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Sample records for agnes scott college

  1. Citation for Scott Doney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, David M.; Doney, Scott

    “A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery. James Joyce, Ulysses (1922). ”After collaborating with Scott Doney for the past 14 years I know what Joyce meant. When working with someone as bright as Scott it inevitably happens that you just don't understand. And because we're trained skeptics the question immediately arises, ”has our friend and colleague made a mistake?“ But we're wrong; we just didn't see the portal through which people like Scott had already proceeded. Certainly this is what we reserve these awards of ‘outstandingness’ for; those whose insight lead through the portals of discovery”.

  2. Scott Gives Salute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott, commander, gives a military salute while standing beside the deployed U.S. flag during the Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Hadley-Apennine landing site. The flag was deployed toward the end of EVA-2. The Lunar Module 'Falcon' is partially visible on the right. Hadley Delta in the background rises approximately 4,000 meters (about 13,124 feet) above the plain. The base of the mountain is approximately 5 kilometers (about 3 statute miles) away. This photograph was taken by Astronaut James B. Irwin, Lunar Module pilot.

  3. Obscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Amy

    2014-07-01

    Obscured AGN may correspond to a substantial fraction of the supermassive black hole growth rate. I will present new surveys with the SCUBA-2 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope of the Chandra Deep Fields and discuss whether we can distinguish obscured AGN in hard X-ray and radio selected samples using submillimeter observations.

  4. Scott and Amundsen: Another Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Maurice

    1999-01-01

    Differences between the planning and execution of two 1911-12 polar expeditions transcend matters of aims and resources. Scott's planning approach was deterministic, whereas Amundsen's was deliberative, resolving each problem in its practical, human context. Like Scott's expedition, current U.S. and British attempts to improve education practice…

  5. A Brief Response to Bailey, Jaggars, and Scott-Clayton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goudas, Alexandros M.; Boylan, Hunter R.

    2013-01-01

    Shortly after we published "Addressing Flawed Research in Developmental Education" (2012) in the "Journal of Developmental Education," Thomas Bailey, Shanna Smith Jaggars, and Judith Scott- Clayton from the Community College Research Center (CCRC) wrote a response rebutting several of our claims. Though their response corrects…

  6. Remembering Professor Walter A. Scott

    PubMed Central

    Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2014-01-01

    Walter Scott was a Biochemistry professor at the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine and a leading figure in the field of HIV drug resistance. His untimely passing in January 2013 marked a loss for his family, as well as for students and colleagues who knew him as a dedicated and unassuming scholar, and a lively scientist with a great sense of humor. PMID:25333466

  7. Students Speak With NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA’s International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students in the Galena Park Independent Scho...

  8. ASK Talks with W. Scott Cameron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, W. Scott

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an interview with Scott Cameron who is the Capital Systems Manager for the Food and Beverage Global Business Unit of Procter and Gamble. He has been managing capital projects and mentoring other project managers for the past 20 years at Procter and Gamble within its Beauty Care, Health Care, Food and Beverage, and Fabric and Home Care Businesses. Scott also has been an Academy Sharing Knowledge (ASK) feature writer since Volume One.

  9. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, D.; Zakamska, N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. It operates by either heating or driving the gas that would otherwise be available for star formation out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. We have assembled a large sample of 133 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1AGN-ionized gas, the stellar masses of the host galaxies and their star formation rates. We then investigate the relationships between AGN luminosities, specific star formation rates (sSFR) and outflow strengths W_{90} - the 90% velocity width of the [OIII]λ5007Å line power and a proxy for the AGN-driven outflow speed. Outflow strength W_{90} is independent of sSFR for AGN selected based on their mid-IR luminosity. This is in agreement with previous work that demonstrates that star formation is not sufficient to produce the observed ionized gas outflows which have to be powered by AGN activity. More importantly, we find a negative correlation between W_{90} and sSFR in the AGN hosts with the highest star formation rates, i.e., with the highest gas content. This relationship implies that AGN with strong outflow signatures are hosted in galaxies that are more `quenched' considering their stellar mass than galaxies with weaker outflow signatures. This correlation is only seen in AGN host galaxies with SFR >100 M_{⊙} yr^{-1} where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, or `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  10. Scott Goodnight: A Dean for All Seasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hove, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    Examines the professional career and personal characteristics of Scott Goodnight, a pioneer in the field of student personnel work and the first president of the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (then known as the National Association of Deans and Advisors of Men). (Author/NB)

  11. Reframing Michael Scott: Exploring Inappropriate Workplace Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Zachary A.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals who work in professional settings interact with others who may exhibit a variety of cultural beliefs and decision-making approaches. Page (2007) argues that cognitive diversity (i.e., how people approach and attempt to solve problems) is a vital asset in effective organizations. Michael Scott, who portrays the inept main character on…

  12. [Sybil Scott and East Texas Baseball Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodfin, Samantha, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This issue of "Loblolly Magazine" is dedicated to Sybil Scott, born in 1910 and still going at the age of 85. She shares some interesting tales of what it was like growing up in the '10's and '20's in Texas, including her school years. She remembers, very vividly, her childhood and teenage years in East Texas. Among the many interesting stories…

  13. Poles apart: Scott, Amundsen and science.

    PubMed

    Larson, Edward J

    2011-12-01

    One hundred years ago, teams led by Roald Amundsen and Robert Scott may have been heading in the same direction but they were poles apart in the way they sought their goals. Amundsen led a five-person team of expert Nordic skiers and dog-sledders with a single goal: getting to the South Pole first. He planned and executed the effort brilliantly. Scott, in contrast, led a complex and multi-faceted Antarctic expedition with 33 explorers and scientists, many of whom were focused on ambitious and often taxing scientific research projects that had nothing whatsoever to do with reaching the Pole. Although Scott failed to reach the South Pole first and died with four men on the return trip, his expedition made significant contributions to Antarctic science. Indeed, at least some of Scott's failure to reach the Pole first and the subsequent death of his polar party on the return trip can be attributed to burden of trying to do too much and not focusing on reaching the pole. PMID:22055019

  14. Astronaut Scott Carpenter tests balance mechanism performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter's balance mechanism performance is tested by his walking on a narrow board in his bare feet. He is performing this test at the School of Aviation Medicine, Pensicola, Florida (04570); Carpenter walks a straight line by putting one foot directly in front of the other to test his balance (04571).

  15. Thinking Visually: An Interview with Scott Bennett.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Scott Bennett, an artist of abstract art and traditional craft. Focuses on issues such as the role of art in his life, how his art has developed over time, and his process of creating his works of art. Includes directions for a glazing project. (CMK)

  16. Reading, Learning, Teaching N. Scott Momaday

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Jim

    2007-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the literature and art of American writer N. Scott Momaday, winner of the 1969 Pulitzer Prize and member of the Kiowa American Indian Tribe. The book describes the impact of Momaday's family, Kiowa heritage, Pueblo cultural experiences, and academic preparation on his worldview, poetry, novels, essays, children's…

  17. Astronaut Scott Parazynski during egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski looks at fellow STS-66 mission specialist Joseph R. Tanner, (partially visible in foreground) during a rehearsal of procedures to be followed during the launch and entry phases of their scheduled November 1994 flight. This rehearsal, held in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) of JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory, was followed by a training session on emergency egress procedures.

  18. Astronaut Scott Parazynski during egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski looks at fellow STS-66 mission specialist Joseph R. Tanner, (foreground) during a rehearsal of procedures to be followed during the launch and entry phases of their scheduled November 1994 flight. This rehearsal, held in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) of JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory, was followed by a training session on emergency egress procedures.

  19. Scott on Slope of Hadley Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott, mission commander, with tongs and gnomon in hand, studies a boulder on the slope of Hadley Delta during the Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) or Rover is in right foreground. View is looking slightly south of west. 'Bennett Hill' is at extreme right. Astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, took this photograph.

  20. The Ornery American: Orson Scott Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oatman, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles Orson Scott Card, the winner of this year's Margaret A. Edwards Award for his outstanding contributions to teen literature, specifically for Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow (1999, both Tor), a companion tale. Card, the magician behind both of these best sellers, is one of the nation's most prolific--and contentious--authors.…

  1. Interview with Scott and Mark Kelly (PART 3)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts and brothers Scott and Mark Kelly are interviewed before their missions. Scott Kelly (left) will be Expedition 26 Commander and Mark will be the STS-134 Commander. The two brothers may m...

  2. Interview with Scott and Mark Kelly (PART 5)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts and brothers Scott and Mark Kelly are interviewed before their missions. Scott Kelly (left) will be Expedition 26 Commander and Mark will be the STS-134 Commander. The two brothers may m...

  3. Interview with Scott and Mark Kelly (PART 2)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts and brothers Scott and Mark Kelly are interviewed before their missions. Scott Kelly (left) will be Expedition 26 Commander and Mark will be the STS-134 Commander. The two brothers may m...

  4. Interview with Scott and Mark Kelly (PART 4)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts and brothers Scott and Mark Kelly are interviewed before their missions. Scott Kelly (left) will be Expedition 26 Commander and Mark will be the STS-134 Commander. The two brothers may m...

  5. Interview with Scott and Mark Kelly (PART 6)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts and brothers Scott and Mark Kelly are interviewed before their missions. Scott Kelly (left) will be Expedition 26 Commander and Mark will be the STS-134 Commander. The two brothers may m...

  6. Interview with Scott and Mark Kelly (PART 1)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts and brothers Scott and Mark Kelly are interviewed before their missions. Scott Kelly (left) will be Expedition 26 Commander and Mark will be the STS-134 Commander. The two brothers may m...

  7. Neutrinos from AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The great penetrating power of neutrinos makes them ideal probe of astrophysical sites and conditions inaccessible to other forms of radiation. These are the centers of stars (collapsing or not) and the centers of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). It has been suggested that AGN presented a very promising source of high energy neutrinos, possibly detectable by underwater neutrino detectors. This paper reviews the evolution of ideas concerning the emission of neutrinos from AGN in view of the more recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy and their implications for the neutrino emission from these class of objects.

  8. Challenging Constitutional Authority: African American Responses to "Scott v. Sandford."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDorman, Todd F.

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates the importance of extra-legal texts in contextualizing and challenging judicial authority by analyzing Black Abolitionist responses to "Scott v. Sandford" (the "Dred Scott" decision). Concludes that responses to Dred Scott demonstrate how legally excluded classes may persuasively challenge constitutional authority and have…

  9. Armstrong and Scott with Hatches Open

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and David R. Scott sit with their spacecraft hatches open while awaiting the arrival of the recovery ship, the USS Leonard F. Mason after the successful completion of their Gemini VIII mission. They are assisted by U.S. Navy divers. The overhead view shows the Gemini 8 spacecraft with the yellow flotation collar attached to stabilize the spacecraft in choppy seas. The green marker dye is highly visible from the air and is used as a locating aid.

  10. Scott E. Forbush 1904”1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, Martin A.

    1984-04-01

    Scott E. Forbush, a pioneer in cosmic ray research, was the quintessential geophysicist's geophysicist. Until, on the eve of his 80th birthday, he succumbed to pneumonia, he maintained an abiding interest in the continued reliable operation of the three remaining cosmic ray ionization chambers of the worldwide network that he had set up in the mid 1930s. No one could have predicted, when the first instrument at Cheltenham, Md. commenced operation in 1936, that Forbush was destined to discover most of the important multifarious time variations of cosmic rays that were accessible to his classic detectors

  11. The evolution of early Homo: a reply to Scott.

    PubMed

    Van Arsdale, A P; Wolpoff, M H

    2014-03-01

    Scott presents a welcome reply to our article, "A single lineage in early Pleistocene Homo" (Van Arsdale and Wolpoff ). However, Scott's reply mischaracterizes and fails to directly address the hypothesis of a single lineage that we test. Additionally, the approach taken by Scott fails to replicate the methods used in our analysis. As Scott himself suggests, our null hypothesis of a single evolving lineage in early Homo remains without refutation. Although many evolutionary scenarios might explain the complex pattern of variation present in the early Homo fossil record, the most parsimonious remains that of a single lineage displaying evolutionary change over time. PMID:24372272

  12. SWIFT Observations AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    I will present results from the x-ray and optical follow-up observations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) survey. I will discuss the nature of obscuration in these objects, the relationship to optical properties and the change of properties with luminosity and galaxy type.

  13. Professor John Scott, folate and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Hoffbrand, A Victor

    2014-02-01

    John Scott (1940-2013) was born in Dublin where he was to spend the rest of his career, both as an undergraduate and subsequently Professor of Biochemistry and Nutrition at Trinity College. His research with the talented group of scientists and clinicians that he led has had a substantial impact on our understanding of folate metabolism, mechanisms of its catabolism and deficiency. His research established the leading theory of folate involvement with vitamin B12 in the pathogenesis of vitamin B12 neuropathy. He helped to establish the normal daily intake of folate and the increased requirements needed either in food or as a supplement before and during pregnancy to prevent neural tube defects. He also suggested a dietary supplement of vitamin B12 before and during pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. It would be an appropriate epitaph if fortification of food with folic acid became mandatory in the UK and Ireland, as it is in over 70 other countries. PMID:24224721

  14. The Coretta Scott King Awards Book, 1970-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Henrietta M., Ed.

    For 30 years, the Coretta Scott King Awards have honored notable African American authors and illustrators. This volume provides up-to-date information about the Coretta Scott King award books. Celebrating 30 years of African American contributions to children's literature, it serves as a selection tool and teaching resource, in both schools and…

  15. Kleene, Rabin, and Scott Are Available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenicke, Jochen; Meyer, Roland; Olderog, Ernst-Rüdiger

    We are concerned with the availability of systems, defined as the ratio between time of correct functioning and uptime. We propose to model guaranteed availability in terms of regular availability expressions (rae) and availability automata. We prove that the intersection problem of rae is undecidable. We establish a Kleene theorem that shows the equivalence of the formalisms and states precise correspondence of flat rae and simple availability automata. For these automata, we provide an extension of the powerset construction for finite automata due to Rabin and Scott. As a consequence, we can state a complementation algorithm. This enables us to solve the synthesis problem and to reduce model checking of availability properties to reachability.

  16. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-08-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  17. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  18. Starburst or AGN dominance in submm-luminous candidate AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppin, Kristen; Alexander, Dave; Aretxaga, Itziar; Blain, Andrew; Chapman, Scott; Clements, Dave; Dunlop, James; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Farrah, Duncan; Hughes, David; Ivison, Rob; Kim, Sungeun; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mat; Pope, Alexandra; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Scott, Douglas; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Vaccari, Mattia; van Kampen, Eelco

    2008-03-01

    It is widely believed that starbursts/ULIRGs and AGN activity are triggered by galaxy interactions and merging; and sub-mm selected galaxies (SMGs) seem to be simply high redshift ULIRGs, observed near the peak of activity. In this evolutionary picture every SMG would host an AGN, which would eventually grow a black hole strong enough to blow off all of the gas and dust leaving an optically luminous QSO. In order to probe this evolutionary sequence, a crucial sub-sample to focus on would be the 'missing link' sources, which demonstrate both strong starburst and AGN signatures and to determine if the starburst is the main power source even in SMGs when we have evidence that an AGN is present. The best way to determine if a dominant AGN is present is to look in the mid-IR for their signatures, since often even deep X-ray observations miss identifying the presence of AGN in heavily dust-obscured SMGs. We have selected a sample of SMGs which are good candidates for harboring powerful AGN on the basis of their IRAC colours (S8um/S4.5um>2). Once we confirm these SMGs are AGN-dominated, we can then perform an audit of the energy balance between star-formation and AGN within this special sub-population of SMGs where the BH has grown appreciably to begin heating the dust emission. The proposed observations with IRS will probe the physics of how SMGs evolve from a cold-dust starburst-dominated ULIRG to an AGN/QSO by measuring the level of the mid-IR continuum, PAH luminosity, and Si absorption in these intermediate `transitory' AGN/SMGs.

  19. STS-87 Mission Specialist Scott in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39B by Danny Wyatt, NASA quality assurance specialist. STS-87 is the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201. Scott is scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity spacewalk with Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, during STS-87. Scott also performed a spacewalk on the STS-72 mission.

  20. STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston E. Scott suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott dons his launch and entry suit with the assistance of a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Scotts second space flight. He and the five other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff on a 16-day mission to perform microgravity and solar research. Scott is scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity spacewalk with Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, during STS-87. He also performed a spacewalk on STS-72.

  1. Models of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Françcoise

    2015-02-01

    The physical processes responsible of sweeping up the surrounding gas in the host galaxy of an AGN, and able in some circumstances to expel it from the galaxy, are not yet well known. The various mechanisms are briefly reviewed: quasar or radio modes, either momentum-conserving outflows, energy-conserving outflows, or intermediate. They are confronted to observations, to know whether they can explain the M-sigma relation, quench the star formation or whether they can also provide some positive feedback and how the black hole accretion history is related to that of star formation.

  2. Obscured accretion from AGN surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignali, Cristian

    2014-07-01

    Recent models of super-massive black hole (SMBH) and host galaxy joint evolution predict the presence of a key phase where accretion, traced by obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) emission, is coupled with powerful star formation. Then feedback processes likely self-regulate the SMBH growth and quench the star-formation activity. AGN in this important evolutionary phase have been revealed in the last decade via surveys at different wavelengths. On the one hand, moderate-to-deep X-ray surveys have allowed a systematic search for heavily obscured AGN, up to very high redshifts (z~5). On the other hand, infrared/optical surveys have been invaluable in offering complementary methods to select obscured AGN also in cases where the nuclear X-ray emission below 10 keV is largely hidden to our view. In this review I will present my personal perspective of the field of obscured accretion from AGN surveys.

  3. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott during photo session outside KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (left), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot, the Gemini 8 prime crew, during a photo session outside the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mission Control Center. They are standing in front of a radar dish.

  4. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott arrive at Hickam Field, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (center), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot, arrive at Hickam Field, Hawaii on their way from Naha, Okinawa, to Cape Kennedy, Florida. Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr. is at extreme left.

  5. Astronaut Scott Carpenter and technician Joe Schmidt during suiting exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Mercury Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter, prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 7 flight, and Crew Equipment Specialist Joe Schmidt are before a suiting exercise. Schmidt is seen checking the gloves on the Carpenter's pressure suit.

  6. 10. TRUSS DETAILS, BRIDGE OVER SCOTT SWAMP (Shop Drawing, Berlin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. TRUSS DETAILS, BRIDGE OVER SCOTT SWAMP (Shop Drawing, Berlin Construction Company) Sheet 1 of 2, July 5, 1927 - Bridge No. 475, Spanning Pequabuck River on U.S. Route 6, Farmington, Hartford County, CT

  7. 11. FLOOR SYSTEM DETAILS, BRIDGE OVER SCOTT SWAMP (Shop Drawing, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. FLOOR SYSTEM DETAILS, BRIDGE OVER SCOTT SWAMP (Shop Drawing, Berlin Construction Company) Sheet 2 of 2, July 9, 1927 - Bridge No. 475, Spanning Pequabuck River on U.S. Route 6, Farmington, Hartford County, CT

  8. Starburst or AGN Dominance in Submillimetre-Luminous Candidate AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppin, Kristen; Pope, Alexandra; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Alexander, David M.; Dunlop, James

    2010-06-01

    It is widely believed that ultraluminous infrared (IR) galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity are triggered by galaxy interactions and merging, with the peak of activity occurring at z~2, where submillimetre galaxies are thousands of times more numerous than local ULIRGs. In this evolutionary picture, submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) would host an AGN, which would eventually grow a black hole (BH) strong enough to blow off all of the gas and dust leaving an optically luminous QSO. To probe this evolutionary sequence we have focussed on the `missing link' sources, which demonstrate both strong starburst (SB) and AGN signatures, in order to determine if the SB is the main power source even in SMGs when we have evidence that an AGN is present from their IRAC colours. The best way to determine if a dominant AGN is present is to look for their signatures in the mid-infrared with the Spitzer IRS, since often even deep X-ray observations miss identifying the presence of AGN in heavily dust-obscured SMGs. We present the results of our audit of the energy balance between star-formation and AGN within this special sub-population of SMGs-where the BH has grown appreciably to begin heating the dust emission.

  9. Mission impossible: William Scott and the first Sydney Observatory directorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    1998-06-01

    The Reverend William Scott (1825-1917) was the founding Director of the Sydney Observatory, and succeeded in acquiring state-of-the art astronomical instruments, establishing a network of country meteorological stations, and conducting a range of astronomical observations. He also worked to promote popular interest in astronomy, and immersed himself in the scientific culture of New South Wales. This paper examines Scott's achievements in astronomy and meteorology, the reasons for his premature resignation in 1862, and the search for his successor.

  10. AGN from HeII: AGN host galaxy properties & demographics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Rudolf E.; Schawinski, Kevin; Weigel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of HeII emitting objects classified as AGN. In a sample of 81'192 galaxies taken from the seventh data release (DR7) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the redshift interval 0.02 < z < 0.05 and with r < 17 AB mag, the Baldwin, Philips & Terlevitsch 1981 method (BPT) identifies 1029 objects as active galactic nuclei. By applying an analysis using HeII λ 4686 emission lines, based on Shirazi & Binchmann 2012, we have identified an additional 283 active galactic nuclei, which were missed by the BPT method. This represents an increase of over 25 %. The characteristics of the HeII selected AGN are different from the AGN found through the PBT; the colour - mass diagram and the colour histogram both show that HeII selected AGN are bluer. This new selection technique can help inform galaxy black hole coevolution scenarios.

  11. AGN Science: The Past, The Present, The Future . AGN Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, Th.

    I review some basic results on AGN science by concentrating on the Fe K and Fe L line observations and on the Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 physics. This paper is based on a talk given at the Vulcano workshop, 'The multifrequency behavior of high energy cosmic sources` in 2009. Given the length of the talk and the number of pages the review on AGN science cannot be complete and is biased towards two science topics and my personal view.

  12. College Library Technology and Cooperation Grants Program, Higher Education Act, Title II-D. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanifan, Thomas; Hoogheem, Cynthia L.

    The Eastern Iowa Community College District (EICCD) libraries received a federal College Library Technology and Cooperation grant to provide and link public access catalogs at each college of the district--Clinton Community College, Muscatine Community College, and Scott Community College. That network is named Quad-LINC (Quad Cities Libraries in…

  13. AGN and their host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinborn, L. K.; Dolag, K.; Hirschmann, M.; Remus, R.-S.; Teklu, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    Large scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations are an important tool to study the co-evolution between black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies. However, in order to model the accretion onto BHs and AGN feedback we need sub-grid models which contain several free parameters. The choice of these parameters has a significant impact on the properties of the BHs and their host galaxies. Therefore, we improve the accretion model and the AGN feedback model based on both theory and observations to eliminate most free parameters. In that way, the slope of the observed relation between BH mass and stellar mass is reproduced self-consistently. We performed a few extremely large simulation runs as part of the Magneticum Pathfinder simulation set, combining a high resolution with very large cosmological volumes, enabling us to study for example dual AGN, the role of galaxy mergers and AGN clustering properties.

  14. Accretion Timescales from Kepler AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-01-01

    We constrain AGN accretion disk variability mechanisms using the optical light curves of AGN observed by Kepler. AGN optical fluxes are known to exhibit stochastic variations on timescales of hours, days, months and years. The excellent sampling properties of the original Kepler mission - high S/N ratio (105), short sampling interval (30 minutes), and long sampling duration (~ 3.5 years) - allow for a detailed examination of the differences between the variability processes present in various sub-types of AGN such as Type I and II Seyferts, QSOs, and Blazars. We model the flux data using the Auto-Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) representation from the field of time series analysis. We use the Kalman filter to determine optimal mode parameters and use the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) to select the optimal model. We find that optical light curves from Kepler AGN cannot be fit by low order statistical models such as the popular AR(1) process or damped random walk. Kepler light curves exhibit complicated power spectra and are better modeled by higher order ARMA processes. We find that Kepler AGN typically exhibit power spectra that change from a bending power law (PSD ~ 1/fa) to a flat power spectrum on timescales in the range of ~ 5 - 100 days consistent with the orbital and thermal timescales of a typical 107 solar mass black hole.

  15. AGN Observations with STACEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramel, D. A.; Boone, L. M.; Carson, J.; Chae, E.; Covault, C. E.; Fortin, P.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hanna, D. S.; Hinton, J. A.; Mukherjee, R.; Mueller, C.; Ong, R. A.; Ragan, K.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schuette, D. R.; Theoret, C. G.; Williams, D. A.; Wong, J.; Zweerink, J.

    2003-03-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a gamma-ray detector designed to study astrophysical sources at energies between 50 and 500 GeV. It uses 64 large, steerable mirrors at the National Solar Tower Test Facility near Albuquerque, NM, USA to collect Cherenkov light from extended air showers and concentrate it onto an array of photomultiplier tubes. The large light-collection area gives it a lower energy threshold than imaging-type Cherenkov detectors. STACEE is now fully operational, and we report here on the performance of the complete STACEE instrument, as well as preliminary results of recent observations of several AGN targets. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (under Grant Numbers PHY-9983836, PHY-0070927, and PHY-0070953), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Le Fond Quebecois de la Recherche sur la Nature et les Technologies (FQRNT), the Research Corporation, and the California Space Institute. CEC is a Cottrell Scholar of the Research Corporation.

  16. APOLLO 9: Dave scott performs Extra Vehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dave Scott performs Extra Vehicular Activities around the Command Module 'Gumdrop'. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 9: The Duet of Spider & Gumdrop': part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) Mission: APOLLO 9: Earth orbital flight with James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott, and Russell Schweickart. First flight of the Lunar Module. Performed rendezvous, docking and E.V.A..Mission Duration 241hrs 0m 54s.

  17. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott during photo session outside KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (left), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot, the Gemini 8 prime crew, during a photo session outside the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mission Control Center. Both men are wearing full space suits and carring their helmets.

  18. Astronauts Scott and Armstrong undergoe water egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (on left), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot of the Gemini 8 prime crew, use a boilerplate model of a Gemini spacecraft during water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico. Three Manned Spacecraft Center swimmers assist in the training exercise.

  19. Astronauts Scott and Armstrong undergoe water egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (center), command pilot, and David R. Scott (right), pilot of the Gemini 8 prime crew, are suited up for water egress training aboard the NASA Motor Vessel Retriever in the Gulf of Mexico. At left is Dr. Kenneth N. Beers, M.D., Flight Medicine Branch, Center Medical Office.

  20. Theorizing Steampunk in Scott Westerfeld's YA Series Leviathan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielke, Tammy L.; LaHaie, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we offer an explanation of steampunk and theorize the genre and its functions within Scott Westerfeld's YA series Leviathan. In order to do so, we examine the "cogs" of the genre machine and its use of nostalgic longing for a revised past/future to rebel against present day cultural norms. Critics note that steampunk…

  1. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: Interview with Scott Durow, Software Engineer, Oxford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Conducted by Paul

    1998-05-01

    Scott Durow was educated at Bootham School, York. He studied Physics, Mathematics and Chemistry to A-level and went on to Nottingham University to read Medical Physics. After graduating from Nottingham he embarked on his present career as a Software Engineer based in Oxford. He is a musician in his spare time, as a member of a band and playing the French horn.

  2. Scott Morgan Johnson Middle School: Personalization Leads to Unlimited Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The well-known lyrics may be "The Eyes of Texas Are Upon You," but at Scott Morgan Johnson Middle School in McKinney, TX, it's definitely the "eye of the tiger" that sets the bar for Tiger PRIDE (perseverance, respect, integrity, determination, and excellence). This article describes how those ideals have been infused…

  3. Walter Dill Scott and the Student Personnel Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Schwartz, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Walter Dill Scott (1869-1955), tenth president of Northwestern University and pioneer of industrial psychology, is an essential architect of student personnel work. This study of his accomplishments, drawing on records from the Northwestern University archives, tells a story about the people he influenced and his involvement in codifying what was…

  4. Moving the Education Needle: A Conversation with Scott Hamilton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Scott Hamilton is the Forrest Gump of education reform, although with a lot more IQ points and fewer chocolates. He worked for Bill Bennett in the U.S. Department of Education and for Benno Schmidt at the Edison Project. He authorized charter schools in Massachusetts, co-founded the KIPP network, quadrupled the size of Teach For America (TFA), and…

  5. Astronaut Scott Parazynski in hatch of CCT during training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski, STS-66 mission specialist, poses near the hatchway of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) (out of frame) in JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory. Crew members were about to begin a rehearsal of procedures to be followed during the launch and entry phases of their flight. That rehearsal was followed by a training session on emergency egress procedures.

  6. Astronaut Scott Parazynski in hatch of CCT during training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski, STS-66 mission specialist, poses at the hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) prior to a rehearsal of launch and entry procedures for a November 1994 flight aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Parazynski is wearing his launch and entry suit for this training session.

  7. Astronaut Scott Carpenter examines protective material on pressure bulkhead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Mercury Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter examines the honeycomb protective material on the main pressure bulkhead in the white room facility at Hanger S, Cape Canaveral, Florida. This is the spacecraft which will carry astronaut Carpenter on the nation's second manned orbital flight.

  8. "Children of the Sun" by N. Scott Momaday. Cue Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterfall, Milde M.

    This performance guide is designed for teachers to use with students before and after a performance of "Children of the Sun," by N. Scott Momaday. The guide, called a "Cuesheet," is in the form of a Director's Notebook--a scrapbook/journal of clippings, memos, lists, illustrations, notes, and other items--to show students how a director finds and…

  9. Narrating Socialization: Linda Scott DeRosier's Memoirs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locklear, Erica Abrams

    2007-01-01

    Linda Scott DeRosier's autobiographical accounts of literacy attainment in "Creeker: A Woman's Journey" and "Songs of Life and Grace" reveal that entrance into a secondary discourse community via literacy can bring both pleasure and pain. Analyzing the identity negotiations DeRosier encounters reveals that although she experiences a sense of loss…

  10. Multiwavelength AGN Surveys and Studies (IAU S304)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.; Sanders, David B.

    2014-08-01

    1. Historical surveys: spectral and colorimetric surveys for AGN, surveys for UV-excess galaxies; 2. AGN from IR/submm surveys: 2MASS, IRAS, ISO, AKARI, SCUBA, SST, WISE, Herschel; 3. AGN from radio/mm surveys: NVSS, FIRST, ALMA, Planck, and others; 4. AGN from X-ray/gamma-ray surveys: ROSAT, ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra, XMM, INTEGRAL, Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS, NuSTAR; 5. Multiwavelength AGN surveys, AGN statistics and cross-correlation of multiwavelength surveys; 6. Unification and other models of AGN, accretion modes, understanding of the structure of nearby AGN from IFUs on VLT and other telescopes; 7. AGN feedback in galaxies and clusters, AGN host galaxies and the AGN environments; 8. Binary AGN and Merging Super-Massive Black Holes; 9. Study of unique AGN, AGN variability and the Phenomena of Activity; 10. Future large projects; Author index.

  11. The Close AGN Reference Survey (CARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Barry; Husemann, Bernd; Busch, Gerold; Dierkes, Jens; Eckart, Andreas; Krajnovic, Davor; Scharwaechter, Julia; Tremblay, Grant R.; Urrutia, Tanya

    2015-08-01

    We present the first science results from the Close AGN Reference Survey (CARS). This program is a snapshot survey of 39 local type 1 AGN (0.01 < z <0.06) designed to address the issue of AGN-driven star formation quenching by characterizing the condition for star formation in AGN host galaxies. The primary sample was observed with Multi Unit Spectrscopic Explorer (MUSE), an optical wavelength integral field unit (IFU) with a 1'x1' field of view on the VLT. The optical 3D spectroscopy complements existing sub-mm CO(1-0) data and near-IR imaging to establish a unique dataset combining molecular and stellar masses with star formation rates, gas, stellar kinematics and AGN properties. The primary goals of CARS are to:1) investigate if the star formation efficiency and gas depletion time scales are suppressed as a consequence of AGN feedback; 2) identify AGN-driven outflows and their relation to the molecular gas reservoir of the host galaxy; 3) investigate the the balance of AGN feeding and feedback through the ratio of the gas reservoir to the AGN luminosity; and 4) provide the community with a reference survey of local AGN with a high legacy value. Future work will incorporate near-infrared IFU observations to present a complete spatially resolved picture of the interplay among AGN, star-formation, stellar populations, and the ISM.

  12. THE GALACTIC SPIN OF AGN GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Hernandez, X.; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young E-mail: xavier@astroscu.unam.mx

    2011-07-01

    Using an extensive sample of galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5, we compare the angular momentum distribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with non-AGN hosting late-type galaxies. To this end we characterize galactic spin through the dimensionless angular momentum parameter {lambda}, which we estimate through simple dynamical considerations. Using a volume-limited sample, we find a considerable difference when comparing the empirical distributions of {lambda} for AGNs and non-AGN galaxies, the AGNs showing typically low {lambda} values and associated dispersions, while non-AGNs present higher {lambda} values and a broader distribution. A more striking difference is found when looking at {lambda} distributions in thin M{sub r} cuts; while the spin of non-AGN galaxies presents an anticorrelation with M{sub r} , with bright (massive) galaxies having low spins, AGN host galaxies present uniform values of {lambda} at all magnitudes, a behavior probably imposed by the fact that most late-type AGN galaxies present a narrow range in color, with a typical constant {lambda} value. We also find that the fraction of AGN hosting galaxies in our sample strongly depends on galactic spin, increasing dramatically for decreasing {lambda}. For AGN host galaxies, we compute the mass of their supermassive black holes and find that this value tends to be higher for low spin galaxies, even at fixed luminosity, a result that could account, to a certain extent, for the spread on the luminosity-black-hole mass relation.

  13. John Scott Haldane: The father of oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, KC; Rao, SSC Chakra

    2014-01-01

    John Scott Haldane was a versatile genius who solved several problems of great practical significance. His ability to look beyond the laboratory and investigate theory added crucial findings in the field of respiratory physiology. His work on high altitude physiology, diving physiology, oxygen therapy, and carbon monoxide poisoning led to a sea change in clinical medicine and improved safety and reduced mortality and morbidity in many high risk situations. PMID:25024490

  14. 76 FR 71042 - Scott S. Reuben: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing an order under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act permanently debarring Scott S. Reuben, M.D. from providing services in any capacity to a person that has an approved or pending drug product application. FDA bases this order on a finding that Dr. Reuben was convicted of a felony under Federal law for conduct relating to the regulation of......

  15. John Scott Haldane: The father of oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Kc; Rao, Ssc Chakra

    2014-05-01

    John Scott Haldane was a versatile genius who solved several problems of great practical significance. His ability to look beyond the laboratory and investigate theory added crucial findings in the field of respiratory physiology. His work on high altitude physiology, diving physiology, oxygen therapy, and carbon monoxide poisoning led to a sea change in clinical medicine and improved safety and reduced mortality and morbidity in many high risk situations. PMID:25024490

  16. Relativistic Scott correction in self-generated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdős, László; Fournais, Søren; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-09-01

    We consider a large neutral molecule with total nuclear charge Z in a model with self-generated classical magnetic field and where the kinetic energy of the electrons is treated relativistically. To ensure stability, we assume that Zα < 2/π, where α denotes the fine structure constant. We are interested in the ground state energy in the simultaneous limit Z → ∞, α → 0 such that κ = Zα is fixed. The leading term in the energy asymptotics is independent of κ, it is given by the Thomas-Fermi energy of order Z7/3 and it is unchanged by including the self-generated magnetic field. We prove the first correction term to this energy, the so-called Scott correction of the form S(αZ)Z2. The current paper extends the result of Solovej et al. [Commun. Pure Appl. Math. LXIII, 39-118 (2010)] on the Scott correction for relativistic molecules to include a self-generated magnetic field. Furthermore, we show that the corresponding Scott correction function S, first identified by Solovej et al. [Commun. Pure Appl. Math. LXIII, 39-118 (2010)], is unchanged by including a magnetic field. We also prove new Lieb-Thirring inequalities for the relativistic kinetic energy with magnetic fields.

  17. Non-thermal AGN models

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.L.

    1986-12-01

    The infrared, optical and x-ray continua from radio quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN) are explained by a compact non-thermal source surrounding a thermal ultraviolet emitter, presumably the accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The ultraviolet source is observed as the ''big blue bump.'' The flat (..cap alpha.. approx. = .7) hard x-ray spectrum results from the scattering of thermal ultraviolet photons by the flat, low energy end of an electron distribution ''broken'' by Compton losses; the infrared through soft x-ray continuum is the synchrotron radiation of the steep, high energy end of the electron distribution. Quantitative fits to specific AGN result in models which satisfy the variability constraints but require electron (re)acceleration throughout the source. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Radio Loud AGNs are Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaberge, Marco; Gilli, Roberto; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Norman, Colin

    2015-06-01

    We measure the merger fraction of Type 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z\\gt 1 using new samples. The objects have Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the IR channel. These samples are compared to the 3CR sample of radio galaxies at z\\gt 1 and to a sample of non-active galaxies. We also consider lower redshift radio galaxies with HST observations and previous generation instruments (NICMOS and WFPC2). The full sample spans an unprecedented range in both redshift and AGN luminosity. We perform statistical tests to determine whether the different samples are differently associated with mergers. We find that all (92%-14%+8%) radio-loud galaxies at z\\gt 1 are associated with recent or ongoing merger events. Among the radio-loud population there is no evidence for any dependence of the merger fraction on either redshift or AGN power. For the matched radio-quiet samples, only 38%-15+16 are merging systems. The merger fraction for the sample of non-active galaxies at z\\gt 1 is indistinguishable from radio-quiet objects. This is strong evidence that mergers are the triggering mechanism for the radio-loud AGN phenomenon and the launching of relativistic jets from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We speculate that major black hole (BH)–BH mergers play a major role in spinning up the central SMBHs in these objects.

  19. Comparing Simulations of AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Thacker, Robert J.; Dubois, Yohan; Wurster, James; Silk, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological zoom simulations of a region around a forming galaxy cluster, comparing the ability of the methods to handle successively more complex baryonic physics. In the simplest, non-radiative case, the two methods are in good agreement with each other, but the SPH simulations generate central cores with slightly lower entropies and virial shocks at slightly larger radii, consistent with what has been seen in previous studies. The inclusion of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback leads to much larger differences between the two methods. Most dramatically, at z=5, rapid cooling in the AMR case moves the accretion shock to well within the virial radius, while this shock remains near the virial radius in the SPH case, due to excess heating, coupled with poorer capturing of the shock width. On the other hand, the addition of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to the simulations results in much better agreement between the methods. For our AGN model, both simulations display halo gas entropies of 100 keV cm2, similar decrements in the star formation rate, and a drop in the halo baryon content of roughly 30%. This is consistent with the AGN growth being self-regulated, regardless of the numerical method. However, the simulations with AGN feedback continue to differ in aspects that are not self-regulated, such that in SPH a larger volume of gas is impacted by feedback, and the cluster still has a lower entropy central core.

  20. The Importance of Winds for AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.; Fischer, T. C.; Gagne, J.

    2014-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are fed by accretion of matter onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs), generating huge amounts of radiation from very small volumes. AGN also provide feedback to their environments via mass outflows of ionized gas, which could play a critical role in the formation of large-scale structure in the early Universe, chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium, and self-regulation of SMBH and galactic bulge growth. We provide an update on our research on the winds in nearby moderate-luminosity AGN, In particular, we concentrate on winds that occur on relatively large scales (hundreds of parsecs) that are revealed through spatially resolved HST spectra of emission-line gas in the narrow line regions (NLRs) of nearby AGN. We discuss the techniques for measuring the mass outflow rates and kinetic luminosities of these AGN winds and gauge their importance for providing significant AGN feedback.

  1. New insights into AGN coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohfink, Anne; Fabian, Andrew C.; Malzac, Julien; Belmont, Renaud; Buisson, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are some of the most energetic sources of radiation in the Universe. The conversion of gravitational energy into radiation is thought to take place in an accretion disk/corona system just outside the black hole. In this system thermal, UV/optical photons from the accretion disk are upscattered in a corona of hot electrons situated above the accretion disk producing X-rays. The nature of this Comptonizing corona remains a key open question in AGN physics. The NuSTAR satellite provides the opportunity to study the Comptonization spectrum produced by the corona in great detail. In our talk we will show some key results from these new studies of the Comptonization spectrum. We explore how, together with our growing knowledge of coronal sizes, we are able to draw first conclusions about the physics taking place in the corona. We find evidence for coronae to be hot and radiatively compact, putting them close to the boundary of the region in the compactness-temperature diagram which is forbidden due to runaway pair production. This suggests that pair production and annihilation are essential ingredients in the coronae of AGN and that they control the coronal temperature and shape of the observed spectra.

  2. Probing AGN Unification with galaxy neighbours: pitfalls and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarroel, B.

    2015-09-01

    Statistical tests of AGN unification harbour many caveats. One way of constraining the validity of the AGN unification is through studies of close neighbours to Type-1 and Type-2 AGN. Examining thousands of AGN- galaxy pairs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and the Galaxy Zoo project, we found that Type-2 AGN appear to reside in more star-forming environments than Type-1 AGN.

  3. APOLLO 15: Commander Scott on those who gave all

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 15: A demonstration of a classic experiment. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 15: 'The mountains of the Moon'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 15: Fourth manned lunar landing with David R. Scott, Alfred M. Worden, and James B. Irwin. Landed at Hadley rilleon July 30, 1971;performed EVA with Lunar Roving Vehicle; deployed experiments. P& F Subsattelite spring-launched from SM in lunar orbit. Mission Duration 295 hrs 11 min 53sec

  4. New Calif. Community-College Chief Seeks Unity over Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Josh

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that the incoming chancellor of California's enormous community-college system is facing a crucial choice amid tough times. Jack Scott, a longtime chair of State Senate's committee on education, will take the helm of the California community-college system in January. But in a twist of state politics, his influence over the…

  5. SWIFT BAT Survey of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, J.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barthelmy, S.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Winter, L. M.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results1 of the analysis of the first 9 months of data of the Swift BAT survey of AGN in the 14-195 keV band. Using archival X-ray data or follow-up Swift XRT observations, we have identified 129 (103 AGN) of 130 objects detected at [b] > 15deg and with significance > 4.8-delta. One source remains unidentified. These same X-ray data have allowed measurement of the X-ray properties of the objects. We fit a power law to the logN - log S distribution, and find the slope to be 1.42+/-0.14. Characterizing the differential luminosity function data as a broken power law, we find a break luminosity logL*(ergs/s)= 43.85+/-0.26. We obtain a mean photon index 1.98 in the 14-195 keV band, with an rms spread of 0.27. Integration of our luminosity function gives a local volume density of AGN above 10(exp 41) erg/s of 2.4x10(exp -3) Mpc(sup -3), which is about 10% of the total luminous local galaxy density above M* = -19.75. We have obtained X-ray spectra from the literature and from Swift XRT follow-up observations. These show that the distribution of log nH is essentially flat from nH = 10(exp 20)/sq cm to 10(exp 24)/sq cm, with 50% of the objects having column densities of less than 10(exp 22)/sq cm. BAT Seyfert galaxies have a median redshift of 0.03, a maximum log luminosity of 45.1, and approximately half have log nH > 22.

  6. AGN Winds and Blazar Phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2012-01-01

    The launch of {\\em Fermi} produced a significant number of AGN detections to allow statistical treatment of their properties. One of the first such systematics was the "Blazar Divide" in FSRQs and BL Lacs according to their gamma-ray spectral index and luminosity. Further data accumulation indicated this separation to be less clear than thought before. An MHD wind model which can model successfully the Seyfert X-ray absorber properties provides the vestiges of an account of the observed blazar classification. We propose to employ this model to model in detail the broad band blazar spectra and their statistical properties in terms of the physical parameters of these MHD winds.

  7. Partners in Excellence: Development of the Temple College Clinical Simulation Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Temple College (TC) is a comprehensive community college located in Temple, Texas. Temple also is home to Scott & White Hospital, Central Texas Veterans Health Care System, King's Daughters Hospital, and Texas A&M University College of Medicine's clinical campus. In the summer of 2001, TC's health-sciences programs were scattered across three…

  8. Geologic Map of the Scott City 7.5-Minute Quadrangle, Scott and Cape Girardeau Counties, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Richard W.; Palmer, James R.; Hoffman, David; Vaughn, James D.; Repetski, John E.; Frederiksen, Norman O.; Forman, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    The Scott City quadrangle is located at the northern end of the Mississippi embayment (fig. 1). The quadrangle contains parts of three physiographic features: the abandoned channel of the ancestral Mississippi River, the Benton Hills, and the flood plain of the ancestral Ohio River and modern Mississippi River. These features are largely the manifestation of the Quaternary evolution of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, the chronology and analysis of which has been discussed by Fisk (1944), Saucier (1968, 1974, 1994), Guccione and others (1990), Madole and others (1991), Autin and others (1991), Porter and Guccione (1994), and Blum and others (1995a,b).

  9. AGN Zoo and Classifications of Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.

    2015-07-01

    We review the variety of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) classes (so-called "AGN zoo") and classification schemes of galaxies by activity types based on their optical emission-line spectrum, as well as other parameters and other than optical wavelength ranges. A historical overview of discoveries of various types of active galaxies is given, including Seyfert galaxies, radio galaxies, QSOs, BL Lacertae objects, Starbursts, LINERs, etc. Various kinds of AGN diagnostics are discussed. All known AGN types and subtypes are presented and described to have a homogeneous classification scheme based on the optical emission-line spectra and in many cases, also other parameters. Problems connected with accurate classifications and open questions related to AGN and their classes are discussed and summarized.

  10. The Secrets of St. Agnes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Janell

    2006-01-01

    This article reveals the disturbing truths uncovered by a retired biology professor about the past practices of a North Carolina hospital. In the 1990s, Irene Clark was a biology professor at St. Augustine's College, a historically Black college in Raleigh, North Carolina. One day, a janitor asked the native Virginian what she knew about the…

  11. The 60-month all-sky BAT Survey of AGN and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGN

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Alexander, D.M.; Greiner, J.; Madejski, G.M.; Gehrels, N.; Burlon, D.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2012-04-02

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/BAT. In this timeframe, BAT detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGN, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of {approx}2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGN. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona-fide Compton-thick AGN and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGN represent a {approx}5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT dataset to refine the determination of the LogN-LogS of AGN which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, towards assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the LogN-LogS of AGN selected above 10 keV is now established to a {approx}10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGN and measure a space density of 7.9{sub -2.9}{sup +4.1} x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. As the BAT AGN are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGN in the nearby Universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGN that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local ({le} 85 Mpc) Universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions.

  12. 76 FR 71611 - Notice of Establishment of the Fort Winfield Scott Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... Fort Winfield Scott as a new national center focused on service and leadership development. DATES... on the establishment of a new national center (``Center'') focused on service and leadership... dedicated to service and leadership at Fort Scott in the Presidio of San Francisco; (b)...

  13. 78 FR 60929 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Fort Scott Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Scott as a new national center focused on service and leadership development. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... establishment of a new national center (Center) focused on service and leadership development, with specific... leadership at Fort Scott in the Presidio of San Francisco; (b) providing recommendations related to...

  14. 78 FR 3479 - Notice of Public Meeting of Fort Scott Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... reuse of Fort Winfield Scott as a new national center focused on service and leadership development... will advise on the establishment of a new national center (Center) focused on service and leadership... dedicated to service and leadership at Fort Scott in the Presidio of San Francisco; (b)...

  15. Compton Thick AGN in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Cosmos Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    I will present the results we published in a couple of recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, arXiv 1505.01153) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^24 cm^-2) AGN, in the COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems.We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^25 cm^-2), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line.The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.We will also present estimates on the detectability of such extreme sources up to redshift ~6-7 with Athena. Combining the most up to date models for the Luminosity Function of CT AGN at high z, aggressive data analysis techniques on faint sources, and the current Athena survey design, we demonstrate that we will detect, and recognize as such, a small (few to ten) but incredibly valuable sample of CT AGN at such high redshift.

  16. STS-120 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski Repairs ISS Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    While anchored to a foot restraint on the end of the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS), astronaut Scott Parazynski, STS-120 mission specialist, participated in the mission's fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the International Space Station (ISS). During the 7-hour and 19-minute space walk, Parazynski cut a snagged wire and installed homemade stabilizers designed to strengthen the structure and stability of the damaged P6 4B solar array wing. Astronaut Doug Wheelock (out of frame), mission specialist, assisted from the truss by keeping an eye on the distance between Parazynski and the array. Once the repair was complete, flight controllers on the ground successfully completed the deployment of the array.

  17. STS-120 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski Repairs ISS Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    While anchored to a foot restraint on the end of the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS), astronaut Scott Parazynski, STS-120 mission specialist, participated in the mission's fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the International Space Station (ISS). During the 7-hour and 19-minute space walk, Parazynski cut a snagged wire and installed homemade stabilizers designed to strengthen the structure and stability of the damaged P6 4B solar array wing. Astronaut Doug Wheelock (out of frame), mission specialist, assisted from the truss by keeping an eye on the distance between Parazynski and the array. Once the repair was complete, flight controllers on the ground successfully completed the deployment of the array.

  18. Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski checks his flight suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski gets help with his flight suit in the Operations and Checkout Building from a suit technician George Brittingham. The final fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39B. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  19. STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is suited up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is assisted during suit-up activities by Lockheed Suit Technician Valerie McNeil from Johnson Space Center in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Altman and the rest of the STS-90 crew will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits a second liftoff attempt at 2:19 p.m. EDT. His first trip into space, Altman is participating in a life sciences research flight that will focus on the most complex and least understood part of the human body - - the nervous system. Neurolab will examine the effects of spaceflight on the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and sensory organs in the human body.

  20. Toward a Unified AGN Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; Fukumura, Keigo; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulosa, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    We present a unified model for the structure and appearance of accretion powered sources across their entire luminosity range from galactic X-ray binaries (XRB) to luminous quasars, with emphasis on AG N and their phenomenology. Central to this model is the notion of MHD winds launched by the accretion disks that power these objects. These winds provide the matter that manifests as blueshifted absorption features in the UV and X-ray spectra of a large fraction of these sources; furthermore, their density distribution in the poloidal plane determines their "appearance" (i.e. the column and velocity structure of these absorption features and the obscuration of the continuum source) as a function of the observer inclination angle (a feature to which INTEGRAL has made significant contributions). This work focuses on just the broadest characteristics of these objects; nonetheless, it provides scaling laws that allow one to reproduce within this model the properties of objects extending in luminosity from luminous quasars to XRBs. Our general conclusion is that the AGN phenomenology can be accounted for in terms of three parameters: The wind maSS flux in units of the Eddington value, m(dot), the observers' inclination angle Theta and the logarithmic slope between the 0/UV and X-ray fluxes alpha(sub ox); however because of a correlation between alpha(sub ox) and UV luminosity the number of significant parameters is two. The AGN correlations implied by this model appear to extend to and consistent with the XRB phenomenology, suggesting the presence of a truly unified underlying structure for accretion powered sources.

  1. Spectral Energy Distributions of Type 1 AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Heng

    The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are essential to understand the physics of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. This thesis present a detailed study of AGN SED shapes in the optical-near infrared bands (0.3--3microm) for 413 X-ray selected Type 1 AGNs from the XMM-COSMOS Survey. We define a useful near-IR/optical index-index ('color-color') diagram to investigate the mixture of AGN continuum, host galaxy and reddening contributions. We found that ˜90% of the AGNs lie on mixing curves between the Elvis et al. (1994) mean AGN SED (E94) and a host galaxy, with only the modest reddening [E(B-V)=0.1--0.2] expected in type 1 AGNs. Lower luminosity and Eddington ratio objects have more host galaxy, as expected. The E94 template is remarkably good in describing the SED shape in the 0.3--3microrn decade of the spectrum over a range of 3.2 dex in LOPT, 2.7 dex in L/LEdd, and for redshifts up to 3. The AGN phenomenon is thus insensitive to absolute or relative accretion rate and to cosmic time. However, 10% of the AGNs are inconsistent with any AGN+host+reddening mix. These AGNs have weak or non-existent near-IR bumps, suggesting a lack of the hot dust characteristic of AGNs. The fraction of these hot-dust-poor AGNs evolves with redshift from 6% at low redshift (z < 2) to 20% at moderately high redshift (2 < z < 3.5). A similar fraction of HDP quasars are found in the Elvis et al. 1994 (BQS) and Richards et al. 2006 (SDSS) samples. The 1--3microm emission of the HDP quasars is a factor 2--4 smaller than the typical E94 AGN SED. The implied torus covering factor is 2%--29%, well below the 75% required by unified models. The weak hot dust emission seems to expose an extension of the accretion disk continuum in some of AGNs. For these, we estimate the outer edge of their accretion disks to lie at ˜104 Schwarzschild radii, more than ten times the gravitational stability radii. Either the host-dust is destroyed

  2. Low luminosity AGNs in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikiz, Tuba; Peletier, Reynier F.; Yesilyaprak, Cahit

    2016-04-01

    Galaxies are known to contain black holes (e.g. Ferrarese & Merritt 2000), whose mass correlates with the mass of their bulge. A fraction of them also has an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), showing excess emission thought to be due to accretion of mass by the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy. It is thought that AGNs play a very important role during the formation of galaxies by creating large outflows that stop star formation in the galaxy (see e.g. Kormendy & Ho 2013). The aim is to detect the fraction of Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus (LLAGN) in the nearby Universe. At present, they are typically found using optical spectroscopy (e.g. Kauffmann, Heckman et al. 2003), who discuss the influence of the AGN on the host galaxy and vice versa. However, optical spectra are seriously affected by extinction in these generally very dusty objects, and therefore can only give us partial information about the AGN. I used a newly-found method, and apply it to the S4G sample, a large, complete, sample of nearby galaxies, which I am studying in detail with a large collaboration, to detect the fraction of low luminosity AGNs, and to better understand the relation between AGNs and their host galaxy which is thought to be crucial for their formation.

  3. A New Catalog of Type 1 AGNs and its Implications on the AGN Unified Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyuseok; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Schawinski, Kevin; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Soto, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    We have recently identified a substantial number of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) featuring weak broad-line regions (BLRs) at z\\lt 0.2 from detailed analysis of galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. These objects predominantly show a stellar continuum but also a broad Hα emission line, indicating the presence of a low-luminosity AGN oriented so that we are viewing the central engine directly without significant obscuration. These accreting black holes have previously eluded detection due to their weak nature. The newly discovered BLR AGNs have increased the number of known type 1 AGNs by 49%. Some of these new BLR AGNs were detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and their X-ray properties confirm that they are indeed type 1 AGNs. Based on our new and more complete catalog of type 1 AGNs, we derived the type 1 fraction of AGNs as a function of [O iii] λ 5007 emission luminosity and explored the possible dilution effect on obscured AGNs due to star formation. The new type 1 AGN fraction shows much more complex behavior with respect to black hole mass and bolometric luminosity than has been suggested previously by the existing receding torus model. The type 1 AGN fraction is sensitive to both of these factors, and there seems to be a sweet spot (ridge) in the diagram of black hole mass and bolometric luminosity. Furthermore, we present the possibility that the Eddington ratio plays a role in determining opening angles.

  4. Heroes for the past and present: a century of remembering Amundsen and Scott.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Peder

    2011-12-01

    In 1911-1912 Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott led rival parties in a race to the geographic South Pole. While both parties reached the Pole--Amundsen first--Scott's men died on the return journey. Amundsen became a Norwegian icon through his record-setting travels; Scott became a symbol of courage and devotion to science. The memory of each was invoked at various points during the twentieth century in the context of contemporary Antarctic events. Scott's status as a scientific figure was central to the Scott Polar Research Institute, while Amundsen's lack of scientific legacy became a way for British polar explorers to differentiate themselves from Norwegian contemporaries during the interwar years. After 1945 Scott and Amundsen were again invoked as exemplars of national polar achievement, even as the rise of large-scale science on the continent overshadowed past British and Norwegian achievements. In the present Amundsen and Scott remain wedded to particular values, focused respectively on national achievement and sacrifice in the name of science, while their race has become secondary. PMID:21880370

  5. Obscured AGN Accretion Across Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coil, Alison

    We propose to combine data from XMM-Newton, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Spitzer Space Telescope with ground-based optical spectroscopy from Keck and Magellan to measure the relationship between AGN obscuration and accretion activity over the bulk of cosmic history. This work will establish the prominence of both obscured and unobscured growth phases of black holes and shed light on the processes that trigger and fuel AGN as a function of time. We will complete three complementary projects that focus on a) understanding the completeness and biases of AGN selection at mid-IR versus X-ray wavelengths, b) tracing optical obscuration as a function of luminosity and redshift, and c) measuring the distribution and evolution of X-ray absorption of AGN. We will undertake a study of AGN demographics comparing selection techniques at three different wavelengths: mid-IR selection using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, X- ray selection using data from the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, and broad-line optical selection using PRIMUS spectroscopy. We will determine the overlap and uniqueness of samples created using each method, to quantify the completeness and biases inherent in AGN selection at each wavelength. This will lead to a constraint on the fraction of heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGN to z~1. To study the optical obscuration of AGN, we will use three recently-completed spectroscopic surveys -- PRIMUS, DEEP2, and our own Keck program -- to robustly determine the ratio of unobscured (broad-line) to obscured (non--broad-line) X-ray selected AGN as a function of luminosity from z~0.2 to z~3. We will utilize the well- understood selection functions and characterize the AGN completeness of each survey as a function of redshift, magnitude, and obscuration properties. This will allow us to correct for a variety of observational effects to measure the underlying joint redshift- and luminosity-dependence of optical obscuration, which has direct implications

  6. A method for determining AGN accretion phase in field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micic, Miroslav; Martinović, Nemanja; Sinha, Manodeep

    2016-09-01

    Recent observations of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in massive galaxies (log M*/ M⊙ > 10.4) show the following: (1) at z < 1, AGN-hosting galaxies do not show enhanced merger signatures compared with normal galaxies, (2) also at z < 1, most AGNs are hosted by quiescent galaxies and (3) at z > 1, the percentage of AGNs in star-forming galaxies increases and becomes comparable to the AGN percentage in quiescent galaxies at z ˜ 2. How can major mergers explain AGN activity in massive quiescent galaxies that have no merger features and no star formation to indicate a recent galaxy merger? By matching merger events in a cosmological N-body simulation to the observed AGN incidence probability in the COSMOS survey, we show that major merger-triggered AGN activity is consistent with the observations. By distinguishing between `peak' AGNs (recently merger-triggered and hosted by star-forming galaxies) and `faded' AGNs (merger-triggered a long time ago and now residing in quiescent galaxies), we show that the AGN occupation fraction in star-forming and quiescent galaxies simply follows the evolution of the galaxy merger rate. Since the galaxy merger rate drops dramatically at z < 1, the only AGNs left to be observed are the ones triggered by old mergers that are now in the declining phase of their nuclear activity, hosted by quiescent galaxies. As we go towards higher redshifts, the galaxy merger rate increases and the percentages of `peak' AGNs and `faded' AGNs become comparable.

  7. The Davydov/Scott model for energy storage and transport in proteins.

    PubMed

    Cruzeiro, Leonor

    2009-02-01

    The current status of the Davydov/Scott model for energy transfer in proteins is reviewed. After a brief introduction to the theoretical framework and to the basic results, the problems of finite temperature dynamics and of the full quantum and mixed quantum-classical approximations are described, as well as recent results obtained within each of these approximations. A short survey of experimental evidence in support of the Davydov/Scott model is made and absorption spectra are calculated that show the same temperature dependence as that measured in crystalline acetanilide. Future applications of the Davydov/Scott model to protein folding and function and to misfolding diseases are outlined. PMID:19669568

  8. They Call Me Agnes: A Crow Narrative Based on the Life of Agnes Yellowtail Deernose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voget, Fred W.; Mee, Mary K.

    This book is about life on the Crow Indian Reservation from around 1910 to the present and is based on the personal experiences of Donnie and Agnes Deernose. Following Donnie's death, Agnes became the principal narrator of the book. The Crow Indian Reservation is situated between Billings, Montana, and Sheridan, Wyoming. More so than any other…

  9. Calibrating AGN Feedback in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    Whether caused by AGN jets, shocks, or mergers, the most definitive evidence for heating in cluster cores comes from X-ray spectroscopy. Unfortunately such spectra are essentially limited to studying the emission spectrum from the cluster as a whole. However since the same underlying emission measure distribution produces both the observed CCD and RGS spectra, X-ray imaging can still provide spatial information on the heating process. Using Chandra archival data for a sample of 9 clusters, we demonstrate how imaging data can be used to constrain departures from a canonical, isobaric cooling flow model as a function of position in a given cluster. The results of this analysis are also shown for the deep archival exposure of the Perseus cluster. Such ``heating maps'' can provide constraints on both the location and magnitude of the heating in the cores of clusters. When combined with detections and spectral index maps from low-frequency radio observations, these maps can be used to distinguish between different models for heating in these objects.

  10. The Angular Clustering of WISE-Selected AGN: Different Haloes for Obscured and Unobscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin

    2015-08-01

    We calculate the angular correlation function for a sample of 170,000 AGN extracted from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalog, selected to have red mid-IR colors (W1 - W2 > 0.8) and 4.6 micron flux densities brighter than 0.14 mJy). The sample is expected to be >90% reliable at identifying AGN, and to have a mean redshift of z=1.1. In total, the angular clustering of WISE-AGN is roughly similar to that of optical AGN. We cross-match these objects with the photometric SDSS catalog and distinguish obscured sources with (r - W2) > 6 from bluer, unobscured AGN. Obscured sources present a higher clustering signal than unobscured sources. Since the host galaxy morphologies of obscured AGN are not typical red sequence elliptical galaxies and show disks in many cases, it is unlikely that the increased clustering strength of the obscured population is driven by a host galaxy segregation bias. By using relatively complete redshift distributions from the COSMOS survey, we find obscured sources at mean redshift z=0.9 have a bias of b = 2.9 \\pm 0.6 and are hosted in dark matter halos with a typical mass of log(M/M_odot)~13.5. In contrast, unobscured AGN at z~1.1 have a bias of b = 1.6 \\pm 0.6 and inhabit halos of log(M/M_odot)~12.4. These findings suggest that obscured AGN inhabit denser environments than unobscured AGN, and are difficult to reconcile with the simplest AGN unification models, where obscuration is driven solely by orientation.

  11. Scott Tannenbaum on the “Science of Teamwork”: HHP Directorate Innovation Lecture Series

    NASA Video Gallery

    Scott Tannenbaum, Ph.D. is President and Co-Founder of gOE. Under his leadership, gOE has served more than 500 organizations globally across all major industries. Dr. Tannenbaum is a leading expert...

  12. 115. PYROTECHNICS MAGAZINE (BUILDINGS 99100), PLAN AND ELEVATIONS, FULLER/SCOTT, MARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. PYROTECHNICS MAGAZINE (BUILDINGS 99-100), PLAN AND ELEVATIONS, FULLER/SCOTT, MARCH 16, 1941. QP ACC 1793. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  13. Long Timescale Variability of AGN with RXTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHardy, I. M.; Uttley, P.; Taylor, R. D.; Seymour, N.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper we review the very large contribution made by RXTE to our understanding of Active Galaxies (AGN). We discuss the relationship between AGN and Galactic Black Hole X-ray binary systems (GBHs) and show, by comparison of their powerspectral densities (PSDs) that some AGN are the equivalent of GBHs in their `high' state, rather than in their `low' state as has previously been assumed. We plot the timescale at which the PSD slope steepens from -1 to -2 against the black hole mass for a sample of AGN, and for Cyg X-1 in its high and low states. We find it is not possible to fit all AGN to the same linear scaling of break timescale with black hole mass. However broad line AGN are consistent with a linear scaling of break timescale with mass from Cyg X-1 in its low state and NLS1 galaxies scale better with Cyg X-1 in its high state, although there is an exception, NGC3227. We suggest that the relationship between black hole mass and break timescale is a function of another underlying parameter which may be accretion rate or black hole spin or, probably, both. We examine X-ray spectral variability and show how simple `flux-flux' plots can distinguish between `two-component' and `spectral pivoting' models. We also examine the relationship between the X-ray emission and that in other wavebands. In the case of X-ray/optical variability we show how cooler discs in AGN with larger mass black holes lead to greater proximity of the X-ray and optical emission regions and hence to more highly correlated variability. The very large amplitude of optical variability then rules out reprocessing as the origin of the optical emission. We show how the radio emission in NGC 4051 is strongly correlated with the X-ray emission, implying some contribution to the X-ray emission from a jet for which there is some evidence in radio images. We point out, however, that we have only studied in detail the X-ray variability of a handful of AGN. There is a strong requirement to extend such

  14. Promoting Climate Science in K-12 Education: An Interview With Eugenie Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-06-01

    Over the course of 26 years at the National Center for Science Education (NCSE), Eugenie Scott has worked to defend the teaching of evolution and climate science in public schools by providing resources to teachers, schools, and citizens and by working on legal aspects of these issues at the local, state, and national levels. Scott, who was appointed as executive director of NCSE in 1987, recently announced her intention to retire from that position.

  15. Steps Toward Unveiling the True Population of AGN: Photometric Selection of Broad-Line AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Evan; Impey, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present an AGN selection technique that enables identification of broad-line AGN using only photometric data. An extension of infrared selection techniques, our method involves fitting a given spectral energy distribution with a model consisting of three physically motivated components: infrared power law emission, optical accretion disk emission, and host galaxy emission. Each component can be varied in intensity, and a reduced chi-square minimization routine is used to determine the optimum parameters for each object. Using this model, both broad- and narrow-line AGN are seen to fall within discrete ranges of parameter space that have plausible bounds, allowing physical trends with luminosity and redshift to be determined. Based on a fiducial sample of AGN from the catalog of Trump et al. (2009), we find the region occupied by broad-line AGN to be distinct from that of quiescent or star-bursting galaxies. Because this technique relies only on photometry, it will allow us to find AGN at fainter magnitudes than are accessible in spectroscopic surveys, and thus probe a population of less luminous and/or higher redshift objects. With the vast availability of photometric data in large surveys, this technique should have broad applicability and result in large samples that will complement X-ray AGN catalogs.

  16. Increasing Access to College: Extending Possibilities for All Students. SUNY Series, Frontiers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, William G., Ed.; Hagedorn, Linda Serra, Ed.

    This collection of papers examines pre-college enrichment programs that offer a specific remedy to the problem of low income and underrepresented students' access to higher education. The 10 papers are: (1) "Pre-College Outreach Programs: A National Perspective" (Watson Scott Swail and Laura W. Perna); (2) "The Relationship between Urbanicity and…

  17. Satellites of radio AGN in SDSS: Insights into agn triggering and feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, Cameron; Salim, Samir E-mail: salims@indiana.edu

    2014-04-10

    We study the effects of radio jets on galaxies in their vicinity (satellites) and the role of satellites in triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The study compares the aggregate properties of satellites of a sample of 7220 radio AGNs at z < 0.3 (identified by Best and Heckman from the SDSS and NVSS+FIRST surveys) to the satellites of a control sample of radio-quiet galaxies, which are matched in redshift, color, luminosity, and axis ratio, as well as by environment type: field galaxies, cluster members, and brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Remarkably, we find that radio AGNs exhibit on average a 50% excess (17σ significance) in the number of satellites within 100 kpc even though the cluster membership was controlled (e.g., radio BCGs have more satellites than radio-quiet BCGs, etc.). Satellite excess is not confirmed for high-excitation sources, which are only 2% of radio AGN. Extra satellites may be responsible for raising the probability for hot gas AGN accretion via tidal effects or may otherwise enhance the intensity or duration of the radio-emitting phase. Furthermore, we find that the incidence of radio AGNs among potential hosts (massive ellipticals) is similar for field galaxies and for non-BCG cluster members, suggesting that AGN fueling depends primarily on conditions in the host halo rather than the parent, cluster halo. Regarding feedback, we find that radio AGNs, either high or low excitation, have no detectable effect on star formation in their satellites, as neither induced star formation nor star formation quenching is present in more than ∼1% of radio AGN.

  18. Observational evidence for thin AGN disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai

    1992-01-01

    AGN spectrum and spectral features, polarization, inclination, and X-ray line and continuum reflection features are discussed in a critical way in order to determine the ones that are the least model-dependent. The sign and strength of absorption and emission edges are found to be model-dependent, and relativistic broadening and shifting makes them hard to detect. The presence or absence of the predicted Lyman edge polarization feature may be used as a decisive test for thin, bare AGN disks. Other good model-independent tests are several inclination-related line and continuum correlations in big AGN samples. It is shown that electron temperature near the surface of the disk can greatly exceed the disk equilibrium temperature, which causes deviations from LTE. This effect must be incorporated into realistic disk models.

  19. A multi-wavelength survey of AGN in massive clusters: AGN distribution and host galaxy properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klesman, Alison J.; Sarajedini, Vicki L.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the effect of environment on the presence and fuelling of active galactic nuclei (AGN) by identifying galaxies hosting AGN in massive galaxy clusters and the fields around them. We have identified AGN candidates via optical variability (178), X-ray emission (74), and mid-IR SEDs (64) in multi-wavelength surveys covering regions centred on 12 galaxy clusters at redshifts 0.5 < z < 0.9. In this paper, we present the radial distribution of AGN in clusters to examine how local environment affects the presence of an AGN and its host galaxy. While distributions vary from cluster to cluster, we find that the radial distribution of AGN generally differs from that of normal galaxies. X-ray-selected AGN candidates appear to be more centrally concentrated than normal galaxies in the inner 20 per cent of the virial radius, while becoming less centrally concentrated in the outer regions. Mid-IR-selected AGN are less centrally concentrated overall. Optical variables have a similar distribution to normal galaxies in the inner regions, then become somewhat less centrally concentrated farther from the cluster centre. The host galaxies of AGN reveal a different colour distribution than normal galaxies, with many AGN hosts displaying galaxy colours in the `green valley' between the red sequence and blue star-forming normal galaxies. This result is similar to those found in field galaxy studies. The colour distribution of AGN hosts is more pronounced in disturbed clusters where minor mergers, galaxy harassment, and interactions with cluster substructure may continue to prompt star formation in the hosts. Among normal galaxies, we find that galaxy colours become generally bluer with increasing cluster radius, as is expected. However, we find no relationship between host galaxy colour and cluster radius among AGN hosts, which may indicate that processes related to the accreting supermassive black hole have a greater impact on the star-forming properties of the host galaxy

  20. γ-Ray Generation in Microquasars: the link with AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, I. J.; Aye, K.-M.; Brown, A. M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Hadjichristidis, C. N.; Le Gallou, R.; McComb, T. J. L.; Nolan, S. J.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Noutsos, A.; Rayner, S. M.

    2005-02-01

    The link between the physical processes responsible for high energy emission from relativistic jets in AGN and microquasars is investigated. A Fortran code based on an existing inhomogeneous, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, for AGN is presented. The code is then applied to the AGN 3C 279 and the microquasar LS5039. Spectral energy distributions (SED's) are presented.

  1. FE Features in Highly Obscured AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schachter, Jonathan F.

    1999-01-01

    This final report is a summary of the combined study of ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) observations of NGC 7582 with archival ROSAT HRI (High Resolution Imager) and PSPC (Position Sensitive Proportional Counter) data. These observations were important in that they established that X-ray emission in NGC 7582, the most narrow-line of NLXGs (narrow-line X-ray galaxies), is associated with an AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei). Thus implying that all NLXGs are obscured AGN, as has been hypothesized to explain the X-ray spectral background paradox.

  2. Detailed Analysis of Starburst and AGN Activity in Blue E/S0 Galaxies in RESOLVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Ashley; Snyder, Elaine M.; Kannappan, Sheila; Norman, Dara J.; Norris, Mark A.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Stark, David; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    We identify a population of ~120 blue E/S0 galaxies among the ~1350 galaxies that are targeted for spectroscopy and have measured morphologies in the highly complete REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local Volume (RESOLVE) survey. Blue E/S0s are identified as being early type objects morphologically classified between E and S0/a that fall on the blue sequence. Most (~85%) of our blue E/S0s have stellar masses <10^10 M_sun. Using pPXF, we have measured the stellar velocity dispersions (sigma values) from high resolution 485 - 550 nm spectroscopy for ~15% of the blue E/S0 sample. Using three variations of the M_BH -- sigma relation, this kinematic subsample is estimated to typically host central black holes within the range log M_BH = 4-6 M_sun. Following up on previous suggestions of nuclear activity in the blue E/S0 population, we investigate nuclear starburst and/or AGN activity occurring within the full sample. Preliminary results from cross-checking known AGN catalogs with the blue E/S0 sample have revealed nuclear activity in ~20 of these galaxies based on heterogeneous criteria (BPT line ratio analysis, spectral line broadening, etc.), some of which may not entirely distinguish starburst from AGN activity. In an attempt to break the degeneracy between AGN and starburst activity, we perform detailed spectral analysis for a few of the galaxies with kinematic data. We also consider the viability of alternate AGN detection methods based on L_Edd estimates calculated from the M_BH estimates. This research has been supported by the National Science Foundation through the CAP REU Program (ACI-1156614) and the RESOLVE Survey (AST-0955368) as well as the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program and the NC Space Grant Consortium.

  3. Staying the Course while Charting New Waters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Describes the capital campaign, business strategies, and facilities program at Agnes Scott College in Atlanta, which are attempting to tap into the school's history to stay competitive in the marketplace. (EV)

  4. The Team Approach to Planning a College Science Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarbrough, David B.

    In considering the team approach to architectural service, emphasis is given to the advantages of many specialists working together to solve complex building problems. An actual use of the team approach is described to illustrate how Caudill, Rowlett and Scott Architects solved the problems in planning a science building for Colorado College. The…

  5. A Global Picture of AGN Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Fukumura, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present a unified structure for accretion powered sources across their entire luminosity range from accreting galactic black holes to the most luminous quasars, with emphasis on AGN and their phenomenology. Central to this end is the notion of MHD winds launched from the accretion disks that power these objects. This work similar in spirit to that of Elvis of more that a decade ago, provides, on one hand, only the broadest characteristics of these objects, but on the other, also scaling laws that allow one to make contact with objects of different luminosity. The conclusion of this work is that AGN phenomenology can be accounted for in terms of dot(m), the wind mass flux in units of the Eddington value, the observer's inclination angle theta and alpha_OX the logarithmic slope between UV and X-ray flares. However given the well known correlation between alpha(sub ox) and UV Luminosity, we conclude that the AGN structure depends on only two parameters. The small number of model parameters hence suggests that an understanding of the global AGN properties maybe within reach.

  6. Mid-IR Observations of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packham, Christopher C.; Alonso Herrero, Almudena; Levenson, Nancy A.; Piratas AGN Group

    2016-01-01

    We present new observations of AGN, predominantly from the 10.4m GranTeCan. These observations are modeled and interpreted within the context of the clumpy torus models. In this poster we present our recent results and interpretation of the model outputs.

  7. Mabel Agnes Elliott, We Hardly Knew You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGonigal, Kathryn; Galliher, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Sociologist Mabel Agnes Elliott was elected the fourth president of the Society for the Study of Social Problems in 1956-1957 and was the first woman to hold this position. She was an anti-war activist, a feminist and a creative and diligent writer. Yet she experienced many challenges. The Federal Bureau of Investigation kept an active file on…

  8. The Horizon-AGN Simulation: Morphological Diversity of Galaxies ,Promoted by AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien; Pichon, Christophe; Devriendt, Julien; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Welker, Charlotte; Volonteri, Marta

    2016-09-01

    The interplay between cosmic gas accretion onto galaxies and galaxy mergers drives the observed morphological diversity of galaxies. By comparing the state-of-the-art hydrodynamical cosmological simulations HORIZON-AGN and HORIZON-NOAGN, we unambiguously identify the critical role of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in setting up the correct galaxy morphology for the massive end of the population. With AGN feedback, typical kinematic and morpho-metric properties of galaxy populations as well as the galaxy-halo mass relation are in much better agreement with observations. Only AGN feedback allows massive galaxies at the center of groups and clusters to become ellipticals, while without AGN feedback those galaxies reform discs. It is the merger-enhanced AGN activity that is able to freeze the morphological type of the post-merger remnant by durably quenching its quiescent star formation. Hence morphology is shown not to be purely driven by mass but also by the nature of cosmic accretion: at constant galaxy mass, ellipticals are galaxies that are mainly assembled through mergers, while discs are preferentially built from the in situ star formation fed by smooth cosmic gas infall.

  9. X-ray selected AGN in a Merging Cluster Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Dara; Coldwell, Georgina; Soechting, Ilona

    2010-08-01

    Although a general understanding of the overall AGN population is being addressed by optical large area surveys, a complete picture of cluster AGN is hampered by survey biases and a lack of information about AGN environments where we can trace cluster interactions. Optically selected AGN are under-represented in cluster environments due to color selection criteria insensitive to red and dusty sources. X-ray selection of AGN can overcome this bias. Hierarchical simulations suggest the gravitational processes which govern the evolution of clusters also have a role in AGN triggering, and AGN feedback is critically important to galaxy evolution. Confirmation of models requires comparisons not just of the cluster galaxy population, but also of the distributions of AGN in clusters especially forming clusters, which are not fully identified in surveys. Weak lensing cluster selection can overcome this bias. We propose to obtain GMOS-S spectra for a sample of 23 X-ray selected , optically faint (20 with R>20.3) AGN cluster candidates in an X-ray cluster discovered by its weak lensing shear signal. This cluster is unique in the large number of 1) X-ray AGN candidates identified in its environment and 2) X-ray sub-clusters identified. We require redshift data to identify AGN cluster members.

  10. AGN identification and host galaxies properties in the MOSDEF survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Mojegan; Coil, Alison L.; MOSDEF team

    2016-06-01

    We present new results on the identification and host galaxy properties of X-ray, IR and optically-selected AGN at 1.4 < z < 3.8, using spectroscopic data from the on-going MOSDEF survey, which is obtaining rest-frame optical spectra of ~1,500 galaxies and AGN using the new Keck/MOSFIRE instrument. We find clear selection effects when identifying AGN at different wavelengths, in that optically-selected AGN are more likely to be found in galaxies with low SFR, while IR AGN are typically found in galaxies with higher SFR. There is also a bias against finding AGN at any wavelength in low mass galaxies. We find that optical AGN selection identifies less powerful AGN that may be obscured at other wavelengths. Combining the AGN we identify at different wavelengths, we find that AGN host galaxies have similar stellar age and dust content as inactive galaxies of the same stellar mass. Finally, we do not find a significant correlation between either SFR or stellar mass and L[OIII], which argues against the presence of strong AGN feedback.

  11. A POWERFUL AGN OUTBURST IN RBS 797

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnolo, K. W.; McNamara, B. R.; Wise, M. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Gitti, M.; Brueggen, M.; Rafferty, D. A.

    2011-05-10

    Utilizing {approx}50 ks of Chandra X-Ray Observatory imaging, we present an analysis of the intracluster medium (ICM) and cavity system in the galaxy cluster RBS 797. In addition to the two previously known cavities in the cluster core, the new and deeper X-ray image has revealed additional structure associated with the active galactic nucleus (AGN). The surface brightness decrements of the two cavities are unusually large and are consistent with elongated cavities lying close to our line of sight. We estimate a total AGN outburst energy and mean jet power of {approx}(3-6) x 10{sup 60} erg and {approx}(3-6) x 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, respectively, depending on the assumed geometrical configuration of the cavities. Thus, RBS 797 is apparently among the most powerful AGN outbursts known in a cluster. The average mass accretion rate needed to power the AGN by accretion alone is {approx}1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We show that accretion of cold gas onto the AGN at this level is plausible, but that Bondi accretion of the hot atmosphere is probably not. The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) harbors an unresolved, non-thermal nuclear X-ray source with a bolometric luminosity of {approx}2 x 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. The nuclear emission is probably associated with a rapidly accreting, radiatively inefficient accretion flow. We present tentative evidence that star formation in the BCG is being triggered by the radio jets and suggest that the cavities may be driving weak shocks (M {approx} 1.5) into the ICM, similar to the process in the galaxy cluster MS 0735.6+7421.

  12. Decreased specific star formation rates in AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and M*'s from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and M* as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find that a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (CO Legacy Database for GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey, COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray luminosity and distance from the MS. While the morphological distribution of the BAT AGN is more similar to star-forming galaxies, the sSFR of each morphology is more similar to the COLD GASS AGN. The merger fraction in the BAT AGN is much higher than the COLD GASS AGN and star-forming galaxies and is related to distance from the MS. These results support a model in which bright AGN tend to be in high-mass star-forming galaxies in the process of quenching which eventually starves the supermassive black hole itself.

  13. Magic, Mind Control, and the Body Electric: "Materia Medica" in Sir Walter Scott's Library at Abbotsford.

    PubMed

    Levy, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    This chapter examines the medical texts, or "Materia Medica", held by Sir Walter Scott in his library at Abbotsford. While the vast majority of Scott's medical texts are antiquarian, his library also contains rare tracts and ephemera relating to the medical practice of the infamous quack, Dr James Graham (1745-94), and the Burke and Hare controversy of 1828 and its aftermath. Examining Scott's holdings of medical texts in relation to his own health and that of his family and friends, it is argued that the lack of contemporary medical self-help texts in his library is striking and indicative of his stoical attitude towards health, despite his clear interest in medical culture. PMID:27132356

  14. Under the Radar: The First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller Goss, W.

    2012-05-01

    Under the Radar, the First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott W. Miller Goss, NRAO Socorro NM Ruby Payne-Scott (1912-1981) was an eminent Australian scientist who made major contributions to the WWII radar effort (CSIR) from 1941 to 1945. In late 1945, she pioneered radio astronomy efforts at Dover Heights in Sydney, Australia at a beautiful cliff top overlooking the Tasman Sea. Again at Dover Heights, Payne-Scott carried out the first interferometry in radio astronomy using an Australian Army radar antenna as a radio telescope at sun-rise, 26 January 1946. She continued these ground breaking activities until 1951. Ruby Payne-Scott played a major role in discovering and elucidating the properties of Type III bursts from the sun, the most common of the five classes of transient phenomena from the solar corona. These bursts are one of the most intensively studied forms of radio emission in all of astronomy. She is also one of the inventors of aperture synthesis in radio astronomy. I examine her career at the University of Sydney and her conflicts with the CSIR hierarchy concerning the rights of women in the work place, specifically equal wages and the lack of permanent status for married women. I also explore her membership in the Communist Party of Australia as well as her partially released Australian Scientific Intelligence Organization file. Payne-Scott’s role as a major participant in the flourishing radio astronomy research of the post war era remains a remarkable story. She had a number of strong collaborations with the pioneers of early radio astronomy in Australia: Pawsey, Mills, Christiansen, Bolton and Little. I am currently working on a popular version of the Payne-Scott story; “Making Waves, The Story of Ruby Payne-Scott: Australian Pioneer Radio Astronomer” will be published in 2013 by Springer in the Astronomers’ Universe Series.

  15. Astronaut David Scott watching hammer and feather fall to lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott, Apollo 15 commander, watches a geological hammer and a feather hit the lunar surface simultaneously in a test of Galileo's law of motion concerning falling bodies, as seen in this color reproduction taken from a transmission made by the RCA color television camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Scott released the hammer from his right hand and the feather from his left at the same instant. This experiment occured toward the end of the third and final lunar surface extravehicular activity.

  16. AGN feedback in the Perseus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendron-Marsolais, Marie-Lou; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; Clarke, Tracy E.; Intema, Huib; Fabian, Andrew C.; Taylor, Gregory B.; Blundell, Katherine

    2016-04-01

    Deep Chandra images of the Perseus cluster of galaxies have revealed a succession of cavities created by the jets of the central supermassive black hole, pushing away the X-ray emitting gas and leaving bubbles filled with radio emission. Perseus is one of the rare examples showing buoyantly rising lobes from past radio outbursts, characterized by a steep spectral index and known as ghost cavities. All of these structures trace the complete history of mechanical AGN feedback over the past 500 Myrs. I will present results on new, ultra deep 230-470 MHz JVLA data. This low-frequency view of the Perseus cluster will probe the old radio-emitting electron population and will allow us to build the most detailed map of AGN feedback in a cluster thus far.

  17. Discovering Rare AGN with Stripe 82X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMassa, S.; Urry, C.; Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Glikman, E.; Richards, G.; Boehringer, H.; Murray, S.; Civano, F.

    2014-07-01

    We have begun a wide-area survey overlapping the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) region Stripe 82 which contains extensive multi-wavelength coverage from both ground- and space-based observatories. With the initial data release of Stripe 82X, covering 16.5 deg^{2} from XMM-Newton and Chandra, we identified ˜3300 X-ray sources, including the highest spectroscopically confirmed X-ray selected quasar to date (z = 5.86). I will review the science highlights of this survey so far, including the space density of high luminosity AGN and results from our ground-based campaign to target optically dull, infrared bright targets, which are prime candidates for obscured AGN at high redshift. I will conclude with a discussion of what we expect to learn with the additional 20 deg^{2} of coverage with XMM-Newton awarded to us in AO 13, which will more than double our current survey area.

  18. The universal spectrum of AGNs and QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of the feedback of e(+)-e(-) pair reinjection in a plasma due to photon photon absorption of its own radiation are examined. A mechanism is presented which can produce an electron distribution function that can account for the overall spectral distribution of radiation of AGNs and QSOs and the specific slopes observed in the IR to UV and 2-50 keV bands. It is interesting to note that the necessary condition for this mechanism to work (i.e., most of energy injected at e(M sub e)(C sup 2) is realized in the accretion shock model of Kazanas and Ellison. This mechanism involves only one free parameter the compactness of the sources, L/R, whose mean value can also account for the diffuse gamma ray background in terms of AGNs.

  19. AGN feedback in galaxy clusters and groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical feedback via Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets in the centres of galaxy groups and clusters is a crucial ingredient in current models of galaxy formation and cluster evolution. Jet feedback is believed to regulate gas cooling and thus star formation in the most massive galaxies, but a robust physical understanding of this feedback mode is currently lacking. Athena will provide (1) the first kinematic measurements on relevant spatial scales of the hot gas in galaxy, group and cluster haloes as it absorbs the impact of AGN jets, and (2) vastly improved ability to map thermodynamic conditions on scales well-matched to the jets, lobes and gas disturbances produced by them. I will present new predictions of Athena's ability to measure the energetic impact of powerful jets based on our most recent set of numerical models.

  20. Jets in AGN at extremely high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid I.; Frey, Sándor; Paragi, Zsolt

    2015-03-01

    The jet phenomenon is a trademark of active galactic nuclei (AGN). In most general terms, the current understanding of this phenomenon explains the jet appearance by effects of relativistic plasma physics. The fundamental source of energy that feeds the plasma flow is believed to be the gravitational field of a central supermassive black hole. While the mechanism of energy transfer and a multitude of effects controlling the plasma flow are yet to be understood, major properties of jets are strikingly similar in a broad range of scales from stellar to galactic. They are supposed to be controlled by a limited number of physical parameters, such as the mass of a central black hole and its spin, magnetic field induction and accretion rate. In a very simplified sense, these parameters define the formation of a typical core-jet structure observed at radio wavelengths in the region of the innermost central tens of parsecs in AGN. These core-jet structures are studied in the radio domain by Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) with milli- and sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution. Such structures are detectable at a broad range of redshifts. If observed at a fixed wavelength, a typical core-jet AGN morphology would appear as having a steep-spectrum jet fading away with the increasing redshift while a flat-spectrum core becoming more dominant. If core-jet AGN constitute the same population of objects throughout the redshift space, the apparent ``prominence'' of jets at higher redshifts must decrease (Gurvits 1999): well pronounced jets at high z must appear less frequent than at low z.

  1. The softest Einstein AGN (active galactic nuclei)

    SciTech Connect

    Cordova, F.A.; Kartje, J.; Mason, K.O.; Mittaz, J.P.D.; Chicago Univ., IL; University Coll., London . Mullard Space Science Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    We have undertaken a coarse spectral study to find the softest sources detected with the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) on the Einstein Observatory. Of the nearly 7700 IPC sources, 226 have color ratios that make them candidate ultrasoft'' sources; of these, 83 have small enough errors that we can say with confidence that they have a spectral component similar to those of the white dwarfs Sirius and HZ 43, nearby stars such as {alpha} Cen and Procyon, and typical polar'' cataclysmic variables. By means of catalog searches and ground-based optical and radio observations we have thus far identified 96 of the 226 candidate soft sources; 37 of them are active galactic nuclei (AGN). In the more selective subset of 83 sources, 47 have been identified, 12 of them with AGN. The list of 47 identifications is given in Cordova et al. For one QSO in our sample, E0132.8--411, we are able to fit the pulse-height data to a power-law model and obtain a best fit for the energy spectral index of 2. 2{sub {minus}0.4}{sup +0.6}. For the remainder of the AGN in the higher confidence sample we are able to infer on the basis of their x-ray colors that they have a similar spectral component. Two-thirds of the AGN are detected below 0.5 keV only, while the remainder evidence a flatter spectral component in addition to the ultra-soft component. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Comparative Effectiveness of "Scott Foresman Science": A Report of a Randomized Experiment in Ogden City School District. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gloria I.; Jaciw, Andrew; Ma, Boya

    2007-01-01

    This research project consists of a randomized experiment in Ogden City School District. The primary purpose of this research is to produce scientifically based evidence of the comparative effectiveness of the "Scott Foresman" program. The question being addressed by the research is whether the "Scott Foresman" program is more effective than the…

  3. Comparative Effectiveness of Scott Foresman Science: A Report of a Randomized Experiment in Visalia Unified School District. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gloria I.; Jaciw, Andrew; Vu, Minh-Thien

    2007-01-01

    This research project consists of a randomized experiment in Visalia Unified School District. The question being addressed by the research is whether "Scott Foresman Science" is as effective as or more effective than the curriculum being used at each site. Since Scott Foresman Science provides a significant reading component, the authors also…

  4. AGN Black Hole Masses from Reverberation Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.

    2004-01-01

    Emission-line variability data on bright AGNs indicates that the central objects in these sources have masses in the million to few-hundred million solar mass range. The time-delayed response of the emission lines to continuum variations can be used to infer the size of the line-emitting region via light travel-time arguments. By combining these sizes with the Doppler widths of the variable part of the emission lines, a virial mass estimate can be obtained. For three especially well-studied sources, NGC 5548, NGC 7469, and 3C 390.3, data on multiple emission lines can be used to test the virial hypothesis. In each of these cases, the response time of the various emission lines is anticorrelated with the line width, with the dependence as expected for gravitationally bound motion of the line-emitting clouds, i.e., that the square of the Doppler line width is inversely proportional to the emission-line time delay. Virial masses based on the Balmer lines have now been measured for about three dozen AGNs. Systematic effects currently limit the accuracy of these masses to a factor of several, but characteristics of the radius-luminosity and mass-luminosity relationships for AGNs are beginning to emerge.

  5. Do stars contribute to AGN fuelling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Richard

    2011-11-01

    While the existence of a starburst-AGN connection is undisputed, there is no consensus on whether AGN fuelling is synchronous with star formation or follows it during a post-starburst phase. I begin by presenting an overview of some of the observational evidence and theoretical models favouring each perspective. I then focus on recent high resolution observations that are able to probe the central tens of parsecs where star formation might influence AGN activity. I show that both the starburst phase and the physical state of the dense molecular gas imply that stellar feedback plays a critical role in first hindering and then helping accretion. I argue that it is only after the early turbulent phases of a starburst that gas from slow stellar winds can accrete efficiently to smaller scales. And I outline other contexts where similar processes appear to be at work. I finish by showing how the properties of the obscuring torus are directly coupled to this star formation, and that we should be thinking of the torus as a complex dynamical entity.

  6. The Keck OSIRIS Nearby AGN (KONA) Survey: AGN Fueling and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Erin K. S.; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Malkan, Matthew A.; Yu, Po-Chieh

    In an effort to better constrain the relevant physical processes dictating the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and the galaxies in which they reside we turn to local Seyfert AGN. It is only with these local AGN that we can reach the spatial resolution needed to adequately characterize the inflow and outflow mechanisms thought to be the driving forces in establishing the relationship between black holes and their host galaxies at higher redshift. We present the first results from the KONA (Keck OSIRIS Nearby AGN) survey, which takes advantage of the integral field unit OSIRIS plus laser and natural guide star adaptive optics to probe down to scales of 5-30 parsecs in a sample of 40 local Seyfert galaxies. With these K-band data we measure the two-dimensional distribution and kinematics of the nuclear stars, molecular gas, and ionized gas within the central few hundred parsecs.

  7. Intermediate inclinations of type 2 Coronal-Line Forest AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Marvin; Elvis, Martin; Crenshaw, Michael; Glidden, Ana

    2015-07-01

    Coronal-Line Forest Active Galactic Nuclei (CLiF AGN) are remarkable in the sense that they have a rich spectrum of dozens of coronal emission lines (e.g. [Fe VII], [Fe X] and [Ne V]) in their spectra. Rose, Elvis & Tadhunter suggest that the inner obscuring torus wall is the most likely location of the coronal line region in CLiF AGN, and the unusual strength of the forbidden high-ionization lines is due to a specific AGN-torus inclination angle. Here, we test this suggestion using mid-IR colours (4.6-22 μm) from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer for the CLiF AGN. We use the Fischer et al. result that showed that as the AGN-torus inclination becomes more face on, the Spitzer 5.5-30 μm colours become bluer. We show that the [W2-W4] colours for the CLiF AGN (<[W2-W4]> = 5.92 ± 0.12) are intermediate between Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) type 1 (<[W2-W4]> = 5.22 ± 0.01) and type 2 AGN (<[W2-W4]> = 6.35 ± 0.03). This implies that the AGN-torus inclinations for the CLiF AGN are indeed intermediate, supporting the work of Rose, Elvis & Tadhunter. The confirmed relation between CLiF AGN and their viewing angle shows that CLiF AGN may be useful for our understanding of AGN unification.

  8. PRIMUS: The Relationship between Star Formation and AGN Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Mojegan; Aird, James; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Mendez, Alexander J.; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-06-01

    We study the evidence for a connection between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) fueling and star formation by investigating the relationship between the X-ray luminosities of AGNs and the star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. We identify a sample of 309 AGNs with {10}41\\lt {L}X\\lt {10}44 erg s-1 at 0.2\\lt z\\lt 1.2 in the PRIMUS redshift survey. We find AGNs in galaxies with a wide range of SFR at a given LX. We do not find a significant correlation between SFR and the observed instantaneous LX for star-forming AGN host galaxies. However, there is a weak but significant correlation between the mean LX and SFR of detected AGNs in star-forming galaxies, which likely reflects that LX varies on shorter timescales than SFR. We find no correlation between stellar mass and LX within the AGN population. Within both populations of star-forming and quiescent galaxies, we find a similar power-law distribution in the probability of hosting an AGN as a function of specific accretion rate. Furthermore, at a given stellar mass, we find a star-forming galaxy ˜2-3 more likely than a quiescent galaxy to host an AGN of a given specific accretion rate. The probability of a galaxy hosting an AGN is constant across the main sequence of star formation. These results indicate that there is an underlying connection between star formation and the presence of AGNs, but AGNs are often hosted by quiescent galaxies.

  9. Ultra-fast outflows (aka UFOs) from AGNs and QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappi, M.; Tombesi, F.; Giustini, M.

    During the last decade, strong observational evidence has been accumulated for the existence of massive, high velocity winds/outflows (aka Ultra Fast Outflows, UFOs) in nearby AGNs and in more distant quasars. Here we briefly review some of the most recent developments in this field and discuss the relevance of UFOs for both understanding the physics of accretion disk winds in AGNs, and for quantifying the global amount of AGN feedback on the surrounding medium.

  10. Hot Dust Obscured Galaxies with Excess Blue Light: Dual AGN or Single AGN Under Extreme Conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assef, R. J.; Walton, D. J.; Brightman, M.; Stern, D.; Alexander, D.; Bauer, F.; Blain, A. W.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Hickox, R. C.; Tsai, C.-W.; Wu, J. W.

    2016-03-01

    Hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a population of hyper-luminous infrared galaxies identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission from their very red mid-IR colors, and characterized by hot dust temperatures (T > 60 K). Several studies have shown clear evidence that the IR emission in these objects is powered by a highly dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) that shows close to Compton-thick absorption at X-ray wavelengths. Thanks to the high AGN obscuration, the host galaxy is easily observable, and has UV/optical colors usually consistent with those of a normal galaxy. Here we discuss a sub-population of eight Hot DOGs that show enhanced rest-frame UV/optical emission. We discuss three scenarios that might explain the excess UV emission: (i) unobscured light leaked from the AGN by reflection over the dust or by partial coverage of the accretion disk; (ii) a second unobscured AGN in the system; or (iii) a luminous young starburst. X-ray observations can help discriminate between these scenarios. We study in detail the blue excess Hot DOG WISE J020446.13-050640.8, which was serendipitously observed by Chandra/ACIS-I for 174.5 ks. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a single, hyper-luminous, highly absorbed AGN, and is strongly inconsistent with the presence of a secondary unobscured AGN. Based on this, we argue that the excess blue emission in this object is most likely either due to reflection or a co-eval starburst. We favor the reflection scenario as the unobscured star formation rate needed to power the UV/optical emission would be ≳1000 M⊙ yr-1. Deep polarimetry observations could confirm the reflection hypothesis.

  11. A comparative study of AGN feedback algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, J.; Thacker, R. J.

    2013-05-01

    Modelling active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback in numerical simulations is both technically and theoretically challenging, with numerous approaches having been published in the literature. We present a study of five distinct approaches to modelling AGN feedback within gravitohydrodynamic simulations of major mergers of Milky Way-sized galaxies. To constrain differences to only be between AGN feedback models, all simulations start from the same initial conditions and use the same star formation algorithm. Most AGN feedback algorithms have five key aspects: the black hole accretion rate, energy feedback rate and method, particle accretion algorithm, black hole advection algorithm and black hole merger algorithm. All models follow different accretion histories, and in some cases, accretion rates differ by up to three orders of magnitude at any given time. We consider models with either thermal or kinetic feedback, with the associated energy deposited locally around the black hole. Each feedback algorithm modifies the region around the black hole to different extents, yielding gas densities and temperatures within r ˜ 200 pc that differ by up to six orders of magnitude at any given time. The particle accretion algorithms usually maintain good agreement between the total mass accreted by dot{M} dt and the total mass of gas particles removed from the simulation, although not all algorithms guarantee this to be true. The black hole advection algorithms dampen inappropriate dragging of the black holes by two-body interactions. Advecting the black hole a limited distance based upon local mass distributions has many desirably properties, such as avoiding large artificial jumps and allowing the possibility of the black hole remaining in a gas void. Lastly, two black holes instantly merge when given criteria are met, and we find a range of merger times for different criteria. This is important since the AGN feedback rate changes across the merger in a way that is dependent

  12. The AGN origin of cluster magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao

    The origin of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters is one of the most fascinating but challenging problems in astrophysics. In this dissertation, the possibility of an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) origin of cluster magnetic fields is studied through state of the art simulations of magnetic field evolution in large scale structure formation using a newly developed cosmological Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code -- EnzoMHD. After presenting a complete but concise description and verification of the code, we discuss the creation of magnetic fields through the Biermann Battery effect during first star formation and galaxy cluster formation. We find that magnetic fields are produced as predicted by theory in both cases. For the first star formation, we obtain a lower limit of (~ 10 -9 G) for magnetic fields when the first generation stars form. On the other hand, we find that the magnetic energy is amplified 4 orders of magnitude within ~ 10 Gyr during cluster formation. We then study magnetic field injection from AGN into the Intra- Cluster Medium (ICM) and their impact on the ICM. We reproduce the X-ray cavities as well as weak shocks seen in observations in the simulation, and further confirm the idea that AGN outburst must contain lots of magnetic energy (up to 10 61 ergs) and the magnetic fields play an important part in the formation of jet/lobe system. We present high resolution simulations of cluster formation with magnetic fields injected from high redshift AGN. We find that these local magnetic fields are spread quickly throughout the whole cluster by cluster mergers. The ICM is in a turbulent state with a Kolmogorov-like power spectrum. Magnetic fields are amplified to and maintained at the observational level of a few mG by bulk flows at large scale and the ICM turbulence at small scale. The total magnetic energy increases about 25 times to ~ 1.2 × 10^61 ergs at the present time. We conclude that magnetic fields from AGN at high

  13. Identifying Luminous AGN in Deep Surveys: Revised IRAC Selection Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donley, Jennifer; Koekemoer, A. M.; Brusa, M.; Capak, P.; Cardamone, C. N.; Civano, F.; Ilbert, O.; Impey, C. D.; Kartaltepe, J.; Miyaji, T.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Trump, J. R.; Zamorani, G.

    2012-01-01

    Spitzer IRAC selection is a powerful tool for identifying luminous AGN. The AGN selection wedges currently in use, however, are heavily contaminated by star-forming galaxies, especially at high redshift. Using the large samples of luminous AGN and high-redshift star-forming galaxies in COSMOS, we redefine the AGN selection criteria for use in deep IRAC surveys. The new IRAC criteria are designed to be both highly complete and reliable, and incorporate the best aspects of the current AGN selection wedges and of infrared power-law selection while excluding high redshift star-forming galaxies selected via the BzK, DRG, LBG, and SMG criteria. At QSO-luminosities of log L(2-10 keV)>44, the new IRAC criteria recover 75% of the hard X-ray and IRAC-detected XMM-COSMOS sample, yet only 37% of the IRAC AGN candidates have X-ray counterparts, a fraction that rises to 51% in regions with Chandra exposures of 50-160 ks. X-ray stacking of the individually X-ray non-detected AGN candidates leads to a hard X-ray signal indicative of heavily obscured to mildly Compton-thick obscuration (log NH >= 23.7). While IRAC selection recovers a substantial fraction of luminous unobscured and obscured AGN, it is incomplete to low-luminosity and host-dominated AGN.

  14. AGN Variability Surveys: DASCH from BATSS to EXIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, J. E.

    2007-10-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are variable on a wide range of timescales. Combined with their redshifts and thus luminosity, variability was of course instrumental in their initial identification with accretion onto supermassive black holes. Previous broad-band (both spectral and temporal) variability surveys of AGN are limited in their temporal and spectral bandwidth, despite their promise for probing the central engine and black hole mass. We provide a brief summary of three new AGN variability surveys, two (BATSS and DASCH) about to begin and the third (EXIST) possible within the next decade, which will open new windows on the physics and fundamental properties of AGN.

  15. Investigating The AGN Population In Cluster Environments Across Different Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byler, Eleanor; Norman, D.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there is no complete picture of AGN formation and evolution in galaxy clusters. A general understanding of the AGN population has been impeded by cluster and selection biases and recent studies have shown that there is a large population of obscured or optically unremarkable AGN in galaxy clusters. We used SDSS data to look at the AGN distribution in 12 clusters over a range of redshifts (z = 0.16 - 0.35) and compared the optical and X-ray AGN content with that of six `blank’ fields. We found that on average the cluster fields had a small optical AGN excess as compared to blank fields. The AGN population and distribution was also compared by cluster morphology, and non-virialized clusters were found to have a higher X-ray and optical AGN content than virialized clusters. We also compare our optical AGN to Gilmour et al.'s (2009) X-ray survey to compare assumptions made about cluster membership. Byler was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program and the Department of Defense ASSURE program through Scientific Program Order No. 13 (AST-0754223) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF.

  16. Coretta Scott King Award Winner Javaka Steptoe Stands Tall "In Daddy's Arms."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Jackie; Hendershot, Judy

    1999-01-01

    Offers an interview with artist and author Javaka Steptoe, winner of the Coretta Scott King award for his book "In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall: African Americans Celebrating Fathers." Discusses his background in the arts, the variety of media he uses, how he begins thinking about his illustrations, his work with children's art, and aspects of his work.…

  17. Craniodigital syndrome of Scott: clinical and neuroradiological features of a new case.

    PubMed

    Milani, Donatella; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Erbetta, Alessandra; Selicorni, Angelo; Riva, Daria; Pantaleoni, Chiara

    2007-07-01

    We report on a girl presenting with mental retardation, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and syndactyly. The child's mother and maternal grandfather presented bilateral syndactyly of toes 2 and 3. These manifestations, falling within the ambit of what has been termed the craniodigital syndromes, were first reported by Scott et al (1971) in 3 brothers. PMID:17715284

  18. On the role of the weather in the deaths of R. F. Scott and his companions

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Susan; Stearns, Charles R.

    1999-01-01

    Robert Falcon Scott and his companions reached the South Pole in January of 1912, only to die on their return journey at a remote site on the Ross Ice Shelf, about 170 miles from their base camp on the coast. Numerous contributing causes for their deaths have been proposed, but it has been assumed that the cold temperatures they reported encountering on the Ross Ice Shelf, near 82–80°S during their northward trek toward safety, were not unusual. The weather in the region where they perished on their unassisted trek by foot from the Pole remained undocumented for more than half a century, but it has now been monitored by multiple automated weather stations for more than a decade. The data recorded by Scott and his men from late February to March 19, 1912, display daily temperature minima that were on average 10 to 20°F below those obtained in the same region and season since routine modern observations began in 1985. Only 1 year in the available 15 years of measurements from the location where Scott and his men perished displays persistent cold temperatures at this time of year close to those reported in 1912. These remarkably cold temperatures likely contributed substantially to the exhaustion and frostbite Scott and his companions endured, and their deaths were therefore due, at least in part, to the unusual weather conditions they endured during their cold march across the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica. PMID:10557264

  19. The Pleasures and Lessons of Academic Mythbusting: An Interview with Scott Lilienfeld

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinn, Tracy E.

    2010-01-01

    Scott O. Lilienfeld is a professor of psychology at Emory University, in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Lilienfeld is founder and editor of the journal, "Scientific Review of Mental Health Practice," and is past president of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology. He has been a member of 11 journal editorial boards, including the "Journal of…

  20. The Francis Scott Key School, Locust Point, Baltimore, Maryland. Bulletin, 1920, No. 41

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Charles A.

    1921-01-01

    Some time ago the Commissioner of Education was requested to offer advice in regard to the reorganization of the Francis Scott Key School, to meet more effectively the needs of its children and the adult population of that section, and to suggest plans for a building to be so constructed as to adapt it to the use of the school so reorganized. In…

  1. A Conversation with Sharon Draper, Winner of the 1998 Coretta Scott King Award.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendershot, Judy; Peck, Jackie

    1999-01-01

    Offers an interview with teacher and author Sharon Draper (winner of the 1998 Coretta Scott King Award), describing her life as a high school educator and as an author of novels, chapter books, and poetry for a wide range of readers. (SR)

  2. Orson Scott Card's "Ender and Bean": The Exceptional Child as Hero

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Orson Scott Card's school stories in outer space, "Ender's Game" and "Ender's Shadow," purportedly occur at the same time and tell the "same" story, but from the perspectives of two different child protagonists. Scenes in "Ender's Shadow" even reproduce text from "Ender's Game." Nevertheless, 14 years elapsed between the publications of the two…

  3. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with Scott McLeod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Scott McLeod is recognized as one of the nation's leading experts on K-12 school technology leadership issues. After 14 years as an Educational Leadership professor, Dr. McLeod currently serves as the Director of Innovation for Prairie Lakes Area Education Agency in Iowa. He also is the Founding Director of the UCEA Center for the Advanced Study…

  4. Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Elementary Mathematics. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report. Updated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Elementary Mathematics" is a core mathematics curriculum for students in prekindergarten through grade 6. The program aims to improve students' understanding of key math concepts through problem-solving instruction, hands-on activities, and math problems that involve reading and writing. The curriculum focuses on…

  5. A New Way of Thinking about Technology: An Interview with Futurists Joel Barker and Scott Erickson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.; Barker, Joel; Erickson, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Editor-in-chief James Morrison interviews Joel Barker and Scott Erickson, co-authors of the book "Five Regions of the Future: A New Way to Think about Technology". In their book, the authors propose an ecological model that classifies technology according to different clusters or regions, each of which entails its own perspective of technology and…

  6. Raise Test Scores without Selling Your Soul: An Interview with Scott Mandel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    With his 10th book, Improving Test Scores: A Practical Approach for Teachers and Administrators, Scott Mandel outlines steps educators can take to boost achievement on standardized exams while maintaining the integrity of their day-to-day teaching. Mandel, who holds a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction from USC, teaches history and English at…

  7. Astronaut David Scott on slope of Hadley Delta during Apollo 15 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott, mission commander, with tongs and gnomon in hand, studies a boulder on the slope of Hadley Delta during the Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) or Rover is in right foreground. View is looking slightly south of west. 'Bennett Hill' is at extreme right. Astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, took this photograph.

  8. Teaching One Way and Testing Another: An Interview with Scott Howell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.; Howell, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Editor-in-Chief James L. Morrison interviews Scott Howell, the co-editor of a three-volume book series entitled "Online Assessment and Measurement" that was published in 2006 by IDEA Group. In discussing his own research, Howell first highlights the value of test blueprints as a valuable tool for ensuring an effective alignment of assessment…

  9. Statement of Facts for 1994 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. Scott Walker v. Tanya Brewster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its 23rd annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides the material for a mock civil trial over an accidental shooting. Thirteen-year-old T. J. Walker, Scott Walker's son from a previous marriage, visited the home of 5-year-old Jesse Walker with a pistol…

  10. Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Elementary Mathematics. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Elementary Mathematics" is a core curriculum for students at all ability levels in prekindergarten through grade 6. The program supports students' understanding of key math concepts and skills and covers a range of mathematical content across grades. The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) reviewed 12 studies on "Scott…

  11. James Edward Scott: The Leadership Journey of a Senior-Level African American Student Affairs Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Salatha T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, understand, and describe the life, leadership, and influence of Dr. James Edward Scott on higher education and more specifically student affairs; as one of the most well-known and respected African American male chief student affairs officers in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Using a qualitative…

  12. 77 FR 7182 - Scott W. Houghton, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... Respondent lacks such state authority, both the plain language of applicable federal statutory provisions and... practitioner who lacks .'' Roy Chi Lung, 74 FR 20346, 20347 (2009); Scott Sandarg, D.M.D., 74 FR 17528, 174529 (2009); John B. Freitas, D.O., 74 FR 17524, 17525 (2009); Roger A. Rodriguez, M.D., 70 FR 33206,...

  13. Conservation assessment for the Siskiyou Mountains salamander and Scott Bar salamander in northern California.

    SciTech Connect

    Vinikour, W. S.; LaGory, K. E.; Adduci, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-10-20

    The purpose of this conservation assessment is to summarize existing knowledge regarding the biology and ecology of the Siskiyou Mountains salamander and Scott Bar salamander, identify threats to the two species, and identify conservation considerations to aid federal management for persistence of the species. The conservation assessment will serve as the basis for a conservation strategy for the species.

  14. 78 FR 77791 - Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad Corporation-Abandonment Exemption-in Scott County, Iowa

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad Corporation--Abandonment Exemption--in Scott County, Iowa Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad Corporation d/b/a Canadian Pacific (DM&E)...

  15. 78 FR 18633 - Notice of Public Meeting of Fort Scott Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... new national center focused on service and leadership development. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The... establishment of a new national center (Center) focused on service and leadership development, with specific... leadership at Fort Scott in the Presidio of San Francisco; (b) providing recommendations related to...

  16. On the role of the weather in the deaths of R. F. Scott and his companions.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; Stearns, C R

    1999-11-01

    Robert Falcon Scott and his companions reached the South Pole in January of 1912, only to die on their return journey at a remote site on the Ross Ice Shelf, about 170 miles from their base camp on the coast. Numerous contributing causes for their deaths have been proposed, but it has been assumed that the cold temperatures they reported encountering on the Ross Ice Shelf, near 82-80 degrees S during their northward trek toward safety, were not unusual. The weather in the region where they perished on their unassisted trek by foot from the Pole remained undocumented for more than half a century, but it has now been monitored by multiple automated weather stations for more than a decade. The data recorded by Scott and his men from late February to March 19, 1912, display daily temperature minima that were on average 10 to 20 degrees F below those obtained in the same region and season since routine modern observations began in 1985. Only 1 year in the available 15 years of measurements from the location where Scott and his men perished displays persistent cold temperatures at this time of year close to those reported in 1912. These remarkably cold temperatures likely contributed substantially to the exhaustion and frostbite Scott and his companions endured, and their deaths were therefore due, at least in part, to the unusual weather conditions they endured during their cold march across the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica. PMID:10557264

  17. Modernity in Two Great American Writers' Vision: Ernest Miller Hemingway and Scott Fitzgerald

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshmiri, Fahimeh; Darzikola, Shahla Sorkhabi

    2016-01-01

    Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, American memorable novelists have had philosophic ideas about modernity. In fact their idea about existential interests of American, and the effects of American system on society, is mirrored in their creative works. All through his early works, Fitzgerald echoes the existential center of his era. Obviously,…

  18. Astronaut Scott Carpenter recieves call from President on U.S.S. Intrepid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter, prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 7 (MA-7) mission, talks with President John F. Kennedy via radio-telephone from aboard the carrier U.S.S. Intrepid. Carpenter was recovered by a helicopter and taken to the U.S.S. Intrepid after a 4 hour and 56 minute mission in space.

  19. "I Have a Dream, Too!": The American Dream in Coretta Scott King Award-Winning Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Linda T.; Castleman, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The Coretta Scott King (CSK) Award, instituted in 1969 and recognized as an official award by the American Library Association (ALA) in 1982, is conferred annually to an African American author and an illustrator for their outstanding contributions to literature about the Black experience for children and young adults. A partial impetus for the…

  20. Are the hosts of VLBI-selected radio-AGN different to those of radio-loud AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, G. A.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Herrera-Ruiz, N.; Middelberg, E.

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have found that radio-AGN selected by radio-loudness show little difference in terms of their host galaxy properties when compared to non-AGN galaxies of similar stellar mass and redshift. Using new 1.4 GHz very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the Cosmological Evolution Survey field, we find that approximately 49 ± 8 per cent of high-mass (M > 1010.5 M⊙), high-luminosity (L1.4 > 1024 W Hz-1) radio-AGN possess a VLBI-detected counterpart. These objects show no discernible bias towards specific stellar masses, redshifts or host properties other than what is shown by the radio-AGN population in general. Radio-AGN that are detected in VLBI observations are not special, but form a representative sample of the radio-loud AGN population.

  1. Investigating AGN Variability Using Combined Multi-Quarter Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revalski, Mitchell; Nowak, D.; Wiita, P. J.; Wehrle, A. E.; Unwin, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The study of long and short term variability in active galactic nuclei (AGN) yields deeper insight into the physical nature of their emissions from the accretion disk around, and relativistic jets powered by, a galaxy’s central super-massive black hole. We have now obtained a total of eleven quarters of Kepler data on four radio-loud AGN. Our prior work involved calculating power spectral densities (PSDs) on these data both with and without corrections for various instrumental artifacts. We now focus on combining these data sets into one continuous set for each object which spans approximately 2.5 years at a 30 minute sampling rate with >98% duty cycle. The process of stringing together these data is complicated by the quarterly rolls the Kepler space satellite telescope conducts, which causes each target to fall on a different CCD four times per year. We attempt to overcome this problem with a scaling procedure that maintains the original percentage of variations and scales all eleven quarters to the overall average. We calculate PSDs on these stitched light curves both with and without various end-matching techniques applied to increase the accuracy of the PSDs. The PSDs computed for the stitched light curves allow us to probe a full decade lower in frequency than our previous work and show comparable slopes to the PSDs calculated for individual quarters, suggesting we are linking the quarters appropriately. Our average PSD slopes are consistent with ground based observations of other quasars, falling approximately between -1.6 and -1.9. In addition, we have used original codes to bin and average individual PSDs to reduce the bias introduced on the slope fitting process induced by the uneven population of points in the PSDs. This allows for a more accurate power law fitting and tends to steepen the overall slope by approximately 0.1 in the majority of cases. We note increased flaring in one of our objects on the order of 15%, with our remaining three objects

  2. Long-term Variation of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Xie, G. Z.; Adam, G.; Copin, Y.; Lin, R. G.; Bai, J. M.; Quin, Y. P.

    In this paper we will present the long-term variation in the optical and the infrared bands for some selected AGNs. 1. Some new optical data observed by us have been presented for BL Lacertae (1995-1996) and OJ 287 (1994-1995), and new infrared data are presented for OJ 287 (Nov=2E 1995), which corresponds to the second optical peak (Sillanpaa et al. 1996; Takalo et al. 1996) and during last outburst. 2. For objects with long term observations, the Jurkevich's method has been used to analyses the long-term variation period. It is interesting that the reported periods of AGNs are of the similar value of about 10 years: 3C 345 11.4 years (Webb et al. 1988), 3C 120 15 years (Belokon et al. 1987; Hagen-Thorn et al. 1997), ON 231 13.6 years (Liu et al. 1995), OJ 287 12 years (Sillanpaa et al. 1988; Kidger et al. 1992), PKS 0735+178 14 years (Fan et al. 1997), NGC 4151 15 years (Fan et al. 1998a), BL Lacertae 14.0 years (Fan et al. 1998b). Is the mechanism for the long-term variation the same for different AGNs? 3. The DCF method has been adopted to analysis the variation correlation in the optical and infrared bands for BL Lac object OJ 287, the results show that these two bands are strongly correlated, which suggest that the emission mechanism in the two bands is the same. 4. For the optical and infrared bands, the maximum variations are correlated.

  3. Optical variability of the Kepler AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelson, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Kepler has opened a new era for the study of AGN optical variability, producing light curves with ~0.1% errors (for a ~15th magnitude source), 30 min sampling, >90% duty cycle and durations of years. Thanks to an intensive identification campaign, the number of Seyfert 1s/quasars monitored by Kepler rose from just one (Zw 229-15) in the first year to 37 by the time of May 2013 reaction wheel failure. We measured the optical power spectral density (PSD) functions of these Kepler AGN finding that that on timescales of ~6 hr to 1 month, the PSDs are typically well-fitted with a slop of ~-3, steeper than seen in the X-rays. In a few sources there is also evidence for a flattening at the longest timescales. We also find a broad correlation between rms variability and flux level. These results broadly support the model in which the optical fluctuations are due to vicious instabilities in the accretion disk. I will also present the light curve for W2R1926+42, the only rapidly variable BL Lac object known to be monitored by Kepler. With data covering over a year and sampling rates of 1-30 min, this may be the information-richest AGN light curve ever gathered at any wavelength. The PSD appears to bend from a slope of -2.6 to -1.2 on a ~7 hr timescale, but fits are formally unacceptable. These data indicate that the phenomenon of blazar "microvariability" (sporadic variations on timescales shorter than the ~12 hour window available from the ground) actually results from a combination of rapid, powerful variability interspersed with longer, relatively quiescent periods.

  4. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  5. The Starburst-AGN Connection under the Multiwavelength Limelight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guainazzi, Matteo

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of a tight relation between supermassive black hole masses, the bulge luminosity, and the stellar velocity dispersion in the local universe galaxies, mounting experimental evidence has been collected pointing to a connection between nuclear activity and star formation over a wide range of redshifts. Although a growing number of galaxies from different samples exhibit simultaneous starburst and AGN phenomenology, it is still a matter of debate whether this is the smoking gun of a causal relation between them, and, if so, with which trend. Basic issues in modern astrophysics, such as the evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes, AGN feeding and feedback to the interstellar and intergalactic medium, as well as the role played by the environment on the star formation history are related to this "Starburst-AGN Connection". This Workshop aims at gathering observational and theoretical astronomers so as to answer the following questions: * The "Starburst-AGN Connection": A causal relation? * "Starburst-AGN Connection" at low and high redshift: any evidence for evolution? * Is there a connection between AGN obscuration and star formation? * In which way are the star formation and AGN phenomena affected by the environment? * Do stars contribute to AGN fueling? Multiwavelength observations in the last decade have given a paramount contribution to improve our understanding in this field. The Workshop will build on this panoptic view, and aims at contributing to the scientific case of future ground-based and space large observatories.

  6. Propiedades de los AGNs oscurecidos y no oscurecidos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, M.; Bornancini, C.

    In this work we analyze the properties of obscured and unobscured AGNs selected from the "Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile" (MUSYC). The sample of AGNs was selected base on their mid-infrared colors ([3.6], [4.5], [5.8] y [8.0] μm), from images obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We select obscured and unobscured AGN samples using a simple criterion based on the observed optical to mid-IR color with limits R - [4.5] = 3.04 (AB system) and with redshifts in the range 1 < z < 3. Obscured AGNs are intrinsically optically faint in the R band, suggesting that luminous IR- selected AGNs have significant dust extinction. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  7. Uncovering AGN Fueling and Feedback in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2014-09-01

    While massive black holes (BHs) are ubiquitous in massive galaxies, their presence in dwarf galaxies is less certain. This constitutes a major gap in our understanding of BH-galaxy co-evolution. Identifying low-mass BHs in local dwarfs could also constrain BH seed formation at high z. Active BHs in dwarfs can reveal BH fueling and feedback in a vastly different regime than the well-studied AGN in massive hosts. Most AGN feedback models focus on the latter, as star formation is thought to suffice to drive feedback in dwarfs. However, AGN are increasingly found in dwarfs, where their effect on hosts may be most dramatic. We propose an unprecedented program to detect and characterize AGN fueling and feedback in the low-mass regime, using a unique sample of Swift-BAT AGN in dwarf

  8. Anchoring the AGN X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, John

    2003-09-01

    Knowledge of the AGN LF over a range of luminosities and redshifts is crucial to understanding the accretion history of supermassive blackholes. Much of the CXRB has been resolved and spectroscopic follow-up has revealed a mixed bag of object types at moderate to high redshifts. For the deep Chandra survey results to be useful in studying the evolution of the XLF, a representative sample of local AGNs of various types with known X-ray luminosities is needed. The new KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS) provides the best available sample of H-alpha selected Type 1 and 2 AGNs to serve as the baseline for XLF evolution studies. We propose to observe a volume-limited sample of 28 KISS AGNs to assess their X-ray emission characteristics and establish the local AGN XLF.

  9. The PEP survey: infrared properties of radio-selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Lutz, D.; Rosario, D.; Berta, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Santini, P.

    2014-07-01

    By exploiting the VLA-COSMOS and the Herschel-PEP surveys, we investigate the far-infrared (FIR) properties of radio-selected AGN. To this purpose, from VLA-COSMOS we considered the 1537, F1.4 GHz ≥ 0.06 mJy sources with a reliable redshift estimate, and sub-divided them into star-forming galaxies and AGN solely on the basis of their radio luminosity. The AGN sample is complete with respect to radio selection at all z ≲ 3.5. 832 radio sources have a counterpart in the PACS Evolutionary Probe catalogue. 175 are AGN. Their redshift distribution closely resembles that of the total radio-selected AGN population, and exhibits two marked peaks at z ˜ 0.9 and 2.5. We find that the probability for a radio-selected AGN to be detected at FIR wavelengths is both a function of radio power and redshift, whereby powerful sources are more likely to be FIR emitters at earlier epochs. This is due to two distinct effects: (1) at all radio luminosities, FIR activity monotonically increases with look-back time and (2) radio activity of AGN origin is increasingly less effective at inhibiting FIR emission. Radio-selected AGN with FIR emission are preferentially located in galaxies which are smaller than those hosting FIR-inactive sources. Furthermore, at all z ≲ 2, there seems to be a preferential (stellar) mass scale M* ˜ [1010-1011] M⊙ which maximizes the chances for FIR emission. We find such FIR (and mid-infrared) emission to be due to processes indistinguishable from those which power star-forming galaxies. It follows that radio emission in at least 35 per cent of the entire AGN population is the sum of two contributions: AGN accretion and star-forming processes within the host galaxy.

  10. A UV to mid-IR study of AGN selection

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stern, Daniel; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Moustakas, John

    2014-07-20

    We classify the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 431,038 sources in the 9 deg{sup 2} Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). There are up to 17 bands of data available per source, including ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (NDWFS), near-IR (NEWFIRM), and mid-infrared (IRAC and MIPS) data, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for ∼20,000 objects, primarily from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. We fit galaxy, active galactic nucleus (AGN), stellar, and brown dwarf templates to the observed SEDs, which yield spectral classes for the Galactic sources and photometric redshifts and galaxy/AGN luminosities for the extragalactic sources. The photometric redshift precision of the galaxy and AGN samples are σ/(1 + z) = 0.040 and σ/(1 + z) = 0.169, respectively, with the worst 5% outliers excluded. On the basis of the χ{sub ν}{sup 2} of the SED fit for each SED model, we are able to distinguish between Galactic and extragalactic sources for sources brighter than I = 23.5 mag. We compare the SED fits for a galaxy-only model and a galaxy-AGN model. Using known X-ray and spectroscopic AGN samples, we confirm that SED fitting can be successfully used as a method to identify large populations of AGNs, including spatially resolved AGNs with significant contributions from the host galaxy and objects with the emission line ratios of 'composite' spectra. We also use our results to compare with the X-ray, mid-IR, optical color, and emission line ratio selection techniques. For an F-ratio threshold of F > 10, we find 16,266 AGN candidates brighter than I = 23.5 mag and a surface density of ∼1900 AGN deg{sup –2}.

  11. Does the obscured AGN fraction really depend on luminosity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.

    2015-12-01

    We use a sample of 151 local non-blazar active galactic nuclei (AGN) selected from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray survey to investigate if the observed declining trend of the fraction of obscured (i.e. showing X-ray absorption) AGN with increasing luminosity is mostly an intrinsic or selection effect. Using a torus-obscuration model, we demonstrate that in addition to negative bias, due to absorption in the torus, in finding obscured AGN in hard X-ray flux-limited surveys, there is also positive bias in finding unobscured AGN, due to Compton reflection in the torus. These biases can be even stronger taking into account plausible intrinsic collimation of hard X-ray emission along the axis of the obscuring torus. Given the AGN luminosity function, which steepens at high luminosities, these observational biases lead to a decreasing observed fraction of obscured AGN with increasing luminosity even if this fraction has no intrinsic luminosity dependence. We find that if the central hard X-ray source in AGN is isotropic, the intrinsic (i.e. corrected for biases) obscured AGN fraction still shows a declining trend with luminosity, although the intrinsic obscured fraction is significantly larger than the observed one: the actual fraction is larger than ˜85 per cent at L ≲ 1042.5 erg s-1 (17-60 keV), and decreases to ≲60 per cent at L ≳ 1044 erg s-1. In terms of the half-opening angle θ of an obscuring torus, this implies that θ ≲ 30° in lower luminosity AGN, and θ ≳ 45° in higher luminosity ones. If, however, the emission from the central supermassive black hole is collimated as dL/dΩ ∝ cos α, the intrinsic dependence of the obscured AGN fraction is consistent with a luminosity-independent torus half-opening angle θ ˜ 30°.

  12. Extremely efficient Zevatron in rotating AGN magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanov, Z.; Mahajan, S.; Machabeli, G.; Chkheidze, N.

    2014-12-01

    A novel model of particle acceleration in the magnetospheres of rotating active galactic nuclei (AGN) is constructed. The particle energies may be boosted up to 1021 eV in a two-step mechanism: in the first stage, the Langmuir waves are centrifugally excited and amplified by means of a parametric process that efficiently pumps rotational energy to excite electrostatic fields. In the second stage, the electrostatic energy is transferred to particle kinetic energy via Landau damping made possible by rapid `Langmuir collapse'. The time-scale for parametric pumping of Langmuir waves turns out to be small compared to the kinematic time-scale, indicating high efficiency of the first process. The second process of `Langmuir collapse' - the creation of caverns or low-density regions - also happens rapidly for the characteristic parameters of the AGN magnetosphere. The Langmuir collapse creates appropriate conditions for transferring electric energy to boost up already high particle energies to much higher values. It is further shown that various energy loss mechanism are relatively weak, and do not impose any significant constraints on maximum achievable energies.

  13. Extending the Fermi - Swift Joint AGN Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, Chris R.; Macomb, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Swift BAT and the Fermi LAT each provide excellent sky coverage and have led to impressive compilations of extragalactic source catalogs. For the most part they sample separate AGN subpopulations - Swift the lower-luminosity and relatively nearby Seyfert galaxies while the Fermi sample is dominated by blazars and does not include any radio-quiet objects. The overlap between these samples is among the radio-loud subset of the Swift sample as has been discussed elsewhere in the literature. The observable properties at these two bands - flux and spectral indices - are not expected to be well correlated as they sample different portions of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) spectral energy distribution. In this contribution we consider an extension of the high-latitude Swift sample by relaxing the significance cut to less than 5 standard deviations and consider the overlap of that subsample with the Fermi AGN catalog. While such a threshold is generally inadvisable as it introduces the strong possibility of spurious detections, the objects of the overlapping sample which are detected at high significance in Fermi can be considered as reasonably high-confidence Swift detections. For example, there are 190 Swift sub-5-sigma Swift sources that have significance >2-sigma with Fermi counterparts, whereas we predict only ~5 due to statistical fluctuation. We also investigate any coincident INTEGRAL/IBIS observations to further bolster or diminish candidate Swift detections. We present our correlation analyses and offer interpretation in the context of the blazar sequence.

  14. Blood and the Revenant in Walter Scott's The Fair Maid of Perth.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    In Sir Walter Scott's The Fair Maid of Perth; or St Valentine's Day (1828), the resuscitated subject is referred to as a revenant, a term that Scott borrowed from Henry Thomson's Blackwoodian tale 'Le Revenant' (1827), meaning 'dead-alive'. Taking its cue from the sanguinary subtext of The Fair Maid of Perth, which is fascinated with the shedding of blood and transfusion of fluids, this chapter reads the Scottish revenant as a literary reflection on the extraordinary promise of blood transfusion in the 1820s: that death could be understood as a process, rather than an absolute state, and that medical intervention could restore life to those on the brink of death and even to the recently deceased. PMID:27132355

  15. Surviving Rescue: A Feminist Reading of Scott O'Dell's "Island of the Blue Dolphins"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baecker, Diann L.

    2007-01-01

    Scott O'Dell's "Island of the Blue Dolphins" tells the archetypal story of the young, virgin, orphan girl who is vulnerable to either debauchery or rescue. That such a girl must succumb to either one or the other is a necessary element of the archetype. In O'Dell's work--one intended, after all, for children--the heroine is rescued by a…

  16. Chemical and mechanical denudation rates in the Scott River catchment (Svalbard) during the summer season 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmiel, Stanisław; Bartoszewski, Stefan; Siwek, Krzysztof; Sposób, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Chemical and mechanical denudation rates were calculated i. a. for the Scott River (Scottelva) catchment (NW part of Wedel Jarlsberg Land - Svalbard). Runoff was recorded from 14th of July until 1st of September, 2005. Daily water samples were collected in order to determine the ion composition and suspended sediment. In the research period 5,120·103 m3 of water outflowed, which-corresponded to 1,201 dm3·s-1 of average discharge, 506 mm of runoff index and 119 dm3·s-1·km-2 of specific runoff. The chemical denudation rate for the Scott River catchment was 0.24 to 0.70 t·km-2·day-1, 0.50 t·km-2·day-1 on average in the research period. The mechanical denudation rate for the Scott River catchment was 2.53 t·km-2·day-1 on average and changed in the range from 0.32 do 18.2 t·km-2·day-1.

  17. Exploring cell apoptosis and senescence to understand and treat cancer: an interview with Scott Lowe

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scott W. Lowe is currently principal investigator at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. After beginning his studies in chemical engineering, he decided to take another path and became fascinated by biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, which ultimately led to an interest in human disease, particularly cancer. During his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Scott had the opportunity to benefit from the exceptional mentorship of Earl Ruley, David Housman and Tyler Jacks, and contributed to elucidating how the p53 (TP53) tumor suppressor gene limits oncogenic transformation and modulates the cytotoxic response to conventional chemotherapy. This important work earned him a fellowship from the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which helped to launch his independent career. Scott is now a leading scientist in the cancer field and his work has helped to shed light on mechanisms of cell apoptosis and senescence to better understand and treat cancer. In this interview, he talks about this incredible scientific journey. PMID:26512122

  18. Exploring cell apoptosis and senescence to understand and treat cancer: an interview with Scott Lowe.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Scott; Cifra, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    Scott W. Lowe is currently principal investigator at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. After beginning his studies in chemical engineering, he decided to take another path and became fascinated by biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, which ultimately led to an interest in human disease, particularly cancer. During his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Scott had the opportunity to benefit from the exceptional mentorship of Earl Ruley, David Housman and Tyler Jacks, and contributed to elucidating how the p53 (TP53) tumor suppressor gene limits oncogenic transformation and modulates the cytotoxic response to conventional chemotherapy. This important work earned him a fellowship from the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which helped to launch his independent career. Scott is now a leading scientist in the cancer field and his work has helped to shed light on mechanisms of cell apoptosis and senescence to better understand and treat cancer. In this interview, he talks about this incredible scientific journey. PMID:26512122

  19. Structure Function Analysis of AGN Variability using Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2014-06-01

    We study the variability properties of AGN light-curves observed by the Kepler satellite. AGN optical fluxes are known to exhibit stochastic variations on time-scales of hours, days, months and years. Previous efforts to characterize the stochastic nature of this variability have been hampered by the lack of high-precision space-based measurements of AGN fluxes with regular cadence. Kepler provides light-curves with a S/N ratio of 10-5 for 87 AGN observed over a period of ~ 3 years with a cadence of once every 30 minutes allowing for a detailed examination of the variability process. We probe AGN variability using the Structure Functions of the light-curves of the Kepler AGN. Monte-Carlo simulations of the structure function are used to fit the observed light-curve to models for the Power Spectral Density. We test various models for the form of the PSD including the damped random walk and the powered exponential models. We show that on the shorter time-scales probed by Kepler data, the damped random walk model fails to adequately characterize AGN variability. We find that the PSD may be better modelled by combination of a steep power law of the form 1/f3 on shorter time-scales, and a more shallow power law of the form 1/f2 on the longer time-scales traditionally probed by ground-based variability studies.

  20. Star Formation Quenching and Identifying AGN in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Alexander; Coil, A. L.; Lotz, J. M.; Aird, J.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Moustakas, J.; Salim, S.; Simard, L.; Blanton, M. R.; Eisenstein, D.; Wong, K. C.; Cool, R. J.; Zhu, G.; PRIMUS; AEGIS

    2014-01-01

    I will discuss two observational projects related to galaxy and active galactic nuclei (AGN) evolution at z < 1. First I will present a statistical study of the morphologies of galaxies in which star formation is being shut down or quenched; this has implications for how red, elliptical galaxies are formed. I will discuss the physical processes behind star formation quenching from the morphological transformations that galaxies undergo during this process. Then I will focus on multi-wavelength AGN selection methods and tie together disparate results in the literature. Several IR-AGN selection methods have been developed using Spitzer/IRAC data in order to supplement traditional X-ray AGN selection; I will characterize the uniqueness and complementarity of these methods as a function of both IR and X-ray depth. I will use data from the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) to compare the efficiency of IR and X-ray AGN selection and discuss the properties of the AGN and host galaxy populations of each. Finally, I will briefly mention ongoing work to compare the clustering of observed IR and X-ray AGN samples relative to stellar mass-matched galaxy samples.

  1. Spectral decomposition of broad-line agns and host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Shen, Jiajian; Yip, Ching-Wa; Schneider, Donald P.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Burton, Ross E.; Jester, Sebastian; Hall, Patrick B.; Szalay, Alex S.; Brinkmann, John; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-09-01

    Using an eigenspectrum decomposition technique, we separate the host galaxy from the broad line active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a set of 4666 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), from redshifts near zero up to about 0.75. The decomposition technique uses separate sets of galaxy and quasar eigenspectra to efficiently and reliably separate the AGN and host spectroscopic components. The technique accurately reproduces the host galaxy spectrum, its contributing fraction, and its classification. We show how the accuracy of the decomposition depends upon S/N, host galaxy fraction, and the galaxy class. Based on the eigencoefficients, the sample of SDSS broad-line AGN host galaxies spans a wide range of spectral types, but the distribution differs significantly from inactive galaxies. In particular, post-starburst activity appears to be much more common among AGN host galaxies. The luminosities of the hosts are much higher than expected for normal early-type galaxies, and their colors become increasingly bluer than early-type galaxies with increasing host luminosity. Most of the AGNs with detected hosts are emitting at between 1% and 10% of their estimated Eddington luminosities, but the sensitivity of the technique usually does not extend to the Eddington limit. There are mild correlations among the AGN and host galaxy eigencoefficients, possibly indicating a link between recent star formation and the onset of AGN activity. The catalog of spectral reconstruction parameters is available as an electronic table.

  2. Compton Thick AGN in the XMM-COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Perna, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Gruppioni, C.; Comastri, A.

    2016-06-01

    I will present results we published in two recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 578A 120) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^{24} cm^{-2}) AGN, in the XMM-COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems. We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^{25} cm^{-2}), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field, and to the unrivaled XMM sensitivity. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line. The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.

  3. Cadence Requirements for AGN Accretion Studies with LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jackeline; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Kasliwal, Vishal P.

    2016-01-01

    We test various samplings of mock AGN lightcurves to determine minimum cadence requirements for future technologies like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). AGN lightcurves exhibit stochastic behavior, with variability seen in ground-based optical surveys on timescales from days to years. Significant variability structure on timescales up to a few days was revealed by the high time resolution (~30 minutes) of Kepler Satellite. Now it is apparent that under-sampling by ground based instruments may be leaving out a big chunk of the AGN accretion picture. To probe Kepler AGN, recent studies have investigated the suitability of sophisticated models like CARMA processes to better understand dominant mechanisms driving observed variability across these timescales. By testing models against AGN photometry, we gain insights about accretion physics, intrinsic differences between AGN sub-types, and physical scales pertaining to orbits or casually connected matter flows. We investigate cadence, time window, and regularity requirements that accurately recover parameters of our model lightcurves constructed with a CARMA process and observations such that ground based telescopes can optimally collect data for AGN science.

  4. Studying AGN Feedback with Galactic Outflows in Luminous Obscured Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Feedback from Active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been proposed as an important quenching mechanism to suppress star formation in massive galaxies. We investigate the most direct form of AGN feedback - galactic outflows - in the most luminous obscured AGN (L>10^45 erg/s) from the SDSS sample in the nearby universe (z<0.2). Using ALMA and Magellan observations to target molecular and ionized outflows, we find that luminous AGN can impact the dynamics and phase of the galactic medium, and confirm the complex multi-phase and multi-scaled nature of the feedback phenomenon. In particular, we found that most of these luminous AGN hosts ionized outflows. The outflow size, velocity, and energetics correlate with the AGN luminosity, and can be very extended (r > 10 kpc) and fast (v > 1000 km/s) for the most luminous ones. I end with presenting a new technique to find extended ionized outflows using broadband imaging surveys, and to characterize their occurrence rate, morphology, size distribution, and their dependence on the AGN luminosity. This technique will open a new window for feedback studies in the era of large-scale optical imaging surveys, e.g., HSC and then LSST.

  5. Mid-infrared diagnostics to distinguish AGNs from starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, O.; Mirabel, I. F.; Charmandaris, V.; Gallais, P.; Madden, S. C.; Sauvage, M.; Vigroux, L.; Cesarsky, C.

    2000-07-01

    We present new mid-infrared (MIR) diagnostics to distinguish emission of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from that originating in starburst regions. Our method uses empirical spectroscopic criteria based on the fact that MIR emission from star forming or active galaxies arises mostly from HII regions, photo-dissociation regions (PDRs) and AGNs. The analysis of the strength of the 6.2 mu m Unidentified Infrared Band (UIB) and the MIR continuum shows that UIBs are very faint or absent in regions harboring the intense and hard radiation fields of AGNs and pure HII regions, where the UIB carriers could be destroyed. The MIR signature of AGNs is the presence of an important continuum in the 3-10 mu m band which originates from very hot dust heated by the intense AGN radiation field. Using these two distinct spectral properties found in our MIR templates, we build diagnostic diagrams which provide quantitative estimates of the AGN, PDR and HII region contribution in a given MIR spectrum. This new MIR classification can be used to reveal the presence of AGNs highly obscured by large columns of dust. Based on observations made with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  6. Compton Thick AGN in the XMM-COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Perna, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Gruppioni, C.; Comastri, A.

    2016-06-01

    I will present results we published in two recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A≈A 578A 120) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^{24} cm^{-2}) AGN, in the XMM-COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems. We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^{25} cm^{-2}), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field, and to the unrivaled XMM sensitivity. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line. The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.

  7. Absorption-line measurements of AGN outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Dale L.

    Investigations into the elemental abundances in two nearby active galaxies, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 Markarian 1044 and the Seyfert 1 Markarian 279, are reported. Spectra from three space-based observatories HST, FUSE, and CHANDRA, are used to measure absorption lines in material outflowing from the nucleus. I make multi-wavelength comparisons to better convert the ionic column densities into elemental column densities which can then be used to determine abundances (metallicities). Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are known to have extreme values of a number of properties compared to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as a class. In particular, emission-line studies have suggested that NLS1s are unusually metal-rich compared to broad-line AGNs of comparable luminosity. To test these suggestions I perform absorption-line studies on the NLS1 Markarian 1044, a nearby and bright AGN. I use lines of H I, C IV, N V, and O VI to properly make the photoionization correction through the software Cloudy and determine abundances of Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen. I find two results. The first is that Markarian 1044 has a bulk metallicity greater than five times solar. The second is that the N/C ratio in Markarian 1044 is consistent with a solar mixture. This is in direct contradiction of extrapolations from local H II regions which state N/ C should scale with bulk metallicity. This implies a different enrichment history in Markarian 1044 than in the Galactic disk. I also report discovery of three new low-redshift Lya forest lines with log N HI >= 12:77 in the spectrum of Markarian 1044. This number is consistent with the 2.6 expected Lya forest lines in the path length to Markarian 1044. I also investigate the CHANDRA X-ray spectrum of Markarian 279, a broad-line Seyfert 1. I use a new code, PHASE, to self-consistently model the entire absorption spectrum simultaneously. Using solely the X-ray spectrum I am able to determine the physical parameters of this absorber to a degree only

  8. The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danae Griffin, Rhiannon; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.; Nugent, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    The Swift active galactic nucleus (AGN) and Cluster Survey (SACS) uses 125 deg^2 of Swift X-ray Telescope serendipitous fields with variable depths surrounding X-ray bursts to provide a medium depth (4 × 10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and area survey filling the gap between deep, narrow Chandra/XMM-Newton surveys and wide, shallow ROSAT surveys. Here, we present the first two papers in a series of publications for SACS. In the first paper, we introduce our method and catalog of 22,563 point sources and 442 extended sources. We examine the number counts of the AGN and galaxy cluster populations. SACS provides excellent constraints on the AGN number counts at the bright end with negligible uncertainties due to cosmic variance, and these constraints are consistent with previous measurements. The depth and areal coverage of SACS is well suited for galaxy cluster surveys outside the local universe, reaching z ˜ 1 for massive clusters. In the second paper, we use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 data to study the 203 extended SACS sources that are located within the SDSS footprint. We search for galaxy over-densities in 3-D space using SDSS galaxies and their photometric redshifts near the Swift galaxy cluster candidates. We find 103 Swift clusters with a > 3σ over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmations as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, BCG magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, X-ray luminosity and red sequences. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≤ 0.3 and 80% complete for z ≤ 0.4, consistent with the survey depth of SDSS. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 2 and 1 matches in optical, X-ray and SZ catalogs, respectively, so the majority of these

  9. Supernovae and AGN Driven Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mahavir; Nath, Biman B.

    2013-01-01

    We present analytical solutions for winds from galaxies with a Navarro-Frank-White (NFW) dark matter halo. We consider winds driven by energy and mass injection from multiple supernovae (SNe), as well as momentum injection due to radiation from a central black hole. We find that the wind dynamics depends on three velocity scales: (1) v_\\star ˜ (\\dot{E} / 2 \\dot{M})^{1/2} describes the effect of starburst activity, with \\dot{E} and \\dot{M} as energy and mass injection rate in a central region of radius R; (2) v • ~ (GM •/2R)1/2 for the effect of a central black hole of mass M • on gas at distance R; and (3) v_{s} =(GM_h / 2 {C}r_s)^{1/2}, which is closely related to the circular speed (vc ) for an NFW halo, where rs is the halo scale radius and {C} is a function of the halo concentration parameter. Our generalized formalism, in which we treat both energy and momentum injection from starbursts and radiation from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), allows us to estimate the wind terminal speed to be (4v 2 sstarf + 6(Γ - 1)v • 2 - 4v 2 s )1/2, where Γ is the ratio of force due to radiation pressure to gravity of the central black hole. Our dynamical model also predicts the following: (1) winds from quiescent star-forming galaxies cannot escape from 1011.5 M ⊙ <= Mh <= 1012.5 M ⊙ galaxies; (2) circumgalactic gas at large distances from galaxies should be present for galaxies in this mass range; (3) for an escaping wind, the wind speed in low- to intermediate-mass galaxies is ~400-1000 km s-1, consistent with observed X-ray temperatures; and (4) winds from massive galaxies with AGNs at Eddington limit have speeds >~ 1000 km s-1. We also find that the ratio [2v 2 sstarf - (1 - Γ)v • 2]/v 2 c dictates the amount of gas lost through winds. Used in conjunction with an appropriate relation between M • and Mh and an appropriate opacity of dust grains in infrared (K band), this ratio has the attractive property of being minimum at a certain halo

  10. Radio AGN in the local universe: unification, triggering and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadhunter, Clive

    2016-06-01

    Associated with one of the most important forms of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, and showing a strong preference for giant elliptical host galaxies, radio AGN (L_{1.4 GHz} > 10^{24} W Hz^{-1}) are a key sub-class of the overall AGN population. Recently their study has benefitted dramatically from the availability of high-quality data covering the X-ray to far-IR wavelength range obtained with the current generation of ground- and space-based telescope facilities. Reflecting this progress, here I review our current state of understanding of the population of radio AGN at low and intermediate redshifts (z < 0.7), concentrating on their nuclear AGN and host galaxy properties, and covering three interlocking themes: the classification of radio AGN and its interpretation; the triggering and fuelling of the jet and AGN activity; and the evolution of the host galaxies. I show that much of the observed diversity in the AGN properties of radio AGN can be explained in terms of a combination of orientation/anisotropy, mass accretion rate, and variability effects. The detailed morphologies of the host galaxies are consistent with the triggering of strong-line radio galaxies (SLRG) in galaxy mergers. However, the star formation properties and cool ISM contents suggest that the triggering mergers are relatively minor in terms of their gas masses in most cases, and would not lead to major growth of the supermassive black holes and stellar bulges; therefore, apart from a minority (<20 %) that show evidence for higher star formation rates and more massive cool ISM reservoirs, the SLRG represent late-time re-triggering of activity in mature giant elliptical galaxies. In contrast, the host and environmental properties of weak-line radio galaxies (WLRG) with Fanaroff-Riley class I radio morphologies are consistent with more gradual fuelling of the activity via gas accretion at low rates onto the supermassive black holes.

  11. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation in Soft X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF)) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF))from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF) derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3sigma confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne ii]12.8 micron and [O iv]26 micron lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L(sub x,SF) and L(sub x,AGN) at the 3 sigma level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  12. DISENTANGLING AGN AND STAR FORMATION IN SOFT X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-10-20

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF}) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3{sigma} confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m and [O IV]26 {mu}m lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L{sub x,SF} and L{sub x,AGN} at the 3{sigma} level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  13. The Spitzer Mid-infrared AGN Survey. II. The Demographics and Cosmic Evolution of the AGN Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, M.; Ridgway, S. E.; Sajina, A.; Petric, A. O.; Gates, E. L.; Urrutia, T.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.

    2015-04-01

    We present luminosity functions derived from a spectroscopic survey of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from Spitzer Space Telescope imaging surveys. Selection in the mid-infrared is significantly less affected by dust obscuration. We can thus compare the luminosity functions of obscured and unobscured AGNs in a more reliable fashion than by using optical or X-ray data alone. We find that the AGN luminosity function can be well described by a broken power-law model in which the break luminosity decreases with redshift. At high redshifts (z\\gt 1.6), we find significantly more AGNs at a given bolometric luminosity than found by either optical quasar surveys or hard X-ray surveys. The fraction of obscured AGNs decreases rapidly with increasing AGN luminosity, but, at least at high redshifts, appears to remain at ≈ 50% even at bolometric luminosities ˜ {{10}14} {{L}⊙ }. The data support a picture in which the obscured and unobscured populations evolve differently, with some evidence that high luminosity obscured quasars peak in space density at a higher redshift than their unobscured counterparts. The amount of accretion energy in the universe estimated from this work suggests that AGNs contribute about 12% to the total radiation intensity of the universe, and a high radiative accretion efficiency ≈ 0.18-0.07+0.12 is required to match current estimates of the local mass density in black holes.

  14. Role of reconnection in AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2003-10-01

    We discuss the possible role of reconnection in electro-magnetically dominated cores of relativistic AGN jets. We suggest that reconnection may proceed in a two-fold fashion: initial explosive collapse on the Alfvén time-scale of a current-carrying jet (which is of the order of the light crossing time) and subsequent slow quasi-steady reconnection. Sites of explosive collapse are associated with bright knots, while steady-state reconnection re-energizes particles in the 'bridges' between the knots. Ohmic dissipation in reconnection layers leads to particle acceleration either by inductive electric fields or by stochastic particle acceleration in the ensuing electro-magnetic turbulence.

  15. X-ray AGN in the XMM-LSS galaxy clusters: no evidence of AGN suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulouridis, E.; Plionis, M.; Melnyk, O.; Elyiv, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Clerc, N.; Surdej, J.; Chiappetti, L.; Pierre, M.

    2014-07-01

    We present a study of the overdensity of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) in 33 galaxy clusters in the XMM-LSS field (The XMM-Newton Large Scale Structure Survey), up to redshift z = 1.05 and further divided into a lower (0.14 ≤ z ≤ 0.35) and a higher redshift (0.43 ≤ z ≤ 1.05) subsample. Previous studies have shown that the presence of X-ray-selected AGN in rich galaxy clusters is suppressed, since their number is significantly lower than what is expected from the high galaxy overdensities in the area. In the current study we have investigated the occurrence of X-ray-selected AGN in low (⟨ Lx,bol ⟩ = 2.7 × 1043 erg/s) and moderate (⟨ Lx,bol ⟩ = 2.4 × 1044 erg/s) X-ray luminosity galaxy clusters in an attempt to trace back the relation between high-density environments and nuclear activity. Owing to the wide contiguous XMM-LSS survey area, we were able to extend the study to the cluster outskirts. We therefore determined the projected overdensity of X-ray point-like sources around each cluster out to 6r500 radius, within δr500 = 1 annulus, with respect to the field expectations based on the X-ray source log N - log S of the XMM-LSS field. To provide robust statistical results we also conducted a consistent stacking analysis separately for the two z ranges. We investigated whether the observed X-ray overdensities are to be expected thanks to the obvious enhancement of galaxy numbers in the cluster environment by also estimating the corresponding optical galaxy overdensities, and we assessed the possible enhancement or suppression of AGN activity in clusters. We find a positive X-ray projected overdensity in both redshift ranges at the first radial bins, which however has the same amplitude as that of optical galaxies. Therefore, no suppression (or enhancement) of X-ray AGN activity with respect to the field is found, in sharp contrast to previous results based on rich galaxy clusters, implying that the mechanisms responsible for the

  16. The KMOS AGN Survey at High Redshift (KASHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C.; Alexander, D.; Mullaney, J.; Stott, J.; Swinbank, M.; Arumugam, V.; Bauer, F.; Bower, R.; Bunker, A.; Sharples, R.

    2016-03-01

    The KMOS AGN Survey at High Redshift (KASHz) is an extensive observational programme to obtain spatially resolved spectroscopy of distant galaxies that host rapidly growing supermassive black holes (i.e., active galactic nuclei [AGN]). By exploiting the unique capabilities of KMOS we will spatially resolve the ionised gas kinematics in around 200 such galaxies. A fundamental prediction of galaxy formation models is that AGN inject considerable energy into their host galaxies and ultimately destroy or remove star-forming material via outflows. However, until now, observational constraints of this prediction have been limited to only a small number of distant galaxies. KASHz will provide the strongest constraints to date on the prevalence, properties and impact of ionised outflows in the host galaxies of distant AGN. The survey is described and our first results presented.

  17. Completing the AGN Census for Nearby Galaxies (Archival Component)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Luis

    2010-09-01

    The census of AGNs in the local Universe provides an efficient and effective estimate of the occupation fraction of central black holes in galaxies. While the demographics of AGNs in bulge-dominated systems is fairly well known, the situation in later-type galaxies is still murky because of potential optical selection biases. Searching for X-ray cores using Chandra can bypass these complications. We propose to complete the local AGN census by surveying all 188 star-forming (H II) nuclei in the well-studied Palomar sample of nearby galaxies. We request funding to analyze the 85 objects already in the archive; new observations have been proposed for the rest. We will establish with unprecedented reliability the AGN fraction across a wide range in Hubble type and Eddington ratios.

  18. Broad Band Properties of the BAT Selected AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard; Winter, Lisa; Tueller, jack

    2008-01-01

    We will present the x-ray spectral properties of approximately 150 Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) focusing on the issues of spectral complexity, x-ray absorption and its distribution and that contribution of sources to the x-ray background. If time permits we will also present the nature of the host galaxies of the AGN and their relationship to merger candidates.

  19. The bulge-disc decomposition of AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, V. A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Mortlock, A.; Kocevski, D. D.; McGrath, E. J.; Rosario, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results from a study of the morphologies of moderate luminosity X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxies in comparison to a carefully mass-matched control sample at 0.5 < z < 3 in the CANDELS GOODS-S field. We apply a multiwavelength morphological decomposition analysis to these two samples and report on the differences between the morphologies as fitted from single Sérsic and multiple Sérsic models, and models which include an additional nuclear point-source component. Thus, we are able to compare the widely adopted single Sérsic fits from previous studies to the results from a full morphological decomposition, and address the issue of how biased the inferred properties of AGN hosts are by a potential nuclear contribution from the AGN itself. We find that the AGN hosts are indistinguishable from the general galaxy population except that beyond z ≃ 1.5 they have significantly higher bulge fractions. Even including nuclear sources in our modelling, the probability of this result arising by chance is ˜1 × 10-5, alleviating concerns that previous, purely single Sérsic, analyses of AGN hosts could have been spuriously biased towards higher bulge fractions. This data set also allows us to further probe the physical nature of these point-source components; we find no strong correlation between the point-source component and AGN activity. Our analysis of the bulge and disc fractions of these AGN hosts in comparison to a mass-matched control sample reveals a similar morphological evolutionary track for both the active and non-active populations, providing further evidence in favour of a model where AGN activity is triggered by secular processes.

  20. Young AGN Outburst Running over Older X-Ray Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Akos; van Weeren, Reinout Johannes; Kraft, Ralph; Forman, William; Scott, Randall; Giacintucci, Simona; Churazov, Eugene; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Noell-Storr, Jacob; Jones, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Although the energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is believed to have a profound effect on the evolution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, details of AGN heating remain elusive. Here, we study NGC 193 -- a nearby lenticular galaxy in a group -- based on X-ray and radio observations. These data reveal the complex AGN outburst history of the galaxy: we detect a pair of inner X-ray cavities, an outer X-ray cavity, a shock front, and radio lobes extending beyond the inner cavities. We suggest that the inner cavities were produced about 78 Myr ago by a weaker AGN outburst, while the outer cavity, the radio lobes, and the shock front are due to a younger (13-26 Myr) and 4-8 times more powerful outburst. Combining this with the observed morphology of NGC 193, we conclude that NGC 193 likely represents the first example of a second, more powerful, AGN outburst overrunning an older, weaker outburst. These results help us to understand how the outburst energy is dissipated uniformly in the core of galaxies, and therefore may play a crucial role in resolving how AGN outbursts suppress the formation of large cooling flows at cluster centers.

  1. A Herschel View on Galaxy/AGN Co-Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D.; Pep Consortium

    2011-10-01

    Deep far-infrared photometric surveys studying galaxy evolution and the nature of the cosmic infrared background are a key strength of the Herschel mission. The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) guaranteed time key program obtains deep photometric surveys of some of the key extragalactic multiwavelength fields at wavelengths between 70 and 160μm. This contribution gives an overview of first science results, illustrating the potential of Herschel in providing calorimetric star formation rates for various high redshift galaxy populations, thus testing and superseding previous extrapolations from other wavelengths, and enabling a wide range of galaxy evolution studies. Herschel measured star formation rates of high redshift X-ray AGN suggest an interplay between two paths of AGN/host coevolution. A correlation of AGN luminosity and host star formation is traced locally over a wide range of luminosities and also extends to luminous high-z AGN. This correlation reflects an evolutionary connection, likely via merging. For lower AGN luminosities, star formation is similar to that in non-active massive galaxies and shows little dependence on AGN luminosity. The level of this secular, non-merger driven star formation increasingly dominates over the correlation at increasing redshift.

  2. Mini-Survey Of SDSS of [OIII] AGN With Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; George, I. M.; Hill, J.; Padgett, C. A.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2008-01-01

    The number of AGN and their luminosity distribution are crucial parameters for our understanding of the AGN phenomenon. Recent work (e.g. Ferrarese and Merritt 2000) strongly suggests every massive galaxy has a central black hole. However, most of these objects either are not radiating or have been very difficult to detect. We are now in the era of large surveys, and the luminosity function (LF) of AGN has been estimated in various ways. In the X-ray band, Chandra and XMM surveys (e.g., Barger et al. 2005; Hasinger, et al. 2005) have revealed that the LF of Hard X-ray selected AGN shows a strong luminosity-dependent evolution with a dramatic break towards low L(x) (at al z). This is seen for all types of AGN, but is stronger for the broad-line objects (e.g., Steffen et al. 2004). In sharp contrast, the local LF of optically-selected samples shows no such break and no differences between narrow and broad-line objects (Hao et al. 2005). If, as been suggested, hard X-ray and optical emission line can both be fair indicators of AGN activity, it is important to first understand how reliable these characteristics are if we hope to understand the apparent discrepancy in the LFs.

  3. Modeling IR SED of AGN with Spitzer and Herschel data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltre, A.

    2012-12-01

    One of the remaining open issues in the context of the analysis of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is the evidence that nuclear gravitational accretion is often accompanied by a concurrent starburst (SB) activity. What is, in this picture, the role played by the obscur- ing dust around the nucleus and what do the state of the art AGN torus models have to say? Can the IR data provided by Spitzer and Herschel help us in extensively investigate both phenomena and, if so, how and with what limitations? In this paper we present our contribution to the efforts of answering these questions. We show some of the main results coming from a comparative study of various AGN SED modeling approaches, focusing mostly on the much-debated issue about the morphology of the dust distribution in the toroidal structure surrounding the AGN. We found that the properties of dust in AGN as measured by matching observations (be it broad band IR photometry or IR spectra) with models, strongly depend on the choice of the dust distribution. Then, we present the spec- tral energy distribution (SED) fitting procedure we developed, making make the best use of Spitzer and Herschel SPIRE mid- and far-IR observations, to dig into the role played by the possible presence of an AGN on the host galaxy's properties.

  4. YOUNG AGN OUTBURST RUNNING OVER OLDER X-RAY CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdán, Ákos; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Randall, Scott; Jones, Christine; Giacintucci, Simona; Churazov, Eugene; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Noell-Storr, Jacob

    2014-02-20

    Although the energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is believed to have a profound effect on the evolution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, details of AGN heating remain elusive. Here, we study NGC 193—a nearby lenticular galaxy—based on X-ray (Chandra) and radio (Very Large Array and Giant Meter-wave Radio Telescope) observations. These data reveal the complex AGN outburst history of the galaxy: we detect a pair of inner X-ray cavities, an outer X-ray cavity, a shock front, and radio lobes extending beyond the inner cavities. We suggest that the inner cavities were produced ∼78 Myr ago by a weaker AGN outburst, while the outer cavity, the radio lobes, and the shock front are due to a younger (13-26 Myr) and 4-8 times more powerful outburst. Combining this with the observed morphology of NGC 193, we conclude that NGC 193 likely represents the first example of a second, more powerful, AGN outburst overrunning an older, weaker outburst. These results help us to understand how the outburst energy is dissipated uniformly in the core of galaxies, and therefore may play a crucial role in resolving how AGN outbursts suppress the formation of large cooling flows at cluster centers.

  5. On the physical origin of AGN outflow driving mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Wako

    2016-07-01

    Super-massive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) respond to the accretion process by feeding back energy and momentum into the surrounding environment. Galaxy-scale outflows are thought to provide the physical link connecting the small scales of the central black hole to the large scales of the host galaxy. Such powerful outflows are now starting to be commonly observed, and have been considered as a proof of AGN feedback in action. However, the physical origin of the mechanism driving the observed outflows is still unclear, and whether it is due to energy-driving or radiation-driving is a source of much debate in the literature. We consider AGN feedback driven by radiation pressure on dust, and show that AGN radiative feedback is capable of driving powerful outflows on galactic scales. In particular, we can obtain outflowing shells with high velocity and large momentum flux, by properly taking into account the effects of radiation trapping. Alternatively, the observed outflow characteristics may be significantly biased by AGN variability. I will discuss the resulting implications in the global context of black hole accretion-AGN feedback coupling.

  6. Calibration and Groundwater Management Scenario Analysis with the Scott Valley Integrated Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolley, D. G.; Foglia, L.; Neumann, J.; Harter, T.

    2014-12-01

    Late summer streamflow for the Scott River in northern California has decreased approximately 50% since the mid 1960's, resulting in increased water temperatures and disconnection of certain portions of the stream which negatively impacts aquatic habitat of fish species such as coho and fall-run Chinook salmon. In collaboration with local stakeholders, the Scott Valley Integrated Hydrologic Model has been developed, which combines a water budget model and a groundwater-surface water model (MODLFOW) of the 200 km2 basin. The goal of the integrated model is to better understand the hydrologic system of the valley and explore effects of different groundwater management scenarios on late summer streamflow. The groundwater model has a quarter-hectare resolution with aggregated monthly stress periods over a 21 year period (1990-2011). The Scott River is represented using either the river (RIV) or streamflow routing (SFR) package. UCODE was used for sensitivity analysis and calibration using head observations for 52 wells in the basin and gain/loss observations for two sections of the river. Of 32 model parameters (hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, riverbed conductance and mountain recharge), 13 were found significantly sensitive to observations. Results from the calibration show excellent agreement between modeled and observed heads and to seasonal and interannual variations in streamflow. The calibrated model was used to evaluate several management scenarios: 1) alternative water budget which takes into account measured irrigation rates in the valley, 2) in-lieu recharge where surface-water instead of groundwater is used to irrigate fields near the river while streamflow is sufficiently high, and 3) managed recharge on agricultural fields in gulches on the eastern side of the valley in the winter months. Preliminary results indicate that alternative water management scenarios (in-lieu and managed recharge) significantly increase late summer streamflow by keeping

  7. The complete census of optically selected AGNs in the Coma supercluster: the dependence of AGN activity on the local environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Savorgnan, G.; Fumagalli, Mattia

    2011-10-01

    Aims: To investigate the dependence of the occurrence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on local galaxy density, we study the nuclear properties of ~5000 galaxies in the Coma supercluster whose density spans two orders of magnitude from the sparse filaments to the cores of rich clusters. Methods: We obtained optical spectra of the nuclei of 283 galaxies using the 1.5 m Cassini telescope of Bologna observatory. Among these galaxies, 177 belong to the Coma supercluster and are added to the 4785 spectra available from SDSS (DR7) to fill-in the incomplete coverage by SDSS of luminous galaxies. We perform a spectral classification of the nuclei of galaxies in this region (with a completeness of 98% at r ≤ 17.77), classifying the nuclear spectra in six classes: three of them (SEY, sAGN, LIN) refer to AGNs and the remaining three (HII, RET, PAS) refer to different stages of starburst activity. We perform this classification as recommended by Cid Fernandes and collaborators using the ratio of λ 6584 [NII] to Hα lines and the equivalent width of Hα (WHAN diagnostic), after correcting the last quantity by 1.3 Å for underlying absorption. Results: We find that 482 (10%) of 5027 galaxies host an AGN: their frequency strongly increases with increasing luminosity of the parent galaxies, such that 32% of galaxies with Log(Li/L⊙) ≥ 10.2 harbor an AGN at their interior. In addition to their presence in luminous galaxies, AGNs are also found in red galaxies with ⟨g - i⟩ ≃ 1.15 ± 0.15 mag. The majority of SEY and sAGN (strong AGNs) are associated with luminous late-type (or S0a) galaxies, while LIN (weak AGNs) and RET ("retired": nuclei that have experienced a starburst phase in the past and are now ionized by their hot evolved low-mass stars), are mostly found among E/S0as. The number density of AGNs, HII region-like, and retired galaxies is found to anti-correlate with the local density of galaxies, such that their frequency drops by a factor of two near the cluster

  8. SUPERNOVAE AND AGN DRIVEN GALACTIC OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Mahavir; Nath, Biman B. E-mail: biman@rri.res.in

    2013-01-20

    We present analytical solutions for winds from galaxies with a Navarro-Frank-White (NFW) dark matter halo. We consider winds driven by energy and mass injection from multiple supernovae (SNe), as well as momentum injection due to radiation from a central black hole. We find that the wind dynamics depends on three velocity scales: (1) v{sub *}{approx}( E-dot / 2 M-dot ){sup 1/2} describes the effect of starburst activity, with E-dot and M-dot as energy and mass injection rate in a central region of radius R; (2) v {sub .} {approx} (GM {sub .}/2R){sup 1/2} for the effect of a central black hole of mass M {sub .} on gas at distance R; and (3) v{sub s}=(GM{sub h} / 2Cr{sub s}){sup 1/2}, which is closely related to the circular speed (v{sub c} ) for an NFW halo, where r{sub s} is the halo scale radius and C is a function of the halo concentration parameter. Our generalized formalism, in which we treat both energy and momentum injection from starbursts and radiation from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), allows us to estimate the wind terminal speed to be (4v {sup 2} {sub *} + 6({Gamma} - 1)v {sub .} {sup 2} - 4v {sup 2} {sub s}){sup 1/2}, where {Gamma} is the ratio of force due to radiation pressure to gravity of the central black hole. Our dynamical model also predicts the following: (1) winds from quiescent star-forming galaxies cannot escape from 10{sup 11.5} M {sub Sun} {<=} M{sub h} {<=} 10{sup 12.5} M {sub Sun} galaxies; (2) circumgalactic gas at large distances from galaxies should be present for galaxies in this mass range; (3) for an escaping wind, the wind speed in low- to intermediate-mass galaxies is {approx}400-1000 km s{sup -1}, consistent with observed X-ray temperatures; and (4) winds from massive galaxies with AGNs at Eddington limit have speeds {approx}> 1000 km s{sup -1}. We also find that the ratio [2v {sup 2} {sub *} - (1 - {Gamma})v {sub .} {sup 2}]/v {sup 2} {sub c} dictates the amount of gas lost through winds. Used in conjunction with

  9. MidAmerican's Walter Scott, Jr. Energy Center Unit 4 earns Power's highest honor

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.

    2007-08-15

    MidAmerican Energy Co. and its project partners are convinced that supercritical coal-firing technology's inherently higher efficiency and lower CO{sub 2} emissions no longer come with a price: reduced reliability. Unit 4 of the Walter Scott, Jr. Energy Center (WSEC) entered into service in June 2006 doubling the capacity of the PRB-coal fuelled plant to 1,600 MW. This is the first major new supercritical plant in the US in more than 15 years. The design of the boiler and the air pollution control systems downstream are described and illustrated. Unit 4 won the 2007 Plant of the Year awarded by Power magazine. 11 figs.

  10. Mafic Materials in Scott Crater? A Test for Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.

    2007-01-01

    Clementine 750 nm and multispectral ratio data, along with Lunar Orbiter and radar data, were used to study the crater Scott in the lunar south polar region. The multispectral data provide evidence for mafic materials, impact melts, anorthositic materials, and a small pyroclastic deposit. High-resolution radar data and Lunar Orbiter photography for this area show differences in color and surface texture that correspond with the locations of the hypothesized mafic and anorthositic areas on the crater floor. This region provides a test case for the upcoming Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Verification of the existence of a mafic deposit at this location is relevant to future lunar resource utilization planning.

  11. Quantum entanglement between amide-I and amide-site in Davydov-Scott model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Fan, Heng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly derive non-Markovian operator Langevin equations of the Davydov monomer in its environment. Next, we replace the equations with the c-number quantum general Langevin equations (QGLEs) by calculating statistical and quantum averages of the operator Langevin equations. Then, by using the c-number QGLEs we investigate the evolutions of the subsystems amide-I and amide-site. The evolution of a parameter θ describing quantum entanglement of the coupling subsystems with continuous variable Hamiltonian has also been investigated. It is shown that there is certain entanglement between the amide-I and amide-site in the Davydov-Scott monomer.

  12. Astronaut David Scott gives salute beside U.S. flag during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott, commander, gives a military salute while standing beside the deployed U.S. flag during the Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Hadley-Apennine landing site. The flag was deployed toward the end of EVA-2. The Lunar Module 'Falcon' is partially visible on the right. Hadley Delta in the background rises approximately 4,000 meters (about 13,124 feet) above the plain. The base of the mountain is approximately 5 kilometers (about 3 statute miles) away. This photograph was taken by Astronaut James B. Irwin, Lunar Module pilot.

  13. Astronauts Scott and Irwin join geologists in looking at Apollo 15 samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronauts David R. Scott, left, and James B. Irwin, right, join Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) geologists in looking at some of the first Apollo 15 samples to be opened in the Non-Sterile Nitrogen Processing Line (NNPL) in the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL). Holding the microphone and making recorded tapes of the two Apollo 15 crewmen's comments is Dr. Gary Lofgren. Partially obscured, near center of photo is Dr. William Phinney, and to his left is Dr. James L. Head.

  14. On the Importance of Very Light Internally Subsonic AGN Jets in Radio-mode AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai

    2016-07-01

    Radio-mode active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in the evolution of galaxy groups and clusters. Its physical origin lies in the kiloparsec-scale interaction of AGN jets with the intracluster medium. Large-scale jet simulations often initiate light internally supersonic jets with density contrast 0.01 < η < 1. Here we argue for the first time for the importance of very light (η < 0.01) internally subsonic jets. We investigated the shapes of young X-ray cavities produced in a suite of hydrodynamic simulations, and found that bottom-wide cavities are always produced by internally subsonic jets, while internally supersonic jets inflate cylindrical, center-wide, or top-wide cavities. We found examples of real cavities with shapes analogous to those inflated in our simulations by internally subsonic and internally supersonic jets, suggesting a dichotomy of AGN jets according to their internal Mach numbers. We further studied the long-term cavity evolution, and found that old cavities resulted from light jets spread along the jet direction, while those produced by very light jets are significantly elongated along the perpendicular direction. The northwestern ghost cavity in Perseus is pancake shaped, providing tentative evidence for the existence of very light jets. Our simulations show that very light internally subsonic jets decelerate faster and rise much slower in the intracluster medium than light internally supersonic jets, possibly depositing a larger fraction of jet energy to cluster cores and alleviating the problem of low coupling efficiencies found previously. The internal Mach number points to the jet’s energy content, and internally subsonic jets are energetically dominated by non-kinetic energy, such as thermal energy, cosmic rays, or magnetic fields.

  15. Mini Survey of SDSS [OIII] AGN with Swift: Testing the Hypothesis that L(sub [OIII]) Traces AGN Luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The number of AGN and their luminosity distribution are crucial parameters for our understanding of the AGN phenomenon. Recent work strongly suggests every massive galaxy has a central black hole. However most of these objects either are not radiating or have been very difficult to detect We are now in the era of large surveys, and the luminosity function (LF] of AGN has been estimated in various ways. In the X-ray band. Chandra and XMM surveys have revealed that the LF of hard X-ray selected AGN shows a strong luminosity-dependent evolution with a dramatic break towards low L(sub x) (at all z). This is seen for all types of AGN, but is stronger for the broad-line objects. In sharp contrast, the local LF of optically-selected samples shows no such break and no differences between narrow and broad-line objects. If as been suggested, hard X ray and optical emission line can both can be fair indicators of AGN activity, it is important to first understand how reliable these characteristics are if we hope to understand the apparent discrepancy in the LFs.

  16. Reconfinement shocks in relativistic AGN jets

    SciTech Connect

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Sikora, Marek

    2008-12-24

    Stationary knots observed in many AGN jets can be explained in terms of a reconfinement shock that forms when relativistic flow of the jet matter collides with the external medium. The position of these knots can be used, together with information on external pressure profile, to constrain dynamical parameters of the jet. We present a semi-analytical model for the dynamical structure of reconfinement shocks, taking into account exact conservation laws both across the shock surface and in the zone of the shocked jet matter. We show that, due to the transverse pressure gradient in the shock zone, the position of the reconfinement is larger than predicted by simple models. A portion of kinetic energy is converted at the shock surface to internal energy, with efficiency increasing strongly with both bulk Lorentz factor of the jet matter and the jet half-opening angle. Our model may be useful as a framework for modeling non-thermal radiation produced within the stationary features.

  17. Spectropolarimetry of AGN, and `Women &\\ Science'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, L.

    1999-12-01

    I have been using optical spectropolarimetry to investigate the nature of AGN. For the CAREER project, I have worked with A. M. Magalhães of the IAG in Brazil to use a visiting polarimetry module with the RC Spectrograph at CTIO, as well as conduct observations at Lick. Projects include observations of broad--line radio galaxies with double--peaked emission line profiles suggestive of accretion disks, and observations of a sample of X-ray selected narrow--line Seyfert 1 galaxies. Another project involves optical and X-ray observations of a complete sample of nearby Seyfert 2 galaxies in order to investigate the frequency of obscured broad--line regions and to determine their contribution to the X-ray background. In addition to involving undergraduate students in research, my educational efforts have focused on getting science into our Women's Studies program. I teach a course on the history and sociology of women in science, co-teach a course on feminist science studies, helped to create a course on women's health, organized a faculty seminar on gender and science issues, and lead a project at Barnard on gender and scientific literacy. I gratefully acknowledge support from NSF CAREER grant AST-9501835, as well as support from NSF International Research Fellowship INT-9423970, and from NSF grant EHR-9555808 to the AAC&U for the Gender and Scientific Literacy project.

  18. Oblique Shocks in AGN Jet Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Hughes, P. A.; Wardle, J. F. C.; Roberts, D. H.; Homan, D. C.

    2001-12-01

    We present multi-epoch VLBI images and single antenna monitoring results from a study of 10 highly variable AGNs (BL Lacs and QSOs) whose primary goal is to investigate the strengths and orientations of oblique shocks in relativistic flows by comparing observed polarized features found in VLBA total intensity and polarization images and UMRAO monitoring data with the predictions of simple oblique shock models which account for the effects of relativistic aberration. The data consist of weekly observations at 14.5, 8.0 and 4.8 GHz using the UMRAO 26-meter telescope, and seven sets of VLBA total flux and polarization images spaced over the past two years at 15 and 43 GHz supplemented by maps at 8 and 22 GHz for a subset known to exhibit significant opacity. The morphological evolution in both structure and polarization revealed by these data are used to provide an estimation of the projected flow deviation and magnetic field orientation at shocks, and initial results from a comparison of the data with newly developed radiative transfer models allowing for a range of shock orientations are presented. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST-9900723. The UMRAO is supported by the University of Michigan; The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is operated by Associated Universities, Inc, under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  19. Radio-Loud AGN: The Suzaku View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita

    2009-01-01

    We review our Suzaku observations of Broad-Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs). The continuum above 2 approx.keV in BLRGs is dominated by emission from an accretion flow, with little or no trace of a jet, which is instead expected to emerge at GeV energies and be detected by Fermi. Concerning the physical conditions of the accretion disk, BLRGs are a mixed bag. In some sources the data suggest relatively high disk ionization, in others obscuration of the innermost regions, perhaps by the jet base. While at hard X-rays the distinction between BLRGs and Seyferts appears blurry, one of the cleanest observational differences between the two classes is at soft X-rays, where Seyferts exhibit warm absorbers related to disk winds while BLRGs do not. We discuss the possibility that jet formation inhibits disk winds, and thus is related to the remarkable dearth of absorption features at soft X-rays in BLRGs and other radio-loud AGN.

  20. Using AGN to Observe the Growth of the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S.; Jones, C.; Forman, W.; Kenter, A.; Vihklinin, A.; Markevitch, M.; Brand, K.; Jannuzi, B.; Kochanek, C.; Eisenstein, D.

    We present X-ray and optical observations of the contiguous 9 3 sq deg XBootes survey made with the ACIS instrument on Chandra The X-ray survey consists of 126 5ksec pointings that achieve a sensitivity of about 4 times10 -15 erg cm -2 s -1 in the 0 5--7 keV band At this sensitivity limit we detect 4642 X-ray sources As part of the AGES galaxy survey in the Bootes region Kochanek et al 2005 we have obtained 1800 redshifts of the X-ray selected objects most of which are AGN yielding a density of sim150 AGN per square degree The mean AGN redshift is 1 3 with the distribution extending to z 4 We have analyzed the spatial distribution of the X-ray selected AGN and compared this to the distribution of the sim20000 AGES galaxies To z sim0 7 the limit of galaxy sample the galaxies and AGN both trace the same structures and show the same web of voids and filaments At larger redshifts the X-ray AGN continue to show the characteristic structure of voids and filaments Quantitatively we computed the spatial 2-point correlation function for the X-ray selected AGN and find that the correlation length r 0 simeq6 4 h -1 Mpc and the exponent gamma simeq-1 7 of the correlation function are similar to the canonical values derived for galaxies In addition we have compared the correlation function in several redshift intervals and find that the correlation length is approximately constant to z sim1 5

  1. The impact of AGN on their host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.

    2014-07-01

    In these proceedings I briefly: (1) review the impact (or ``feedback'') that active galactic nuclei (AGN) are predicted to have on their host galaxies and larger scale environment, (2) review the observational evidence for or against these predictions and (3) present new results on ionised outflows in AGN. The observational support for the ``maintenance mode'' of feedback is strong (caveat the details); AGN at the centre of massive halos appear to be regulating the cooling of hot gas, which could in turn control the levels of future star formation (SF) and black hole growth. In contrast, direct observational support for more rapid forms of feedback, which dramatically impact on SF (i.e., the ``quasar mode''), remains elusive. From a systematic study of the spectra of ~24 000 AGN we find that extreme ionised gas kinematics are common, and are most prevalent in radio bright AGN (L 1.4 GHz > 103 W Hz-1). Follow-up IFU observations have shown that these extreme gas kinematics are extended over kilo-parsec scales. However, the co-existence of high-levels of SF, luminous AGN activity and radio jets raises interesting questions on the primary drivers and impact of these outflows. Galaxy-wide, high-mass outflows are being observed in an increasing number of AGN and are a plausible mechanism for the depletion of gas; however, there is still much work to be done to determine the physical processes that drive these outflows and to measure the level of impact that they have on their host galaxies.

  2. SED and Emission Line Properties of Red 2MASS AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Schmidt, Gary; Ghosh, Himel

    2009-09-01

    Radio and far-IR surveys, and modeling of the cosmic X-ray background suggest that a large population of obscured AGN has been missed by traditional, optical surveys. The Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) has revealed a large population (surface density comparable to that of optically selected AGN with Ks<14.5mag) of mostly nearby (median z=0.25), red, moderately obscured AGN, among which 75% are previously unidentified emission-line AGN, with 85% showing broad emission lines. We present the SED and emission line properties of 44 such red (J-Ks>2) 2MASS AGN observed with Chandra. They lie at z<0.37, span a full range of spectral types (Type 1, intermediate, Type 2),Ks-to-X-ray slopes, and polarization (<13%). Their IR-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are red in the near-IR/opt/UV showing little or no blue bump. The optical colors are affected by reddening, host galaxy emission, redshift, and in few, highly polarized objects, also by scattered AGN light. The levels of obscuration obtained from optical, X-rays, and far-IR imply N_H AGN light. PCA analysis of the IR-X-ray SED and emission line properties shows that, while obscuration/inclination is important, the dominant cause of variance in the sample (eigenvector 1) is the L/L_{edd} ratio (perhaps because the red near-IR selection limits the range of inclination/obscuration values in our sample). This analysis also distinguishes two sources of obscuration: the host galaxy and circumnuclear absorption.

  3. AGN coronal emission models - I. The predicted radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raginski, I.; Laor, Ari

    2016-06-01

    Accretion discs in active galactic nucleus (AGN) may be associated with coronal gas, as suggested by their X-ray emission. Stellar coronal emission includes radio emission, and AGN corona may also be a significant source for radio emission in radio quiet (RQ) AGN. We calculate the coronal properties required to produce the observed radio emission in RQ AGN, either from synchrotron emission of power-law (PL) electrons, or from cyclosynchrotron emission of hot mildly relativistic thermal electrons. We find that a flat spectrum, as observed in about half of RQ AGN, can be produced by corona with a disc or a spherical configuration, which extends from the innermost regions out to a pc scale. A spectral break to an optically thin power-law emission is expected around 300-1000 GHz, as the innermost corona becomes optically thin. In the case of thermal electrons, a sharp spectral cut-off is expected above the break. The position of the break can be measured with very long baseline interferometry observations, which exclude the cold dust emission, and it can be used to probe the properties of the innermost corona. Assuming equipartition of the coronal thermal energy density, the PL electrons energy density, and the magnetic field, we find that the energy density in a disc corona should scale as ˜R-1.3, to get a flat spectrum. In the spherical case the energy density scales as ˜R-2, and is ˜4 × 10-4 of the AGN radiation energy density. In Paper II we derive additional constraints on the coronal parameters from the Gudel-Benz relation, Lradio/LX-ray ˜ 10- 5, which RQ AGN follow.

  4. Changes in concentration of contaminants in Scott Creek, Western North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allmendinger, N. E.; Clapp, R. B.

    2004-12-01

    Scott Creek is a 4th-order gravel-bedded stream in the Little Tennessee watershed in a mountainous region of Western North Carolina. The region is highly dependent on this river for water contact sports and input for a paper mill. Recently, water sample have shown high levels of fecal coliform in spite of efforts to fix a broken sewer pipeline and eliminate straight-piping. Our objective is to assess the current quality of the water, and to devise methods for future monitoring and prediction of contaminant concentration in the river. During a 5-day period in July 2004, we monitored the stage and velocity of the river as well as the concentration of nitrates, reactive phosphorous and fecal coliform in the water. Our results suggest that the nutrients and the bacteria counts vary in phase with the river discharge. Our analysis of the data leads us to conclude that both discharge and E. coli concentration are related to precipitation. The relationship between river stage and precipitation is complex, requiring a "multiple" regression equation which plots Q as a function of the previous 3 days of rainfall. The relationship between E. coli concentration and precipitation is much simpler, showing that the abundance of bacteria varies directly with daily rainfall. We infer from our data that it is unlikely that E. coli in Scott's Creek has a "point" source, suggesting that the bacterial contamination is related to undetected straight pipes and not to a steady sewer failure.

  5. Late Pleistocene evolution of Scott Glacier, southern Transantarctic Mountains: implications for the Antarctic contribution to deglacial sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Hall, Brenda L.; Stone, John O.; Conway, Howard

    2012-09-01

    Glacial deposits preserved adjacent to Scott Glacier, southern Transantarctic Mountains, provide a record of past fluctuations in the thickness of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Geologic mapping of these deposits, in conjunction with emerging 10Be surface-exposure data, indicate that the most recent expansion of Scott Glacier occurred during the last glacial maximum in response to grounding of ice in the Ross Sea Embayment. At that time, the ice surface at the confluence of Scott Glacier and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet lay at ˜1100 m elevation. While this ice-surface reconstruction is in accord with other geologic estimates from throughout the Ross Sea Embayment, it contrasts with most computer-based simulations, which tend to overestimate former ice thickness in the southern Ross Sea. Together with recently modelled estimates of Antarctica's contribution to sea level, this finding calls into question an Antarctic source for meltwater pulse 1A.

  6. Detecting AGNs using multi-filter imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiaoyi

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this research project was to develop and test a technique to detect active galactic nuclei, AGNs, using high quality, multi-filter imaging data alone. In order to perform a physically meaningful aperture photometric measurement, we have adapted an image manipulation method - shapelets. shapelets can remove the Point Spread Function (PSF) from an image without the traditional deconvolution in Fourier space. It can therefore be used to adjust the image PSF, i.e., to sharpen the PSF and to make each filter's PSF have the same full width at half maximum (FWHM). shapelets is realized by an IDL based package SHAPELETS, originally designed for studying weak gravitational lensing, and adjusted to suit our application. The primary data we used were selected from the CFHT Legacy Survey Wide Survey field W4. The sample included 6670 galaxies, with u magnitudes ≤ +22 mag, and inclinations ≤ 60°. We applied shapelets to each galaxy for each filter. The result was a shapelets reconstructed image with a 2-D Gaussian PSF with FWHM=3 pixels. We then made relevant photometric measurements on the reconstructed image. In order to calculate distance-dependent parameters such as the galaxy luminosity, we estimated the photometric redshift using an artificial neural network (ANN) with a root mean square (RMS) of 0.025. We designed another neural net to classify the galaxy morphological type based on its photometric properties. The classification was based on Nair and Abraham (2010), and has an accuracy < 2T types. Because galaxy colours alone cannot be used to distinguish AGNs from "normal" galaxies, we also designed a neural net to separate AGN, "normal" , and starforming/starburst galaxies. The accuracy of this classification technique is about 75%. Because our method relies largely on the spatial resolution of the data, we limited our analysis to z ≤ 0.1. The sample contained 1570 galaxies, and we detected 178 AGNs (11.3%), 176 "normal" (11.2%), and 1216

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF A SAMPLE OF INTERMEDIATE-TYPE AGNs. I. SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES AND SERENDIPITOUS DISCOVERY OF NEW DUAL AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, Erika; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Martinez, Benoni; Jimenez-Bailon, Elena; Mendez-Abreu, Jairo; Lopez-Martin, Luis; Fuentes-Carrera, Isaura; Leon-Tavares, Jonathan; Chavushyan, Vahram H.

    2013-01-20

    A sample of 10 nearby intermediate-type active galactic nuclei (AGNs) drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey is presented. The aim of this work is to provide estimations of the black hole (BH) mass for the sample galaxies from the dynamics of the broad-line region. For this purpose, a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the objects was done. Using Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagnostic diagrams, we have carefully classified the objects as true intermediate-type AGNs and found that 80%{sup +7.2%} {sub -17.3%} are composite AGNs. The BH mass estimated for the sample is within 6.54 {+-} 0.16 < log M {sub BH} < 7.81 {+-} 0.14. Profile analysis shows that five objects (J120655.63+501737.1, J121607.08+504930.0, J141238.14+391836.5, J143031.18+524225.8, and J162952.88+242638.3) have narrow double-peaked emission lines in both the red (H{alpha}, [N II] {lambda}{lambda}6548,6583 and [S II] {lambda}{lambda}6716, 6731) and the blue (H{beta} and [O III] {lambda}{lambda}4959, 5007) regions of the spectra, with velocity differences ({Delta}V) between the double peaks within 114 km s{sup -1} < {Delta}V < 256 km s{sup -1}. Two of them, J121607.08+504930.0 and J141238.14+391836.5, are candidates for dual AGNs since their double-peaked emission lines are dominated by AGN activity. In searches of dual AGNs, type 1, type II, and intermediate-type AGNs should be carefully separated, due to the high serendipitous number of narrow double-peaked sources (50% {+-} 14.4%) found in our sample.

  8. Kiloparsec-scale outflows are prevalent among luminous AGN: outflows and feedback in the context of the overall AGN population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Swinbank, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    We present integral field unit observations covering the [O III]λλ4959, 5007 and Hβ emission lines of 16 z < 0.2 type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our targets are selected from a well-constrained parent sample of ≈24 000 AGN so that we can place our observations into the context of the overall AGN population. Our targets are radio quiet with star formation rates (SFRs; ≲[10-100] M⊙ yr-1) that are consistent with normal star-forming galaxies. We decouple the kinematics of galaxy dynamics and mergers from outflows. We find high-velocity ionized gas (velocity widths ≈600-1500 km s-1; maximum velocities ≤1700 km s-1) with observed spatial extents of ≳(6-16) kpc in all targets and observe signatures of spherical outflows and bi-polar superbubbles. We show that our targets are representative of z < 0.2, luminous (i.e. L[O III] > 1041.7 erg s-1) type 2 AGN and that ionized outflows are not only common but also in ≥70 per cent (3σ confidence) of cases, they are extended over kiloparsec scales. Our study demonstrates that galaxy-wide energetic outflows are not confined to the most extreme star-forming galaxies or radio-luminous AGN; however, there may be a higher incidence of the most extreme outflow velocities in quasars hosted in ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Both star formation and AGN activity appear to be energetically viable to drive the outflows and we find no definitive evidence that favours one process over the other. Although highly uncertain, we derive mass outflow rates (typically ≈10 times the SFRs), kinetic energies (≈0.5-10 per cent of LAGN) and momentum rates (typically ≳10-20 × LAGN/c) consistent with theoretical models that predict AGN-driven outflows play a significant role in shaping the evolution of galaxies.

  9. AGN host galaxy mass function in COSMOS. Is AGN feedback responsible for the mass-quenching of galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, A.; Schulze, A.; Merloni, A.; Zamorani, G.; Ilbert, O.; La Franca, F.; Peng, Y.; Piconcelli, E.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Brusa, M.; Fiore, F.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the role of supermassive black holes in the global context of galaxy evolution by measuring the host galaxy stellar mass function (HGMF) and the specific accretion rate, that is, λSAR, the distribution function (SARDF), up to z ~ 2.5 with ~1000 X-ray selected AGN from XMM-COSMOS. Using a maximum likelihood approach, we jointly fit the stellar mass function and specific accretion rate distribution function, with the X-ray luminosity function as an additional constraint. Our best-fit model characterizes the SARDF as a double power-law with mass-dependent but redshift-independent break, whose low λSAR slope flattens with increasing redshift while the normalization increases. This implies that for a given stellar mass, higher λSAR objects have a peak in their space density at earlier epoch than the lower λSAR objects, following and mimicking the well-known AGN cosmic downsizing as observed in the AGN luminosity function. The mass function of active galaxies is described by a Schechter function with an almost constant M∗⋆ and a low-mass slope α that flattens with redshift. Compared to the stellar mass function, we find that the HGMF has a similar shape and that up to log (M⋆/M⊙) ~ 11.5, the ratio of AGN host galaxies to star-forming galaxies is basically constant (~10%). Finally, the comparison of the AGN HGMF for different luminosity and specific accretion rate subclasses with a previously published phenomenological model prediction for the "transient" population, which are galaxies in the process of being mass-quenched, reveals that low-luminosity AGN do not appear to be able to contribute significantly to the quenching and that at least at high masses, that is, M⋆ > 1010.7 M⊙, feedback from luminous AGN (log Lbol ≳ 46 [erg/s]) may be responsible for the quenching of star formation in the host galaxy.

  10. AGN and Star Formation in HerMES-IRS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltre, Anna; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Fritz, Jacopo; Franceschini, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    One of the remaining open issues in the context of the analysis of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is the evidence that nuclear gravitational accretion is often accompanied by a concurrent starburst activity. We developed a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting technique to derive simultaneously the physical properties of active galaxies and coexisting starbursts making the best use of Spitzer and Herschel IR observations. We apply the SED fitting procedure to a large sample of extragalactic sources representing the HerMES (Herschel/Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey) population with IRS spectra with a plethora of multi-wavelength data in order to study the impact of a possible presence of an AGN on the host galaxy's properties. We analyze the star formation rate (SFR) in conncetion to the presence of an AGN and compared the properties of the hot (AGN) and cold (starburst) dust component. Our findings are consistent with no evidence for the presence of an AGN affecting the star formation processes of the host galaxies.

  11. The New Spectral Picture of Seyfert 1 AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, K.; Noda, H.; Yamada, S.; Makishima, K.

    2014-07-01

    X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) were so far considered to consist of a single power-law (PL) like primary component and a reflection component accompanied by an FeKα line. However, the assumption of ``single primary component'' has not been confirmed observationally. To overcome this limitation, we developed a method that can decompose observed AGN spectra model-independently using time-variability (Noda et al. 2011, 2013). We applied it to the bright and variable Seyfert 1 AGN, IC4329A. It was observed by Suzaku 5 times in 2007, and once in 2012. Using our method, the time-averaged spectra have been successfully decomposed into a fast-variable component and a slowly-variable one. While the former can be regarded as a PL with photon index Γ~2.1, the latter is explained as a sum of the distant reflection component and a harder PL with Γ~1.4. This harder PL component, observed in all observations of IC 4329A and in many other AGNs (Noda et al. 2011, 2013), can be interpreted neither as partially-covered Γ~2.1 PL, nor relativistic reflection that varies with the primary. Therefore, the Γ~1.4 PL is considered to be another primary component. Its recognition has a big impact on our understanding of the AGN central engine.

  12. Inverse Compton X-ray signature of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2013-12-01

    Bright AGN frequently show ultrafast outflows (UFOs) with outflow velocities vout ˜ 0.1c. These outflows may be the source of AGN feedback on their host galaxies sought by galaxy formation modellers. The exact effect of the outflows on the ambient galaxy gas strongly depends on whether the shocked UFOs cool rapidly or not. This in turn depends on whether the shocked electrons share the same temperature as ions (one-temperature regime, 1T) or decouple (2T), as has been recently suggested. Here we calculate the inverse Compton spectrum emitted by such shocks, finding a broad feature potentially detectable either in mid-to-high energy X-rays (1T case) or only in the soft X-rays (2T). We argue that current observations of AGN do not seem to show evidence for the 1T component. The limits on the 2T emission are far weaker, and in fact it is possible that the observed soft X-ray excess of AGN is partially or fully due to the 2T shock emission. This suggests that UFOs are in the energy-driven regime outside the central few pc, and must pump considerable amounts of not only momentum but also energy into the ambient gas. We encourage X-ray observers to look for the inverse Compton components calculated here in order to constrain AGN feedback models further.

  13. A Meeting on the AGN/Galaxy Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1999-01-01

    This grant was used for travel support of several junior astronomers to attend the meeting "The Actice Galactic Nuclei (AGN)/Normal Galaxy Connection", Session El.2 of the 32nd COSPAR Assembly held in Nagoya, Japan, 12-19 July 1998. This meeting included the contributions from both theoretical and observational astronomers to the following fundamental questions: What causes the activity in galaxies? What is the difference between normal and active galaxies? Which processes are responsible for fueling the AGN? Do all galaxies have central Black Holes? What is the difference between low and high luminosity AGN? The observational papers discussed themes like: the detection of the black hole at the nucleus of our Galaxy, as well as in other galaxies; results from surveys of AGN in local galaxies, the source of their activity and their cold gas content; the observations of quasar host galaxies; the properties of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies. These papers used data from ground based observatories and several space missions (e.g. ASCA, ROSAT, HST, ISO) in wavebands from radio through gamma-rays. The theoretical papers discussed issues like: mechanisms to fuel the AGN; the physics of the accretion process; the formation of black-holes, quasars and their jets.

  14. The QUEST-La Silla AGN Variability Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, R.; Lira, P.; Coppi, P.; Sánchez, P.; Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Muñoz, R. R.

    2016-03-01

    It is widely believed that supermassive black holes reside at the centres of every massive galaxy. When actively accreting they are known as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). Most commonly, their presence is exposed by the radiation generated by the accretion of matter toward their centres. This radiation can show dramatic flux variations on timescales from minutes to years that can be observed across the full electromagnetic spectrum from X-ray to radio wavelengths. Although the exact origin of AGN variability remains unclear, such variability can be used as an efficient tool to find them and to understand the origin and demographics of flux variations. To this end, we have undertaken an AGN variability survey using the QUEST camera on the ESO 1.0-metre Schmidt Telescope at La Silla. The QUEST-La Silla AGN Variability Survey aims to discover thousands of new AGNs, and provide highly sampled light curves to study the ultraviolet/optical flux variations to a limiting magnitude of r ~ 21.5 mag.

  15. STS-87 Mission Specialists Scott and Doi with EVA coordinator Laws participate in the CEIT for their

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Participating in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) at Kennedy Space Center are STS-87 crew members, assisted by Glenda Laws, extravehicular activity (EVA) coordinator, Johnson Space Center, at left. Next to Laws is Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, who is looking on as Mission Specialist Winston Scott gets a hands-on look at some of the equipment. The STS-87 mission will be the fourth United States Microgravity Payload and flight of the Spartan-201 deployable satellite. During the mission, scheduled for a Nov. 19 liftoff from KSC, Dr. Doi and Scott will both perform spacewalks.

  16. Coordinated Multifrequency Observations of Variable Agns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Diana M.

    1984-07-01

    Our ME measurements of BL Lac objects to date, coordinated with observations in other frequency bands, show positive spectral curvature within the infrared to ultraviolet energy range (Worrall and Bruhweiler 1982). There is evidence that this component is synchrotron radiation. In order to fit the spectral measurements, we find that relativistic beaming is an essential ingredient of simple models not involving electron reacceleration. It is important to discover to what extent this is observationally true of all BL Lac objects, and to then compare with expectations of the distribution in Lorentz factor derived from geometrical arguments. Our sample of BL Lac objects so far numbers 5. There are 17 other BL Lac objects for which IUE observations are listed in the master catalogue. However, many of these objects are so heavily contaminated by a galactic component in the visual and near infrared that the data cannot be usefully employed for our purpose. Also, to our knowledge, the necessary nearly simultaneous coverage in the infrared and visual only exists for 6 of these 17. The near-simultaneity is a vital element, since these active galactic nuclei (AGNs) tend to exhibit different flux variability characteristics in the different available wavebands. We present a target list primarily composed of BL Lac objects, but including 3 QSOs. Conclusions from non-simultaneous multifrequency observations by Malkan and Sargent (1982) suggest that one difference between QSOs and BL Lacs is that the non-thermal infrared to ultraviolet QSO flux does not appear to exhibit curvature. We would like to investigate this more closely, with simultaneous observations. We propose to coordinate all our observations with radio, millimeter, infrared and visual wavelength coverage and have calculated time periods during which this will be possible. Final target selection from our list of visually variable objects will be based on their magnitudes just prior to shift allotment.

  17. Agnes Pockels: Life, Letters and Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Christiane A.

    2004-03-01

    Agnes Pockels (1862 - 1935) was a German woman, whose studies pioneered surface science. She was born in malaria infected North Italy while her father served in the Austrian army. Because he suffered adverse health effects, the family moved in1871 to Braunschweig (North Germany). There, Pockels went to high school. She was interested in science, but formal training was not available for girls. She took on the role of household manager and nurse as her parents' health deteriorated further. Her diary illustrates the difficulties she faced in trying to maintain her own health, the health of her parents and her scientific research at the same time. When Pockels was 18 or 19, she designed a ring tensiometer. Additionally, she found a new method to introduce water-insoluble compounds to the water surface by dissolving them in an organic solvent, and applying drops of the solution. Her surface film balance technique from 1882 is the basis for the method later developed by Langmuir. Since her experimental work was highly original and in a new field, she failed to get it recognized in her own country. When she was 28, she wrote to Lord Rayleigh, since she had read about his recent experiments in surface physics. Rayleigh was so impressed with her experimental methods and results that he had her letter translated from German and published it in Nature (1891). She continued her research on surface films, interactions of solutions and contact angles (more papers, 3 in Nature). Still, she did all experiments at home. With the death of her brother in 1913 and the onset of the war, she retired into private life. Thus she was surprised when she was awarded in her late 60ies with a honorary doctorate by the TU Braunschweig (1932) and the annual prize of the German Colloid Society (1931).

  18. Uncovering East Antarctic Bedrock using detrital zircon geochronology and pebble lithologies from Mount Howe, Scott Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dits, T.; Licht, K.; Bader, N.; Kaplan, M. R.; Schaefer, J. M.; Winckler, G.

    2012-12-01

    Till from the flanks of Mount Howe, the southernmost outcrop in the world at the head of the Scott Glacier, Antarctica, offers an exclusive view of East Antarctic bedrock through analysis of detrital zircon geochronology and pebble lithology. With no outcrops upstream of the Mount Howe nunatak, detrital zircons and pebbles incorporated in the supraglacial till place direct new age and lithologic constraints on unmapped, ice covered bedrock in the Scott Glacier catchment. Nine moraine crests were sampled along a 2 km transect from the modern ice edge toward exposed Beacon Supergroup bedrock, where rock weathering increases away from the ice margin. Preliminary cosmogenic ages on boulders on the same crests as the provenance study indicate most of the moraine complex formed over the last 100 ka, but some ridges close to the headwall may be much older. Pebble lithologies across the transect show minimal statistical variation, averaging 60% mafic igneous, 30% metamorphic, and 10% sedimentary lithologies dominantly from the Ferrar and Beacon Supergroups. Observations of faceting and striations on pebble surfaces reveal that up to 40-50% of the pebble fraction of the till was subglacially transported, and a minimum of 15% are exotic lithologies. Nearly 80% of cobbles collected from a non-random survey reveal the presence of several exotic rock types, including vesicular olivine basalt, quartzite, and four different compositions of granite. Guided by backscatter electron imagery of detrital zircons, 385 ages from U-Pb isotopes of detrital zircons from 8 sequential moraine crests were determined by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (LA-ICPMS). Distinct age populations were identified at 185-190 Ma, 255-270 Ma, 355-365 Ma, 550-580 Ma, and 2740 Ma. Four samples in the middle of the transect all display a similar 1010-1040 Ma peak that is statistically different from the remaining samples. The 185 Ma population differs from the typical East Antarctic

  19. Compton thick AGN in the XMM-COSMOS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Ranalli, P.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Georgakakis, A.; Delvecchio, I.; Akylas, T.; Berta, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Hasinger, G.; Iwasawa, K.; Koekemoer, A.; Lusso, E.; Marchesi, S.; Mainieri, V.; Merloni, A.; Mignoli, M.; Piconcelli, E.; Pozzi, F.; Rosario, D. J.; Salvato, M.; Silverman, J.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-01-01

    Heavily obscured, Compton thick (CT, NH> 1024 cm-2) active galactic nuclei (AGN) may represent an important phase in AGN/galaxy co-evolution and are expected to provide a significant contribution to the cosmic X-ray background at its peak. However, unambiguously identifying CT AGN beyond the local Universe is a challenging task even in the deepest X-ray surveys, and given the expected low spatial density of these sources in the 2-10 keV band, large area surveys are needed to collect sizable samples. Through direct X-ray spectra analysis, we selected 39 heavily obscured AGN (NH>3 × 1023 cm-2) at bright X-ray fluxes (F2-10 ≳ 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2) in the 2 deg2 XMM-COSMOS survey. After selecting CT AGN based on the fit of a simple absorbed two power law model to the shallow XMM-Newton data, the presence of bona fide CT AGN was confirmed in 80% of the sources using deeper Chandra data and more complex models. The final sample comprises ten CT AGN (six of them also have a detected Fe Kα line with EW ~ 1 keV), spanning a wide range of redshifts (z ~ 0.1-2.5) and luminosity (L2-10 ~ 1043.5-1045 erg s-1) and is complemented by 29 heavily obscured AGN spanning the same redshift and luminosity range. We collected the rich multi-wavelength information available for all these sources, in order to study the distribution of super massive black hole and host properties, such as black hole mass (MBH), Eddington ratio (λEdd), stellar mass (M∗), specific star formation rate (sSFR) in comparison with a sample of unobscured AGN. We find that highly obscured sources tend to have significantly smaller MBH and higher λEdd with respect to unobscured sources, while a weaker evolution in M∗ is observed. The sSFR of highly obscured sources is consistent with the one observed in the main sequence of star forming galaxies, at all redshifts. We also present and briefly discuss optical spectra, broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) and morphology for the sample of ten CT AGN. Both

  20. The Triggering and Evolution of AGN in Cluster Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Steven

    It is now well established that the evolution of super-massive black holes (SMBHs) is closely linked to that of their host galaxies. However, the detailed causal connections behind this relationship remain largely unknown. This is due in part to the complex diversity of active galactic nuclei (AGN) properties, the differing time-scales for AGN and star-forming processes, and a variety of observational selection effects. Physically, a prerequisite for both AGN activity and the formation of new stars in the host galaxy is the availability of gas. Environmental processes in galaxy clusters can strongly and rapidly affect gas reservoirs. Observations of star-forming galaxies in clusters have shown that the cluster environment drives evolution at a different rate than in the field. We here propose to make new measurements of the distribution of X-ray selected AGN, within cluster fields, and of their infrared (IR) and ultra-violet (UV) host galaxy properties to better understand the AGN triggering process, and the physical links between the SMBHs and their host galaxies. With a combination of superb spatial resolution and excellent sensitivity, Chandra X-ray observations have revolutionised studies of AGN evolution. The X-ray waveband is optimally suited for AGN surveys suffering little contamination from the host galaxy and only modest absorption bias, down to luminosities of 10^43 erg/s and across a wide range of source redshifts, providing direct access to a significant fraction of the total accretion power in the Universe (Brandt & Alexander 2015). However, two significant challenges exist that limit current studies of X-ray AGN in clusters: 1) the expense of optical follow-up of X-ray point source targets in order to confirm cluster membership; and 2) the low number of X-ray AGN that reside in clusters (typically 2-3 per cluster) relative to the background population (9,800 deg^2 in the deepest Chandra fields). In Ehlert et al. (2013, 2014 and 2015) we presented a

  1. MERGING AND CLUSTERING OF THE SWIFT BAT AGN SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2010-06-20

    We discuss the merger rate, close galaxy environment, and clustering on scales up to an Mpc of the Swift BAT hard X-ray sample of nearby (z<0.05), moderate-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find a higher incidence of galaxies with signs of disruption compared to a matched control sample (18% versus 1%) and of close pairs within 30 kpc (24% versus 1%). We also find a larger fraction with companions compared to normal galaxies and optical emission line selected AGNs at scales up to 250 kpc. We hypothesize that these merging AGNs may not be identified using optical emission line diagnostics because of optical extinction and dilution by star formation. In support of this hypothesis, in merging systems we find a higher hard X-ray to [O III] flux ratio, as well as emission line diagnostics characteristic of composite or star-forming galaxies, and a larger IRAS 60 {mu}m to stellar mass ratio.

  2. A Response to Scott's Concerns about the Relevance of Environmental Education Research: Applying Social-Ecological Systems Thinking and Consilience to Defining Research Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasny, Marianne E.

    2009-01-01

    In William Scott's plenary address at the World Environmental Education Conference, he expressed concerns about the relevance of environmental education research in a world facing global environmental and demographic change. In responding to Scott's concerns, I argue that addressing challenges related to development and the environment requires…

  3. Quenching histories of galaxies and the role of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethurst, Rebecca Jane; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke; Galaxy Zoo Team

    2016-01-01

    Two open issues in modern astrophysics are: (i) how do galaxies fully quench their star formation and (ii) how is this affected - or not - by AGN feedback? I present the results of a new Bayesian-MCMC analysis of the star formation histories of over 126,000 galaxies across the colour magnitude diagram showing that diverse quenching mechanisms are instrumental in the formation of the present day red sequence. Using classifications from Galaxy Zoo we show that the rate at which quenching can occur is morphologically dependent in each of the blue cloud, green valley and red sequence. We discuss the nature of these possible quenching mechanisms, considering the influence of secular evolution, galaxy interactions and mergers, both with and without black hole activity. We focus particularly on the relationship between these quenched star formation histories and the presence of an AGN by using this new Bayesian method to show a population of type 2 AGN host galaxies have recently (within 2 Gyr) undergone a rapid (τ < 1 Gyr) drop in their star formation rate. With this result we therefore present the first statistically supported observational evidence that AGN feedback is an important mechanism for the cessation of star formation in this population of galaxies. The diversity of this new method also highlights that such rapid quenching histories cannot account fully for all the quenching across the current AGN host population. We demonstrate that slower (τ > 2 Gyr) quenching rates dominate for high stellar mass (log10[M*/M⊙] > 10.75) hosts of AGN with both early- and late-type morphology. We discuss how these results show that both merger-driven and non-merger processes are contributing to the co-evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes across the entirety of the colour magnitude diagram.

  4. Tracing outflows in the AGN forbidden region with SINFONI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakkad, D.; Mainieri, V.; Padovani, P.; Cresci, G.; Husemann, B.; Carniani, S.; Brusa, M.; Lamastra, A.; Lanzuisi, G.; Piconcelli, E.; Schramm, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Active galactic nucleus (AGN) driven outflows are invoked in numerical simulations to reproduce several observed properties of local galaxies. The z > 1 epoch is of particular interest as it was during this time that the volume averaged star formation and the accretion rate of black holes were at their maximum. Radiatively driven outflows are therefore believed to be common during this epoch. Aims: We aim to trace and characterize outflows in AGN hosts with high mass accretion rates at z > 1 using integral field spectroscopy. We obtain spatially resolved kinematics of the [O iii] λ5007 line in two targets which reveal the morphology and spatial extension of the outflows. Methods: We present SINFONI observations in the J band and the H + K band of five AGNs at 1.2 < z < 2.2. To maximize the chance of observing radiatively driven outflows, our sample was pre-selected based on peculiar values of the Eddington ratio and the hydrogen column density of the surrounding interstellar medium. We observe high velocity (~600-1900 km s-1) and kiloparsec scale extended ionized outflows in at least three of our targets, using [O iii] λ5007 line kinematics tracing the AGN narrow line region. We estimate the total mass of the outflow, the mass outflow rate, and the kinetic power of the outflows based on theoretical models and report on the uncertainties associated with them. Results: We find mass outflow rates of ~1-10 M⊙/yr for the sample presented in this paper. Based on the high star formation rates of the host galaxies, the observed outflow kinetic power, and the expected power due to the AGN, we infer that both star formation and AGN radiation could be the dominant source for the outflows. The outflow models suffer from large uncertainties, hence we call for further detailed observations for an accurate determination of the outflow properties to confirm the exact source of these outflows.

  5. The INTEGRAL/IBIS AGN catalogue: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malizia, A.; Landi, R.; Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Ubertini, P.

    2016-04-01

    In the most recent IBIS survey based on observations performed during the first 1000 orbits of INTEGRAL, are listed 363 high energy emitters firmly associated with AGN, 107 of which are reported here for the first time. We have used X-ray data to image the IBIS 90% error circle of all the AGN in the sample of 107, in order to obtain the correct X-ray counterparts, locate them with arcsec accuracy and therefore pinpoint the correct optical counterparts. This procedure has led to the optical and spectral characterization of the entire sample. This new set consists of 34 broad line or type 1 AGN, 47 narrow line or type 2 AGN, 18 Blazars and 8 sources of unknown class. These 8 sources have been associated with AGN from their positional coincidence with 2MASX/Radio/X-ray sources. Seven high energy emitters have been included since they are considered to be good AGN candidates. Spectral analysis has been already performed on 55 objects and the results from the most recent and/or best statistical measurements have been collected. For the remaining 52 sources, we report the spectral analysis for the first time in this work. We have been able to obtain the full X-ray coverage of the sample making use of data from Swift/XRT, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR. In addition to the spectral characterization of the entire sample, this analysis has enabled us to identify peculiar sources and by comparing different datasets, highlight flux variability in the 2-10 keV and 20-40 keV bands.

  6. The most obscured AGN in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Perna, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pozzi, F.; Vietri, G.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-06-01

    Highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN) are common in nearby galaxies, but are difficult to observe beyond the local Universe, where they are expected to significantly contribute to the black hole accretion rate density. Furthermore, Compton-thick (CT) absorbers (NH ≳ 1024 cm-2) suppress even the hard X-ray (2-10 keV) AGN nuclear emission, and therefore the column density distribution above 1024 cm-2 is largely unknown. We present the identification and multi-wavelength properties of a heavily obscured (NH ≳ 1025 cm-2), intrinsically luminous (L2-10 > 1044 erg s-1) AGN at z = 0.353 in the COSMOS field. Several independent indicators, such as the shape of the X-ray spectrum, the decomposition of the spectral energy distribution and X-ray/[NeV] and X-ray/6 μm luminosity ratios, agree on the fact that the nuclear emission must be suppressed by a ≳1025 cm-2 column density. The host galaxy properties show that this highly obscured AGN is hosted in a massive star-forming galaxy, showing a barred morphology, which is known to correlate with the presence of CT absorbers. Finally, asymmetric and blueshifted components in several optical high-ionization emission lines indicate the presence of a galactic outflow, possibly driven by the intense AGN activity (LBol/LEdd = 0.3-0.5). Such highly obscured, highly accreting AGN are intrinsically very rare at low redshift, whereas they are expected to be much more common at the peak of the star formation and BH accretion history, at z ~ 2-3. We demonstrate that a fully multi-wavelength approach can recover a sizable sample of such peculiar sources in large and deep surveys such as COSMOS.

  7. The INTEGRAL/IBIS AGN catalogue: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malizia, A.; Landi, R.; Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Ubertini, P.

    2016-07-01

    In the most recent IBIS survey based on observations performed during the first 1000 orbits of INTEGRAL, are listed 363 high-energy emitters firmly associated with AGN, 107 of which are reported here for the first time. We have used X-ray data to image the IBIS 90 per cent error circle of all the AGN in the sample of 107, in order to obtain the correct X-ray counterparts, locate them with arcsec accuracy and therefore pinpoint the correct optical counterparts. This procedure has led to the optical and spectral characterization of the entire sample. This new set consists of 34 broad line or type 1 AGN, 47 narrow line or type 2 AGN, 18 blazars and 8 sources of unknown class. These eight sources have been associated with AGN from their positional coincidence with 2MASX/Radio/X-ray sources. Seven high-energy emitters have been included since they are considered to be good AGN candidates. Spectral analysis has been already performed on 55 objects and the results from the most recent and/or best statistical measurements have been collected. For the remaining 52 sources, we report the spectral analysis for the first time in this work. We have been able to obtain the full X-ray coverage of the sample making use of data from Swift/XRT, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR. In addition to the spectral characterization of the entire sample, this analysis has enabled us to identify peculiar sources and by comparing different data sets, highlight flux variability in the 2-10 keV and 20-40 keV bands.

  8. The merging/AGN connection: a case for 3D spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Christensen, L.; Becker, T.; Kelz, A.; Jahnke, K.; Benn, C. R.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Roth, M. M.

    2004-02-01

    We discuss an ongoing study of the connection between galaxy merging/interaction and AGN activity, based on integral field spectroscopy. We focus on the search for AGN ionization in the central regions of mergers, previously not classified as AGNs. We present here the science case, the current status of the project, and plans for future observations.

  9. Soft X-Ray Spectra of AGN Discovered Via Their Hard X-Ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    This final report is a study of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Investigation of the soft x-ray spectra of AGN were performed by using their hard x-ray emission. ROSAT observations of AGN was also performed, which allowed for the study of these x-ray spectra and the structures of 7 clusters of galaxies.

  10. On the electron-positron cascade in AGN central engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alex; Keenan, Brett; Medvedev, Mikhail

    2016-03-01

    Processes around spinning supermassive black holes (BH) in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to determine how relativistic jets are launched and how the BH energy is extracted. The key ``ingredient'' is the origin of plasma in BH magnetospheres. In order to explore the process of the electron-positron plasma production, we developed a numerical code which models a one-dimensional (along a magnetic field line) dynamics of the cascade. Our simulations show that plasma production is controlled by the spectrum of the ambient photon field, the B-field strength, the BH spin and mass. Implications of our results to the Galactic Center and AGNs are discussed.

  11. The QUEST-La Silla AGN Variability Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, Régis; Lira, Paulina; Coppi, Paolo; Sánchez, Paula; Arévalo, Patricia; Bauer, Franz E.; Rabinowitz, David; Zinn, Robert; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Meza, Nicolás

    2015-09-01

    We present the characterization and initial results from the QUEST-La Silla active galactic nucleus (AGN) variability survey. This is an effort to obtain well-sampled optical light curves in extragalactic fields with unique multiwavelength observations. We present photometry obtained from 2010 to 2012 in the XMM-COSMOS field, which was observed over 150 nights using the QUEST camera on the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Schmidt telescope. The survey uses a broadband filter, the Q band, similar to the union of the g and the r filters, achieving an intrinsic photometric dispersion of 0.05 mag and a systematic error of 0.05 mag in the zero point. Since some detectors of the camera show significant nonlinearity, we use a linear correlation to fit the zero points as a function of the instrumental magnitudes, thus obtaining a good correction to the nonlinear behavior of these detectors. We obtain good photometry to an equivalent limiting magnitude of r˜ 20.5. The astrometry has an internal precision of ˜ 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 1 and an overall accuracy of 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2 when compared to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Studying the optical variability of X-ray-detected sources in the XMM-COSMOS field, we find that the survey is ˜75%-80% complete to magnitudes r˜ 20, and ˜67% complete to a magnitude r˜ 21. Additionally, broad-line (BL) AGNs have larger variation amplitude than non-broad-line (NL) AGNs, with ˜80% of the BL AGNs classified as variable, while only ˜21% of the NL AGNs are classified as variable. We also find that ˜22% of objects classified as galaxies (GALs) are also variable. The determination and parameterization of the structure function ({{SF}}{norm}(τ )=A{τ }γ ) of the variable sources show that most BL AGNs are characterized by A\\gt 0.1 and γ \\gt 0.025. It is further shown that NL AGNs and GAL sources occupying the same parameter space in A and γ are very likely to correspond to obscured or low

  12. Platelets and coagulation in thrombus formation: aberrations in the Scott syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Johanna P; Swieringa, Frauke; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2016-05-01

    Platelets play key roles in thrombosis and hemostasis by forming aggregates and providing a procoagulant surface, at which thrombin is generated and fibrin fibers are formed. Here we present an overview of the different mechanisms how platelets orchestrate coagulation processes in thrombus formation in thrombosis and hemostasis. Parts of these are via Ca(2+)-dependent activation responses, leading to phosphatidylserine exposure; swelling to form balloons with increased binding of coagulation factors; and calpain-mediated integrin αIIbβ3 cleavage and inactivation. Other mechanisms are secretion of (anti) coagulation factors, and αIIbβ3-mediated thrombus retraction, and clot retraction. In a thrombus, coagulation factors are found at both platelets and fibrin fibers. Many of the procoagulant platelet activities are altered in the Scott syndrome. PMID:27207414

  13. Scott river riparian woodland revegetation demonstration project, FY 1994. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jopson, T.M.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate techniques that could lead to the successful restoration of riparian woodland along the Scott River and elsewhere at a reasonable cost. Three sites were selected for the projects on the basis of need for restoration (i.e. the lack of vegetation), the applicability of the site as a demonstration area (how typical of other areas it was), exclusionary fencing, and the willingness of the landowner to participate. Three woody plant species, black cottonwood (Populus nigra), willow (Salix sp.) and Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) were chosen for planting on the site. These species were known to occur naturally in the riparian zone of the river, were relatively easy to grow in the available time, would produce a variety of habitats when mature, and would grow tall enough to provide shade for the water.

  14. Identification of novel mutations in Mexican patients with Aarskog–Scott syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Coria, Mariana; Lugo-Trampe, José J; Zamudio-Osuna, Michell; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iram P; Lugo-Trampe, Angel; de la Fuente-Cortez, Beatriz; Campos-Acevedo, Luis D; Martínez-de-Villarreal, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    Aarskog–Scott syndrome (AAS), also known as faciogenital dysplasia (FGD, OMIM # 305400), is an X-linked disorder of recessive inheritance, characterized by short stature and facial, skeletal, and urogenital abnormalities. AAS is caused by mutations in the FGD1 gene (Xp11.22), with over 56 different mutations identified to date. We present the clinical and molecular analysis of four unrelated families of Mexican origin with an AAS phenotype, in whom FGD1 sequencing was performed. This analysis identified two stop mutations not previously reported in the literature: p.Gln664* and p.Glu380*. Phenotypically, every male patient met the clinical criteria of the syndrome, whereas discrepancies were found between phenotypes in female patients. Our results identify two novel mutations in FGD1, broadening the spectrum of reported mutations; and provide further delineation of the phenotypic variability previously described in AAS. PMID:26029706

  15. Possible Mafic Patches at Mons Malapert and Scott Crater Highlight the Value of Site Selection studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, B. L.

    2007-01-01

    Possible areas of mafic material on the rim and floor of Scott crater (82.1 S, 48.5 E) and on the northeast flank of Mons Malapert (85.5 S, 0 E) are suggested by analysis of shadow-masked Clementine false-colorration images. Mafic materials can produce more oxygen than can highlands materials, and mafic materials close to the south pole may be important for propellant production for a future lunar mission. If the dark patches are confirmed as mafic materials, this finding would suggest that other mafic patches may also exist, perhaps even closer to the poles. These preliminary findings illustrate the need for additional site selection studies in the lunar polar regions, to improve our capability to "live off the land".

  16. California State Waters map series—Offshore of Scott Creek, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Golden, Nadine E.; Endris, Charles A.; Hartwell, Stephen R,; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Watt, Janet T.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Sliter, Ray W.; Finlayson, David P.; Maier, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Seafloor habitats in the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, which lie within the Shelf (continental shelf) megahabitat, range from significant rocky outcrops that support kelp-forest communities nearshore to rocky-reef communities in deeper water. Biological productivity resulting from coastal upwelling supports populations of Sooty Shearwater, Western Gull, Common Murre, Cassin’s Auklet, and many other less populous bird species. In addition, an observable recovery of Humpback and Blue Whales has occurred in the area; both species are dependent on coastal upwelling to provide nutrients. The large extent of exposed inner shelf bedrock supports large forests of “bull kelp,” which is well adapted for high-wave-energy environments. The kelp beds are the northernmost known habitat for the population of southern sea otters. Common fish species found in the kelp beds and rocky reefs include lingcod and various species of rockfish and greenling.

  17. Identification of novel mutations in Mexican patients with Aarskog-Scott syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Coria, Mariana; Lugo-Trampe, José J; Zamudio-Osuna, Michell; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iram P; Lugo-Trampe, Angel; de la Fuente-Cortez, Beatriz; Campos-Acevedo, Luis D; Martínez-de-Villarreal, Laura E

    2015-05-01

    Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS), also known as faciogenital dysplasia (FGD, OMIM # 305400), is an X-linked disorder of recessive inheritance, characterized by short stature and facial, skeletal, and urogenital abnormalities. AAS is caused by mutations in the FGD1 gene (Xp11.22), with over 56 different mutations identified to date. We present the clinical and molecular analysis of four unrelated families of Mexican origin with an AAS phenotype, in whom FGD1 sequencing was performed. This analysis identified two stop mutations not previously reported in the literature: p.Gln664* and p.Glu380*. Phenotypically, every male patient met the clinical criteria of the syndrome, whereas discrepancies were found between phenotypes in female patients. Our results identify two novel mutations in FGD1, broadening the spectrum of reported mutations; and provide further delineation of the phenotypic variability previously described in AAS. PMID:26029706

  18. Neyman-Scott cluster model for daily rainfall processes in lower extremadura (Spain): Rainfall Generating Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marroquin, A.; Garcia, J. A.; Garrido, J.; Mateos, V. L.

    1995-09-01

    A Neyman-Scott cluster model was fitted to the daily rainfall data recorded at the observatory of Badajoz (southwestern Spain) for the period 1901 1990. The data were previously homogenized. The goodness of the fit that indicated the daily rainfall process follows some Rainfall Generating Mechanism (RGM). Having decided on the criteria that a block of rainfall must fulfill to be considered as a RGM, a method was proposed to classify the days that belong to RGMs according to the 500 hPa and the surface topography. In this method each day is characterized by a string of 22 alphanumeric characters. From the subsequent analysis, the structure of the synoptic patterns associated with each RGM was deduced.

  19. An Unintentional System of Gaps: A Phenomenological Reading of Scott O'Dell's "Island of the Blue Dolphins."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarr, C. Anita

    1997-01-01

    Argues that, in "Island of the Blue Dolphins," Scott O'Dell offers a skeleton main character (Karana). Contends that O'Dell has sketched Karana as a stereotype and that readers complete her characterization, filling out the skeleton by perpetuating the stereotypes. Points out this trading of stereotype for true character development in his other…

  20. 76 FR 17664 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits, City of Scotts Valley and Santa Cruz...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ..., under the Act (59 FR 5499, February 4, 1994; 62 FR 3616, January 24, 1997). Section 9 of the Act (16 U.S... and Santa Cruz County, CA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability... Santa Cruz (County) and the City of Scotts Valley (City) (applicants) for incidental take permits...

  1. A Brief Historical Introduction to Solitons and the Inverse Scattering Transform--A Vision of Scott Russell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with a brief introduction to major remarkable discoveries of the "soliton" and the "inverse scattering transform" in the 1960s. The discovery of the soliton (or the solitary waves) began with the famous physical experiments of the Scottish Engineer and Naval Architect John Scott Russell in the Glasgow-Edinburgh Canal in 1834. The…

  2. Comparative Effectiveness of "Scott Foresman Science": A Report of Randomized Experiments in Five School Districts. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gloria I.; Jaciw, Andrew; Ma, Boya

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the authors' investigated whether "Scott Foresman Science" program, a year-long curriculum intended for daily use that provides a sequence of structured and supportive inquiry activities and text materials to develop students' independent investigative skills, is more effective than current science programs in five diverse…

  3. Comparative Effectiveness of "Scott Foresman Science": A Report of a Randomized Experiment in Reynoldsburg City Schools. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gloria I.; Jaciw, Andrew; Wei, Xin; Ma, Boya

    2007-01-01

    This research project consists of a randomized experiment in a few of the Reynoldsburg City Schools. The primary purpose of this research is to produce scientifically based evidence of the comparative effectiveness of the "Scott Foresman Science" ("SFScience)" program. The question being addressed by the research is whether "SFScience" is more…

  4. Comparative Effectiveness of "Scott Foresman Science": A Report of a Randomized Experiment in St. Petersburg Catholic Schools. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gloria I.; Jaciw, Andrew; Vu, Minh-Thien

    2007-01-01

    This research project consists of a randomized experiment in St. Petersburg Catholic Schools. The question being addressed by the research is whether "Scott Foresman Science" is as effective as the current curricula being used in the participating campuses of the Roman Catholic Diocese of St. Petersburg. The research focuses on 3rd, 4th, and 5th…

  5. An Analysis of Two Beginning Reading Programs: Scott Foresman's "Reading Unlimited" and Pittsburgh LRDC's "New Primary Grades Reading Systems."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Helen Mitchell

    The two reading programs discussed in this paper, "Reading Unlimited" (RU) published by Scott Foresman and "New Primary Grades Reading Systems" (RS) by the University of Pittsburgh Learning Research and Development Center, provide maximal contrasts in materials and teaching strategies. The instructional strategies in RU are analytic and inductive,…

  6. 76 FR 19187 - City of Davenport, Iowa-Construction and Operation Exemption-in Scott County, Iowa

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board City of Davenport, Iowa--Construction and Operation Exemption--in Scott... of the petition and the potential environmental issues, the Board granted the requested...

  7. Comparative Effectiveness of "Scott Foresman Science": A Report of a Randomized Experiment in Federal Way Public Schools. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gloria I.; Jaciw, Andrew; Wei, Xin

    2007-01-01

    Pearson Education contracted with Empirical Education Inc. to conduct five randomized experiments to determine the effectiveness of its "Scott Foresman Science" ("SFScience") curriculum and associated materials. This report addresses the experiment in Federal Way Public Schools in Washington State. The primary purpose of this research is to…

  8. The Readability Levels of the 1981 Scott, Foresman and Co. Basal Texts and Their Comparison with the 1978 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Bonnie

    Fry's Readability Graph was used to determine the readability levels of the 1981 Scott, Foresman and Co. basal textbook series for grades one through six. The readability levels were then compared to those established for the 1978 edition. In the 1981 edition, all stories were handscored. Poems, skill lessons, and plays were not examined in order…

  9. An Author as a Counter-Storyteller: Applying Critical Race Theory to a "Coretta Scott King Award Book"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Wanda

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes the 2002 Coretta Scott King Award book by Mildred Taylor entitled "The Land". The novel and its author are situated within a tradition of historical fiction written by and about African Americans. I then offer an analysis that utilizes Critical Race Theory as an interpretive tool for examining the ways Taylor embeds meanings…

  10. Impact evaluation of a slush stock chest bypass installed at Scott Paper Company under the energy $avings plan

    SciTech Connect

    Oens, M.A.; Spanner, G.E.

    1995-02-01

    This impact evaluation of the bypass of a slush stock chest that was recently installed at Scott Paper Company (Scott Paper) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The project consists of installing an adjustable speed drive, a 74.6 kW (100 hp) pump, a re-sized impeller, and piping modifications to bypass the slush stock chest and related equipment. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Scott Paper as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Scott Paper`s proposal and completion report). Based on this impact evaluation, energy savings from this project are expected to be 763,600 kilowatt-hours/year (kWh/yr) or 0.087 average megawatts (aMW). On a per-ton basis, this project will save 4.64 kWh/ton or 39.2%. The project cost $120,098 to install, and Scott Paper received payment of $82,232 (in 1993 dollars) from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Pacific Northwest Laboratory calculated the real levelized cost of the energy savings to Bonneville as 14.2 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars) over the project`s assumed 15-year life, and the real levelized cost to the region as 21.9 mills/kWh, not including transmission and distribution effects. The project would not have been implemented without the acquisition payment from Bonneville and therefore is not a free rider.

  11. A Method of Identifying AGNs Based on Emission-Line Excess and the Nature of Low-Luminosity AGNs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. II. The Nature of Low-Luminosity AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayuki

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a new method of identifying active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and studied the nature of low-luminosity AGNs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This is the latter part of a series of papers in which we consider correlations between the AGN activities and the host-galaxy properties. Based on a sample of AGNs identified by a new method developed in the former part (2012, PASJ, 64, 36), we found that AGNs typically show extinction of τV = 1.2, and exhibit a wide range of ionization levels. The finding of ionization levels motivated us to use [O II] + [O III] as an indicator of AGN power. We found that AGNs are preferentially located in massive, red, early-type galaxies. Taking into account a selection bias of the Oxygen-excess method, we showed that strong AGNs are located in active star-forming galaxies, and that rapidly growing super-massive black holes are located in rapidly growing galaxies, which clearly shows the coevolution of super-massive black holes and their host galaxies. This is a surprising phenomenon, given that the growths of black holes and host galaxies occur on their respective physical scales which are very different. Interestingly, the AGN power does not strongly correlate with the host-galaxy mass. It seems that the mass works as a ``switch'' for activating AGNs. The absence of AGNs in low-mass galaxies might be due to the absence of super-massive black holes there, but a dedicated observation of the nuclear region of nearby low-mass galaxies would be necessary to obtain a deeper insight into it.

  12. Converting the Audience: A Conversation with Agnes Wilcox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Becky

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a conversation with Agnes Wilcox, Executive Director of Prison Performing Arts in St. Louis, Missouri, about Prison Performing Arts. Although the average person might balk at the notion of interacting with prison inmates, finding it intimidating, worrisome, or self-sacrificial, for Wilcox, Prison Performing Arts is a…

  13. Disc outflows and high-luminosity true type 2 AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Netzer, Hagai

    2016-06-01

    The absence of intrinsic broad-line emission has been reported in a number of active galactic nuclei (AGN), including some with high Eddington ratios. Such `true type 2 AGN' are inherent to the disc-wind scenario for the broad-line region: broad-line emission requires a minimal column density, implying a minimal outflow rate and thus a minimal accretion rate. Here we perform a detailed analysis of the consequences of mass conservation in the process of accretion through a central disc. The resulting constraints on luminosity are consistent with all the cases where claimed detections of true type 2 AGN pass stringent criteria, and predict that intrinsic broad-line emission can disappear at luminosities as high as ˜4 × 1046 erg s-1 and any Eddington ratio, though more detections can be expected at Eddington ratios below ˜1 per cent. Our results are applicable to every disc outflow model, whatever its details and whether clumpy or smooth, irrespective of the wind structure and its underlying dynamics. While other factors, such as changes in spectral energy distribution or covering factor, can affect the intensities of broad emission lines, within this scenario they can only produce true type 2 AGN of higher luminosity then those prescribed by mass conservation.

  14. The search for red AGN with 2MASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Nelson, B. O.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Huchra, J. P.; Smith, P. S.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of a simple, highly efficient 2MASS color-based survey that has already discovered 140 previously unknown red AGN and QSOs. These objects are near-infrared-bright and relatively nearby; the media redshift of the sample is z=0.25, and all but two have z<0.7.

  15. FLOYDS Classification of Gaia16ann as an AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, G.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; McCully, C.; Valenti, S.

    2016-07-01

    We obtained a spectrum of Gaia16ann on 2016 July 7.5 UT with the robotic FLOYDS instrument mounted on the LCOGT 2-meter telescope on Haleakala, Hawai'i. Using SNID (Blondin & Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024), we find a good fit to an AGN at redshift z=0.196.

  16. New light on obscured accretion in nearby AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, Patricia

    Analyses of the Cosmic X-ray Background have shown that a substantial fraction of the black hole growth in the Universe occurred behind dense clouds of obscuring material. As such, it is critical to the study the detailed spectral characteristics of nearby obscured black holes, which provide templates for deriving accurate physical parameters from more distant obscured accretors. Hard X-rays are important in this regard, allowing us to peer more directly into the central engine of obscured sources and constrain the nature of the obscuration. The recently launched NuSTAR telescope is unique at focusing hard X-rays, producing the lowest background-contaminated spectra to date and rendering accurate, high signal-to-noise spectra up to 80 keV. NuSTAR covers precisely the energy range where the main features of obscured accretion appear and where the intrinsic emission might even shine through. Importantly, the low level of background also allows us for the first time to measure rapid variability of AGN at high X-ray energies. Both features combined are revealing the detailed nature of the engine of nearby obscured AGN, including the properties of the obscurer, the intrinsic emitted flux of the AGN and whether or not we can see through the torus at these high energies. In this talk I will show how NuSTAR data is challenging past assumptions about even the very local obscured AGN.

  17. Time Series Analysis of the UV Flickering in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Edward L.; Welsh, William F.

    2001-01-01

    Many active galactic nuclei (AGN) exhibit large-amplitude luminosity fluctuations on short timescales. The fluctuations lead to a profound conclusion: The size of the emitting region is remarkably small. This observational fact is one of the pillars supporting the AGN paradigm: Prodigious amounts of gravitational potential energy are liberated in an accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The goals of the research were to extract from the IUE Archive the very best observational characterizations of AGN flickering, and to use these to test and develop models for AGN variability. We hoped to answer these specific questions: 1) What does the intrinsic flickering continuum spectrum look like? 2) What do the intrinsic flickering emission-line profiles look like? 3) What is the power spectrum of the flickering? 4) What is the wavelength dependence of the power spectrum? 5) Is the flickering spectrum timescale dependent? and 6) What do the high-order cross correlation functions look like? A short summary of the papers produced by this research is presented.

  18. The Role of Environment in Fueling Seyfert AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Erin Kathleen Strobel

    2015-08-01

    We consider the role of environment in fueling of Seyfert AGN through a combined analysis of Hubble Space Telescope images and integral field spectroscopy of the ISM in a sample of local AGN. Using visible and near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope images and color maps of over a 100 galaxies we determine the distribution of the cold ISM, as traced by dust. We also measure the two-dimensional distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas, traced by H2 1-0 S(1) emission at 2.12 μm, down to scales of tens of parsecs using OSIRIS at Keck and SINFONI on VLT for a subset of approximately 20 of these galaxies. Informed by these kinematic measurements of the ISM we classify the nuclear dust morphologies of the full sample of galaxies and interpret the significance of these morphologies in terms of inflow. Our relatively small precursor sample (Hicks et al. 2009, Davies et al. 2014) hinted at a connection between the host galaxy environment and the primary mechanism driving gas inward such that fueling of AGN in isolated galaxies occurs primarily via secular processes (e.g. nuclear spirals) and galaxies in groups of 10-15 members via accretion of external gas. Using our expanded sample that now has the ability to reveal statistically significant trends we explore the potential influence of the galaxy environment on the fueling of Seyfert AGN.

  19. Review of Space VLBI RadioAstron studies of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid; Kovalev, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    Space VLBI offers an unrivalled resolution in studies of the AGN phenomena. Since 2011, the Russia-led SVLBI mission RadioAstron conducts observations at 92, 18, 6 and 1.3 cm with baselines an order of magnitude longer than the Earth diameter, therefore offering an order of magnitude "sharper" view at the brightest radio sources than achieved with Earth-based VLBI systems. In our presentation we will review the current status of the RadioAstron's scientific programme. Over the first 4.5 years of the in-orbit operations, the mission achieved successful VLBI detections of extragalactic continuum radio sources at all four observing bands. To date, detections on SVLBI baselines have been obtained for more than 150 AGN's at projected baselines up to 350 000 km (about 28 Earth diameters, ED). The highest resolution achieved is 14 microarcscends from 1.3 cm observations. RadioAstron is an international project; it conducts observations with up to 30 Earth-based radio telescopes located on different continents. We will review results of total intensity and polarisation imaging with extreme angular resolution of blazars and nearby active galaxies. We will also discuss typical and maximum brightness temperatures of blazar cores from the AGN Survey obtained with RadioAstron. Physical implications for the AGN jets formation, magnetic field and emission mechanism will be discussed on the basis of the results obtained to date.

  20. Fast ionized X-ray absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the physics of the X-ray ionized absorbers often identified as warm absorbers (WAs) and ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in Seyfert AGNs from spectroscopic studies in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind scenario. Launched and accelerated by the action of a global magnetic field anchored to an underlying accretion disk around a black hole, outflowing plasma is irradiated and ionized by an AGN radiation field characterized by its spectral energy density (SED). By numerically solving the Grad-Shafranov equation in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework, the physical property of the magnetized disk-wind is determined by a wind parameter set, which is then incorporated into radiative transfer calculations with xstar photoionization code under heating-cooling equilibrium state to compute the absorber's properties such as column density N_H, line-of-sight (LoS) velocity v, ionization parameter ξ, among others. Assuming that the wind density scales as n ∝ r-1, we calculate theoretical absorption measure distribution (AMD) for various ions seen in AGNs as well as line spectra especially for the Fe Kα absorption feature by focusing on a bright quasar PG 1211+143 as a case study and show the model's plausibility. In this note we demonstrate that the proposed MHD-driven disk-wind scenario is not only consistent with the observed X-ray data, but also help better constrain the underlying nature of the AGN environment in a close proximity to a central engine.

  1. Fast Ionized X-ray Absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk wind models in an effort to explain the highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) identified as X-ray absorbers recently detected in various sub-classes of Seyfert AGNs. Our primary focus is to show that magnetically-driven outflows are physically plausible candidates to account for the AGN X-ray spectroscopic observations. We calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption line spectra in comparison with an XXM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert AGN, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log(xi[erg cm/s]) = 5-6 and a hydrogen-equivalent column density on the order of 1e23 cm-2, outflowing at a sub-relativistic velocity of v/c = 0.1-0.2. The best-fit model favors its radial location at R = 200 Rs (Rs is the Schwarzschild radius), with a disk inner truncation radius at Rt = 30Rs. The overall K-shell feature in data is suggested to be dominated by Fe XXV with very little contribution from Fe XXVI and weakly-ionized iron, which is in a good agreement with a series of earlier analysis of the UFOs in various AGNs including PG 1211+143.

  2. First Results from the NuSTAR AGN Physics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Laura; Fuerst, F.; Matt, G.; Walton, D.; Madejski, G. M.; Marinucci, A.; Elvis, M.; Risaliti, G.; Harrison, F.; Stern, D.; Boggs, S.; Christensen, F.; Craig, W. W.; Zhang, W.; NuSTAR Team

    2013-04-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR, launched June 2012) is revolutionizing our knowledge of the physics at work in active galactic nuclei (AGN). With its high collecting area, focusing optics and low background from 3-79 keV, NASA's newest X-ray observatory is providing an unprecedented look at the spectral and timing properties of AGN in this energy range, which have been notoriously difficult to access. NuSTAR has observed several AGN to date simultaneously with XMM-Newton, Suzaku and/or Swift for the purposes of understanding their coronal properties (e.g., plasma temperature, optical depth) and measuring the spins of their supermassive black holes. We present the first results from these observing campaigns, highlighting the spectral and timing analysis of the bright, nearby AGN IC 4329A, NGC 4151, NGC 1365 and MCG--6-30-15. These are the highest signal-to-noise datasets ever obtained across the 0.2-79 keV energy band for these three sources, allowing us to cleanly deconvolve the X-ray continuum, absorption and reflection components in each galaxy for the first time via time-averaged and time-resolved spectroscopy.

  3. A Degeneracy in DRW Modelling of AGN Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Szymon

    2016-04-01

    Individual light curves of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are nowadays successfully modelled with the damped random walk (DRW) stochastic process, characterized by the power exponential covariance matrix of the signal, with the power β = 1. By Monte Carlo simulation means, we generate mock AGN light curves described by non-DRW stochastic processes (0.5 ≤ β ≤ 1.5 and β ≠ 1) and show they can be successfully and well-modelled as a single DRW process, obtaining comparable goodness of fits. A good DRW fit, in fact, may not mean that DRW is the true underlying process leading to variability and it cannot be used as a proof for it. When comparing the input (non-DRW) and measured (DRW) process parameters, the recovered time scale (amplitude) increases (decreases) with the increasing input β. In practice, this means that the recovered DRW parameters may lead to biased (or even non-existing) correlations of the variability and physical parameters of AGNs if the true AGN variability is caused by non-DRW stochastic processes. The proper way of identifying the processes leading to variability are model-independent structure functions and/or power spectral densities and then using such information on the covariance matrix of the signal in light curve modelling.

  4. Sexual Freedom Rights for Adolescents? A Rejoinder to Agnes Tellings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steutel, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Agnes Tellings rightly observes that adolescents, if compared with pre-pubescent children, are much more capable of making their own choices and therefore should be granted much more freedom to arrange their own lives. However, the capacity of adolescents to make prudent choices still seems to be below the threshold of competence. Therefore,…

  5. Agnes Mary Clerke: Ever-popular historian of astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brück, M.

    In her day, Agnes Mary Clerke (1842-1907) was the English-speaking world's most highly regarded writer on the rapidly developing science of astrophysics. This account outlines how, without any formal education but with a deep interest in learning, this remarkable woman rose to the admired position she still holds as a leading historian of astronomy and astrophysics.

  6. A degeneracy in DRW modelling of AGN light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Szymon

    2016-07-01

    Individual light curves of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are nowadays successfully modelled with the damped random walk (DRW) stochastic process, characterized by the power exponential covariance matrix of the signal, with the power β = 1. By Monte Carlo simulation means, we generate mock AGN light curves described by non-DRW stochastic processes (0.5 ≤ β ≤ 1.5 and β ≠ 1) and show they can be successfully and well modelled as a single DRW process, obtaining comparable goodness of fits. A good DRW fit, in fact, may not mean that DRW is the true underlying process leading to variability and it cannot be used as a proof for it. When comparing the input (non-DRW) and measured (DRW) process parameters, the recovered time-scale (amplitude) increases (decreases) with the increasing input β. In practice, this means that the recovered DRW parameters may lead to biased (or even non-existing) correlations of the variability and physical parameters of AGNs if the true AGN variability is caused by non-DRW stochastic processes. The proper way of identifying the processes leading to variability are model-independent structure functions and/or power spectral densities and then using such information on the covariance matrix of the signal in light-curve modelling.

  7. Understanding AGNs in the Local Universe through Optical Reverberation Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Liuyi

    2016-01-01

    I present the results of observational projects aimed at measuring the mass of the black hole at the center of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and understanding the structure and kinematics of the broad-line emitting gas within the black hole's sphere of influence.The first project aims to measure the black hole mass in the Kepler-field AGN KA1858. We obtained simultaneous spectroscopic data from the Lick Observatory 3-m telescope using the Kast Double Spectrograph and photometry data from five ground-based telescopes, and used reverberation mapping (RM) techniques to measure the emission-line light curves' lags relative to continuum variations. We obtained lags for H-beta, H-gamma, H-delta, and He II, and obtained the first black hole mass measurement for this object. Our results will serve as a reference point for future studies on relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics using Kepler AGN light curves.The second project, in collaboration with the AGN STORM team, aims to understand the structure and dynamics of the broad line region (BLR) in NGC 5548 in both UV and optical wavelengths. To supplement 6 months of HST UV observations, we obtained simultaneous optical spectroscopic data from six ground-based observatories. We obtained emission-line lags for the optical H-beta and He II lines as well as velocity-resolved lag measurements for H-beta. We also compared the velocity-resolved lags for H-beta to the UV emission lines C IV and Ly-alpha and found similar lag profiles for all three lines.Finally, I will discuss my contributions to two other collaborations in AGN RM. A key component in RM is monitoring continuum variability, which is often done through ground-based photometry. I will present a pipeline that performs aperture photometry on any number of images of an AGN with WCS coordinates and immediately produces relative light curves. This pipeline enables quick looks of AGN variability in real time and has been used in the

  8. Type 1 AGN at low z- I. Emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Laor, Ari

    2012-06-01

    We analyse the emission properties of a new sample of 3579 type 1 AGN, selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 based on the detection of broad Hα emission. The sample extends over a broad Hα luminosity LbHα of ? and a broad Hα full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of ?, which covers the range of black hole mass 106 < MBH/M⊙ < 109.5 and luminosity in Eddington units 10-3 < L/LEdd < 1. We combine ROSAT, GALEX and 2MASS observations to form the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 2.2 ?m to 2 keV. We find the following. (1) The distribution of the Hα FWHM values is independent of luminosity. (2) The observed mean optical-ultraviolet (optical-UV) SED is well matched by a fixed-shape SED of luminous quasars, which scales linearly with LbHα, and a host galaxy contribution. (3) The host galaxy r-band (fibre) luminosity function follows well the luminosity function of inactive non-emission-line galaxies (NEGs), consistent with a fixed fraction of ˜3 per cent of NEGs hosting an AGN, regardless of the host luminosity. (4) The hosts of lower luminosity AGN have a mean z-band luminosity and u-z colour which are identical to NEGs with the same redshift distribution. With increasing LbHα the AGN hosts become bluer and less luminous than NEGs. The implied increasing star formation rate with LbHα is consistent with the relation for SDSS type 2 AGN of similar bolometric luminosity. (5) The optical-UV SED of the more luminous AGN shows a small dispersion, consistent with dust reddening of a blue SED, as expected for thermal thin accretion disc emission. (6) There is a rather tight relation between ? and LbHα, which provides a useful probe for unobscured (true) type 2 AGN. (7) The primary parameter that drives the X-ray to UV emission ratio is luminosity, rather than MBH or L/LEdd.

  9. A radio view of high-energy emitting AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Robert Frank

    2016-07-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are among the most energetic objects in the Universe. These galaxies that are dominated in part or even throughout the electromagnetic spectrum by emission from their central, compact region. AGNs are extensively studied by multi-wavelength observations. In the standard picture, the main driver of an AGN is a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in its centre that is surrounded by an accretion disk. Perpendicular to the disk, in the vicinity of highly magnetized SMBH relativistic outflows of plasma, so-called jets, can form on either side that can reach far beyond the host galaxy. Only about 10% of all AGNs are dominated by emission from these jets due to relativistic beaming effects and these so-called blazars dominate the extragalactic gamma-ray sky. It is commonly accepted that the low-energy emission (radio to UV/X-ray) is due to synchrotron emission from the jet. The high-energy emission is considered to stem from inverse-Compton scattering of photons on the jet particles, but different sources for these photons are discussed (internal or external to the AGN) and other models for the high-energy emission have also been proposed. The nature of the high-energy emission is strongly linked to the location of the emission region in the jet which requires a detailed understanding of the formation and evolution of jets. Radio observations especially using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) provide the best way to gain direct information on the intrinsic properties of jets down to sub-pc scales, close to their formation region. In this thesis, I focus on the properties of three different AGNs, IC 310, PKS2004-447, and 3C 111 that belong to the small non-blazar population of gamma-ray-loud AGNs. I study them in detail with a variety of radio astronomical instruments with respect to their high-energy emission and in the context of the large monitoring programmes MOJAVE (Monitoring Of Jets in Active galactic nuclei with VLBA Experiments) and

  10. Host Galaxy Properties of the Swift BAT Ultra Hard X-Ray Selected AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa M.; Baumgartner, Wayne; Tueller, Jack; Gehrels, Neil; Valencic, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    We have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected (14-195 keV) AGN with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z<0.05), moderate luminosity AGN from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample. The BAT AGN host galaxies have intermediate optical colors (u -- r and g -- r) that are bluer than a comparison sample of inactive galaxies and optically selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are chosen to have the same stellar mass. Based on morphological classifications from the RC3 and the Galaxy Zoo, the bluer colors of BAT AGN are mainly due to a higher fraction of mergers and massive spirals than in the comparison samples. BAT AGN in massive galaxies (log Stellar Mass >10.5) have a 5 to 10 times higher rate of spiral morphologies than in SDSS AGN or inactive galaxies. We also see enhanced far-IR emission in BAT AGN suggestive of higher levels of star formation compared to the comparison samples. BAT AGN are preferentially found in the most massive host galaxies with high concentration indexes indicative of large bulge-to-disk ratios and large supermassive black holes. The narrow-line (NL) BAT AGN have similar intrinsic luminosities as the SDSS NL Seyferts based on measurements of [O III] Lambda 5007. There is also a correlation between the stellar mass and X-ray emission. The BAT AGN in mergers have bluer colors and greater ultra hard X-ray emission compared to the BAT sample as whole. In agreement with the Unified Model of AGN, and the relatively unbiased nature of the BAT sources, the host galaxy colors and morphologies are independent of measures of obscuration such as X-ray column density or Seyfert type. The high fraction of massive spiral galaxies and galaxy mergers in BAT AGN suggest that host galaxy morphology is related to the activation and fueling of local AGN.

  11. Host Galaxy Properties of BAT Hard X-ray Selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2010-07-01

    Surveys of AGN taken in the optical, UV, and soft X-rays miss an important population of obscured AGN only visible in the hard X-rays and mid-IR wavelengths. The SWIFT BAT survey in the hard X-ray range (14-195 keV) has provided a uniquely unbiased sample of 246 AGN unaffected by galactic or circumnuclear absorption [1]. Most of the sources in the survey are bright, Seyfert like AGN's with median redshift of 0.03. Of the AGN, 43% are obscured, type II AGN. We obtained 17 nights of imaging of 90 host galaxies of these AGN in 2008 at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope in the SDSS ugriz filters. For the broad line sources we subtracted the AGN contribution using GALFIT. By comparing our sample of AGN to inactive galaxies in the SDSS, we find that AGN are found in the most massive galaxies and are bluer in color than inactive galaxies of comparable stellar mass. We also find a correlation between the point source optical light and hard X-ray luminosity.

  12. Host Galaxy Properties of BAT Hard X-ray Selected AGN

    SciTech Connect

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2010-07-15

    Surveys of AGN taken in the optical, UV, and soft X-rays miss an important population of obscured AGN only visible in the hard X-rays and mid-IR wavelengths. The SWIFT BAT survey in the hard X-ray range (14-195 keV) has provided a uniquely unbiased sample of 246 AGN unaffected by galactic or circumnuclear absorption [1]. Most of the sources in the survey are bright, Seyfert like AGN's with median redshift of 0.03. Of the AGN, 43% are obscured, type II AGN. We obtained 17 nights of imaging of 90 host galaxies of these AGN in 2008 at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope in the SDSS ugriz filters. For the broad line sources we subtracted the AGN contribution using GALFIT. By comparing our sample of AGN to inactive galaxies in the SDSS, we find that AGN are found in the most massive galaxies and are bluer in color than inactive galaxies of comparable stellar mass. We also find a correlation between the point source optical light and hard X-ray luminosity.

  13. Galaxy Zoo: AGN may be fueled by stellar bars in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Melanie; Willett, Kyle; Fortson, Lucy; Galaxy Zoo Science Team

    2015-01-01

    Bars are a mechanism that have been proposed to explain how gas in the outer regions of a galaxy can be channeled inward and fuel AGN. Multiple observational studies have reported a significantly higher bar fraction in AGN than non-AGN. To accurately probe whether an excess of bars in AGN host galaxies exists because the galaxies host a bar, it is necessary to compare bar and AGN fractions at fixed mass and color, because the presence of bars strongly correlates with both. Thus, a sufficiently large sample is necessary to maintain adequate numbers in subsets of fixed mass and color. We have created a large, volume-limited sample of 19,765 disc galaxies using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By using morphological classifications from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we identify stellar bars in 51.8% of AGN hosts and 37.1% of star-forming disk galaxies. Once mass and color are fixed, there remains a statistically significant increase in the fraction of barred AGN over their unbarred counterparts. Using the L[O III]/MBH ratio as a measure of accretion efficiency, we also show that barred AGN do not exhibit stronger accretion than unbarred AGN at fixed mass or color. The data are consistent with a model in which bar-driven fueling does contribute to the probability of an actively growing black hole, but in which other dynamical mechanisms must contribute to AGN fueling via smaller, non-axisymmetric perturbations.

  14. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A 49594 in apple juice supplemented with cinnamon.

    PubMed

    Yuste, J; Fung, D Y C

    2002-10-01

    Normal (pH 3.7) and adjusted (pH 5.0) pasteurized apple juice containing cinnamon (0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3%) was inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes Scott A 49594 at 10(4) CFU/ml and stored at 5 and 20 degrees C for 7 days. Counts on tryptic soy agar (TSA), modified Oxford (MOX) medium, and thin agar layer (TAL) were determined at 1 h and 1, 3, and 7 days. The TAL method (MOX medium overlaid with TSA) was used for the recovery of injured cells. In apple juice, both at normal and adjusted pH, with any doses of cinnamon, no L. monocytogenes (a 4.6-log CFU/ml reduction) was detected after 1 h of storage at both temperatures, and no growth occurred at any points of storage. Therefore, cinnamon by itself (regardless of pH) had a pronounced killing effect. A further enrichment step with brain heart infusion agar showed that L monocytogenes was completely inactivated in apple juice stored at 20 degrees C, except in pH 5.0 samples with 0.1% of cinnamon. The TAL method was as effective as TSA in recovering injured cells of L. monocytogenes. Cinnamon considerably inactivates L. monocytogenes in apple juice and thus enhances the safety of this product. PMID:12380758

  15. Observations of chlorine monoxide over Scott Base, Antarctica, during the ozone hole, 1996-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connor, Brian; Solomon, Philip; Barrett, James; Mooney, Thomas; Parrish, Alan

    2007-01-01

    We report observations of chlorine monoxide, ClO, in the lower stratosphere, made from Scott Base (77.85º S, 166.77º E) in springtime during each year, 1996-2005. The ClO amounts in the atmosphere are retrieved from remote measurements of microwave emission spectra. ClO column densities of up to about 2.5 × 1015 cm-2 are recorded during September, when chlorine is present in chemically active forms due to reactions on the surface of Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) particles. Maximum mixing ratios of ClO are approximately 2 ppbv. The annual average of ClO column density during the activation period is anticorrelated with similar averages of ozone column measured at nearby Arrival Heights, with correlation coefficient of –0.81, and with averages of ozone mass integrated over the entire polar region, with similar correlation coefficients. There was a substantial decrease in ClO amounts during 2002-2004. There has been no systematic change in the timing of chlorine deactivation attributable to secular change in the Antarctic vortex

  16. Scott Wallace on the National Alliance for Health Information Technology. Interview by Deborah Mears.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Scott

    2004-01-01

    The National Alliance for Health Information Technology (NAHIT) appointed Scott Wallace as its first president and CEO in 2003. NAHIT is an organization of 90 Leading healthcare associations, suppliers, vendors, hospitals, and healthcare systems committed tothe development of voluntary standards for health information technoLogy. Wallace previously was the principal owner of Great kes Capital, a financiaL, commerciaL, and business development consulting firm with a major focus in technology. Prior to starting Great Lakes, Wallace led several technoLogy-based companies. He served as president and CEO of PowerClip Co., a wireless products mpany; president and CEO of Eichrom Industries, an advanced materials and specialty chemical company; and vice president and general counsel for GCI, a venture capital fund. Wallace earned a juris doctorate from the University of Chicago Law School, a master's degree in business administration from the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, anda bachelor's degree in economics from Duke University. PMID:15603090

  17. Effect of temperature history on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A at refrigeration temperatures.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, R L; Klawitter, L A

    1991-02-01

    The effect of pre-inoculation temperature on the subsequent growth of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A at 5 degrees C was examined in microbiological medium, UHT milk, canned dog food, and raw ground beef (untreated and irradiation-sterilized). In microbiological medium, the duration of the lag phase was decreased when aerobic and anaerobic cultures were initially grown at less than or equal to 28 and less than or equal to 13 degrees C, respectively. Subsequent exponential growth rates and maximum population densities of the 5 degrees C cultures were not affected by temperature history. Differences in lag phase durations were also observed when L. monocytogenes initially cultured at 19 and 37 degrees C were grown at 5 degrees C in UHT milk and some of the canned dog food varieties. Growth of L. monocytogenes was not observed in either untreated or irradiation-sterilized raw ground beef. While temperature history can affect the growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes at 5 degrees C, it did not account for the lack of growth in raw meat, suggesting that there is an inhibitory condition or component in ground beef that is lost upon cooking. PMID:1904762

  18. STS-103 Pilot Scott Kelly and MS John Grunsfeld try on oxygen masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the bunker at Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly (left) and Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) (right) try on oxygen masks during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Other crew members taking part are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who are with the European Space Agency. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  19. Review of behavioral health integration in primary care at Baylor Scott and White Healthcare, Central Region

    PubMed Central

    Fluet, Norman R.; Reis, Michael D.; Stern, Charles H.; Thompson, Alexander W.; Jolly, Gillian A.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of behavioral health services in primary care has been referred to in many ways, but ultimately refers to common structures and processes. Behavioral health is integrated into primary care because it increases the effectiveness and efficiency of providing care and reduces costs in the care of primary care patients. Reimbursement is one factor, if not the main factor, that determines the level of integration that can be achieved. The federal health reform agenda supports changes that will eventually permit behavioral health to be fully integrated and will allow the health of the population to be the primary target of intervention. In an effort to develop more integrated services at Baylor Scott and White Healthcare, models of integration are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of each model are discussed. Recommendations to increase integration include adopting a disease management model with care management, planned guideline-based stepped care, follow-up, and treatment monitoring. Population-based interventions can be completed at the pace of the development of alternative reimbursement methods. The program should be based upon patient-centered medical home standards, and research is needed throughout the program development process. PMID:27034543

  20. F-100A with nose through hangar wall following Scott Crossfield's emergency landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    A NACA High-Speed Flight Station hangar wall meets the nose of a North American F-100A Super Sabre airplane on 8 September 1954. On the first NACA research flight of airplane #52-5778, pilot Scott Crossfield had to make a powerless 'deadstick' landing following an engine fire warning. This was something North American's own test pilots doubted could be done, for the early F-100 lacked flaps and landed 'hot as hell.' Crossfield followed up the flawless approach and landing by coasting off the lakebed, up the ramp, and then through the front door of the NACA hangar, frantically trying to stop the F-100A, which had used up its emergency brake power. Crossfield missed the NACA X fleet, but crunched the nose of the aircraft through the hangar's side wall. It is reported that Chuck Yeager then proclaimed that while the sonic wall had been his, the hangar wall was Crossfield's! The hangar wall and the F-100A were repaired, and the airplane flew again.

  1. No Absolutism Here: Harm Predicts Moral Judgment 30× Better Than Disgust-Commentary on Scott, Inbar, & Rozin (2016).

    PubMed

    Gray, Kurt; Schein, Chelsea

    2016-05-01

    Moral absolutism is the idea that people's moral judgments are insensitive to considerations of harm. Scott, Inbar, and Rozin (2016, this issue) claim that most moral opponents to genetically modified organisms are absolutely opposed-motivated by disgust and not harm. Yet there is no evidence for moral absolutism in their data. Perceived risk/harm is the most significant predictor of moral judgments for "absolutists," accounting for 30 times more variance than disgust. Reanalyses suggest that disgust is not even a significant predictor of the moral judgments of absolutists once accounting for perceived harm and anger. Instead of revealing actual moral absolutism, Scott et al. find only empty absolutism: hypothetical, forecasted, self-reported moral absolutism. Strikingly, the moral judgments of so-called absolutists are somewhat more sensitive to consequentialist concerns than those of nonabsolutists. Mediation reanalyses reveal that moral judgments are most proximally predicted by harm and not disgust, consistent with dyadic morality. PMID:27217244

  2. The McAndrews Leadership Lecture: February 2015, by Dr Scott Haldeman. Challenges of the Past, Challenges of the Present

    PubMed Central

    Haldeman, Scott; McAndrews, George P.; Goertz, Christine; Sportelli, Louis; Hamm, Anthony W.; Johnson, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The McAndrews Leadership Lecture was developed by the American Chiropractic Association to honor the legacy of Jerome F. McAndrews, DC, and George P. McAndrews, JD, and their contributions to the chiropractic profession. This article is a transcription of the presentation made by Dr Scott Haldeman on February 28, 2015, in Washington, DC, at the National Chiropractic Leadership Conference. PMID:26770177

  3. Listeria monocytogenes Scott A: Cell Surface Charge, Hydrophobicity, and Electron Donor and Acceptor Characteristics under Different Environmental Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Briandet, Romain; Meylheuc, Thierry; Maher, Catherine; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie Noëlle

    1999-01-01

    We determined the variations in the surface physicochemical properties of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A cells that occurred under various environmental conditions. The surface charges, the hydrophobicities, and the electron donor and acceptor characteristics of L. monocytogenes Scott A cells were compared after the organism was grown in different growth media and at different temperatures; to do this, we used microelectrophoresis and the microbial adhesion to solvents method. Supplementing the growth media with glucose or lactic acid affected the electrical, hydrophobic, and electron donor and acceptor properties of the cells, whereas the growth temperature (37, 20, 15, or 8°C) primarily affected the electrical and electron donor and acceptor properties. The nonlinear effects of the growth temperature on the physicochemical properties of the cells were similar for cells cultivated in two different growth media, but bacteria cultivated in Trypticase soy broth supplemented with 6 g of yeast extract per liter (TSYE) were slightly more hydrophobic than cells cultivated in brain heart infusion medium (P < 0.05). Adhesion experiments conducted with L. monocytogenes Scott A cells cultivated in TSYE at 37, 20, 15, and 8°C and then suspended in a sodium chloride solution (1.5 × 10−1 or 1.5 × 10−3 M NaCl) confirmed that the cell surface charge and the electron donor and acceptor properties of the cells had an influence on their attachment to stainless steel. PMID:10583984

  4. The stability of QSO/AGN broad emission line clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsky, I. S.; Puetter, R. C.

    1992-08-01

    Results of a numerical linear stability analysis of QSO/AGN emission-line clouds (ELCs) embedded within a confining hot intercloud medium (HIM) are reported. A first-order linear perturbation analysis reveals two important ionstabilities. The first instability is thermal in nature and arises in the interface region between the HIM and the ELC where thermal convection dominates gas heating; the growth time of the instability is approximately 1000 s, resulting in an ELC evaporation time of about 10 yr. The second instability is dynamic in nature, with the sound wave amplitude growing in response to radiative forces. The growth time of this instability is about 10 exp 6 s and essentially independent of the wavelength. The results suggest that if QSO/AGN ELCs have properties similar to those of the standard ELC model, then the broad-line region is in a constant state of flux in which ELCs continually form, are destroyed, and then re-formed.

  5. Four Dual AGN Candidates Observed with the VLBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabányi, K. É.; An, T.; Frey, S.; Komossa, S.; Paragi, Z.; Hong, X.-Y.; Shen, Z.-Q.

    2016-08-01

    According to hierarchical structure formation models, merging galaxies are expected to be seen in different stages of coalescence. However, there are currently no straightforward observational methods to either select or to confirm a large number of dual active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates. Most attempts involve obtaining a better understanding of double-peaked narrow emission line sources, in order to distinguish the objects for which the emission lines originate from narrow-line kinematics or jet-driven outflows, from those which might harbor dual AGNs. We observed four such candidate sources with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), at 1.5 GHz with a ∼10 mas angular resolution, for which the spectral profiles of AGN optical emission suggested the existence of dual AGNs. In SDSS J210449.13–000919.1 and SDSS J23044.82–093345.3 the radio structures are aligned with the optical emission features, thus the double-peaked emission lines might be the results of jet-driven outflows. In the third detected source SDSS J115523.74+150756.9, the radio structure is less extended and is oriented nearly perpendicular to the position angle derived from optical spectroscopy. The fourth source remained undetected with the VLBA, but it was imaged with the Very Large Array at arcsec resolution a few months before our observations, suggesting the existence of an extended radio structure. We did not detect two radio-emitting cores in any of the four sources, a convincing signature of duality.

  6. Observational aspects of AGN jets at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Jun

    2015-03-01

    For the last two decades, significant and dramatic progress has been made in understanding astrophysical jet sources, particularly in the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands. For example, the Chandra X-ray observatory reveals a number of AGN jets extending from kpc to Mpc scales. More recently, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescopes launched in 2008 started monitoring the gamma-ray sky with excellent sensitivity of about ten times greater than that of EGRET onboard CGRO, and has detected more than 2,000 sources (mostly AGNs) as of 2014. Moreover, Fermi-LAT has discovered gamma-ray emissions not only from blazars but from a dozen radio galaxies not previously known to emit gamma-rays. Closer to home, the Fermi-bubbles were discovered to extend 50 degrees above and below the Galactic center. These large scale diffuse gamma-ray structures are similar in structure to AGN lobes such as those seen in Cen A and provide evidence for past activity in our Galactic center. In this review, I will first summarize recent highlights of large scale jets in radio galaxies, specifically resolved by the Chandra X-ray observatory. Next I will move on to the gamma-ray sky to present some highlights from Fermi-LAT observations of ``misaligned'' blazars, namely radio galaxies. I will discuss a unification scheme connecting blazars and misaligned radio galaxies. In the last part, I will also briefly comment on recent multiband observations of the Fermi-bubble and possible impacts on the AGN jet physics in the near future.

  7. X-ray AGN Clustering, Bias & Accretion mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plionis, Manolis; Koutoulidis, Lazaros; Georgantopoulos, Ioannis; Fanidakis, Nikolaos

    2012-09-01

    We present the spatial clustering properties of 1466 X-ray selected AGN compiled from the Chandra CDF-N, CDF-S, eCDF-S, COSMOS and AEGIS fields in the 0.5-8 keV band. The X-ray sources span the redshift interval 0AGN bias and the corresponding dark-matter host halo mass, are significantly higher than the corresponding values of optically selected AGN (at the same redshifts. The redshift evolution of the X-ray selected AGN bias indicates, in agreement with other recent studies, that a unique dark-matter halo mass does not fit well the bias at all the different redshifts probed. Furthermore, we investigate if there is a dependence of the clustering strength on X-ray luminosity, applying a procedure to disentangle the dependence of clustering on redshift. We find indications for a positive dependence of the clustering length on X-ray luminosity, in the sense that the more luminous sources have a larger clustering length and hence a higher dark-matter halo mass.

  8. Type 1 AGN at low z. I. Emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J.; Laor, A.

    2012-07-01

    We analyze the emission properties of a new sample of 3 596 type 1 AGN, selected from the SDSS DR7 based on the detection of broad Hα emission. The sample extends over a broad Hα luminosity LbHα of 1040-1044 erg s-1 and a broad Hα FWHM of 1 000-25 000 km s-1, which covers the range of black hole mass 106 < MBH/Modot < 109.5 and luminosity in Eddington units 10-3 < L/LEdd < 1. We combine ROSAT, GALEX and 2MASS observations to form the SED from 2.2 μm to 2 keV. We find the following: 1. The distribution of the Hα FWHM values is independent of luminosity. 2. The observed mean optical-UV SED is well matched by a fixed shape SED of luminous quasars, which scales linearly with LbHα, and a host galaxy contribution. 3. The host galaxy r-band (fibre) luminosity function follows well the luminosity function of inactive non-emission line galaxies (NEG), consistent with a fixed fraction of ~ 3% of NEG hosting an AGN, regardless of the host luminosity. 4. The optical-UV SED of the more luminous AGN shows a small dispersion, consistent with dust reddening of a blue SED, as expected for thermal thin accretion disc emission. 5. There is a rather tight relation of νLν(2 keV) and LbHα, which provides a useful probe for unobscured (true) type 2 AGN.

  9. Alignment of Stellar and AGN Accretion Disks from SDSS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Padilla, Nelson D.; Strauss, Michael A.; Hao, Lei

    2010-05-01

    Lagos, Padilla & Cora (2009) show that if alignments between the galaxy kinematics and the AGN system were to occur, massive galaxies should host BHs with high spin values, regardless of the detailed physics of the BH. Since the BH spin regulates the mass-to-energy conversion (Marconi et al. 2004) and possibly the existence of radio jets (Sikora et al. 2007), this study has a strong impact in our understanding of galaxy formation.

  10. Near-UV Snapshot Survey of Low Luminosity AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Delgado, Rosa

    2005-07-01

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei {LLAGNs} comprise 30% of all bright galaxies {B<12.5} and are the most common type of AGN. These include low-luminosity Seyfert galaxies, LINERs, and transition-type objects {TOs, also called weak-[OI] LINERs}. What powers them is still at the forefront of AGN research. To unveil the nature of the central source we propose a near-UV snapshot survey of 50 nearby LLAGNs using ACS/HRC and the filter {F330W}, a configuration which is optimal to detect faint star forming regions around their nuclei. These images will complement optical and near-IR images available in the HST archive, providing a panchromatic atlas of the inner regions of these galaxies, which will be used to study their nuclear stellar population. Our main goals are to: 1} Investigate the presence of nuclear unresolved sources that can be attributed to an AGN; 2} Determine the frequency of nuclear and circumnuclear stellar clusters, and whether they are more common in Transition Objects {TOs} than in LINERs; 3} Characterize the sizes, colors, luminosities, masses and ages of these clusters; 4} Derive the luminosity function of star clusters and study their evaporation over time in the vicinity of AGNs. Finally, the results of this project will be combined with those of a previous similar one for Seyfert galaxies in order to compare the nature of the nuclear sources and investigate if there could be an evolution from Seyferts to TOs and LINERs. By adding UV images to the existing optical and near-IR ones, this project will also create an extremely valuable database for astronomers with a broad range of scientific interests.

  11. The Multiwavelength AGN Population and the X-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treister, Ezequiel; Urry, Claudia M.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Volonteri, Marta

    2014-07-01

    In order to fully understand galaxy formation we need to know when in the cosmic history are supermassive black holes (SMBHs) growing more intensively, in what type of galaxies this growth is happening and what fraction of these sources are invisible at most wavelengths due to obscuration. Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) population synthesis models that can explain the spectral shape and intensity of the cosmic X-ray background (CXRB) indicate that most of the SMBH growth occurs in moderate-luminosity (L X ~ 1044 erg/s) sources (Seyfert-type AGN), at z~ 0.5-1 and in heavily obscured but Compton-thin, NH ~ 1023cm-2, systems. However, this is not the complete history, as a large fraction of black hole growth does not emit significantly in X-rays either due to obscuration, intrinsic low luminosities or large distances. The integrated intensity at high energies indicates that a significant fraction of the total black hole growth, 22%, occurs in heavily-obscured systems that are not individually detected in even the deepest X-ray observations. We further investigate the AGN triggering mechanism as a function of bolometric luminosity, finding evidence for a strong connection between significant black hole growth events and major galaxy mergers from z~ 0 to z~ 3, while less spectacular but longer accretion episodes are most likely due to other (stochastic) processes. AGN activity triggered by major galaxies is responsible for ~60% of the total black hole growth. Finally, we constrain the total accreted mass density in supermassive black holes at z > 6, inferred via the upper limit derived from the integrated X-ray emission from a sample of photometrically selected galaxy candidates. We estimate an accreted mass density <1000 M⊙Mpc-3 at z~ 6, significantly lower than the previous predictions from some existing models of early black hole growth and earlier prior observations.

  12. The AGN Population and the Cosmic X-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treister, Ezequiel; Urry, C. Meg; Schawinski, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    In order to fully understand galaxy formation we need to know when in the cosmic history are supermassive black holes (SMBHs) growing more intensively, in what type of galaxies this growth is happening and what fraction of these sources are invisible at most wavelengths due to obscuration. Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) population synthesis models that can explain the spectral shape and intensity of the cosmic X-ray background (CXRB) indicate that most of the SMBH growth occurs in moderate-luminosity (Lx~1044 erg/s) sources (Seyfert-type AGN), at z~0.5-1 and in heavily obscured but Compton-thin, NH~1023 cm-2, systems.However, this is not the complete history, as a large fraction of black hole growth does not emit significantly in X-rays either due to obscuration, intrinsic low luminosities or large distances. Using a combination of X-ray stacking and multi wavelength selection techniques we constrain the amount of black hole accretion as a function of cosmic history, from z~0 to z~6. The integrated intensity at high energies indicates that a significant fraction of the total black hole growth, 22%, occurs in heavily-obscured systems that are not individually detected in even the deepest X-ray observations.We finally investigate the AGN triggering mechanism as a function of bolometric luminosity, finding evidence for a strong connection between significant black hole growth events and major galaxy mergers from z~0 to z~3, while less spectacular but longer accretion episodes are most likely due to other (stochastic) processes. AGN activity triggered by major galaxies is responsible for ~60% of the total black hole growth.

  13. Cadenced IRAC Monitoring of Infrared-Variable AGNs, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Fouesneau, Morgan; Hora, Joseph; Krick, Jessica; Smith, Howard; Surace, Jason

    2008-03-01

    We have analyzed IRAC imaging data from all 97 Spitzer visits to a very well-studied field, the IRAC Dark Calibration Field (IRAC-CF) near the north ecliptic pole. With this extensive dataset we have already identified a unique sample of 30 IR-variable galaxies which we are now working to characterize with respect to variability amplitudes and timescales, panchromatic SEDs, and host morphologies, among other quantities. Unfortunately, the continual change in spacecraft roll angle means that our sources are typically observed for at most six months at a time by each IRAC FOV in succession -- in other words, the visibility windows are exactly out of phase. Thus the existing data, despite the fact that they extend over more than four years, present large, unavoidable gaps that frustrate the time-delay analysis we wish to perform on exactly the timescales known to be common in active galaxies. This has only changed beginning in 2007 July: since that time cadenced IRAC observations have been carried out in synchrony with the IRAC-CF dark-calibration observations as part of our approved Cycle-4 program (PID 40553). Here we are proposing to continue this successful AGN monitoring campaign until the end of the cryogenic mission. The resulting timelines (covering 1500 days thus far and expected to run ultimately to some 2200+ days), will be a unique legacy of the Spitzer mission. This dataset, especially for the sizable, unbiased AGN sample we now have, holds unique promise for measuring the colors and temperatures of IR-varying AGN, and will have much to say about the underlying physical models of the infrared AGN emission. Accordingly we ask for just 8 h to gather IRAC photometry in the temporal gaps that would otherwise accrue in Cycle 5.

  14. Clustering of ROSAT All-Sky Survey AGNs Through Cross-Correlation Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumpe, Mirko; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Coil, Alison

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the clustering propertiesof ~1550 low-redshift broad-line AGNs detected in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through a cross-correlation function (CCF) with ~46000 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using this approach, we avoid small-number statistics and systematic errors caused by the variation of the Galactic absorption compared to a direct measurement of the AGN auto-correlation function (ACF). We compute the ACF of low-z RASS-AGN based on the CCF for the total X-ray sample ( = 0.25) and found a correlation length of r0 = 4.3-0.4+0.4 h-1 Mpc. Furthermore, we discovered an X-ray luminosity dependence of the clustering signal, i.e. high luminosity AGN cluster stronger than low luminosity AGN. We have also applied a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model directly to our AGN-LRG CCF.

  15. Suzaku Observations of AGN and Synergy with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Jun; Takahashi, Tad; Madejski, Greg; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-29

    In next five years, dramatic progress is anticipated for the AGN studies, as we have two important missions to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST and Suzaku. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite which was successfully launched in July 2005. It carries four X-ray sensitive imaging CCD cameras (0.2-12 keV) located in the focal planes of X-ray telescope, and a non-imaging, collimated hard X-ray detector, which extends the bandpass of the observatory to include the 10-600 keV range. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments (GLAST and Suzaku) will be particularly valuable for variable radio-loud AGN, allowing the cross-correlations of time series as well as detailed modeling of the spectral evolution between the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands. In this paper, we show early highlights from Suzaku observations of radio-loud AGNs, and discuss what we can do with GLAST in forthcoming years.

  16. Probing the central parsecs of AGN using Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, R. T.; Taylor, G. B.

    2002-05-01

    A broad frequency range and low instrumental polarization makes the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) an ideal instrument for studying polarimetry at sub-milliarcsecond resolution. To take advantage of these unique capabilities we have conducted a multi-frequency polarization survey of 40 radio-loud AGN (Quasars, BL Lacs, and radio galaxies). Our aim is to use Faraday Rotation Measures (RMs) as a probe of the central 1-50 parsecs of these objects. The RM is produced by the line of sight magnetic field weighted by the electron density. Using the electron density established through spectral line diagnostics a magnetic field strength and topology can be estimated within a few parsecs of the central engines of these AGN. The observations for the survey are complete, and we present the first results for 8 quasars, 5 BL Lacs, and 4 radio galaxies. The magnitudes for the RMs range from several thousand rad m-2 in the quasars and radio galaxies to a few hundred rad m-2 in the BL Lac objects. These values are in agreement with the basic ideas of the unified model for AGN. We also observe variations in the RM on small spatial (< ~ 1 pc) in radio galaxies and quasars; and short time scales ( ~ 6 months) in the quasars 3C 273 and 3C 279. R.T.Z. gratefully acknowledges support from a pre-doctoral research appointment at NRAO and from the New Mexico Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professiorate through NSF grant HRD-0086701.

  17. Doppler disc tomography applied to low-mass AGN spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Matthew J.; Ingram, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Doppler tomography can provide a powerful means of determining black hole spin when our view to the central regions are revealed and obscured by optically thick orbiting material, and can provide an independent estimate that does not suffer as many degeneracies as traditional methods. For low-mass active galactic nuclei (AGN), time-dependent obscuration is expected to leave a signature in the changing spectrum of the disc emission which extends into the soft X-ray bandpass. We create a spectral model incorporating Doppler tomography and apply it to the case of the low-mass (8 × 105 M⊙) AGN, RX J1301.9+2747 which shows unusual timing properties in the form of short-lived flares that we argue are best explained by the orbit of a window through an optically thick wind. Modelling the phase-resolved spectrum over the course of the highest data quality flare indicates a very low spin even when we relax our constraints. This is the lowest mass AGN for which a spin has been measured and the first via this technique. We note that, as the mass and spin are very low, this appears to favour supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth by chaotic rather than constant accretion.

  18. Modeling AGN outbursts from supermassive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.

    2012-12-01

    When galaxies merge to assemble more massive galaxies, their nuclear supermassive black holes (SMBHs) should form bound binaries. As these interact with their stellar and gaseous environments, they will become increasingly compact, culminating in inspiral and coalescence through the emission of gravitational radiation. Because galaxy mergers and interactions are also thought to fuel star formation and nuclear black hole activity, it is plausible that such binaries would lie in gas-rich environments and power active galactic nuclei (AGN). The primary difference is that these binaries have gravitational potentials that vary - through their orbital motion as well as their orbital evolution - on humanly tractable timescales, and are thus excellent candidates to give rise to coherent AGN variability in the form of outbursts and recurrent transients. Although such electromagnetic signatures would be ideally observed concomitantly with the binary's gravitational-wave signatures, they are also likely to be discovered serendipitously in wide-field, high-cadence surveys; some may even be confused for stellar tidal disruption events. I discuss several types of possible "smoking gun" AGN signatures caused by the peculiar geometry predicted for accretion disks around SMBH binaries.

  19. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of AGN evolution stretching back to z˜5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function - all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is demonstrated at z ≈0 and 0.9, and clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z. The results support the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering: one, at high luminosity, that only occurs in high mass, highly biased haloes, and one that can occur over a wide range of halo masses and leads to luminosities that are correlated with halo mass. This latter mode dominates at z<0.9. The CLFs for Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs are also constrained at z ≈0, and we find evidence that unobscured quasars are more likely to be found in higher mass halos than obscured quasars. Thus, the AGN unification model seems to fail at quasar luminosities.

  20. X-Ray Absorption, Nuclear Infrared Emission, and Dust Covering Factors of AGNs: Testing Unification Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Watson, M. G.; Blain, A.; Caccianiga, A.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Ramos Almeida, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present the distributions of the geometrical covering factors of the dusty tori (f2) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGNs drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGNs have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2-10 keV luminosities between 1042 and 1046 erg s-1, and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work, we determined the rest-frame 1-20 μm continuum emission from the torus, which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGNs are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGNs having, on average, tori with higher f2 than type 1 AGNs. Nevertheless, ˜20% of type 1 AGNs have tori with large covering factors, while ˜23%-28% of type 2 AGNs have tori with small covering factors. Low f2 are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGNs the effect is certainly small. f2 increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction and X-ray absorption take place in material that share an overall geometry and most likely belong to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity, and also f2 determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ˜1-20 μm nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.

  1. College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapa, Marisa; Galvan-De Leon, Vanessa; Solis, Judith; Mundy, Marie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    During the 79th Texas Legislature, the bill "Advancement of College Readiness in Curriculum" was passed (THECB). As a response to this, high schools and colleges have combined forming an early college high school. The result of this union was a program that condensed the time it took to complete both the high school diploma and up to two…

  2. College Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Scalzo, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    This article describes Oakwood City School District's College Connection Study, which is now in its eighth year. The purpose of the study is to help the educators in the district learn how to effectively prepare students for success in the colleges of their choice. Teachers, administrators, and other staff members travel to colleges to conduct…

  3. Cycling of the powerful AGN in MS 0735.6+7421 and the duty cycle of radio AGN in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantyghem, A. N.; McNamara, B. R.; Russell, H. R.; Main, R. A.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Wise, M. W.; Hoekstra, H.; Gitti, M.

    2014-08-01

    We present an analysis of deep Chandra X-ray observations of the galaxy cluster MS 0735.6+7421, which hosts the most energetic radio active galactic nucleus (AGN) known. Our analysis has revealed two cavities in its hot atmosphere with diameters of 200-240 kpc. The total cavity enthalpy, mean age, and mean jet power are 9 × 1061 erg, 1.6 × 108 yr, and 1.7 × 1046 erg s-1, respectively. The cavities are surrounded by nearly continuous temperature and surface brightness discontinuities associated with an elliptical shock front of Mach number 1.26 (1.17-1.30) and age of 1.1 × 108 yr. The shock has injected at least 4 × 1061 erg into the hot atmosphere at a rate of 1.1 × 1046 erg s-1. A second pair of cavities and possibly a second shock front are located along the radio jets, indicating that the AGN power has declined by a factor of 30 over the past 100 Myr. The multiphase atmosphere surrounding the central galaxy is cooling at a rate of 40 M⊙yr-1, but does not fuel star formation at an appreciable rate. In addition to heating, entrainment in the radio jet may be depleting the nucleus of fuel and preventing gas from condensing out of the intracluster medium. Finally, we examine the mean time intervals between AGN outbursts in systems with multiple generations of X-ray cavities. We find that, like MS0735, their AGN rejuvenate on a time-scale that is approximately 1/3 of their mean central cooling time-scales, indicating that jet heating is outpacing cooling in these systems.

  4. Highly variable AGN from the XMM-Newton slew survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strotjohann, N. L.; Saxton, R. D.; Starling, R. L. C.; Esquej, P.; Read, A. M.; Evans, P. A.; Miniutti, G.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We investigate the properties of a variability-selected complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in order to identify the mechanisms which cause large amplitude X-ray variability on timescales of years. Methods: A complete sample of 24 sources was constructed, from AGN which changed their soft X-ray luminosity by more than one order of magnitude over 5-20 years between ROSAT observations and the XMM-Newton slew survey. Follow-up observations were obtained with the Swift satellite. We analysed the spectra of these AGN at the Swift and XMM observation epochs, where six sources had continued to display extreme variability. Multiwavelength data are used to calculate black hole masses and the relative X-ray brightness αOX. Results: After removal of two probable spurious sources, we find that the sample has global properties which differ little from a non-varying control sample drawn from the wider XMM-slew/ROSAT/Veron sample of all secure AGN detections. A wide range of AGN types are represented in the varying sample. The black hole mass distributions for the varying and non-varying sample are not significantly different. This suggests that long timescale variability is not strongly affected by black hole mass. There is marginal evidence that the variable sources have a lower redshift (2σ) and X-ray luminosity (1.7σ). Apart from two radio-loud sources, the sample sources have normal optical-X-ray ratios (αOX) when at their peak but are X-ray weak during their lowest flux measurements. Conclusions: Drawing on our results and other studies, we are able to identify a variety of variability mechanisms at play: tidal disruption events, jet activity, changes in absorption, thermal emission from the inner accretion disc, and variable accretion disc reflection. Little evidence for strong absorption is seen in the majority of the sample and single-component absorption can be excluded as the mechanism for most sources.

  5. AGN Feedback in Overdense Environments at z=2.23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucy, Adrian B.; Lehmer, B.; Alexander, D. M.; Best, P.; Geach, J.; Harrison, C. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Matsuda, Y.; Mullaney, J.; Smail, I.; Sobral, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from a ≈100 ks Chandra observation of the 2QZ Cluster 1004+00 galaxy overdensity at z=2.23. This 2QZ Clus structure was first identified as an overdensity of four optically-selected quasars; that sample was subsequently found to overlap with an overdensity of 22 Hα-emitting galaxies (HAEs) identified through narrow and broad band near-infrared imaging by Matsuda et al. (2011). In addition to the preselected quasars in 2QZ Clus, our Chandra observation reveals that a further three HAEs are X-ray sources, all characterized by X-ray luminosities and spectral slopes consistent with unobscured active galactic nuclei (AGN). In total, we find that ≈30% of HAEs in our observed region of 2QZ Clus are AGN. This AGN fraction is high compared to AGN fractions among HAEs in the Chandra-COSMOS field (C-COSMOS), and if this enhancement is purely a result of the quasar selection bias of our sample, we estimate that such activity is rare at this redshift. Hα is a tracer of star formation, so 2QZ Clus is well suited to the investigation of the coeval growth of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies in the precursors to rich local clusters. Moreover, we have an ideal control sample in C-COSMOS; this survey contains a large sample of HAEs classified identically using infrared imaging, but without any selection of quasars. We calculate AGN fraction as a function of galaxy overdensity in C-COSMOS, and perform stacking analyses of Chandra and 250μ Herschel SPIRE data to obtain mean black hole accretion rates dMBH/dt and star formation rates SFR. Preliminary results indicate that dMBH/dt and its ratio to SFR are significantly elevated in 2QZ Clus compared to similarly overdense regions of C-COSMOS. We discuss these relations in the context of theoretical models describing the emergence of the MBH/Mgal relation of the local Universe.

  6. Hydrodynamic models of AGN feedback in cooling core clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleo, John C.

    X-ray observations show that the Intra Cluster Medium (ICM) in many galaxy clusters is cooling at a rapid rate, often to the point that it should have radiated away all of its energy in less than the age of the cluster. There is however a very clear lack of enough cool end products of this gas in the centers of the clusters. Energetic arguments indicate that Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) should be capable of heating the inner regions of clusters enough to offset the radiative cooling; truncating massive galaxy formation and solving the cooling flow problem. We present three sets of high resolution, ideal hydrodynamic simulations with the ZEUS code to test this AGN heating paradigm. For the first set of simulations, we study the dependence of the interaction between the AGN jets and the ICM on the parameters of the jets themselves. We present a parameter survey of two-dimensional (axisymmetric) models of back-to-back jets injected into a cluster atmosphere. We follow the passive evolution of the resulting structures. These simulations fall into roughly two classes, cocoon-bounded and non-cocoon bounded. We find that the cocoon-bounded sources inject significantly more entropy into the core regions of the ICM atmosphere, even though the efficiency with which the energy is thermalized is independent of the morphological class. In all cases, a large fraction of the energy injected by the jet ends up as gravitational potential energy due to the expansion of the atmosphere. For the second set, we present three-dimensional simulations of jetted AGN that act in response to cooling-mediated accretion of an ICM atmosphere. We find that our models are incapable of producing a long term balance of heating and cooling; catastrophic cooling can be delayed by the jet action but inevitably takes hold. At the heart of the failure of these models is the formation of a low density channel through which the jet can freely flow, carrying its energy out of the cooling core. Finally, we

  7. Three years of Swift/BAT Survey of AGN: Reconciling Theory and Observations?

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, D.; Ajello, M.; Greiner, J.; Comastri, A.; Merloni, A.; Gehrels, N.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-02-07

    It is well accepted that unabsorbed as well as absorbed AGN are needed to explain the nature and the shape of the Cosmic X-ray background, even if the fraction of highly absorbed objects (dubbed Compton-thick sources) substantially still escapes detection. We derive and analyze the absorption distribution using a complete sample of AGN detected by Swift-BAT in the first three years of the survey. The fraction of Compton-thick AGN represents only 4.6% of the total AGN population detected by Swift-BAT. However, we show that once corrected for the bias against the detection of very absorbed sources the real intrinsic fraction of Compton-thick AGN is 20{sub -6}{sup +9}%. We proved for the first time (also in the BAT band) that the anti-correlation of the fraction of absorbed AGN and luminosity it tightly connected to the different behavior of the luminosity functions (XLFs) of absorbed and unabsorbed AGN. This points towards a difference between the two subsamples of objects with absorbed AGN being, on average, intrinsically less luminous than unobscured ones. Moreover the XLFs show that the fraction of obscured AGN might also decrease at very low luminosity. This can be successfully interpreted in the framework of a disk cloud outflow scenario as the disappearance of the obscuring region below a critical luminosity. Our results are discussed in the framework of population synthesis models and the origin of the Cosmic X-ray Background.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gamma-ray AGN type determination (Hassan+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, T.; Mirabal, N.; Contreras, J. L.; Oya, I.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we employ Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and Random Forest (RF) that embody two of the most robust supervised learning algorithms available today. We are interested in building classifiers that can distinguish between two AGN classes: BL Lacs and FSRQs. In the 2FGL, there is a total set of 1074 identified/associated AGN objects with the following labels: 'bzb' (BL Lacs), 'bzq' (FSRQs), 'agn' (other non-blazar AGN) and 'agu' (active galaxies of uncertain type). From this global set, we group the identified/associated blazars ('bzb' and 'bzq' labels) as the training/testing set of our algorithms. (2 data files).

  9. Cooling, AGN Feedback and Star Formation in Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg; Ruszkowski, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    The feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is widely considered to be the major heating source in cool-core galaxy clusters to prevent a classical cooling flow. Numerical simulations with AGN feedback have successfully suppressed radiative cooling, but generally fail to reproduce the right amount of cold gas and the expected cyclical AGN activities. We perform adaptive mesh simulations including both momentum-driven AGN feedback and star formation to study the interplay between cooling, AGN heating and star formation over ~ 6.5 Gyr time in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps first cool out of the ICM due to the non-liner perturbation driven by the AGN jets. These cold clumps feed both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst which increases the entropy of the ICM and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, which leads to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and develops multiphase gas again, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. The average star formation rate is ~40 solar mass/yr. The black hole accretion rate shows a large scatter, but the average correlates well with the star formation rate and is roughly one order of magnitude lower.

  10. The sharpest view of the local AGN population at mid-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, Daniel; Hönig, Sebastian F.; Gandhi, Poshak; Smette, Alain; Duschl, Wolfgang J.

    2014-07-01

    We present the largest mid-infrared (MIR) atlas of active galactic nuclei at sub-arcsec spatial scales containing 253 objects with a median redshift of 0.016. It comprises all available ground-based high-angular resolution MIR observations performed to date with 8-meter class telescopes and includes 895 photometric measurements. All types of AGN are present in the atlas, which also includes 80 per cent of the 9-month BAT AGN sample. Therefore, this atlas and its subsamples are very well-suited for AGN unification studies. A first application of the atlas is the extension of the MIR-X-ray luminosity correlation for AGN.

  11. Characterization of a spontaneous, pressure-tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Scott A ctsR deletion mutant.

    PubMed

    Joerger, Rolf D; Chen, Haiqiang; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2006-01-01

    A spontaneous, pressure-tolerant mutant of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, designated 2-1, was isolated after several rounds of pressure treatments at 500 MPa for 10 min. Mutant 2-1 was almost 100,000-fold more resistant than the wild type to a pressure of 350 MPa, and about 100-fold more resistant to 450 MPa when pressurized in growth medium. Approximately ten times more mutant cells than wild-type cells survived a 20-min exposure to 55 degrees C, and the mutant appears also to be more resistant to 0.2% H(2)O(2), although the difference could not be confirmed statistically. About 10 times more wild-type than mutant cells survived exposure to growth medium adjusted to pH 2.5 with HCl. The mutant is about 16-fold more sensitive to nisin than the wild type. Mutant 2-1 is non-motile, produces hemolytic activity, is able to grow in fetal calf serum as well as the wild type, and exhibits a lower level of invasiveness of human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cells than the wild type. The mutation in strain 2-1 is a deletion in the ctsR gene that results in the predicted production of truncated CtsR of 20 amino acids compared to a CtsR of 152 amino acids in the wild type. With the exception of its response to pH and possibly also to H(2)O(2), mutant 2-1 shares most of the phenotypes of the previously described ctsR mutant, AK01. The isolation of another spontaneous, pressure-resistant ctsR mutant confirms the central role of this regulatory gene in pressure tolerance of L. monocytogenes. Although such mutants appear of lesser concern to human health then the wild type, current detection methods for Listeria monocytogenes are not able to distinguish between these mutants and wildtype cells. PMID:16761946

  12. Antibacterial activity of hen egg white lysozyme against Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in foods.

    PubMed

    Hughey, V L; Wilger, P A; Johnson, E A

    1989-03-01

    Egg white lysozyme killed or prevented growth of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in several foods. Lysozyme was more active in vegetables than in animal-derived foods that we tested. For maximum activity in certain foods, EDTA was required in addition to lysozyme. Lysozyme with EDTA effectively killed inoculated populations of 10(4) L. monocytogenes per g in fresh corn, fresh green beans, shredded cabbage, shredded lettuce, and carrots during storage at 5 degrees C. Control incubations without lysozyme supported growth of L. monocytogenes to 10(6) to 10(7)/g. Lysozyme had less activity in animal-derived foods, including fresh pork sausage (bratwurst) and Camembert cheese. In bratwurst, lysozyme with EDTA prevented L. monocytogenes from growing for 2 to 3 weeks but did not kill significant numbers of cells and did not prevent eventual growth. The control sausages not containing lysozyme supported rapid and heavy growth, which indicated that lysozyme was bacteriostatic for 2 to 3 weeks in fresh pork sausage. We also prepared Camembert cheese containing 10(4) L. monocytogenes cells per g and investigated the changes during ripening in cheeses supplemented with lysozyme and EDTA. Cheeses with lysozyme by itself or together with EDTA reduced the L. monocytogenes population by approximately 10-fold over the first 3 to 4 weeks of ripening. In the same period, the control cheese wheels without added lysozyme with and without chelator slowly started to grown and eventually reached 10(6) to 10(7) CFU/g after 55 days of ripening.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2494938

  13. Understanding the Effects of Multiscale Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions on Scott River Baseflow and Stream Temperature in Support of Beneficial Salmon Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, R.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Scott River watershed is one of only a handful of major watersheds in California that include a zone of adjudicated groundwater and that is not managed by a major reservoir. The Scott River is a major tributary in the Klamath River basin, providing habitat for cold water salmon fishery, including the migration, spawning, reproduction, and early development of cold water fish such as coho salmon, Chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. The Scott Valley entertains extensive alfalfa and hay productions that provide the economic base for the agricultural valley. Due to the Mediterranean climate in the area, discharge rates in the river are highly seasonal. Almost all annual discharge occurs during the winter precipitation season and spring snowmelt. During the summer months (July through September), the main-stem river becomes disconnected from its tributaries throughout much of Scott Valley and relies primarily on baseflow from the Scott Valley aquifer. Summer baseflow in the Scott supports juvenile coho salmon that remain in the Valley until the following winter. Stream temperatures in the Scott River have increased to levels that are not considered sustainable for the native salmon population. Concurrently, late summer/early fall baseflow has decreased, possibly leading to substantial deterioration of habitat conditions. Increased temperature and decreased baseflow are thought to be due in part to groundwater pumping for irrigation and to increased solar radiation from lack of shade by riparian vegetation. Scott Valley agriculture relies on a combination of surface water and groundwater supplies for crop irrigation during April through September. Regional scale surface water - groundwater modeling is employed to investigate the benefits to mid-and late summer baseflow in the Scott River of various conjunctive use management alternatives, including increased spring irrigation recharge and deficit irrigation. Field measurements of stream temperature indicate that

  14. Linking X-ray AGN with dark matter halos: a model compatible with AGN luminosity function and large-scale clustering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütsi, Gert; Gilfanov, Marat; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our goal is to find a minimalistic model that describes the luminosity function and large-scale clustering bias of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei in the general framework of the concordance ΛCDM model. Methods: We assume that a simple population-averaged scaling relation between the AGN X-ray luminosity LX and the host dark matter halo mass Mh exists. With such a relation, the AGN X-ray luminosity function can be computed from the halo mass function. Using the concordance ΛCDM halo mass function for the latter, we obtain the Mh - LX relation required to match the redshift-dependent AGN X-ray luminosity function known from X-ray observations. Results: We find that with a simple power-law-scaling Mh ∝ LΓ(z), our model can successfully reproduce the observed X-ray luminosity function. Furthermore, we automatically obtain predictions for the large-scale AGN clustering amplitudes and their dependence on the luminosity and redshift, which seem to be compatible with AGN clustering measurements. Our model also includes the redshift-dependent AGN duty cycle, which peaks at the redshift z ≃ 1, and its peak value is consistent with unity, suggesting that on average there is no more than one AGN per dark matter halo. For a typical X-ray-selected AGN at z ~ 1, our best-fit Mh - LX scaling implies low Eddington ratio LX/LEdd ~ 10-4 - 10-3 (2-10 keV band, no bolometric correction applied) and correspondingly high mass-growth e-folding times, suggesting that typical X-ray AGN are dominantly fueled via relatively inefficient "hot-halo" accretion mode.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ASCA AGN optical identifications (Akiyama+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, M.; Ueda, Y.; Ohta, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yamada, T.

    2003-10-01

    We present the results of optical spectroscopic identifications of a bright subsample of 2-10keV hard X-ray-selected sources from the ASCA Medium Sensitivity Survey in the northern sky (AMSSn). The flux limit of the subsample is 3x10-13erg/s/cm2 in the 2-10keV band. All but one of the 87 hard X-ray-selected sources are optically identified, with AGNs (including broad-line AGNs, narrow-line AGNs, and three BL Lac objects), seven clusters of galaxies, and one galactic star. It is the largest complete sample of hard X-ray-selected AGNs at the bright flux limit. Amounts of absorption to their nuclei are estimated to be hydrogen column densities (NH) of up to 3x1023cm-2 from their X-ray spectra. Optical properties of X-ray absorbed AGNs with NH>1x1022cm-2 indicate the effects of dust absorption: at redshifts z<0.6, AGNs without broad H{beta} emission lines have significantly larger NH-values than AGNs with broad H{beta} emission lines. At z>0.6, the X-ray absorbed AGNs have a large hard X-ray to optical flux ratio (logf2-10keV/fR>+1). However, three X-ray absorbed z>0.6 AGNs show strong broad lines. In combination with hard X-ray-selected AGN samples from the ASCA Large Sky Survey, the ASCA Deep Survey in the Lockman Hole, and Chandra Deep Field North, the luminosity distributions of absorbed (NH>1x1022cm-2) and less-absorbed (NH<1x1022cm-2) AGNs are compared. (4 data files).

  16. AGN are cooler than you think: the intrinsic far-IR emission from QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symeonidis, M.; Giblin, B. M.; Page, M. J.; Pearson, C.; Bendo, G.; Seymour, N.; Oliver, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present an intrinsic AGN spectral energy distribution (SED) extending from the optical to the submm, derived with a sample of unobscured, optically luminous (νLν,5100 > 1043.5 erg s-1) QSOs at z < 0.18 from the Palomar Green survey. The intrinsic AGN SED was computed by removing the contribution from stars using the 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature in the QSOs' mid-IR spectra; the 1σ uncertainty on the SED ranges between 12 and 45 per cent as a function of wavelength and is a combination of PAH flux measurement errors and the uncertainties related to the conversion between PAH luminosity and star-forming luminosity. Longwards of 20 μm, the shape of the intrinsic AGN SED is independent of the AGN power indicating that our template should be applicable to all systems hosting luminous AGN (νLν, 5100 or L_X(2-10 keV) ≳ 1043.5 erg s-1). We note that for our sample of luminous QSOs, the average AGN emission is at least as high as, and mostly higher than, the total stellar powered emission at all wavelengths from the optical to the submm. This implies that in many galaxies hosting powerful AGN, there is no `safe' broad-band photometric observation (at λ < 1000 μm) which can be used in calculating star formation rates without subtracting the AGN contribution. Roughly, the AGN contribution may be ignored only if the intrinsic AGN luminosity at 5100 AA is at least a factor of 4 smaller than the total infrared luminosity (LIR, 8-1000 μm) of the galaxy. Finally, we examine the implication of our work in statistical studies of star formation in AGN host galaxies.

  17. Are Compton-thick AGNs the Missing Link between Mergers and Black Hole Growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Brightman, Murray; Nandra, Kirpal; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salvato, Mara; Aird, James; Bell, Eric F.; Hsu, Li-Ting; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Koo, David C.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Mozena, Mark; Rosario, David; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2015-12-01

    We examine the host morphologies of heavily obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z∼ 1 to test whether obscured super-massive black hole growth at this epoch is preferentially linked to galaxy mergers. Our sample consists of 154 obscured AGNs with {N}{{H}}\\gt {10}23.5 {{cm}}-2 and z\\lt 1.5. Using visual classifications, we compare the morphologies of these AGNs to control samples of moderately obscured (1022 cm{}-2\\lt {N}{{H}}\\lt {10}23.5 {{cm}}-2) and unobscured ({N}{{H}}\\lt {10}22 {{cm}}-2) AGN. These control AGNs have similar redshifts and intrinsic X-ray luminosities to our heavily obscured AGN. We find that heavily obscured AGNs are twice as likely to be hosted by late-type galaxies relative to unobscured AGNs ({65.3}-4.6+4.1% versus {34.5}-2.7+2.9%) and three times as likely to exhibit merger or interaction signatures ({21.5}-3.3+4.2% versus {7.8}-1.3+1.9%). The increased merger fraction is significant at the 3.8σ level. If we exclude all point sources and consider only extended hosts, we find that the correlation between the merger fraction and obscuration is still evident, although at a reduced statistical significance (2.5σ ). The fact that we observe a different disk/spheroid fraction versus obscuration indicates that the viewing angle cannot be the only thing differentiating our three AGN samples, as a simple unification model would suggest. The increased fraction of disturbed morphologies with obscuration supports an evolutionary scenario, in which Compton-thick AGNs are a distinct phase of obscured super-massive black hole (SMBH) growth following a merger/interaction event. Our findings also suggest that some of the merger-triggered SMBH growth predicted by recent AGN fueling models may be hidden among the heavily obscured, Compton-thick population.

  18. Analysis of Background Seismic Noise Recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Aster, R.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Butler, R.

    2006-12-01

    A small array of high frequency seismometers was recently placed around the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in order to characterize seismic noise generated by the station during operations. This week long experiment, titled, "South Pole Analysis of Machines" or SPAM was conducted in January of 2006 using equipment provided by IRIS PASSCAL to sample the high frequency noise sources generated at the NSF's research base. These data will be correlated to those observed at the ultra quiet GSN seismic station (QSPA) located 5 miles from the base. The purpose of the experiment is to show that although the QSPA sensors are 5 miles away and nearly 1000 feet deep in the ice, there is still a risk of contamination of the signals by cultural noise from the South Pole research base. A Quiet Sector was established around the QSPA station in order to minimize vibrational noise sources, but there is interest in moving some experiments out into the Quiet Sector. Characterizing the noise sources will help us determine the potential reduction in data quality expected at the QSPA station as experiments move closer to the site. Sensors were placed next to the power generators, aircraft taxiway, large antenna towers, as well as at the base of the new station itself. Sensors were also placed between the research base and the QSPA station to get an idea of the propagation of the noise toward the QSPA station. Several high frequency noise sources are clearly seen on all array elements with a number of very clear spectral lines above 1 Hz. These are primarily associated with snow moving tractors and power generators. Smaller signals are seen that may be related to wind loading on the new South Pole elevated station along with harmonics that appear to be correlated with large air handling equipment in the station. Also evident are air operations with landings, takeoffs, taxi and idling C-130's evident. Although greatly attenuated, almost all of these signals are observed at the QSPA

  19. Relativistic HD and MHD modelling for AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, R.; Porth, O.; Monceau-Baroux, R.; Walg, S.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic hydro and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provide a continuum fluid description for plasma dynamics characterized by shock-dominated flows approaching the speed of light. Significant progress in its numerical modelling emerged in the last two decades; we highlight selected examples of modern grid-adaptive, massively parallel simulations realized by our open-source software MPI-AMRVAC (Keppens et al 2012 J. Comput. Phys. 231 718). Hydrodynamical models quantify how energy transfer from active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets to their surrounding interstellar/intergalactic medium (ISM/IGM) gets mediated through shocks and various fluid instability mechanisms (Monceau-Baroux et al 2012 Astron. Astrophys. 545 A62). With jet parameters representative for Fanaroff-Riley type-II jets with finite opening angles, we can quantify the ISM volumes affected by jet injection and distinguish the roles of mixing versus shock-heating in cocoon regions. This provides insight in energy feedback by AGN jets, usually incorporated parametrically in cosmological evolution scenarios. We discuss recent axisymmetric studies up to full 3D simulations for precessing relativistic jets, where synthetic radio maps can confront observations. While relativistic hydrodynamic models allow one to better constrain dynamical parameters like the Lorentz factor and density contrast between jets and their surroundings, the role of magnetic fields in AGN jet dynamics and propagation characteristics needs full relativistic MHD treatments. Then, we can demonstrate the collimating properties of an overal helical magnetic field backbone and study differences between poloidal versus toroidal field dominated scenarios (Keppens et al 2008 Astron. Astrophys. 486 663). Full 3D simulations allow one to consider the fate of non-axisymmetric perturbations on relativistic jet propagation from rotating magnetospheres (Porth 2013 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 429 2482). Self-stabilization mechanisms related to the detailed

  20. The view of AGN-host alignment via reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Matthew J.; Parker, Michael L.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Lohfink, Anne M.

    2016-04-01

    The fuelling of active galactic nuclei (AGN) - via material propagated through the galactic disc or via minor mergers - is expected to leave an imprint on the alignment of the sub-pc disc relative to the host galaxy's stellar disc. Determining the inclination of the inner disc usually relies on the launching angle of the jet; here instead we use the inclination derived from reflection fits to a sample of AGN. We determine the distorting effect of unmodelled Fe XXV/XXVI features and, via extensive simulations, determine the difference in disc inclination resulting from the use of RELXILL compared to REFLIONX. We compare inner disc inclinations to those for the host galaxy stellar disc derived from the Hubble formula and, via Monte Carlo simulations, find a strong lack of a correlation (at ≫5σ) implying either widespread feeding via mergers if we assume the sample to be homogeneous, or that radiative disc warps are distorting our view of the emission. However, we find that by removing a small (˜1/5) subset of AGN, the remaining sample is consistent with random sampling of an underlying 1:1 correlation (at the 3σ level). A heterogenous sample would likely imply that our view is not dominated by radiative disc warps but instead by different feeding mechanisms with the majority consistent with coplanar accretion (although this may be the result of selection bias), whilst a smaller but not insignificant fraction may have been fuelled by minor mergers in the recent history of the host galaxy.

  1. The AGN Contribution to Galaxy Merger Infrared Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Lee; Hayward, Christopher C.; Smith, Howard; Ashby, Matthew; Hung, Chao-Ling; Martinez-Galarza, Rafael; Weiner, Aaron; Zezas, Andreas; Lanz, Lauranne

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of AGN activity to the infrared luminosity of interacting galaxies by analyzing dust radiative transfer calculations of a hydrodynamically simulated merger, created with the code GADGET-2. We focus on emission in the mid-IR to far-IR wavelength ranges, and trace the luminosity density of an interacting gas-rich galaxy pair throughout its evolution. We find that the AGN contribution to IR luminosity is greatest during and immediately after coalescence of the galaxies' central black holes. This period lasts roughly 80 Myr, during which time the increased influx of gas to the center of the merger increases the total luminosity by a factor of a thousand or more due to both increased star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion. We compare different interstellar medium models used to describe sub-resolution gas and dust clouds in the radiative transfer calculations by studying the color evolution of our merger in the Herschel Space Observatory photometric filter bands, and compare the results to Herschel observations. We conclude that using infrared luminosity as a simple surrogate for SFR can overestimate the true rate, due to the contribution of AGN or other dust heating mechanisms. This conclusion has an especially significant impact in assessing the star formation activity in high-redshift galaxies for which luminosity (the best measured property) may not accurately measure the SFR, and in cases where the molecular gas content can differ from that of local systems. Further work will extend this analysis to simulations of mergers between late-type galaxies. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851, by the Smithsonian Institution and by NASA grant NNX14AJ6IG.

  2. AGN-stimulated cooling of hot gas in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Milena; Brighenti, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    We study the impact of relatively weak active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback on the interstellar medium (ISM) of intermediate and massive elliptical galaxies. We find that the AGN activity, while globally heating the ISM, naturally stimulates some degree of hot gas cooling on scales of several kpc. This process generates the persistent presence of a cold ISM phase, with mass ranging between 104 and ≳ 5 × 107 M⊙, where the latter value is appropriate for group centred, massive galaxies. Widespread cooling occurs where the ratio of cooling to free-fall time before the activation of the AGN feedback satisfies tcool/tff ≲ 70, that is we find a less restrictive threshold than commonly quoted in the literature. This process helps explaining the body of observations of cold gas (both ionized and neutral/molecular) in Ellipticals and, perhaps, the residual star formation detected in many early-type galaxies. The amount and distribution of the off-centre cold gas vary irregularly with time. The cold ISM velocity field is irregular, initially sharing the (outflowing) turbulent hot gas motion. Typical velocity dispersions of the cold gas lie in the range 100-200 km s-1. Freshly generated cold gas often forms a cold outflow and can appear kinematically misaligned with respect to the stars. We also follow the dust evolution in the hot and cold gas. We find that the internally generated cold ISM has a very low dust content, with representative values of the dust-to-gas ratio of 10-4-10-5. Therefore, this cold gas can escape detection in the traditional dust-absorption maps.

  3. A Search for AGN Intra-Day Variability with KVN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taeseok; Trippe, Sascha; Oh, Junghwan; Byun, Do-Young; Sohn, Bong-Won; Lee, Sang-Sung

    2015-10-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are known for irregular variability on all time scales, down to intra-day variability with relative variations of a few percent within minutes to hours. On such short timescales, unexplored territory, such as the possible existence of a shortest characteristic time scale of activity and the shape of the high frequency end of AGN power spectra, still exists. We present the results of AGN single-dish fast photometry performed with the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). Observations were done in a "anti-correlated" mode using two antennas, with always at least one antenna pointing at the target. This results in an effective time resolution of less than three minutes. We used all four KVN frequencies, 22, 43, 86, and 129 GHz, in order to trace spectral variability, if any. We were able to derive high-quality light curves for 3C 111, 3C 454.3, and BL Lacertae at 22 and 43 GHz, and for 3C 279 at 86 GHz, between May 2012 and April 2013. We performed a detailed statistical analysis in order to assess the levels of variability and the corresponding upper limits. We found upper limits on flux variability ranging from ∼1.6% to ∼7.6%. The upper limits on the derived brightness temperatures exceed the inverse Compton limit by three to six orders of magnitude. From our results, plus comparison with data obtained by the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory, we conclude that we have not detected source-intrinsic variability which would have to occur at sub-per cent levels.

  4. Liners and Low Luminosity AGN in the ROSAT Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This program has led to a series of papers being written and published in the Astrophysical Journal. Together these papers try to explain major parts of the LINER and low luminosity AGN puzzle. One paper ('Accretion Disk Instabilities, Cold Dark Matter Models, and Their Role in Quasar Evolution', Hatziminaoglou E., Siemiginowska A., & Elvis M., 2001, ApJ, 547, 90) describes an analytical model for the evolution of the quasar luminosity function. By combining the Press-Schechter formalism for the masses of initial structures with the luminosity distribution for a population of single mass black holes given by an unstable accretion disk an almost complete end-to-end physics-based model of quasar evolution is produced. In this model black holes spend 75% of their time in a low accretion state (at L(Edd)). This low state population of black holes is likely to be observed as the LINER and low luminosity AGNs in the local universe. Another paper ('Broad Emission Line Regions in AGN: the Link with the Accretion Power', Nicastro F., 2000, ApJ Letters, 530, L65) gives a physical basis for why low state black holes appear as LINERS. By linking the Lightman-Eardley instability in an accretion disk to the ori.gin of a wind that contains the broad emission line cloud material this model explains the large widths seen in these lines as being the Keplerian velocity of the disk at the instability radius. For LINERS the key is that below an accretion rate of 10(exp -3)M(sub Edd)the Lightman-Eardley instability falls within the innermost stable orbit of the disk, and so leaves the entire disk stable. No wind occurs, and so no broad emission lines are seen. Most LINERS are likely to be black holes in this low state. Tests of this model are being considered.

  5. Fossil AGN jets as ultrahigh-energy particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, Gregory; Protheroe, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Remnants of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets and their surrounding cocoons leave colossal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fossil structures storing total energies ~1060 erg. The original AGN may be dead but the fossil will retain its stable configuration resembling the reversed-field pinch (RFP) encountered in laboratory MHD experiments. In an RFP the longitudinal magnetic field changes direction at a critical distance from the axis, leading to magnetic reconnection there, and to slow decay of the large-scale RFP field. We show that this field decay induces large-scale electric fields which can accelerate cosmic rays with an E-2 power law up to ultrahigh energies with a cut-off depending on the fossil parameters. The cut-off is expected to be rigidity dependent, implying the observed composition would change from light to heavy close to the cut-off if one or two nearby AGN fossils dominate. Given that several per cent of the Universe's volume may house such slowly decaying structures, these fossils may even re-energize ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays from distant/old sources, offsetting the `GZK-losses' due to interactions with photons of the cosmic microwave background radiation and giving evidence of otherwise undetectable fossils. In this case the composition would remain light to the highest energies if distant sources or fossils dominated, but otherwise would be mixed. It is hoped the new generation of cosmic ray experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and ultrahigh-energy neutrino telescopes such as ANITA and lunar Cherenkov experiments will clarify this.

  6. Why are AGN found in high-mass galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lan; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2008-12-01

    There is a strong observed mass dependence of the fraction of nearby galaxies that contain either low-luminosity [low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) type] or higher luminosity (Seyfert or composite type) active galactic nuclei (AGN). This implies that either only a small fraction of low-mass galaxies contain black holes, or that the black holes in these systems only accrete rarely or at very low rates, and hence are generally not detectable as AGN. In this paper, we use semi-analytic models implemented in the Millennium Simulation to analyse the mass dependence of the merging histories of dark matter haloes and of the galaxies that reside in them. Only a few per cent of galaxies with stellar masses less than M* < 1010Msolar are predicted to have experienced a major merger. The fraction of galaxies that have experienced major mergers increases steeply at larger stellar masses. We argue that if a major merger is required to form the initial seed black hole, the mass dependence of AGN activity in local galaxies can be understood quite naturally. We then investigate when the major mergers that first create these black holes are predicted to occur. High-mass galaxies are predicted to have formed their first black holes at very early epochs. The majority of low-mass galaxies never experience a major merger and hence may not contain a black hole, but a significant fraction of the supermassive black holes that do exist in low-mass galaxies are predicted to have formed recently.

  7. Revisiting Stochastic Variability of AGNs with Structure Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Szymon

    2016-08-01

    Discrepancies between reported structure function (SF) slopes and their overall flatness as compared to the expectations from the damped random walk (DRW) model, which generally well describes the variability of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), have triggered us to study this problem in detail. We review common AGN variability observables and identify their most common problems. Equipped with this knowledge, we study ∼9000 r-band AGN light curves from Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, using SFs described by stochastic processes with the power exponential covariance matrix of the signal. We model the “subensemble” SFs in the redshift–absolute magnitude bins with the full SF equation (including the turnover and the noise part) and a single power law (SPL; in the “red noise regime” after subtracting the noise term). The distribution of full-equation SF (SPL) slopes peaks at γ =0.55+/- 0.08 (0.52 ± 0.06) and is consistent with the DRW model. There is a hint of a weak correlation of γ with the luminosity and a lack of correlation with the black hole mass. The typical decorrelation timescale in the optical is τ =0.97+/- 0.46 year. The SF amplitude at one year obtained from the SPL fitting is {{SF}}0=0.22+/- 0.06 mag and is overestimated because the SF is already at the turnover part, so the true value is {{SF}}0=0.20+/- 0.06 mag. The asymptotic variability is {{SF}}∞ =0.25+/- 0.06 mag. It is strongly anticorrelated with both the luminosity and the Eddington ratio and is correlated with the black hole mass. The reliability of these results is fortified with Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Agnes Mary Clerke and the Rise of Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brück, M. T.

    2008-03-01

    Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. Family background in County Cork; 2. Ireland and Italy; 3. London, the literary scene; 4. The History of Astronomy; 5. A circle of astronomers; 6. A visit to South Africa; 7. The System of the Stars; 8. Social life in scientific circles; 9. Homer, the Herschels and a revised History; 10. The opinion moulder; 11. Popularisation, cryogenics and evolution; 12. Problems in Astrophysics; 13. Women in astronomy in Britain in Agnes Clerke's time; 14. Revised System of the Stars; 15. Cosmogonies, cosmology and Nature's spiritual clues; 16. Last days and retrospect; 17. Epilogue; Notes; Appendix; Bibliography; Index.

  9. Hard X-ray AGN Clustering & SMBH Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelluti, Nico

    2012-09-01

    In this review talk I present the status of the art of the studies on AGN clustering in the X-ray band and its applications in understanding the coeval growth of SMBH and Dark Matter Halos. A well defined picture has been taken up to z~2 while, at high-z, where important physical phenomena connected with SMBH formation, the knowledge is still relegated to the study of anisotropies of the unresolved CXB. I will finally present recent applications of clustering analysis to the study of clustering pattern in the unresolved CXB, and pointing out the possibility of the detection of the first BH in the University through fluctuation analysis.

  10. Dust in the torus of the AGN unified model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Rachel E.

    2015-10-01

    In these proceedings I briefly summarize our current understanding of the dusty torus of the AGN unified model: its structure, composition, and ideas about its origin and evolution. The paper is based on an invited review talk at the 7th Meeting on Cosmic Dust, which covered dust-related topics in areas from comets to debris disks and high-redshift galaxies. This is therefore intended to be an accessible, introductory overview of the torus with some emphasis on the solid-state spectral features observed.

  11. Effects of AGN feedback on ΛCDM galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia Del P.; Cora, Sofía A.; Padilla, Nelson D.

    2008-08-01

    We study the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback on the formation and evolution of galaxies by using a combination of a cosmological N-body simulation of the concordance Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) paradigm and a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. This model is an improved version of the one described by Cora (2006), which now considers the growth of black holes (BHs) as driven by (i) gas accretion during merger-driven starbursts and mergers with other BHs, (ii) accretion during starbursts triggered by disc instabilities and (iii) accretion of gas cooled from quasi-hydrostatic hot gas haloes. It is assumed that feedback from AGN operates in the last case. The model has been calibrated in order to reproduce observational correlations between BH mass and mass, velocity dispersion and absolute magnitudes of the galaxy bulge. AGN feedback has a strong impact on reducing or even suppressing gas cooling, an effect that becomes important at lower redshifts. This phenomenon helps to reproduce the observed galaxy luminosity function (LF) in the optical and near-infrared bands at z = 0, and the cosmic star formation rate and stellar mass functions over a wide redshift range (0 <~ z <~ 5). It also allows us to have a population of massive galaxies already in place at z >~ 1, which are mostly early-type and have older and redder stellar populations than lower mass galaxies, reproducing the observed bimodality in the galaxy colour distribution, and the morphological fractions. The evolution of the optical QSO LF is also reproduced, provided that the presence of a significant fraction of obscured QSOs is assumed. We explore the effects of AGN feedback during starbursts finding that, in order to obtain a good agreement with observations, these need to be strong enough to expel the reheated gas away from the galaxy halo. We also test new, recent prescriptions for dynamical friction time-scales, and find that they produce an earlier formation of elliptical

  12. The Properties of Low-Luminosity AGN: Variability, Accretion Rate, Black Hole Mass and Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleas, Juan; Podjed, Stephanie; Sarajedini, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    We present the results from a study of ~5000 Broad-Line selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. Galaxy and AGN templates have been fit to the SDSS spectra to isolate the AGN component. The sources have absolute magnitudes in the range -23 < Mi < -18 and lie at redshifts less than z ~ 0.8. A variability analysis reveals that the anti-correlation between luminosity and variability amplitude continues to the faintest AGN in our sample (Gallastegui-Aizpun & Sarajedini 2014), though the underlying cause of the relation is still poorly understood. To address this, we further explore the connection between AGN luminosity and variability through measurement of the Hβ line width to determine black hole mass and accretion rate. We find that AGN with the highest variability amplitudes at a given luminosity appear to have lower accretion rates compared to low amplitude variables. We also investigate correlations with AGN color and accretion rate among these low-luminosity AGN.

  13. Photometric and Astrometric Characterization of the La Silla QUEST AGN Variability Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, Paolo S.; Cartier, R. A.; QUEST Team

    2014-01-01

    We study the photometric and astrometric properties of the La Silla QUEST AGN Variability Survey and present preliminary results. This wide-field survey is designed to collect well-sampled AGN light curves, on day to year timescales, in order to better characterize the variability properties of a large sample of AGN selected by a variety of other techniques. These properties can then be used to test and improve AGN variability selection techniques, e.g., to better prepare for the arrival of LSST. Additionally, we hope to connect these variability properties to the fundamental physical parameters of AGN such as black hole mass. To achieve this goal, we carry out nightly observations of a set of extragalactic fields with good multiwavelength coverage such as COSMOS. The survey uses the QUEST camera (with ~7.5 square degree field-of-view) operating on the 1m ESO Schmidt located in La Silla, Chile. The survey began in March 2010 and will likely continue for at least two more years. We review our progress and present sample AGN light curves from the first two years of the survey. We use the two-year data to test for possible biases in current selection variability techniques by looking at the known AGN in the COSMOS field. The larger QUEST variabiliity survey, which is now being used to find supernova, will eventually provide high-quality AGN variability data over ~15,000 square degrees of sky.

  14. The KMOS AGN Survey at High redshift (KASHz): the prevalence and drivers of ionized outflows in the host galaxies of X-ray AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Stott, J. P.; Swinbank, A. M.; Arumugam, V.; Bauer, F. E.; Bower, R. G.; Bunker, A. J.; Sharples, R. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present the first results from the KMOS (K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph) AGN (active galactic nuclei) Survey at High redshift (KASHz), a VLT/KMOS integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) survey of z ≳ 0.6 AGN. We present galaxy-integrated spectra of 89 X-ray AGN (L2-10 keV = 1042-1045 erg s-1), for which we observed [O III] (z ≈ 1.1-1.7) or Hα emission (z ≈ 0.6-1.1). The targets have X-ray luminosities representative of the parent AGN population and we explore the emission-line luminosities as a function of X-ray luminosity. For the [O III] targets, ≈50 per cent have ionized gas velocities indicative of gas that is dominated by outflows and/or highly turbulent material (i.e. overall line widths ≳600 km s-1). The most luminous half (i.e. LX > 6 × 1043 erg s-1) have a ≳2 times higher incidence of such velocities. On the basis of our results, we find no evidence that X-ray obscured AGN are more likely to host extreme kinematics than unobscured AGN. Our KASHz sample has a distribution of gas velocities that is consistent with a luminosity-matched sample of z < 0.4 AGN. This implies little evolution in the prevalence of ionized outflows, for a fixed AGN luminosity, despite an order-of-magnitude decrease in average star formation rates over this redshift range. Furthermore, we compare our Hα targets to a redshift-matched sample of star-forming galaxies and despite a similar distribution of Hα luminosities and likely star formation rates, we find extreme ionized gas velocities are up to ≈10 times more prevalent in the AGN-host galaxies. Our results reveal a high prevalence of extreme ionized gas velocities in high-luminosity X-ray AGN and imply that the most powerful ionized outflows in high-redshift galaxies are driven by AGN activity.

  15. DUAL SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES IN THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Comerford, Julia M.; Schluns, Kyle; Greene, Jenny E.; Cool, Richard J.

    2013-11-01

    Dual supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with kiloparsec-scale separations in merger-remnant galaxies are informative tracers of galaxy evolution, but the avenue for identifying them in large numbers for such studies is not yet clear. One promising approach is to target spectroscopic signatures of systems where both SMBHs are fueled as dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or where one SMBH is fueled as an offset AGN. Dual AGNs may produce double-peaked narrow AGN emission lines, while offset AGNs may produce single-peaked narrow AGN emission lines with line-of-sight velocity offsets relative to the host galaxy. We search for such dual and offset systems among 173 Type 2 AGNs at z < 0.37 in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES), and we find two double-peaked AGNs and five offset AGN candidates. When we compare these results to a similar search of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey and match the two samples in color, absolute magnitude, and minimum velocity offset, we find that the fraction of AGNs that are dual SMBH candidates increases from z = 0.25 to z = 0.7 by a factor of ∼6 (from 2/70 to 16/91, or 2.9{sup +3.6}{sub -1.9}% to 18{sup +5}{sub -5}%). This may be associated with the rise in the galaxy merger fraction over the same cosmic time. As further evidence for a link with galaxy mergers, the AGES offset and dual AGN candidates are tentatively ∼3 times more likely than the overall AGN population to reside in a host galaxy that has a companion galaxy (from 16/173 to 2/7, or 9{sup +3}{sub -2}% to 29{sub -19}{sup +26}%). Follow-up observations of the seven offset and dual AGN candidates in AGES will definitively distinguish velocity offsets produced by dual SMBHs from those produced by narrow-line region kinematics, and will help sharpen our observational approach to detecting dual SMBHs.

  16. AGN proximity zone fossils and the delayed recombination of metal lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Schaye, Joop

    2013-09-01

    We model the time-dependent evolution of metal-enriched intergalactic and circumgalactic gas exposed to the fluctuating radiation field from an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We consider diffuse gas densities (nH = 10-5-10-2.5 cm-3) exposed to the extra-galactic background (EGB) and initially in thermal equilibrium (T ˜ 104-104.5 K). Once the proximate AGN field turns on, additional photo-ionization rapidly ionizes the HI and metals. The enhanced AGN radiation field turns off after a typical AGN lifetime (τAGN = 1-20 Myr) and the field returns to the EGB intensity, but the metals remain out of ionization equilibrium for time scales that can significantly exceed τAGN. We define this phase as the AGN proximity zone `fossil' phase and show that high ionization stages (e.g. OVI, NeVIII, MgX) are in general enhanced, while the abundances of low ions (e.g. CIV, OIV, MgII) are reduced. In contrast, HI re-equilibrates rapidly (≪τAGN) owing to its low neutral fraction at diffuse densities. We demonstrate that metal column densities of intervening gas observed in absorption in quasar sight lines are significantly affected by delayed recombination for a wide range of densities, metallicities, AGN strengths, AGN lifetimes and AGN duty cycles. As an example, we show that a fossil zone model can simultaneously reproduce the observed NeVIII, MgII, HI and other metal columns of the z = 0.927 PG1206+259 absorption system observed by Tripp et al. using a single, T ˜ 104 K phase model. At low redshift even moderate-strength AGN that are off for 90 per cent of the time could significantly enhance the high-ion metal columns in the circum-galactic media of galaxies observed without active AGN. Fossil proximity zones may be particularly important during the quasar era, z ˜ 2-5. Indeed, we demonstrate that at these redshifts a large fraction of the metal-enriched intergalactic medium may consist of out-of-equilibrium fossil zones. AGN proximity zone fossils allow a whole new class

  17. Optically Elusive AGN in the 3XMM Catalog and the Chandra-COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, Estelle; Watson, Mike; Elvis, Martin; Civano, Francesca M.

    2015-01-01

    'Optically elusive AGN' are powerful X-ray sources (LHX > 1042 erg/s), but are not detected as AGN in the optical. Pons and Watson (2014) showed that in XMM these AGNs are a mix of Narrow Line Seyfert 1s, True Seyfert 2's and weak Seyfert 2s. The nature of these objects, coming from the cross-match of 3XMM with the SDSS-DR9 spectroscopic catalog, has been investigated through a detailed analysis of their IR/optical and X-ray properties. The fainter Chandra-COSMOS field should be rich in optically elusive AGNs as ¾ of the AGNs there are narrow-lined. There are ~850 Chandra-COSMOS galaxy spectra, mainly from five different telescopes (SDSS, Magellan, MMT, VLT and Keck). To find optically elusive objects, we investigate the optical classification using emission line diagnostic diagrams. For low redshift galaxies (z~<0.7) the standard BPT diagram ([OIII

  18. Community Colleges. The Boston Junior College Blues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papke, David Ray

    1975-01-01

    Private junior colleges for women in Boston are suffering from severe financial difficulties. The solutions at three schools, Garland Junior College, Pine Manor Junior College, and Mount Ida Junior College, are presented. (Author/PG)

  19. PRIMUS: The Dependence of AGN Accretion on Host Stellar Mass and Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, James; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Burles, Scott M.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2012-02-01

    We present evidence that the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the distribution of their accretion rates do not depend on the stellar masses of their host galaxies, contrary to previous studies. We use hard (2-10 keV) X-ray data from three extragalactic fields (XMM-LSS, COSMOS, and ELAIS-S1) with redshifts from the Prism Multi-object Survey to identify 242 AGNs with L 2-10 keV = 1042-44 erg s-1 within a parent sample of ~25,000 galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 over ~3.4 deg2 and to i ~ 23. We find that although the fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN at fixed X-ray luminosity rises strongly with stellar mass, the distribution of X-ray luminosities is independent of mass. Furthermore, we show that the probability that a galaxy will host an AGN can be defined by a universal Eddington ratio distribution that is independent of the host galaxy stellar mass and has a power-law shape with slope -0.65. These results demonstrate that AGNs are prevalent at all stellar masses in the range 9.5 and that the same physical processes regulate AGN activity in all galaxies in this stellar mass range. While a higher AGN fraction may be observed in massive galaxies, this is a selection effect related to the underlying Eddington ratio distribution. We also find that the AGN fraction drops rapidly between z ~ 1 and the present day and is moderately enhanced (factor ~2) in galaxies with blue or green optical colors. Consequently, while AGN activity and star formation appear to be globally correlated, we do not find evidence that the presence of an AGN is related to the quenching of star formation or the color transformation of galaxies.

  20. Stellar and quasar feedback in concert: effects on AGN accretion, obscuration, and outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Torrey, Paul; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2016-05-01

    We study the interaction of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and a multiphase interstellar medium (ISM), in simulations including explicit stellar feedback, multiphase cooling, accretion-disc winds, and Compton heating. We examine radii ˜0.1-100 pc around a black hole (BH), where the accretion rate on to the BH is determined and where AGN-powered winds and radiation couple to the ISM. We conclude: (1) the BH accretion rate is determined by exchange of angular momentum between gas and stars in gravitational instabilities. This produces accretion rates ˜0.03-1 M⊙ yr-1, sufficient to power luminous AGN. (2) The gas disc in the galactic nucleus undergoes an initial burst of star formation followed by several million years where stellar feedback suppresses the star formation rate (SFR). (3) AGN winds injected at small radii with momentum fluxes ˜LAGN/c couple efficiently to the ISM and have dramatic effects on ISM properties within ˜100 pc. AGN winds suppress the nuclear SFR by factors ˜10-30 and BH accretion rate by factors ˜3-30. They increase the outflow rate from the nucleus by factors ˜10, consistent with observational evidence for galaxy-scale AGN-driven outflows. (4) With AGN feedback, the predicted column density distribution to the BH is consistent with observations. Absent AGN feedback, the BH is isotropically obscured and there are not enough optically thin sightlines to explain type-I AGN. A `torus-like' geometry arises self-consistently as AGN feedback evacuates gas in polar regions.

  1. Simulations of the OzDES AGN reverberation mapping project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Anthea L.; Martini, Paul; Davis, Tamara M.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Skielboe, Andreas; Vestergaard, Marianne; Huff, Eric; Watson, Darach; Banerji, Manda; McMahon, Richard; Sharp, Rob; Lidman, C.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the Australian spectroscopic dark energy survey (OzDES) we are carrying out a large-scale reverberation mapping study of ≥500 quasars over five years in the 30 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova fields. These quasars have redshifts ranging up to 4 and have apparent AB magnitudes between 16.8 mag < r < 22.5 mag. The aim of the survey is to measure time lags between fluctuations in the quasar continuum and broad emission-line fluxes of individual objects in order to measure black hole masses for a broad range of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and constrain the radius-luminosity (R-L) relationship. Here we investigate the expected efficiency of the OzDES reverberation mapping campaign and its possible extensions. We expect to recover lags for ˜35-45 per cent of the quasars. AGN with shorter lags and greater variability are more likely to yield a lag measurement, and objects with lags ≲6 months or ˜1 yr are expected to be recovered the most accurately. The baseline OzDES reverberation mapping campaign is predicted to produce an unbiased measurement of the R-L relationship parameters for H β, Mg II λ2798, and C IV λ1549. Extending the baseline survey by either increasing the spectroscopic cadence, extending the survey season, or improving the emission-line flux measurement accuracy will significantly improve the R-L parameter constraints for all broad emission lines.

  2. An AGN Identification for 3EG J2006-2321

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, P. M.; Halpern, J. P.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Thompson, D. J.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of the high-energy gamma-ray source 3EG J2006-2321 (l = 18 deg.82, b = -26 deg.26). The flux of this source above 100 MeV is shown to be variable on time scales of days and months. Optical observations and careful examination of archived radio data indicate that its most probable identification is with PMN J2005-2310, a flat-spectrum radio quasar with a 5GHz flux density of 260 mJy. Study of the V = 19.3 optical counterpart indicates a redshift of 0.833 and variable linear polarization. No X-ray source has been detected near the position of PMN J2005-2310, but an X-ray upper limit is derived from ROSAT data. This upper limit provides for a spectral energy distribution with global characteristics similar to those of known gamma-ray blazars. Taken together, these data indicate that 3EG J2006-2321, listed as unidentified in the 3rd EGRET Catalog, is a member of the blazar class of AGN. The 5-GHz radio flux density of this blazar is the lowest of the 68 EGRET-detected AGN. The fact that EGRET has detected such a source has implications for unidentified EGRET sources, particularly those at high latitudes (absolute value of b greater than 30 deg), many of which may be blazars.

  3. Hot Gas and AGN Feedback in Galaxies and Nearby Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Bogdan, Akos; Randall, Scott; Kraft, Ralph; Churazov, Eugene

    2013-07-01

    Massive galaxies harbor a supermassive black hole at their centers. At high redshifts, these galaxies experienced a very active quasar phase, when, as their black holes grew by accretion, they produced enormous amounts of energy. At the present epoch, these black holes still undergo occasional outbursts, although the mode of their energy release is primarily mechanical rather than radiative. The energy from these outbursts can reheat the cooling gas in the galaxy cores and maintain the red and dead nature of the early-type galaxies. These outbursts also can have dramatic effects on the galaxy-scale hot coronae found in the more massive galaxies. We describe research in three areas related to the hot gas around galaxies and their supermassive black holes. First we present examples of galaxies with AGN outbursts that have been studied in detail. Second, we show that X-ray emitting low-luminosity AGN are present in 80% of the galaxies studied. Third, we discuss the first examples of extensive hot gas and dark matter halos in optically faint galaxies.

  4. XMM-Newton, powerful AGN winds and galaxy feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K.; King, A.

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that ultra-fast ionized winds - sufficiently powerful to disrupt growth of the host galaxy - are a common feature of luminous AGN is major scientific breakthrough led by XMM-Newton. An extended observation in 2014 of the prototype UFO, PG1211+143, has revealed an unusually complex outflow, with distinct and persisting velocities detected in both hard and soft X-ray spectra. While the general properties of UFOs are consistent with being launched - at the local escape velocity - from the inner disc where the accretion rate is modestly super-Eddington (King and Pounds, Ann Rev Astron Astro- phys 2015), these more complex flows have raised questions about the outflow geometry and the importance of shocks and enhanced cooling. XMM-Newton seems likely to remain the best Observatory to study UFOs prior to Athena, and further extended observations, of PG1211+143 and other bright AGN, have the exciting potential to establish the typical wind dynamics, while providing new insights on the accretion geometry and continuum source structure. An emphasis on such large, coordinated observing programmes with XMM-Newton over the next decade will continue the successful philosophy pioneered by EXOSAT, while helping to inform the optimum planning for Athena

  5. The evolution of AGN's at x ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, Tommaso; Dellaceca, R.; Gioia, I. M.; Stocke, J. T.; Wolter, A.

    1992-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the Luminosity Function (LF) of x-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are discussed. The sample used is extracted from the Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) and consists of more than 420 objects. Preliminary results from the Rosat all sky survey data confirm the correctness of the optical identification of the EMSS sources, thus giving confidence to the results obtained from the analysis of the AGN sample. The XLF observed at different redshifts gives direct evidence of cosmological evolution. Data were analyzed within the framework of luminosity evolution models and the two most common evolutionary forms were considered. Luminosity dependent evolution is required if the evolution function has the exponential form, whereas the simpler pure luminosity evolution model is still acceptable if the evolution function has the power law form. Using the whole sample of objects the number counts and the devolved XLF were derived. A comparison of the EMSS Data with preliminary Rosat results indicates an overall agreement.

  6. Exploring the Variability Characteristics of the Fermi AGN Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, Chris R.

    2016-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi) has cataloged over 3000 gamma-ray (>100 MeV) point sources of which ~70% are likely AGN. The AGN are predominantly representative of the radio-loud “blazar” subclass. The emission from these objects is known to be dominated by relativistic beaming and is almost always variable, often exhibiting high-amplitude flaring. To date there have been numerous studies of individual objects including multi-wavelength campaigns with some including parsec-scale radio jet morphological studies. These studies have led to new insight in to our understanding of the blazar phenomena and jet propagation. However, there remains a dearth of statistical information on the variability characteristics of the population in aggregate. What, for example, are the distributions of flare amplitudes, durations, temporal profiles and recurrence histories among the gamma-ray blazar subclasses? We present some results of our study of a large ( ~103) set of gamma-ray light curves. For the brightest subset we explore in greater detail their properties such as morphologies and their rise and decay timescales. We include where plausible the associated energy dependencies of these rise and decay profiles. We discuss our results in terms of the possible implications on the scale and location of jet structures associated with the emission sites and the cooling timescales of the electron population producing the gamma rays.

  7. Simulations of the OzDES AGN reverberation mapping project

    SciTech Connect

    King, Anthea L.; Martini, Paul; Davis, Tamara M.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Skielboe, Andreas; Vestergaard, Marianne; Huff, Eric; Watson, Darach; Banerji, Manda; McMahon, Richard; Sharp, Rob; Lidman, C.

    2015-08-26

    As part of the Australian spectroscopic dark energy survey (OzDES) we are carrying out a large-scale reverberation mapping study of ~500 quasars over five years in the 30 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova fields. These quasars have redshifts ranging up to 4 and have apparent AB magnitudes between 16.8 mag < r < 22.5 mag. The aim of the survey is to measure time lags between fluctuations in the quasar continuum and broad emission-line fluxes of individual objects in order to measure black hole masses for a broad range of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and constrain the radius–luminosity (R–L) relationship. Here we investigate the expected efficiency of the OzDES reverberation mapping campaign and its possible extensions. We expect to recover lags for ~35–45 % of the quasars. AGN with shorter lags and greater variability are more likely to yield a lag measurement, and objects with lags ≲6 months or ~1 yr are expected to be recovered the most accurately. The baseline OzDES reverberation mapping campaign is predicted to produce an unbiased measurement of the R–L relationship parameters for Hβ, MgIIλ2798, and C IVλ1549. As a result, extending the baseline survey by either increasing the spectroscopic cadence, extending the survey season, or improving the emission-line flux measurement accuracy will significantly improve the R–L parameter constraints for all broad emission lines.

  8. 'Harder when Brighter' Spectral Variability in Low-Luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, S.; McHardy, I.; Skipper, C.; Dwelly, T.

    2015-07-01

    We present X-ray spectral variability of four low accretion rate AGN - M81, NGC 1097, NGC 1052 and NGC 3998 - as observed by Swift and RXTE. All four objects were selected due to having spectra which hardened with increasing count rate, converse to the `softer when brighter' behaviour normally observed in AGN with higher accretion rates. The spectra were summed in flux bins and fitted with a variety of models. A simple absorbed power law model was found to fit the spectra of M81, NGC 1097 and NGC 3998 well, whilst NGC 1052 required a partially covered power law model. In all four cases, the most likely main source of spectral variability is found to be luminosity-dependent changes in the photon index of the power law component. An anticorrelation between the photon index and the count rate is found in all of the sources. The anticorrelation is likely to be caused by accretion via a radiatively-inefficient accretion flow, expected in low-Eddington ratio systems such as these, and/or due to the presence of a jet. This behaviour is similar to that seen in the `hard state' of X-ray binaries, implying that these LLAGN are in a similar state.

  9. Dramatic long-term X-ray variability in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Edward C.

    2016-04-01

    Dramatic X-ray and optical variability on ˜ 10 year timescales has been discovered recently in a handful of quasars, which may provide important new insight into the issue of how luminous AGNs are fueled. We have assembled a new sample of extremely variable X-ray sources from archival Einstein and ROSAT data that could increase substantially the number of such objects known. The sources in our sample varied in X-ray flux by at least a factor of 7-8 over a 10-year span, and most exhibited significantly larger variability amplitudes (10 to over 100). We present the details of how our sample was assembled and preliminary results regarding the identifications, properties, and X-ray histories of the objects. Although a heterogeneous population is expected, some sources in the sample are associated with broad-line AGNs, including a radio-quiet quasar at z = 1.3 that decreased in X-ray luminosity by a factor of 40.

  10. Effects of AGN feedback in galaxy groups and Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, C.; Padilla, N.; Cora, S.

    2009-05-01

    The combination of Cosmological numerical simulations and semi-analytical models of galaxy formation is a very appropriate method to study how different phenomena influence the galaxy and galaxy cluster formation. The main advantage of this combination consists in the fact that N-body simulations do not need to be rerun every time a change in the assumptions about baryonic processes is made since these are included in the semi-analytical models which run on the final N-Body simulation output. The Semi-analytic model takes into account radiative cooling of gas, stellar formation and different types of SN contribution, which eject energy and metals to the interstellar medium, allowing the chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium. In this project we use the semi-analytic hybrid model by Cora (2006, MNRAS, 368, 1540) and implement the AGN feedback, in two modes, the QSO mode (which takes into account mergers and galactic disk instabilities), and the Radio mode, which modifies the cooling in the galaxies These two processes allow to suppress the super flows in the hybrid model, and allows the study of QSOs in galaxy groups. This new implementation opens different possibles studies including the QSO luminosity function, the anti-hierarchical evolution of Mass Function, the BH mass and bulge mass relation, Color-Magnitude diagrams, TF relation, the galaxy luminosity function, the effects of AGN in neighbor galaxies and the behavior of QSOs in the sub-millimeter window.

  11. Eclipsing the innermost accretion disc regions in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfrutos, M.; Miniutti, G.; Dovčiak, M.; Agís-González, B.

    2016-05-01

    Variable X-ray absorption has been observed in active galactic nuclei (AGN) on several time scales. Observations allow us to identify the absorber with clouds associated either with the clumpy torus (parsec scales, long timescales) or with the broad line region (BLR) (short timescales). In the latter, the cloud size has been estimated to be of the order of few gravitational radii from the observed absorption variability. Such small cloud sizes are comparable to the X-ray emitting regions so that a detailed modeling of occultation events in AGN has the potential of enabling us to infer accurately the geometry of the system. We have developed a relativistic X-ray spectral model for occultation events and we present here theoretical predictions on the different observables that can be inferred by studying X-ray eclipses in simulated XMM-Newton data. These include the size of the X-ray emitting regions as well as more fundamental parameters such as the black hole spin and the system inclination. We find that absorption varies as a function of the energy range and that its maximum takes place when the approaching part of the accretion disc is covered. Therefore we study the hard-to-soft (H / S) ratio light curves produced during an eclipse and use them to characterise the properties of the inner accretion disc in a new model-independent way.

  12. Using gravitationally lensed images to investigate the intrinsic AGN variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Muller, S.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss about how the relative flux densities among the images of gravitationally-lensed active galactic nuclei (AGN), can be used to study the intrinsic AGN variability with high accuracy. Multi-frequency monitoring observations of resolved gravitational lenses can allow us to detect signals of very weak variability and also provide information about the jet opacity and structure. As an example, we investigate the variability of the flux-density ratio between the two lensed images of the blazar B 0218+357, using dual-frequency cm-wave observations. Similar to our previously reported submm-wave observations of the lensed blazar PKS 1830-211, we observe a clear chromatic variability, starting short before an increase in the flux-density of the blazar. The evolution of the flux-density ratios between the blazar images shows a more clear and rich structure than that of the mere lightcurves of each individual image. The accuracy in the ratio measurements is allowing us to see variability episodes in the blazar that are weaker than the natural scatter in the absolute flux-density measurements. A simple opacity model in the jet is used to consistently explain the difference between the flux-density-ratio evolution at the two frequencies.

  13. Studying AGN Feedback in Galaxy Clusters and Groups with Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jeremy; Athena Topical PanelAGN Feedback in Clusters; Groups

    2015-09-01

    In the centres of clusters of galaxies and groups the central active galactic nuclei are playing a vital role in preventing the rapid cooling of the surrounding hot atmosphere. Important scientific questions remain unanswered, however. These include (1) What is the mechanism by which the energy from jets is dissipated and distributed through intracluster or intragroup medium? (2) How is the AGN fuelling regulated? (3) What is the cumulative impact of powerful radio galaxies on baryons over cosmic time? With its high spectral resolution, good spatial resolution and large effective area, Athena promises to make important progress in answering these questions. For the first time it will measure both the spatially-resolved velocity distribution and thermodynamics of the cluster core region, allowing us to measure all the energetic contributions to feedback and cooling in the hot plasma. We describe how Athena will address these areas, as described in our supporting paper for the Athena mission proposal on AGN feedback in galaxy clusters and groups.

  14. AGN-Induced Cavities in NGC 1399 And NGC 4649

    SciTech Connect

    Shurkin, K.; Dunn, R.J.H.; Gentile, G.; Taylor, G.B.; Allen, S.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-14

    We present an analysis of archival Chandra and VLA observations of the E0 galaxy NGC1399 and the E2 galaxy NGC4649 in which we investigate cavities in the surrounding X-ray emitting medium caused by the central AGN. We calculate the jet power required for the AGN to evacuate these cavities and find values of {approx} 8x10{sup 41} erg s-1 and {approx} 14x10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} for the lobes of NGC1399 and {approx} 7x10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} and {approx} 6x1041 erg s{sup -1} for those of NGC4649. We also calculate the k/f values for each cavity, where k is the ratio of the total particle energy to that of electrons radiating in the range of 10 MHz to 10 GHz, and f is the volume filling factor of the plasma in the cavity. We find that the values of k/f for the lobes of NGC1399 are {approx} 93 and {approx} 190, and those of the lobes of NGC4649 are {approx} 15000 and {approx} 12000. We conclude that the assumed spectrum describes the electron distribution in the lobes of NGC1399 reasonably well, and that there are few entrained particles. For NGC4649, either there are many entrained particles or the model spectrum does not accurately describe the population of electrons.

  15. Dynamics of matter available for accretion in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proga, Daniel

    We propose to study fluid dynamics in the central regions of active galaxies. Several key attributes of AGN, such as infall rates onto the central black hole and the geometry and rates of outward energy and momentum transfer, are determined in their central regions. However, despite many years of intensive studies, how radiation and mass outflows affect the structure of active galaxies remains uncertain, mostly because multi- dimensional geometrical effects and the dynamics of gas and dust are poorly understood. We will construct time-dependent, multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations to study, from first principles, the morphology of central galactic flows on scales ranging from subparsec to tens of parsecs. The novel features of our proposed models are: (1) radiative heating and cooling of dust and gas, (2) radiation pressure on dust and gas,
(3) the essential physics of dust sublimation, and (4) radiative transfer. The results of this project will reveal the basic physical properties of flows in AGN with unprecedented accuracy and detail. We will use our models to calculate diagnostics such as line profiles, broad band spectra, and intensity maps. These diagnostics will be compared with observations by both current NASA missions such as HST, Chandra, Spitzer, and Swift and planned missions such as JWST.

  16. The AGN-driven shock in NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendron-Marsolais, Marie-Lou; Kraft, Ralph P.; Bogdan, Akos; Forman, William R.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; Jones, Christine; Nulsen, Paul; Randall, Scott W.; Roediger, Elke

    2016-04-01

    Chandra observations of most cool core clusters of galaxies have revealed large cavities where the inflation of the jet-driven radio bubbles displace the cluster gas. In a few cases, outburst shocks, likely driven by cavity inflation, are detected in the ambient gas. AGN-driven shocks may be key to balancing the radiative losses as shocks will increase the entropy of, and thereby heat, the diffuse gas. We will present initial results on deep Chandra observations of the nearby (D=17 Mpc) early-type massive elliptical galaxy NGC 4472, the most optically luminous galaxy in the local Universe, lying on the outskirts of the Virgo cluster. The X-ray observations show clear cavities in the X-ray emission at the position of the radio lobes, and rings of enhanced X-ray emission just beyond the lobes. We will present results from our analysis to determine whether the lobes are inflating supersonically or are rising buoyantly. We will compare the energy and power of this AGN outburst with previous powerful radio outbursts in clusters and groups to determine whether this outburst lies on the same scaling relations or whether it represents a new category of outburst.

  17. Environmental Assessment of the Gering-Stegall 115-kV Transmission Line Consolidation Project, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to consolidate segments of two transmission lines near the Gering Substation in Gering, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, within the city of Gering. Presently, there are three parallel 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines on separate rights-of-way (ROW) that terminate at the Gering Substation. The project would include dismantling the Archer-Gering wood-pole transmission line and rebuilding the remaining two lines on single-pole steel double circuit structures. The project would consolidate the Gering-Stegall North and Gering-Stegall South 115-kV transmission lines on to one ROW for a 1.33-mile segment between the Gering Substation and a point west of the Gering Landfill. All existing wood-pole H-frame structures would be removed, and the Gering-Stegall North and South ROWs abandoned. Western is responsible for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the line. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the 115-kV transmission line consolidation. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  18. PRIMUS: INFRARED AND X-RAY AGN SELECTION TECHNIQUES AT 0.2 < z < 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Alexander J.; Coil, Alison L.; Aird, James; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu Guangtun

    2013-06-10

    We present a study of Spitzer/IRAC and X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) selection techniques in order to quantify the overlap, uniqueness, contamination, and completeness of each. We investigate how the overlap and possible contamination of the samples depend on the depth of both the IR and X-ray data. We use Spitzer/IRAC imaging, Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray imaging, and spectroscopic redshifts from the PRism MUlti-object Survey to construct galaxy and AGN samples at 0.2 < z < 1.2 over 8 deg{sup 2}. We construct samples over a wide range of IRAC flux limits (SWIRE to GOODS depth) and X-ray flux limits (10 ks to 2 Ms). We compare IR-AGN samples defined using both the IRAC color selection of Stern et al. and Donley et al. with X-ray-detected AGN samples. For roughly similar depth IR and X-ray surveys, we find that {approx}75% of IR-selected AGNs are also identified as X-ray AGNs. This fraction increases to {approx}90% when comparing against the deepest X-ray data, indicating that at most {approx}10% of IR-selected AGNs may be heavily obscured. The IR-AGN selection proposed by Stern et al. suffers from contamination by star-forming galaxies at various redshifts when using deeper IR data, though the selection technique works well for shallow IR data. While similar overall, the IR-AGN samples preferentially contain more luminous AGNs, while the X-ray AGN samples identify a wider range of AGN accretion rates including low specific accretion rate AGNs, where the host galaxy light dominates at IR wavelengths. The host galaxy populations of the IR and X-ray AGN samples have similar rest-frame colors and stellar masses; both selections identify AGNs in blue, star-forming and red, quiescent galaxies.

  19. PRIMUS: Infrared and X-Ray AGN Selection Techniques at 0.2 < z < 1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Alexander J.; Coil, Alison L.; Aird, James; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2013-06-01

    We present a study of Spitzer/IRAC and X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) selection techniques in order to quantify the overlap, uniqueness, contamination, and completeness of each. We investigate how the overlap and possible contamination of the samples depend on the depth of both the IR and X-ray data. We use Spitzer/IRAC imaging, Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray imaging, and spectroscopic redshifts from the PRism MUlti-object Survey to construct galaxy and AGN samples at 0.2 < z < 1.2 over 8 deg2. We construct samples over a wide range of IRAC flux limits (SWIRE to GOODS depth) and X-ray flux limits (10 ks to 2 Ms). We compare IR-AGN samples defined using both the IRAC color selection of Stern et al. and Donley et al. with X-ray-detected AGN samples. For roughly similar depth IR and X-ray surveys, we find that ~75% of IR-selected AGNs are also identified as X-ray AGNs. This fraction increases to ~90% when comparing against the deepest X-ray data, indicating that at most ~10% of IR-selected AGNs may be heavily obscured. The IR-AGN selection proposed by Stern et al. suffers from contamination by star-forming galaxies at various redshifts when using deeper IR data, though the selection technique works well for shallow IR data. While similar overall, the IR-AGN samples preferentially contain more luminous AGNs, while the X-ray AGN samples identify a wider range of AGN accretion rates including low specific accretion rate AGNs, where the host galaxy light dominates at IR wavelengths. The host galaxy populations of the IR and X-ray AGN samples have similar rest-frame colors and stellar masses; both selections identify AGNs in blue, star-forming and red, quiescent galaxies.

  20. Navigating College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arum, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Students moving from high school to college in the United States typically confront a bewildering set of largely unstructured options. In the absence of clear signals about how to get the most out of college, they often choose pathways that involve limited academic rigor and engagement. In this article, Richard Arum describes a study that followed…

  1. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  2. Responding to the Needs of Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the 21st Century. Hearing before the Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness and the Subcommittee on Select Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, Second Session (September 19, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This hearing on the needs of historically black colleges and universities is the fourth in a series that explores the issues faced by these minority-serving institutions and the opportunities they have afforded black students over the years. Following opening statements by Representative Howard P. McKeon, Representative Robert C. Scott, and…

  3. Downscaling transient climate change using a Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses stochastic rainfall model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, A.; Fowler, H. J.; Blenkinsop, S.; Kilsby, C. G.

    2010-02-01

    SummaryThe future management of hydrological systems must be informed by climate change projections at relevant time horizons and at appropriate spatial scales. Furthermore, the robustness of such management decisions is dependent on both the uncertainty inherent in future climate change scenarios and the natural climate system. Addressing these needs, we present a new transient rainfall simulation methodology which combines dynamical and statistical downscaling techniques to produce transient (i.e. temporally non-stationary) climate change scenarios. This is used to generate a transient multi-model ensemble of simulated point-scale rainfall time series for 1997-2085 for the polluted Brévilles spring in Northern France. The recovery of this previously potable source may be affected by climatic changes and variability over the next few decades. The provision of locally-relevant transient climate change scenarios for use as input to hydrological models of both water quality and quantity will ultimately provide a valuable resource for planning and decision making. Observed rainfall from 1988-2006 was characterised in terms of a set of statistics for each calendar month: the daily mean, variance, probability dry, lag-1 autocorrelation and skew, and the monthly variance. The Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses (NSRP) stochastic rainfall model was fitted to these observed statistics and correctly simulated both monthly statistics and extreme rainfall properties. Multiplicative change factors which quantify the change in each statistic between the periods 1961-1990 and 2071-2100 were estimated for each month and for each of 13 Regional Climate Models (RCMs) from the PRUDENCE ensemble. To produce transient climate change scenarios, pattern scaling factors were estimated and interpolated from four time-slice integrations of two General Circulation Models which condition the RCMs, ECHAM4/OPYC and HadCM3. Applying both factors to the observed statistics provided projected

  4. X-15 #2 on lakebed after a hard landing by pilot Scott Crossfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A series of ground and in-flight accidents occurred during the X-15's contractor program, fortunately without injuries or even greatly delaying the program. On 5 November 1959 a small engine fire -- always extremely hazardous in a volatile rocket airplane -- forced pilot Scott Crossfield to make an emergency landing on Rosamond Dry Lake. The X-15, not designed to land with fuel, came down with a heavy load of propellants and broke its back, grounding this particular X-15, ship #2 (56-6671), for three months. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow-on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and movable horizontal stabilizers to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a B-52

  5. PRIMUS + DEEP2: Clustering of X-Ray, Radio, and IR-AGNs at z~0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Alexander J.; Coil, Alison L.; Aird, James; Skibba, Ramin A.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2016-04-01

    We measure the clustering of X-ray, radio, and mid-IR-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 0.2\\lt z\\lt 1.2 using multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic redshifts from the PRIMUS and DEEP2 redshift surveys, covering seven separate fields spanning ∼10 deg 2 . Using the cross-correlation of AGNs with dense galaxy samples, we measure the clustering scale length and slope, as well as the bias, of AGNs selected at different wavelengths. Similar to previous studies, we find that X-ray and radio AGNs are more clustered than mid-IR-selected AGNs. We further compare the clustering of each AGN sample with matched galaxy samples designed to have the same stellar mass, star-formation rate (SFR), and redshift distributions as the AGN host galaxies and find no significant differences between their clustering properties. The observed differences in the clustering of AGNs selected at different wavelengths can therefore be explained by the clustering differences of their host populations, which have different distributions in both stellar mass and SFR. Selection biases inherent in AGN selection therefore determine the clustering of observed AGN samples. We further find no significant difference between the clustering of obscured and unobscured AGNs, using IRAC or Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer colors or X-ray hardness ratio.

  6. A Sub-Arcsecond Mid-Infrared Survey of X-Ray-Selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson, N. A.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Packham, Chris; Los Piratas AGN Science Team

    2015-08-01

    Detailed studies of local active galactic nuclei (AGN) following X-ray selection yields significant measurements of the physical properties of the AGN and their host galaxies. In turn, the complete analysis of the nearby cases at high spatial resolution---to distinguish multiple physical components---and high signal-to-noise ratio informs broader surveys of more distant examples where such observations are not possible. We apply these methods in the Los Piratas survey, which emphasizes new observations at mid-infrared wavelengths obtained using CanariCam on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We measure intrinsic bolometric luminosity of the roughly 100 AGN in the sample using X-rays, ensuring a span of luminosity over a range of activity level (from low-ionization nuclei through Seyfert galaxies and quasars), optical type, and radio loudness. The mid-infrared observations at resolution of ~0.3arcsec correspond to typical spatial scales of 60 pc for the low-luminosity AGN and Seyferts and 400 pc for other types. We isolate the AGN emission that is reprocessed by dust in the central regions, which we model in a clumpy distribution. We distinguish this emission from the stellar contributions on larger scales. Across types, the AGN-heated dust emission is overall well-correlated with the X-ray flux, but stellar contributions can be significant on larger scales, especially at moderate AGN luminosity.

  7. A Model for Type 2 Coronal Line Forest (CLiF) AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glidden, Ana; Rose, Marvin; Elvis, Martin; McDowell, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    We present a model for the classification of Coronal Line Forest Active Galactic Nuclei (CLiF AGNs). CLiF AGNs are of special interest due to their remarkably large number of emission lines, especially forbidden high-ionization lines (FHILs). Rose et al. suggest that their emission is dominated by reflection from the inner wall of the obscuring region rather than direct emission from the accretion disk. This makes CLiF AGNs laboratories to test AGN-torus models. Modeling an AGN as an accreting supermassive black hole surrounded by a cylinder of dust and gas, we show a relationship between the viewing angle and the revealed area of the inner wall. From the revealed area, we can determine the amount of FHIL emission at various angles. We calculate the strength of [Fe vii]λ6087 emission for a number of intermediate angles (30°, 40°, and 50°) and compare the results with the luminosity of the observed emission line from six known CLiF AGNs. We find that there is good agreement between our model and the observational results. The model also enables us to determine the relationship between the type 2:type 1 AGN fraction vs the ratio of torus height to radius, h/r.

  8. Role of the α-Glucanase Agn1p in Fission-Yeast Cell Separation

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Nick; Speijer, Dave; Grün, Christian H.; van den Berg, Marlene; de Haan, Annett; Hochstenbach, Frans

    2004-01-01

    Cell division in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe yields two equal-sized daughter cells. Medial fission is achieved by deposition of a primary septum flanked by two secondary septa within the dividing cell. During the final step of cell division, cell separation, the primary septum is hydrolyzed by an endo-(1,3)-β-glucanase, Eng1p. We reasoned that the cell wall material surrounding the septum, referred to here as the septum edging, also must be hydrolyzed before full separation of the daughter cells can occur. Because the septum edging contains (1,3)-α-glucan, we investigated the cellular functions of the putative (1,3)-α-glucanases Agn1p and Agn2p. Whereas agn2 deletion results in a defect in endolysis of the ascus wall, deletion of agn1 leads to clumped cells that remained attached to each other by septum-edging material. Purified Agn1p hydrolyzes (1,3)-α-glucan predominantly into pentasaccharides, indicating an endo-catalytic mode of hydrolysis. Furthermore, we show that the transcription factors Sep1p and Ace2p regulate both eng1 and agn1 expression in a cell cycle-dependent manner. We propose that Agn1p acts in concert with Eng1p to achieve efficient cell separation, thereby exposing the secondary septa as the new ends of the daughter cells. PMID:15194814

  9. The cosmic evolution of massive black holes in the Horizon-AGN simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, M.; Dubois, Y.; Pichon, C.; Devriendt, J.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the demographics of black holes (BHs) in the large-volume cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Horizon-AGN. This simulation statistically models how much gas is accreted on to BHs, traces the energy deposited into their environment and, consequently, the back-reaction of the ambient medium on BH growth. The synthetic BHs reproduce a variety of observational constraints such as the redshift evolution of the BH mass density and the mass function. Strong self-regulation via AGN feedback, weak supernova feedback, and unresolved internal processes result in a tight BH-galaxy mass correlation. Starting at z ˜ 2, tidal stripping creates a small population of BHs over-massive with respect to the halo. The fraction of galaxies hosting a central BH or an AGN increases with stellar mass. The AGN fraction agrees better with multi-wavelength studies, than single-wavelength ones, unless obscuration is taken into account. The most massive haloes present BH multiplicity, with additional BHs gained by ongoing or past mergers. In some cases, both a central and an off-centre AGN shine concurrently, producing a dual AGN. This dual AGN population dwindles with decreasing redshift, as found in observations. Specific accretion rate and Eddington ratio distributions are in good agreement with observational estimates. The BH population is dominated in turn by fast, slow, and very slow accretors, with transitions occurring at z = 3 and z = 2, respectively.

  10. The cosmic evolution of massive black holes in the Horizon-AGN simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, M.; Dubois, Y.; Pichon, C.; Devriendt, J.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the demographics of black holes (BHs) in the large-volume cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Horizon-AGN. This simulation statistically models how much gas is accreted onto BHs, traces the energy deposited into their environment and, consequently, the back-reaction of the ambient medium on BH growth. The synthetic BHs reproduce a variety of observational constraints such as the redshift evolution of the BH mass density and the mass function. Strong self-regulation via AGN feedback, weak supernova feedback, and unresolved internal processes result in a tight BH-galaxy mass correlation. Starting at z~2, tidal stripping creates a small population of BHs over-massive with respect to the halo. The fraction of galaxies hosting a central BH or an AGN increases with stellar mass. The AGN fraction agrees better with multi-wavelength studies, than single-wavelength ones, unless obscuration is taken into account. The most massive halos present BH multiplicity, with additional BHs gained by ongoing or past mergers. In some cases, both a central and an off-centre AGN shine concurrently, producing a dual AGN. This dual AGN population dwindles with decreasing redshift, as found in observations. Specific accretion rate and Eddington ratio distributions are in good agreement with observational estimates. The BH population is dominated in turn by fast, slow, and very slow accretors, with transitions occurring at z=3 and z=2 respectively.

  11. The Average 0.5-200 keV Spectrum of AGNs at 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2013-04-01

    The X-ray spectra of AGNs span nearly three decades in energy and are comprised of many separate components: a power-law with a high energy cutoff, reflection from the accretion disk as well as distant material, and, in many cases, a soft excess. Aside from a small number of bright sources observed with BeppoSAX, the full energy range of AGN spectra has only been studied in piecemeal by a fleet of X-ray observatories that can only focus on a small part of the entire spectrum. Therefore, while catalogues of the spectral properties of hundreds of AGNs have been published in different energy bands, these results are isolated from one another and a clear picture of the broadband spectral properties of typical AGNs remains elusive. In this work, we make use of the 0 X-ray luminosity functions of AGNs in the 0.5-2 keV, 2-10 keV, 3-20 keV, 15-55 keV and 14-195 keV bands to construct the spectral model of an average AGN that can simultaneously account for all 5 luminosity functions. Enhanced iron abundances, disk reflection, and the presence or absence of the X-ray Baldwin Effect are considered, along with the traditional parameters of photon index and cutoff energy. Applications to X-ray background modelling and AGN physics are discussed.

  12. Effectiveness of WISE colour-based selection techniques to uncover obscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, S.

    2014-07-01

    We present a highly reliable and efficient mid-infrared colour-based selection technique for luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey. Our technique is designed to identify objects with red mid-infrared power-law spectral energy distributions. We studied the dependency of our mid-infrared selection on the AGN intrinsic luminosity and the effectiveness of our technique to uncover obscured AGN missed in X-ray surveys. To do so we used two samples of luminous AGN independently selected in hard X-ray and optical surveys. We used the largest catalogue of 887 [OIII] λ5007-selected type 2 quasars (QSO2s) at z<~0.83 in the literature from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and the 258 hard (>4.5 keV) X-ray-selected AGN from the Bright Ultrahard XMM-Newton Survey (BUXS). The effectiveness of our mid-infrared selection technique increases with the AGN luminosity. At high luminosities and at least up to z~1 our technique is very effective at identifying both Compton-thin and Compton-thick AGN.

  13. Binary Black Holes, Accretion Disks and Relativistic Jets: Photocenters of Nearby AGN and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrle, Ann E.; Jones, Dayton L.; Meier, David L.; Piner, B. Glenn; Unwin, Stephen C.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most challenging questions in astronomy today is to understand the origin, structure, and evolution of the central engines in the nuclei of quasars and active galaxies (AGNs). The favoured theory involves the activation of relativistic jets from the fueling of a supermassive black hole through an accretion disk. In some AGN an outer optically thick, dusty torus is seen orbiting the black hole system. This torus is probably related to an inner accretion disk - black hole system that forms the actual powerhouse of the AGN. In radio-loud AGN two oppositely-directed radio jets are ejected perpendicular to the torus/disk system. Although there is a wealth of observational data on AGN, some very basic questions have not been definitively answered. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) will address the following three key questions about AGN. 1) Does the most compact optical emission from an AGN come from an accretion disk or from a relativistic jet? 2) Does the separation of the radio core and optical photocenter of the quasars used for the reference frame tie, change on the timescales of their photometric variability, or is the separation stable at the level of a few microarcseconds? 3) Do the cores of galaxies harbor binary supermassive black holes remaining from galaxy mergers? It is not known whether such mergers are common, and whether binaries would persist for a significant time.

  14. On the variable nature of low luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Lorena

    2015-09-01

    X-ray variability is very common in active galactic nuclei (AGN), but it is still unknown if these variations occur similarly in different families of AGN. The main purpose of this work is to disentangle the true structure of low ionization nuclear emission line regions (LINERs) compared to Seyfert 2s by the study of their X-ray variations. We assembled the X-ray spectral properties, as well as the X-ray variability pattern(s), which were obtained from simultaneous spectral fittings and letting different parameters to vary in the model, derived from our previous analyses (Hernández-García et al. 2013, 2014, 2015). We find that Seyfert 2s need more complex models to fit their spectra than LINERs. Among the spectral parameters, major differences are observed in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosities, and the Eddington ratios, which are higher in Seyfert 2s. Differences are observed also in the hard column densities, temperatures, and black hole masses, although less significant. Short-term X-ray variations cannot be claimed, while long-term variability is very common in both families. An exception is found for Compton-thick sources, which do not vary, most probably because the AGN is not accesible in the 0.5--10 keV energy band. The changes are mostly related with variations in the nuclear continuum, but other patterns of variability show that variations in the absorbers (more common in Seyfert 2s) and at soft energies can be present in a few cases. Variations at UV frequencies are observed only in LINER nuclei. The X-ray variations occur similarly in LINERs and Seyfert 2s, i.e., they are related to the nuclear continuum, although they might have different accretion mechanisms, being more efficient in Seyfert 2s. Absorption variations and changing-look sources are not usually observed in LINERs. However, UV nuclear variations are common among LINERs, indicating an unobstructed view of the inner disc where the UV emission might take place. We

  15. TORUS2015: The AGN unification scheme after 30 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, P.; Hoenig, S. F.

    2015-09-01

    The torus paradigm has proved to be remarkably successful at unifying the observed zoo of active galaxy (AGN) classes, despite having many manifest holes. The field is still data-driven with novel observational results at multiple wavelengths emerging rapidly. We are only now beginning to map out the structure of dusty gas feeding and obscuring AGN, and to model its evolution in galaxy growth. But these have also brought out several apparently contradictory results which must hold the key to future progress. As we celebrate 30 years of the paradigm, this is the perfect time to draw together our current knowledge and reassess the state of the field. This will be an international workshop at the University of Southampton, UK, with the objective of laying out the major challenges to the field and paving future research directions. Our hope is to facilitate plenty of informal discussions between multiwavelength observers and theorists, addressing some key issues: * What is the main driver in the unification scheme? What are the roles of orientation, mass accretion rate and feedback? * What is the nature and structure of gas and dust in the torus? Do we have a self-consistent picture across multiple wavelengths? * How critical is the role of the torus as an interface between small nuclear scales and large galactic scales? Does galaxy evolution necessarily require tori? * How close are we to self-consistently simulating nuclear activity including AGN feeding and nuclear star-formation? Workshop Rationale The three themes of accretion, orientation, and evolution will be covered through invited and solicited contributions. Different to other conferences, we are building each session around some key papers that have shaped the field or those with great future potential to do so. We specifically pit competing ideas against each other to help painting a realistic picture of the state-of-the-art. Each session will end with discussion rounds delving into important future

  16. AGN Clustering in the Local Universe: An Unbiased Picture from Swift-BAT

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelluti, N.; Ajello, M.; Burlon, D.; Krumpe, M.; Miyaji, T.; Bonoli, S.; Greiner, J.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2011-08-11

    We present the clustering measurement of hard X-ray selected AGN in the local Universe. We used a sample of 199 sources spectroscopically confirmed detected by Swift-BAT in its 15-55 keV all-sky survey. We measured the real space projected auto-correlation function and detected a signal significant on projected scales lower than 200 Mpc/h. We measured a correlation length of r{sub 0} = 5.56{sup +0.49}{sub -0.43} Mpc/h and a slope {gamma} = 1.64{sup -0.08}{sub -0.07}. We also measured the auto-correlation function of Tyep I and Type II AGN and found higher correlation length for Type I AGN. We have a marginal evidence of luminosity dependent clustering of AGN, as we detected a larger correlation length of luminous AGN than that of low luminosity sources. The corresponding typical host DM halo masses of Swift-BAT are {approx} log(M{sub DMH) {approx} 12-14 h{sup -1}M/M{sub {circle_dot}} which is the typical mass of a galaxy group. We estimated that the local AGN population has a typical lifetime {tau}{sub AGN} {approx}0.7 Gyr, it is powered by SMBH with mass M{sub BH} {approx}1-10x10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}} and accreting with very low efficiency, log({epsilon}){approx}-2.0>. We also conclude that local AGN galaxies are typically red-massive galaxies with stellar mass of the order 2-80x10{sup 10} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}. We compared our results with clustering predictions of merger-driven AGN triggering models and found a good agreement.

  17. Dust Obscured AGN are Masquerading as Star Formation in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Sajina, Anna; Roebuck, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The buildup of stellar and black hole mass peaked during z=1-3, making this a key epoch for understanding how the interplay of star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN) drive galaxy evolution. IR luminous galaxies, which are massive and heavily dust obscured (LIR > 1011 Lsun), dominate the stellar growth during this era, and many are harboring a hidden AGN. I have quantified the contribution of AGN heating to the infrared emission of 343 IR luminous galaxies from z=0.5-2.8 using Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy, available for every source, making this an unprecedented sample. I classify sources as star forming galaxies, AGN, or composites based on the presence of mid-IR continuum emission due to a dusty torus. My findings are: 1) Surprisingly, 60% of IR luminous galaxies show signs of some dust heating emanating from an AGN. I quantify the far-IR emission using deep Herschel imaging and find that the strength of mid-IR AGN emission is tightly correlated with the total contribution of an AGN to LIR, which has important consequences for calculating star formation rates in dusty high redshift galaxies. I demonstrate techniques to remove the contribution of AGN to LIR when mid-IR spectroscopy is available and when only limited photometry is available. 2) The composites are a separate class of galaxy which show a true mix of star formation and AGN activity in their mid- and far-IR emission. Because of dust obscuration, this activity is largely undetected at other wavelengths. This composite population is important for understanding galaxy evolution and makes up at least 30% of the deepest IR selected samples. I underscore the importance of considering composite galaxies separately in studies of star formation and black hole growth at high redshift.

  18. Unravelling ICM Physics and AGN Feedback with Deep Chandra Observations of NGC 5813

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Scott; Nulsen, Paul; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Clarke, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    We present results based on very deep (650 ks) Chandra observations of the galaxy group NGC 5813. This system shows three pairs of collinear cavities, with each pair associated with an elliptical AGN outburstshock. Due to the relatively regular morphology of this system, and the unique unambiguous detection of three distinct AGN outburstshocks, it is particularly well-suited for the study of AGN feedbackand the AGN outburst history. The implied mean kinetic power is roughly the same for each outburst, demonstrating that the average AGN kinetic luminosity can remain stable over long timescales (roughly 50Myr). The two older outbursts have larger, roughly equal total energies as compared with the youngest outburst, implying that the youngest outburst is ongoing. We find that the radiative cooling rate and the mean shock heating rate of the gas are well balanced at each shock front, suggesting that AGN outburst shock heating alone is sufficient to offset cooling and establish AGN/ICM feedback within at least the central 30 kpc. This heating takes place roughly isotropically and most strongly at small radii, as is required for feedback to operate. We suggest that shock heating may play a significant role in AGN feedback at smaller radii in other systems, where weak shocks are more difficult to detect. We find non-zero shockfront widths that are too large to be explained by particle diffusion. Instead, all measured widths are consistent with shock broadening due to propagation through a turbulent ICM with a mean turbulent speed of roughly 70 km/s. Significant contributions to our understanding of AGN feedback and ICM physics, partially via studies similar to the one described here, will be one of the major achievements of the Athena mission.

  19. Constraining AGN triggering mechanisms through the clustering analysis of active black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, M.; Shankar, F.; Bouillot, V.; Menci, N.; Lamastra, A.; Hirschmann, M.; Fiore, F.

    2016-02-01

    The triggering mechanisms for active galactic nuclei (AGN) are still debated. Some of the most popular ones include galaxy interactions (IT) and disc instabilities (DIs). Using an advanced semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation, coupled to accurate halo occupation distribution modelling, we investigate the imprint left by each separate triggering process on the clustering strength of AGN at small and large scales. Our main results are as follows: (i) DIs, irrespective of their exact implementation in the SAM, tend to fall short in triggering AGN activity in galaxies at the centre of haloes with Mh > 1013.5 h-1 M⊙. On the contrary, the IT scenario predicts abundance of active central galaxies that generally agrees well with observations at every halo mass. (ii) The relative number of satellite AGN in DIs at intermediate-to-low luminosities is always significantly higher than in IT models, especially in groups and clusters. The low AGN satellite fraction predicted for the IT scenario might suggest that different feeding modes could simultaneously contribute to the triggering of satellite AGN. (iii) Both scenarios are quite degenerate in matching large-scale clustering measurements, suggesting that the sole average bias might not be an effective observational constraint. (iv) Our analysis suggests the presence of both a mild luminosity and a more consistent redshift dependence in the AGN clustering, with AGN inhabiting progressively less massive dark matter haloes as the redshift increases. We also discuss the impact of different observational selection cuts in measuring AGN clustering, including possible discrepancies between optical and X-ray surveys.

  20. The Star-Forming Properties of an Ultra-Hard X-ray Selected Sample of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Thomas Taro; Mushotzky, Richard; Melendez, Marcio; Koss, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We present results from our Herschel follow-up survey of the Swift/BAT AGN 58 month catalog. Using the PACS and SPIRE instruments, 313 AGN were imaged at 5 far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths (70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm) producing the largest and most complete FIR catalog of local AGN. We combine our FIR photometry with archival mid-infrared photometry to form broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that for the first time reach into the sub-millimeter regime. We fit these SEDs with several models to determine the star-forming properties of the host galaxies such as star-formation rate (SFR), IR luminosity, dust temperature, and dust mass and measure their relationship with various AGN properties such as X-ray luminosity, Eddington ratio, black hole mass, and column density. We find a weak dependence of the global SFR on the AGN strength indicating either the AGN has little influence on star formation over the entire galaxy or that the variability of the AGN on short timescales washes away any correlation between star formation and the AGN. Comparing the BAT AGN to a sample of normal star-forming galaxies on the “main sequence”, we find the BAT AGN systematically have decreased levels of specific SFR (sSFR = SFR/stellar mass). This is possibly indirect evidence that the AGN has suppressed star-formation in its host galaxy. Analysis of the FIR images themselves reveals that many of the BAT AGN are compact which leads to increased levels of SFR surface density, high enough for starburst driven winds. Finally, we show the 70 μm luminosity can be heavily contaminated by AGN emission and should not be used as a SFR indicator for AGN host galaxies.

  1. The INTEGRAL/IBIS AGN catalogue - I. X-ray absorption properties versus optical classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malizia, A.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Masetti, N.; Panessa, F.; Stephen, J. B.; Ubertini, P.

    2012-11-01

    In this work we present the most comprehensive INTEGRAL active galactic nucleus (AGN) sample. It lists 272 AGN for which we have secure optical identifications, precise optical spectroscopy and measured redshift values plus X-ray spectral information, i.e. 2-10 and 20-100 keV fluxes plus column density. Here we mainly use this sample to study the absorption properties of active galaxies, to probe new AGN classes and to test the AGN unification scheme. We find that half (48 per cent) of the sample is absorbed, while the fraction of Compton-thick AGN is small (˜7 per cent). In line with our previous analysis, we have however shown that when the bias towards heavily absorbed objects which are lost if weak and at large distance is removed, as it is possible in the local Universe, the above fractions increase to become 80 and 17 per cent. We also find that absorption is a function of source luminosity, which implies some evolution in the obscuration properties of AGN. A few peculiar classes, so far poorly studied in the hard X-ray band, have been detected and studied for the first time such as 5 X-ray bright optically normal galaxies, 5 type 2 QSOs and 11 low-ionization nuclear emission regions. In terms of optical classification, our sample contains 57 per cent of type 1 and 43 per cent of type 2 AGN; this subdivision is similar to that found in X-rays if unabsorbed versus absorbed objects are considered, suggesting that the match between optical and X-ray classifications is overall good. Only a small percentage of sources (12 per cent) does not fulfil the expectation of the unified theory as we find 22 type 1 AGN which are absorbed and 10 type 2 AGN which are unabsorbed. Studying in depth these outliers we found that most of the absorbed type 1 AGN have X-ray spectra characterized by either complex or warm/ionized absorption more likely due to ionized gas located in an accretion disc wind or in the biconical structure associated with the central nucleus, therefore

  2. The host galaxies and narrow-line regions of four double-peaked [OIII] AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Villforth, Carolin; Hamann, Fred

    2015-03-01

    Major gas-rich mergers of galaxies are expected to play an important role in triggering and fueling luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The mechanism of AGN fueling during mergers, however, remains poorly understood. We present deep multi-band (u/r/z) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy of four double-peaked [OIII] emitting AGNs. This class of object is likely associated with either kiloparsec-separated binary AGNs or final stage major mergers, although AGNs with complex narrow-line regions (NLRs) are known contaminants. Such objects are of interest since they represent the onset of AGN activity during the merger process. Three of the four double-peaked [OIII] emitters studied have been confirmed as major mergers using near-infrared imaging and one is a confirmed X-ray binary AGN. All AGNs are luminous, radio-quiet to radio-intermediate, and have redshifts of 0.1AGN suggests that the merger of a binary black hole can take longer than 1 Gyr. All AGNs hosted by merging galaxies have companions at distances ⩽150 kpc. The NLRs have large sizes (10 kpc < r < 100 kpc) and consist of compact clumps with considerable relative velocities between components (∼200–650 km s{sup −1}). We detect broad, predominantly blue, wings with velocities up to ∼1500 km s{sup −1} in [OIII], indicative of powerful outflows. The outflows are compact (<5 kpc) and co-spatial with nuclear regions showing considerable reddening, consistent with enhanced star formation. One source shows an offset between gas and stellar kinematics, consistent with either a bipolar flow or a counter-rotating gas disk. In all other sources, the ionized gas

  3. Is There an Obscured AGN in the Normal Galaxy IRASF01063-8034

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, Lincoln J.

    2005-01-01

    The XMM target for this program is ostensibly a "normal" galaxy, but the presence of water maser emission indicated that it may be an obscured AGN. Our primary goal is to test this hypothesis; detection hard X-ray emission and a reflection-dominated spectrum would indicate an AGN is present. Demonstration that the local universe contains obscured AGN is important to constraining models of the hard cosmic X-ray background, as is identification of efficient methods to locate them (e.g., ground-based detection of maser emission at microwave frequencies).

  4. The Vertical Structure of Nuclear Starburst Disks: Testing a Model of AGN Obscuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.; Gohil, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear starburst disks are Eddington-limited, radiation pressure supported disks that may be active in the nuclear environment of active galaxies (ULIRGS and AGNs). Earlier analytical models suggested that, under certain conditions, these disks may be geometrically thick on pc-scales, and thus could be a viable source for AGN obscuration, partcularly at z≤1, when gas factions in galaxies are still significant. Here, we present early results from numerical 2D models of nuclear starburst disks where the vertical structure is calculated explicitly from solving the hydrostatic balance and radiative transfer equations. We quantitatively assess under which conditions the starburst disk may present substantial obscuring columns for AGN observations.

  5. X-ray and Optical Properties of an Unbiased Sample of Local AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Lisa M.; Mushotzky, R.; Tueller, J.; Lewis, K.; Reynolds, C.

    2007-12-01

    The SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), while not focused on a Gamma-ray burst, conducts an all-sky survey in the 14 - 195 keV band. After the first 9 months, the BAT has detected a sample of 153 local (z ˜ 0.03) AGN at a flux limit of a few times 10-11 erg/s/cm-2 (Tueller et al. 2007). Since the AGN were detected at very high X-ray energies, they are an unbiased sample towards column densities below 1025 cm-2. We present the X-ray and optical properties of a sample of the BAT AGN.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: RM AGNs accretion rates and BH masses (Du+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, P.; Wang, J.-M.; Hu, C.; Ho, L. C.; Li, Y.-R.; Bai, J.-M.

    2016-05-01

    We select all AGNs with reverberation mapping (RM) data (here only broad Hβ line), which yield robust BH mass estimates needed for our analysis. All RM AGNs before 2013 are summarized by Bentz et al. (2013ApJ...767..149B). Our project to search for super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs) has monitored about 25 candidates and successfully measured Hβ lags ({tau}Hβ) in 14 AGNs to date (Du et al. 2015, J/ApJ/806/22) and other five objects monitored between 2014 and 2015 (to be submitted). See section 2 for further explanations. (2 data files).

  7. Relativistic Effects on Reflection X-ray Spectra of AGN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Fuerst, Steven V.; Brandwardi-Raymond, Graziella; Wu, Kinwah; Crowley, Oliver; /University Coll. London

    2007-01-05

    We have calculated the reflection component of the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and shown that they can be significantly modified by the relativistic motion of the accretion flow and various gravitational effects of the central black hole. The absorption edges in the reflection spectra suffer severe energy shifts and smearing. The degree of distortion depends on the system parameters, and the dependence is stronger for some parameters such as the inner radius of the accretion disk and the disk viewing inclination angles. The relativistic effects are significant and are observable. Improper treatment of the reflection component of the X-ray continuum in spectral fittings will give rise to spurious line-like features, which will mimic the fluorescent emission lines and mask the relativistic signatures of the lines.

  8. Jets and Outflows in Radio Galaxies: Implications for AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, Eleonora; Grandi, Paola; Costantini, Elisa; Palumbo, Giorgio G. C.

    One of the main debated astrophysical problems is the role of the AGN feedback in galaxy formation. It is known that massive black holes have a profound effect on the formation and evolution of galaxies, but how black holes and galaxies communicate is still an unsolved problem. For Radio Galaxies, feedback studies have mainly focused on jet/cavity systems in the most massive and X-ray luminous galaxy clusters. The recent high-resolution detection of warm absorbers in some Broad Line Radio Galaxies allow us to investigate the interplay between the nuclear engine and the surrounding medium from a different perspective. We report on the detection of warm absorbers in two Broad Line Radio Galaxies, 3C 382 and 3C 390.3, and discuss the physical and energetic properties of the absorbing gas. Finally, we attempt a comparison between radio-loud and radio-quiet outflows.

  9. Synergy Between Observations of AGN with GLAST and MAXI

    SciTech Connect

    Madejski, Grzegorz

    2002-03-25

    In five years' time we will witness the launch of two important missions developed to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST, sensitive in the high energy {gamma}-ray band, and MAXI, the all-sky X-ray monitor. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments will be particularly valuable for variable sources, allowing cross-correlations of time series between the two bands. We present the anticipated results from such observations of active galaxies, and in particular, of the jet-dominated sub-class of AGN known as blazars. We discuss the constraints on the structure and emission processes--and in particular, on the internal shock models currently invoked to explain the particle acceleration processes in blazars--that can be derived with simultaneous {gamma}-ray and X-ray data.

  10. Fossil shell emission in dying radio loud AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kino, M.; Ito, H.; Kawakatu, N.; Orienti, M.; Nagai, H.; Wajima, K.; Itoh, R.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate shell emission associated with dying radio loud AGNs. First, based on our recent work by Ito et al. (2015), we describe the dynamical and spectral evolution of shells after stopping the jet energy injection. We find that the shell emission overwhelms that of the radio lobes soon after stopping the jet energy injection because fresh electrons are continuously supplied into the shell via the forward shock, while the radio lobes rapidly fade out without jet energy injection. We find that such fossil shells can be a new class of target sources for SKA telescope. Next, we apply the model to the nearby radio source 3C84. Then, we find that the fossil shell emission in 3C84 is less luminous in the radio band while it is bright in the TeV γ-ray band and can be detectable by CTA. Data from STELLA

  11. Optical Monitoring of Selected X-ray AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, V. D.; Sadun, A.; Kelly, M.; Baca, P.; Holt, J.; Galadari, A.; Nied, P.; Howard, E.; Ghosh, K.

    2001-12-01

    We present the results of microvariability studies of X-ray loud/radio quiet AGN in optical wavelengths (R band). The optical data were taken over approximately eight months at the Sommers-Bausch Observatory (U. Colorado-Boulder), and at the SARA Observatory. In addition to engaging in routine optical analysis, we investigated the extent to which these objects exhibited intra-night variability. The presence of microvariability would indicate that in addition to an accretion disk, there would also be present relativistic components such as parsec-scale jets; quiescence would indicate that long-term variability in these objects is perhaps due to accretion disk instabilities alone. The preliminary indication from our data is that there is indeed evidence of relativistic jets in this class of objects.

  12. Future requirements for X-ray monitoring of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandra, K.

    2000-10-01

    Observations with RXTE have lead to major advances in our knowledge of the X-ray and multi-waveband variability properties of active galactic nuclei (AGN). In large part, this has been due to the fact that it has been possible to probe long time scale (months-years) variability in a systematic way. Current and future high-throughput missions will do an excellent job defining the characteristics of the short time variations. It is important, however, to make plans for longer-term monitoring in the future, given that RXTE has shown that this is how many of the important science questions can be addressed. The author is supported by NASA ADP grant NAG5-7067 to the Universities Space Research Association.

  13. IGM Heating and AGN activity in Fossil Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraghaei, H.; Khosroshahi, H. G.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Ponman, T. J.; Jetha, N. N.; Raychaudhury, S.

    2014-07-01

    Fossil galaxy groups are energetically and morphologically ideal environments to study the intergalactic medium (IGM) heating, because their inter-galactic gas is undisturbed due to the lack of recent group scale mergers. We study the role of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in heating the IGM in a sample of five fossil galaxy groups by employing properties at 610 MHz and 1.4 GHz. We find that two of the dominant galaxies in fossil groups, ESO 3060170 and RX J1416.4+2315, are associated with the radio lobes. We evaluate the PdV work of the radio lobes and their corresponding heating power and compare to the X-ray emission loss within cooling radius. Our results show that the power due to mechanical heating is not sufficiently high to suppress the cooling.

  14. AGN disks and black holes on the weighting scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huré, J.-M.; Hersant, F.; Surville, C.; Nakai, N.; Jacq, T.

    2011-06-01

    We exploit our formula for the gravitational potential of finite size, power-law disks to derive a general expression linking the mass of the black hole in active galactic nuclei (AGN), the mass of the surrounding disk, its surface density profile (through the power index s), and the differential rotation law. We find that the global rotation curve v(R) of the disk in centrifugal balance does not obey a power law of the cylindrical radius R (except in the confusing case s = -2 that mimics a Keplerian motion), and discuss the local velocity index. This formula can help to understand how, from position-velocity diagrams, mass is shared between the disk and the black hole. To this purpose, we checked the idea by generating a sample of synthetic data with different levels of Gaussian noise, added in radius. It turns out that, when observations are spread over a large radial domain and exhibit low dispersion (standard deviation σ ≲ 10% typically), the disk properties (mass and s-parameter) and black hole mass can be deduced from a non linear fit of kinematic data plotted on a (R,Rv2)-diagram. For σ ≳ 10%, masses are estimated fairly well from a linear regression (corresponding to the zeroth-order treatment of the formula), but the power index s is no longer accessible. We have applied the model to 7 AGN disks whose rotation has already been probed through water maser emission. For NGC 3393 and UGC 3789, the masses seem well constrained through the linear approach. For IC 1481, the power-law exponent s can even be deduced. Because the model is scale-free, it applies to any kind of star/disk system. Extension to disks around young stars showing deviation from Keplerian motion is thus straightforward.

  15. X-ray variability in AGN: LINER vs. Seyfert 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Lorena; Masegosa, Josefa; Gonzalez-Martin, Omaira; Marquez, Isabel

    2015-09-01

    Although variability is a general property characterizing active galactic nuclei (AGN), it is not well stablished if the changes occur in the same way in every nuclei . The main purpose of this work is to study the X-ray variability pattern(s) in low luminosity AGN in a large sample, including 18 low ionization nuclear emission line regions (LINERs) and 26 type 2 Seyferts (Sy2), using the public archives in Chandra and/or XMM-Newton. Spectra of the same source gathered at different epochs were simultaneously fitted to study long term variations, whereas the variability patterns were studied allowing different parameters to vary during the spectral fit. Whenever possible, short term variations from the analysis of the light curves and long term UV flux variability were studied. Short term variations are not found at X-rays, but variations in timescales of months/years is very common in both families. The main driver of the long term X-ray variations seems to be related to changes in the nuclear power in both LINERs and Sy2, but other variability patterns cannot be discarded in a few cases, because changes of the column density or at soft energies are also found. The X-ray variations occur in the same way in LINERs and type 2 Seyferts, i.e., related to the nuclear continuum, but they might have different accretion mechanisms. As absorption variations and changing-look sources are not observed in LINERs, but UV nuclear variations are common, we speculate that the BLR and the torus might disappear in these sources.

  16. The AGN Content of the Micron all Sky Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutri, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) began routine operations from its northern facility on Mt. Hopkins, AZ in June of 1997, and from its southern facility on Cerro Tololo, Chile in March of 1998. At each site, highly automated 1.3 m telescopes equipped with identical 3-channel cameras, are systematically imaging the sky in three near infrared wavelength bands, J (1.25 um), H (1.65 um) and K-s (2.17 um). The Survey will ultimately produce an Image Atlas containing nearly two million 512 x 1024 pixel images (1 arcsec/pix) in the three colors, a highly complete and reliable catalog containing approx. 300 million point sources having SNR greater than 10 photometry at J less or = 15.8, H less or = 15.1 and K-s less or = 14.3 mag. and an astrometric accuracy greater than 0.511 RMS, and a catalog of 1-2 million resolved sources, primarily galaxies, having SNR greater than 10 photometric accuracy at J less than or = 15.5, H less than or = 14.8 and K-s less than or = 13.5 mag. The 2MASS Sampler, an introductory set of data, was released to the community in December of 1998 (see http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/2mass/). We review the near IR and optical/IR properties of "conventional" QSOs from UV and optical samples, and estimate the number that will be detected by 2MASS. We also discuss 2MASS's ability to test for for new populations of extremely red AGN that have been missed by UV and Visual surveys, as suggested by from IRAS and radio studies. Results of spectroscopic follow-up of 2MASS-selected new AGN candidates will also be presented.

  17. Do the Kepler AGN light curves need reprocessing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Williams, Joshua; Carini, Michael T.

    2015-10-01

    We gauge the impact of spacecraft-induced effects on the inferred variability properties of the light curve of the Seyfert 1 AGN Zw 229-15 observed by Kepler. We compare the light curve of Zw 229-15 obtained from the Kepler MAST data base with a reprocessed light curve constructed from raw pixel data. We use the first-order structure function, SF(δt), to fit both light curves to the damped power-law PSD (power spectral density) of Kasliwal et al. On short time-scales, we find a steeper log PSD slope (γ = 2.90 to within 10 per cent) for the reprocessed light curve as compared to the light curve found on MAST (γ = 2.65 to within 10 per cent) - both inconsistent with a damped random walk (DRW) which requires γ = 2. The log PSD slope inferred for the reprocessed light curve is consistent with previous results that study the same reprocessed light curve. The turnover time-scale is almost identical for both light curves (27.1 and 27.5 d for the reprocessed and MAST data base light curves). Based on the obvious visual difference between the two versions of the light curve and on the PSD model fits, we conclude that there remain significant levels of spacecraft-induced effects in the standard pipeline reduction of the Kepler data. Reprocessing the light curves will change the model inferenced from the data but is unlikely to change the overall scientific conclusions reached by Kasliwal et al. - not all AGN light curves are consistent with the DRW.

  18. Simulations of the OzDES AGN reverberation mapping project

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, Anthea L.; Martini, Paul; Davis, Tamara M.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Skielboe, Andreas; Vestergaard, Marianne; Huff, Eric; Watson, Darach; et al

    2015-08-26

    As part of the Australian spectroscopic dark energy survey (OzDES) we are carrying out a large-scale reverberation mapping study of ~500 quasars over five years in the 30 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova fields. These quasars have redshifts ranging up to 4 and have apparent AB magnitudes between 16.8 mag < r < 22.5 mag. The aim of the survey is to measure time lags between fluctuations in the quasar continuum and broad emission-line fluxes of individual objects in order to measure black hole masses for a broad range of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and constrainmore » the radius–luminosity (R–L) relationship. Here we investigate the expected efficiency of the OzDES reverberation mapping campaign and its possible extensions. We expect to recover lags for ~35–45 % of the quasars. AGN with shorter lags and greater variability are more likely to yield a lag measurement, and objects with lags ≲6 months or ~1 yr are expected to be recovered the most accurately. The baseline OzDES reverberation mapping campaign is predicted to produce an unbiased measurement of the R–L relationship parameters for Hβ, MgIIλ2798, and C IVλ1549. As a result, extending the baseline survey by either increasing the spectroscopic cadence, extending the survey season, or improving the emission-line flux measurement accuracy will significantly improve the R–L parameter constraints for all broad emission lines.« less

  19. CMB quenching of high-redshift radio-loud AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Haardt, F.; Ciardi, B.; Sbarrato, T.; Gallo, E.; Tavecchio, F.; Celotti, A.

    2015-10-01

    The very existence of more than a dozen of high-redshift (z ≳ 4) blazars indicates that a much larger population of misaligned powerful jetted active galactic nucleus (AGN) was already in place when the Universe was ≲1.5 Gyr old. Such parent population proved to be very elusive, and escaped direct detection in radio surveys so far. High-redshift blazars themselves seem to be failing in producing extended radio lobes, raising questions about the connection between such class and the vaster population of radio galaxies. We show that the interaction of the jet electrons with the intense cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation explains the lack of extended radio emission in high-redshift blazars and in their parent population, helping to explain the apparently missing misaligned counterparts of high-redshift blazars. On the other hand, the emission from the more compact and more magnetized hotspots are less affected by the enhanced CMB energy density. By modelling the spectral energy distribution of blazar lobes and hotspots, we find that most of them should be detectable by low-frequency deep radio observations, e.g. by LOw-Frequency ARray for radio astronomy and by relatively deep X-ray observations with good angular resolution, e.g. by the Chandra satellite. At high redshifts, the emission of a misaligned relativistic jet, being debeamed, is missed by current large sky area surveys. The isotropic flux produced in the hotspots can be below ˜1 mJy and the isotropic lobe radio emission is quenched by the CMB cooling. Consequently, even sources with very powerful jets can go undetected in current radio surveys, and misclassified as radio-quiet AGNs.

  20. Geologic map of the Scotts Mills, Silverton, and Stayton Northeast 7.5 minute quadrangles, Northwest Oregon: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tolan, Terry; Beeson, Marvin; Wheeler, Karen L.

    1999-01-01

    The Scotts Mills, Silverton, and Stayton NE 7.5 minute quadrangles are situated along the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and adjacent lower foothills (Waldo and Silverton Hills) of the Cascade Range (Fig. 1). The terrain within this area is of low to moderate relief, ranging from 100 to more than 1000 ft above sea level. This area is largely rural, with most of the valley floor and low-relief foothills under cultivation. In the last decade, the rural areas outside the boundaries of established towns have experienced significant growth in new homes built and the expansion of housing subdivisions. This growth has placed an increased demand on existing geologic resources (e.g., groundwater, sand and gravel, crushed stone) and the need to better understand potential geologic hazards within this region. Previous geologic mapping by Piper (1942), Peck and others (1964), Newton (1969), Hampton (1972), Miller and Orr (1984), Orr and Miller (1984), and Miller and Orr (1986, 1988) established and refined the general stratigraphic framework of this region. This mapping identified few faults or folds; earlier investigators were hindered by the lack of reliably identifiable marker horizons within the stratigraphic section. Werner (1991), using available seismic profile lines and well data in the Willamette Valley to locate the top of the Columbia River Basalt Group, was able to identify and map faults within the subsurface. Reconnaissance mapping of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) units in this region in the early 1980’s indicated that these stratigraphic units could serve as a series of unique reference horizons for identifying post-Miocene folding and faulting (Beeson and others, 1985, 1989; Beeson and Tolan, 1990). The major emphasis of this investigation was to identify and map CRBG units within the Scotts Mills, Silverton, and Stayton NE quadrangles and to utilize this detailed CRBG stratigraphy to identify and characterize structural features.

  1. The Third Turn toward the Social: Nancy Welch's "Living Room," Tony Scott's "Dangerous Writing," and Rhetoric and Composition's Turn toward Grassroots Political Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Kelly; Girshin, Thomas; Bowlin, Barrett

    2013-01-01

    This review essay examines recent texts by Nancy Welch and Tony Scott, both of which use embodied activism as a starting point for their inquiries. Taken together, these works point to a distinct shift in composition studies' turn toward the social, one that calls on workers both within and outside the academy to actively engage in grassroots…

  2. A Critique of "An Exploratory Investigation of the Effects of Communication Apprehension in Alternative Systems of Instruction" by Michael Scott, Michael Yates, and Lawrence Wheeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, John A.

    In this critique, comments and suggestions are offered that might be integrated into future research by Scott, Yates, and Wheeless on the topics of communication apprehension and alternative instructional approaches. These authors suggest, in their paper, that one's level of communication apprehension should be predictive of attitudes held toward,…

  3. An exceptionally powerful AGN outburst in the low-luminosity non-cool-core group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Ewan

    2013-10-01

    The shallow potentials of galaxy groups make them vulnerable to heating and gas loss caused by powerful AGN outbursts. Theoretical models suggest that feedback at z~2 must have ejected gas from groups, reducing their baryon content, but a lack of identified nearby non-cool-core (NCC) groups makes it difficult to determine whether AGN continue to have such a significant impact on the structure of the intra-group medium (IGM). We propose a deep observation of HCG 15, a disturbed non-cool-core group which appears to have undergone an exceptionally powerful AGN outburst ~190-330 Myr ago. We will search for cavities, make a more accurate estimate of the outburst power, examine the IGM for evidence of outward gas transport, and determine whether the AGN has disrupted the group core.

  4. Prospects for AGN Science using the ART-XC on the SRG Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Bonamente, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    The enhanced hard X-ray sensitivity provided by the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope to the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission facilitates the detection of heavily obscured and other hard-spectrum cosmic X-ray sources. The SRG all-sky survey will obtain large, statistically-well-defined samples of active galactic nuclei (AGN) including a significant population of local heavily-obscured AGN. In anticipation of the SRG all-sky survey, we investigate the prospects for refining the bright end of the AGN luminosity function and determination of the local black hole mass function and comparing the spatial distribution of AGN with large-scale structure defined by galaxy clusters and groups. Particular emphasis is placed on studies of the deep survey Ecliptic Pole regions.

  5. The MOSDEF Survey: Outflows from AGN at z~2.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Gene; Coil, Alison L.; MOSDEF Team

    2016-06-01

    The MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, which is being undertaken with the new MOSFIRE spectrograph on the Keck I telescope, will obtain rest-frame optical spectra of ~1500 galaxies and AGN at 1.4 < z < 3.8. We analyze the spectra of 67 X-ray, IR, and/or optical AGN at z~2.3 in data from the first two years of the MOSDEF survey. We measure the H_β, [O III], H_α and [N II] emission line profiles to identify and characterize potential outflows from the AGN. We present measurements of the kinematics, physical extent, and emission line ratios of the outflows and quantify the high incidence of outflows in these AGN at z~2.3.

  6. The nature and origin of Narrow Line AGN activity in a sample of isolated SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coziol, R.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Islas-Islas, J. M.; Ortega-Minakata, R. A.; Neri-Larios, D. M.; Andernach, H.

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the nature and origin of the nuclear activity observed in a sample of 292 SDSS narrow-emission-line galaxies, considered to have formed and evolved in isolation. The fraction of Narrow Line AGNs (NLAGNs) and Transition type Objects (TOs; a NLAGN with circumnuclear star formation) amounts to 64% of the galaxies. We verify that the probability for a galaxy to show an AGN characteristic increases with the bulge mass of the galaxy (Torres-Papaqui et al. 2011), and find evidence that this trend is really a by-product of the morphology, suggesting that the AGN phenomenon is intimately connected with the formation process of the galaxies. The NLAGNs in our sample are consistent with a scaled-down or powered-down versions of quasars and Broad Line AGNs.

  7. Cold-gas outflows in typical low-redshift galaxies are driven by star formation, not AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzi, Marc; Kaviraj, Sugata; Nedelchev, Borislav; Tiffany, Joshua; Shabala, Stanislav S.; Deller, Adam T.; Middelberg, Enno

    2016-02-01

    Energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is an important ingredient for regulating the star formation history of galaxies in models of galaxy formation, which makes it important to study how AGN feedback actually occurs in practice. In order to catch AGNs in the act of quenching star formation, we have used the interstellar Na I λλ5890, 5895(NaD) absorption lines to look for cold-gas outflows in a sample of 456 nearby galaxies for which we could unambiguously ascertain the presence of radio-AGN activity, thanks to radio imaging at milli-arcsecond scales. While compact radio emission indicating a radio AGN was found in 103 galaxies (23 per cent of the sample), and 23 objects (5 per cent) exhibited NaD absorption-line kinematics suggestive of cold-gas outflows, not one object showed evidence of a radio AGN and of a cold-gas outflow simultaneously. Radio-AGN activity was found predominantly in early-type galaxies, while cold-gas outflows were mainly seen in spiral galaxies with central star formation or composite star formation/AGN activity. Optical AGNs also do not seem capable of driving galactic winds in our sample. Our work adds to a picture of the low-redshift Universe, where cold-gas outflows in massive galaxies are generally driven by star formation and where radio-AGN activity occurs most often in systems in which the gas reservoir has already been significantly depleted.

  8. THE 60 MONTH ALL-SKY BURST ALERT TELESCOPE SURVEY OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS AND THE ANISOTROPY OF NEARBY AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Madejski, G. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Greiner, J.; Burlon, D.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-04-10

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). In this time frame, BAT-detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGNs, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of {approx}2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGNs. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona fide Compton-thick AGNs and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGNs represent {approx}5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT data set to refine the determination of the log N-log S of AGNs which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, toward assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the log N-log S of AGNs selected above 10 keV is now established to {approx}10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGNs and measure a space density of 7.9{sup +4.1}{sub -2.9} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. As the BAT AGNs are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGNs in the nearby universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGNs that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local ({<=}85 Mpc) universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions.

  9. The 60 Month All-Sky Burst Alert Telescope Survey of Active Galactic Nucleus and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Greiner, J.; Madejeski, G. M.; Gehrels, N.; Burlon, D.

    2014-01-01

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). In this time frame, BAT-detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGNs, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of approx. 2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGNs. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona fide Compton-thick AGNs and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGNs represent approx. 5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT data set to refine the determination of the log N-log S of AGNs which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, toward assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the log N-log S of AGNs selected above 10 keV is now established to approx. 10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGNs and measure a space density of 7.9(+4.1/-2.9)× 10(exp -5)/cubic Mpc for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 × 10(exp 42) erg / s. As the BAT AGNs are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGNs in the nearby universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGNs that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local (much < 85 Mpc) universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions..

  10. Type 1 AGN at low z - III. The optical narrow-line ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Laor, Ari

    2013-05-01

    We present the optical narrow-line ratios in a Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based sample of 3175 broad Hα selected type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN), and explore their positions in the BPT diagrams as a function of the AGN and the host properties. We find the following: (1) the luminosities of all measured narrow lines (Hα, Hβ, [O III], [N II], [S II], [O I]) show a Baldwin relation relative to the broad Hα luminosity LbHα, with slopes in the range of 0.53-0.72. (2) About 20 per cent of the type 1 AGN reside within the `Composite' and `star-forming' (SF) regions of the Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich (BPT) diagrams. These objects also show excess narrow Hα and ultraviolet (UV) luminosities, for their LbHα, consistent with contribution from star formation which dominates the narrow-lines emission, as expected from their positions in the BPT diagrams. (3) The type 1 which reside within the AGN region in the BPT diagrams, are offset to lower [S II]/Hα and [N II]/Hα luminosity ratios, compared to type 2 AGN. This offset is a selection effect, related to the lower AGN/host luminosity selection of the type 2 AGN selected from the SDSS galaxy sample. (4) The [N II]/Hα and [N II]/[S II] ratios in type 1 AGN increase with the host mass, as expected if the mass-metallicity relation of quiescent galaxies holds for the AGN narrow-line region (NLR). (5) The broad lines optical Fe II is higher for a higher [N II]/Hα, at a fixed Lbol and Eddington ratio L/LEdd. This suggests that the broad line region metallicity is also related to the host mass. (6) The fraction of AGN which are low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) increases sharply with decreasing L/LEdd. This fraction is the same for type 1 and type 2 AGN. (7) The BPT position is unaffected by the amount of dust extinction of the optical-UV continuum, which suggests that the extincting dust resides on scales larger than the NLR.

  11. The Contribution of Compton-Thick AGN/ULIRGs to the X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardini, Emanuele

    Accretion onto the supermassive black holes located at the centre of Active Galactic Nuclei(AGN) is one of the most efficient power sources in the Universe, and provides a significant contribution to the energy radiated over cosmic times. The spectral shape of the X-ray background and its progressive resolution strongly suggests that most AGN are heavily obscured by large amounts of dust and gas. Their primary radiation field is reprocessed and re-emitted at longer wavelengths, driving a huge IR luminosity. Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) are the local counterparts of the high-redshift (z < 1 3) IR systems that harbour the bulk of obscured nuclear activity in the early Universe. We have been recently awarded Suzaku observations of two ULIRGs, IRAS 00182 7112 and IRAS 12127 1412, for a total exposure time of 150 ks. Both the sources are known to host an elusive AGN whose intrinsic luminosity is estimated to fall in the quasar range. Although classified as Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Regions in the optical, these ULIRGs sport the typical features of buried AGN in the mid-IR. IRAS 12127 1412 was observed for the first time in the X-rays by our group. Its Chandra spectrum clearly shows the signatures of AGN reflection at 2 10 keV. Similar properties were previously found in IRAS 00182 7112. Our Suzaku observations will allow to pinpont the AGN emission above 10 keV, and will provide fundamental information on the physical and geometrical structure of Compton-thick AGN embedded in a nuclear starburst. These sources are believed to experience the very initial phase of the AGN feedback on the surrounding environment, eventually leading to the formation of powerful optically- bright quasars. Besides this, we stress another remarkable opportunity related to the study of these two ULIRGs. Due to their really unique mid-IR and hard X-ray spectral properties, IRAS 00182 7112 and IRAS 12127 1412 can be considered as representative templates for a significant

  12. A spectroscopic survey of X-ray-selected AGNs in the northern XMM-XXL field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, M.-L.; Merloni, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Salvato, M.; Aubourg, E.; Brandt, W. N.; Brusa, M.; Buchner, J.; Dwelly, T.; Nandra, K.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Schwope, A.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a survey of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with optical spectroscopic follow-up in a ˜ 18 deg2 area of the equatorial XMM-XXL north field. A sample of 8445 point-like X-ray sources detected by XMM-Newton above a limiting flux of F_{0.5-10 keV} > 10^{-15} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} was matched to optical (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS) and infrared (IR; WISE) counterparts. We followed up 3042 sources brighter than r = 22.5 mag with the SDSS Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectrograph. The spectra yielded a reliable redshift measurement for 2578 AGNs in the redshift range z = 0.02-5.0, with 0.5-2 keV luminosities ranging from 1039-1046 erg s- 1. This is currently the largest published spectroscopic sample of X-ray-selected AGNs in a contiguous area. The BOSS spectra of AGN candidates show a distribution of optical line widths which is clearly bimodal, allowing an efficient separation between broad- and narrow-emission line AGNs. The former dominate our sample (70 per cent) due to the relatively bright X-ray flux limit and the optical BOSS magnitude limit. We classify the narrow-emission line objects (22 per cent of the full sample) using standard optical emission line diagnostics: the majority have line ratios indicating the dominant source of ionization is the AGN. A small number (8 per cent of the full sample) exhibit the typical narrow line ratios of star-forming galaxies, or only have absorption lines in their spectra. We term the latter two classes `elusive' AGN, which would not be easy to identify correctly without their X-ray emission. We also compare X-ray (XMM-Newton), optical colour (SDSS) and and IR (WISE) AGN selections in this field. X-ray observations reveal, by far, the largest number of AGN. The overlap between the selections, which is a strong function of the imaging depth in a given band, is also remarkably small. We show using spectral stacking that a large fraction of the X-ray AGNs would not be

  13. Merger-driven fueling of active galactic nuclei: Six dual and of AGNs discovered with Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope observations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Comerford, Julia M.; Pooley, David; Barrows, R. Scott; Greene, Jenny E.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Madejski, Greg M.; Cooper, Michael C.

    2015-06-19

    Dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and offset AGNs are kpc-scale separation supermassive black holes pairs created during galaxy mergers, where both or one of the black holes are AGNs, respectively. These dual and offset AGNs are valuable probes of the link between mergers and AGNs but are challenging to identify. Here we present Chandra/ACIS observations of 12 optically selected dual AGN candidates atmore » $$z\\lt 0.34$$, where we use the X-rays to identify AGNs. We also present Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 observations of 10 of these candidates, which reveal any stellar bulges accompanying the AGNs. We discover a dual AGN system with separation $${\\rm \\Delta }x=2.2$$ kpc, where the two stellar bulges have coincident [O iii] λ5007 and X-ray sources. This system is an extremely minor merger (460:1) that may include a dwarf galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole. We also find six single AGNs, and five systems that are either dual or offset AGNs with separations $${\\rm \\Delta }x\\lt 10$$ kpc. Four of the six dual AGNs and dual/offset AGNs are in ongoing major mergers, and these AGNs are 10 times more luminous, on average, than the single AGNs in our sample. This hints that major mergers may preferentially trigger higher luminosity AGNs. Further, we find that confirmed dual AGNs have hard X-ray luminosities that are half of those of single AGNs at fixed [O III] λ5007 luminosity, on average. Lastly, this could be explained by high densities of gas funneled to galaxy centers during mergers, and emphasizes the need for deeper X-ray observations of dual AGN candidates.« less

  14. An enhanced fraction of starbursting galaxies among high Eddington ratio AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, E.; Mullaney, J. R.; Daddi, E.; Ciesla, L.; Schreiber, C.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the star-forming properties of 1620 X-ray selected AGN host galaxies as a function of their specific X-ray luminosity (i.e., X-ray luminosity per unit host stellar mass) - a proxy of the Eddington ratio. Our motivation is to determine whether there is any evidence of a suppression of star-formation at high Eddington ratios, which may hint toward "AGN feedback" effects. Star-formation rates (SFRs) are derived from fits to Herschel-measured far-infrared spectral energy distributions, taking into account any contamination from the AGN. Herschel-undetected AGNs are included via stacking analyses to provide average SFRs in bins of redshift and specific X-ray luminosity (spanning 0.01 ≲ L_X/M_{ast } ≲ 100 L_{⊙} M_{⊙}^{-1}). After normalising for the effects of mass and redshift arising from the evolving galaxy main sequence, we find that the SFRs of high specific luminosity AGNs are slightly enhanced compared to their lower specific luminosity counterparts. This suggests that the SFR distribution of AGN hosts changes with specific X-ray luminosity, a result reinforced by our finding of a significantly higher fraction of starbursting hosts among high specific luminosity AGNs compared to that of the general star-forming galaxy population (i.e., 8-10 per cent vs. 3 per cent). Contrary to our original motivation, our findings suggest that high specific luminosity AGNs are more likely to reside in galaxies with enhanced levels of star-formation.

  15. Cooling, AGN Feedback, and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G. Mark; O'Shea, Brian W.; Donahue, Megan

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation, and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating, and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM) and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations of cool-core clusters. ICM cooling is dynamically balanced by AGN heating, and a cool-core appearance is preserved. The minimum cooling time to free-fall time ratio typically varies between a few and ≳ 20. The star formation rate (SFR) covers a wide range, from 0 to a few hundred {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1, with an average of ˜ 40 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. The instantaneous SMBH accretion rate shows large variations on short timescales, but the average value correlates well with the SFR. Simulations without stellar feedback or self-gravity produce qualitatively similar results, but a lower SMBH feedback efficiency (0.1% compared to 1%) results in too many stars.

  16. The Search for Molecular Outflows in Local Volume AGNs with Herschel-PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M.; Veilleux, S.; Meléndez, M.; Sturm, E.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; González-Alfonso, E.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results from a systematic search for galactic-scale, molecular (OH 119 μm) outflows in a sample of 52 Local Volume (d\\lt 50 Mpc) Burst Alert Telescope detected active galactic nuclei (BAT AGNs) with Herschel-PACS. We combine the results from our analysis of the BAT AGNs with the published Herschel/PACS data of 43 nearby (z\\lt 0.3) galaxy mergers, mostly ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. The objects in our sample of BAT AGNs have, on average, ˜ 10{--}100 times lower AGN luminosities, star formation rates, and stellar masses than those of the ULIRG and QSO samples. OH 119 μm is detected in 42 of our BAT AGN targets. Evidence for molecular outflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than ‑50 km s‑1 and/or blueshifted wings with 84% velocities less than ‑300 km s‑1) is seen in only four BAT AGNs (NGC 7479 is the most convincing case). Evidence for molecular inflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than 50 km s‑1) is seen in seven objects, although an inverted P-Cygni profile is detected unambiguously in only one object (Circinus). Our data show that both the starburst and AGN contribute to driving OH outflows, but the fastest OH winds require AGNs with quasar-like luminosities. We also confirm that the total absorption strength of OH 119 μm is a good proxy for dust optical depth as it correlates strongly with the 9.7 μm silicate absorption feature, a measure of obscuration originating in both the nuclear torus and host galaxy disk. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  17. Results from the NuSTAR Survey of Swift/BAT AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balokovic, Mislav; Harrison, Fiona

    2015-08-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has enabled studies of the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) to extend into the spectral window above 10 keV with unprecedented spatial resolution and two orders of magnitude better sensitivity than any other instrument operating in that energy range. As a part of its long-term extragalactic program NuSTAR is surveying the nearby population of AGN detected at hard X-ray energies by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT). We present results based on 15-25 ks observations of ~150 Swift/BAT AGN surveyed in the first 2.5 years of NuSTAR operation. This sample forms an atlas of the highest quality hard X-ray spectra available to date for a large number of AGN. Assuming a range of hard X-ray spectral models, phenomenological as well as physically motivated, we constrain the main spectral parameters for each source individually and test the applicability of the models on a large sample for the first time. This analysis allows us to determine distributions of the main spectral parameters (spectral index, high-energy cut-off, absorption column, reflection strength, iron line equivalent width) in a well-defined population of nearby AGN. We find that approximately 70% of obscured AGN spectra can be well modeled in terms of simple models used in the literature, while the rest requires careful consideration of more advanced models. We will discuss the implications for the local AGN population, the effects on interpretation of high-redshift AGN observations, and the limitations of the current results.

  18. A compendium of AGN inclinations with corresponding UV/optical continuum polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.

    2014-06-01

    The anisotropic nature of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to be responsible for the observational differences between type-1 (pole-on) and type-2 (edge-on) nearby Seyfert-like galaxies. In this picture, the detection of emission and/or absorption features is directly correlated to the inclination of the system. The AGN structure can be further probed by using the geometry-sensitive technique of polarimetry, yet the pairing between observed polarization and Seyfert type remains poorly examined. Based on archival data, I report here the first compilation of 53 estimated AGN inclinations matched with ultraviolet/optical continuum polarization measurements. Corrections, based on the polarization of broad emission lines, are applied to the sample of Seyfert-2 AGN to remove dilution by starburst light and derive information about the scattered continuum alone. The resulting compendium agrees with past empirical results, i.e. type-1 AGN show low polarization degrees (P ≤ 1 per cent) predominantly associated with a polarization position angle parallel to the projected radio axis of the system, while type-2 objects show stronger polarization percentages (P > 7 per cent) with perpendicular polarization angles. The transition between type-1 and type-2 inclination occurs between 45° and 60° without noticeable impact on P. The compendium is further used as a test to investigate the relevance of four AGN models. While an AGN model with fragmented regions matches observations better than uniform models, a structure with a failed dusty wind along the equator and disc-born, ionized, polar outflows is by far closer to observations. However, although the models correctly reproduce the observed dichotomy between parallel and perpendicular polarization, as well as correct polarization percentages at type-2 inclinations, further work is needed to account for some highly polarized type-1 AGN.

  19. A Population of WISE-Selected Dual AGNs Revealed by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secrest, Nathan; Satyapal, Shobita; Rothberg, Barry; Ellison, Sara; Gliozzi, Mario; Fischer, Jackie; Schmitt, Henrique R.; O'Connor, Jess; Fertig, Derek

    2015-08-01

    Since the vast majority of galaxies contain supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxy interactions trigger nuclear gas accretion, a direct consequence of the hierarchical model of galaxy formation would be the existence of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The existence, frequency, and characteristics of such binary AGNs have important astrophysical implications on the SMBH mass function, the interplay between SMBHs and the host galaxy, and the M-σ relation. Despite decades of searching, and strong theoretical reasons that they should exist, observationally confirmed cases of binary AGNs are extremely rare, and most have been discovered serendipitously. Using the all-sky WISE survey, we identified a population of over one hundred strongly interacting galaxies that display extreme red mid-infrared colors (W1-W2 > 0.8) thus far exclusively associated in extragalactic sources with powerful AGNs. The vast majority of these galaxies are optically quiescent suggesting that they capture a population of binary AGNs that cannot be found through optical studies. In our previous pilot Chandra program, we observed the 6 brightest WISE selected dual AGN candidates with separations of a few kiloparsecs. Of the 5 observed thus far, 4 display two nuclear X-ray point sources consistent with dual AGNs, demonstrating that WISE pre-selection may be effective in identifying a new population of dual AGNs. We have obtained follow-up ground based near-IR spectroscopy of 2 targets that reveal broad Pa-α emission confirming the presence of massive black holes with masses ~ 108 M⊙. We will discuss our findings, the state of this research, and its implications for our understanding of the relationship between SMBHs and their host galaxies.

  20. The Search for Molecular Outflows in Local Volume AGNs with Herschel-PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M.; Veilleux, S.; Meléndez, M.; Sturm, E.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; González-Alfonso, E.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results from a systematic search for galactic-scale, molecular (OH 119 μm) outflows in a sample of 52 Local Volume (d\\lt 50 Mpc) Burst Alert Telescope detected active galactic nuclei (BAT AGNs) with Herschel-PACS. We combine the results from our analysis of the BAT AGNs with the published Herschel/PACS data of 43 nearby (z\\lt 0.3) galaxy mergers, mostly ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. The objects in our sample of BAT AGNs have, on average, ∼ 10{--}100 times lower AGN luminosities, star formation rates, and stellar masses than those of the ULIRG and QSO samples. OH 119 μm is detected in 42 of our BAT AGN targets. Evidence for molecular outflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than ‑50 km s‑1 and/or blueshifted wings with 84% velocities less than ‑300 km s‑1) is seen in only four BAT AGNs (NGC 7479 is the most convincing case). Evidence for molecular inflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than 50 km s‑1) is seen in seven objects, although an inverted P-Cygni profile is detected unambiguously in only one object (Circinus). Our data show that both the starburst and AGN contribute to driving OH outflows, but the fastest OH winds require AGNs with quasar-like luminosities. We also confirm that the total absorption strength of OH 119 μm is a good proxy for dust optical depth as it correlates strongly with the 9.7 μm silicate absorption feature, a measure of obscuration originating in both the nuclear torus and host galaxy disk. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. Ultra-fast outflows (aka UFOs) in AGNs and their relevance for feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappi, Massimo; Tombesi, F.; Giustini, M.; Dadina, M.; Braito, V.; Kaastra, J.; Reeves, J.; Chartas, G.; Gaspari, M.; Vignali, C.; Gofford, J.; Lanzuisi, G.

    2012-09-01

    During the last decade, several observational evidences have been accumulated for the existence of massive, high velocity winds/outflows (aka UFOs) in nearby AGNs and, possibly, distant quasars. I will review here such evidences, present some of the latest results in this field, and discuss the relevance of UFOs for both understanding the physics of accretion/ejection flows on supermassive black holes, and for quantifying the amount of AGN feedback.

  2. An enhanced fraction of starbursting galaxies among high Eddington ratio AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, E.; Mullaney, J. R.; Daddi, E.; Ciesla, L.; Schreiber, C.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the star-forming properties of 1620 X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxies as a function of their specific X-ray luminosity (i.e. X-ray luminosity per unit host stellar mass) - a proxy of the Eddington ratio. Our motivation is to determine whether there is any evidence of a suppression of star formation at high Eddington ratios, which may hint towards `AGN feedback' effects. Star formation rates (SFRs) are derived from fits to Herschel-measured far-infrared spectral energy distributions, taking into account any contamination from the AGN. Herschel-undetected AGNs are included via stacking analyses to provide average SFRs in bins of redshift and specific X-ray luminosity (spanning 0.01 ≲ L_X/M_{ast } ≲ 100 L_{{⊙}} M_{{⊙}}^{-1}). After normalizing for the effects of mass and redshift arising from the evolving galaxy main sequence, we find that the SFRs of high specific luminosity AGNs are slightly enhanced compared to their lower specific luminosity counterparts. This suggests that the SFR distribution of AGN hosts changes with specific X-ray luminosity, a result reinforced by our finding of a significantly higher fraction of starbursting hosts among high specific luminosity AGNs compared to that of the general star-forming galaxy population (i.e. 8-10 per cent versus 3 per cent). Contrary to our original motivation, our findings suggest that high specific luminosity AGNs are more likely to reside in galaxies with enhanced levels of star formation.

  3. A statistical study of H i gas in nearby narrow-line AGN-hosting galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yi-Nan; Wu, Hong E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    As a quenching mechanism, active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback could suppress on going star formation in host galaxies. On the basis of a sample of galaxies selected from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) H i survey, the dependence of the H i mass (M{sub H} {sub i}), stellar mass (M{sub *}), and H i-to-stellar mass ratio (M{sub H} {sub i}/M{sub *}) on various tracers of AGN activity are presented and analyzed in this paper. Almost all the AGN hostings in this sample are gas-rich galaxies, and there is not any evidence to indicate that the AGN activity could increase or decrease either M{sub H} {sub i} or M{sub H} {sub i}/M{sub *}. The position of the cold neutral gas cannot be fixed accurately based only on available H i data, due to the large beam size of ALFALFA survey. In addition, even though AGN hostings are more easily detected by an H i survey compared with absorption line galaxies, these two types of galaxies show similar star formation history. If an AGN hosting would ultimately evolve into an old red galaxy with low cold gas, then when and how the gas has been exhausted must be solved by future hypotheses and observations.

  4. Dusting off the star formation history of AGN hosts with SHARDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Recent works show that the restframe colours of X-ray selected AGN host galaxies at z~1 are no different from those of inactive galaxies once stellar mass selection effects are taken into account. However, there is a clear deficit of AGN among quiescent galaxies, and the average star formation rates of AGN hosts are comparable or higher than those of inactive star-forming galaxies. These apparently contradictory findings could be a consequence of higher extinction in star-forming AGN hosts compensating for their younger stellar populations in observed colours. In this talk I will present a new method of extinction correction that breaks the degeneracy with stellar age and metallicity by comparing the restframe U-V colour with measurements of the Dn(4000) index on intermediate band photospectra from SHARDS. I'll show that the distribution of extinction corrected U-V colours and Dn(4000) for AGN hosts at z<1 is significantly different from that of comparison samples of inactive galaxies, with a clear deficit of AGN in intrinsic red galaxies and a higher prevalence among those with intermediate age stellar populations.

  5. Dual AGNs in Mergers: An X-ray and IR investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyapal, Shobita; Secrest, Nathan; Rothburg, Barry; Ellison, Sara L.; McNulty, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Since the vast majority of galaxies contain supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxy interactions trigger nuclear gas accretion, a direct consequence of the hierarchical model of galaxy formation would be the existence of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The existence, frequency, and characteristics of such binary AGNs have important astrophysical implications on the SMBH mass function, the interplay between SMBHs and the host galaxy, and the M-sigma relation. Despite decades of searching, and strong theoretical reasons that they should exist, observationally confirmed cases of binary AGNs are extremely rare, and most have been discovered serendipitously. Using the all-sky WISE survey, we identified a population of over one hundred strongly interacting galaxies that display extreme red mid-infrared colors thus far exclusively associated in extragalactic sources with powerful AGNs. In this talk, I will summarize follow-up X-ray and near-IR spectroscopic observations of this population that reveal a population of optically quiescent dual AGNs at kpc scales. These observations demonstrate that mid_IR surveys are an ideal pre-selection strategy in finding dual AGNs in the most advanced mergers.

  6. The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey: Measuring the AGN contribution to galaxies over cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Kate

    2014-07-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) is the widest deep radio survey ever attempted, covering ~7deg2 across its two fields, the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) and the European Large Area ISO Survey South 1 Region (ELAIS-S1). ATLAS has extensive multiwavelength data, including optical, infrared and X-ray, to complement its ~15μJy rms 1.4 GHz radio data. At these faint radio flux densities, the proportion of AGN to star-forming galaxies (SFGs) is high, and there are likely many composite objects, which have both an AGN and ongoing star formation. In ATLAS, we estimate that the number of AGN is approximately 50%, and this proportion will change with decreasing flux density. To understand the relationship between the AGN and the host galaxy, we need to measure the contribution of the AGN to the total luminosity, and determine how this varies with the evolutionary stage of the galaxy. Here I present results exploring the AGN contribution to galaxies over cosmic time, through the use of different multiwavelength discriminants.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGN neutrino source candidates (Achterberg+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achterberg, A.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Ahrens, J.; Atlee, D. W.; Bahcall, J. N.; Bair, X.; Baret, B.; Bartelt, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Becka, T.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Braun, J.; Burgess, C.; Burgess, T.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Clem, J.; Collin, B.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Davour, A.; Day, C. T.; de Clercq, C.; Desiati, P.; De Young, T.; Dreyer, J.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Evenson, P. A.; Fazely, A. R.; Feser, T.; Filimonov, K.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Greene, M. G.; Grullon, S.; Gross, A.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, D.; Hardtke, R.; Harenberg, T.; Hart, J. E.; Hauschildt, T.; Hays, D.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G. C.; Hodges, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Hughey, B.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jones, A.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Karle, A.; Kawai, H.; Kelley, J. L.; Kestel, M.; Kitamura, N.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Koepke, L.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Liubarsky, I.; Lundbert, J.; Madsen, J.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McCauley, T.; McParland, C. P.; Meli, A.; Messarius, T.; Meszaros, P.; Minor, R. H.; Miocinovic, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Mokhtarani, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morey, A.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Munich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Oegelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Olivas, A.; Patton, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Pretz, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Razzaque, S.; Refflinghaus, F.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rizzo, A.; Robbins, S.; Rott, C.; Rutledge, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schneider, D.; Seckel, D.; Seo, S. H.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, A. J.; Solarz, M.; Song, C.; Sopher, J. E.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Steffen, P.; Steele, D.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R.G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sumner, T.J.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Turcan, D.; Van Eijndhoven, T. J.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Voigt, B.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Waldmann, H.; Walter, M.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wendt, C.; Wiesbusch, C. H.; Wikstroem, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zornoza, J. D.; Biermann, P.L.

    2007-02-01

    The sensitivity of a search for sources of TeV neutrinos can be improved by grouping potential sources together into generic classes in a procedure that is known as source stacking. In this paper, we define catalogs of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and use them to perform a source stacking analysis. The grouping of AGN into classes is done in two steps: first, AGN classes are defined, then, sources to be stacked are selected assuming that a potential neutrino flux is linearly correlated with the photon luminosity in a certain energy band (radio, IR, optical, keV, GeV, TeV). Lacking any secure detailed knowledge on neutrino production in AGN, this correlation is motivated by hadronic AGN models, as briefly reviewed in this paper. The source stacking search for neutrinos from generic AGN classes is illustrated using the data collected by the AMANDA-II high-energy neutrino detector during the year 2000. No significant excess for any of the suggested groups was found. (11 data files).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGN activity in isolated SDSS galaxies (Coziol+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coziol, R.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Islas-Islas, J. M.; Ortega-Minakata, R. A.; Neri-Larios, D. M.; Andernach, H.

    2011-09-01

    We discuss the nature and origin of the nuclear activity observed in a sample of 292 SDSS narrow-emission-line galaxies, considered to have formed and evolved in isolation. All these galaxies are spiral like and show some kind of nuclear activity. The fraction of Narrow Line AGNs (NLAGNs) and Transition type Objects (TOs; a NLAGN with circumnuclear star formation) is relatively high, amounting to 64% of the galaxies. There is a definite trend for the NLAGNs to appear in early-type spirals, while the star forming galaxies and TOs are found in later-type spirals. We verify that the probability for a galaxy to show an AGN characteristic increases with the bulge mass of the galaxy (Torres-Papaqui et al. 2011), and find evidence that this trend is really a by-product of the morphology, suggesting that the AGN phenomenon is intimately connected with the formation process of the galaxies. Consistent with this interpretation, we establish a strong connection between the astration rate -- the efficiency with which the gas is transformed into stars - the AGN phenomenon, and the gravitational binding energy of the galaxies: the higher the binding energy, the higher the astration rate and the higher the probability to find an AGN. The NLAGNs in our sample are consistent with scaled-down or powered-down versions of quasars and Broad Line AGNs. (2 data files).

  9. ISO Key Project: Exploring the Full Range of Quasar/AGN Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, B.

    2001-01-01

    The origin of the infrared emission in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), whose strength is comparable to the optical/ultra-violet (OUV) emission, is generally thought to be a combination of thermal emission from dust and non-thermal, synchrotron emission. Although data are sparse, particularly in the far-infrared, the broad wavelength range of this emission suggests a wide range of temperatures and a combination of AGN and starburst heating mechanisms. The strength of the non-thermal emission is expected to be related to the radio emission. While this scenario is well-established, basic questions, such as the spatial and temperature distribution of the dust, the relative importance of AGN and starburst heating, and the significance of the non-thermal contribution, remain largely undetermined. The wide wavelength range of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) combined with its arcmin spatial resolution and increased sensitivity facilitated the observation of a larger subset of the AGN population than previously covered, allowing these questions to be investigated in more detail. This paper will review the spectral energy distributions (SED) of AGN with particular emphasis on the infrared emission and on ISO contributions to our knowledge. Preliminary results from ISO observations of X-ray selected and high-redshift AGN will be described.

  10. The dependency of AGN infrared colour-selection on source luminosity and obscuration. An observational perspective in CDFS and COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messias, H.; Afonso, J. M.; Salvato, M.; Mobasher, B.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    Aims: This work addresses the AGN IR-selection dependency on intrinsic source luminosity and obscuration, in order to identify and characterise biases that could affect conclusions in studies. Methods: We study IR-selected AGN in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) survey and in the Cosmological Survey (COSMOS). The AGN sample is divided into low and high X-ray luminosity classes and into unobscured (type-1) and obscured (type-2) classes by means of X-ray and optical spectroscopy data. Specifically in the X-ray regime, we adopt the intrinsic luminosity taking the estimated column density (NH) into account. We also take the opportunity to highlight important differences resulting from adopting different methods of assessing AGN obscuration. Results: In agreement with previous studies, we also find that AGN IR-selection efficiency shows a decrease with decreasing source AGN X-ray luminosity. For the intermediate-luminosity AGN population (43.3 ≲ log (LX [erg s-1] ) ≲ 44), the efficiency also worsens with increasing obscuration (NH). The same sample also shows an evolution with cosmic time of the obscured fraction at the highest X-ray luminosities, independently of the adopted type-1/type-2 classification method. Conclusions: We confirm that AGN IR-selection is genuinely biased towards unobscured AGNe, but only at intermediate luminosities. At the highest luminosities, where AGN IR-selection is more efficient, there is no obscuration bias. We show that type-1 AGNe are intrinsically more luminous than type-2 AGNe only at z ≲ 1.6, thus resulting in more type-1 AGN being selected when the IR survey is shallower. Based on this and other studies, we conclude that deep hard-X-ray coverages, high-resolution IR imaging, or a combination of IR and radio data are required to recover the lower luminosity obscured AGN population. In addition, wide IR surveys are needed to recover the rare powerful, obscured AGN population. Finally, when the James Webb Space Telescope comes

  11. Celebrating the Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Cindy; Ames, Suzanne; Semet, Betty; Newell, L. Jackson

    2001-01-01

    Profiles four community colleges in celebration of the one hundred-year anniversary of the American Association of Community Colleges. Reports on the oldest community college, Joliet Junior College (Illinois); the newest, Cascadia Community College (Washington); the largest, Miami-Dade Community College (Florida); and the smallest, Deep Springs…

  12. The Role AGN Play in the Evolution of Quasars Host Galaxies with Spectral Signatures of Post-Starburst Stellar Polulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cales, Sabrina; Brotherton, M. S.; Shang, Z.; Bennert, V.; Canalizo, G.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Our understanding of the link between galaxies and the active galactic nuclei (AGN) they host is crucial for our understanding of galaxy evolution, a major question for astronomy today. As such, galaxies that harbor both luminous, broad-lined AGN phenomenon and massive, post-starburst stellar populations (post- starburst quasars, PSQs) provide a natural laboratory for those studying AGN, galaxies and galaxy evolution alike. PSQs are predicted to be transitioning galaxies whereby both the AGN and post-starburst phenomenon exist simultaneously. Thus studying these objects can prove invaluable for understanding connections between nuclear activity and host galaxy evolution. Project: We present the latest work on the study of PSQs and their role in mutual black hole and galaxy evolution. In particular we utilize AGN/host galaxy light decomposition analysis of high quality imaging and spectroscopic data (including IFU) to look at PSQ morphology and AGN and post-starburst fundamental physical properties.

  13. Theoretical and Observational Studies of the Central Engines of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivron, Ran

    1995-01-01

    In Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) the luminosity is so intense that the effect of radiation pressure on a particle may exceed the gravitational attraction. It was shown that when such luminosities are reached, relatively cold (not completely ionized) thermal matter clouds may form in the central engines of AGN, where most of the luminosity originates. We show that the spectrum of emission from cold clouds embedded in hot relativistic matter is similar to the observed spectrum. We also show that within the hot relativistic matter, cold matter moves faster than the speed of sound or the Alfven speed, and shocks form. The shocks provide a mechanism by which a localized perturbation can propagate throughout the central engine. The shocked matter can emit the observed luminosity, and can explain the flux and spectral variability. It may also provide an efficient mechanism for the outward transfer of angular momentum and provide the outward flow of winds. With observations from X-ray satellites, emission features from the cold and hot matter may be revealed. Our analysis of X-ray data from the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG - 6-30-15 over five years using detectors on the Ginga and Rosat satellites, revealed some interesting variable features. A source with hot matter emits non-thermal radiation which is Compton reflected from cold matter and then absorbed by warm (partially ionized) absorbing matter in the first model, which can be fit to the data if both the cold and warm absorbers are near the central engine. An alternative model in which the emission from the hot matter is partially covered by very warm matter (in which all elements except Iron are mostly ionized) is also successful. In this model the cold and warm matter may be at distances of up to 100 times the size of the central engine, well within the region where broad optical lines are produced. The flux variability is more naturally explained by the second model. Our results support the existence of cold matter in, or

  14. Early Results from Swift AGN and Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xinyu; Griffin, Rhiannon; Nugent, Jenna; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-04-01

    The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey (SACS) uses 125 deg^2 of Swift X-ray Telescope serendipitous fields with variable depths surrounding gamma-ray bursts to provide a medium depth (4 × 10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and area survey filling the gap between deep, narrow Chandra/XMM-Newton surveys and wide, shallow ROSAT surveys. Here, we present the first two papers in a series of publications for SACS. In the first paper, we introduce our method and catalog of 22,563 point sources and 442 extended sources. SACS provides excellent constraints on the AGN and cluster number counts at the bright end with negligible uncertainties due to cosmic variance, and these constraints are consistent with previous measurements. The depth and areal coverage of SACS is well suited for galaxy cluster surveys outside the local universe, reaching z > 1 for massive clusters. In the second paper, we use SDSS DR8 data to study the 203 extended SACS sources that are located within the SDSS footprint. We search for galaxy over-densities in 3-D space using SDSS galaxies and their photometric redshifts near the Swift galaxy cluster candidates. We find 103 Swift clusters with a > 3σ over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmations as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, BCG magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, X-ray luminosity and red sequences. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≤ 0.3 and 80% complete for z ≤ 0.4, consistent with the survey depth of SDSS. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm presented in our first paper has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further studying cluster evolution and cosmology. In the end, we will discuss our ongoing optical identification of z>0.5 cluster

  15. PRIMUS: THE DEPENDENCE OF AGN ACCRETION ON HOST STELLAR MASS AND COLOR

    SciTech Connect

    Aird, James; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Blanton, Michael R.; Zhu Guangtun; Burles, Scott M.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.

    2012-02-10

    We present evidence that the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the distribution of their accretion rates do not depend on the stellar masses of their host galaxies, contrary to previous studies. We use hard (2-10 keV) X-ray data from three extragalactic fields (XMM-LSS, COSMOS, and ELAIS-S1) with redshifts from the Prism Multi-object Survey to identify 242 AGNs with L{sub 2-10keV} = 10{sup 42-44} erg s{sup -1} within a parent sample of {approx}25,000 galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 over {approx}3.4 deg{sup 2} and to i {approx} 23. We find that although the fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN at fixed X-ray luminosity rises strongly with stellar mass, the distribution of X-ray luminosities is independent of mass. Furthermore, we show that the probability that a galaxy will host an AGN can be defined by a universal Eddington ratio distribution that is independent of the host galaxy stellar mass and has a power-law shape with slope -0.65. These results demonstrate that AGNs are prevalent at all stellar masses in the range 9.5< log M{sub *}/M{sub sun}<12 and that the same physical processes regulate AGN activity in all galaxies in this stellar mass range. While a higher AGN fraction may be observed in massive galaxies, this is a selection effect related to the underlying Eddington ratio distribution. We also find that the AGN fraction drops rapidly between z {approx} 1 and the present day and is moderately enhanced (factor {approx}2) in galaxies with blue or green optical colors. Consequently, while AGN activity and star formation appear to be globally correlated, we do not find evidence that the presence of an AGN is related to the quenching of star formation or the color transformation of galaxies.

  16. The SIX survey: evolution and properties of AGN in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottacini, Eugenio

    2014-07-01

    Current most sensitive surveys at soft X-ray (~ 0.5-10 keV) energies by Chandra and XMM-Newton preferably sample AGN at high-redshift (z > 0.5). At low-redshift (z < 0.5), where AGN are supposed to be in their evolution end-stage, these sources are very sparsely sampled. The low-redshift universe is best fathomed at hard X-ray energies (> 15 keV) by the INTEGRAL and the Swift missions with their coded-mask telescopes IBIS/ISGRI and BAT respectively. These instruments have two major advantages: 1) they have a huge field of view, hence allowing to sample a large number of AGN at low-redshift; 2) they operate at energies above 15 keV, hence allowing detecting photons with enough power to efficiently pierce even through the Compton-thick torus of AGN. Estimates based on observations with PDS on board the BeppoSAX satellite predict that Compton-thick AGN should dominate over unabsorbed AGN in the local universe playing an important role in reproducing the shape and intensity of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB). However coded-mask detectors suffer from heavy systematic effects preventing them from reaching their theoretical limiting sensitivity. We overcome this limit with a new and alternative approach, which has been designed ad hoc to improve the sensitivity of hard X-ray surveys by using IBIS/ISGRI and BAT. Both telescopes are so close in design that their observations can be combined to obtain a more sensitive survey. The observations are combined with resampling, merging, and cross-calibration techniques. We are able to sample limiting fluxes of the order of ~3.3 times 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 18-55 keV energy range. This is called the SIX survey, that stands for Swift-INTEGRAL X-ray survey. The SIX survey extends over a wide sky area of 6200 deg2 and it is used to obtain a persistent sample of faint AGN. The source number density (log N - log S) is a factor of 3 better than current parent surveys of BAT and IBIS/ISGRI alone. I will present a study of the

  17. Searching for highly obscured AGNs in the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Watson, M. G.; Rosen, S. R.; Koulouridis, E.; Page, K. L.; Ranalli, P.; Lanzuisi, G.; Mountrichas, G.; Akylas, A.; Stewart, G. C.; Pye, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    The majority of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are obscured by large amounts of absorbing material that makes them invisible at many wavelengths. X-rays, given their penetrating power, provide the most secure way for finding these AGNs. The XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalog, of which 3XMM-DR4 is the latest version, is the largest catalog of X-ray sources ever produced; it contains about half a million detections. These sources are mostly AGNs. We have derived X-ray spectral fits for very many 3XMM-DR4 sources (≳114 000 observations, corresponding to ~77 000 unique sources), which contain more than 50 source photons per detector. Here, we use a subsample of ≃1000 AGNs in the footprint of the SDSS area (covering 120 deg2) with available spectroscopic redshifts. We searched for highly obscured AGNs by applying an automated selection technique based on X-ray spectral analysis that is capable of efficiently selecting AGNs. The selection is based on the presence of either a) flat rest-frame spectra from a simple power-law fit; b) flat observed spectra from an absorbed power-law fit; c) an absorption turnover, indicative of a high rest-frame column density; or d) the presence of an Fe Kα line with a large equivalent width (>500 eV). We found 81 highly obscured candidate sources. Subsequent detailed manual spectral fits revealed that 28 of them are heavily absorbed by column densities higher than 1023 cm-2. Of these 28 AGNs, 15 are candidate Compton-thick AGNs on the basis of either a high column density, consistent within the 90% confidence level with NH> 1024 cm-2, or a large equivalent width (>500 eV) of the Fe Kα line. Another six are associated with near-Compton-thick AGNs with column densities of ~ 5 × 1023 cm-2. A combination of selection criteria a) and c) for low-quality spectra, and a) and d) for medium- to high-quality spectra, pinpoint highly absorbed AGNs with an efficiency of 80%. Table 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Eddington Ratio Distribution of X-Ray-selected Broad-line AGNs at 1.0 < z < 2.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyewon; Hasinger, Günther; Steinhardt, Charles; Silverman, John D.; Schramm, Malte

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the Eddington ratio distribution of X-ray-selected broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.0 < z < 2.2, where the number density of AGNs peaks. Combining the optical and Subaru/Fiber Multi Object Spectrograph near-infrared spectroscopy, we estimate black hole masses for broad-line AGNs in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDF-S), and the XMM-Newton Lockman Hole (XMM-LH) surveys. AGNs with similar black hole masses show a broad range of AGN bolometric luminosities, which are calculated from X-ray luminosities, indicating that the accretion rate of black holes is widely distributed. We find a substantial fraction of massive black holes accreting significantly below the Eddington limit at z ≲ 2, in contrast to what is generally found for luminous AGNs at high redshift. Our analysis of observational selection biases indicates that the “AGN cosmic downsizing” phenomenon can be simply explained by the strong evolution of the comoving number density at the bright end of the AGN luminosity function, together with the corresponding selection effects. However, one might need to consider a correlation between the AGN luminosity and the accretion rate of black holes, in which luminous AGNs have higher Eddington ratios than low-luminosity AGNs, in order to understand the relatively small fraction of low-luminosity AGNs with high accretion rates in this epoch. Therefore, the observed downsizing trend could be interpreted as massive black holes with low accretion rates, which are relatively fainter than less-massive black holes with efficient accretion. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  19. College education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Space Grant Colleges and Universities must build the space curriculum of the future on the firm basis of deep knowledge of an involvement with the present operating programs of the nation and an on-going and extensive program of leading edge research in the aerospace sciences and engineering, management, law, finance, and the other arts that are integral to our planetary society. The Space Grant College and Fellowship Program must create new academic fields of enquiry, which is a long and difficult process that will require deeper and broader interaction between NASA and academia than has previously existed.

  20. The Host Galaxy Properties of Variability Selected AGN in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinis, S.; Gezari, S.; Kumar, S.; Burgett, W. S.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-07-01

    We study the properties of 975 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected by variability in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium deep Survey. Using complementary multi-wavelength data from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared, we use spectral energy distribution fitting to determine the AGN and host properties at z < 1 and compare to a well-matched control sample. We confirm the trend previously observed: that the variability amplitude decreases with AGN luminosity, but we also observe that the slope of this relation steepens with wavelength, resulting in a “redder when brighter” trend at low luminosities. Our results show that AGNs are hosted by more massive hosts than control sample galaxies, while the rest frame dust-corrected NUV ‑ r color distribution of AGN hosts is similar to control galaxies. We find a positive correlation between the AGN luminosity and star formation rate (SFR), independent of redshift. AGN hosts populate the entire range of SFRs within and outside of the Main Sequence of star-forming galaxies. Comparing the distribution of AGN hosts and control galaxies, we show that AGN hosts are less likely to be hosted by quiescent galaxies and more likely to be hosted by Main Sequence or starburst galaxies.

  1. An Antifungal Exo-α-1,3-Glucanase (AGN13.1) from the Biocontrol Fungus Trichoderma harzianum

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Lahsen, Hassane; Soler, Andrés; Rey, Manuel; de la Cruz, Jesús; Monte, Enrique; Llobell, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum secretes α-1,3-glucanases when it is grown on polysaccharides, fungal cell walls, or autoclaved mycelium as a carbon source (simulated antagonistic conditions). We have purified and characterized one of these enzymes, named AGN13.1. The enzyme was monomeric and slightly basic. AGN13.1 was an exo-type α-1,3-glucanase and showed lytic and antifungal activity against fungal plant pathogens. Northern and Western analyses indicated that AGN13.1 is induced by conditions that simulated antagonism. We propose that AGN13.1 contributes to the antagonistic response of T. harzianum. PMID:11722942

  2. Impact of AGN and stellar feedback on the gas of a simulated z~2 star-forming galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Orianne; Bournaud, Frédéric; Juneau, Stephanie; Gabor, Jared

    2015-08-01

    With high-resolution simulations of star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift, we study the effects of combined AGN and stellar feedback models on the gas of the host-galaxy. AGN feedback is modeled using a standard thermal recipe of feedback (gas is heated and pushed away) plus a post-processing method to compute AGN ionization. We first consider AGN feedback only and show that, even though the AGN generates powerful outflows, the effects of AGN feedback on star formation is relatively weak on time-scales up to a few 100s of Myrs, even when long-range radiative feedback is accounted for. Furthermore, as the combination of stellar feedback models generates outflows that are more powerful than the sum of the models taken separately, we check whether combined AGN and stellar feedback also couple non-linearly. We then include several stellar feedback sources on top of AGN feedback, such as young stars creating HII regions through radiative pressure and supernovae releasing thermal and kinetic energy in the ISM. We follow their impact on the gas of high-resolution simulations and study the coupling between the different sources of outflows (AGN, young stars, supernovae) , which could produce very fast outflows, with important outflow rates. How do these feedback-driven winds affect the host? What is the amount of expelled gas? What is its density and temperature and what is the consequence for in place and future star formation? Can such outflows change the distribution of existing stars?

  3. Interpreting the IR SED of z~0.3-2.8 IR-Luminous Galaxies and AGN Using Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roebuck, Eric John; Sajina, Anna; Hayward, Christopher C.; Pope, Alexandra; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Hernquist, Lars E.; Yan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamical galaxy merger simulations to further investigate the nature of a sample of 342 24 μm-selected (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies at z~0.3-2.8. All of our sources have low-resolution Spitzer/IRS spectra -- the largest such sample outside the local universe. These spectra allow us to determine that our sample consists of a mixture of star forming galaxies (SFGs), AGN, and composites. We address the question of how well do empirical IR AGN fraction estimates trace the intrinsic AGN fraction (i.e. the AGN-to-total power in the galaxy prior to dust re-processing), including how they relate to galaxy properties such as merger stage, dust/gas content, and star formation rates. We do this by fitting the observed SEDs of our sample with theoretical SEDs based on GADGET hydrodynamic merger simulations additionally processed through the SUNRISE radiative transfer code. We additionally investigate systematic uncertainties associated with these quantities using the goodness of fits to our model library. The key findings are: 1) our simulation-based fits are in broad agreement with the empirical model-based fits, 2) much of the AGN fraction of LIR is missed if the AGN's contribution to heating the host galaxy dust is not accounted for, and 3) the IR AGN fraction traces the intrinsic AGN fraction up to the coalescence stage, however may underestimate the intrinsic AGN fraction post coalescence.

  4. AGN Feedback in the X-ray Surveyor Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Chris

    2015-10-01

    It is now widely recognized that the growth of supermassive black holes can have a profound influence on the evolution of their host galaxy. For example, powerful quasars resulting from the merger of gas rich galaxies can produce sub-relativistic winds that may expel cold gas from the galaxy, extinguishing continued star formation. Another form of feedback occurs in giant elliptical galaxies and galaxy clusters - relativistic jets from the central AGN appear to heat the hot interstellar/intracluster gas, preventing a cooling catastrophe that would otherwise grow the stellar mass appreciably. While current observations reveal incontrovertible signatures of these feedback processes, the underlying physical mechanisms remain very poorly understood. What drives the powerful winds in luminous quasars? How does the energy injected by relativistic jets actually become thermalized in the intracluster medium? How are the feedback loops maintained? In this talk, I will discuss these questions and the impact of future observations by Astro-H, ATHENA and the X-ray Surveyor.

  5. Compton-thick AGN in the 3XMM spectral survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgantopoulos, I.; Corral, A.; Watson, M.; Rosen, S.

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of an ESA Prodex project, we have derived X-ray spectral fits for a large number (120,000) of 3XMM sources. We focus our study on the 120 square degrees that overlap with the SDSS survey. For about 1,100 AGN there are spectroscopic redsifts available. We automatically select candidate Compton-thick sources using simple spectral models. Various selection criteria are applied including a) a high equivalent width FeK line b) a flat spectrum with a photon index of 1.4 or lower at the 90% confidence level or at higher redshift an absorption turnover consistent with a column density of logNh=24. We find 30 candidate Compton-thick sources. More detailed spectral models are applied trying to secure the Compton-thick nature of these sources. We compare our findings with X-ray background synthesis models as well as with Compton-thick surveys in the COSMOS and XMM/CDFS areas.

  6. High School Observations of AGN Using the GTN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLin, Kevin M.; Jordan, R.; Perkins, A.; Adkins, J.; Cominsky, L.

    2008-03-01

    Students at Deer Valley High School in Antioch, California have undertaken an AGN monitoring program using telescopes of the Global Telescope Network (GTN) and SkyNet. The GTN is a network of small telescopes funded by GLAST to support the science of high energy astrophysics missions, specifically GLAST, Swift and XMM-Newton. It is managed by the NASA E/PO Group at Sonoma State University. SkyNet is a network of small telescopes managed from the University of North Carolina to catch gamma ray burst afterglows. A primary motivator behind both networks is education. In the program outlined here, high school students will schedule, reduce and analyze observations of active galaxies in order to determine if any microflaring activity has occurred. Students will compare their results with previous studies reported in the literature and then report their own results at the Contra Costa County Science and Engineering Fair. This work will give the students direct experience with several aspects of scientific research, including literature searches, data acquisition and analysis, and reporting of results.

  7. Using NASA Archives in High Schools to Study AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petach, Helen; Spuck, T.; Meredith, K.; Ramseyer, E.; Gorjian, V.

    2011-01-01

    The NITARP (NASA IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project) program provides a link between NASA researchers and high school teachers and students. This past year the Luminous Data Miners (LDM) developed and implemented a research plan to investigate whether the UV light emitted from the accretion disk of an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) is correlated with the IR emission from its surrounding dust. Contemporaneous data was obtained from the GALEX and Spitzer data archives for a set of galaxies. Scientists, teachers, and students from across the country work together in this authentic research experience. Students learned about the physics of the science in question, the structure of the archived data stored in NASA databases, extraction methods for obtaining relevant data, use of photometry tools to make brightness measurements, and relevant correlations that could be determined. Our results suggest that students are eager to have these research opportunities and will make use of data archives to carry out research projects to answer relevant questions. This poster will highlight the process the students and teachers went through and the tools they developed along the way.

  8. Radiative Transfer, Black Hole Growth, AGN Feedback in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    We have performed 3D hydrodynamic simulations of black hole fueling and AGN feedback using a novel method for treating the radial forces on interstellar gas due to absorption of photons by dust grains. The method provides a solution to the radiative transfer equation and hence computes forces on the gas self-consistently by first solving for the radiation field taking into account radiation sources, absorption, and scattering. The algorithm gives the correct behavior in all of the relevant limits (dominated by the central point source; dominated by the distributed isotropic source; optically thin; optically thick to UV/optical; optically thick to IR) and reasonably interpolates between the limits when necessary. The simulations allow us to study gas flows and feedback processes over length scales from ~1 pc to ~100 kpc. We find that the dynamics and final state of simulations are measurably but only moderately affected by radiative forces on dust, even when assumptions about the dust-to-gas ratio are varied from zero to a value appropriate for the Milky Way. In simulations with high gas densities designed to mimic ULIRGs with a star formation rate of several hundred solar masses per year, dust makes a more substantial contribution to the dynamics and outcome of the simulation.

  9. Galaxy-Scale Clouds of Ionized Gas around AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnowski, S. Drew; Keel, William C.

    2012-02-01

    The serendipitous 2007 discovery of the object now known (even by NED) as "Hanny's Voorwerp" (Lintott et al. 2009) set into motion a search for more examples of galaxy-scale clouds of highly-ionized gas in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Using a sample assembled primarily by 'citizen scientists' via a dedicated thread in the Galaxy Zoo Forum, we carried out the first part of a larger long- slit spectroscopic survey of such objects with the 2.1m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Of the 30 objects targeted during seven nights (multiple exposures for several), extended emission clouds were observed in 15 objects, with [OIII]λ5007 emission occasionally extending >30 kpc from galaxy cores. A strong majority (11/15) of the extended emission clouds coincide with merging or otherwise violently disrupted systems, but more relevant to our search were the handful of clouds coinciding with isolated, symmetric galaxies lacking an obvious excitation mechanism. We present the results of part one in the hunt for Voorwerp analogues, much of which served to weed-out the more interesting objects to be targeted for future, multi-wavelength studies.

  10. Exploring Dual and Binary AGN via Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke Spolaor, Sarah; Lazio, J.

    2012-05-01

    Dual and binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are thought to form as a direct result of a major galaxy merger. The discovery of late-stage SMBH pairs could critically inform upcoming gravitational wave science and cosmological formation models, and could provide fascinating studies of post-merger dynamics and merger-induced SMBH growth. However, it has been notoriously difficult to identify clear electromagnetic markers for dual and binary SMBHs in late-stage merger systems. Accordingly, few definitive discoveries of paired SMBHs have yet been made, with only a handful of known systems at projected separations below 1kpc. We will review the unique contributions that radio imaging observations can make to this field: particularly in the search for new systems, the confirmation of candidate small-orbit binary systems, and the potential for multi-messenger gravitational wave science when combined with pulsar timing methods. We will also provide an update on recent radio searches for binary AGN. We acknowledge that a portion of research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. Modelling galaxy and AGN evolution in the infrared: black hole accretion versus star formation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Zamorani, G.; Vignali, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present a new backward evolution model for galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the infrared (IR). What is new in this model is the separate study of the evolutionary properties of different IR populations (i.e. spiral galaxies, starburst galaxies, low-luminosity AGNs, 'unobscured' type 1 AGNs and 'obscured' type 2 AGNs) defined through a detailed analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of large samples of IR-selected sources. The evolutionary parameters have been constrained by means of all the available observables from surveys in the mid- and far-IR (source counts, redshift and luminosity distributions, luminosity functions). By decomposing the SEDs representative of the three AGN classes into three distinct components (a stellar component emitting most of its power in the optical/near-IR, an AGN component due to the hot dust heated by the central black hole peaking in the mid-IR, and a starburst component dominating the far-IR spectrum), we have disentangled the AGN contribution to the monochromatic and total IR luminosity emitted by different populations considered in our model from that due to star formation activity. We have then obtained an estimate of the total IR luminosity density [and star formation density (SFD) produced by IR galaxies] and the first ever estimate of the black hole mass accretion density (BHAR) from the IR. The derived evolution of the BHAR is in agreement with estimates from X-rays, though the BHAR values we derive from the IR are slightly higher than the X-ray ones. Finally, we have simulated source counts, redshift distributions, and SFD and BHAR that we expect to obtain with the future cosmological surveys in the mid-/far-IR that will be performed with the JWST-MIRI and SPICA-SAFARI. Outputs of the model are available online.1

  12. Intranight polarization variability in radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villforth, Carolin; Nilsson, Kari; Østensen, Roy; Heidt, Jochen; Niemi, Sami-Matias; Pforr, Janine

    2009-08-01

    Intranight polarization variability in active galactic nuclei (AGN) has not been studied extensively so far. Studying the variability in polarization makes it possible to distinguish between different emission mechanisms. Thus, it can help answering the question if intranight variability in radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN is of the same or of fundamentally different origin. In this paper, we investigate intranight polarization variability in AGN. Our sample consists of 28 AGN at low to moderate redshifts (0.048 <= z <= 1.036), 12 of which are radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and 16 are radio-loud blazars. The subsample of blazars consists of eight flat-spectrum radio-quasars (FSRQs) and eight BL Lac objects. Each AGN was observed for a time-span of ~4h in the R band to measure polarization and variability. Using statistical methods, we determine duty cycles for polarized emission and polarization intranight variability. We find clear differences between the two samples. A majority of the radio-loud AGN show moderate to high degrees of polarization, more than half of them also show variability in polarization. There seems to be a dividing line for polarization intranight variability at P ~ 5 per cent over which all objects vary in polarization. We did not find clear correlations between the strength of the variability and the redshift or degree of polarization. Only two out of 12 RQQs show polarized emission, both at levels of P < 1 per cent. The lack of polarization intranight variability in radio-quiet AGN points towards accretion instabilities being the cause for intranight flux variability whereas the high duty cycle of polarization variability in radio-loud objects is more likely caused by instabilities in the jet or changes of physical conditions in the jet plasma. We were able to constrain the time-scale of the detected variations to >4 h. Further studies of intranight polarization variability will be necessary to reveal exact physical conditions behind this

  13. Obscuring Torus Geometry from the NuSTAR Survey of Swift/BAT AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balokovic, Mislav; Harrison, Fiona; NuSTAR

    2016-06-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has enabled studies of the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) to extend into the spectral window above 10 keV with unprecedented spatial resolution and two orders of magnitude better sensitivity than any other instrument operating in that energy range. As a part of its long-term extragalactic program NuSTAR is surveying the nearby population of AGN detected at hard X-ray energies by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT). I will present spectroscopic results based on NuSTAR and Swift observations of ~150 Swift/BAT AGN surveyed in the first three years of NuSTAR operation. This sample forms an atlas of the highest quality hard X-ray spectra available to date for a large number of AGN, providing unprecedented insight into the variety AGN spectra in the hard X-ray band. In addition to phenomenology, which is an essential ingredient of Cosmic X-ray Background studies, it is possible to use new fitting models to directly probe the geometry of the toroidal obscurer (torus). Its main spectral features lie within the NuSTAR bandpass, making it possible to test the common assumption that a similar Compton-thick torus exists around essentially every Seyfert-type AGN. I will discuss torus geometry constraints based on the X-ray spectra in relation to those from other wavelengths, the effects on interpretation of high-redshift AGN observations, and the limitations of the current results.

  14. An infrared and optical analysis of a sample of XBONGs and optically elusive AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Koss, M. E-mail: richard@astro.umd.edu

    2014-10-20

    We present near-infrared (NIR) spectra of four optically elusive active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and four X-ray bright, optically normal galaxies (XBONGs) from the Swift-BAT survey. With archival observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, Spitzer, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we test a number of AGN indicators in the NIR and mid-infrared; namely, NIR emission line diagnostic ratios, the presence of coronal high-ionization lines, and infrared photometry. Of our eight hard X-ray selected AGNs, we find that optical normalcy has a variety of causes from object to object, and no one explanation applies. Our objects have normal Eddington ratios and so are unlikely to host radiatively inefficient accretion flows. It is unlikely that star formation in the host or starlight dilution is contributing to their failure of optical diagnostics, except perhaps in two cases. The NIR continua are well fit by two blackbodies: one at the stellar temperature, and a hot dust component near the dust sublimation temperature. The XBONGs are more likely to have significant hot dust components, while these components are small relative to starlight in the optically elusive AGN. Some of our sample have NIR line ratios typical of AGNs, but NIR diagnostics are unsuccessful in distinguishing H II regions from AGNs in general. In one object, we discover a hidden broad-line region in the NIR. These results have strong relevance to the origin of optically normal AGNs in deep X-ray surveys.

  15. A New Sample of Obscured AGNs Selected from the XMM-Newton and AKARI Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Yuichi; Hirata, Yoshitaka; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Oyabu, Shinki; Gandhi, Poshak; Toba, Yoshiki; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2015-11-01

    We report a new sample of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source and AKARI point-source catalogs. We match X-ray sources with infrared (18 and 90 μm) sources located at | b| \\gt 10^\\circ to create a sample consisting of 173 objects. Their optical classifications and absorption column densities measured by X-ray spectra are compiled and study efficient selection criteria to find obscured AGNs. We apply the criteria (1) X-ray hardness ratio defined by using the 2-4.5 keV and 4.5-12 keV bands > -0.1 and (2) EPIC-PN count rate (CR) in the 0.2-12 keV to infrared flux ratio CR/{F}90\\lt 0.1 or CR/{F}18\\lt 1, where F18 and F90 are infrared fluxes at 18 and 90 μm in Jy, respectively, to search for obscured AGNs. X-ray spectra of 48 candidates, for which no X-ray results have been published, are analyzed and X-ray evidence for the presence of obscured AGNs such as a convex shape X-ray spectrum indicative of absorption of {N}{{H}} ˜ 1022-24 cm-2, a very flat continuum, or a strong Fe-K emission line with an equivalent width of \\gt 700 {{eV}} is found in 26 objects. Six of them are classified as Compton-thick AGNs, and four are represented by either Compton-thin or Compton-thick spectral models. The success rate of finding obscured AGNs combining our analysis and the literature is 92% if the 18 μm condition is used. Of the 26 objects, 4 are optically classified as an H ii nucleus and are new “elusive AGNs” in which star formation activity likely overwhelms AGN emission in the optical and infrared bands.

  16. Are the variability properties of the Kepler AGN light curves consistent with a damped random walk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-08-01

    We test the consistency of active galactic nuclei (AGN) optical flux variability with the damped random walk (DRW) model. Our sample consists of 20 multiquarter Kepler AGN light curves including both Type 1 and 2 Seyferts, radio-loud and -quiet AGN, quasars, and blazars. Kepler observations of AGN light curves offer a unique insight into the variability properties of AGN light curves because of the very rapid (11.6-28.6 min) and highly uniform rest-frame sampling combined with a photometric precision of 1 part in 105 over a period of 3.5 yr. We categorize the light curves of all 20 objects based on visual similarities and find that the light curves fall into five broad categories. We measure the first-order structure function of these light curves and model the observed light curve with a general broken power-law power spectral density (PSD) characterized by a short-time-scale power-law index γ and turnover time-scale τ. We find that less than half the objects are consistent with a DRW and observe variability on short time-scales (˜2 h). The turnover time-scale τ ranges from ˜10-135 d. Interesting structure function features include pronounced dips on rest-frame time-scales ranging from 10-100 d and varying slopes on different time-scales. The range of observed short-time-scale PSD slopes and the presence of dip and varying slope features suggests that the DRW model may not be appropriate for all AGN. We conclude that AGN variability is a complex phenomenon that requires a more sophisticated statistical treatment.

  17. The star formation-AGN interplay in merging galaxies: insights from hydrodynamical simulations and observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Galarza, Juan R.; Smith, Howard Alan; Weiner, Aaron; Hayward, Christopher C.; Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Rosenthal, Lee; Ashby, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Thermal emission from an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) can provide a significant contribution to the bolometric luminosity of galaxies, and its effect at infrared wavelengths can mimic the process of star-formation, jeopardizing star formation rate (SFR) diagnostics. It is therefore important to model the AGN emission and to quantify its effect on the estimated SFRs when SED fitting tools are applied. We tackle this problem by studying the dust radiative transfer calculations of hydrodynamically simulated binary galaxy mergers covering a broad range of parameters, including stellar mas ratios, gas contents, AGN luminosity and viewing angles. We apply the energy balance SED fitting codes CHIBURST and CIGALE to the mock SEDs of our simulated merger, and then compare with the results of applying the same codes to the SEDs of observed merging galaxies in the Local Universe. At different stages of the interaction, we compare their derived SFRs and AGN fractions with those predicted by the hydrodynamical simulations, for a broad range of the interaction parameters, but focus on the stages near coalescence, when the AGN contribution exceed 10% of the total luminosity. We show that the contribution to IR luminosity is greatest during and immediately after coalescence, when the two supermassive black holes of the interacting pair merge and undergo and enhanced period of accretion. Under certain conditions, CIGALE succeeds at recovering the SFRs and AGN fractions with higher accuracy than other available codes, such as MAGPHYS, even during these extreme stages. Our results show that using the IR luminosity as a simple surrogate for star formation can significantly overestimate the true SFR by underestimating the contribution from the AGN. Finally, we study the effect of using different parametric star formation histories (SFHs) when fitting the SEDs of galaxies, and show that a delayed SFH is usually a reasonable choice for merging galaxies.

  18. Intermediate mass black holes in AGN discs - I. Production and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKernan, B.; Ford, K. E. S.; Lyra, W.; Perets, H. B.

    2012-09-01

    Here we propose a mechanism for efficiently growing intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in discs around supermassive black holes. Stellar mass objects can efficiently agglomerate when facilitated by the gas disc. Stars, compact objects and binaries can migrate, accrete and merge within discs around supermassive black holes. While dynamical heating by cusp stars excites the velocity dispersion of nuclear cluster objects (NCOs) in the disc, gas in the disc damps NCO orbits. If gas damping dominates, NCOs remain in the disc with circularized orbits and large collision cross-sections. IMBH seeds can grow extremely rapidly by collisions with disc NCOs at low relative velocities, allowing for super-Eddington growth rates. Once an IMBH seed has cleared out its feeding zone of disc NCOs, growth of IMBH seeds can become dominated by gas accretion from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) disc. However, the IMBH can migrate in the disc and expand its feeding zone, permitting a super-Eddington accretion rate to continue. Growth of IMBH seeds via NCO collisions is enhanced by a pile-up of migrators. We highlight the remarkable parallel between the growth of IMBH in AGN discs with models of giant planet growth in protoplanetary discs. If an IMBH becomes massive enough it can open a gap in the AGN disc. IMBH migration in AGN discs may stall, allowing them to survive the end of the AGN phase and remain in galactic nuclei. Our proposed mechanisms should be more efficient at growing IMBH in AGN discs than the standard model of IMBH growth in stellar clusters. Dynamical heating of disc NCOs by cusp stars is transferred to the gas in an AGN disc helping to maintain the outer disc against gravitational instability. Model predictions, observational constraints and implications are discussed in a companion paper (Paper II).

  19. AGN POPULATION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS. I. DATA AND NUCLEAR ACTIVITY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    MartInez, M. A.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Coziol, R. E-mail: chony@iaa.es E-mail: rcoziol@astro.ugto.mx

    2010-03-15

    We have conducted a new spectroscopic survey to characterize the nature of nuclear activity in Hickson compact group (HCG) galaxies and establish its frequency. We have obtained new intermediate-resolution optical spectroscopy for 200 member galaxies and corrected for underlying stellar population contamination using galaxy templates. Spectra for 11 additional galaxies have been acquired from the ESO and 6dF public archives, and emission-line ratios have been taken from the literature for 59 more galaxies. Here we present the results of our classification of the nuclear activity for 270 member galaxies, which belong to a well-defined sample of 64 HCGs. We found a large fraction of galaxies, 63%, with emission lines. Using standard diagnostic diagrams, 45% of the emission-line galaxies were classified as pure active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 23% as Transition Objects (TOs), and 32% as star-forming nuclei (SFNs). In the HCGs, the AGN activity appears as the most frequent activity type. Adopting the interpretation that in TOs a low-luminosity AGN coexists with circumnuclear star formation, the fraction of galaxies with an AGN could rise to 42% of the whole sample. The low frequency (20%) of SFNs confirms that there is no star formation enhancement in HCGs. After extinction correction, we found a median AGN H{alpha} luminosity of 7.1 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}, which implies that AGNs in HCG have a characteristically low luminosity. This result added to the fact that there is an almost complete absence of broad-line AGNs in compact groups (CGs) as found by MartInez et al. and corroborated in this study for HCGs, is consistent with very few gas left in these galaxies. In general, therefore, what may characterize the level of activity in CGs is a severe deficiency of gas.

  20. AGN Population in Hickson Compact Groups. I. Data and Nuclear Activity Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M. A.; Del Olmo, A.; Coziol, R.; Perea, J.

    2010-03-01

    We have conducted a new spectroscopic survey to characterize the nature of nuclear activity in Hickson compact group (HCG) galaxies and establish its frequency. We have obtained new intermediate-resolution optical spectroscopy for 200 member galaxies and corrected for underlying stellar population contamination using galaxy templates. Spectra for 11 additional galaxies have been acquired from the ESO and 6dF public archives, and emission-line ratios have been taken from the literature for 59 more galaxies. Here we present the results of our classification of the nuclear activity for 270 member galaxies, which belong to a well-defined sample of 64 HCGs. We found a large fraction of galaxies, 63%, with emission lines. Using standard diagnostic diagrams, 45% of the emission-line galaxies were classified as pure active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 23% as Transition Objects (TOs), and 32% as star-forming nuclei (SFNs). In the HCGs, the AGN activity appears as the most frequent activity type. Adopting the interpretation that in TOs a low-luminosity AGN coexists with circumnuclear star formation, the fraction of galaxies with an AGN could rise to 42% of the whole sample. The low frequency (20%) of SFNs confirms that there is no star formation enhancement in HCGs. After extinction correction, we found a median AGN Hα luminosity of 7.1 × 1039 erg s-1, which implies that AGNs in HCG have a characteristically low luminosity. This result added to the fact that there is an almost complete absence of broad-line AGNs in compact groups (CGs) as found by Martínez et al. and corroborated in this study for HCGs, is consistent with very few gas left in these galaxies. In general, therefore, what may characterize the level of activity in CGs is a severe deficiency of gas.