the strength of radiative feedback of the second kind that operates on the annually varying, global-scale perturbation of temperature at the Earth’s surface. The gain factor is computed not only for all sky but also for clear sky. The gain factor of so-called “cloud radiative forcing” is then computed as the difference between the two. The gain factors thus obtained are compared with those obtained from 35 models that were used for the fourth and fifth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment. Here, we show that the gain factors obtained from satellite observations of cloud radiative forcing are effective for identifying systematic biases of the feedback processes that control the sensitivity of simulated climate, providing useful information for validating and improving a climate model. PMID:23613585

  8. Forcing, feedbacks and climate sensitivity in CMIP5 coupled atmosphere-ocean climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Timothy; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Webb, Mark J.; Taylor, Karl E.

    2012-05-15

    We quantify forcing and feedbacks across available CMIP5 coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) by analysing simulations forced by an abrupt quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. This is the first application of the linear forcing-feedback regression analysis of Gregory et al. (2004) to an ensemble of AOGCMs. The range of equilibrium climate sensitivity is 2.1–4.7 K. Differences in cloud feedbacks continue to be important contributors to this range. Some models show small deviations from a linear dependence of top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes on global surface temperature change. We show that this phenomenon largely arises from shortwave cloud radiative effects over the ocean and is consistent with independent estimates of forcing using fixed sea-surface temperature methods. Moreover, we suggest that future research should focus more on understanding transient climate change, including any time-scale dependence of the forcing and/or feedback, rather than on the equilibrium response to large instantaneous forcing.

  9. A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, Mary; Keasling, Jay; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2011-07-14

    Cells use feedback to implement a diverse range of regulatory functions. Building synthetic feedback control systems may yield insight into the roles that feedback can play in regulation since it can be introduced independently of native regulation, and alternative control architectures can be compared. We propose a model for microbial biofuel production where a synthetic control system is used to increase cell viability and biofuel yields. Although microbes can be engineered to produce biofuels, the fuels are often toxic to cell growth, creating a negative feedback loop that limits biofuel production. These toxic effects may be mitigated by expressing efflux pumps that export biofuel from the cell. We developed a model for cell growth and biofuel production and used it to compare several genetic control strategies for their ability to improve biofuel yields. We show that controlling efflux pump expression directly with a biofuel-responsive promoter is a straight forward way of improving biofuel production. In addition, a feed forward loop controller is shown to be versatile at dealing with uncertainty in biofuel production rates.

  10. A nonlinear feedback model for granular and surface charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Kozachkov, Leo; Siu, Theo

    2015-03-01

    Independent laboratories have experimentally demonstrated that identical materials brought into symmetric contact generate contact charges. Even the most basic features of this odd behavior remain to be explained. In this talk, we provide a simple, Ising-like, model that appears to account for many of the observed phenomena. We calculate the electric field acting on surface molecules in a lattice, and we show that if the molecules are polarizable, then infinitesimal random polarizations typically build exponentially rapidly in time. These polarizations self-assemble to produce surface patterns that come in two types, and we find that one of these types accounts for strong localized charging, while the other produces a weaker persistent surface charge pattern. We summarize predictions for both ideal surfaces and for defects in granular beds. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR-1404792.

  11. Feedback from Mass Outflows in Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Ultraviolet and X-Ray Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2012-07-01

    We present an investigation into the impact of feedback from outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in nearby (z < 0.04) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). From studies of the kinematics, physical conditions, and variability of the absorbers in the literature, we calculate the possible ranges in the total mass outflow rate (\\dot{M}_{out}) and kinetic luminosity (L KE) for each AGN, summed over all of its absorbers. These calculations make use of values (or limits) for the radial locations of the absorbers determined from variability, excited-state absorption, and other considerations. From a sample of 10 Seyfert 1 galaxies with detailed photoionization models for their absorbers, we find that 7 have sufficient constraints on the absorber locations to determine \\dot{M}_{out} and L KE. For the low-luminosity AGN NGC 4395, these values are low, although we do not have sufficient constraints on the X-ray absorbers to make definitive conclusions. At least five of the six Seyfert 1s with moderate bolometric luminosities (L bol = 1043 - 1045 erg s-1) have mass outflow rates that are 10-1000 times the mass accretion rates needed to generate their observed luminosities, indicating that most of the mass outflow originates from outside the inner accretion disk. Three of these (NGC 4051, NGC 3516, and NGC 3783) have L KE in the range 0.5%-5% L bol, which is the range typically required by feedback models for efficient self-regulation of black hole and galactic bulge growth. At least two of the other three (NGC 5548, NGC 4151, and NGC 7469) have L KE >~ 0.1%L bol, although these values may increase if radial locations can be determined for more of the absorbers. We conclude that the outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in moderate-luminosity AGNs have the potential to deliver significant feedback to their environments.

  12. The complexity of the coronal line region in AGNs: Gas-jet interactions and outflows revealed by NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ardila, Alberto; Prieto, Almudena; Mazzalay, Ximena

    2016-08-01

    Apart from the classical broad line region (BLR) at small core distances, and the extended classical narrow-line region (NLR), a subset of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show, in their spectra, lines from very highly ionised atoms, known as Coronal lines (CLs). The precise nature and origin of these CLs remain uncertain. Advances on this matter include the determination of the size and morphology of the CLR by means of optical HST and ground-based AO imaging/spectroscopy in a few AGNs. The results indicate CLRs with sizes varying from compact (~30 pc) to extended (~200 pc) emission and aligned preferentially with the direction of the lower ionisation cones seen in these sources. In this talk, we present results of a pioneering work aimed at studying the CLR in the near-infrared region on a selected sample of nearby AGNs. The excellent angular resolution of the data allowed us to resolve and map the extension of the coronal line gas and compare it to that emitting low- and mid-ionization lines. In most cases, the very good match between the radio emission and the CLR suggest that at least part of the high-ionization gas is jet-driven. Results from photoionization models where the central engine is the only source of energy input strongly fail at reproducing the observed line ratios, mainly at distances larger than 60 pc from the centre. We discuss here other processes that should be at work to enhance this energetic emission and suggest that the presence of coronal lines in AGNs is an unambiguous signature of feedback processes in these sources.

  13. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of AGN evolution stretching back to z˜5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function - all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is demonstrated at z ≈0 and 0.9, and clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z. The results support the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering: one, at high luminosity, that only occurs in high mass, highly biased haloes, and one that can occur over a wide range of halo masses and leads to luminosities that are correlated with halo mass. This latter mode dominates at z<0.9. The CLFs for Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs are also constrained at z ≈0, and we find evidence that unobscured quasars are more likely to be found in higher mass halos than obscured quasars. Thus, the AGN unification model seems to fail at quasar luminosities.

  14. Interpretation of cloud-climate feedback as produced by 14 atmospheric general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Potter, G. L.; Ghan, S. J.; Blanchet, J. P.; Boer, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    Understanding the cause of differences among general circulation model projections of carbon dioxide-induced climatic change is a necessary step toward improving the models. An intercomparison of 14 atmospheric general circulation models, for which sea surface temperature perturbations were used as a surrogate climate change, showed that there was a roughly threefold variation in global climate sensitivity. Most of this variation is attributable to differences in the models' depictions of cloud-climate feedback, a result that emphasizes the need for improvements in the treatment of clouds in these models if they are ultimately to be used as climatic predictors.

  15. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junwei; Zhou, Tianshou

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per and clk mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  16. Star formation in galaxy mergers with realistic models of stellar feedback and the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Narayanan, Desika; Hayward, Christopher C.; Murray, Norman

    2013-04-01

    We use hydrodynamic simulations with detailed, explicit models for stellar feedback to study galaxy mergers. These high-resolution (˜1 pc) simulations follow the formation and destruction of individual giant molecular clouds (GMC) and star clusters. We find that the final starburst is dominated by in situ star formation, fuelled by gas which flows inwards due to global torques. The resulting high gas density results in rapid star formation. The gas is self-gravitating, and forms massive (≲1010 M⊙) GMC and subsequently super star clusters (with masses up to 108 M⊙). However, in contrast to some recent simulations, the bulk of new stars which eventually form the central bulge are not born in super-clusters which then sink to the centre of the galaxy. This is because feedback efficiently disperses GMC after they turn several per cent of their mass into stars. In other words, most of the mass that reaches the nucleus does so in the form of gas. The Kennicutt-Schmidt law emerges naturally as a consequence of feedback balancing gravitational collapse, independent of the small-scale star formation microphysics. The same mechanisms that drive this relation in isolated galaxies, in particular radiation pressure from infrared photons, extend, with no fine-tuning, over seven decades in star formation rate (SFR) to regulate star formation in the most extreme starburst systems with densities ≳104 M⊙ pc-2. This feedback also drives super-winds with large mass-loss rates; however, a significant fraction of the wind material falls back on to the discs at later times, leading to higher post-starburst SFRs in the presence of stellar feedback. This suggests that strong active galactic nucleus feedback may be required to explain the sharp cut-offs in SFR that are observed in post-merger galaxies. We compare the results to those from simulations with no explicit resolution of GMC or feedback [`effective equation-of-state' (EOS) models]. We find that global galaxy properties

  17. z ~ 6 metal-line absorbers as a probe of galactic feedback models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Laura C.; Puchwein, Ewald; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Bird, Simeon; Bolton, James S.

    2017-03-01

    Observations of metal absorption lines in the spectra of QSOs out to z > 6 are providing an important probe into the enrichment and ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at the tail end of reionization. Using simulations with four different feedback models, including the Illustris and Sherwood simulations, we investigate how the overall incidence rate and equivalent width distribution of metal-line absorbers varies with the galactic wind scheme. The low-ionization absorbers are reasonably insensitive to the feedback implementation, with all models reasonably close to the observed incidence rate of O i absorbers. However, all of our models struggle to reproduce the observations of C iv, which is probing overdensities close to the mean at z ~ 6, suggesting that the metals are not being transported out into the IGM efficiently enough in these simulations.

  18. Type-dependent stochastic Ising model describing the dynamics of a non-symmetric feedback module.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Navarrete, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    We study an alternative approach to model the dynamical behaviors of biological feedback loop, that is, a type-dependent spin system, this class of stochastic models was introduced by Fernández et. al [13], and are useful since take account to inherent variability of gene expression. We analyze a non-symmetric feedback module being an extension for the repressilator, the first synthetic biological oscillator, invented by Elowitz and Leibler [7]. We consider a mean-field dynamics for a type-dependent Ising model, and then study the empirical-magnetization vector representing concentration of molecules. We apply a convergence result from stochastic jump processes to deterministic trajectories and present a bifurcation analysis for the associated dynamical system. We show that non-symmetric module under study can exhibit very rich behaviours, including the empirical oscillations described by repressilator.

  19. Output feedback model matching in linear impulsive systems with control feedthrough: a structural approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zattoni, Elena

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of structural model matching by output feedback in linear impulsive systems with control feedthrough. Namely, given a linear impulsive plant, possibly featuring an algebraic link from the control input to the output, and given a linear impulsive model, the problem consists in finding a linear impulsive regulator that achieves exact matching between the respective forced responses of the linear impulsive plant and of the linear impulsive model, for all the admissible input functions and all the admissible sequences of jump times, by means of a dynamic feedback of the plant output. The problem solvability is characterized by a necessary and sufficient condition. The regulator synthesis is outlined through the proof of sufficiency, which is constructive.

  20. Coherently amplified negative feedback loop as a model for NF-kappaB oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Jaewook

    2010-03-01

    The cells secrets various signaling molecules as a response to an external signal and modulate its own signaling processes. The precise role of this autocrine and/or paracrine signaling on cell information processing is mostly unknown. We will present the effect of TNF alpha autocrine signaling on NF-kappaB oscillations, using a simplified model of coherently amplified negative feedback loop. We will discuss the bifurcation diagram (i.e., dose-response curve), especially the robustness and the tenability of the period of NF-kappaB oscillations. Finally, we will compare the results from the above model with those from a previous model of time-delayed negative feedback alone.

  1. Three years of Swift/BAT Survey of AGN: Reconciling Theory and Observations?

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, D.; Ajello, M.; Greiner, J.; Comastri, A.; Merloni, A.; Gehrels, N.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-02-07

    It is well accepted that unabsorbed as well as absorbed AGN are needed to explain the nature and the shape of the Cosmic X-ray background, even if the fraction of highly absorbed objects (dubbed Compton-thick sources) substantially still escapes detection. We derive and analyze the absorption distribution using a complete sample of AGN detected by Swift-BAT in the first three years of the survey. The fraction of Compton-thick AGN represents only 4.6% of the total AGN population detected by Swift-BAT. However, we show that once corrected for the bias against the detection of very absorbed sources the real intrinsic fraction of Compton-thick AGN is 20{sub -6}{sup +9}%. We proved for the first time (also in the BAT band) that the anti-correlation of the fraction of absorbed AGN and luminosity it tightly connected to the different behavior of the luminosity functions (XLFs) of absorbed and unabsorbed AGN. This points towards a difference between the two subsamples of objects with absorbed AGN being, on average, intrinsically less luminous than unobscured ones. Moreover the XLFs show that the fraction of obscured AGN might also decrease at very low luminosity. This can be successfully interpreted in the framework of a disk cloud outflow scenario as the disappearance of the obscuring region below a critical luminosity. Our results are discussed in the framework of population synthesis models and the origin of the Cosmic X-ray Background.

  2. Evaluating Effectiveness of Modeling Motion System Feedback in the Enhanced Hess Structural Model of the Human Operator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaychik, Kirill; Cardullo, Frank; George, Gary; Kelly, Lon C.

    2009-01-01

    In order to use the Hess Structural Model to predict the need for certain cueing systems, George and Cardullo significantly expanded it by adding motion feedback to the model and incorporating models of the motion system dynamics, motion cueing algorithm and a vestibular system. This paper proposes a methodology to evaluate effectiveness of these innovations by performing a comparison analysis of the model performance with and without the expanded motion feedback. The proposed methodology is composed of two stages. The first stage involves fine-tuning parameters of the original Hess structural model in order to match the actual control behavior recorded during the experiments at NASA Visual Motion Simulator (VMS) facility. The parameter tuning procedure utilizes a new automated parameter identification technique, which was developed at the Man-Machine Systems Lab at SUNY Binghamton. In the second stage of the proposed methodology, an expanded motion feedback is added to the structural model. The resulting performance of the model is then compared to that of the original one. As proposed by Hess, metrics to evaluate the performance of the models include comparison against the crossover models standards imposed on the crossover frequency and phase margin of the overall man-machine system. Preliminary results indicate the advantage of having the model of the motion system and motion cueing incorporated into the model of the human operator. It is also demonstrated that the crossover frequency and the phase margin of the expanded model are well within the limits imposed by the crossover model.

  3. Visual crowding illustrates the inadequacy of local vs. global and feedforward vs. feedback distinctions in modeling visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Aaron M.; Herzog, Michael H.; Francis, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Experimentalists tend to classify models of visual perception as being either local or global, and involving either feedforward or feedback processing. We argue that these distinctions are not as helpful as they might appear, and we illustrate these issues by analyzing models of visual crowding as an example. Recent studies have argued that crowding cannot be explained by purely local processing, but that instead, global factors such as perceptual grouping are crucial. Theories of perceptual grouping, in turn, often invoke feedback connections as a way to account for their global properties. We examined three types of crowding models that are representative of global processing models, and two of which employ feedback processing: a model based on Fourier filtering, a feedback neural network, and a specific feedback neural architecture that explicitly models perceptual grouping. Simulations demonstrate that crucial empirical findings are not accounted for by any of the models. We conclude that empirical investigations that reject a local or feedforward architecture offer almost no constraints for model construction, as there are an uncountable number of global and feedback systems. We propose that the identification of a system as being local or global and feedforward or feedback is less important than the identification of a system's computational details. Only the latter information can provide constraints on model development and promote quantitative explanations of complex phenomena. PMID:25374554

  4. Arctic Amplification Feedback Analysis in CMIP5 Models: Land Surfaces, Arctic Ocean and Seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, A.; Yoshimori, M.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic region is the region where surface warming associated with atmospheric green-house gas concentration increase is expected to be the greatest. This particularity is already being observed currently and is also simulated by climate models. Feedback mechanisms associated with this particularly strong warming, or Artic Amplification, are multiple. The relative role of the different feedbacks are not easy to evaluate precisely using direct model outputs. In this study, we use the "radiative kernels" method (Soden et al, 2008) to perform a multi-model intercomparison analysis. The radiative decomposition is performed at the surface instead of the top of atmosphere in order to consider surface temperature changes specifically. The kernels are derived from the MIROC3.2 model. The intercomparison includes 32 CMIP5 coupled models, whose outputs are analyzed for changes from the late 20th to the late 21st centuries following the rcp4.5 scenario. We consider results separately for land and oceanic surfaces, as the mechanisms and orders of magnitude differ substantially for these two types of surface. We also consider seasons separately as we show that seasonality in the feedback processes is determinant.

  5. Modeling neural correlates of auditory attention in evoked potentials using corticothalamic feedback dynamics.

    PubMed

    Trenado, Carlos; Haab, Lars; Strauss, Daniel J

    2007-01-01

    Auditory evoked cortical potentials (AECP) are well established as diagnostic tool in audiology and gain more and more impact in experimental neuropsychology, neuro-science, and psychiatry, e.g., for the attention deficit disorder, schizophrenia, or for studying the tinnitus decompensation. The modulation of AECP due to exogenous and endogenous attention plays a major role in many clinical applications and has experimentally been studied in neuropsychology. However the relation of corticothalamic feedback dynamics to focal and non-focal attention and its large-scale effect reflected in AECPs is far from being understood. In this paper, we model neural correlates of auditory attention reflected in AECPs using corticothalamic feedback dynamics. We present a mapping of a recently developed multiscale model of evoked potentials to the hearing path and discuss for the first time its neurofunctionality in terms of corticothalamic feedback loops related to focal and non-focal attention. Our model reinforced recent experimental results related to online attention monitoring using AECPs with application as objective tinnitus decompensation measure. It is concluded that our model presents a promising approach to gain a deeper understanding of the neurodynamics of auditory attention and might be use as an efficient forward model to reinforce hypotheses that are obtained from experimental paradigms involving AECPs.

  6. Galaxy assembly, stellar feedback and metal enrichment: the view from the GAEA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; De Lucia, Gabriella; Fontanot, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    One major problem of current theoretical models of galaxy formation is given by their inability to reproduce the apparently `anti-hierarchical' evolution of galaxy assembly: massive galaxies appear to be in place since z ˜ 3, while a significant increase of the number densities of low-mass galaxies is measured with decreasing redshift. In this work, we perform a systematic analysis of the influence of different stellar feedback schemes, carried out in the framework of GAEA, a new semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. It includes a self-consistent treatment for the timings of gas, metal and energy recycling, and for the chemical yields. We show this to be crucial to use observational measurements of the metallicity as independent and powerful constraints for the adopted feedback schemes. The observed trends can be reproduced in the framework of either a strong ejective or preventive feedback model. In the former case, the gas ejection rate must decrease significantly with cosmic time (as suggested by parametrizations of the cosmological `FIRE' simulations). Irrespective of the feedback scheme used, our successful models always imply that up to 60-70 per cent of the baryons reside in an `ejected' reservoir and are unavailable for cooling at high redshift. The same schemes predict physical properties of model galaxies (e.g. gas content, colour, age, and metallicity) that are in much better agreement with observational data than our fiducial model. The overall fraction of passive galaxies is found to be primarily determined by internal physical processes, with environment playing a secondary role.

  7. AGN Observations with STACEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramel, D. A.; Boone, L. M.; Carson, J.; Chae, E.; Covault, C. E.; Fortin, P.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hanna, D. S.; Hinton, J. A.; Mukherjee, R.; Mueller, C.; Ong, R. A.; Ragan, K.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schuette, D. R.; Theoret, C. G.; Williams, D. A.; Wong, J.; Zweerink, J.

    2003-03-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a gamma-ray detector designed to study astrophysical sources at energies between 50 and 500 GeV. It uses 64 large, steerable mirrors at the National Solar Tower Test Facility near Albuquerque, NM, USA to collect Cherenkov light from extended air showers and concentrate it onto an array of photomultiplier tubes. The large light-collection area gives it a lower energy threshold than imaging-type Cherenkov detectors. STACEE is now fully operational, and we report here on the performance of the complete STACEE instrument, as well as preliminary results of recent observations of several AGN targets. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (under Grant Numbers PHY-9983836, PHY-0070927, and PHY-0070953), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Le Fond Quebecois de la Recherche sur la Nature et les Technologies (FQRNT), the Research Corporation, and the California Space Institute. CEC is a Cottrell Scholar of the Research Corporation.

  8. The Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) contribution to CMIP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Mark J.; Andrews, Timothy; Bodas-Salcedo, Alejandro; Bony, Sandrine; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Chadwick, Robin; Chepfer, Hélène; Douville, Hervé; Good, Peter; Kay, Jennifer E.; Klein, Stephen A.; Marchand, Roger; Medeiros, Brian; Pier Siebesma, A.; Skinner, Christopher B.; Stevens, Bjorn; Tselioudis, George; Tsushima, Yoko; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of CFMIP is to inform future assessments of cloud feedbacks through improved understanding of cloud-climate feedback mechanisms and better evaluation of cloud processes and cloud feedbacks in climate models. However, the CFMIP approach is also increasingly being used to understand other aspects of climate change, and so a second objective has now been introduced, to improve understanding of circulation, regional-scale precipitation, and non-linear changes. CFMIP is supporting ongoing model inter-comparison activities by coordinating a hierarchy of targeted experiments for CMIP6, along with a set of cloud-related output diagnostics. CFMIP contributes primarily to addressing the CMIP6 questions How does the Earth system respond to forcing? and What are the origins and consequences of systematic model biases? and supports the activities of the WCRP Grand Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity.A compact set of Tier 1 experiments is proposed for CMIP6 to address this question: (1) what are the physical mechanisms underlying the range of cloud feedbacks and cloud adjustments predicted by climate models, and which models have the most credible cloud feedbacks? Additional Tier 2 experiments are proposed to address the following questions. (2) Are cloud feedbacks consistent for climate cooling and warming, and if not, why? (3) How do cloud-radiative effects impact the structure, the strength and the variability of the general atmospheric circulation in present and future climates? (4) How do responses in the climate system due to changes in solar forcing differ from changes due to CO2, and is the response sensitive to the sign of the forcing? (5) To what extent is regional climate change per CO2 doubling state-dependent (non-linear), and why? (6) Are climate feedbacks during the 20th century different to those acting on long-term climate change and climate sensitivity? (7) How do regional climate responses (e.g. in

  9. Analysis of Atmosphere-Ocean Surface Flux Feedbacks in Recent Satellite and Model Reanalysis Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, F. R.; Clayson, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent investigations have examined observations in an attempt to determine when and how the ocean forces the atmosphere, and vice versa. These studies focus primarily on relationships between sea surface temperature anomalies and the turbulent and radiative surface heat fluxes. It has been found that both positive and negative feedbacks, which enhance or reduce sea surface temperature anomaly amplitudes, can be generated through changes in the surface boundary layer. Consequent changes in sea surface temperature act to change boundary layer characteristics through changes in static stability or turbulent fluxes. Previous studies over the global oceans have used coarse-resolution observational and model products such as ICOADS and the NCEP Reanalysis. This study focuses on documenting the atmosphere ocean feedbacks that exist in recently produced higher resolution products, namely the SeaFlux v1.0 product and the NASA Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). It has been noted in recent studies that evidence of oceanic forcing of the atmosphere exists on smaller scales than the usually more dominant atmospheric forcing of the ocean, particularly in higher latitudes. It is expected that use of these higher resolution products will allow for a more comprehensive description of these small-scale ocean-atmosphere feedbacks. The SeaFlux intercomparisons have revealed large scatter between various surface flux climatologies. This study also investigates the uncertainty in surface flux feedbacks based on several of these recent satellite based climatologies

  10. Modeling feedback loops in the H-NS-mediated regulation of the Escherichia coli bgl operon.

    PubMed

    Radde, Nicole; Gebert, Jutta; Faigle, Ulrich; Schrader, Rainer; Schnetz, Karin

    2008-01-21

    The histone-like nucleoid-associated protein H-NS is a global transcriptional repressor that controls approximately 5% of all genes in Escherichia coli and other enterobacteria. H-NS binds to DNA with low specificity. Nonetheless, repression of some loci is exceptionally specific. Experimental data for the E. coli bgl operon suggest that highly specific repression is caused by regulatory feedback loops. To analyze whether such feedback loops can account for the observed specificity of repression, here a model was built based on expression data. The model includes several regulatory interactions, which are synergy of repression by binding of H-NS to two regulatory elements, an inverse correlation of the rate of repression by H-NS and transcription, and a threshold for positive regulation by anti-terminator BglG, which is encoded within the operon. The latter two regulatory interactions represent feedback loops in the model. The resulting system of equations was solved for the expression level of the operon and analyzed with respect to different promoter activities. This analysis demonstrates that a small (3-fold) increase of the bgl promoter activity results in a strong (80-fold) enhancement of bgl operon expression. Thus, the parameters included into the model are sufficient to simulate specific repression by H-NS.

  11. Direct Evidence for AGN-Driven Winds in a z = 1.5 Radio Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbring, Eric

    2010-05-01

    Feedback from AGN is a key component in most current models of galaxy formation and evolution. For the most massive galaxies, heating and removal of gas by the AGN could precipitate an abrupt quenching of star formation during a dramatic blow-out phase. The “smoking gun” for such a scenario would be direct evidence of powerful outflows associated with the jet. I present some preliminary results of a program to look for these in high-z radio galaxies (HzRGs). Recent observations of the z = 1.5 radio galaxy 3C 230 obtained with the NIFS integral-field spectrograph and Altair laser adaptive optics facility on Gemini North are shown. These reveal with unprecedented resolution the complex kinematics of this system in redshifted Hα and [N ii] emission. The bi-polar velocity field is aligned with the jet axis, with a kinematic center associated with the radio core itself, and turbulent edges approaching the galaxy's escape velocity. This suggests a gas mass of roughly 1011 M⊙ has been propagating outwards for 107 to 108 years, corresponding to a mass loss of roughly 102-3 M⊙ yr-1, based on its velocity and spatial extent. This is in good agreement with the energetics and typical ages of radio jets, and likely heralds the onset of the “red and dead” stage for this HzRG.

  12. Surface moisture feedback in modelled aeolian rippled sand strip and dune field patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Surface moisture plays a key role in controlling sediment availability and transport in aeolian systems which leads to the development of a diverse range of spatial patterns including transient sand strips on beaches with small temporal and spatial scales, and large-scale dune patterns dominated by wet interdune areas. By altering feedback response times between surface moisture and transport dynamics, these different patterns can be explored and modelled using a cellular automaton-based algorithm. This algorithm includes stochastic transport and mimics real-world behaviour, where surface moisture limits aeolian erosion, but a modest amount of moisture hardens the surface, increasing the elasticity of rebounding grains. Simulations allow for examination of different sediment availability scenarios which can be related to the developed internal stratigraphy of the modeled landscape. Results elucidate the controlling mechanism of surface moisture in sediment availability and highlight the importance of mutual feedback for developing diverse aeolian landscape patterns at different spatial and temporal scales.

  13. AGN jets as pion factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Karl

    There has been a dramatic revolution in gamma-ray astronomy throughout the last few years. Beginning with the discovery made by the spark chamber EGRET on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory that AGN with jets are the most powerful quasi-steady gamma-ray sources in the Universe, air-Cerenkov telescopes have soon after succeeded in detecting gamma-rays up to TeV energies. In the last year, it has become clear that these AGN emit photons even up to 10 TeV and more. This is a strong indication for proton acceleration going on in them, since protons owing to their large mass suffer weaker energy losses than electrons and can thus reach higher energies. Nucleons escaping from the AGN jets contribute to the local flux of cosmic rays at highest energies. If AGN produce the diffuse gamma-ray background, they would also be able to produce all the cosmic rays above the ankle in the local spectrum. The majority of AGN resides at large distances, indicated by their cosmological redshifts, and can therefore not be seen through the fog of electron-positron pairs which they produce interacting with diffuse infrared radiation from the era of galaxy formation. To observe the cosmic accelerators at large redshifts, neutrino observations are required. It is important to understand the astrophysical neutrino sources in order to be able to recognize signatures of new physics, e.g. due to decaying or annihilating particles from the early phases of the Universe.

  14. Submillimetre observations of WISE/radio-selected AGN and their environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Suzy F.; Blain, Andrew W.; Lonsdale, Carol; Condon, James; Farrah, Duncan; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Assef, Roberto J.; Bridge, Carrie; Kimball, Amy; Lacy, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter; Wu, Jingwen; Jarrett, Tom

    2015-04-01

    We present JCMT SCUBA-2 850 μm submillimetre (submm) observations of 30 mid-infrared (mid-IR) luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs), detected jointly by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky IR survey and the NVSS/FIRST radio survey. These rare sources are selected by their extremely red mid-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and compact radio counterparts. Further investigations show that they are highly obscured, have abundant warm AGN-heated dust and are thought to be experiencing intense AGN feedback. These galaxies appear to be consistent with a later AGN-dominated phase of merging galaxies, while hot, dust-obscured galaxies are an earlier starburst-dominated phase. When comparing the number of submm galaxies detected serendipitously in the surrounding 1.5 arcmin to those in blank-field submm surveys, there is a very significant overdensity, of order 5, but no sign of radial clustering centred at our primary objects. The WISE/radio-selected AGN thus reside in 10-Mpc-scale overdense environments that could be forming in pre-viralized clusters of galaxies. WISE/radio-selected AGNs appear to be the strongest signposts of high-density regions of active, luminous and dusty galaxies. SCUBA-2 850 μm observations indicate that their submm fluxes are low compared to many popular AGN SED templates, hence the WISE/radio-selected AGNs have either less cold and/or more warm dust emission than normally assumed for typical AGN. Most of the targets are not detected, only four targets are detected at SCUBA-2 850 μm, and have total IR luminosities ≥1013 L⊙, if their redshifts are consistent with the subset of the 10 SCUBA-2 undetected targets with known redshifts, z ˜ 0.44-2.86.

  15. X-ray emission around the z = 4.1 radio galaxy TN J1338-1942 and the potential role of far-infrared photons in AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smail, Ian; Blundell, Katherine M.

    2013-10-01

    We report the discovery in an 80-ks observation of spatially extended X-ray emission around the high-redshift radio galaxy TN J1388-1942 (z = 4.11) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The X-ray emission extends over a ˜30-kpc diameter region and although it is less extended than the GHz-radio lobes, it is roughly aligned with them. We suggest that the X-ray emission arises from inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of photons by relativistic electrons around the radio galaxy. At z = 4.11, this is the highest redshift detection of IC emission around a radio galaxy. We investigate the hypothesis that in this compact source, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), which is ˜700× more intense than at z ˜ 0 is nonetheless not the relevant seed photon field for the bulk of the IC emission. Instead, we find a tentative correlation between the IC emission and far-infrared luminosities of compact, far-infrared luminous high-redshift radio galaxies (those with lobe lengths of ≲100 kpc). Based on these results, we suggest that in the earliest phases of the evolution of radio-loud active galactic nuclei at very high redshift, the far-infrared photons from the co-eval dusty starbursts occurring within these systems may make a significant contribution to their IC X-ray emission and so contribute to the feedback in these massive high-redshift galaxies.

  16. Optimized feedback control system modeling of resistive wall modes for burning plasmas experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, Oksana Nikolaevna

    A numerical study of active feedback control system performance and optimization for tokamak Resistive Wall Modes (RWM) is the subject of this thesis. The ability to accurately model and predict the performance of an active MHD control systems is critical to present and future advanced confinement scenarios and fusion reactor design studies. The computer code VALEN has been designed to calculate the performance of a MHD feedback control system in an arbitrary geometry. The simulation of realistic effects in feedback systems, such as noise, time delays and filters is of particular importance. In this work realistic measurement noise analysis was added to VALEN and used to design the RWM feedback control amplifier power level for the DIII-D experiment. Modern control theory based on a state-space formulation obtained from VALEN was applied to design an Optimal Controller and Observer based on a reduced VALEN model. A quantitative low order model of the VALEN state space was derived from the high dimensional intrinsic state space structure of the VALEN using methods of a balanced realization and matched DC gain truncation. These techniques for the design of an optimal controller and optimal observer were applied to models of the DIII-D and ITER experiments and showed an order of magnitude reduction of the required control coil current and voltage in the presence of white noise as compared to a traditional, classical PID controller. This optimal controller for the ITER burning plasma experiment was robust from the no-wall pressure limit to a pressure value well above those achieved with a classical PID controller and could approach the ideal wall limit.

  17. Constructing wetlands: measuring and modeling feedbacks of oxidation processes between plants and clay-rich material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaltink, Rémon; Dekker, Stefan C.; Griffioen, Jasper; Wassen, Martin J.

    2016-04-01

    Interest is growing in using soft sediment as a building material in eco-engineering projects. Wetland construction in the Dutch lake Markermeer is an example: here the option of dredging some of the clay-rich lake-bed sediment and using it to construct 10.000 ha of wetland will soon go under construction. Natural processes will be utilized during and after construction to accelerate ecosystem development. Knowing that plants can eco-engineer their environment via positive or negative biogeochemical plant-soil feedbacks, we conducted a six-month greenhouse experiment to identify the key biogeochemical processes in the mud when Phragmites australis is used as an eco-engineering species. We applied inverse biogeochemical modeling to link observed changes in pore water composition to biogeochemical processes. Two months after transplantation we observed reduced plant growth and shriveling as well as yellowing of foliage. The N:P ratios of plant tissue were low and were affected not by hampered uptake of N but by enhanced uptake of P. Plant analyses revealed high Fe concentrations in the leaves and roots. Sulfate concentrations rose drastically in our experiment due to pyrite oxidation; as reduction of sulfate will decouple Fe-P in reducing conditions, we argue that plant-induced iron toxicity hampered plant growth, forming a negative feedback loop, while simultaneously there was a positive feedback loop, as iron toxicity promotes P mobilization as a result of reduced conditions through root death, thereby stimulating plant growth and regeneration. Given these two feedback mechanisms, we propose that when building wetlands from these mud deposits Fe-tolerant species are used rather than species that thrive in N-limited conditions. The results presented in this study demonstrate the importance of studying the biogeochemical properties of the building material and the feedback mechanisms between plant and soil prior to finalizing the design of the eco-engineering project.

  18. Modeling of the Feedback Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode in Tokamak Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Chu, M. S.

    1999-11-01

    The VACUUM^1 code is currently being modified to simulate the feedback stabilization of the RWM in the DIII-D device^2. We formulate the problem in terms of the eigenfunctions of the surface Laplacian obtained from the matching of the fields across a thin resistive toroidally symmetric shell. The window pane feedback (C-)coils are modeled accurately in the poloidal angle θ, and approximately by a single harmonic variation in φ. VACUUM relates the perturbations on the various surfaces, i.e., the plasma, both sides of the resistive shell and the C-coil. This results in an operator made up of a set of coupled time dependent equations relating the shell response to the plasma and feedback coil. Various attributes of the system can be calculated, such as the eddy current patterns and the time responses of the eigenmodes of the surface Laplacian operator. As a first appproximation, a PEST or GATO surface eigenmode of an ideal kink is assumed, whose structure remains unchanged during the feedback process, allowing only the magnitude to change. By energizing the C-coils according to the various proposed feedback schemes we propose to correlate with the present experimental results, and also to provide helpful guidance for future runs. rule[1.ex]1.9in.005in This work supported by DoE contract No. DE-AC02-76-CHO-3073 ^1 M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas, 4(1997)2161 ^2 A. A. Garofalo et al., Phys. Plasmas 6(1999) 1893

  19. Modelling Plant and Soil Nitrogen Feedbacks Affecting Forest Carbon Gain at High CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrie, R. E.; Norby, R. J.; Franklin, O.; Pepper, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Short-term, direct effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on plant carbon gain are relatively well understood. There is considerable uncertainty, however, about longer-term effects, which are influenced by various plant and ecosystem feedbacks. A key feedback in terrestrial ecosystems occurs through changes in plant carbon (C) allocation patterns. For instance, if high CO2 were to increase C allocation to roots, then plants may experience positive feedback through improved plant nutrition. A second type of feedback, associated with decomposition of soil-organic matter, may reduce soil-nutrient availability at high CO2. This paper will consider mechanistic models of both feedbacks. Effects of high CO2 on plant C allocation will be investigated using a simple model of forest net primary production (NPP) that incorporates the primary mechanisms of plant carbon and nitrogen (N) balance. The model called MATE (Model Any Terrestrial Ecosystem) includes an equation for annual C balance that depends on light- saturated photosynthetic rate and therefore on [CO2], and an equation for N balance incorporating an expression for N uptake as a function of root mass. The C-N model is applied to a Free Air CO2 Exchange (FACE) experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee, USA, where closed-canopy, monoculture stands of the deciduous hardwood sweetgum ( Liquidambar styraciflua) have been growing at [CO2] of 375 and 550 ppm for ten years. Features of this experiment are that the annual NPP response to elevated CO2 has averaged approximately 25% over seven years, but that annual fine-root production has almost doubled on average, with especially large increases in later years of the experiment (Norby et al. 2006). The model provides a simple graphical approach for analysing effects of elevated CO2 and N supply on leaf/root/wood C allocation and productivity. It simulates increases in NPP and fine-root production at the ORNL FACE site that are consistent

  20. Model-based feedback control of subsonic cavity flows: Control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin

    In this dissertation, we present and discuss development, implementation, and experimental results of reduced-order model based feedback control of subsonic cavity flows. Model based feedback control of subsonic flows have been studied and implemented by the flow control group at the Collaborative Center of Control Science (CCCS) at the Ohio State University (OSU). The team, composed of researchers from the departments of Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering at the Ohio State, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and NASA Glenn Research Center, possesses synergistic capabilities in all of the required multidisciplinary areas of experimental data acquisition, computational flow simulation, low dimensional modeling, controller design, and experimental validation. The goal of the CCCS effort is to develop tools and methodologies for the use of closed-loop aerodynamic flow control to manipulate the flow over maneuvering air vehicles. The problem chosen for the initial study by the CCCS flow team is control of the resonant noise generated by subsonic flow past an open cavity. This phenomenon is characterized by a strong coupling between the flow dynamics and the flow-induced acoustic field that can lead to self-sustained resonance. Two approaches towards model development have been studied in this dissertation. One aims at representing the physical properties of the system by dynamical models in transfer function forms, referred to as the physics-based linear model in this dissertation. The other approach we have followed is based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and Galerkin projection methods involving the flow governing equations, which is referred to as the nonlinear model or Galerkin model in the dissertation. Each model mentioned above can be further divided into two types: model derived from numerical simulation data and model derived from real time experimental data. Different types of feedback controllers have been designed for corresponding

  1. Heavily Obscured AGN with SIMBOL-X

    SciTech Connect

    Ceca, R. Della; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.

    2009-05-11

    By comparing an optically selected sample of narrow lines AGN with an X-ray selected sample of AGN we have recently derived an estimate of the intrinsic (i.e. before absorption) 2-10 keV luminosity function (XLF) of Compton Thick AGNs. We will use this XLF to derive the number of Compton Thick AGN that will be found in the SIMBOL-X survey(s)

  2. Heavily Obscured AGN with SIMBOL-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Ceca, R.; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.

    2009-05-01

    By comparing an optically selected sample of narrow lines AGN with an X-ray selected sample of AGN we have recently derived an estimate of the intrinsic (i.e. before absorption) 2-10 keV luminosity function (XLF) of Compton Thick AGNs. We will use this XLF to derive the number of Compton Thick AGN that will be found in the SIMBOL-X survey(s).

  3. Modelling and Feedback Control of Bistability in a Turbulent Bluff Body Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackston, Rowan; Wynn, Andrew; Garcia de La Cruz, Juan Marcos; Rigas, Georgios; Morrison, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    The turbulent wake behind many three-dimensional bluff bodies exhibits a bistable behaviour, the properties of which has been the subject of significant recent interest. This feature of the wake is known to contribute to the pressure drag on the body and is relevant for geometries representative of many road vehicles. Furthermore, due to its high visibility from surface mounted pressure measurements, it is a feature that may be observed and controlled in real-time. In Brackston et al. we have recently demonstrated such a feedback control strategy that aims to suppress the bistable feature of the wake. Starting from a stochastic modelling approach, we identify a linearised model for this mode of the flow, obtaining parameters via a system identification. The identified model is then used to design the feedback controller, with the aim of restoring the flow to the unstable, symmetric state. The controller is implemented experimentally at Re 2 . 3 ×105 and is found to both suppress the bistability of the flow and reduce the drag on the body. Furthermore, the control system is found to have a positive energy balance, providing a key demonstration of efficient feedback control applied to a 3D bluff body wake at turbulent Reynolds numbers.

  4. Searching for Short Term Variable Active Galactic Nuclei: A Vital Step Towards Using AGN as Standard Candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilts, Kelly; Gorjian, Varoujan; Rutherford, Thomas; Kohrs, Russell; Urbanowski, Vincent; Bellusci, Nina; Horton, Savannah; Jones, Dana; Jones, Kaytlyn; Pawelski, Peter; Tranum, Haley; Zhang, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Current models for accretion disk sizes of active galactic nuclei (AGN) do not match the limited observational data available, so there is an active need from the modeling community for many more accretion disk/dusty torus reverberation mapping campaigns with which to better calibrate models. Since short term variable AGN can be more easily monitored for reverberation mapping than long term variable AGN, they can begin to provide data more quickly. This project looked for short term variable AGN in the Young Stellar Object Variability (YSOVAR) survey conducted using the Spitzer Space Telescope. The YSOVAR survey targeted 12 nearby star forming regions for repeated observations. Potential AGN from the YSOVAR data were first selected by color ([3.6] - [4.5] > 0.4) and then by magnitude (m < 14) based on previous Spitzer surveys of known AGN. Since AGN share some similar color characteristics with young stars, images of each YSOVAR region were viewed to remove potential objects near concentrations of known young stellar objects since these were likely also YSOs. The spectral energy distribution (SED) for each remaining potential AGN was then examined for AGN like characteristics. Several potential short term variable AGN were found.

  5. Chaos analysis and delayed-feedback control in a discrete dynamic coupled map traffic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yaling; Shi, Zhongke

    2015-03-01

    The presence of chaos in traffic flow is studied using a modified discrete dynamic coupled map model which is derived from both the flow-density-speed fundamental diagram and Del Castillo's speed-density model. The modified model employs occupancy as its new variable and introduces a coupling strength with the consideration of effect of the front adjacent vehicle. And we analyze its stability of the control system and provide a procedure to design the decentralized delayed-feedback controllers for the traffic control system. These theoretical results are illustrated by numerical simulations.

  6. Time-Dependent Photoionization of Gas Outflows in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhoussieny, Ehab E.; Bautista, M.; Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Gas outflows are fundamental components of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) activity. Time-variability of ionizing radiation, which is characteristic of AGN in various different time scales, may produce non-equilibrium photoionization conditions over a significant fraction of the flow and yields supersonically moving cooling/heating fronts. These fast fronts create pressure imbalances that can only be resolved by fragmentation of the flow and acceleration of such fragments. This mechanism can explain the kinematic structure of low ionization BAL systems (FeLoBAL). This mechanism may also have significant effects on other types of outflows given the wide range of variability time scales in AGN. We will study these effects in detail by constructing time-dependent photoionization models of the outflows and incorporating these models into radiative-hydrodynamic simulations.

  7. Non-linear feedbacks affecting sea ice deformation in the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A.; Maslowski, W.; Mills, T.; Hunke, E. C.; Craig, A.; Osinski, R.; Cassano, J. J.; Duvivier, A.; Hughes, M.; Zeng, X.; Brunke, M.; Gutowski, W. J., Jr.; Fisel, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present the latest results of high-resolution sea ice simulations from the fully coupled Regional Arctic System Model (RASM), including explicit melt ponds, form drag and anisotropic sea ice rheology. RASM is a pan-Arctic model composed of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) and Los Alamos Sea ice Model (CICE5) at ~9km resolution, coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model at 50km resolution using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) coupling framework. Using RASM, we have analyzed coupled feedbacks resulting from different sea ice mechanics formulations. Strong spatial and temporal scaling of sea ice deformation has been observed in the Arctic using the Radarsat Geophysical Processing System and Global Positioning System equipped buoys. Whereas previous results from stand-alone ice-ocean simulations suggest that the established Elastic Viscous Plastic (EVP) rheology is unable to replicate these features, RASM simulates the observed scaling using EVP, with a spatial scaling fractal dimension of around -0.23, as compared to the observed range of -0.18 to -0.20. Using this metric, we extend our analysis to test for spatial scaling in sea ice deformation using a recently revised EVP formulation, as well as the new Elastic Plastic Anistropic rheology in CICE5. Our results suggest that a fundamental source of scaling stems from feedbacks associated with frequent coupling between high resolution ocean and atmospheric models, and this result serves as an example of the broader utility of limited-area, fully coupled models in isolating coupled feedbacks and evaluating them using daily in-situ and satellite measurements.

  8. Analysis of Forcing, Response, and Feedbacks in a Paleoclimate Modeling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K E; Hewitt, C D; Braconnot, P; Broccoli, A J; Doutriaux, C; Mitchell, J F B

    2001-04-11

    It is often argued that paleoclimate studies are necessary to determine whether climate models and their predictions of future climate change can be trusted. An overall measure of the sensitivity of global mean surface temperature to a given radiative perturbation is provided by the global climate sensitivity parameter. In climate model experiments, this parameter appears to be moderately independent of the cause of the perturbation [see, for example, Hansen et al. (1997) and Hewitt and Mitchell (1997)], but it may differ from one model to the next by as much as a factor of three (IPCC, 1995). Moreover, there are some scientists who claim that all models are much more sensitive than the climate system itself (Lindzen, 1997). Thus it would be valuable to determine which models (if any) are consistent with the paleoclimate record and what factors are responsible for model differences in sensitivity. In an analysis of the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) of 21,000 years ago, we have calculated how the ''forcing'' and feedbacks determine the climatic response. In the PMIP context, the ice sheet distribution is prescribed and the resulting increase in planetary albedo is the most important ''forcing'' factor. Also important are radiation perturbations induced by changes in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. Here we describe a new, approximate method for estimating the strength of forcing and feedback factors from commonly archived model output. We also summarize preliminary results from the PMIP experiment, which show that differences in forcing and to a lesser extent differences in feedbacks can explain differences in surface temperature response.

  9. Modeling Feedbacks Between Individual Human Decisions and Hydrology Using Interconnected Physical and Social Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J.; Lammers, R. B.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Ozik, J.; Altaweel, M.; Collier, N. T.; Alessa, L.; Kliskey, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    The global hydrological cycle intersects with human decision making at multiple scales, from dams and irrigation works to the taps in individuals' homes. Residential water consumers are commonly encouraged to conserve; these messages are heard against a background of individual values and conceptions about water quality, uses, and availability. The degree to which these values impact the larger-hydrological dynamics, the way that changes in those values have impacts on the hydrological cycle through time, and the feedbacks by which water availability and quality in turn shape those values, are not well explored. To investigate this domain we employ a global-scale water balance model (WBM) coupled with a social-science-grounded agent-based model (ABM). The integration of a hydrological model with an agent-based model allows us to explore driving factors in the dynamics in coupled human-natural systems. From the perspective of the physical hydrologist, the ABM offers a richer means of incorporating the human decisions that drive the hydrological system; from the view of the social scientist, a physically-based hydrological model allows the decisions of the agents to play out against constraints faithful to the real world. We apply the interconnected models to a study of Tucson, Arizona, USA, and its role in the larger Colorado River system. Our core concept is Technology-Induced Environmental Distancing (TIED), which posits that layers of technology can insulate consumers from direct knowledge of a resource. In Tucson, multiple infrastructure and institutional layers have arguably increased the conceptual distance between individuals and their water supply, offering a test case of the TIED framework. Our coupled simulation allows us to show how the larger system transforms a resource with high temporal and spatial variability into a consumer constant, and the effects of this transformation on the regional system. We use this to explore how pricing, messaging, and

  10. AGN identification: what lies ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotopoulou, Sotiria

    2016-08-01

    Classification has been one the first concerns of modern astronomy, starting from stars sorted in the famous Harvard classification system and promptly followed by the morphological classification of galaxies by none other than Edwin Hubble himself (Hubble 1926). Both classification schema are essentially connected to the physics of the objects reflecting the temperature for stars and e.g. the age of the star population for galaxies. Systematic observations of galaxies have revealed the intriguing class of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), objects of tremendous radiation that do not share the same properties of what we now call normal galaxies. Observations have led to the definition of distinct and somewhat arbitrary categories (Seyfert galaxies, quasars, QSO, radio AGN, etc), essentially rediscovering the many faces of the same phenomenon, up until the unification of AGN (Antonucci 1993, Urry and Padovani 1995). Even after the realization that all AGN have the same engine powering their amazing radiation, astronomers are still using and refining the selection criteria within their favorite electromagnetic range in the hope to better understand the impact of the AGN phenomenon in the greater context of galaxy evolution. In the dawn of Big Data astronomy we find ourselves equipped with new tools. I will present the prospects of machine learning methods in better understanding the AGN population. Namely, I will show results from supervised learning algorithms whereby a labeled training set is used to amalgamate decision tree(s) (Fotopoulou et al., 2016) or neural network(s), and unsupervised learning where the algorithm performs clustering analysis of the full dataset in a multidimensional space identifying clusters of objects sharing potentially the same physical properties (Fotopoulou in prep.).

  11. Toward a comprehensive model for feedback by active galactic nuclei: New insights from M87 observations by LOFAR, Fermi, and H.E.S.S

    SciTech Connect

    Pfrommer, Christoph

    2013-12-10

    Feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appears to be critical in balancing radiative cooling of the low-entropy gas at the centers of galaxy clusters and in mitigating the star formation of elliptical galaxies. New observations of M87 enable us to put forward a comprehensive model for the physical heating mechanism. Low-frequency radio observations by LOFAR revealed the absence of fossil cosmic-ray (CR) electrons in the radio halo surrounding M87. This puzzle can be resolved by accounting for the CR release from the radio lobes and the subsequent mixing of CRs with the dense ambient intracluster gas, which thermalizes the electrons on a timescale similar to the radio halo age of 40 Myr. Hadronic interactions of similarly injected CR protons with the ambient gas should produce an observable gamma-ray signal in accordance with the steady emission of the low state of M87 detected by Fermi and H.E.S.S. Hence, we normalize the CR population to the gamma-ray emission, which shows the same spectral slope as the CR injection spectrum probed by LOFAR, thereby supporting a common origin. We show that CRs, which stream at the Alfvén velocity with respect to the plasma rest frame, heat the surrounding thermal plasma at a rate that balances that of radiative cooling on average at each radius. However, the resulting global thermal equilibrium is locally unstable and allows for the formation of the observed cooling multi-phase medium through thermal instability. Provided that CR heating balances cooling during the emerging 'cooling flow', the collapse of the majority of the gas is halted around 1 keV—in accordance with X-ray data. We show that both the existence of a temperature floor and the similar radial scaling of the heating and cooling rates are generic predictions of the CR heating model.

  12. An improved car-following model with multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lantian; Zhao, Xiangmo; Yu, Shaowei; Li, Xiuhai; Shi, Zhongke

    2017-04-01

    In order to explore and evaluate the effects of velocity variation trend of multiple preceding cars used in the Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) strategy on the dynamic characteristic, fuel economy and emission of the corresponding traffic flow, we conduct a study as follows: firstly, with the real-time car-following (CF) data, the close relationship between multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback and the host car's behaviors is explored, the evaluation results clearly show that multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation with different time window-width are highly correlated to the host car's acceleration/deceleration. Then, a microscopic traffic flow model is proposed to evaluate the effects of multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback in the CACC strategy on the traffic flow evolution process. Finally, numerical simulations on fuel economy and exhaust emission of the traffic flow are also implemented by utilizing VT-micro model. Simulation results prove that considering multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback in the control strategy of the CACC system can improve roadway traffic mobility, fuel economy and exhaust emission performance.

  13. Modeling the relativistic runaway electron avalanche and the feedback mechanism with GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Skeltved, Alexander Broberg; Østgaard, Nikolai; Carlson, Brant; Gjesteland, Thomas; Celestin, Sebastien

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the first study that uses the GEometry ANd Tracking 4 (GEANT4) toolkit to do quantitative comparisons with other modeling results related to the production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes and high-energy particle emission from thunderstorms. We will study the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) and the relativistic feedback process, as well as the production of bremsstrahlung photons from runaway electrons. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the effects of electron ionization, electron by electron (Møller), and electron by positron (Bhabha) scattering as well as the bremsstrahlung process and pair production, in the 250 eV to 100 GeV energy range. Our results indicate that the multiplication of electrons during the development of RREAs and under the influence of feedback are consistent with previous estimates. This is important to validate GEANT4 as a tool to model RREAs and feedback in homogeneous electric fields. We also determine the ratio of bremsstrahlung photons to energetic electrons Nγ /Ne . We then show that the ratio has a dependence on the electric field, which can be expressed by the avalanche time τ(E) and the bremsstrahlung coefficient α(ε). In addition, we present comparisons of GEANT4 simulations performed with a "standard" and a "low-energy" physics list both validated in the 1 keV to 100 GeV energy range. This comparison shows that the choice of physics list used in GEANT4 simulations has a significant effect on the results.

  14. Analyses of the Variability Asymmetry of Kepler AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Yang; Wang, Jun-Xian

    2015-05-01

    The high-quality light curves from the Kepler space telescope make it possible to analyze the optical variability of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with unprecedented time resolution. Studying the asymmetry in variations could provide independent constraints on physical models for AGN variability. In this paper, we use Kepler observations of 19 sources to perform analyses of the variability asymmetry of AGNs. We apply smoothing correction to light curves to deduct their bias toward high-frequency variability asymmetry caused by long-term variations that have been poorly sampled due to the limited length of light curves. A parameter β based on structure functions is introduced to quantitively describe the asymmetry and its uncertainty is measured using extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Individual sources show no evidence of asymmetry at timescales of 1˜ 20 days and there is no general trend toward positive or negative asymmetry over the whole sample. Stacking the data from all 19 AGNs, we derive an averaged \\bar{β } of 0.00 ± 0.03 and -0.02 ± 0.04 over timescales of 1 ˜ 5 days and 5 ˜ 20 days, respectively, which are statistically consistent with zero. Quasars and Seyfert galaxies show similar asymmetry parameters. Our results indicate that short-term optical variations in AGNs are highly symmetric.

  15. How baryonic feedback processes can affect dark matter halos: a stochastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundlich, J.; El-Zant, A.; Combes, F.

    2016-12-01

    Feedback processes from stars and active galactic nuclei result in gas density fluctuations which can contribute to `heating' dark matter haloes, decrease their density at the center and hence form more realistic `cores' than the steep `cusps' predicted by cold dark matter (CDM) simulations. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic density variations in the gas distribution perturb the gravitational potential and hence affect the halo particles. We analytically derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the CDM particles and the corresponding relaxation time, and further perform numerical simulations to show that the assumed process can indeed lead to the formation of a core in an initially cuspy halo within a timescale comparable to the derived relaxation time. This suggests that feedback-induced cusp-core transformations observed in hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation may be understood and parametrized in relatively simple terms.

  16. Dusty Feedback from Massive Black Holes in Two Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temi, P.; Brighenti, F.; Mathews, W. G.; Amblard, A.; Riguccini, L.

    2013-01-01

    Far-infrared dust emission from elliptical galaxies informs us about galaxy mergers, feedback energy outbursts from supermassive black holes and the age of galactic stars. We report on the role of AGN feedback observationally by looking for its signatures in elliptical galaxies at recent epochs in the nearby universe. We present Herschel observations of two elliptical galaxies with strong and spatially extended FIR emission from colder grains 5-10 kpc distant from the galaxy cores. Extended excess cold dust emission is interpreted as evidence of recent feedback-generated AGN energy outbursts in these galaxies, visible only in the FIR, from buoyant gaseous outflows from the galaxy cores.

  17. First X-ray Statistical Tests for Clumpy Torii Models: Constraints from RXTE monitoring of Seyfert AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowitz, A.

    2015-09-01

    We summarize two papers providing the first X-ray-derived statistical constraints for both clumpy-torus model parameters and cloud ensemble properties. In Markowitz, Krumpe, & Nikutta (2014), we explored multi-timescale variability in line-of-sight X-ray absorbing gas as a function of optical classification. We examined 55 Seyferts monitored with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and found in 8 objects a total of 12 eclipses, with durations between hours and years. Most clouds are commensurate with the outer portions of the BLR, or the inner regions of infrared-emitting dusty tori. The detection of eclipses in type Is disfavors sharp-edged tori. We provide probabilities to observe a source undergoing an absorption event for both type Is and IIs, yielding constraints in [N_0, sigma, i] parameter space. In Nikutta et al., in prep., we infer that the small cloud angular sizes, as seen from the SMBH, imply the presence of >10^7 clouds in BLR+torus to explain observed covering factors. Cloud size is roughly proportional to distance from the SMBH, hinting at the formation processes (e.g. disk fragmentation). All observed clouds are sub-critical with respect to tidal disruption; self-gravity alone cannot contain them. External forces (e.g. magnetic fields, ambient pressure) are needed to contain them, or otherwise the clouds must be short-lived. Finally, we infer that the radial cloud density distribution behaves as 1/r^{0.7}, compatible with VLTI observations. Our results span both dusty and non-dusty clumpy media, and probe model parameter space complementary to that for short-term eclipses observed with XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra.

  18. Modeling the relativistic runaway electron avalanche and the feedback mechanism with GEANT4

    PubMed Central

    Skeltved, Alexander Broberg; Østgaard, Nikolai; Carlson, Brant; Gjesteland, Thomas; Celestin, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first study that uses the GEometry ANd Tracking 4 (GEANT4) toolkit to do quantitative comparisons with other modeling results related to the production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes and high-energy particle emission from thunderstorms. We will study the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) and the relativistic feedback process, as well as the production of bremsstrahlung photons from runaway electrons. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the effects of electron ionization, electron by electron (Møller), and electron by positron (Bhabha) scattering as well as the bremsstrahlung process and pair production, in the 250 eV to 100 GeV energy range. Our results indicate that the multiplication of electrons during the development of RREAs and under the influence of feedback are consistent with previous estimates. This is important to validate GEANT4 as a tool to model RREAs and feedback in homogeneous electric fields. We also determine the ratio of bremsstrahlung photons to energetic electrons Nγ/Ne. We then show that the ratio has a dependence on the electric field, which can be expressed by the avalanche time τ(E) and the bremsstrahlung coefficient α(ε). In addition, we present comparisons of GEANT4 simulations performed with a “standard” and a “low-energy” physics list both validated in the 1 keV to 100 GeV energy range. This comparison shows that the choice of physics list used in GEANT4 simulations has a significant effect on the results. Key Points Testing the feedback mechanism with GEANT4 Validating the GEANT4 programming toolkit Study the ratio of bremsstrahlung photons to electrons at TGF source altitude PMID:26167437

  19. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  20. Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548. I. A global model for the broadband spectral energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdipour, M.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kriss, G. A.; Cappi, M.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Steenbrugge, K. C.; Arav, N.; Behar, E.; Bianchi, S.; Boissay, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Costantini, E.; Ebrero, J.; Di Gesu, L.; Harrison, F. A.; Kaspi, S.; De Marco, B.; Matt, G.; Paltani, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Ponti, G.; Pozo Nuñez, F.; De Rosa, A.; Ursini, F.; de Vries, C. P.; Walton, D. J.; Whewell, M.

    2015-03-01

    An extensive multi-satellite campaign on NGC 5548 has revealed this archetypal Seyfert-1 galaxy to be in an exceptional state of persistent heavy absorption. Our observations taken in 2013-2014 with XMM-Newton, Swift, NuSTAR, INTEGRAL, Chandra, HST and two ground-based observatories have together enabled us to establish that this unexpected phenomenon is caused by an outflowing stream of weakly ionised gas (called the obscurer), extending from the vicinity of the accretion disk to the broad-line region. In this work we present the details of our campaign and the data obtained by all the observatories. We determine the spectral energy distribution of NGC 5548 from near-infrared to hard X-rays by establishing the contribution of various emission and absorption processes taking place along our line of sight towards the central engine. We thus uncover the intrinsic emission and produce a broadband continuum model for both obscured (average summer 2013 data) and unobscured (<2011) epochs of NGC 5548. Our results suggest that the intrinsic NIR/optical/UV continuum is a single Comptonised component with its higher energy tail creating the "softX-ray excess". This component is compatible with emission from a warm, optically-thick corona as part of the inner accretion disk. We then investigate the effects of the continuum on the ionisation balance and thermal stability of photoionised gas for unobscured and obscured epochs. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Passage Feedback with IRIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Kiduk; Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Newby, Gregory B.

    2001-01-01

    Compares a user-defined passage feedback system to a document feedback system for information retrieval, based on TREC (Text Retrieval Conference) guidelines. Highlights include a description of IRIS, an interactive retrieval system; text processing; ranking; term weights; feedback models, including the adaptive linear model; and suggestions for…

  2. Modeling of testosterone regulation by pulse-modulated feedback: An experimental data study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Per; Medvedev, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The continuous part of a hybrid (pulse-modulated) model of testosterone feedback regulation is extended with infinite-dimensional and nonlinear dynamics, to better explain the testosterone concentration profiles observed in clinical data. A linear least-squares based optimization algorithm is developed for the purpose of detecting impulses of gonadotropin-realsing hormone from measured concentration of luteinizing hormone. The parameters in the model are estimated from hormone concentration measured in human males, and simulation results from the full closed-loop system are provided.

  3. A feedback control model for network flow with multiple pure time delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, J.

    1972-01-01

    A control model describing a network flow hindered by multiple pure time (or transport) delays is formulated. Feedbacks connect each desired output with a single control sector situated at the origin. The dynamic formulation invokes the use of differential difference equations. This causes the characteristic equation of the model to consist of transcendental functions instead of a common algebraic polynomial. A general graphical criterion is developed to evaluate the stability of such a problem. A digital computer simulation confirms the validity of such criterion. An optimal decision making process with multiple delays is presented.

  4. The Horizon-AGN simulation: evolution of galaxy properties over cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviraj, S.; Laigle, C.; Kimm, T.; Devriendt, J. E. G.; Dubois, Y.; Pichon, C.; Slyz, A.; Chisari, E.; Peirani, S.

    2017-01-01

    We compare the predictions of Horizon-AGN, a hydro-dynamical cosmological simulation that uses an adaptive mesh refinement code, to observational data in the redshift range 0 < z < 6. We study the reproduction, by the simulation, of quantities that trace the aggregate stellar-mass growth of galaxies over cosmic time: luminosity and stellar-mass functions, the star formation main sequence, rest-frame UV-optical-near infrared colours and the cosmic star-formation history. We show that Horizon-AGN, which is not tuned to reproduce the local Universe, produces good overall agreement with these quantities, from the present day to the epoch when the Universe was 5% of its current age. By comparison to Horizon-noAGN, a twin simulation without AGN feedback, we quantify how feedback from black holes is likely to help shape galaxy stellar-mass growth in the redshift range 0 < z < 6, particularly in the most massive galaxies. Our results demonstrate that Horizon-AGN successfully captures the evolutionary trends of observed galaxies over the lifetime of the Universe, making it an excellent tool for studying the processes that drive galaxy evolution and making predictions for the next generation of galaxy surveys.

  5. Modelling ecogeomorphic feedbacks: investigating mechanisms of land degradation in semi-arid grassland and shrubland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Laura; Mueller, Eva; Tietjen, Britta; Wainwright, John

    2014-05-01

    Across vast areas of the world's drylands, land degradation is exacerbated by ecohydrological processes, which alter the structure, function and connectivity of dryland hillslopes. These processes are often interlinked through feedback mechanisms in such a way that a trigger may result in a re-organization of the affected landscape. Here, we present a spatially explicit process-based ecogeomorphic model, MAHLERAN-EcoHyD to enhance our understanding of complex linkages between abiotic and biotic drivers and processes of degradation in drylands. This ecogeomorphic modelling approach is innovative in two main ways: it couples biotic and abiotic processes, and simulates intra and inter-event dynamics, thus overcoming a key limitation of previous modelling approaches in terms of their temporal scaling, by simulating key ecogeomorphic processes at process-relevant time steps. Redistribution of water, sediment and nutrients during high-intensity rainstorms is simulated at 1-sec time steps, soil moisture and transpiration dynamics at daily time steps, and vegetation dynamics (establishment, growth, mortality) at 14-day time steps, over a high-resolution 1x1 m grid. We use this innovative modelling approach to investigate soil-vegetation feedback mechanisms within a grassland-shrubland transition zone at the Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research site in the south-western United States. Results from three modelling experiments are presented: the first modelling experiment investigates the impact of annual variations in individual high-intensity storms to assess long-term variations in runoff, soil-moisture conditions and sediment and nutrient fluxes over two decades; the second modelling experiment assesses the impact of vegetation composition on spatial changes in surface soil texture due to soil erosion by water; and the third modelling experiment investigates how long-term changes in vegetation alter feedbacks between biotic and abiotic processes using scenarios for

  6. A statistical study of H i gas in nearby narrow-line AGN-hosting galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yi-Nan; Wu, Hong E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    As a quenching mechanism, active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback could suppress on going star formation in host galaxies. On the basis of a sample of galaxies selected from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) H i survey, the dependence of the H i mass (M{sub H} {sub i}), stellar mass (M{sub *}), and H i-to-stellar mass ratio (M{sub H} {sub i}/M{sub *}) on various tracers of AGN activity are presented and analyzed in this paper. Almost all the AGN hostings in this sample are gas-rich galaxies, and there is not any evidence to indicate that the AGN activity could increase or decrease either M{sub H} {sub i} or M{sub H} {sub i}/M{sub *}. The position of the cold neutral gas cannot be fixed accurately based only on available H i data, due to the large beam size of ALFALFA survey. In addition, even though AGN hostings are more easily detected by an H i survey compared with absorption line galaxies, these two types of galaxies show similar star formation history. If an AGN hosting would ultimately evolve into an old red galaxy with low cold gas, then when and how the gas has been exhausted must be solved by future hypotheses and observations.

  7. On the relation between X-ray absorption and optical extinction in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordovás-Pascual, I.; Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Wiersema, K.; Caccianiga, A.; Della Ceca, R.; Severgnini, P.; Moretti, A.; Ballo, L.

    2017-03-01

    According to the Unified Model of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), an X-ray unabsorbed AGN should appear as unobscured in the optical band (the so called type-1 AGN). However, there is an important fraction (10–30%) of AGN whose optical and X-ray classifications do not match. To provide insight into the origin of such apparent discrepancies, we have conducted two types of analysis: 1) a detailed study of the UV-to-near-IR emission of two X-ray low absorbed AGN with high optical extinction drawn from the Bright Ultra-Hard XMM-Newton Survey (BUXS); 2) a statistical analysis of the optical obscuration and X-ray absorption properties of 159 type-1 AGN drawn from BUXS to determine the distribution of dust-to-gas ratios in AGN over a broad range of luminosities and redshifts. We have determined the impact of contamination from the AGN hosts in their optical classification (detection or lack of detection of rest-frame UV-optical broad emission lines). This is an on-going project, but our preliminary results, reported below, are very promising.

  8. Hard X-ray Spectroscopy of Obscured AGN with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balokovic, Mislav; Harrison, Fiona; NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys Team

    2017-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has enabled studies of the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) to extend into the hard X-ray band, up to 79 keV, with unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity. As a part of its extragalactic program, NuSTAR is surveying the nearby population of AGN detected at hard X-ray energies by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT), selecting even the most obscured local AGN. I will highlight some of the results based on broadband X-ray spectroscopy of individual targets and present my work on the large representative sample of more than a hundred nearby obscured AGN, which constitutes the largest available atlas of hard X-ray spectra of obscured AGN to date. The high quality of the data allows us to probe the details of AGN structures such as the X-ray-emitting corona and the toroidal obscurer in the under-explored spectral window above 10 keV. I will present both phenomenological results important for synthesis models of the cosmic X-ray background, and a novel approach for constraining the geometry of the gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (including the accretion disk, the broad-line region, and the torus) from the hard X-ray band. Finally, I will discuss how what we learned from this survey of local AGN relates to deeper high-redshift X-ray surveys and AGN structure probes at other wavelengths.

  9. AGN Survey to characterize the clumpy torus using FORCAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique

    2015-10-01

    A geometrically and optically thick torus of gas and dust obscures the black hole and accretion disk in active galactic nuclei (AGN) in some lines of sight. One of the most important question that still remain uncertain is: How do the properties, such as torus geometry and distribution of clumps, of the torus depend on the AGN luminosity and/or activity class? Infrared (IR) observations are essential to these investigations as the torus intercepts and re-radiates (peaking within 30-40 um) a substantial amount of flux from the central engine. Near-IR (NIR) and mid-IR (MIR) observations from the ground have been key to advance our knowledge in this field. However, the atmosphere is opaque to the 30-40 um range and observations are impossible from ground-based telescopes. FORCAST presents a unique opportunity to explore AGN, providing the best angular resolution observations within the 30-40 um range for the current suite of instruments. From our analysis using Cycle 2 observations, we found that FORCAST provides the largest constraining power of the clumpy torus models in the suggested wavelength range. We therefore request an AGN Survey using FORCAST of snapshot imaging observations of a flux-limited (>500 mJy at 37.1 um) sample of 23 Seyfert galaxies with existing high-angular resolution MIR spectra observed on 8-m class telescopes. Using the FORCAST data requested here in combination with already acquired NIR and MIR data, we will have an unprecedentedly homogeneous AGN sample of IR (1-40 um) SED at the largest spatial-resolution, which yield to a better knowledge of the torus structure in the AGN unified model.

  10. INEFFICIENT DRIVING OF BULK TURBULENCE BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN A HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Balbus, Steven A.; Schekochihin, Alexander A.

    2015-12-10

    Central jetted active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appear to heat the core regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) in cooling-core galaxy clusters and groups, thereby preventing a cooling catastrophe. However, the physical mechanism(s) by which the directed flow of kinetic energy is thermalized throughout the ICM core remains unclear. We examine one widely discussed mechanism whereby the AGN induces subsonic turbulence in the ambient medium, the dissipation of which provides the ICM heat source. Through controlled inviscid three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we verify that explosive AGN-like events can launch gravity waves (g-modes) into the ambient ICM, which in turn decays to volume-filling turbulence. In our model, however, this process is found to be inefficient, with less than 1% of the energy injected by the AGN activity actually ending up in the turbulence of the ambient ICM. This efficiency is an order of magnitude or more too small to explain the observations of AGN-feedback in galaxy clusters and groups with short central cooling times. Atmospheres in which the g-modes are strongly trapped/confined have an even lower efficiency since, in these models, the excitation of turbulence relies on the g-modes’ ability to escape from the center of the cluster into the bulk ICM. Our results suggest that, if AGN-induced turbulence is indeed the mechanism by which the AGN heats the ICM core, its driving may rely on physics beyond that captured in our ideal hydrodynamic model.

  11. An enhanced fraction of starbursting galaxies among high Eddington ratio AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, E.; Mullaney, J. R.; Daddi, E.; Ciesla, L.; Schreiber, C.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the star-forming properties of 1620 X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxies as a function of their specific X-ray luminosity (i.e. X-ray luminosity per unit host stellar mass) - a proxy of the Eddington ratio. Our motivation is to determine whether there is any evidence of a suppression of star formation at high Eddington ratios, which may hint towards `AGN feedback' effects. Star formation rates (SFRs) are derived from fits to Herschel-measured far-infrared spectral energy distributions, taking into account any contamination from the AGN. Herschel-undetected AGNs are included via stacking analyses to provide average SFRs in bins of redshift and specific X-ray luminosity (spanning 0.01 lesssim L_X/M_{ast } lesssim 100 L_{{⊙}} M_{{⊙}}^{-1}). After normalizing for the effects of mass and redshift arising from the evolving galaxy main sequence, we find that the SFRs of high specific luminosity AGNs are slightly enhanced compared to their lower specific luminosity counterparts. This suggests that the SFR distribution of AGN hosts changes with specific X-ray luminosity, a result reinforced by our finding of a significantly higher fraction of starbursting hosts among high specific luminosity AGNs compared to that of the general star-forming galaxy population (i.e. 8-10 per cent versus 3 per cent). Contrary to our original motivation, our findings suggest that high specific luminosity AGNs are more likely to reside in galaxies with enhanced levels of star formation.

  12. The Cusp/Core problem: supernovae feedback versus the baryonic clumps and dynamical friction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.; Pace, F.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we compare the predictions of two well known mechanisms considered able to solve the cusp/core problem (a. supernova feedback; b. baryonic clumps-DM interaction) by comparing their theoretical predictions to recent observations of the inner slopes of galaxies with masses ranging from dSphs to normal spirals. We compare the α-V_{rot} and the α-M_{ast} relationships, predicted by the two models with high resolution data coming from Adams et al. (Astrophys. J. 789, 63, 2014), Simon et al. (Astrophys. J. 621, 757, 2005), LITTLE THINGS (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 149, 180, 2015), THINGS dwarves (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 141, 193, 2011a; Oh et al. in Astron. J. 142, 224, 2011b), THINGS spirals (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 149, 180, 2015), Sculptor, Fornax and the Milky Way. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the complete set of data shows that the two models perform similarly, while when we restrict the analysis to a smaller subsample of higher quality, we show that the method presented in this paper (baryonic clumps-DM interaction) performs better than the one based on supernova feedback. We also show that, contrarily to the first model prediction, dSphs of small mass could have cored profiles. This means that observations of cored inner profiles in dSphs having a stellar mass <106 M_{⊙} not necessarily imply problems for the ΛCDM model.

  13. On the nature of the sea ice albedo feedback in simple models.

    PubMed

    Moon, W; Wettlaufer, J S

    2014-08-01

    We examine the nature of the ice-albedo feedback in a long-standing approach used in the dynamic-thermodynamic modeling of sea ice. The central issue examined is how the evolution of the ice area is treated when modeling a partial ice cover using a two-category-thickness scheme; thin sea ice and open water in one category and "thick" sea ice in the second. The problem with the scheme is that the area evolution is handled in a manner that violates the basic rules of calculus, which leads to a neglected area evolution term that is equivalent to neglecting a leading-order latent heat flux. We demonstrate the consequences by constructing energy balance models with a fractional ice cover and studying them under the influence of increased radiative forcing. It is shown that the neglected flux is particularly important in a decaying ice cover approaching the transitions to seasonal or ice-free conditions. Clearly, a mishandling of the evolution of the ice area has leading-order effects on the ice-albedo feedback. Accordingly, it may be of considerable importance to reexamine the relevant climate model schemes and to begin the process of converting them to fully resolve the sea ice thickness distribution in a manner such as remapping, which does not in principle suffer from the pathology we describe.

  14. Modeling and control of non-square MIMO system using relay feedback.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, D; Thyagarajan, T; Gokulraj, N

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a systematic approach for the modeling and control of non-square MIMO systems in time domain using relay feedback. Conventionally, modeling, selection of the control configuration and controller design of non-square MIMO systems are performed using input/output information of direct loop, while the output of undesired responses that bears valuable information on interaction among the loops are not considered. However, in this paper, the undesired response obtained from relay feedback test is also taken into consideration to extract the information about the interaction between the loops. The studies are performed on an Air Path Scheme of Turbocharged Diesel Engine (APSTDE) model, which is a typical non-square MIMO system, with input and output variables being 3 and 2 respectively. From the relay test response, the generalized analytical expressions are derived and these analytical expressions are used to estimate unknown system parameters and also to evaluate interaction measures. The interaction is analyzed by using Block Relative Gain (BRG) method. The model thus identified is later used to design appropriate controller to carry out closed loop studies. Closed loop simulation studies were performed for both servo and regulatory operations. Integral of Squared Error (ISE) performance criterion is employed to quantitatively evaluate performance of the proposed scheme. The usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated on a lab-scale Two-Tank Cylindrical Interacting System (TTCIS), which is configured as a non-square system.

  15. Reciprocal Markov modeling of feedback mechanisms between emotion and dietary choice using experience sampling data

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ji; Pan, Junhao; Zhang, Qiang; Dubé, Laurette; Ip, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    With intensively collected longitudinal data, recent advances in Experience Sampling Method (ESM) benefit social science empirical research, but also pose important methodological challenges. As traditional statistical models are not generally well-equipped to analyze a system of variables that contain feedback loops, this paper proposes the utility of an extended hidden Markov model to model reciprocal relationship between momentary emotion and eating behavior. This paper revisited an ESM data set (Lu, Huet & Dube, 2011) that observed 160 participants’ food consumption and momentary emotions six times per day in 10 days. Focusing on the analyses on feedback loop between mood and meal healthiness decision, the proposed Reciprocal Markov Model (RMM) can accommodate both hidden (“general” emotional states: positive vs. negative state) and observed states (meal: healthier, same or less healthy than usual) without presuming independence between observations and smooth trajectories of mood or behavior changes. The results of RMM analyses illustrated the reciprocal chains of meal consumption and mood as well as the effect of contextual factors that moderate the interrelationship between eating and emotion. A simulation experiment that generated data consistent to the empirical study further demonstrated that the procedure is promising in terms of recovering the parameters. PMID:26717120

  16. Sensory Feedback, Error Correction, and Remapping in a Multiple Oscillator Model of Place-Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Joseph D.; Knierim, James J.; Zhang, Kechen

    2011-01-01

    Mammals navigate by integrating self-motion signals (“path integration”) and occasionally fixing on familiar environmental landmarks. The rat hippocampus is a model system of spatial representation in which place cells are thought to integrate both sensory and spatial information from entorhinal cortex. The localized firing fields of hippocampal place cells and entorhinal grid-cells demonstrate a phase relationship with the local theta (6–10 Hz) rhythm that may be a temporal signature of path integration. However, encoding self-motion in the phase of theta oscillations requires high temporal precision and is susceptible to idiothetic noise, neuronal variability, and a changing environment. We present a model based on oscillatory interference theory, previously studied in the context of grid cells, in which transient temporal synchronization among a pool of path-integrating theta oscillators produces hippocampal-like place fields. We hypothesize that a spatiotemporally extended sensory interaction with external cues modulates feedback to the theta oscillators. We implement a form of this cue-driven feedback and show that it can retrieve fixed points in the phase code of position. A single cue can smoothly reset oscillator phases to correct for both systematic errors and continuous noise in path integration. Further, simulations in which local and global cues are rotated against each other reveal a phase-code mechanism in which conflicting cue arrangements can reproduce experimentally observed distributions of “partial remapping” responses. This abstract model demonstrates that phase-code feedback can provide stability to the temporal coding of position during navigation and may contribute to the context-dependence of hippocampal spatial representations. While the anatomical substrates of these processes have not been fully characterized, our findings suggest several signatures that can be evaluated in future experiments. PMID:21994494

  17. Tree cover bistability in the MPI Earth system model due to fire-vegetation feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasslop, Gitta; Brovkin, Victor; Kloster, Silvia; Reick, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The global distribution of tree cover is mainly limited by precipitation and temperature. Within tropical ecosystems different tree cover values have been observed in regions with similar climate. Satellite data even revealed a lack of ecosystems with tree coverage around 60% and dominant tree covers of 20% and 80%. Conceptual models have been used to explain this tree cover distribution and base it on a bistability in tree cover caused by fire-vegetation interactions or competition between trees and grasses. Some ecological models also show this property of multiple stable tree covers, but it remains unclear which mechanism is the cause for this behaviour. Vegetation models used in climate simulations usually use simple approaches and were criticised to neglect such ecological theories and misrepresent tropical tree cover distribution and dynamics. Here we show that including the process based fire model SPITFIRE generated a bistability in tree cover in the land surface model JSBACH. Previous model versions showed only one stable tree cover state. Using a conceptual model we can show that a bistability can occur due to a feedback between grasses and fire. Grasses and trees are represented in the model based on plant functional types. With respect to fire the main difference between grasses and trees is the fuel characteristics. Grass fuels are smaller in size, and have a higher surface area to volume ratio. These grass fuels dry faster increasing their flammability which leads to a higher fire rate of spread. Trees are characterized by coarse fuels, which are less likely to ignite and rather suppress fire. Therefore a higher fraction of grasses promotes fire, fire kills trees and following a fire, grasses establish faster. This feedback can stabilize ecosystems with low tree cover in a low tree cover state and systems with high tree cover in a high tree cover state. In previous model versions this feedback was absent. Based on the new JSBACH model driven with

  18. Feedback loops and temporal misalignment in component-based hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, Mostafa M.; Goodall, Jonathan L.; Castronova, Anthony M.

    2011-12-01

    In component-based modeling, a complex system is represented as a series of loosely integrated components with defined interfaces and data exchanges that allow the components to be coupled together through shared boundary conditions. Although the component-based paradigm is commonly used in software engineering, it has only recently been applied for modeling hydrologic and earth systems. As a result, research is needed to test and verify the applicability of the approach for modeling hydrologic systems. The objective of this work was therefore to investigate two aspects of using component-based software architecture for hydrologic modeling: (1) simulation of feedback loops between components that share a boundary condition and (2) data transfers between temporally misaligned model components. We investigated these topics using a simple case study where diffusion of mass is modeled across a water-sediment interface. We simulated the multimedia system using two model components, one for the water and one for the sediment, coupled using the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI) standard. The results were compared with a more conventional numerical approach for solving the system where the domain is represented by a single multidimensional array. Results showed that the component-based approach was able to produce the same results obtained with the more conventional numerical approach. When the two components were temporally misaligned, we explored the use of different interpolation schemes to minimize mass balance error within the coupled system. The outcome of this work provides evidence that component-based modeling can be used to simulate complicated feedback loops between systems and guidance as to how different interpolation schemes minimize mass balance error introduced when components are temporally misaligned.

  19. Simulating galaxy formation with black hole driven thermal and kinetic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Rainer; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars; Pillepich, Annalisa; Marinacci, Federico; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Naiman, Jill; Torrey, Paul

    2017-03-01

    The inefficiency of star formation in massive elliptical galaxies is widely believed to be caused by the interactions of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with the surrounding gas. Achieving a sufficiently rapid reddening of moderately massive galaxies without expelling too many baryons has however proven difficult for hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation, prompting us to explore a new model for the accretion and feedback effects of supermassive black holes. For high-accretion rates relative to the Eddington limit, we assume that a fraction of the accreted rest mass energy heats the surrounding gas thermally, similar to the 'quasar mode' in previous work. For low-accretion rates, we invoke a new, pure kinetic feedback model that imparts momentum to the surrounding gas in a stochastic manner. These two modes of feedback are motivated both by theoretical conjectures for the existence of different types of accretion flows as well as recent observational evidence for the importance of kinetic AGN winds in quenching galaxies. We find that a large fraction of the injected kinetic energy in this mode thermalizes via shocks in the surrounding gas, thereby providing a distributed heating channel. In cosmological simulations, the resulting model produces red, non-star-forming massive elliptical galaxies, and achieves realistic gas fractions, black hole growth histories and thermodynamic profiles in large haloes.

  20. A stage structure pest management model with impulsive state feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Guoping; Chen, Lansun; Xu, Weijian; Fu, Gang

    2015-06-01

    A stage structure pest management model with impulsive state feedback control is investigated. We get the sufficient condition for the existence of the order-1 periodic solution by differential equation geometry theory and successor function. Further, we obtain a new judgement method for the stability of the order-1 periodic solution of the semi-continuous systems by referencing the stability analysis for limit cycles of continuous systems, which is different from the previous method of analog of Poincarè criterion. Finally, we analyze numerically the theoretical results obtained.

  1. Video modeling by experts with video feedback to enhance gymnastics skills.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Eva; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Batsche, Catherine; Fogel, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The effects of combining video modeling by experts with video feedback were analyzed with 4 female competitive gymnasts (7 to 10 years old) in a multiple baseline design across behaviors. During the intervention, after the gymnast performed a specific gymnastics skill, she viewed a video segment showing an expert gymnast performing the same skill and then viewed a video replay of her own performance of the skill. The results showed that all gymnasts demonstrated improved performance across three gymnastics skills following exposure to the intervention.

  2. The effects of verbal instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback on correct posture during flute playing.

    PubMed

    Dib, Nancy Ellen; Sturmey, Peter

    2007-07-01

    A behavioral skills training package, including verbal instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback, was used to teach children correct posture, defined as keeping feet on the floor, legs parallel to each other, and the back and neck perpendicular to the floor, during flute lessons. Three typically developing girls aged 8 to 9 years participated. All three students' posture improved from 0% during baseline to nearly 100% after training for all sessions, generalization probes, and after a 1- to 2-month follow-up. The training package was proven effective in the acquisition, generalization, and maintenance of correct posture for flute playing.

  3. Feedbacks between climate, CO2 and N2O quantified by a fully coupled Earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracher, D.; Reick, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is evoked by an anthropogenic increase of green house gases (GHG) in the atmosphere, induced by direct emissions from industrial processes or indirectly due to human impacts on ecosystems. Those indirect GHG emissions are strongly influenced by climatic conditions implying several feedback loops in the climate - carbon (C) - nitrogen (N) system. In our study we aim at quantifying the climate - nitrous oxide (N2O) feedback strength in comparison to other feedback mechanisms by applying an Earth system model with explicit representation of interactive N2O in the atmosphere-land-ocean system. Beside the feedbacks emerging due to the temperature sensitivity of biogenic CO2 and N2O emissions, another feedback addressed arises from additional inter-linkages between climate and C and N cycles. Future increased atmospheric CO2 leads to enhanced primary productivity ('CO2 fertilization') causing changes in N availability in the different land and ocean ecosystems. As N2O emissions are driven by availability of N, increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations will impact the climate system also via modifications in N2O emissions. Those changes in N2O emissions will feed back to the climate and will hence also modify the natural biogenic release of CO2 into the atmosphere. This and other associated feedbacks are quantified by applying MPI-ESM, the Earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg. MPI-ESM is an atmosphere and ocean global circulation model with model components for land and ocean biogeochemistry. For both CO2 and N2O, land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere exchange as well as atmospheric transport are simulated explicitly. Hence, different feedback components in the climate-C-N system can be quantified by cutting artificially single feedback pathways in the model.

  4. Self-tuning bistable parametric feedback oscillator: Near-optimal amplitude maximization without model information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David J.; Sutas, Andrius; Vijayakumar, Sethu

    2017-01-01

    Theory predicts that parametrically excited oscillators, tuned to operate under resonant condition, are capable of large-amplitude oscillation useful in diverse applications, such as signal amplification, communication, and analog computation. However, due to amplitude saturation caused by nonlinearity, lack of robustness to model uncertainty, and limited sensitivity to parameter modulation, these oscillators require fine-tuning and strong modulation to generate robust large-amplitude oscillation. Here we present a principle of self-tuning parametric feedback excitation that alleviates the above-mentioned limitations. This is achieved using a minimalistic control implementation that performs (i) self-tuning (slow parameter adaptation) and (ii) feedback pumping (fast parameter modulation), without sophisticated signal processing past observations. The proposed approach provides near-optimal amplitude maximization without requiring model-based control computation, previously perceived inevitable to implement optimal control principles in practical application. Experimental implementation of the theory shows that the oscillator self-tunes itself near to the onset of dynamic bifurcation to achieve extreme sensitivity to small resonant parametric perturbations. As a result, it achieves large-amplitude oscillations by capitalizing on the effect of nonlinearity, despite substantial model uncertainties and strong unforeseen external perturbations. We envision the present finding to provide an effective and robust approach to parametric excitation when it comes to real-world application.

  5. Modeling and Automatic Feedback Control of Tremor: Adaptive Estimation of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Rehan, Muhammad; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses modeling and automatic feedback control of (postural and rest) tremor for adaptive-control-methodology-based estimation of deep brain stimulation (DBS) parameters. The simplest linear oscillator-based tremor model, between stimulation amplitude and tremor, is investigated by utilizing input-output knowledge. Further, a nonlinear generalization of the oscillator-based tremor model, useful for derivation of a control strategy involving incorporation of parametric-bound knowledge, is provided. Using the Lyapunov method, a robust adaptive output feedback control law, based on measurement of the tremor signal from the fingers of a patient, is formulated to estimate the stimulation amplitude required to control the tremor. By means of the proposed control strategy, an algorithm is developed for estimation of DBS parameters such as amplitude, frequency and pulse width, which provides a framework for development of an automatic clinical device for control of motor symptoms. The DBS parameter estimation results for the proposed control scheme are verified through numerical simulations. PMID:23638163

  6. Climate sensitivity of a one-dimensional radiative-convective model with cloud feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Rossow, W. B.; Yao, M.-S.; Wolfson, M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential complexity of the feedback between global mean cloud amount and global mean surface temperature when variations of the vertical cloud distribution are included is illustrated. This is done by studying the behavior of a one-dimensional radiative-convective model with two types of cloud variation: (1) variable cloud cover with constant optical thickness and (2) variable optical thickness with constant cloud cover. The variable parameter is calculated on the assumption that a correlation exists between cloud amount and precipitation or the vertical flux convergence of latent heat. Since the vertical latent heat flux is taken to be a fraction of the total heat flux, modeled by convective adjustment, the sensitivity of the results to two different critical lapse rates is examined. These are a constant 6.5 K/km lapse rate and a temperature-dependent, moist adiabatic lapse rate. The effects of the vertical structure of climate perturbations on the nature of the cloud feedback are also examined. The model results reveal that changes in the vertical cloud distribution and mean cloud optical thickness can be as important to climate variations as are changes in the total cloud cover.

  7. Development of Reduced-order Models for Feedback Control of Axisymmetric Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Aniruddha; Serrani, Andrea; Samimy, Mo

    2009-11-01

    We present the preliminary steps toward development of reduced-order models (ROM) for feedback control of a high-speed and high Reynolds number axisymmetric jet. The control objective is two-fold: attenuation of far-field acoustic radiation, or, enhancement of bulk mixing, using a set of localized arc filament plasma actuators that perturb the initial shear layer of the jet through intense localized Joule heating. The proposed feedback sensing mechanism involves pressure information from the irrotational near-field of the jet. The proposed route for creating the ROM involves collecting PIV data of the jet simultaneously with the pressure measurements, performing Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and Stochastic Estimation to obtain a time- and space-resolved database, and using Galerkin Projection to derive the dynamical model. Here we evaluate the above strategy using a DNS database (Freund, J. B., J. Fluid Mech., 438, 2001, 277--305). The ROMs obtained using various modeling options are simulated and their comparative fidelity are adjudged based on the original simulation results.

  8. Applying forces to elastic network models of large biomolecules using a haptic feedback device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocks, M. B.; Laycock, S. D.; Hayward, S.

    2011-03-01

    Elastic network models of biomolecules have proved to be relatively good at predicting global conformational changes particularly in large systems. Software that facilitates rapid and intuitive exploration of conformational change in elastic network models of large biomolecules in response to externally applied forces would therefore be of considerable use, particularly if the forces mimic those that arise in the interaction with a functional ligand. We have developed software that enables a user to apply forces to individual atoms of an elastic network model of a biomolecule through a haptic feedback device or a mouse. With a haptic feedback device the user feels the response to the applied force whilst seeing the biomolecule deform on the screen. Prior to the interactive session normal mode analysis is performed, or pre-calculated normal mode eigenvalues and eigenvectors are loaded. For large molecules this allows the memory and number of calculations to be reduced by employing the idea of the important subspace, a relatively small space of the first M lowest frequency normal mode eigenvectors within which a large proportion of the total fluctuation occurs. Using this approach it was possible to study GroEL on a standard PC as even though only 2.3% of the total number of eigenvectors could be used, they accounted for 50% of the total fluctuation. User testing has shown that the haptic version allows for much more rapid and intuitive exploration of the molecule than the mouse version.

  9. Applying forces to elastic network models of large biomolecules using a haptic feedback device.

    PubMed

    Stocks, M B; Laycock, S D; Hayward, S

    2011-03-01

    Elastic network models of biomolecules have proved to be relatively good at predicting global conformational changes particularly in large systems. Software that facilitates rapid and intuitive exploration of conformational change in elastic network models of large biomolecules in response to externally applied forces would therefore be of considerable use, particularly if the forces mimic those that arise in the interaction with a functional ligand. We have developed software that enables a user to apply forces to individual atoms of an elastic network model of a biomolecule through a haptic feedback device or a mouse. With a haptic feedback device the user feels the response to the applied force whilst seeing the biomolecule deform on the screen. Prior to the interactive session normal mode analysis is performed, or pre-calculated normal mode eigenvalues and eigenvectors are loaded. For large molecules this allows the memory and number of calculations to be reduced by employing the idea of the important subspace, a relatively small space of the first M lowest frequency normal mode eigenvectors within which a large proportion of the total fluctuation occurs. Using this approach it was possible to study GroEL on a standard PC as even though only 2.3% of the total number of eigenvectors could be used, they accounted for 50% of the total fluctuation. User testing has shown that the haptic version allows for much more rapid and intuitive exploration of the molecule than the mouse version.

  10. Semi-Classical theory model for feedback effect of orthogonally polarized dual frequency He-Ne laser.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liu; Zhang, Shulian

    2005-08-22

    The feedback phenomenon of orthogonally polarized dual frequency laser has not been explained theoretically. This paper gives a model based on Lamb's semi-classical gas-laser theory for the first time. The intensity reflectivity of the feedback mirror, the polarization characteristics of the dual frequency laser and external cavity length are considered besides the parameters studied before. The intensities of o-light and e-light are tuned by feedback mirror. The intensity alternation, leaning of curves and height difference of the two equal-intensity points etc. are discovered in the region of moderate optical feedback level. The experiments are done and the results are in good agreement with the theoretical model.

  11. Statistical physics of a model binary genetic switch with linear feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, Paolo; Allen, Rosalind J.; Evans, Martin R.

    2009-03-01

    We study the statistical properties of a simple genetic regulatory network that provides heterogeneity within a population of cells. This network consists of a binary genetic switch in which stochastic flipping between the two switch states is mediated by a “flipping” enzyme. Feedback between the switch state and the flipping rate is provided by a linear feedback mechanism: the flipping enzyme is only produced in the on switch state and the switching rate depends linearly on the copy number of the enzyme. This work generalizes the model of Visco [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 118104 (2008)] to a broader class of linear feedback systems. We present a complete analytical solution for the steady-state statistics of the number of enzyme molecules in the on and off states, for the general case where the enzyme can mediate flipping in either direction. For this general case we also solve for the flip time distribution, making a connection to first passage and persistence problems in statistical physics. We show that the statistics are non-Poissonian, leading to a peak in the flip time distribution. The occurrence of such a peak is analyzed as a function of the parameter space. We present a relation between the flip time distributions measured for two relevant choices of initial condition. We also introduce a correlation measure and use this to show that this model can exhibit long-lived temporal correlations, thus providing a primitive form of cellular memory. Motivated by DNA replication as well as by evolutionary mechanisms involving gene duplication, we study the case of two switches in the same cell. This results in correlations between the two switches; these can be either positive or negative depending on the parameter regime.

  12. Crop phenology feedback on climate over central US in a regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Takle, E.; Xue, L.; Segal, M.

    2004-12-01

    The moisture and CO2 fluxes over cropland represent local climate forcing and an important component of atmospheric energy and CO2 budgets. Since observed fluxes, especially for CO2, are rarely available over extensive areas the fluxes are mainly estimated by climate models. The carbon sequestration and water consumption by crops are only crudely represented in the models. For example, most climate models use climatological or static crop growth and development that do not change from year to year, indistinguishable between flood and drought years. To improve the moisture and CO2 fluxes (i.e., photosynthesis) from crops we coupled crop models (CERES for corn and CropGro for soybean) with the regional model (MM5) along with the land surface model (LSM). This crop-climate coupled model with interactive crop phenology can simulate interannual variations in CO2 and water fluxes from the surface. The coupled model was used to simulate CO2 and moisture fluxes in the past couple of growing seasons in the central U.S. Results were compared with available CO2 flux observations at some AmeriFlux sites. It is found that the coupled model gives more realistic seasonal accumulation of CO2 fluxes and that the dynamic crop development in the coupled model has a strong feedback on regional precipitation. The typical climate models using static crop phenology significantly overestimate CO2 fluxes during early growing season because of positive biases in specifying leaf area index.

  13. Properties of galaxy groups in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II. Active galactic nucleus feedback and star formation truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, Simone M.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H. J.; Croton, Darren J.; Moore, Ben

    2006-11-01

    Successfully reproducing the galaxy luminosity function (LF) and the bimodality in the galaxy distribution requires a mechanism that can truncate star formation in massive haloes. Current models of galaxy formation consider two such truncation mechanisms: strangulation, which acts on satellite galaxies, and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, which predominantly affects central galaxies. The efficiencies of these processes set the blue fraction of galaxies, fblue(L, M), as a function of galaxy luminosity, L, and halo mass, M. In this paper, we use a galaxy group catalogue extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to determine fblue(L, M). To demonstrate the potential power of these data as a benchmark for galaxy formation models, we compare the results to the semi-analytical model for galaxy formation of Croton et al. Although this model accurately fits the global statistics of the galaxy population, as well as the shape of the conditional LF, there are significant discrepancies when the blue fraction of galaxies as a function of mass and luminosity is compared between the observations and the model. In particular, the model predicts (i) too many faint satellites in massive haloes, (ii) a blue fraction of satellites that is much too low, and (iii) a blue fraction of centrals that is too high and with an inverted luminosity dependence. In the same order, we argue that these discrepancies owe to (i) the neglect of tidal stripping in the semi-analytical model, (ii) the oversimplified treatment of strangulation, and (iii) improper modelling of dust extinction and/or AGN feedback. The data presented here will prove useful to test and calibrate future models of galaxy formation and, in particular, to discriminate between various models for AGN feedback and other star formation truncation mechanisms.

  14. Dye-doped cholesteric lasers: Distributed feedback and photonic bandgap lasing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchishin, Igor P.; Tikhonov, Eugene A.

    2015-05-01

    A review of authors' contributions to dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) lasers started from the pioneer authors' paper of 1980 in which the experimental realization of the first CLC laser is presented. Both distributed feedback (DFB) and photonics band edge lasing models are discussed for different experimental conditions. A detailed study and analysis of basic characteristics of steroidal CLC lasers with low liquid crystal optical birefringence is considered with respect to the DFB model. The manifestation of a planar texture quality and mutual orientations of directors on the substrates influencing on the lasing characteristics in steroidal CLCs have been shown and described. The reversible phototuning of the CLC laser wavelength by trans-cis transitions of photoactive components is realized. Reasons for two theoretical models' coexistence for the description of dye-doped CLC lasing is considered.

  15. Model for coeval growth of bulges and their seed black holes in presence of radiative feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, KwangHo; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Wise, John

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of billion solar mass accreting black holes at high redshift poses a great challenge for the modeling of the seed black hole (BH) formation and growth. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations represent a crucial test of plausible scenarios by providing estimated growth rates for the seeds in the intermediate-mass black hole range. Previous works show that radiative feedback from black holes suppresses the cold gas accretion rate dramatically, making it difficult to explain the rapid growth of seed black holes. We however find that the fueling rate of black holes embedded in bulges can increase with the bulge-to-BH mass ratio when the bulge mass is greater than the critical value of ˜106 M⊙. The critical bulge mass is independent of the central black hole mass, thus the growth rate of light seeds (< 102 M⊙) and heavy seed black holes (> 105 M⊙) exhibits distinct dependencies on the bulge-to-BH mass ratio. Our results imply that heavy seeds, that may form via direct collapse, can grow efficiently and coevally with the host galaxies despite radiative feedback whereas the growth of light seeds is stunted. We present the results of an extended semi-analytic model based on the radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which follows the coeval growth of black holes and their bulges.

  16. Quantifying the Negative Feedback of Vegetation to Greenhouse Warming: A Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bounous, L.; Hall, F. G.; Sellers, P. J.; Kumar, A.; Collatz, G. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Imhoff, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Several climate models indicate that in a 2 x CO2 environment, temperature and precipitation would increase and runoff would increase faster than precipitation. These models, however, did not allow the vegetation to increase its leaf density as a response to the physiological effects of increased CO2 and consequent changes in climate. Other assessments included these interactions but did not account for the vegetation down-regulation to reduce plant's photosynthetic activity and as such resulted in a weak vegetation negative response. When we combine these interactions in climate simulations with 2 x CO2, the associated increase in precipitation contributes primarily to increase evapotranspiration rather than surface runoff, consistent with observations, and results in an additional cooling effect not fully accounted for in previous simulations with elevated CO2. By accelerating the water cycle, this feedback slows but does not alleviate the projected warming, reducing the land surface warming by 0.6 C. Compared to previous studies, these results imply that long term negative feedback from CO2-induced increases in vegetation density could reduce temperature following a stabilization of CO2 concentration.

  17. Bifurcation analysis of a delay reaction-diffusion malware propagation model with feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linhe; Zhao, Hongyong; Wang, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    With the rapid development of network information technology, information networks security has become a very critical issue in our work and daily life. This paper attempts to develop a delay reaction-diffusion model with a state feedback controller to describe the process of malware propagation in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSNs). By analyzing the stability and Hopf bifurcation, we show that the state feedback method can successfully be used to control unstable steady states or periodic oscillations. Moreover, formulas for determining the properties of the bifurcating periodic oscillations are derived by applying the normal form method and center manifold theorem. Finally, we conduct extensive simulations on large-scale MWSNs to evaluate the proposed model. Numerical evidences show that the linear term of the controller is enough to delay the onset of the Hopf bifurcation and the properties of the bifurcation can be regulated to achieve some desirable behaviors by choosing the appropriate higher terms of the controller. Furthermore, we obtain that the spatial-temporal dynamic characteristics of malware propagation are closely related to the rate constant for nodes leaving the infective class for recovered class and the mobile behavior of nodes.

  18. Extremely efficient Zevatron in rotating AGN magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanov, Z.; Mahajan, S.; Machabeli, G.; Chkheidze, N.

    2014-12-01

    A novel model of particle acceleration in the magnetospheres of rotating active galactic nuclei (AGN) is constructed. The particle energies may be boosted up to 1021 eV in a two-step mechanism: in the first stage, the Langmuir waves are centrifugally excited and amplified by means of a parametric process that efficiently pumps rotational energy to excite electrostatic fields. In the second stage, the electrostatic energy is transferred to particle kinetic energy via Landau damping made possible by rapid `Langmuir collapse'. The time-scale for parametric pumping of Langmuir waves turns out to be small compared to the kinematic time-scale, indicating high efficiency of the first process. The second process of `Langmuir collapse' - the creation of caverns or low-density regions - also happens rapidly for the characteristic parameters of the AGN magnetosphere. The Langmuir collapse creates appropriate conditions for transferring electric energy to boost up already high particle energies to much higher values. It is further shown that various energy loss mechanism are relatively weak, and do not impose any significant constraints on maximum achievable energies.

  19. Gamma-ray-selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giommi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    The gamma-ray band is the most energetic part of the electromagnetic spectrum. As such it is also where selection effects are most severe, as it can only be reached by the most extreme non-thermal AGN. Blazars, with their emission dominated by non-thermal blue-shifted radiation arising in a relativistic jet pointed in the direction of the observer, naturally satisfy this though requirement. For this reason, albeit these sources are intrisically very rare (orders of magnitude less abundant than radio quiet AGN of the same optical magnitude) they almost completely dominate the extragalactic gamma-ray and very high energy sky. I will discuss the emission of different types of blazars and the selection effects that are at play in the gamma-ray band based on recent results from the current generation of gamma-ray astronomy satellites, ground-based Cherenkov telescopes, and Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. The Bjerknes feedback in the tropical Atlantic in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppenmeier, Anna-Lena; Haarsma, Reindert J.; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2016-10-01

    Coupled state-of-the-art general circulation models still perform relatively poorly in simulating tropical Atlantic (TA) climate. To investigate whether lack of air-sea interaction might be responsible for their biases, we investigate the Bjerknes feedback (BF) in the TA, the driver of the dominant interannual variability in that region. First, we analyse this mechanism from reanalysis data. Then, we compare our findings to model output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5. The feedback is subdivided into three components. The first one consists of the influence of eastern equatorial sea surface temperature anomalies (SST') on zonal wind stress anomalies (τ _u') in the western basin. The second component is the influence of wind stress anomalies in the western TA on eastern equatorial oceanic heat content anomalies (HC'). The third component is the local response of overlying SST' to HC' in the eastern TA. All three components are shown to be present in ERA-Interim and ORAS4 reanalysis by correlating the two variables of each component with each other. The obtained patterns are compared to the ones from model output via pattern correlation per component. While the models display errors in the annual cycles of SST, τ _u, and HC, as well as in the seasonality of the feedback, the impact of SST' on wind stress and the impact of wind stress on HC' are simulated relatively well by most of the models. This is especially the case when correcting for the error in seasonality. The third component of the BF, the impact of HC' on SST' in the eastern part of the basin, deviates from what we find in reanalysis. We find an influence of HC anomalies on overlying SSTs in the eastern equatorial TA, but it is weaker than in the reanalysis and it is not strongly confined to the equator. Longitude-depth cross sections of equatorial temperature variance and correlation between subsurface temperature anomalies and SST' in the cold tongue region show that flawed

  1. The Listening Circle: Using the SBI Model to Enhance Peer Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommelje, Rick

    2012-01-01

    The Listening Circle is a learning activity that is designed to provide students with the opportunity to connect listening knowledge with observed behaviors and to strengthen student peer feedback. Not knowing how to give feedback can result in messages that are confusing, tactless, and counter-productive. Many feedback messages leave the receiver…

  2. Fast Ionized X-ray Absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk wind models in an effort to explain the highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) identified as X-ray absorbers recently detected in various sub-classes of Seyfert AGNs. Our primary focus is to show that magnetically-driven outflows are physically plausible candidates to account for the AGN X-ray spectroscopic observations. We calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption line spectra in comparison with an XXM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert AGN, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log(xi[erg cm/s]) = 5-6 and a hydrogen-equivalent column density on the order of 1e23 cm-2, outflowing at a sub-relativistic velocity of v/c = 0.1-0.2. The best-fit model favors its radial location at R = 200 Rs (Rs is the Schwarzschild radius), with a disk inner truncation radius at Rt = 30Rs. The overall K-shell feature in data is suggested to be dominated by Fe XXV with very little contribution from Fe XXVI and weakly-ionized iron, which is in a good agreement with a series of earlier analysis of the UFOs in various AGNs including PG 1211+143.

  3. New insights into AGN coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohfink, Anne; Fabian, Andrew C.; Malzac, Julien; Belmont, Renaud; Buisson, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are some of the most energetic sources of radiation in the Universe. The conversion of gravitational energy into radiation is thought to take place in an accretion disk/corona system just outside the black hole. In this system thermal, UV/optical photons from the accretion disk are upscattered in a corona of hot electrons situated above the accretion disk producing X-rays. The nature of this Comptonizing corona remains a key open question in AGN physics. The NuSTAR satellite provides the opportunity to study the Comptonization spectrum produced by the corona in great detail. In our talk we will show some key results from these new studies of the Comptonization spectrum. We explore how, together with our growing knowledge of coronal sizes, we are able to draw first conclusions about the physics taking place in the corona. We find evidence for coronae to be hot and radiatively compact, putting them close to the boundary of the region in the compactness-temperature diagram which is forbidden due to runaway pair production. This suggests that pair production and annihilation are essential ingredients in the coronae of AGN and that they control the coronal temperature and shape of the observed spectra.

  4. Star-formation and stellar feedback recipes in galaxy evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard; Recchi, Simone; Ploeckinger, Sylvia; Kuehtreiber, Matthias; Steyrleithner, Patrick; Liu, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Modeling galaxy formation and evolution is critically depending on star formation (SF). Since cosmological and galaxy-scale simulations cannot resolve the spatial and density scales on which SF acts, a large variety of methods are developed and applied over the last decades. Nonetheless, we are still in the test phase how the choice of parameters affects the models and how they agree with observations.As a simple ansatz, recipes are based on power-law SF dependences on gas density as justified by gas cooling and collapse timescales. In order to prevent SF spread throughout the gas, temperature and density thresholds are also used, although gas dynamical effects, like e.g. gas infall, seem to trigger SF significantly.The formed stars influence their environment immediately by energetic and materialistic feedback. It has been experienced in numerical models that supernova typeII explosions act with a too long time delay to regulate the SF, but that winds and ionizing radiation by massive stars must be included. The implementation of feedback processes, their efficiencies and timescales, is still in an experimental state, because they depend also on the physical state of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM).Combining a SF-gas density relation with stellar heating vs. gas cooling and taking the temperature dependence into account, we have derived an analytical expression of self-regulated SF which is free of arbitrary parameters. We have performed numerical models to study this recipe and different widely used SF criteria in both, particle and grid codes. Moreover, we compare the SF behavior between single-gas phase and multi-phase treatments of the ISM.Since dwarf galaxies (DGs) are most sensitive to environmental influences and contain only low SF rates, we explore two main affects on their models: 1. For external effects we compare SF rates of isolated and ram-pressure suffering DGs. Moreover, we find a SF enhancement in tidal-tail DGs by the compressive tidal

  5. Feedback & Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterworth, James R.

    1975-01-01

    Industrial objectives, if they are employee oriented, produce feedback, and the motivation derived from the feedback helps reduce turnover. Feedback is the power to clarify objectives, to stimulate communication, and to motivate people. (Author/MW)

  6. Vegetation-climate feedback causes reduced precipitation in CMIP5 regional Earth system model simulation over Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Minchao; Smith, Benjamin; Schurgers, Guy; Lindström, Joe; Rummukainen, Markku; Samuelsson, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems have been demonstrated to play a significant role within the climate system, amplifying or dampening climate change via biogeophysical and biogeochemical exchange with the atmosphere and vice versa (Cox et al. 2000; Betts et al. 2004). Africa is particularly vulnerable to climate change and studies of vegetation-climate feedback mechanisms on Africa are still limited. Our study is the first application of A coupled Earth system model at regional scale and resolution over Africa. We applied a coupled regional climate-vegetation model, RCA-GUESS (Smith et al. 2011), over the CORDEX Africa domain, forced by boundary conditions from a CanESM2 CMIP5 simulation under the RCP8.5 future climate scenario. The simulations were from 1961 to 2100 and covered the African continent at a horizontal grid spacing of 0.44°. RCA-GUESS simulates changes in the phenology, productivity, relative cover and population structure of up to eight plant function types (PFTs) in response to forcing from the climate part of the model. These vegetation changes feedback to simulated climate through dynamic adjustments in surface energy fluxes and surface properties. Changes in the net ecosystem-atmosphere carbon flux and its components net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration and emissions from biomass burning were also simulated but do not feedback to climate in our model. Constant land cover was assumed. We compared simulations with and without vegetation feedback switched "on" to assess the influence of vegetation-climate feedback on simulated climate, vegetation and ecosystem carbon cycling. Both positive and negative warming feedbacks were identified in different parts of Africa. In the Sahel savannah zone near 15°N, reduced vegetation cover and productivity, and mortality caused by a deterioration of soil water conditions led to a positive warming feedback mediated by decreased evapotranspiration and increased sensible heat flux between vegetation and

  7. A hyperluminous z=2.50 quasar caught in the radiative feedback phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcmahon, Richard

    2012-10-01

    We have recently discovered a z=2.50 heavily reddened (Av=6) hyperluminous K[Vega]=16.15) broad lined Type 1 quasar: ULAS J1234+0907 (Banerji et al, 2012, MNRAS in press). This quasar is the most intrinsically luminous quasar at z=2 known. We propose to obtain an X-ray spectrum with XMM-Newton in order to investigate the physical properties of the absorbing material in an effort to understand its physical properties and test models of radiative feedback in AGN during the main epoch of galaxy formation and accretion activity in the Universe.

  8. Optical feedback effects on terahertz quantum cascade lasers: modelling and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakić, Aleksandar D.; Lim, Yah Leng; Taimre, Thomas; Agnew, Gary; Qi, Xiaoqiong; Bertling, Karl; Han, She; Wilson, Stephen J.; Kundu, Iman; Grier, Andrew; Ikonić, Zoran; Valavanis, Alexander; Demić, Aleksandar; Keeley, James; Li, Lianhe H.; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Harrison, Paul; Ferguson, Blake; Walker, Graeme; Prow, Tarl; Indjin, Dragan; Soyer, H. Peter

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are compact sources of radiation in the 1-5 THz range with significant potential for applications in sensing and imaging. Laser feedback interferometry (LFI) with THz QCLs is a technique utilizing the sensitivity of the QCL to the radiation reflected back into the laser cavity from an external target. We will discuss modelling techniques and explore the applications of LFI in biological tissue imaging and will show that the confocal nature of the QCL in LFI systems, with their innate capacity for depth sectioning, makes them suitable for skin diagnostics with the well-known advantages of more conventional confocal microscopes. A demonstration of discrimination of neoplasia from healthy tissue using a THz, LFI-based system in the context of melanoma is presented using a transgenic mouse model.

  9. Modeling bio-geophysical feedback in the African and Indian monsoon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, M.

    An asynchronously coupled global atmosphere-biome model is used to assess the dynamics of deserts and drought in the Sahel, Saudi-Arabia and the Indian subcontinent. Under present-day conditions of solar irradiation and sea-surface temperatures, the model finds two solutions: the first solution yields the present-day distribution of vegetation and deserts and the second shows a northward spread of savanna and xerophytic shrub of some 600 km, particularly in the southwest Sahara. Comparison of atmospheric states associated with these solutions corroborates Charney's theory of a self-induction of deserts through albedo enhancement in the Sahel. Over the Indian subcontinent, changes in vegetation are mainly caused by a positive feedback between increased soil moisture and stronger summer monsoon.

  10. Phytotoxicity of salt and plant salt uptake: Modeling ecohydrological feedback mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Rasmussen, Nikolaj F.; Feificova, Dagmar; Trapp, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    A new model of phytotoxicity of salt and plant salt uptake is presented and is coupled to an existing three-dimensional groundwater simulation model. The implementation of phytotoxicity and salt uptake relationships is based on experimental findings from willow trees grown in hydroponic solution. The data confirm an s-shaped phytotoxicity relationship as found in previous studies. Uptake data were explained assuming steady state salt concentration in plant roots, passive salt transport into the roots, and active enzymatic removal of salt from plant roots. On the one hand, transpiration strongly depends on groundwater salinity (phytotoxicity); on the other hand, transpiration significantly changes the groundwater salinity (uptake). This feedback loop generates interesting dynamic phenomena in hydrological systems that are dominated by transpiration and are influenced by significant salinity gradients. Generic simulations are performed for the Okavango island system and are shown to reproduce essential phenomena observed in nature.

  11. Positive water vapour feedback in climate models confirmed by satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Lerner, J.; Chiou, E.-W.; Chu, W.; Larsen, J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1991-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that GCMs used to evaluate climate change overestimate the greenhouse effect due to increased concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere. Here, new satellite-generated water vapor data are used to compare summer and winter moisture values in regions of the middle and upper troposphere that have previously been difficult to observe with confidence. It is found that, as the hemispheres warm, increased convection leads to increased water vapor above 500 mbar in approximate quantitative agreement with results from current climate models. The same conclusion is reached by comparing the tropical western and eastern Pacific regions. Thus, water vapor feedback is not overestimated in models and should amplify the climate response to increased trace-gas concentrations.

  12. Feedback Regulation in a Cancer Stem Cell Model can Cause an Allee Effect.

    PubMed

    Konstorum, Anna; Hillen, Thomas; Lowengrub, John

    2016-04-01

    The exact mechanisms of spontaneous tumor remission or complete response to treatment are phenomena in oncology that are not completely understood. We use a concept from ecology, the Allee effect, to help explain tumor extinction in a model of tumor growth that incorporates feedback regulation of stem cell dynamics, which occurs in many tumor types where certain signaling molecules, such as Wnts, are upregulated. Due to feedback and the Allee effect, a tumor may become extinct spontaneously or after therapy even when the entire tumor has not been eradicated by the end of therapy. We quantify the Allee effect using an 'Allee index' that approximates the area of the basin of attraction for tumor extinction. We show that effectiveness of combination therapy in cancer treatment may occur due to the increased probability that the system will be in the Allee region after combination treatment versus monotherapy. We identify therapies that can attenuate stem cell self-renewal, alter the Allee region and increase its size. We also show that decreased response of tumor cells to growth inhibitors can reduce the size of the Allee region and increase stem cell densities, which may help to explain why this phenomenon is a hallmark of cancer.

  13. Feedback stabilization of an oscillating vertical cylinder by POD Reduced-Order Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, Gilles; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective is to demonstrate the use of reduced-order models (ROM) based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to stabilize the flow over a vertically oscillating circular cylinder in the laminar regime (Reynolds number equal to 60). The 2D Navier-Stokes equations are first solved with a finite element method, in which the moving cylinder is introduced via an ALE method. Since in fluid-structure interaction, the POD algorithm cannot be applied directly, we implemented the fictitious domain method of Glowinski et al. [1] where the solid domain is treated as a fluid undergoing an additional constraint. The POD-ROM is classically obtained by projecting the Navier-Stokes equations onto the first POD modes. At this level, the cylinder displacement is enforced in the POD-ROM through the introduction of Lagrange multipliers. For determining the optimal vertical velocity of the cylinder, a linear quadratic regulator framework is employed. After linearization of the POD-ROM around the steady flow state, the optimal linear feedback gain is obtained as solution of a generalized algebraic Riccati equation. Finally, when the optimal feedback control is applied, it is shown that the flow converges rapidly to the steady state. In addition, a vanishing control is obtained proving the efficiency of the control approach.

  14. Feedback Regulation in a Cancer Stem Cell Model can Cause an Allee Effect

    PubMed Central

    Konstorum, Anna; Hillen, Thomas; Lowengrub, John

    2016-01-01

    The exact mechanisms of spontaneous tumor remission or complete response to treatment are phenomena in oncology that are not completely understood. We use a concept from ecology, the Allee effect, to help explain tumor extinction in a model of tumor growth that incorporates feedback regulation of stem cell dynamics, which occurs in many tumor types where certain signaling molecules, such as Wnts, are upregulated. Due to feedback and the Allee effect, a tumor may become extinct spontaneously or after therapy even when the entire tumor has not been eradicated by the end of therapy. We quantify the Allee effect using an ‘Allee index’ that approximates the area of the basin of attraction for tumor extinction. We show that effectiveness of combination therapy in cancer treatment may occur due to the increased probability that the system will be in the Allee region after combination treatment versus monotherapy. We identify therapies that can attenuate stem cell self-renewal, alter the Allee region and increase its size. We also show that decreased response of tumor cells to growth inhibitors can reduce the size of the Allee region and increase stem cell densities, which may help to explain why this phenomenon is a hallmark of cancer. PMID:27113934

  15. Measuring and Modelling water related soil - vegetation feedbacks in a fallow plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursino, Nadia; Cassiani, Giorgio; Deiana, Rita; Vignoli, Giulio; Boaga, Jacopo

    2013-04-01

    Land fallowing is one possible response to shortage of water for irrigation. Leaving the soil unseeded implies a change of the soil functioning that has an impact on the water cycle. The development of a soil crust in the open spaces between the patterns of grass weed affects the soil properties and the field scale water balance. The objective of this study was to test the potential of integrated non invasive geophysics and ground-image analysis and to quantify the effect of the soil vegetation interaction on the water balance of a fallow land at the local and plot scale. We measured repeatedly in space and time local soil saturation and vegetation cover over two small plots located in southern Sardinia, Italy, during an infiltration experiment. One plot was left unseeded and the other was cultivated. The comparative analysis of the experimental data evidenced a positive feedback between weed growth and infiltration at the fallow plot. A simple bucket model captured the different soil moisture dynamics at the two plots during the infiltration experiment and was used to estimate the impact of the soil vegetation feedback on the yearly water balance at the site.

  16. Measuring and modelling water related soil-vegetation feedbacks in a fallow plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursino, N.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Vignoli, G.; Boaga, J.

    2013-08-01

    Land fallowing is one possible response to shortage of water for irrigation. Leaving the soil unseeded implies a change of the soil functioning that has an impact on the water cycle. The development of a soil crust in the open spaces between the patterns of grass weed affects the soil properties and the field scale water balance. The objectives of this study are to test the potential of integrated non invasive geophysical methods and ground-image analysis and to quantify the effect of the soil vegetation interaction on the water balance of a fallow land at the local and plot scale. We measured repeatedly in space and time local soil saturation and vegetation cover over two small plots located in southern Sardinia, Italy, during a controlled irrigation experiment. One plot was left unseeded and the other was cultivated. The comparative analysis of ERT maps of soil moisture evidenced a considerably different hydrologic response to irrigation of the two plots. Local measurements of soil saturation and vegetation cover were repeated in space to evidence a positive feedback between weed growth and infiltration at the fallow plot. A simple bucket model captured the different soil moisture dynamics at the two plots during the infiltration experiment and was used to estimate the impact of the soil vegetation feedback on the yearly water balance at the fallow site.

  17. Measuring and modeling water-related soil-vegetation feedbacks in a fallow plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursino, N.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Vignoli, G.; Boaga, J.

    2014-03-01

    Land fallowing is one possible response to shortage of water for irrigation. Leaving the soil unseeded implies a change of the soil functioning that has an impact on the water cycle. The development of a soil crust in the open spaces between the patterns of grass weed affects the soil properties and the field-scale water balance. The objectives of this study are to test the potential of integrated non-invasive geophysical methods and ground-image analysis and to quantify the effect of the soil-vegetation interaction on the water balance of fallow land at the local- and plot scale. We measured repeatedly in space and time local soil saturation and vegetation cover over two small plots located in southern Sardinia, Italy, during a controlled irrigation experiment. One plot was left unseeded and the other was cultivated. The comparative analysis of ERT maps of soil moisture evidenced a considerably different hydrologic response to irrigation of the two plots. Local measurements of soil saturation and vegetation cover were repeated in space to evidence a positive feedback between weed growth and infiltration at the fallow plot. A simple bucket model captured the different soil moisture dynamics at the two plots during the infiltration experiment and was used to estimate the impact of the soil vegetation feedback on the yearly water balance at the fallow site.

  18. Inferring Instantaneous, Multivariate and Nonlinear Sensitivities for the Analysis of Feedback Processes in a Dynamical System: Lorenz Model Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aires, Filipe; Rossow, William B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new approach is presented for the analysis of feedback processes in a nonlinear dynamical system by observing its variations. The new methodology consists of statistical estimates of the sensitivities between all pairs of variables in the system based on a neural network modeling of the dynamical system. The model can then be used to estimate the instantaneous, multivariate and nonlinear sensitivities, which are shown to be essential for the analysis of the feedbacks processes involved in the dynamical system. The method is described and tested on synthetic data from the low-order Lorenz circulation model where the correct sensitivities can be evaluated analytically.

  19. Probing AGN Unification with galaxy neighbours: pitfalls and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarroel, B.

    2015-09-01

    Statistical tests of AGN unification harbour many caveats. One way of constraining the validity of the AGN unification is through studies of close neighbours to Type-1 and Type-2 AGN. Examining thousands of AGN- galaxy pairs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and the Galaxy Zoo project, we found that Type-2 AGN appear to reside in more star-forming environments than Type-1 AGN.

  20. Coupled atmospheric, land surface, and subsurface modeling: Exploring water and energy feedbacks in three-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Jason H.;