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  1. State hospital rate-setting revisited.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Graham

    2009-10-01

    In an attempt to control rapid growth in hospital costs, beginning in the mid-1970s several states implemented rate-setting programs to regulate hospital payments. In seven states, rate-setting was in effect for a substantial period of time (14 years or more). While most of these programs were discontinued by the mid-1990s, two are still active. In five of the seven states, the rates of increase in hospital costs were lower than the corresponding national rates during the periods in which the regulation programs were in place. Four of the states--Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and New Jersey--had some of the lowest rates of hospital cost increases among all the states. This indicates that hospital rate regulation may be a useful approach in managing a major component of health care spending. PMID:20614649

  2. A Partial Test of Agnew's General Theory of Crime and Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yan; Day, George; Cao, Liqun

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, Agnew introduced a new integrated theory, which he labels a general theory of crime and delinquency. He proposes that delinquency is more likely to occur when constraints against delinquency are low and motivations for delinquency are high. In addition, he argues that constraints and motivations are influenced by variables in five life…

  3. Policing sexuality in a modern state hospital.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, T

    1989-01-01

    In 1985 a grand jury was convened by the district attorney to investigate conditions at the Rochester (N.Y.) Psychiatric Center following the center's decision not to notify police of the sodomy of a patient by another patient. The grand jury brought no civil or criminal indictments, but the incident touched off a wave of negative publicity about the hospital and prompted local police and the district attorney to demand that the hospital report any incident of sexual activity involving a mentally incompetent patient. As a result, the hospital instituted a stringent policy requiring extensive investigation and physical examination of patients found having sex. This article discusses legal and clinical issues that were raised by the incident, the impact of public scrutiny on the policing of patient sexuality. The negative aspects of overreporting sexual activity at a state hospital are described. PMID:2912842

  4. Uncompensated Care Decreased At Hospitals In Medicaid Expansion States But Not At Hospitals In Nonexpansion States.

    PubMed

    Dranove, David; Garthwaite, Craig; Ody, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    One pillar of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was its expected impact on the growing burden of uncompensated care costs for the uninsured at hospitals. However, little is known about how this burden changed as a result of the ACA's enactment. We examine how the Affordable Care Act (ACA)'s coverage expansions affected uncompensated care costs at a large, diverse sample of hospitals. We estimate that in states that expanded Medicaid under the ACA, uncompensated care costs decreased from 4.1 percentage points to 3.1 percentage points of operating costs. The reductions in Medicaid expansion states were larger at hospitals that had higher pre-ACA uncompensated care burdens and in markets where we predicted larger gains in coverage through expanded eligibility for Medicaid. Our estimates suggest that uncompensated care costs would have decreased from 5.7 percentage points to 4.0 percentage points of operating costs in nonexpansion states if they had expanded Medicaid. Thus, while the ACA decreased the variation in uncompensated care costs across hospitals within Medicaid expansion states, the difference between expansion and nonexpansion states increased substantially. Policy makers and researchers should consider how the shifting uncompensated care burden affects other hospital decisions as well as the distribution of supplemental public funding to hospitals. PMID:27503973

  5. 77 FR 37035 - O.L.S. Energy-Agnews, Inc.; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission O.L.S. Energy-Agnews, Inc.; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... above-referenced proceeding of O.L.S. Energy-Agnews, Inc.'s application for market-based rate...

  6. 42 CFR 447.298 - State disproportionate share hospital allotments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State disproportionate share hospital allotments... for Hospitals That Serve a Disproportionate Number of Low-Income Patients § 447.298 State disproportionate share hospital allotments. (a) Calculation of State's base allotment for Federal fiscal year...

  7. Reforming the state hospital in a unified care system.

    PubMed

    Spiro, H R

    1982-09-01

    Without reform and linkage to unified care system, state hospitals may become overcrowded and underfunded during the coming decades. The author delineates ten epidemiologic, demographic, and systemic factors that point to increases in episodes of chronic illness which are most likely to end in state hospitalization. General hospitals, nursing homes, and community-based programs are compared as possible substitutes for state hospitals. Finally the author recommends twelve internal reforms to strengthen the state hospital system as an integral part of the chronic care network. PMID:7129386

  8. Leptospirosis-Associated Hospitalizations, United States, 1998–2009

    PubMed Central

    Callinan, Laura S.; Holman, Robert C.; Steiner, Claudia; Guerra, Marta A.

    2014-01-01

    A small percentage of persons with leptospirosis, a reemerging zoonosis, experience severe complications that require hospitalization. The number of leptospirosis cases in the United States is unknown. Thus, to estimate the hospitalization rate for this disease, we analyzed US hospital discharge records for 1998–2009 for the total US population by using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. During that time, the average annual rate of leptospirosis-associated hospitalizations was 0.6 hospitalizations/1,000,000 population. Leptospirosis-associated hospitalization rates were higher for persons >20 years of age and for male patients. For leptospirosis-associated hospitalizations, the average age of patients at admission was lower, the average length of stay for patients was longer, and hospital charges were higher than those for nonleptospirosis infectious disease–associated hospitalizations. Educating clinicians on the signs and symptoms of leptospirosis may result in earlier diagnosis and treatment and, thereby, reduced disease severity and hospitalization costs. PMID:25076111

  9. Hospital financial condition under state rate regulatory programs.

    PubMed

    Cleverley, W O

    1986-01-01

    This article examines the impact that state rate regulatory programs have had on the financial position of hospitals. The findings indicate that state rate regulatory programs have had a negative influence on hospital financial position. State rate regulatory programs, as well as Medicare with its system of prospectively determined prices, should consider the possible impact of their decisions on hospital financial viability. Cost control should not be the only concern in public policy decisions of this type. PMID:10275562

  10. Rural Hospital Patient Safety Systems Implementation in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Daniel R.; Hewett, John E.; Ge, Bin; Schubert, Shari

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: With heightened attention to medical errors and patient safety, we surveyed Utah and Missouri hospitals to assess the "state of the art" in patient safety systems and identify changes over time. This study examines differences between urban and rural hospitals. Methods: Survey of all acute care hospitals in Utah and Missouri…

  11. Hospital librarianship in the United States: at the crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Diane G.; Chastain-Warheit, Christine C.; Easterby-Gannett, Sharon; Chayes, Marion C.; Long, Bradley A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines recent developments in hospital librarianship in the United States, including the current status of hospital-based clinical library services. Several examples of hospital library services are presented that demonstrate some characteristics of struggling and thriving services. The implications of the informationist concept are considered. The continuation of the hospital librarian's primary role in support of patient care is explored, as core competencies are reexamined for relevancy in the new millennium. PMID:11838458

  12. Kawasaki syndrome hospitalizations and associated costs in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Belay, Ermias D.; Holman, Robert C.; Maddox, Ryan A.; Foster, David A.; Schonberger, Lawrence B.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiologic characteristics of patients hospitalized with Kawasaki syndrome (KS) and estimate associated costs in the United States, using a large national hospital discharge dataset. METHODS: Hospitalization discharge records with KS for 1997 through 1999 for U.S. residents <18 years of age were selected from Solucient's hospital discharge records. These records are collected from most of the self-governing children's hospitals and approximately one-third of short-term, non-federal general hospitals in the United States. RESULTS: A total of 7,431 hospital discharges with a KS diagnosis were identified; 2,270 of the discharges were in 1997, 2,700 in 1998, and 2,461 in 1999. Boys comprised 60.0% of the discharges, and 76.4% of discharges were among children ages <5 years. For the 44 states and the District of Columbia with at least one hospital reporting KS, the average annual KS hospitalization rate was 10.2 per 100,000 children ages <5 years. The KS hospitalization rate for boys (12.0 per 100,000) was higher than that for girls (8.3 per 100,000) (risk ratio 1.45; 95% confidence interval 1.37, 1.52). Extrapolation to the U.S. population showed an estimated average annual KS hospitalization rate of 21.6. The median KS hospitalization cost for children <5 years of age during the study period was $6,169 US dollars. CONCLUSIONS: The KS hospitalization rate was consistent with that of previous U.S. studies, although the extrapolated rate may be an overestimation. The median hospitalization cost for KS was higher than that for respiratory syncytial virus-associated bronchiolitis and diarrheal diseases. Large hospitalization datasets can be used to monitor the occurrence of KS in the United States. PMID:12941859

  13. Hospital policies, state laws, and healthcare worker influenza vaccination rates.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Richard K; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Raymund, Mahlon; Bialor, Jamie; Sweeney, Patricia M; Nowalk, Mary Patricia

    2013-08-01

    This study used hierarchical linear modeling to determine the relative contribution of hospital policies and state laws to healthcare worker (HCW) influenza vaccination rates. Hospital mandates with consequences for noncompliance and race were associated with 3%-12% increases in HCW vaccination; state laws were not significantly related to vaccination rates. PMID:23838231

  14. Creedmore State Hospital, Building Y, 8045 Winchester Boulevard (site ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    - Creedmore State Hospital, Building Y, 80-45 Winchester Boulevard (site bounded by Union Turnpike on north, Hillside Avenue on south, Winchester Boulevard on west, & 240th, 241st, & 242nd Streets on east), Queens (subdivision), Queens County, NY

  15. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  16. Upward trend in dengue incidence among hospitalized patients, United States.

    PubMed

    Streit, Judy A; Yang, Ming; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Polgreen, Philip M

    2011-05-01

    International travel and a global expansion of dengue fever have the potential to increase the incidence of dengue in the United States. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of trends in dengue among hospitalized patients by using the National Inpatient Sample (2000-2007); the number of cases more than tripled (p<0.0001). PMID:21529411

  17. Paying the Hospital: Foreign Lessons For the United States

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, William A.

    1983-01-01

    This special report synthesizes the findings of a Health Care Financing Administration grant which allowed the author to analyze hospital finance in six foreign countries and in the United States. The author identified the principal problems facing hospital owners, carriers, and governments in the United States, and he conducted lengthy field work abroad to learn how each country dealt with the same problems. One set of the author's conclusions makes more clear issues that are debated in the United States, such as the meaning of “cost-based reimbursement” and “prospective reimbursement”. Some of the author's findings show the difficulty of implementing policies often proposed in the United States, such as incentive reimbursement schemes. Other findings of the author show the conditions necessary for cost containment, such as strong representation of consumers and firm political will by government. PMID:10310003

  18. Cellular immunity in semistarved states in hospitalized adults.

    PubMed

    Bistrian, B R; Blackburn, G L; Scrimshaw, N S; Flatt, J P

    1975-10-01

    Adult protein-calorie malnutrition, as reflected by decreased levels of serum albumin and transferrin, was studied in 21 hospitalized patients. This malnutrition state was a consequence of a catabolic response to stress and also use of standard parenteral fluid maintenance with 5% dextrose and water. Associated findings included a significant reduction in both total lymphocytes and cellular immunity, as measured by dinitrochlorobenzene and Candida skin testing. This state of visceral attrition, resembling kwashiorkor, occurs commonly in hospitalized patients, and may account for significant morbidity and mortality. Alternatives to the 5% dextrose and water in the nutritional support of the semistarved state may allow better preservation of visceral protein status and immune function. PMID:810018

  19. Hospital charges for people with AIDS in Washington State: utilization of a statewide hospital discharge data base.

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, W E; Hopkins, S G; Honey, J; Harwell, J D; Shoemaker, P C; Kobayashi, J M

    1988-01-01

    We analyzed Washington State inpatient hospital utilization for 165 AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) cases with 344 hospitalizations from July 1984 through December 1985. We found that mean charges per hospitalization were $9,166 and mean length of stay was 13.3 days. In addition, evaluation of two diagnosis-related groups (DRGs 079 and 398) commonly used for AIDS hospitalizations showed that AIDS hospitalizations were substantially more expensive than non-AIDS hospitalizations within the same diagnosis-related group. AIDS-specific diagnosis-related groups may be necessary to achieve a balance between inpatient charges and reimbursements. PMID:3133953

  20. The admissions process in two state psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Solomon, P

    1981-06-01

    In this study, a conceptual model of the factors influencing the admissions process was tested in two state psychiatric hospitals. The factors included in the model fell into four categories: characteristics of patients, characteristics of admitting personnel, system factors, and patient assessment. The attitudes of individuals accompanying an applicant were found to be most important. Patients referred by police, courts, family, friends, or agency personnel were more likely to be admitted than self-referrals. Pathological behaviors that had a significant impact on the admissions process were those that indicated the presence of mental disorder or danger to self or others. The availability of alternatives to hospitalization was not found to be significant, a finding that suggests that admitting personnel, particularly psychiatrists, should be educated about community alternatives if spiraling rates of psychiatric admission are to be reduced. PMID:7262846

  1. 42 CFR 403.321 - State systems for hospital outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State systems for hospital outpatient services. 403... Control Systems § 403.321 State systems for hospital outpatient services. CMS may approve a State's..., projections for the first 12-month period covered by the assurance for each hospital, in both the...

  2. Providing neurologic care in criminal systems and state mental hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Clark Alan; Wortzel, Hal

    2015-01-01

    Summary As health care laws and payment structures change in the near future, neurologists may pursue other practice settings in which to provide care as a way to diversify their practice. Here we describe the challenges and opportunities involved with working in correctional and state mental hospital systems compared to a typical private practice: logistical challenges, patient and provider safety, patient characteristics, and cultural differences. Neurologists may take these factors into consideration when choosing whether to add this health care setting to their current practice. PMID:26124981

  3. Hospitalization for esophageal achalasia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Molena, Daniela; Mungo, Benedetto; Stem, Miloslawa; Lidor, Anne O

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the outcome of different treatments in patients admitted for esophageal achalasia in the United States. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample over an 8-year period (2003-2010). Patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of achalasia were divided into 3 groups based on their treatment: (1) Group 1: patients who underwent Heller myotomy during their hospital stay; (2) Group 2: patients who underwent esophagectomy; and (3) Group 3: patients not undergoing surgical treatment. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included length of stay (LOS), discharge destination and total hospital charges. RESULTS: Among 27141 patients admitted with achalasia, nearly half (48.5%) underwent Heller myotomy, 2.5% underwent esophagectomy and 49.0% had endoscopic or other treatment. Patients in group 1 were younger, healthier, and had the lowest mortality when compared with the other two groups. Group 2 had the highest LOS and hospital charges among all groups. Group 3 had the highest mortality (1.2%, P < 0.001) and the lowest home discharge rate (78.8%) when compared to the other groups. The most frequently performed procedures among group 3 were esophageal dilatation (25.9%) and injection (13.3%). Among patients who died in this group the most common associated morbidities included acute respiratory failure, sepsis and aspiration pneumonia. CONCLUSION: Surgery for achalasia carries exceedingly low mortality in the modern era; however, in complicated patients, even less invasive treatments are burdened by significant mortality and morbidity. PMID:26421106

  4. Histoplasmosis-Associated Hospitalizations in the United States, 2001-2012.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Derado, Gordana; Mody, Rajal K

    2016-01-01

    We examined trends in histoplasmosis-associated hospitalizations in the United States using the 2001-2012 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. An estimated 50 778 hospitalizations occurred, with significant increases in hospitalizations overall and in the proportion of hospitalizations associated with transplant, diabetes, and autoimmune conditions often treated with biologic therapies; therefore, histoplasmosis remains an important opportunistic infection. PMID:26894201

  5. Histoplasmosis-Associated Hospitalizations in the United States, 2001–2012

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Derado, Gordana; Mody, Rajal K.

    2016-01-01

    We examined trends in histoplasmosis-associated hospitalizations in the United States using the 2001–2012 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. An estimated 50 778 hospitalizations occurred, with significant increases in hospitalizations overall and in the proportion of hospitalizations associated with transplant, diabetes, and autoimmune conditions often treated with biologic therapies; therefore, histoplasmosis remains an important opportunistic infection. PMID:26894201

  6. Skinner boxes for psychotics: Operant conditioning at Metropolitan state hospital

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    Between 1953 and 1965, Ogden Lindsley and his associates conducted free-operant research with psychiatric inpatients and normal volunteers at Metropolitan State Hospital in Waltham, Massachusetts. Their project, originally named “Studies in Behavior Therapy,” was renamed “Harvard Medical School Behavior Research Laboratory” in 1955. This name change and its implications were significant. The role of the laboratory in the history of the relationship between the experimental analysis of behavior and applied behavior analysis is discussed. A case is made for viewing Lindsley's early work as foundational for the subfield of the experimental analysis of human behavior that formally coalesced in the early 1980s. The laboratory's work is also contextualized with reference to the psychopharmacological revolution of the 1950s. Finally, a four-stage framework for studying the historical and conceptual development of behavior analysis is proposed. PMID:22478407

  7. Skinner boxes for psychotics: operant conditioning at Metropolitan State Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    Between 1953 and 1965, Ogden Lindsley and his associates conducted free-operant research with psychiatric inpatients and normal volunteers at Metropolitan State Hospital in Waltham, Massachusetts. Their project, originally named "Studies in Behavior Therapy," was renamed "Harvard Medical School Behavior Research Laboratory" in 1955. This name change and its implications were significant. The role of the laboratory in the history of the relationship between the experimental analysis of behavior and applied behavior analysis is discussed. A case is made for viewing Lindsley's early work as foundational for the subfield of the experimental analysis of human behavior that formally coalesced in the early 1980s. The laboratory's work is also contextualized with reference to the psychopharmacological revolution of the 1950s. Finally, a four-stage framework for studying the historical and conceptual development of behavior analysis is proposed. PMID:22478407

  8. Pelargonium quercetorum Agnew induces apoptosis without PARP or cytokeratin 18 cleavage in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Aztopal, Nazlihan; Cevatemre, Buse; Sarimahmut, Mehmet; Ari, Ferda; Dere, Egemen; Ozel, Mustafa Zafer; Firat, Mehmet; Ulukaya, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Pelargonium species have various uses in folk medicine as traditional remedies, and several of them have been screened for their biological activity, including anticancer. Pelargonium quercetorum Agnew (P. quercetorum) is traditionally used for its anthelminthic activity. However, little is known about its biological activity or its effect on cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to determine the cytotoxic activity of P. quercetorum extract on lung cancer cell lines with varying properties. Following the analyses of its chemical composition, the cytotoxic activity was screened by the adenosine triphosphate viability test. M30-Apoptosense® and M65 EpiDeath® enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to determine the cell death mode (apoptosis vs. necrosis). For apoptosis, additional methods, including Annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and Hoechst 33342 staining, were employed. The cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was assayed by western blotting to further dissect the apoptosis mechanism. The methanol extract of P. quercetorum caused cytotoxic activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mode of cell death was apoptosis, as evidenced by the positive staining of the cells for Annexin-V-FITC and the presence of pyknotic nuclei. Notably, neither PARP cleavage nor cytokeratin 18 fragmentation were observed. P.quercetorum caused cell death by an apoptosis mechanism that is slightly different from classical apoptosis. Therefore, future in vivo experiments are required for further understanding of the effect of this plant on cancer cells. PMID:27446448

  9. Promoting accountability: hospital charity care in California, Washington state, and Texas.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Janet P; Stensland, Jeffrey

    2004-05-01

    Debate as to whether private hospitals meet their charitable obligations is heated. This study examines how alternative state approaches for ensuring hospital accountability to the community affects charitable expenditures and potentially affects access to care for the uninsured. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were used to compare private California hospitals' charity care expenditures with those of hospitals in Texas and Washington state. The key finding from this study is that net of hospital characteristics, market characteristics and community need, Texas hospitals were estimated to provide over 3 times more charity care and Washington hospitals were estimated to provide 66% more charity care than California hospitals. This finding suggests that more prescriptive community benefit or charity care requirements may be necessary to ensure that private hospitals assume a larger role in the care of the uninsured. PMID:15253376

  10. Epidemiology of Abusive Abdominal Trauma Hospitalizations in United States Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Wendy Gwirtzman; Dubowitz, Howard; Langenberg, Patricia; Dischinger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To estimate the incidence of abusive abdominal trauma (AAT) hospitalizations among US children age 0-9 years. (2) To identify demographic characteristics of children at highest risk for AAT. Design: Secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional, national hospitalization database. Setting: Hospitalization data from the 2003 and 2006…

  11. Hospitalization for Congestive Heart Failure: United States, 2000-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... care, health care utilization, National Hospital Discharge Survey Did the number and age distribution of patients hospitalized ... those aged 65–74 and 75–84 decreased. Did the rate of hospitalization for CHF change from ...

  12. General Surgery Programs in Small Rural New York State Hospitals: A Pilot Survey of Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Randall; Doty, Brit; Gold, Michael; Bordley, James; Dietz, Patrick; Jenkins, Paul; Heneghan, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitals play a central role in small rural communities and are frequently one of the major contributors to the local economy. Surgical services often account for a substantial proportion of hospital revenues. The current shortage of general surgeons practicing in rural communities may further threaten the financial viability of rural…

  13. Architectural design of a secure forensic state psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Dvoskin, Joel A; Radomski, Steven J; Bennett, Charles; Olin, Jonathan A; Hawkins, Robert L; Dotson, Linda A; Drewnicky, Irene N

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the architectural design of a secure forensic state psychiatric hospital. The project combined input from staff at all levels of the client organization, outside consultants, and a team of experienced architects. The design team was able to create a design that maximized patient dignity and privacy on one hand, and the ability of staff to observe all patient activity on the other. The design centers around 24-bed units, broken into smaller living wings of eight beds each. Each eight-bed living wing has its own private bathrooms (two) and showers (two), as well as a small living area solely reserved for these eight patients and their guests. An indoor-outdoor dayroom allows patients to go outside whenever they choose, while allowing staff to continue observing them. The heart of the facility is a large treatment mall, designed to foster the acquisition of social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral skills that will help patients to safely return to their communities. PMID:12239707

  14. Prevalence and Correlates of Autism in a State Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, David S.; Lawer, Lindsay J.; Branch, Kira; Brodkin, Edward S.; Healey, Kristin; Witalec, Robert; Johnson, Donielle N.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2012-01-01

    This study estimated the ASD prevalence in a psychiatric hospital and evaluated the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) combined with other information for differential diagnosis. Chart review, SRS and clinical interviews were collected for 141 patients at one hospital. Diagnosis was determined at case conference. Receiver operating characteristic…

  15. Management of hospitals solid waste in Khartoum State.

    PubMed

    Saad, Suhair A Gayoum

    2013-10-01

    This research had been conducted during year 2012 to review existing data on hospital waste management for some of Khartoum town hospitals and to try to produce appropriate proposals acceptable for waste management and final treatment methods. The overall status of hospital waste management in Khartoum has been assessed through direct visits and designated questionnaires. Eight main hospitals were covered in the study with an overall bed capacity of 2,978. The current waste management practice observed at all studied hospitals was that most of waste, office, general, food, construction debris, and hazardous chemical materials were all mixed together as they are generated, collected, and finally disposed of. Only a small portion of waste in some hospitals (part of potentially infectious, body parts, and sharps) are collected separately and treated in a central incinerator. The estimated value of per bed generation rate in the studied hospitals was found to be 0.87 kg/day, which lies within the range for the low-income countries. In all studied hospitals, it was found that workers were working under very poor unsafe conditions with very low salaries ($35 to $45 per month on average). About 90 % were completely illiterate or had very low education levels. At the national level, no laws considering hospital waste, or even hazardous waste, were found; only some federal general environmental regulations and some procedures from town and city localities for controlling general municipal waste exist. At the hospital level, no policies or rules were found, except in the radiotherapy center, where they manage radioactive wastes under the laws of the Sudanese Atomic Agency. Urgent actions are needed for the remediation and prevention of hazards associated with this type of waste. PMID:23644667

  16. Adverse Drug Reactions: A Retrospective Review of Hospitalized Patients at a State Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Iuppa, Courtney A.; Nelson, Leigh Anne; Elliott, Ellie; Sommi, Roger W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of information regarding adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in psychiatric patients. Information on common and preventable ADRs (pADRs) in psychiatric patients will allow for targeted improvement projects. Objective: To characterize reported ADRs and pharmacist interventions to prevent ADRs in an extended-care state psychiatric hospital. Methods: Four years of ADR reports were assessed for probability, reaction severity, pharmacological class of medication involved, preventability, change in therapy, and transfers to a medical facility. The pharmacist intervention database was queried for interventions classified as “prevention of ADR.” The interventions were assessed for type of medication and recommendation acceptance. Results: Medication classes responsible for ADRs included mood stabilizers (30%), typical antipsychotics (25%), atypical antipsychotics (25%), and antidepressants (8%). Nine percent resulted in transfer to a medical facility. Of all ADRs, 34.4% were pADRs; mood stabilizers (41%) and atypical antipsychotics (27%) were the most common pADRs. The most common causes of pADRs were supratherapeutic serum concentrations, drug-drug interactions, and history of reaction. There were 87 pharmacist interventions that were classified as “prevention of ADR,” and the acceptance rate of pharmacists’ recommendations was 96.5%. Mood stabilizers (20%), atypical antipsychotics (17%), and typical antipsychotics (11%) were commonly associated with prevented ADRs. Lithium accounted for 13.8% of prevented ADRs; these ADRs were most often due to a drug–drug interaction with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Conclusions: ADRs were most commonly associated with mood stabilizers and antipsychotics, and pADRs were common. There is an opportunity to provide education to medical staff on therapeutic drug monitoring and drug–drug interactions for these classes, particularly lithium. PMID:24474834

  17. Rural Residents Who Are Hospitalized in Rural and Urban Hospitals: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Care Statistics. References Health Resources and Services Administration, Department of Health and Human Services. Area Resource File (ARF). 2012. Moscovice I, Stensland J. Rural hospitals: Trends, challenges, and a future research and policy analysis agenda. J Rural Health ...

  18. Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States, 1990-2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurring out-of-hospital, by race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, 1990–2012 NOTE: Non- ... in 1990; these states did not report Hispanic origin on their birth certificates for these years. SOURCE: ...

  19. HOSPITALIZATIONS FOR CHOLECYSTITIS AND CHOLELITHIASIS IN THE STATE OF RIO GRANDE DO SUL, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    NUNES, Emeline Caldana; ROSA, Roger dos Santos; BORDIN, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The cholelithiasis is disease of surgical resolution with about 60,000 hospitalizations per year in the Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS - Brazilian National Health System) of the Rio Grande do Sul state. Aim: To describe the profile of hospitalizations for cholecystitis and cholelithiasis performed by the SUS of Rio Grande do Sul state, 2011-2013. Methods: Hospital Information System data from the National Health System through morbidity list for cholelithiasis and cholecystitis (ICD-10 K80-K81). Variables studied were sex, age, number of hospitalizations and approved Hospitalization Authorizations (AIH), total amount and value of hospital services generated, days and average length of stay, mortality, mortality and case fatality ratio, from health regions of the Rio Grande do Sul. Results: During 2011-2013 there were 60,517 hospitalizations for cholecystitis and cholelithiasis, representing 18.86 hospitalizations per 10,000 inhabitants/year, most often in the age group from 60 to 69 years (41.34 admissions per 10,000 inhabitants/year) and female (27.72 hospitalizations per 10,000 inhabitants/year). The fatality rate presented an inverse characteristic: 13.52 deaths per 1,000 admissions/year for males, compared with 7.12 deaths per 1,000 admissions/year in females. The state had an average total amount spent and value of hospital services of R$ 16,244,050.60 and R$ 10,890,461.31, respectively. The health region "Capital/Gravataí Valley" exhibit the highest total expenditure and hospital services, and the largest number of deaths, and average length of stay. Conclusion: The hospitalization and lethality coefficients, the deaths, the length of stay and spending related to admissions increased from 50 years old. Females had a higher frequency and higher values ​​spent on hospitalization, while the male higher coefficient of mortality and mean hospital stay. PMID:27438030

  20. Firearm-related hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality in the United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Kalesan, Bindu; French, Clare; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Fowler, Dennis L; Galea, Sandro

    2014-02-01

    Most firearm-related injuries are nonfatal and require hospitalization. Using data on 3,257,720 hospitalizations from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (2000-2010), we determined overall and cause-, gender-, and race-specific trends in firearm-related hospitalization (FRH) and determinants of in-hospital firearm mortality. Types of FRH evaluated, according to International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, E-diagnostic codes, were accident (codes E922.0-E922.3, E922.8, and E922.9), assault (codes E965.0-E965.4), attempted suicide (codes E955.0-E955.4), legal intervention (code E970), undetermined intent (codes E985.0-E985.3), and war (code E991). A moderate reduction in FRH rates was observed from 2000 to 2011: from 62 FRHs per 100,000 hospitalizations to 57 per 100,000 (P-trend = 0.0016). The majority of FRHs were due to assault (P-trend = 0.19) or accident (P-trend = 0.32) and showed no significant reduction in rates over time, whereas rates for 14% of all FRHs-those due to attempted suicide (P-trend = 0.002) and undetermined intent (P-trend = 0.0029)-declined moderately. Moderate declines were observed among both blacks (from 213.1 FRHs per 100,000 hospitalizations to 164.4 per 100,000; P-trend = 0.049) and whites (from 38.4 FRHs per 100,000 hospitalizations to 32.2 per 100,000; P-trend = 0.031). The decline was significant only among men (effect size = 0.9, P-trend = 0.004). In conclusion, the reduction in FRH was driven by a reduction in self-inflicted and undetermined injuries. FRH rates were 6-fold greater among blacks than among whites and 14-fold greater in men than in women throughout the period. PMID:24148708

  1. The effect of changing state health policy on hospital uncompensated care.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, A J; LoSasso, A T; Bazzoli, G J; Zuckerman, S

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of changing state policy, such as Medicaid eligibility, payment generosity, and HMO enrollment on provision of hospital uncompensated care. Using national data from the American Hospital Association for the period 1990 through 1995, we find that not-for-profit and public hospitals' uncompensated care levels respond positively to Medicaid payment generosity, although the magnitude of the effect is small. Not-for-profit hospitals respond negatively to Medicaid HMO penetration. Public and for-profit hospitals respond negatively to increases in Medicaid eligibility. Results suggest that public insurance payment generosity is an effective but inefficient policy instrument for influencing uncompensated care among not-for-profit hospitals. Further, in localities with high HMO penetration or high penetration of for-profit hospitals, it may be necessary to establish explicit payments for care of the uninsured. PMID:11111283

  2. Hospital Information Systems — The State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Johnnie R.

    1980-01-01

    In 1981, it is predicted that the health care industry will spend nearly $2 billion in the automation of medical treatment facilities. The degree of automation within medical treatment facilities ranges from automated administrative, financial and personnel systems to complex systems, such as patient monitoring and multiphasic screening. Regardless of the degree or sophistication of automated medical systems, experts in health care delivery and hospital administration are convinced that several factors dictate the future growth of computerization in hospitals: 1) the continuing inflationary spiral of costs, particularly labor costs; 2) the need for more extensive utilization review data under government programs; and 3) increasing concern on the part of consumer groups and government agencies with quality medical care. Automated hospital information systems offer potential benefits in the above areas.

  3. Hospitals in New York state may have easier time raising cash with tax-exempt bonds.

    PubMed

    Nemes, J

    1992-08-31

    New York state hospitals considering the sale of tax-exempt bonds as early as next year might find it easier to get to market, said the new executive director of the New York State Housing Finance Agency, which oversees the organization that acts as a conduit for not-for-profit hospitals wanting to issue bonds. Among the new exec's priorities is the streamlining of the state's cumbersome bond-pricing process. PMID:10120335

  4. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002–20111

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Brandon A.; Bonnewell, John P.; Wiemken, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  5. The Boston State Hospital case: "involuntary mind control," the constitution, and the "right to rot".

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, P S; Gutheil, T G

    1980-06-01

    The recent Boston State Hospital case represents a problematic decision on the right of inpatients to refuse treatment. The authors describe how basic misconceptions of psychopharmacology led to questionable analysis of the constitutional issues at stake. The effects of the decision may seriously impair proper care for the hospitalized mentally ill. PMID:7377395

  6. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002-2011(1).

    PubMed

    Wuerth, Brandon A; Bonnewell, John P; Wiemken, Timothy L; Arnold, Forest W

    2016-09-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  7. Hospitalization of Nursing Home Residents with Cognitive Impairments: The Influence of Organizational Features and State Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruneir, Andrea; Miller, Susan C.; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of specific nursing home features and state Medicaid policies on the risk of hospitalization among cognitively impaired nursing home residents. Design and Methods: We used multilevel logistic regression to estimate the odds of hospitalization among long-stay (greater than 90 days)…

  8. Healthcare resource utilization and epidemiology of pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations, United States, 2000.

    PubMed

    Shields, Brenda J; Comstock, R Dawn; Fernandez, Soledad A; Xiang, Huiyun; Smith, Gary A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology and financial burden of burn-associated hospitalizations for children younger than 18 years in the United States. Retrospective data analysis of pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations was done using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database for 2000. An estimated 10,000 children younger than 18 years were hospitalized for burn-associated injuries in the United States in 2000. These children spent an estimated 66,200 days in the hospital with associated hospital charges equal to USD 211,772,700. Total charges and length of stay for pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations in the United States during 2000 were associated with degree of burn, percentage of total body surface area burned, child's age, region of the United States, hospital location, and hospital type. Children 2 years old or younger were more likely to be nonwhite, be hospitalized for burns, and burn their hands/wrists, compared with children 3 to 17 years of age. Male children in both age groups were more likely to be hospitalized for burns than female children. Children 2 years old or younger were more likely to be burned by hot liquids/vapors and contact with hot substances/objects, while children 3 to 17 years were more likely to be burned by fire/flames. This study is the first national study on healthcare resource utilization for pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations to utilize the KID database. Burns are a major source of pediatric morbidity and are associated with significant national healthcare resource utilization annually. Future burn prevention efforts should emphasize implementing passive injury prevention strategies, especially for young children who are nonwhite and live in low-income communities. PMID:17925649

  9. A review of offenders remanded in a State Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Lim, L E; Chan, K L; Tan, L L; Sung, M; Loh, M I; Straughan, P T

    2000-03-01

    Patients remanded over a two-year period to Woodbridge Hospital by Court Order were studied retrospectively. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis, theft and robbery the most prevalent offences. Males greatly outnumbered females. There were important gender differences, with males tending to commit sexual offences and females, theft and mischief. Males were less likely to be acquainted with their victims but those who caused hurt were more likely to know their victims. Outrage of modesty and theft were more likely to be committed against strangers. The reconviction rate was 26%, with repeat offenders more likely to commit sexual offences and theft. Patients who had previous psychiatric hospitalisation were more likely to be attending follow-up prior to and after release from remand and were more likely to have schizophrenia. Those assessed to be fit to plead were either fined or given jail sentences. Unsoundness of mind and unfitness to plead were associated with further remand in this hospital. PMID:11063194

  10. Prevalence and correlates of autism in a state psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Mandell, David S; Lawer, Lindsay J; Branch, Kira; Brodkin, Edward S; Healey, Kristin; Witalec, Robert; Johnson, Donielle N; Gur, Raquel E

    2012-11-01

    This study estimated the ASD prevalence in a psychiatric hospital and evaluated the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) combined with other information for differential diagnosis. Chart review, SRS and clinical interviews were collected for 141 patients at one hospital. Diagnosis was determined at case conference. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the SRS as a screening instrument. Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID) analysis estimated the role of other variables, in combination with the SRS, in separating cases and non-cases. Ten percent of the sample had ASD. More than other patients, their onset was prior to 12 years of age, they had gait problems and intellectual disability, and were less likely to have a history of criminal involvement or substance abuse. Sensitivity (0.86) and specificity (0.60) of the SRS were maximized at a score of 84. Adding age of onset < 12 years and cigarette use among those with SRS <80 increased sensitivity to 1.00 without lowering specificity. Adding a history substance abuse among those with SRS >80 increased specificity to 0.90 but dropped sensitivity to 0.79. Undiagnosed ASD may be common in psychiatric hospitals. The SRS, combined with other information, may discriminate well between ASD and other disorders. PMID:21846667

  11. Proposed standards for professional health sciences library services in hospitals of New York State.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, A P; O'Connell, M; Richards, B B; Thompson, J L; Wheeler, R A

    1981-01-01

    Hospital libraries are considered to be the basic unit of the medical information system. A major statewide effort was begun in 1978 to introduce and support legislation in the New York State Legislature which would encourage hospitals to establish and maintain libraries that meet minimum services standards. Included in this legislation is the concept that the Commissioner of Education in consultation with the Commissioner of Health shall have the power to establish standards for hospital libraries. The Ad Hoc Committee for the Promotion of Hospital Library Services, Western New York Library Resources Council, proposes The Standards for Professional Health Sciences Library Services in Hospitals of New York State to clarify and to strengthen existing hospital library standards. These standards differ specifically from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals standards in that they place equal and specific emphasis on eleven points: administration, qualifications of library staff, continuing education of library staff, requirement for a library advisory committee, required library services, required library resources, library space requirements, library budget, library network and consortium membership, documentation of library policy, and continued evaluation of the needs of the hospital for library service. Detailed interpretations are provided. An appendix describes the qualifications of a hospital library consultant. PMID:7248591

  12. Healthcare before Welfare States: Hospitals in Early Twentieth Century England and France.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Barry M

    2016-01-01

    Following the. Second World War, many west European nations developed welfare states to enhance the health and security of their populations, but the systems that were created differed significantly in form and function. This article will provide a comparative overview of the development of hospital services in urban England and France in the first forty years of the 20th century using evidence from two case study cities to enhance our understanding of how these welfare systems developed. It will consider the structure of the two hospital systems; governance and accountability; institutional finance; patients; and the role of the central and local state to argue that the maintenance of two separate providers and the exclusion of hospitals from state health insurance in England prompted a different set of responses to the delivery of hospital care compared to what was found in the unified and increasingly state-funded French system. PMID:27344908

  13. Factors associated with variations in hospital expenditures for acute heart failure in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ziaeian, Boback; Sharma, Puza P.; Yu, Tzy-Chyi; Johnson, Katherine Waltman; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Relatively little contemporary data are available that describe differences in acute heart failure (AHF) hospitalization expenditures as a function of patient and hospital characteristics, especially from a population-based investigation. This study aimed to evaluate factors associated with variations in hospital expenditures for AHF in the United States. Methods A cross-sectional analysis using discharge data from the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, was conducted. Discharges with primary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, diagnosis codes for AHF in adults were included. Costs were estimated by converting Nationwide Inpatient Sample charge data using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Cost-to-Charge Ratio File. Discharges with highest (≥80th percentile) versus lowest (≤20th percentile) costs were compared for patient characteristics, hospital characteristics, utilization of procedures, and outcomes. Results Of the estimated 1 million AHF hospital discharges, the mean cost estimates were $10,775 per episode. Younger age, higher percentage of obesity, atrial fibrillation, pulmonary disease, fluid/electrolyte disturbances, renal insufficiency, and greater number of cardiac/noncardiac procedures were observed in stays with highest versus lowest costs. Highest-cost discharges were more likely to be observed in urban and teaching hospitals. Highest-cost AHF discharges also had 5 times longer length of stay, were 9 times more costly, and had higher in-hospital mortality (5.6% vs 3.5%) compared with discharges with lowest costs (all P < .001). Conclusions Acute heart failure hospitalizations are costly. Expenditures vary markedly among AHF hospitalizations in the United States, with substantial differences in patient and hospital characteristics, procedures, and in-hospital outcomes among discharges with highest compared with lowest costs. PMID:25641538

  14. Predictors of patient satisfaction with inpatient hospital pain management across the United States: A national study.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Daniel C; Shen, Megan Johnson; Holcombe, Randall F

    2016-07-01

    Satisfactory pain management of hospitalized patients remains a national unmet need for the United States. Although prior research indicates that inpatient pain management may be improving nationally, not all populations of patients rate pain management as equally satisfactory. County-level predictors, such as demographics and population density, and hospital-level predictors (eg, hospital-bed number), are understudied determinants of pain management patient satisfaction. We created a multivariate regression model of pain management patient satisfaction scores as indicated by Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey results based on county and hospital level predictors. Number of hospital beds (β = -0.16), percent foreign-born (β = -0.16), and population density (β = -0.08) most strongly predicted unfavorable ratings, whereas African American (β = 0.23), white (β= 0.23), and younger population (β = 0.08) most strongly predicted favorable ratings. Greater attention should be placed on pain management in larger hospitals that serve foreign-born patients in population-dense areas. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:498-501. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26970075

  15. The Impact of Repeat Hospitalizations on Hospitalization Rates for Selected Conditions Among Adults With and Without Diabetes, 12 US States, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Geiss, Linda S.; Thompson, Theodore J.; Gregg, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hospitalization data typically cannot be used to estimate the number of individuals hospitalized annually because individuals are not tracked over time and may be hospitalized multiple times annually. We examined the impact of repeat hospitalizations on hospitalization rates for various conditions and on comparison of rates by diabetes status. Methods We analyzed hospitalization data for which repeat hospitalizations could be distinguished among adults aged 18 or older from 12 states using the 2011 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s State Inpatient Databases. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System was used to estimate the number of adults with and without diagnosed diabetes in each state (denominator). We calculated percentage increases due to repeat hospitalizations in rates and compared the ratio of diabetes with non-diabetes rates while excluding and including repeat hospitalizations. Results Regardless of diabetes status, hospitalization rates were considerably higher when repeat hospitalizations within a calendar year were included. The magnitude of the differences varied by condition. Among adults with diabetes, rates ranged from 13.0% higher for stroke to 41.6% higher for heart failure; for adults without diabetes, these rates ranged from 9.5% higher for stroke to 25.2% higher for heart failure. Ratios of diabetes versus non-diabetes rates were similar with and without repeat hospitalizations. Conclusion Hospitalization rates that include repeat hospitalizations overestimate rates in individuals, and this overestimation is especially pronounced for some causes. However, the inclusion of repeat hospitalizations for common diabetes-related causes had little impact on rates by diabetes status. PMID:26583572

  16. Temporal Trends in Hospitalization for Acute Decompensated Heart Failure in the United States, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sunil K; Wruck, Lisa; Quibrera, Miguel; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Loehr, Laura R; Chang, Patricia P; Rosamond, Wayne D; Wright, Jacqueline; Heiss, Gerardo; Coresh, Josef

    2016-03-01

    Estimates of the numbers and rates of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) hospitalization are central to understanding health-care utilization and efforts to improve patient care. We comprehensively estimated the frequency, rate, and trends of ADHF hospitalization in the United States. Based on Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study surveillance adjudicating 12,450 eligible hospitalizations during 2005-2010, we developed prediction models for ADHF separately for 3 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code 428 discharge diagnosis groups: 428 primary, 428 nonprimary, or 428 absent. We applied the models to data from the National Inpatient Sample (11.5 million hospitalizations of persons aged ≥55 years with eligible ICD-9-CM codes), an all-payer, 20% probability sample of US community hospitals. The average estimated number of ADHF hospitalizations per year was 1.76 million (428 primary, 0.80 million; 428 nonprimary, 0.83 million; 428 absent, 0.13 million). During 1998-2004, the rate of ADHF hospitalization increased by 2.0%/year (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8, 2.5) versus a 1.4%/year (95% CI: 0.8, 2.1) increase in code 428 primary hospitalizations (P < 0.001). In contrast, during 2005-2011, numbers of ADHF hospitalizations were stable (-0.5%/year; 95% CI: -1.4, 0.3), while the numbers of 428-primary hospitalizations decreased by -1.5%/year (95% CI: -2.2, -0.8) (P for contrast = 0.03). In conclusion, the estimated number of hospitalizations with ADHF is approximately 2 times higher than the number of hospitalizations with ICD-9-CM code 428 in the primary position. The trend increased more steeply prior to 2005 and was relatively flat after 2005. PMID:26895710

  17. A model approach to sharing electronic medical records between and within the state hospitals in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Güler, I; Müldür, S

    2001-11-01

    It has always been a research interest to solve hospital management problems with systematic approach by using modern management tools. Almost all the Hospital Information System (HIS) software packages in Turkey keep track of local transactions in administrative activities and material flow. In state hospitals in Turkey, very little medical information is processed and most of the records are still kept manually and archived on papers. In this paper, a cost-effective, flexible and easy-to-use Hospital Information System model is proposed in order to give better diagnostic and treatment services. It is also demonstrated that this model makes it possible to exchange information between and within the hospitals over Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) network. User needs are taken into consideration during model development and the benefits of model implementation to the hospital administration are stated. According to the model proposed in this paper, only a single health care record number (HCRN) is required for a patient to access all her/his medical records stored in different locations, from any state hospital in Turkey. PMID:11604155

  18. Structural, mineralogical and geochemical constraints on the atypical komatiite-hosted Turret deposit in the Agnew-Mt. White district, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voute, F.; Thébaud, N.

    2015-08-01

    In the Norseman-Wiluna belt, Yilgarn Craton, the Agnew-Mt. White district is the host of many gold deposits. Located in the hinge of the regional Lawlers anticline, the Turret gold deposit is structurally controlled by the Table Hill shear zone that transects the Agnew Ultramafic unit. Geochemistry, coupled with petrographic data, allowed the delineation of the paragenetic sequence associated with gold mineralisation and include (1) a pervasive talc-carbonate alteration assemblage, (2) a pre-mineralisation stage associated with pervasive arsenopyrite + chalcopyrite + pyrrhotite + pyrite alteration, followed by (3) a late deformation event along a dilatational segment of the main Table Hill shear zone, leading to the formation of a breccia hosting a Cu-Bi-Mo-Au (± Ag ± Zn ± Te ± W) metal assemblage. The presence of Au-Ag-Cu alloys, native bismuth, chalcopyrite and other Bi-Te-S phases in the mineralisation stage suggest that gold may have been scavenged from the hydrothermal fluids by composite Bi-Te-Cu-Au-Ag-S liquids or melts. Using this mineral paragenetic sequence, together with mineralogical re-equilibration textures observed, we show that the gold deposition at Turret occurred over a temperature range approximately between c. 350 and 270 °C. This temperature range, together with the structural control and typical mesothermal alteration pattern including carbonate-chlorite alteration, shows that the Turret deposit shares common characteristics with the orogenic gold deposit class. However, the metal association of Cu, Au, Bi, and Mo, the quartz-poor, and high copper-sulphide content (up to 15 %) are characteristics that depart from the typical orogenic gold deposit mineralogy. Through comparison with similar deposits in the Yilgarn Craton and worldwide, we propose that the Turret deposit represents an example of a porphyry-derived Au-Cu-Bi-Mo deposit.

  19. Hospitalization flow in the public and private systems in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Moreira, Marizélia Leão

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the migration flows of demand for public and private hospital care among the health regions of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. METHODS Study based on a database of hospitalizations in the public and private systems of the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. We analyzed data from 17 health regions of the state, considering people hospitalized in their own health region and those who migrated outwards (emigration) or came from other regions (immigration). The index of migration effectiveness of patients from both systems was estimated. The coverage (hospitalization coefficient) was analyzed in relation to the number of inpatient beds per population and the indexes of migration effectiveness. RESULTS The index of migration effectiveness applied to the hospital care demand flow allowed characterizing health regions with flow balance, with high emigration of public and private patients, and with high attraction of public and private patients. CONCLUSIONS There are differences in hospital care access and opportunities among health regions in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. PMID:26465661

  20. Trends in pediatric pulmonary hypertension–related hospitalizations in the United States from 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Matthew A.; Morales, David L. S.; Gerald, Ken; Hanna, Brian D.; Mallory, George B.; Rossano, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There are few data on the epidemiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH)–related hospitalizations in children in the United States. Our aim was to determine hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, and hospital charges pertaining to PH-related hospitalizations and also the effects of codiagnoses and comorbidities. A retrospective review of the Kids’ Inpatient Database during the years 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009 was analyzed for patients ≤20 years of age with a diagnosis of PH by ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) codes, along with associated diagnoses and comorbidities. Descriptive statistics, including Rao-Scott χ2, ANOVA, and logistic regression models, were utilized on weighted values with survey analysis procedures. The number of PH-related hospital admissions is rising, from an estimated 7,331 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5,556–9,106) in 2000 to 10,792 (95% CI: 8,568–13,016) in 2009. While infant age and congenital heart disease were most commonly associated with PH-related hospitalizations, they were not associated with mortality. Overall mortality for PH-related hospitalizations was greater than that for hospitalizations not associated with PH, 5.7% versus 0.4% (odds ratio: 16.22 [95% CI: 14.78%–17.8%], P < 0.001), but mortality is decreasing over time. Sepsis, respiratory failure, acute renal failure, hepatic insufficiency, arrhythmias, and the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are associated with mortality. The number of PH-related hospitalizations is increasing in the United States. The demographics of PH in this study are evolving. Despite the increasing prevalence, mortality is improving. PMID:26064460

  1. Hospital charges to injured drinking drivers in Washington State: 1989-1993.

    PubMed

    Mueller, B A; Kenaston, T; Grossman, D; Salzberg, P

    1998-09-01

    The Washington State Patrol Crash Database and computerized hospitalization records for 1989-1993 were used to determine total hospital charges billed for motor vehicle collision injuries to drivers whose crash reports contained any indication of alcohol use. In this population-based study, total hospital charges were summed, and mean charges and lengths of stay were computed within alcohol use and insurance coverage status categories in an attempt to evaluate the hospital charges billed to public funding and private insurance. Of the total hospital charges for drivers with injuries from motor vehicle collisions for which a police-reported indicator of alcohol use status was available, 43% (U.S.$64.8 million) were for drivers who reportedly had been drinking. At the time of discharge, Medicaid was identified as the payor for 47% of these hospitalizations. The mean hospital charge billed per collision was greater for drinking (U.S.$18,258) than nondrinking drivers (U.S.$14,181). Drinking drivers also had longer hospital stays, even after adjustment for patient age, gender and injury severity. During this time in Washington state, the average annual amount billed at discharge for initial inpatient care of injuries to drivers who reportedly had been drinking at the time of the motor vehicle collision was U.S.$13 million. This includes only the amount assessed by the hospital at the time of discharge for treatment of the initial injury and does not include other related medical charges for rehabilitation or outpatient care, or for doctors' or laboratory fees. As increasing pressures of managed and capitated care lead to a shift of financial risk from the federal government and insurers to states and providers, the financial burden of specific, potentially preventable conditions such as this will receive greater attention. PMID:9678213

  2. Hospital integration and vertical consolidation: an analysis of acquisitions in New York State.

    PubMed

    Huckman, Robert S

    2006-01-01

    While prior studies tend to view hospital integration through the lens of horizontal consolidation, I provide an analysis of its vertical aspects. I examine the effect of hospital acquisitions in New York State on the distribution of market share for major cardiac procedures across providers in target markets. I find evidence of benefits to acquirers via business stealing, with the resulting redistribution of volume across providers having small effects, if any, on total welfare with respect to cardiac care. The results of this analysis -- along with similar assessments for other services -- can be incorporated into future studies of hospital consolidation. PMID:16325946

  3. Hospital care and capacity in the tri-state region of Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio: analysis and insights.

    PubMed

    Burns, David J; Chinta, Ravi; Kashyap, Vishal; Manolis, Chris; Sen, Amit

    2008-01-01

    Hospitals are a significant part of the burgeoning healthcare sector in the United States (U.S.) economy. Despite the availability of what some describe as the world's best healthcare, the U.S. suffers from wide discrepancies in healthcare provision across hospitals and regions of the country. Specifically, capacity, utilization, quality, and even financial performance of hospitals vary widely. Based on secondary data from 533 hospitals in the adjoining states of Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio, this study develops several comparative metrics that enable benchmarking, which, in turn, leads to several inferences and implications for hospital administrators. The paper concludes with implications for hospital administrators and suggestions for future research. PMID:19042547

  4. Economic Burden of Hospitalizations for Heat-Related Illnesses in the United States, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Schmeltz, Michael T; Petkova, Elisaveta P; Gamble, Janet L

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how heat waves affect morbidity and mortality, as well as the associated economic costs, is essential for characterizing the human health impacts of extreme heat under a changing climate. Only a handful of studies have examined healthcare costs associated with exposures to high temperatures. This research explores costs associated with hospitalizations for heat-related illness (HRI) in the United States using the 2001 to 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Descriptive statistics of patient data for HRI hospitalizations were examined and costs of hospitalizations were reported using the all-payer inpatient cost-to-charge ratio. Costs were examined using a log-gamma model with patient and hospital characteristics included as fixed effects. Adjusted mean costs were then compared across racial groups. The mean costs of HRI hospitalizations were higher among racial/ethnic minorities compared to Whites, who accounted for almost 65% of all HRI hospitalizations. Observed differences in costs based on income, insurance, and gender were also significant. These results suggest that these populations are suffering disproportionately from health inequity, thus, they could shoulder greater disease and financial burdens due to climate change. These findings may have important implications in understanding the economic impact public health planning and interventions will have on preventing hospitalizations related to extreme heat. PMID:27618079

  5. Hospitalization frequency and charges for neurocysticercosis, United States, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Seth E; Flecker, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis, brain infection with Taenia solium larval cysts, causes substantial neurologic illness around the world. To assess the effect of neurocysticercosis in the United States, we reviewed hospitalization discharge data in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2003-2012 and found an estimated 18,584 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis and associated hospital charges totaling >US $908 million. The risk for hospitalization was highest among Hispanics (2.5/100,000 population), a rate 35 times higher than that for the non-Hispanic white population. Nearly three-quarters of all hospitalized patients with neurocysticercosis were Hispanic. Male sex and age 20-44 years also incurred increased risk. In addition, hospitalizations and associated charges related to cysticercosis far exceeded those for malaria and were greater than for those for all other neglected tropical diseases combined. Neurocysticercosis is an increasing public health concern in the United States, especially among Hispanics, and costs the US health care system a substantial amount of money. PMID:25988221

  6. Hospitalization Frequency and Charges for Neurocysticercosis, United States, 2003–2012

    PubMed Central

    Flecker, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis, brain infection with Taenia solium larval cysts, causes substantial neurologic illness around the world. To assess the effect of neurocysticercosis in the United States, we reviewed hospitalization discharge data in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2003–2012 and found an estimated 18,584 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis and associated hospital charges totaling >US $908 million. The risk for hospitalization was highest among Hispanics (2.5/100,000 population), a rate 35 times higher than that for the non-Hispanic white population. Nearly three-quarters of all hospitalized patients with neurocysticercosis were Hispanic. Male sex and age 20–44 years also incurred increased risk. In addition, hospitalizations and associated charges related to cysticercosis far exceeded those for malaria and were greater than for those for all other neglected tropical diseases combined. Neurocysticercosis is an increasing public health concern in the United States, especially among Hispanics, and costs the US health care system a substantial amount of money. PMID:25988221

  7. [Biosecurity infrastructure for biological agents in hospitals from the south of Bahia State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Penteado, Maridalva de Souza; Oliveira, Tânia Cristina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the biosecurity infrastructure in hospitals located in the South Region of Bahia State, Brazil. That was a descriptive-exploratory study carried out in commissions hospital infections control and institutional prevention commission of accidents about the existence of written norms, the accomplishment of training, the existence of concernments institutional registers to the biosecurity, and the existence of practical attention to the health of the professionals and isolated patients. Hospitals are compared according to the presence of each one of the itens under analysis as its classification, legal-financial issues, etc. It was conclude that the general situation is precarious regarding the presence of the items investigated, that impels to consider the necessity that must take into account an analysis of hospital quality, and also the care of the life of its workers. PMID:21103760

  8. Heat, Heat Waves, and Hospital Admissions among the Elderly in the United States, 1992–2006

    PubMed Central

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel D.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; O’Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Heat-wave frequency, intensity, and duration are increasing with global climate change. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well documented, but less is known regarding associations with hospital admissions. Objectives: Our goal was to determine associations between moderate and extreme heat, heat waves, and hospital admissions for nonaccidental causes among Medicare beneficiaries ≥ 65 years of age in 114 cities across five U.S. climate zones. Methods: We used Medicare inpatient billing records and city-specific data on temperature, humidity, and ozone from 1992 through 2006 in a time-stratified case-crossover design to estimate the association between hospitalization and moderate [90th percentile of apparent temperature (AT)] and extreme (99th percentile of AT) heat and heat waves (AT above the 95th percentile over 2–8 days). In sensitivity analyses, we additionally considered confounding by ozone and holidays, different temperature metrics, and alternate models of the exposure–response relationship. Results: Associations between moderate heat and hospital admissions were minimal, but extreme heat was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 4%) increase in all-cause hospital admissions over the subsequent 8 days. In cause-specific analyses, extreme heat was associated with increased hospitalizations for renal (15%; 95% CI: 9%, 21%) and respiratory (4%; 95% CI: 2%, 7%) diseases, but not for cardiovascular diseases. An added heat-wave effect was observed for renal and respiratory admissions. Conclusion: Extreme heat is associated with increased hospital admissions, particularly for renal causes, among the elderly in the United States. Citation: Gronlund CJ, Zanobetti A, Schwartz JD, Wellenius GA, O’Neill MS. 2014. Heat, heat waves, and hospital admissions among the elderly in the United States, 1992–2006. Environ Health Perspect 122:1187–1192; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206132 PMID:24905551

  9. Implementing Legislation to Improve Hospital Support of Breastfeeding, New York State, 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Hawke, Bethany A.; Ruberto, Rachael A.; Gregg, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Increasing breastfeeding is a public health priority supported by strong evidence. In 2009, New York passed Public Health Law § 2505–a, requiring that hospitals support the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) recommended “Ten Steps for Successful Breastfeeding” (Ten Steps). This legislation strengthened and codified existing New York State’s hospital perinatal regulations. The purpose of this study was to assess hospital policy compliance with New York laws and regulations related to breastfeeding. Methods In 2009, 2011, and 2013, we collected written breastfeeding policies from 129 New York hospitals that provided maternity services. A policy review tool was developed to quantify compliance with the 28 components of breastfeeding support specified in New York Codes, Rules, and Regulations and the new legislation. In 2010 and 2012, hospitals received individual feedback from the New York State Department of Health, which informed hospitals in 2012 that formal regulatory enforcement, including potential fines, would be implemented for noncompliance. Results The number of components included in hospital policies increased from a mean of 10.4 in 2009, to 16.8 in 2011, and to 27.1 in 2013) (P < .001); a greater increase occurred from 2011 through 2013 than from 2009 through 2011 (P < .001). The percentage of hospitals with fully compliant policies increased from 0% in 2009, to 5% in 2011, and to 75% in 2013 (P < .001), and the percentage that included all WHO’s 10 steps increased from 0% to 9% to 87%, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion Although legislation or regulations requiring certain practices are important, monitoring with enforcement accelerates, and may be necessary for, full implementation. Future research is needed to evaluate the impact of improved hospital breastfeeding policies on breastfeeding outcomes in New York. PMID:26226069

  10. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria–associated Lung Disease in Hospitalized Persons, United States, 1998–2005

    PubMed Central

    Billinger, Megan E.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Viboud, Cecile; Montes de Oca, Ruben; Steiner, Claudia; Holland, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence and trends of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM)–associated hospitalizations in the United States were estimated using national hospital discharge data. Records were extracted for all persons with a pulmonary NTM International Classification of Diseases code (031.0) hospitalized in the 11 states with continuous data available from 1998 through 2005. Prevalence was calculated using US census data. Pulmonary NTM hospitalizations (031.0) increased significantly with age among both sexes: relative prevalence for persons 70–79 years of age compared with those 40–49 years of age was 15/100,000 for women (9.4 vs. 0.6) and 9/100,000 for men (7.6 vs. 0.83). Annual prevalence increased significantly among men and women in Florida (3.2%/year and 6.5%/year, respectively) and among women in New York (4.6%/year) with no significant changes in California. The prevalence of pulmonary NTM–associated hospitalizations is increasing in selected geographic areas of the United States. PMID:19861046

  11. Reconstructing the pre-Quaternary landscape in Agnew-Lawlers area, Western Australia with emphasis on the Permo-Carboniferous glaciation and post-glacial weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Walid; Anand, Ravi R.

    2016-04-01

    The pre-Quaternary stratigraphic section in Agnew-Lawlers area consists of Permo-Carboniferous glacial sediments, unconformably overlain by Tertiary clastics of palaeochannel sequence and Quaternary alluvial and colluvial sediments. The unique Permo-Carboniferous glacial sedimentary succession in the Yilgarn Craton has not been studied in detail in terms of vertical chemostratigraphic variations, basin and landscape evolution, diagenesis and post-Permian weathering overprints. In Agnew-Lawlers district, continental facies of glacial diamictites, glaciofluvial sandstones and glaciolacustrine rhythmites vary in thickness from 28 m to 181 m and is preserved beneath Cenozoic sediments as relict landforms in highly irregular, asymmetrical and poorly drained basins. The Permo-Carboniferous sediments were mechanically weathered and eroded by glaciers from the surrounding Archaean basement palaeohighs under a cold arid climate. Textural relationships of diamictites indicate that they were derived from proximal and distal source rocks. The denuded palaeotopography of the basement palaeohighs (source rocks) and Permo-Carboniferous sediments were subjected simultaneously to an intensive, post-Permian chemical weathering. The exposed basement rocks were deeply weathered into residual saprolite, whereas the Permo-Carboniferous sediments were differentiated into three chemostratigraphic units. The diamictite and rhythmite of the lower unit are unweathered and preserves the signature of the glacial/interglacial weathering. Mineralogical and geochemical changes dominated in this unit are related mainly to diagenesis at shallow depth (eogenesis) with no significant compaction. The formation of a paragenetic diagenetic sequence of chlorite, ferroan dolomite and pyrite indicates diagenesis has occurred under reducing and alkaline conditions below the permafrost and modern water table. Mineralogical and geochemical changes dominated in the middle unit are linked mainly to eogenetic

  12. Business-IT Alignment: A Current-State Evaluation of Strategic Alignment within the Hospital Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Kevin W.

    2010-01-01

    More than thirty years of research has shown that the practical value of business-IT alignment is significant and that its importance derives from strategic impact on business outcomes. The purpose of this exploratory study is to identify the current-state of business-IT alignment maturity within the hospital organization. Data for this study was…

  13. Assaultive Behavior in State Psychiatric Hospitals: Differences Between Forensic and Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhorst, Donald M.; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-01-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two…

  14. State Hospital-University Collaborations: A 25-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbott, John A.; Faulkner, Larry R.; Buckley, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A formative survey of psychiatry departments 25 years ago showed strong and valued relationships between these departments and state hospitals. The authors sought to evaluate the extent of present-day collaborative relationships. Methods: A repeat of a similar survey was sent in 2005 to 119 chairs of departments of psychiatry. Results:…

  15. The Establishment and Administration of Operant Conditioning Programs in a State Hospital for the Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Thomas S., Ed.

    Seven articles treat the establishment of operant conditioning programs for the mentally retarded at Pacific State Hospital in California. Emphasis is on the administrative rather than the demonstration of research aspects of operant conditioning programs. Following an introduction and overview, the medical director's point of view on operant…

  16. The Connection between Macro and Micro Levels: States' Spending for Hospitals and Their Suicide Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Shirley L.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzed states' spending for hospitals and suicide rates in 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1984. Found spending was not directly related to suicide rates until 1984 when it accounted for 5 percent increase in variance. Considered effects of divorce rates, and change, density, economic level, and racial composition of population. Discusses implications of…

  17. Underreporting of Driver Alcohol Involvement in United States Police and Hospital Records: Capture-Recapture Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ted R.; Gibson, Rekaya; Zaloshnja, Eduard; Blincoe, Lawrence J.; Kindelberger, John; Strashny, Alexander; Thomas, Andrea; Ho, Shiu; Bauer, Michael; Sperry, Sarah; Peng, Justin; Singleton, Mike; Smith, Tracy J.; Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes what portion of US nonfatal crashes are alcohol-involved and how well police and hospitals detect involvement. A capture recapture model estimated alcohol involvement from levels detected by police and hospitals and the extent of detection overlap. We analyzed 550,933 Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System driver records from 2006–2008 police crash report censuses probabilistically linked to hospital inpatient and emergency department (ED) discharge censuses for CT, KY (admissions only), MD, NE, NY, SC, and UT. We computed national estimates from NHTSA’s General Estimates System. Nationally an estimated 7.5% of drivers in nonfatal crashes and 12.9% of nonfatal crashes were alcohol-involved. (Crashes often involve multiple drivers but rarely are two alcohol-involved.) Police correctly identified an estimated 32% of alcohol-involved drivers in non-fatal crashes including 48% in injury crashes. Excluding KY, police in the six states reported 47% of alcohol involvement for cases treated in EDs and released and 39% for admitted cases. In contrast, hospitals reported 28% of involvement for ED cases and 51% for admitted cases. Underreporting varied widely between states. Police reported alcohol involvement for 44% of those who hospitals reported were alcohol-involved, while hospitals reported alcohol involvement for 33% of those who police reported were alcohol-involved. Police alcohol reporting completeness rose with police-reported driver injury severity. At least one system reported 62% of alcohol involvement. Police and hospitals need to communicate better about alcohol involvement. Despite the proven effectiveness of brief alcohol intervention, EDs rarely detect, much less intervene with crash-involved drinking drivers. Both police and EDs particularly need to assess alcohol involvement in minor injury better. PMID:23169120

  18. Underreporting of driver alcohol involvement in United States police and hospital records: capture-recapture estimates.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ted R; Gibson, Rekaya; Zaloshnja, Eduard; Blincoe, Lawrence J; Kindelberger, John; Strashny, Alexander; Thomas, Andrea; Ho, Shiu; Bauer, Michael; Sperry, Sarah; Peng, Justin; Singleton, Mike; Smith, Tracy J; Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes what portion of US nonfatal crashes are alcohol-involved and how well police and hospitals detect involvement. A capture recapture model estimated alcohol involvement from levels detected by police and hospitals and the extent of detection overlap. We analyzed 550,933 Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System driver records from 2006-2008 police crash report censuses probabilistically linked to hospital inpatient and emergency department (ED) discharge censuses for CT, KY (admissions only), MD, NE, NY, SC, and UT. We computed national estimates from NHTSA's General Estimates System.Nationally an estimated 7.5% of drivers in nonfatal crashes and 12.9% of nonfatal crashes were alcohol-involved. (Crashes often involve multiple drivers but rarely are two alcohol-involved.) Police correctly identified an estimated 32% of alcohol-involved drivers in non-fatal crashes including 48% in injury crashes. Excluding KY, police in the six states reported 47% of alcohol involvement for cases treated in EDs and released and 39% for admitted cases. In contrast, hospitals reported 28% of involvement for ED cases and 51% for admitted cases. Underreporting varied widely between states. Police reported alcohol involvement for 44% of those who hospitals reported were alcohol-involved, while hospitals reported alcohol involvement for 33% of those who police reported were alcohol-involved. Police alcohol reporting completeness rose with police-reported driver injury severity. At least one system reported 62% of alcohol involvement. Police and hospitals need to communicate better about alcohol involvement. Despite the proven effectiveness of brief alcohol intervention, EDs rarely detect, much less intervene with crash-involved drinking drivers. Both police and EDs particularly need to assess alcohol involvement in minor injury better. PMID:23169120

  19. Record-keeping in a state hospital: a modification of the Weed system.

    PubMed

    Fahrner, B G; Ellis, N C; Stark, S L; Spencer, J A

    1977-12-01

    The Weed problem-oriented medical record has been modified for use in a state psychiatric hospital that has a large proportion of long-term patients and uses an interdisciplinary team approach to treatment. Three new record forms were developed during a pilot study at the hospital: the processed-problem list, the problem card, and the unprocessed-problem list. The modified problem-oriented record system is being used in 28 wards providing both short- and long-term psychiatric care. PMID:304437

  20. In Four ACA Expansion States, The Percentage Of Uninsured Hospitalizations For People With HIV Declined, 2012-14.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Fred J

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the influence of the Affordable Care Act's optional state Medicaid expansion on insurance coverage and health outcomes for hospitalized patients with HIV. I used data from the State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project for all hospitalizations of patients with HIV from 2012 through the first six months of 2014 in four states that expanded their Medicaid programs and two states that did not. I found that the percentage of hospitalizations of uninsured people with HIV in the four expansion states fell from 13.7 percent to 5.5 percent in the study period, while the percentage in the two nonexpanding states increased from 14.5 percent to 15.7 percent. I also found that hospitalized patients with HIV who did not have insurance were 40 percent more likely to die during their hospital stays than comparable patients with insurance. PMID:26643626

  1. The State and Trends of Barcode, RFID, Biometric and Pharmacy Automation Technologies in US Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Uy, Raymonde Charles Y; Kury, Fabricio P; Fontelo, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The standard of safe medication practice requires strict observance of the five rights of medication administration: the right patient, drug, time, dose, and route. Despite adherence to these guidelines, medication errors remain a public health concern that has generated health policies and hospital processes that leverage automation and computerization to reduce these errors. Bar code, RFID, biometrics and pharmacy automation technologies have been demonstrated in literature to decrease the incidence of medication errors by minimizing human factors involved in the process. Despite evidence suggesting the effectivity of these technologies, adoption rates and trends vary across hospital systems. The objective of study is to examine the state and adoption trends of automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) methods and pharmacy automation technologies in U.S. hospitals. A retrospective descriptive analysis of survey data from the HIMSS Analytics® Database was done, demonstrating an optimistic growth in the adoption of these patient safety solutions. PMID:26958264

  2. The State and Trends of Barcode, RFID, Biometric and Pharmacy Automation Technologies in US Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Raymonde Charles Y.; Kury, Fabricio P.; Fontelo, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The standard of safe medication practice requires strict observance of the five rights of medication administration: the right patient, drug, time, dose, and route. Despite adherence to these guidelines, medication errors remain a public health concern that has generated health policies and hospital processes that leverage automation and computerization to reduce these errors. Bar code, RFID, biometrics and pharmacy automation technologies have been demonstrated in literature to decrease the incidence of medication errors by minimizing human factors involved in the process. Despite evidence suggesting the effectivity of these technologies, adoption rates and trends vary across hospital systems. The objective of study is to examine the state and adoption trends of automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) methods and pharmacy automation technologies in U.S. hospitals. A retrospective descriptive analysis of survey data from the HIMSS Analytics® Database was done, demonstrating an optimistic growth in the adoption of these patient safety solutions. PMID:26958264

  3. Hospital Use by Children in the United States and Canada. Comparative International Vital and Health Statistics Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Lola Jean; McCarthy, Eileen

    1984-01-01

    This document presents a statistical study of hospital use by children in the United States and Canada designed to determine why the hospital discharge rate of children in the United States is lower than many other Western industrialized nations, although the discharge rate for the general U.S. population is higher. Several reasons for the lower…

  4. Strained local and state government finances among current realities that threaten public hospitals' profitability.

    PubMed

    Kane, Nancy M; Singer, Sara J; Clark, Jonathan R; Eeckloo, Kristof; Valentine, Melissa

    2012-08-01

    This study demonstrates that some safety-net hospitals--those that provide a large share of the care to low-income, uninsured, and Medicaid populations--survived and even thrived before the recent recession. We analyzed the financial performance and governance of 150 hospitals during 2003-07. We found, counterintuitively, that those directly governed by elected officials and in highly competitive markets were more profitable than other safety-net hospitals. They were financially healthy primarily because they obtained subsidies from state and local governments, such as property tax transfers or supplemental Medicaid payments, including disproportionate share payments. However, safety-net hospitals now face a new market reality. The economic downturn, slow recovery, and politics of deficit reduction have eroded the ability of local governments to support the safety net. Many safety-net hospitals have not focused on effective management, cost control, quality improvement, or services that attract insured patients. As a result, and coupled with new uncertainties regarding Medicaid expansion stemming from the recent Supreme Court decision on the Affordable Care Act, many are likely to face increasing financial and competitive pressures that may threaten their survival. PMID:22869645

  5. Cardiac Arrest during Hospitalization for Delivery in the United States, 1998–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mhyre, Jill M.; Tsen, Lawrence C.; Einav, Sharon; Kuklina, Elena V.; Leffert, Lisa R.; Bateman, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the frequency, distribution of potential etiologies, and survival rates of maternal cardiopulmonary arrest during the hospitalization for delivery in the United States. Methods By using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample during the years 1998 through 2011, the authors obtained weighted estimates of the number of U.S. hospitalizations for delivery complicated by maternal cardiac arrest. Clinical and demographic risk factors, potential etiologies, and outcomes were identified and compared in women with and without cardiac arrest. The authors tested for temporal trends in the occurrence and survival associated with maternal arrest. Results Cardiac arrest complicated 1 in 12,000 or 8.5 per 100,000 hospitalizations for delivery (99% CI, 7.7 to 9.3 per 100,000). The most common potential etiologies of arrest included hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, and sepsis. Among patients with cardiac arrest, 58.9% of patients (99% CI, 54.8 to 63.0%) survived to hospital discharge. Conclusions Approximately 1 in 12,000 hospitalizations for delivery is complicated by cardiac arrest, most frequently due to hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, or sepsis. Survival depends on the underlying etiology of arrest. PMID:24694844

  6. Risk factors of low birth weight at three hospitals in Khartoum State, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Omer A M; Ahmed, Haidar A; Ibrahim, Alaa M F; Mahmood, Enas A A; Abdu-Allah, Tasneem O A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the percentage of women who give birth to low birth weight (LBW) children and to study the association of the different risk factors with LBW in three of large hospitals in Khartoum State, Sudan. This was a cross sectional study of 381 women. Three groups: 151, 130 and 100 women, who gave birth to live children, were selected from Alsuadi Teaching Hospital, Khartoum Teaching Hospital and Alribat University Hospital, respectively. Data were collected through structured interviews and the birth weights were recorded as measured by midwives. Uni-Multi variate analysis of the data was performed using SPSS 19. Permissions were taken from hospital administration and the participants before the conduction of the research. 13% of live born children were of low birth weight. The main risk factors for low birth weight in the study were the lack of adequate education (OR= 1.9) gestational age (OR= 5.5), type of pregnancy (OR= 9.6), presence of hypertension (OR= 3.6), renal disease (OR= 2.1), bleeding during pregnancy (OR= 6.1) and presence of moderate or severe anemia (OR= 3.19). While Adequacy of antenatal care (ANC) visits, presence of diabetes mellitus during pregnancy, smoking and malaria in the first three trimesters, presence of previous children and spacing were all found to be statistically not significant risk factors. Many of the risk factors are modifiable and can be prevented by improvement of the health care during pregnancy. PMID:27493401

  7. Functional assessment of hospital laboratory packaging and shipping preparedness in New York State.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Paula A; Antenucci, Alan J; Brennan, Lynn E; Burhans, Robert L; Ostrowski, Stephanie E

    2008-01-01

    The 2006-2007 New York State (NYS) Hospital Laboratory Drill Series was implemented in order to test notification, referral and packaging and shipping (P&S) procedures at acute care hospital facilities (statewide, excluding New York City) that submit suspect bioterrorism (BT), chemical terrorism (CT), and/or pandemic influenza (Pan Flu) clinical specimens to the NYS Department of Health (DOH) Wadsworth Center for confirmatory testing. Results showed that 97% and 84% of hospital facilities had the ability to directly access the notification network and retrieve drill guidance, respectively. Most hospital laboratories (92%) demonstrated the ability to refer specimens to the Wadsworth Center laboratory. Evaluation of specimen submissions found that 68% of BT packages, 27% of Pan Flu packages, and 20% of CT packages arrived to the laboratory with no P&S deficiencies. It can be concluded that acute care hospital facilities in NYS are more prepared to refer and submit clinical specimens during a BT public health emergency than during a Pan Flu or CT emergency event. PMID:19174978

  8. Hospital response to the legalization of abortion in New York State: an analysis of program innovation.

    PubMed

    Miller, J

    1979-12-01

    The reorientation of hospital services in the state of New York to accommodate women's constitutional right to elective abortion was investigated. Market and resource constraints, the social orientations of the organization, and the values of physicians were examined in the effort to evaluate hospital response between 1971 and 1973. Analysis indicates that program innovation in obstetrical and gynecological services to include elective abortion was inhibited by economic factors that generally determined the feasibility of diverting finite resources to a new service and social orientations and values that determined the compatibility of elective abortions with the dominant values underlying hospital operations. The reform of New York abortion statutes and the subsequent ruling by the Supreme Court reiterating the right of women to terminate pregnancy failed to standardize the delivery of health care so that individual rights to service could be obtained everywhere in the state. The social changes ultimately realized through legislative and judicial action were essentially conditional upon the responsiveness of local health care providers. Legal action that failed to specifically address the administrative role of hospitals in social change qualified local access and could not be completely effective in legitimizing the redefinition of abortion in society. PMID:541488

  9. Tax-exempt hospitals and community benefits: a review of state reporting requirements.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Fred Joseph

    2009-02-01

    In June 2007 the Internal Revenue Service proposed a major overhaul of its reporting requirements for tax-exempt hospitals and released draft Form 990 (the IRS form filed by tax-exempt organizations each year). In December 2007 the IRS promulgated the final Form 990 after incorporating some of the recommendations made in the almost seven hundred public comments on the discussion draft. One recommendation adopted in the final Form 990 is the postponement until tax year 2009 (returns filed in 2010) of the requirement for hospitals to submit detailed information on the percentage of total expenses attributable to charity care, unreimbursed Medicaid costs, and community-health improvement programs (the discussion draft required this information for tax year 2007). Although the IRS will not require tax-exempt hospitals to provide detailed information about community benefits until the 2009 tax year, sixteen states have laws requiring tax-exempt hospitals to enumerate the benefits that they provide to the community. Information about the impact of these laws on the provision of community benefits (e.g., charity and uncompensated care) is examined in this study whose primary purpose is to highlight information policy makers may glean from states that have adopted community-benefit reporting laws. PMID:19234293

  10. Access, quality, and costs of care at physician owned hospitals in the United States: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Orav, E John; Jena, Anupam B; Dudzinski, David M; Le, Sidney T; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare physician owned hospitals (POHs) with non-POHs on metrics around patient populations, quality of care, costs, and payments. Design Observational study. Setting Acute care hospitals in 95 hospital referral regions in the United States, 2010. Participants 2186 US acute care hospitals (219 POHs and 1967 non-POHs). Main outcome measures Proportions of patients using Medicaid and those from ethnic and racial minority groups; hospital performance on patient experience metrics, care processes, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, and readmission rates; costs of care; care payments; and Medicare market share. Results The 219 POHs were more often small (<100 beds), for profit, and in urban areas. 120 of these POHs were general (non-specialty) hospitals. Compared with patients from non-POHs, those from POHs were younger (77.4 v 78.4 years, P<0.001), less likely to be admitted through an emergency department (23.2% v. 29.0%, P<0.001), equally likely to be black (5.1% v 5.5%, P=0.85) or to use Medicaid (14.9% v 15.4%, P=0.75), and had similar numbers of chronic diseases and predicted mortality scores. POHs and non-POHs performed similarly on patient experience scores, processes of care, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, 30 day readmission rates, costs, and payments for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia. Conclusion Although POHs may treat slightly healthier patients, they do not seem to systematically select more profitable or less disadvantaged patients or to provide lower value care. PMID:26333819

  11. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-Related Hospitalizations in the United States (2002-2011): Rates, Co-Occurring Illnesses, Suicidal Ideation/Self-Harm, and Hospital Charges.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Mark G; Banta, Jim E; Sonne, Janet L; Przekop, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related hospitalizations in the United States (2002-2011). Over this period, there were an estimated 1,477,944 hospitalizations (915,591 women) with either a primary (reason for hospitalization) or secondary PTSD diagnosis. Population-based hospitalization rates rose from 2002 to 2011; women in the age range of 20 to 44 years had the highest rates and the steepest rise. Most of the hospitalizations for men and women younger than 45 years had been assigned a primary diagnosis of mental illness (including PTSD). Mood and substance use disorders were among the most commonly co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses with PTSD. Suicidal ideation/suicide attempts declined with increasing age. The strongest predictor of this criterion was mood disorder, and its importance as a predictor increased as people aged. Total inflation-adjusted charges for all PTSD-related hospitalizations were $34.9 billion, with 36% being for hospitalizations where a mental illness (including PTSD) was the primary diagnosis. PMID:26588079

  12. Assessment of core and support functions of casebased surveillance of meningitis in hospitals in Khartoum State in 2015.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, I A A

    2016-04-01

    Case-based surveillance of meningitis was implemented in Khartoum State in February 2013 but its implementation has not been evaluated. This study assessed some core (case confirmation) and support (case reporting and investigation resources) functions of case-based surveillance of meningitis at hospital level in Khartoum State, Sudan, from January to March 2015. An interview questionnaire and checklist were used to collect data from 31 hospitals. A poster containing the case definition of meningitis was fixed to the wall in 18% of the hospitals. Bacteriological culture of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and antibiotic sensitivity testing of the cultured bacteria were available in one-third of the hospitals. Laboratory personnel trained in CSF examination were present in 29% of the hospitals, while trained reporting unit personnel were present in 52%. A telephone for reporting was present in 74% of the hospitals. The system for casebased surveillance of meningitis needs to be strengthened, particularly the functions related to case confirmation. PMID:27432411

  13. Rising United States Hospital Admissions for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Recent Trends and Economic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Keith S.; Patel, Dipen A.; Stephens, Jennifer M.; Khachatryan, Alexandra; Patel, Ayush; Johnson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of ambulatory patients seeking treatment for skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) are increasing. The objective of this study is to determine recent trends in hospital admissions and healthcare resource utilization and identify covariates associated with hospital costs and mortality for hospitalized adult patients with a primary SSSI diagnosis in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis (years 2005–2011) of data from the US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample. Recent trends, patient characteristics, and healthcare resource utilization for patients hospitalized with a primary SSSI diagnosis were evaluated. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted to assess patient and hospital characteristics. Results A total of 1.8% of hospital admissions for the years 2005 through 2011 were for adult patients with a SSSI primary diagnosis. SSSI-related hospital admissions significantly changed during the study period (P < .001 for trend) ranging from 1.6% (in 2005) to 2.0% (in 2011). Mean hospital length of stay (LOS) decreased from 5.4 days in the year 2005 to 5.0 days in the year 2011 (overall change, P < .001) with no change in hospital costs. Patients with postoperative wound infections had the longest hospital stays (adjusted mean, 5.81 days; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.80–5.83) and highest total costs (adjusted mean, $9388; 95% CI, $9366-$9410). Year of hospital admission was strongly associated with mortality; infection type, all patient refined diagnosis related group severity of illness level, and LOS were strongly associated with hospital costs. Conclusions Hospital admissions for adult patients in the United States with a SSSI primary diagnosis continue to increase. Decreasing hospital inpatient LOS and mortality rate may be due to improved early treatment. Future research should focus on identifying alternative treatment processes for patients with SSSI

  14. Influence of hospice use on hospital inpatient mortality: a state-level analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cyril F; Steinberg, Stephanie C

    2006-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that high hospice enrollment is associated with lower Medicare inpatient mortality. The results show that Medicare inpatient mortality in a state can be explained by hospice enrollment and a host of demographic and market environment variables. An increase in hospice population by 100 individuals is associated with a reduction of 28 inpatient deaths, ceteris paribus. The results suggest, among other things, that opportunities exist for greater expansion of hospice capacity in low-use states to reduce deaths in the expensive hospital setting and improve the quality of end-of-life care for terminally ill patients. PMID:16708687

  15. Hospital Website Rankings in the United States: Expanding Benchmarks and Standards for Effective Consumer Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Hefner, Jennifer L; Ford, Eric W; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Menachemi, Nir

    2014-01-01

    .19) and 6.49 (SD 0.96). Based on these scores, rank order calculations for the top 100 websites are presented. Additionally, a link to raw data, including AHA ID, is provided to enable researchers and practitioners the ability to further explore relationships to other dynamics in health care. Conclusions This census assessment of US hospitals and their health systems provides a clear indication of the state of the sector. While stakeholder engagement is core to most discussions of the role that hospitals must play in relation to communities, management of an online presence has not been recognized as a core competency fundamental to care delivery. Yet, social media management and network engagement are skills that exist at the confluence of marketing and technical prowess. This paper presents performance guidelines evaluated against best-demonstrated practice or independent standards to facilitate improvement of the sector’s use of websites and social media. PMID:24568892

  16. Trends in Prevalence of Diabetes Among Delivery Hospitalizations, United States, 1993–2009

    PubMed Central

    Bardenheier, Barbara; Elixhauser, Anne; Geiss, Linda S.; Gregg, Edward

    2015-01-01

    To describe recent trends in prevalence of pre-existing diabetes mellitus (PDM) (i.e., type 1 or type 2 diabetes) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among delivery hospitalizations in the United States. Data on delivery hospitalizations from 1993 through 2009 were obtained from the Health Care Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Diagnosis-Related Group codes were used to identify deliveries and diagnosis codes on presence of diabetes. Rates of hospitalizations with diabetes were calculated per 100 deliveries by type of diabetes, hospital geographic region, patient’s age, degree of urbanicity of patient’s residence, categorized median household income for patient’s ZIP Code, expected primary payer, and type of delivery. From 1993 to 2009, age-standardized prevalence of diabetes per 100 deliveries increased from 0.62 to 0.90 for PDM (trend p < 0.001) and from 3.09 to 5.57 for GDM (trend p < 0.001). In 2009, correlates of PDM at delivery included older age [40–44 vs. 15–24: odds ratio 6.45 (95 % CI 5.27–7.88)], Medicaid/Medicare versus private payment sources [1.77 (95 % CI 1.59–1.98)], patient’s ZIP Code with a median household income in bottom quartile versus other quartiles [1.54 (95 % CI 1.41, 1.69)], and C-section versus vaginal delivery [3.36 (95 % CI 3.10–3.64)]. Correlates of GDM at delivery were similar. Among U.S. delivery hospitalizations, the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. In 2009, the prevalence of diabetes was higher among women in older age groups, living in ZIP codes with lower household incomes, or with public insurance. PMID:24996952

  17. Trends in prevalence of diabetes among delivery hospitalizations, United States, 1993-2009.

    PubMed

    Correa, Adolfo; Bardenheier, Barbara; Elixhauser, Anne; Geiss, Linda S; Gregg, Edward

    2015-03-01

    To describe recent trends in prevalence of pre-existing diabetes mellitus (PDM) (i.e., type 1 or type 2 diabetes) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among delivery hospitalizations in the United States. Data on delivery hospitalizations from 1993 through 2009 were obtained from the Health Care Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Diagnosis-Related Group codes were used to identify deliveries and diagnosis codes on presence of diabetes. Rates of hospitalizations with diabetes were calculated per 100 deliveries by type of diabetes, hospital geographic region, patient's age, degree of urbanicity of patient's residence, categorized median household income for patient's ZIP Code, expected primary payer, and type of delivery. From 1993 to 2009, age-standardized prevalence of diabetes per 100 deliveries increased from 0.62 to 0.90 for PDM (trend p < 0.001) and from 3.09 to 5.57 for GDM (trend p < 0.001). In 2009, correlates of PDM at delivery included older age [40-44 vs. 15-24: odds ratio 6.45 (95 % CI 5.27-7.88)], Medicaid/Medicare versus private payment sources [1.77 (95 % CI 1.59-1.98)], patient's ZIP Code with a median household income in bottom quartile versus other quartiles [1.54 (95 % CI 1.41, 1.69)], and C-section versus vaginal delivery [3.36 (95 % CI 3.10-3.64)]. Correlates of GDM at delivery were similar. Among U.S. delivery hospitalizations, the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. In 2009, the prevalence of diabetes was higher among women in older age groups, living in ZIP codes with lower household incomes, or with public insurance. PMID:24996952

  18. Current State of Pain Care for Hospitalized Patients at End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yingwei; Keenan, Gail; Al-Masalha, Fadi; Lopez, Karen Dunn; Khokar, Ashfaq; Johnson, Andrew; Ansari, Rashid; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2013-01-01

    We report findings on the current state of pain care in hospitals for end-of-life (EOL) patients using longitudinal data from eight diverse medical-surgical units located in 4 different Midwestern hospitals over 24 months. We identified 1,425 EOL care episodes, 596 (41.3%) of which had a pain diagnosis. The percentage of EOL patients with pain varied significantly across units (p<.001), and was even lower (27.7%) for those with “acute confusion.” Additionally, 30% of EOL patients had severe or significant pain at death or discharge to hospice and only 42.7% actually met the expected pain related outcome ratings. Pain often improved within 48 hours of admission (p<.005), the improvement, however, stagnated following this initial time period (p=.92). A sizable gap between pain science and clinical practice continues. PMID:22556281

  19. [Pre-hospital care for wounded in military conflicts: state and prospects].

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, I M; Reva, V A

    2015-10-01

    Pre-hospital care is one of the most important links in a chain of the military medical tenet. A survival of the most of severe casualties at the scene depends on a good quality and well-timed first aid and paramedic care. Based on the current state of medical equipment and training of the soldiers of the Russian and foreign armies, we summarized the data about the main medical products designed for pre-hospital care, briefly analyzed and compared their effectiveness to the foreign analogues. It is currently obvious, that fundamental changes in First aid kit modification and Medical Bags are warranted according to the reality and soldier's demands in combat operations. Proposals for modernization of military medical equipment were put forward. PMID:26827503

  20. South front and west side, storage (bldg. no. 217) and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South front and west side, storage (bldg. no. 217) and refrigeration shop (bldg. no. 216) to right, looking northeast. - Agnews State Hospital, Truck Garage, Fourth Street near Avenue A, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, CA

  1. Northwest interior corner of sunroom at north front, two fullheight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Northwest interior corner of sunroom at north front, two full-height arched windows, looking north-west. - Agnews State Hospital, Physician's Cottage & Garage, South Side of Palm Drive, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, CA

  2. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Practices Among Adult Patients Discharged From State Psychiatric Inpatient Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    HOLLEN, VERA; SCHACHT, LUCILLE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to explore antipsychotic medication prescribing practices in a sample of 86,034 patients discharged from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals and to find the prevalence of patients discharged with no antipsychotic medications, on antipsychotic monotherapy, and on antipsychotic polypharmacy. For patients discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the study explored the adjusted rates of antipsychotic polypharmacy, the reasons patients were discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the proportion of antipsychotic polypharmacy by mental health disorder, and the characteristics associated with being discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed all discharges for adult patients (18 to 64 y of age) from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The relationship among variables was explored using χ2, t test, and analysis of variance. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Results: The prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was 12%. Of the discharged patients receiving at least 1 antipsychotic medication (adjusted rate), 18% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy. The strongest predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy being prescribed were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a length of stay of 90 days or more. Patients were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy primarily to reduce their symptoms. Conclusions: Antipsychotic polypharmacy continues at a high enough rate to affect nearly 10,000 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia each year in state psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Further analysis of the clinical presentation of these patients may highlight particular aspects of the illness and its previous treatment that are contributing to practices outside the best-practice guideline. An increased understanding of trend data, patient characteristics, and national benchmarks provides an opportunity for

  3. Uncompensated Care Burden May Mean Financial Vulnerability For Rural Hospitals In States That Did Not Expand Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Kristin L; Noles, Marissa; Pink, George H

    2015-10-01

    The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has led to a large decrease in the number of uninsured people. Yet uncompensated care will still occur, particularly in states where eligibility for Medicaid is not expanded. We compared rural hospitals in Medicaid expansion and nonexpansion states in terms of the amount of uncompensated care they provided and their profitability and market characteristics in 2013. We found that rural hospitals in expansion states provided more dollars of uncompensated care than those in nonexpansion states and that the difference was at least partly driven by greater uncompensated costs associated with public programs such as Medicaid. We found higher dollar values of unrecoverable debt and charity care among non-critical access rural hospitals in nonexpansion states than among those in expansion states. Compared to hospitals in expansion states, those in nonexpansion states provided greater amounts of uncompensated care as a percentage of revenues and appeared to be more financially vulnerable; thus, these hospitals may be more likely to experience financial pressure or losses. Policy makers need to formulate strategies for maintaining access to care for rural populations residing in nonexpansion states. PMID:26438749

  4. Nutrition Screening and Assessment in Hospitalized Patients: A Survey of Current Practice in the United States.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vihas; Romano, Michelle; Corkins, Mark R; DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Earthman, Carrie; Malone, Ainsley; Miller, Sarah; Sabino, Kim; Wooley, Jennifer; Guenter, Peggi

    2014-07-01

    Background: The Joint Commission has mandated universal screening and assessment of hospitalized patients for malnutrition since 1995. Although various validated and nonvalidated tools are available, implementation of this mandate has not been well characterized. We report results of a survey of hospital-based professionals in the United States describing their perspective on the current range of nutrition screening and assessment practices as well as associated gaps in knowledge. Methods and Materials: Data from a 2012-2013 cross-sectional, web-based survey targeting members of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, and the Society of Hospital Medicine were collected with non-hospital-based members excluded. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Survey data from 1777 unique email addresses are included in this report. A majority of respondents were dietitians, nearly half were A.S.P.E.N. members, and 69.4% reported caring for a mix of adult and pediatric patients. Most respondents answered affirmatively about nutrition screening being performed in alignment with The Joint Commission mandate, but only 50% were familiar with the 2012 Consensus Statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/A.S.P.E.N. on adult malnutrition. In most cases, nurses were primarily responsible for nutrition screening, while dietitians had primary responsibility for assessment. No one specific assessment tool or International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code was identified as being used a majority of the time in assessing or coding a patient for malnutrition. Conclusions: The survey findings affirmed compliance with accreditation standards in completing a nutrition screen within 24 hours of admission, and most hospitals appear to have a process to perform a nutrition assessment once a screen is completed. However, there is considerable heterogeneity in both use of tools and

  5. Multidisciplinary team malfunctioning on a state hospital unit: a case study.

    PubMed

    Gomez, E A; Ruiz, P; Langrod, J

    1980-01-01

    The use of multidisciplinary teams in the care of psychiatric patients can be countertherapeutic unless attention is paid to the dynamics of team functioning. The authors present a case study of team malfunctioning on an inpatient unit in a state hospital that resulted from staff's role confusion and insecurity. Patient care was relegated to second place as major interpersonal conflicts among the staff were played out along ethnic and cultural lines. Resolution of the conflicts required identifying their source, clarifying staff roles, and initiating a special inservice training program focused primarily on the needs of paraprofessional staff. PMID:7353821

  6. Sonoma State Hospital, Eldridge, California, geothermal-heating system: conceptual design and economic feasibility report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The Sonoma State Mental Hospital, located in Eldridge, California, is presently equipped with a central gas-fired steam system that meets the space heating, domestic hot water, and other heating needs of the hospital. This system is a major consumer of natural gas - estimated at 259,994,000 cubic feet per year under average conditions. At the 1981 unit gas rate of $0.4608 per therm, an average of $1,258,000 per year is required to operate the steam heating system. The hospital is located in an area with considerable geothermal resources as evidenced by a number of nearby hot springs resorts. A private developer is currently investigating the feasibility of utilizing geothermally heated steam to generate electricity for sale to the Pacific Gas and Electric Company. The developer has proposed to sell the byproduct condensed steam to the hospital, which would use the heat energy remaining in the condensate for its own heating needs and thereby reduce the fossil fuel energy demand of the existing steam heating system. The geothermal heating system developed is capable of displacing an estimated 70 percent of the existing natural gas consumption of the steam heating system. Construction of the geothermal fluid distribution and collection system and the retrofits required within the buildings are estimated to cost $1,777,000. Annual expenses (operation and maintenance, insurance, and geothermal fluid purchase) have been estimated to be $40,380 per year in 1981 dollars. The proposed geothermal heating system could then be completely paid for in 32 months by the savings in natural gas purchases that would result.

  7. United States Department of Justice findings letters in psychiatric hospital CRIPA cases: an aid or a distraction?

    PubMed

    Geller, Jeffrey; Lee, Leilani

    2013-01-01

    The Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA) of 1980 allows the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) to investigate and file lawsuits against certain institutions, including state and county psychiatric hospitals, where individuals within may face unconstitutional conditions. Subsequent to an investigation and before negotiations or litigation, the state is provided a Findings Letter generated by the DOJ that generally contains recommended remedial measures. It has never been determined to what extent a Findings Letter provides a state with a recommendation specific to the institution for corrective action before the state enters into negotiations with the DOJ. Three study groups were derived from a sample of 15 Findings Letters written to states concerning their psychiatric hospitals between 2003 and 2009. The individual recommended remedial measures, labeled texts of interest (TOI), were identified, and the degree of overlap among the Findings Letters was determined. To a surprising degree, TOIs overlapped to various extents, from exact copies of text to paraphrased versions, in Findings Letters written between 2003 and 2009 to different states and for multiple state hospitals in the same state. The recommended remedial measures provided in the DOJ's Findings Letters are not specific to each state hospital's deficiencies. The Findings Letters offer limited guidance to the state on how to remedy the deficiencies before negotiating with the DOJ. This lack of specificity causes inefficient and delayed remediation of unconstitutional conditions and other deficiencies in care and treatment in psychiatric hospitals. While the current process most often leads to improvements in state hospitals, it is a costly, inefficient remedy, despite the possibility of alternative remedial processes of less expensive and equal or greater effectiveness. PMID:23771930

  8. Trends in Gestational Diabetes Among Hospital Deliveries in 19 U.S. States, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Bardenheier, Barbara H.; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Geiss, Linda S.; Saydah, Sharon H.; Devlin, Heather M.; Kim, Shin Y.; Gregg, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is one of the most common and fastest-growing comorbidities of pregnancy. Temporal trends in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have not been examined at the state level. This study examines GDM prevalence trends overall and by age, state, and region for 19 states, and by race/ethnicity for 12 states. Sub-analysis assesses trends among GDM deliveries by insurance type and comorbid hypertension in pregnancy. Methods Using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s National and State Inpatient Databases, deliveries were identified using diagnosis-related group codes for GDM and comorbidities using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes among all community hospitals. General linear regression with a log-link and binomial distribution was used in 2014 to assess annual change in GDM prevalence from 2000 through 2010. Results The age-standardized prevalence of GDM increased from 3.71 in 2000 to 5.77 per 100 deliveries in 2010 (relative increase, 56%). From 2000 through 2010, GDM deliveries increased significantly in all states (p < 0.01), with relative increases ranging from 36% to 88%. GDM among deliveries in 12 states reporting race and ethnicity increased among all groups (p < 0.01), with the highest relative increase in Hispanics (66%). Among GDM deliveries in 19 states, those with pre-pregnancy hypertension increased significantly from 2.5% to 4.1% (relative increase, 64%). The burden of GDM delivery payment shifted from private insurers (absolute decrease of 13.5 percentage points) to Medicaid/Medicare (13.2–percentage point increase). Conclusions Results suggest that GDM deliveries are increasing. The highest rates of increase are among Hispanics and among GDM deliveries complicated by pre-pregnancy hypertension. PMID:26094225

  9. The federal government's use of Title VI and Medicare to racially integrate hospitals in the United States, 1963 through 1967.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, P P

    1997-01-01

    Explicit discrimination against minorities existed in the 1960s in hospital patient admissions and physician and nurse staff appointments. With passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, along with Medicare legislation in 1965, civil rights advocates within the federal government had both a legislative mandate to guarantee equal access to programs funded by the federal government in Title VI and a federal program that affected every hospital in the country in Medicare. This study was conducted to determine the extent to which the Medicare hospital certification program was a major determinant in the racial integration of hospitals throughout the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with individuals involved in hospital and health care policy in the 1950s and 1960s. Other primary resources include archival and personal manuscripts, government documents, newspapers, and periodicals. PMID:9366643

  10. Influenza-Related Hospitalizations and Poverty Levels - United States, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Hadler, James L; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly; Pérez, Alejandro; Anderson, Evan J; Bargsten, Marisa; Bohm, Susan R; Hill, Mary; Hogan, Brenna; Laidler, Matt; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lung, Krista L; Mermel, Elizabeth; Miller, Lisa; Morin, Craig; Parker, Erin; Zansky, Shelley M; Chaves, Sandra S

    2016-02-12

    Annual influenza vaccine is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months in the United States, with recognition that some persons are at risk for more severe disease (1). However, there might be previously unrecognized demographic groups that also experience higher rates of serious influenza-related disease that could benefit from enhanced vaccination efforts. Socioeconomic status (SES) measures that are area-based can be used to define demographic groups when individual SES data are not available (2). Previous surveillance data analyses in limited geographic areas indicated that influenza-related hospitalization incidence was higher for persons residing in census tracts that included a higher percentage of persons living below the federal poverty level (3-5). To determine whether this association occurs elsewhere, influenza hospitalization data collected in 14 FluSurv-NET sites covering 27 million persons during the 2010-11 and 2011-12 influenza seasons were analyzed. The age-adjusted incidence of influenza-related hospitalizations per 100,000 person-years in high poverty (≥20% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts was 21.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.7-22.4), nearly twice the incidence in low poverty (<5% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts (10.9, 95% CI: 10.3-11.4). This relationship was observed in each surveillance site, among children and adults, and across racial/ethnic groups. These findings suggest that persons living in poorer census tracts should be targeted for enhanced influenza vaccination outreach and clinicians serving these persons should be made aware of current recommendations for use of antiviral agents to treat influenza (6). PMID:26866729

  11. The Oregon Health and Science University-Oregon State Hospital Collaboration: Reflections on an Evolving Public-Academic Partnership.

    PubMed

    Chien, Joseph; Novosad, David; Mobbs, Karl E

    2016-03-01

    This column describes the conceptualization and implementation of an innovative collaboration between Oregon State Hospital and Oregon Health and Science University that was created to address understaffing and improve the quality of care. The hospital created a forensic evaluation rotation to address the growing population of forensic patients, which created a valuable recruiting tool for the hospital. One of the authors, a recent recruit, provides a first-person account of his experience working within the collaboration. The model could be emulated by other public-sector facilities facing similar challenges with psychiatrist recruitment and retention. PMID:26695498

  12. State Aids to Medical Libraries in Hospitals. Report of the Council on Library and Network Development. Bulletin No. 3209.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. of Library Services.

    This report presents an overview of health science libraries and the biomedical communications network in Wisconsin, and a list of goals and recommendations related to the role of the state government in the development of health science library services. It is noted that health science libraries in the state range from hospital and academic…

  13. A review of outrage of modesty offenders remanded in a state mental hospital.

    PubMed

    Chan, A O; Lim, L E; Ong, S H

    1997-10-01

    Minor sexual offences have been increasing over the years. These include parasexual offences such as exhibitionism, frotteurism and its variant. In Singapore, a common minor sexual offence which involves touching, grabbing, kissing or fondling is known as outrage of modesty or molestation. To date no known studies have been made on this subtype of sexual offender. This is a five-year retrospective study looking into the profile of 157 outrage of modestry offenders remanded to Woodbridge Hospital, a state mental hospital. Results showed that schizophrenia was the predominant psychiatric diagnosis amongst the offenders (45.3%) followed by mental retardation (21.7%). Only 28.7% of those suffering from a mental illness experienced active psychiatric symptoms at the time of the sexual offence. Touching, stroking or fondling were the most frequently reported type of molestation (60.5%). The majority of the offences took place between 6 am and 6 pm. Only 15.3% had a past history of sexual offences and the majority (94.9%) were of sound mind at the time of the offence. There were no statistically significant differences between first time and repeat offenders with regard to age, ethnic group, educational level, marital status, diagnoses, place of offence, time and type of offence, soundness of mind and fitness to plead. PMID:9383946

  14. Nondestructive evaluation of the preservation state of stone columns in the Hospital Real of Granada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno de Jong van Coevorden, C.; Cobos Sánchez, C.; Rubio Bretones, A.; Fernández Pantoja, M.; García, Salvador G.; Gómez Martín, R.

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the results of the employment of two nondestructive evaluation methods for the diagnostic of the preservation state of stone elements. The first method is based on ultrasonic (US) pulses while the second method uses short electromagnetic pulses. Specifically, these methods were applied to some columns, some of them previously restored. These columns are part of the architectonic heritage of the University of Granada, in particular they are located at the patio de la capilla del Hospital Real of Granada. The objective of this work was the application of systems based on US pulses (in transmission mode) and the ground-penetrating radar systems (electromagnetic tomography) in the diagnosis and detection of possible faults in the interior of columns.

  15. Fatal foodborne Clostridium perfringens illness at a state psychiatric hospital--Louisiana, 2010.

    PubMed

    2012-08-17

    Clostridium perfringens, the third most common cause of foodborne illness in the United States (1), most often causes a self-limited, diarrheal disease lasting 12-24 hours. Fatalities are very rare, occurring in <0.03% of cases (1). Death usually is caused by dehydration and occurs among the very young, the very old, and persons debilitated by illness (2). On May 7, 2010, 42 residents and 12 staff members at a Louisiana state psychiatric hospital experienced vomiting, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. Within 24 hours, three patients had died. The three fatalities occurred among patients aged 41-61 years who were receiving medications that had anti-intestinal motility side effects. For two of three decedents, the cause of death found on postmortem examination was necrotizing colitis. Investigation by the Louisiana Office of Public Health (OPH) and CDC found that eating chicken served at dinner on May 6 was associated with illness. The chicken was cooked approximately 24 hours before serving and not cooled in accordance with hospital guidelines. C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) was detected in 20 of 23 stool specimens from ill residents and staff members. Genetic testing of C. perfringens toxins isolated from chicken and stool specimens was carried out to determine which of the two strains responsible for C. perfringens foodborne illness was present. The specimens tested negative for the beta-toxin gene, excluding C. perfringens type C as the etiologic agent and implicating C. perfringens type A. This outbreak underscores the need for strict food preparation guidelines at psychiatric inpatient facilities and the potential risk for adverse outcomes among any patients with impaired intestinal motility caused by medications, disease, and extremes of age when exposed to C. perfringens enterotoxin. PMID:22895383

  16. Prehospital and hospital delays after stroke onset--United States, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    2007-05-18

    Each year approximately 700,000 persons in the United States have a new or recurrent stroke; of these persons, 15%-30% become permanently disabled, and 20% require institutionalization during the first 3 months after the stroke. The severity of stroke-related disability can be reduced if timely and appropriate treatment is received. Patients with ischemic stroke may be eligible for treatment with intravenous thrombolytic (i.e., tissue plasminogen activator [t-PA]) therapy within 3 hours of symptom onset. Receipt of this treatment usually requires patients to recognize stroke symptoms and receive prompt transport to a hospital emergency department (ED), where timely evaluation and brain imaging (i.e., computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) can take place. For patients eligible for t-PA, evidence suggests that the earlier patients are treated after the onset of symptoms the greater the likelihood of a more favorable outcome. In 2001, Congress established the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry to measure and track the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients. To assess prehospital delays from onset of stroke symptoms to ED arrival and hospital delays from ED arrival to receipt of brain imaging, CDC analyzed data from the four states participating in the national stroke registry. The results of that analysis indicated that fewer than half (48.0%) of stroke patients for whom onset data were available arrived at the ED within 2 hours of symptom onset, and prehospital delays were shorter for persons transported to the ED by ambulance (i.e., emergency medical services) than for persons who did not receive ambulance transport. The interval between ED arrival and brain imaging also was significantly reduced for those arriving by ambulance. More extensive public education is needed regarding early recognition of stroke and the urgency of telephoning 9-1-1 to receive ambulance transport. Shortening prehospital and hospital delays will increase

  17. Trends and characteristics of injuries in the State of Qatar: hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Bener, Abdulbari; Abdul Rahman, Yassir S; Abdel Aleem, Eltayib Y; Khalid, Muayad K

    2012-01-01

    Injuries account for a large burden of mortality and morbidity in the State of Qatar. No comprehensive study has been conducted on all types of injuries in the State of Qatar. The objective of this study was to determine the trend in the number, incidence and pattern of injuries in the State of Qatar. This hospital-based study is a retrospective analysis of 53,366 patients treated at the accident and emergency and trauma centres for injuries during the period from 2006 to 2010. Injuries were determined according to the ICD 10 criteria. The details of the entire trauma patients who were involved in occupational/domestic injuries were extracted from the database of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Hamad Medical Corporation. Our results demonstrated that the rates of injury remained relatively stable in the State of Qatar over the five-year period. Those most at risk of injury were non-Qatari males who were below 30 years. Road traffic accidents (RTA) (36.7%) followed by falls causing back injuries (11.0%) were the most common types of injuries during the period. Most of the injuries occurred at the head for both males (17.7%) and females (13.5%); this was consistently the case across all of the age groups. The greatest proportion of RTA (21.2%), industrial machinery injuries (16.4%), construction injuries (15.5%), recreational sporting injuries (20.5%) and beach/sea/ocean injuries (15.0%) resulted in head injuries. Intervention efforts need to be aimed at reducing occupational injuries, RTA injuries and work-related hazards in the State of Qatar. PMID:22455450

  18. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Kimberley S.; Lee, Leslie K.; Mak, Raymond H.; Wang, Shuang; Pile-Spellman, John; Abrahm, Janet L.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC

  19. Quality and Innovations for Caring Hospitalized Older Persons in the Unites States

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Won; Kim, Sun Jung; Geng, Yan; Shin, Hyun Phil; Nakagawa, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Older persons are occasionally acutely ill and their hospitalizations frequently end up with complications and adverse outcomes. Medicare from U.S. federal government’s payment resource for older persons is facing financial strain. Medicare highlights both cost-saving and high quality of care while older persons are hospitalized. Several health policy changes were initiated to achieve Medicare’s goals. In response to Medicare’s health policy changes, U.S. hospital environments have been changed and these resulted in hospital quality measurements’ improvement. American seniors are facing the challenges during and around their hospital care. Several innovative measures are suggested to overcome these challenges. PMID:24490116

  20. Preliminary results of 2009 pandemic influenza surveillance in the United States using the Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jhung, Michael A.; Davidson, Heidi; McIntyre, Anne; Gregg, William J.; Dasgupta, Sharoda; D’Mello, Tiffany; White, Victoria; Fowlkes, Ashley; Brammer, Lynnette; Finelli, Lyn

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Jhung et al. (2011) Preliminary results of 2009 pandemic influenza surveillance in the United States using the Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 321–327. Background  To augment established influenza surveillance systems in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists implemented the Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity (AHDRA) in August 2009. The AHDRA was designed to meet increased demands for timely and detailed information describing illness severity during the 2009 H1N1 influenza A (pH1N1) pandemic response. Objectives  We describe the implementation of AHDRA and provide preliminary results from this new surveillance activity. Methods  All 50 US states were asked to report influenza‐associated hospitalizations and deaths to AHDRA each week using either a laboratory‐confirmed or syndromic surveillance definition. Aggregate counts were used to calculate age‐specific weekly and cumulative rates per 100 000, and laboratory‐confirmed reports were used to estimate the age distribution of pH1N1 influenza‐associated hospitalizations and deaths. Results  From August 30, 2009, through April 6, 2010, AHDRA identified 41 689 laboratory‐confirmed influenza‐associated hospitalizations and 2096 laboratory‐confirmed influenza‐associated deaths. Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity rates peaked earlier than hospitalization and death rates seen in previous influenza seasons with other surveillance systems, and the age distribution of cases revealed a tendency for hospitalizations and deaths to occur in persons <65 years for age. Conclusions  Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity laboratory‐confirmed reports provided important information during the 2009 pandemic response. Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting

  1. Trends in Outcome and Hospitalization Cost among Adult Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Hussam A.; Al-Qudah, Zaid A.; Khan, Hafiz M. R.; Farhad, Khosro; Ji, Andrew Bo-Hua; Souayah, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction New treatments for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) have been introduced and are expected to improve patients’ overall outcomes. We assessed the impact of new therapeutic strategies on outcome and cost of hospitalization among adult patients with AIS in the United States. Methods Patients with AIS admitted in the United States in 1993–1994 and 2006–2007 were listed using the Nationwide Inpatient Survey database. We determined the rates of occurrence, hospitalization outcomes, and mean hospital charges for all patients. We further analyzed these variables in the ventilated and nonventilated patients. Results We identified 386,043 patients with AIS admitted in the United States in 1993–1994 and 749,766 patients in 2006–2007. The length of hospitalization was significantly higher in 1993–1994 compared with 2006–2007: 6.9 ± 4.2 days versus 4.66 ± 3 days, respectively. In-hospital mortality rate was 8.9% in 1993–1994 and 5.6% in 2006–2007 (P < 0.0001). There was a significant increase in mean hospital charges in 2006–2007 compared with 1993–1994 ($21,916 ± $14,117 versus $9,646 ± $5,727). The length of hospitalization was significantly shorter in 2006–2007 in nonventilated patients. There was a significant increase in mean hospital charges in 2006–2007 compared with 1993–1994 in both ventilated ($81,528 ± $64,526 versus $25,143 ± $17,172, P<0.0001) and nonventilated patients ($21,085 ± $13,042 versus $10,000 ± $6,300, P<0.0001). The mortality rate was significantly lower in 2006–2007 in both subgroups: 46.5% versus 59.8% in ventilated patients and 4.2% versus 8.2% in nonventilated patients (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Our study suggests that new therapeutic strategies have improved outcomes and increased cost of hospitalization among adult patients with AIS in the United States over a period of 13 years. The hospitalization cost was significantly higher in the ventilated and nonventilated patients in 2006–2007, which may

  2. The Cosmos greenstone succession, Agnew-Wiluna greenstone belt, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia: Geochemistry of an enriched Neoarchaean volcanic arc succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Joux, A.; Thordarson, T.; Fitton, J. G.; Hastie, A. R.

    2014-09-01

    The geodynamic setting of the Neoarchaean Eastern Goldfields Superterrane (EGS) of the Yilgarn Craton is the subject of debate. Some authors propose plume models, while others advocate variants on a subduction accretion model for the origin of mineralised greenstone belt sequences. Felsic volcanism in the Kalgoorlie Terrane, the westernmost terrane of the EGS, is considered to have a tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite/dacite (TTG/D) geochemical affinity. The Cosmos greenstone succession, which lies in the Agnew-Wiluna greenstone belt (AWB) of the Kalgoorlie Terrane, contains several komatiite-hosted nickel sulphide deposits, the volcanic footwall to which consists of an intercalated succession of fragmental and coherent rocks ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to rhyolite. Light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion-lithophile elements (LILEs) are strongly enriched relative to high field strength elements (HFSEs) across all volcanic units, and the rocks display strong positive Pb and negative Nb anomalies. These geochemical characteristics resemble closely those of modern high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonite continental arc successions. Contrasting REE, LILE and HFSE concentrations, coupled with assimilation-fractional crystallisation (AFC) modelling, shows that the intercalated dacitic and andesitic volcanic rocks within the footwall succession are not co-genetic. Xenocrystic zircons within the felsic volcanic lithologies indicate that some assimilation of older continental crust contributed to the generation of the footwall volcanic sequence. The geochemical characteristics of the Cosmos volcanic succession indicate that parental melts were derived via partial melting of enriched peridotite that had been contaminated by subducted crustal material within the mantle wedge of a subduction zone. In contrast, two younger felsic porphyry intrusions, which cross-cut the volcanic succession, have a distinct TTG/D affinity. Therefore, these intrusions are

  3. Pattern and outcome of renal diseases in hospitalized children in Khartoum State, Sudan*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Amal H. A; Karrar, Zein A.

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, renal diseases in children constitute important causes of morbidity and mortality. In Sudan, data about patterns and outcome of these disorders is generally scanty. We conducted this study to provide basic renal data that may be utilized by researchers and health planners in a resource poor setting. A retrospective record review of all pediatric patients, followed in four teaching hospitals in Khartoum State over a five-year period (January 2000-June 2004), was achieved. In 150 hospitalized children a total of 200 renal diagnoses were recorded. Urinary tract infection (UTI), occurring with other underlying renal morbidities or isolated, was the commonest renal diagnosis (20%). The second common renal disorders were nephrotic syndrome (NS) and urolithiasis/stones accounting for 16% and 15.5% of cases, respectively. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) and congenital anomalies were relatively less common (12% and 10.5%, respectively). Other less frequently detected diseases were acute renal failure (ARF) in 6%, chronic renal failure (CRF) in 4%, hereditary nephropathies in 3.5% and renal tumors in 2.5%. There was a significant correlation between the pattern of renal diseases and age of patients (P =0.001) but not their gender or social class (P = 0.211 and 0.34, respectively). On follow up, 99 out of 150 patients (66%) recovered their normal renal function, 6/150 (4%) remained with persistent proteinuria, 30/150 (20%) progressed to CRF, 10/150 (6.7%) died, and 5/150 (3.3%) were referred to radiotherapy department for further management. Our data reflects geographical variations of patterns of renal diseases in Sudanese children as in other countries. Many of these diseases are preventable or potentially curable. Therefore, improvement of pediatric renal services and training of health workers would help in early detection and treatment of these conditions leading to reduction in their morbidity and mortality.

  4. Hospitalizations and Deaths Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, United States, 1999–2005

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eili; Smith, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections with Staphylococcus aureus, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections, are a major cause of illness and death and impose serious economic costs on patients and hospitals. However, the recent magnitude and trend of these infections have not been reported. We used national hospitalization and resistance data to estimate the annual number of hospitalizations and deaths associated with S. aureus and MRSA from 1999 through 2005. During this period, the estimated number of S. aureus–related hospitalizations increased 62%, from 294,570 to 477,927, and the estimated number of MRSA-related hospitalizations more than doubled, from 127,036 to 278,203. Our findings suggest that S. aureus and MRSA should be considered a national priority for disease control. PMID:18258033

  5. Long-range hospital capital requirements planning: the state of the art, a proposal for change.

    PubMed

    Hogan, A J

    1984-01-01

    A Hospital Capital Requirements Planning System is proposed to channel competition through the use of a regional planning model. This model would help to reduce the social deadweight loss arising from competition-induced uncertainty. The system would increase the internal long-range planning capacity of hospitals and improve the quality of the applications presented for Certificate of Need review. Both health systems planners and investment bankers should have better information with which to evaluate hospital capital investment proposals. PMID:10269910

  6. The patients' library movement: an overview of early efforts in the United States to establish organized libraries for hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Panella, N M

    1996-01-01

    The patients' library movement in the United States, a dynamic, cohesive drive begun and sustained by librarians and physicians, strove to promote placement of organized libraries for patients in hospitals. It took shape in the early years of this century, evolving from its proponents' deeply held conviction that books and reading foster the rehabilitation of sick people. The American Library Association's World War I service to hospitalized military personnel dramatically reinforced the conviction; the post-World War I institution of public library extension services to general hospitals explicitly reflected it. Enormous energy was infused into the patients' library movement. Throughout the first half of this century, there were sustained efforts not only to establish organized libraries for hospitalized people but also to expand and systematically study bibliotherapy and to shape patients' librarianship as a professional specialty. The movement's achievements include the establishment of patients' library committees within national and international associations; impetus for development of academic programs to train patients' librarians; and publication, from 1944 through 1970, of successive sets of standards for hospital patients' libraries. The first of these remain the first standards written and issued by a professional library association for a hospital library. PMID:8938330

  7. Comparing Safety Climate between Two Populations of Hospitals in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Sara J; Hartmann, Christine W; Hanchate, Amresh; Zhao, Shibei; Meterko, Mark; Shokeen, Priti; Lin, Shoutzu; Gaba, David M; Rosen, Amy K

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare safety climate between diverse U.S. hospitals and Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals, and to explore the factors influencing climate in each setting. Data Sources Primary data from surveys of hospital personnel; secondary data from the American Hospital Association's 2004 Annual Survey of Hospitals. Study Design Cross-sectional study of 69 U.S. and 30 VA hospitals. Data Collection For each sample, hierarchical linear models used safety-climate scores as the dependent variable and respondent and facility characteristics as independent variables. Regression-based Oaxaca–Blinder decomposition examined differences in effects of model characteristics on safety climate between the U.S. and VA samples. Principal Findings The range in safety climate among U.S. and VA hospitals overlapped substantially. Characteristics of individuals influenced safety climate consistently across settings. Working in southern and urban facilities corresponded with worse safety climate among VA employees and better safety climate in the U.S. sample. Decomposition results predicted 1.4 percentage points better safety climate in U.S. than in VA hospitals: −0.77 attributable to sample-characteristic differences and 2.2 due to differential effects of sample characteristics. Conclusions Results suggest that safety climate is linked more to efforts of individual hospitals than to participation in a nationally integrated system or measured characteristics of workers and facilities. PMID:19619250

  8. Health Facilities: New York State's Oversight of Nursing Homes and Hospitals. Report to the Honorable Bill Green, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, New York, NY. Regional Office.

    At the request of Congressman William Green, the General Accounting Office (GAO) evaluated the validity of allegations about deficiencies in the New York State Department of Health's nursing home and hospital inspection processes for certification for participation in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Health Care Financing Administration and…

  9. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Roberto Damian Pacheco; Lira, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; de Castro, Rosane Silvestre; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Viral conjunctivitis is a common, highly contagious disease that is often caused by an adenovirus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis by analyzing data from a prospective clinical study of 122 consecutively enrolled patients who were treated at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) after a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis between November 2011 and June 2012. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate all cases of clinically diagnosed infectious conjunctivitis and based on the laboratory findings, the prevalence of adenoviral infections was determined. The incidence of subepithelial corneal infiltrates was also investigated. RESULTS: Of the 122 patients with acute infectious conjunctivitis included, 72 had positive polymerase chain reaction results for adenoviruses and 17 patients developed subepithelial corneal infiltrates (13.93%). CONCLUSIONS: The polymerase chain reaction revealed that the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis was 59% in all patients who presented with a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis from November 2011 to June 2012. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis in the study population was similar to its prevalence in other regions of the world. PMID:26602522

  10. Trends in venous thromboembolism among pregnancy-related hospitalizations, United States, 1994-2009

    PubMed Central

    Ghaji, Nafisa; Boulet, Sheree L.; Tepper, Naomi; Hooper, William C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate national trends in the rate of pregnancy-related hospitalizations for venous thromboembolism (VTE) from 1994-2009 and to estimate the prevalence of comorbid conditions among these hospitalizations. STUDY DESIGN An estimated 64,413,973 pregnancy-related hospitalizations among women 15-44 years old were identified in the 1994-2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Trends in VTE-associated pregnancy hospitalizations were evaluated with the use of variance-weighted least squares regression. Chi-square tests were used to assess changes in prevalence of demographics and comorbid conditions, and multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the likelihood of VTE during the study period after adjustment for comorbid conditions. Antepartum, delivery, and postpartum hospitalizations were evaluated separately and reported in 4-year increments. RESULTS From 1994-2009, there was a 14% increase in the rate of overall VTE-associated pregnancy hospitalizations; antepartum and postpartum hospitalizations with VTE increased by 17% and 47%, respectively. Between 1994-1997 and 2006-2009, the prevalence of hypertension and obesity doubled among all VTE-associated pregnancy hospitalizations; significant increases in diabetes mellitus and heart disease were also noted. A temporal increase in the likelihood of a VTE diagnosis in pregnancy was observed for antepartum hospitalizations from 2006-2009 when compared with 1994-1997 (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.48–1.78). CONCLUSION There has been an upward trend in VTE-associated pregnancy hospitalizations from 1994-2009 with concomitant increases in comorbid conditions. Clinicians should have a heightened awareness of the risk of VTE among pregnant women, particularly among those with comorbid conditions, and should have a low threshold for evaluation in women with symptoms or signs of VTE. PMID:23810274

  11. States turn up the heat. As self-regulation sputters, state legislatures are leading charge for more accountability in governance of not-for-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mantone, Joseph

    2006-01-30

    Recent scandals have pushed some states to tackle transparency and governance issues at healthcare not-for-profits, which the federal government has been reluctant to touch. Rhode Island Lt. Gov. Charles Fogarty, left, supports a bill in his state that would establish a code of ethics for hospital boards. Fogarty sees leaders as getting too comfortable in their jobs and working without accountability. PMID:16479771

  12. The effect of the social organization of work on the voluntary turnover rate of hospital nurses in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bloom, J R; Alexander, J A; Nuchols, B A

    1992-06-01

    In light of current concerns over nursing shortages and productivity, voluntary turnover among hospital nurses in the United States has assumed renewed importance as a managerial issue. This study examines the thesis that the social organization of work in hospitals is an important determinant of the voluntary turnover rate among registered nurses. This perspective differs from previous work in this area in that both turnover and its determinants are conceptualized at the organizational rather than individual level, thus opening the way for administrative intervention to reduce turnover. The conceptual model is tested using multiple regression techniques on a sample of 435 hospitals. Results suggest that organizational characteristics and environmental conditions are important contributors to turnover. Organizational characteristics are stronger predictors of turnover than are economic factors. PMID:1529379

  13. [Morbidity profile and hospital expenses with elderly patients in Paraná State, Brazil, 2008-2012].

    PubMed

    Kernkamp, Clarice da Luz; Costa, Cassia Kely Favoretto; Massuda, Ely Mitie; Silva, Eraldo Schunk; Yamaguchi, Mirian Ueda; Bernuci, Marcelo Picinin

    2016-07-21

    Growth in the elderly population has increased both the demand for health services and healthcare expenses, with relevant consequences for economic stability. The current study aimed to analyze the morbidity profile and hospital expenses with elderly patients in relation to socioeconomic and demographic conditions in Paraná State, Brazil, from 2008 to 2012, applying principal components analysis and groupings. Regions with higher and lower economic and human development showed high prevalence of hospitalizations and costs pertaining to the circulatory and respiratory systems and cardiac diseases for males and females. In regions with intermediary development, diseases of the nervous system in men and of the circulatory system in women had the highest morbidity and hospital expenses. Thus, measures for prevention and health promotion in this elderly population should be targeted to regional investigations. PMID:27462845

  14. Regional disparities in hospitalization charges for patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor resection in New York State: correlation with outcomes.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon

    2016-06-01

    There is increasing regulatory pressure for cost containment in neuro-oncology, and rationalization of the observed regional disparities. We investigated the presence of such disparities in New York State and examined the impact of risk adjustment on the magnitude of this variation. We performed a cohort study involving patients with brain tumors (gliomas, metastases, or meningiomas), who underwent craniotomy for resection from 2009 to 2013, and were registered in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) database. A linear regression model was utilized for risk-adjustment of inpatient charges using socioeconomic factors and comorbidities. Hospitals with fewer than 20 craniotomies were excluded. 13,535 patients underwent treatment, including 5032 (37.2 %) gliomas, 4858 (35.9 %) metastases, and 3645 (26.9 %) meningiomas. Unadjusted median hospitalization charges ranged from $22,954 to $177,398 at the hospital level, and $30,086 to $159,281 at the county level. Despite extensive risk-adjustment we observed persistent disparities with median hospitalization charges ranging from $40,455 to $124,691 at the hospital level, and $53,999 to $94,844 at the county level. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that these disparities were significant at the facility and the county level (P < 0.0001). Increased charges were not associated with shorter LOS (r = 0.10, P = 0.41), or lower rates of death (r = 0.09, P = 0.46), and unfavorable discharge (r = 0.24, P = 0.06). Using a comprehensive all-payer cohort of patients with brain tumors in New York State we identified wide disparities at the hospital and the county level despite comprehensive risk-adjustment. Increased charges were not associated with shorter LOS, or lower rates of death and unfavorable discharge. PMID:27072560

  15. The founding of Walter Reed General Hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals. PMID:23839016

  16. Hospitalizations in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Michael D.; Danese, Mark; Klaassen, Robert J.; Duryea, Jennifer; Eisen, Melissa; Bussel, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine utilization and outcomes in pediatric immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) hospitalizations, we used ICD-9 code 287.31 to identify hospitalizations in patients with ITP in the 2009 HCUP KID, an all-payer sample of pediatric hospitalizations from US community hospitals. Diagnosis and procedure codes were used to estimate rates of ITP-related procedures, comorbidity prevalence, costs, length of stay (LOS), and mortality. In 2009, there were an estimated 4499 hospitalizations in children aged 6 months–17 years with ITP; 43% in children aged 1–5 years; and 47% with emergency department encounters. The mean hospitalization cost was $5398, mean LOS 2.0 days, with 0.3% mortality (n = 13). With any bleeding (15.2%, including gastrointestinal 2.0%, hematuria 1.3%, intracranial hemorrhage [ICH] 0.6%), mean hospitalization cost was $7215, LOS 2.5 days, with 1.5% mortality. For ICH (0.6%, n = 27), mean cost was $40 209, LOS 8.5 days, with 21% mortality. With infections (14%, including upper respiratory 5.2%, viral 4.9%, bacterial 1.9%), the mean cost was $6928, LOS 2.9 days, with 0.9% mortality. Septic shock was reported in 0.3% of discharges. Utilization included immunoglobulin administration (37%) and splenectomies (2.3%). Factors associated with higher costs included age >6 years, ICH, hematuria, transfusion, splenectomy, and bone marrow diagnostics (p < 0.05). In conclusion, of the 4499 hospitalizations with ITP, mortality rates of 1.5%, 21%, and 0.9% were seen with any bleeding, ICH, and infection, respectively. Higher costs were associated with clinically significant bleeding and procedures. Future analyses may reveal effects of the implementation of more recent ITP guidelines and use of additional treatments. PMID:26941022

  17. Hospitalizations in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Michael D; Danese, Mark; Klaassen, Robert J; Duryea, Jennifer; Eisen, Melissa; Bussel, James

    2016-07-01

    To examine utilization and outcomes in pediatric immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) hospitalizations, we used ICD-9 code 287.31 to identify hospitalizations in patients with ITP in the 2009 HCUP KID, an all-payer sample of pediatric hospitalizations from US community hospitals. Diagnosis and procedure codes were used to estimate rates of ITP-related procedures, comorbidity prevalence, costs, length of stay (LOS), and mortality. In 2009, there were an estimated 4499 hospitalizations in children aged 6 months-17 years with ITP; 43% in children aged 1-5 years; and 47% with emergency department encounters. The mean hospitalization cost was $5398, mean LOS 2.0 days, with 0.3% mortality (n = 13). With any bleeding (15.2%, including gastrointestinal 2.0%, hematuria 1.3%, intracranial hemorrhage [ICH] 0.6%), mean hospitalization cost was $7215, LOS 2.5 days, with 1.5% mortality. For ICH (0.6%, n = 27), mean cost was $40 209, LOS 8.5 days, with 21% mortality. With infections (14%, including upper respiratory 5.2%, viral 4.9%, bacterial 1.9%), the mean cost was $6928, LOS 2.9 days, with 0.9% mortality. Septic shock was reported in 0.3% of discharges. Utilization included immunoglobulin administration (37%) and splenectomies (2.3%). Factors associated with higher costs included age >6 years, ICH, hematuria, transfusion, splenectomy, and bone marrow diagnostics (p < 0.05). In conclusion, of the 4499 hospitalizations with ITP, mortality rates of 1.5%, 21%, and 0.9% were seen with any bleeding, ICH, and infection, respectively. Higher costs were associated with clinically significant bleeding and procedures. Future analyses may reveal effects of the implementation of more recent ITP guidelines and use of additional treatments. PMID:26941022

  18. Job satisfaction and turnover intent among hospital social workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Greg L

    2016-08-01

    Feelings of job satisfaction and turnover intentions among social workers affect work quality for both social workers and the people for whom they provide services. Existing literature on job satisfaction among hospital social workers is limited, and is overly focused on issues of compensation. There is job satisfaction research with hospital nurses available for comparison. Other informative social work research on job satisfaction and turnover exists in mental health and generally, across settings. Research on turnover intent in social work is primarily from child welfare settings and may not generalize. The literature notes gaps and contradictions about predictors of job satisfaction and turnover intent. Using a large national dataset of hospital social workers, this research clarifies and fills gaps regarding hospital social workers, and explores how Herzberg's theory of work can clarify the difference between sources of job dissatisfaction and job satisfaction. Findings include hospital social workers reporting high job satisfaction and that demographics do not contribute to the predictive models. The findings do support centralized social work departments and variety in the job functions of hospital social workers, and are consistent with the theoretical framework. PMID:27322030

  19. Association between Hospital Birth Volume and Maternal Morbidity among Low-Risk Pregnancies in Rural, Urban, and Teaching Hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Thao, Viengneesee; Hung, Peiyin; Tilden, Ellen; Caughey, Aaron B; Snowden, Jonathan M

    2016-05-01

    Objectives This study aims to examine the relationship between hospital birth volume and multiple maternal morbidities among low-risk pregnancies in rural hospitals, urban non-teaching hospitals, and urban teaching hospitals, using a representative sample of U.S. hospitals. Study Design Using the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 607 hospitals, we identified 508,146 obstetric deliveries meeting low-risk criteria and compared outcomes across hospital volume categories. Outcomes include postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), chorioamnionitis, endometritis, blood transfusion, severe perineal laceration, and wound infection. Results Hospital birth volume was more consistently related to PPH than to other maternal outcomes. Lowest-volume rural (< 200 births) and non-teaching (< 650 births) hospitals had 80% higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.56-2.08) and 39% higher odds (AOR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.26-1.53) of PPH respectively, than those in corresponding high-volume hospitals. However, in urban teaching hospitals, delivering in a lower-volume hospital was associated with 14% lower odds of PPH (AOR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.80-0.93). Deliveries in rural hospitals had 31% higher odds of PPH than urban teaching hospitals (AOR = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.13-1.53). Conclusions Low birth volume was a risk factor for PPH in both rural and urban non-teaching hospitals, but not in urban teaching hospitals, where higher volume was associated with greater odds of PPH. PMID:26731180

  20. Hospitalization cost after spine surgery in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a predictive model of hospitalization costs after spine surgery. Several initiatives have been put in place to minimize healthcare expenditures but there are limited data on the magnitude of the contribution of procedure-specific drivers of cost. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving 672,591 patients who underwent spine surgery and were registered in the National Inpatient Sample from 2005-2010. The cohort underwent 1:1 randomization to create derivation and validation subsamples. Regression techniques were used for the creation of a parsimonious predictive model of total hospitalization cost after spine surgery. Included were 356,783 patients (53.1%) who underwent fusions, and 315,808 (46.9%) non-fusion surgeries. The median hospitalization cost was $14,202 (interquartile range $4772-23,632). Common drivers of cost identified in the multivariate analysis included the length of stay, number of admission diagnoses and procedures, hospital size and region, patient income, fusion surgery, acute renal failure, sex, and coagulopathy. The model was validated in an independent cohort and demonstrated a final coefficient of determination that was very similar to the initial model. The predicted and observed values in the validation cohort demonstrated good correlations. This national study quantified the magnitude of significant drivers of hospitalization cost after spine surgery. We developed a predictive model that can be utilized as an adjunct in the cost containment debate and the creation of data driven policies. PMID:26183305

  1. [The clinical and psychosocial profile of inmates in psychiatric hospitals in the State of Ceará, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Melo, Matias Carvalho Aguiar; Albuquerque, Saulo Giovanni Castor; Luz, José Henrique Sousa; Quental, Perpétua Thaís de Lima Feitosa; Sampaio, Alexandre Menezes; Lima, Alexandre Bastos

    2015-02-01

    One of the most vexing problems in the context of psychiatric reform are the inmates of psychiatric hospitals institutionalized for one year or more. The long periods of hospitalization indicate that these inmates have been abandoned, which can aggravate their psychiatric disorders. This article seeks to trace a socio-demographic and clinical profile of the inmates of psychiatric hospitals in the State of Ceará, Brazil. It is a cross-sectional study, based on reviews of medical registers, interviews and application of two scales: the Katz Index and the PANSS. Most of the 39 participants were men, single and of an economically active age. Information on education (69.2%) and religion (66.7%) were not known and for 12.8%, their marital status was unknown. Nearly 75% received no visits from friends or relatives. Two thirds maintained total independence to perform ADLs (Activities of Daily Living). The majority were admitted for primary psychotic disorder (76.8%). These manifested a marked negative syndrome in 96.7% of cases. The study highlights the situation of abandonment and loss of citizenship experienced by chronically institutionalized patients. It is questionable to what extent hospitals are prepared to offer the assistance that this population needs. PMID:25715128

  2. Social Relations and Innovation: Changing the State of Play in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, David J.

    Data on the process and impact of introducing play therapy in children's hospitals in England and Wales are presented in this book. The effects of the introduction of play therapy on children's behaviors in children's wards and on the relationships between parents, doctors, nurses, ancillary staff, and playleaders are described. The responsiveness…

  3. Information Needs and Seeking Behaviours of Nurses: A Survey of Two Hospitals in Bayelsa State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baro, Emmanuel E.; Ebhomeya, Loveth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the information needs of nurses in two hospitals in Nigeria and the ways in which they went about attempting to meet those needs. Design/methodology/approach: The study is a descriptive survey of nurses at the Federal Medical Center (FMC), Yenagoa, and Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital…

  4. Deployable, portable, and temporary hospitals; one state's experiences through the years.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Skarote, Mary Beth; Peterson, Jeff; Stringer, Lew; Alson, Roy L; Cairns, Bruce A; Hubble, Michael W; Rich, Preston B; Cairns, Charles B; Holmes, James H; Runge, Jeff; Siler, Sean M; Winslow, James

    2014-01-01

    This article will review the use of temporary hospitals to augment the healthcare system as one solution for dealing with a surge of patients related to war, pandemic disease outbreaks, or natural disaster. The experiences highlighted in this article are those of North Carolina (NC) over the past 150 years, with a special focus on the need following the September 11, 2001 (9/11) attacks. It will also discuss the development of a temporary hospital system from concept to deployment, highlight recent developments, emphasize the need to learn from past experiences, and offer potential solutions for assuring program sustainability. Historically, when a particular situation called for a temporary hospital, one was created, but it was usually specific for the event and then dismantled. As with the case with many historical events, the details of the 9/11 attacks will fade into memory, and there is a concern that the impetus which created the current temporary hospital program may fade, as well. By developing a broader and more comprehensive approach to disaster responses through all-hazards preparedness, it is reasonable to learn from these past experiences, improve the understanding of current threats, and develop a long-term strategy to sustain these resources for future disaster medical needs. PMID:25348385

  5. An Outcome Evaluation of Reality Orientation Therapy with Geriatric Patients in a State Mental Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Clarke S.; Ivory, Peter B. C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Reality Orientation (RO) Therapy, a recently developed mode of treatment for use with geriatric patients was discussed. A controlled study was conducted comparing the effects of RO with those of traditional hospital care. The results indicated that RO is a promising technique for use with a chronic geriatric patient population. (Author)

  6. International Symposium on Ion Therapy: Planning the First Hospital-Based Heavy Ion Therapy Center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron; Pompos, Arnold; Story, Michael; Jiang, Steve; Timmerman, Robert; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of heavy ions for therapeutic purposes was initially pioneered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1970s [1, 2]. More recently, however, significant advances in determining the safety and efficacy of using heavy ions in the hospital setting have been reported in Japan and Germany [3, 4]. These promising results have helped to resurrect interest in the establishment of hospital-based heavy ion therapy in the United States. In line with these efforts, world experts in the field of heavy ion therapy were invited to attend the first annual International Symposium on Ion Therapy, which was held at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, from November 12 to 14, 2014. A brief overview of the results and discussions that took place during the symposium are presented in this article. PMID:27110586

  7. [Monitoring the physical processes of sterilization in hospitals in the state of Goiás].

    PubMed

    Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Pires, Francine Vieira; Guadagnin, Simone Vieira Toledo; Melo, Dulcelene de Sousa

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this descriptive study was to identify the physical, chemical and biological controls of the sterilization process by saturated steam in Pasteur autoclaves at Material and Sterilization Centers (MSC). The data was obtained by interviewing the worker responsible for the MSC of the largest hospital in every city in the interior of Goiás that had population of at least 20,000, in the period from August 2005 to June 2006. A total 44 municipalities participated. The analysis was performed using SPSS software. In 31 (94.0%) hospitals there were no nurses exclusive to the MSC, the workers responsible for the center were nursing aides and technicians. Most did not perform any physical, chemical and biological control of the sterilization process, and, in one case only these controls were performed simultaneously. Failing to monitor the sterilization cycles, and thus not ensuring the quality of the processes, is a risk to the population being assisted. PMID:21710085

  8. State law mandates for reporting of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infections in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Julie; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Dick, Andrew W; Stone, Patricia W; Divya Srinath, Jd

    2015-03-01

    US state and territorial laws were reviewed to identify Clostridium difficile infection reporting mandates. Twenty states require reporting either under state law or by incorporating federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' reporting requirements. Although state law mandates are more common, the incorporation of federal reporting requirements has been increasing. PMID:25695178

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of community- and hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from United States Hospitals: results from the AWARE Ceftaroline Surveillance Program (2012-2014).

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Jones, Ronald N; Flamm, Robert K

    2016-09-01

    Among 8437 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates collected from 143 medical centers in the United States (2012-2014), 7116 and 1321 were reported as community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) MRSA, respectively. CA-/HA-MRSA were most often isolated from patients with skin and skin structure infections (SSSI; 68.4/26.9%), pneumonia (13.7/49.0%) and bacteremia (10.0/17.7%). Overall, susceptibility rates were generally lower among HA-MRSA compared to CA-MRSA strains, especially for clindamycin (44.6 vs. 66.1%) and levofloxacin (21.4 vs. 35.5%). Also, susceptibility rates were lower for these two compounds among isolates from pneumonia compared to SSSI and bacteremia. Ceftaroline was broadly active against 98.0% of CA-MRSA and 94.3% of HA-MRSA (MIC50/90, 1μg/mL for both; no resistant isolate) overall, with little variation among infection type subsets. PMID:27394637

  10. Incidences and sociodemographics of specific congenital heart diseases in the United States of America: an evaluation of hospital discharge diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Egbe, Alexander; Uppu, Santosh; Stroustrup, Annemarie; Lee, Simon; Ho, Deborah; Srivastava, Shubhika

    2014-08-01

    Current estimates of the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) are derived from small clinical studies and metaanalyses. For the true incidence of CHD in the United States of America to be estimated, a single large representative population must be analyzed. All the data in this study were derived from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. The study determined the overall and lesion-specific incidences of CHD diagnoses among all birth hospitalizations in 2008, stratified by race, gender, socioeconomic status, and hospital geographic location. The study identified 13,093 CHD diagnoses among 1,204,887 birth hospitalizations, yielding an incidence of 10.8 per 1,000, with a predominance of mild lesions and septal defects. Atrial septal defect (ASD) and pulmonic stenosis were more common among females, whereas aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and d-transposition of great arteries were more common among males. No racial difference was observed in the overall CHD incidence. However, isolated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and ventricular septal defects (VSDs) were more common among Caucasians, whereas ASDs were more common among Hispanics. The incidences of CHD diagnoses were similar for all socioeconomic classes except the lowest socioeconomic class, which had a significantly lower CHD incidence. There was no geographic or seasonal variation in CHD incidence. This study demonstrated the incidence of echocardiographically confirmed CHD diagnosis to be 10.8 per 1,000 live births, marked by a high proportion of mild cardiac lesions and isolated PDAs. The high incidence of isolated PDAs in this study may be explained by the inclusion of only CHD diagnoses during birth hospitalization. PMID:24563074

  11. Hospitalization for total hip replacement among inpatients aged 45 and over: United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Wolford, Monica L; Palso, Kathleen; Bercovitz, Anita

    2015-02-01

     Total hip replacement, in which both the head of the femur and its socket are replaced, is done to restore movement to hips damaged by osteoarthritis, late-stage degenerative bone and cartilage disease, or other injuries and disease (1). The number of total hip replacements is expected to increase over the next few decades (2). National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data show trends and estimates of the number and rate of total hip replacements and average length of stay among inpatients aged 45 and over. PMID:25714040

  12. The telematic network of referee hospital "V. Monaldi" in Naples: state of the art and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pepino, A; Colasanate, A; Rossi, A

    2001-01-01

    The new advances in I.T. both in Hardware (wideband network) and in Software are rapidly changing the Health Information Systems scenario. In many hospitals of Campania Region this leads in many case to rebuild, starting from zero, both infrastructure and applications. Ericsson Enterprise has recently developed for the A.O. Monaldi and Integrated information System which consists of an advanced LAN (Local Area Network), a number of software infrastructures and some application systems as WEB site, Dicom PACS, E-mail server, Streaming Video from Operating Theatres, Internal TV Network. This integrated system represents the starting point for modern health information systems, which is compliant with new standards. The start-up of such systems represents always a problem for the organization and management point of view, therefore a number of problems concerning: training, education, security, privacy, operative procedures, co-ordination with existing applications, system management at the start-up and after. This paper deals with the technical aspects of this information system and discusses the problem met in introducing these IT products in a big and important hospital of Campania Region in Italy, in order to suggest a model, useful for other similar experiences. PMID:11604837

  13. Intent to stay in the nursing profession and associated factors among nurses working in Amhara Regional State Referral Hospitals, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses are essential to the health care delivery system especially to meet the health related millennium development goals. However, despite the significant shortage of nurses in Ethiopia, research in the country regarding nurses’ intent to stay in their profession is lacking. This study assessed intent to stay in the nursing profession and associated factors among nurses working in referral hospitals, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia. Methods Institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 389 nurses from April 8 to May 5, 2013. Stratified random sampling technique was used to select the study participants from five referral hospitals. Data were collected using pretested and structured self-administered questionnaires. Descriptive statistics were conducted to summarize the sample characteristics. Backward stepwise logistic regression model was fitted and adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence interval was calculated to identify associated factors. Results The proportion of nurses who reported intent to stay in the nursing profession was 39.8%. Age 40 to 49 (AOR [95% CI] 4.5 [1.6-12.8]), being married (AOR [95% CI] 2.0 [1.0-3.8]), having a bachelor degree in nursing (AOR [95% CI] 2.2 [1.2-4.1]), satisfaction with: autonomy and professional opportunities (AOR [95% CI] 2.6 [1.2-5.9]), scheduling (AOR [95% CI] 3.4 [1.6-7.5]), and pay and benefits (AOR [95% CI] 8.8 [4.5-17.1]); high continuance commitment (AOR [95% CI] 2.4 [1.3-4.8]) and high normative commitment (AOR [95% CI] 3.7 [1.9-7.2]) were the significant predictors of intent to stay in the nursing profession. Conclusions Intent to stay in the nursing profession was low among nurses working in Amhara Regional State referral hospitals. Interventions aimed at increasing the professional autonomy of nurses and revising the current salary and other duty payments are vital. PMID:25180028

  14. Bortezomib Inpatient Prescribing Practices in Free-Standing Children's Hospitals in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Seif, Alix E.; Li, Yimei; Huang, Yuan-Shung Vera; Bagatell, Rochelle; Fisher, Brian T.; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This study is a pharmacoepidemiologic description of pediatric bortezomib use. Exposure was identified through billing codes in patients admitted to US children’s hospitals that participated with the Pediatric Health Information System between 2004 and 2013. Associated information on underlying diseases, demographics, institutional use, mortality, and physician type was collected. Exposure to bortezomib was identified in 314 patients. Hematologist/Oncologists prescribed half of the bortezomib used. Use increased during the study period. Inpatient volume was positively correlated with bortezomib utilization. Bortezomib use in pediatrics is increasing for a variety of diseases. Variation in use exists across institutions. Further studies are needed to characterize bortezomib’s efficacy in pediatric diseases. PMID:26978062

  15. Coding of Electronic Laboratory Reports for Biosurveillance, Selected United States Hospitals, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Sanjaya; Burrer, Sherry L.; Winston, Carla A.; Dey, Achintya; Ajani, Umed; Groseclose, Samuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electronic laboratory reporting has been promoted as a public health priority. The Office of the U.S. National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has endorsed two coding systems: Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for laboratory test orders and Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for test results. Materials and Methods We examined LOINC and SNOMED CT code use in electronic laboratory data reported in 2011 by 63 non-federal hospitals to BioSense electronic syndromic surveillance system. We analyzed the frequencies, characteristics, and code concepts of test orders and results. Results A total of 14,028,774 laboratory test orders or results were reported. No test orders used SNOMED CT codes. To describe test orders, 77% used a LOINC code, 17% had no value, and 6% had a non-informative value, “OTH”. Thirty-three percent (33%) of test results had missing or non-informative codes. For test results with at least one informative value, 91.8% had only LOINC codes, 0.7% had only SNOMED codes, and 7.4% had both. Of 108 SNOMED CT codes reported without LOINC codes, 45% could be matched to at least one LOINC code. Conclusion Missing or non-informative codes comprised almost a quarter of laboratory test orders and a third of test results reported to BioSense by non-federal hospitals. Use of LOINC codes for laboratory test results was more common than use of SNOMED CT. Complete and standardized coding could improve the usefulness of laboratory data for public health surveillance and response. PMID:26392850

  16. Coding of Electronic Laboratory Reports for Biosurveillance, Selected United States Hospitals, 2011.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Sanjaya; Burrer, Sherry L; Winston, Carla A; Dey, Achintya; Ajani, Umed; Groseclose, Samuel L

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electronic laboratory reporting has been promoted as a public health priority. The Office of the U.S. National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has endorsed two coding systems: Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for laboratory test orders and Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for test results. Materials and Methods We examined LOINC and SNOMED CT code use in electronic laboratory data reported in 2011 by 63 non-federal hospitals to BioSense electronic syndromic surveillance system. We analyzed the frequencies, characteristics, and code concepts of test orders and results. Results A total of 14,028,774 laboratory test orders or results were reported. No test orders used SNOMED CT codes. To describe test orders, 77% used a LOINC code, 17% had no value, and 6% had a non-informative value, "OTH". Thirty-three percent (33%) of test results had missing or non-informative codes. For test results with at least one informative value, 91.8% had only LOINC codes, 0.7% had only SNOMED codes, and 7.4% had both. Of 108 SNOMED CT codes reported without LOINC codes, 45% could be matched to at least one LOINC code. Conclusion Missing or non-informative codes comprised almost a quarter of laboratory test orders and a third of test results reported to BioSense by non-federal hospitals. Use of LOINC codes for laboratory test results was more common than use of SNOMED CT. Complete and standardized coding could improve the usefulness of laboratory data for public health surveillance and response. PMID:26392850

  17. Long-term PM2.5 Exposure and Neurological Hospital Admissions in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Kioumourtzoglou, Marianthi-Anna; Schwartz, Joel D.; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Melly, Steven J.; Wang, Yun; Dominici, Francesca; Zanobetti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term exposure to fine particles (particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm; PM2.5) has been consistently linked to heart and lung disease. Recently, there has been increased interest in examining the effects of air pollution on the nervous system, with evidence showing potentially harmful effects on neurodegeneration. Objective Our objective was to assess the potential impact of long-term PM2.5 exposure on event time, defined as time to first admission for dementia, Alzheimer’s (AD), or Parkinson’s (PD) diseases in an elderly population across the northeastern United States. Methods We estimated the effects of PM2.5 on first hospital admission for dementia, AD, and PD among all Medicare enrollees ≥ 65 years in 50 northeastern U.S. cities (1999–2010). For each outcome, we first ran a Cox proportional hazards model for each city, adjusting for prior cardiopulmonary-related hospitalizations and year, and stratified by follow-up time, age, sex, and race. We then pooled the city-specific estimates by employing a random effects meta-regression. Results We followed approximately 9.8 million subjects and observed significant associations of long-term PM2.5 city-wide exposure with all three outcomes. Specifically, we estimated a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.08 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.11) for dementia, an HR of 1.15 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.19) for AD, and an HR of 1.08 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.12) for PD admissions per 1-μg/m3 increase in annual PM2.5 concentrations. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the relationship between long-term exposure to PM2.5 and time to first hospitalization for common neurodegenerative diseases. We found strong evidence of association for all three outcomes. Our findings provide the basis for further studies, as the implications of such exposures could be crucial to public health. Citation Kioumourtzoglou MA, Schwartz JD, Weisskopf MG, Melly SJ, Wang Y, Dominici F, Zanobetti A. 2016. Long-term PM2.5 exposure and neurological

  18. Impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination of infants on pneumonia and influenza hospitalization and mortality in all age groups in the United States.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Lone; Taylor, Robert J; Young-Xu, Yinong; Haber, Michael; May, Larissa; Klugman, Keith P

    2011-01-01

    A seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduced in the United States in 2000 has been shown to reduce invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in both vaccinated children and adults through induction of herd immunity. We assessed the impact of infant immunization on pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations and mortality in all age groups using Health Care Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases (SID) for 1996 to 2006 from 10 states; SID contain 100% samples of ICD9-coded hospitalization data for the selected states. Compared to a 1996-1997 through 1998-1999 baseline, by the 2005-2006 season, both IPD and pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations and deaths had decreased substantially in all age groups, including a 47% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38 to 54%) reduction in nonbacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (ICD9 code 481 with no codes indicating IPD) in infants <2 years old and a 54% reduction (CI, 53 to 56%) in adults ≥65 years of age. A model developed to calculate the total burden of pneumococcal pneumonia prevented by infant PCV7 vaccination in the United States from 2000 to 2006 estimated a reduction of 788,838 (CI, 695,406 to 875,476) hospitalizations for pneumococcal pneumonia. Ninety percent of the reduction in model-attributed pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations occurred through herd immunity among adults 18 years old and older; similar proportions were found in pneumococcal disease mortality prevented by the vaccine. In the first seasons after PCV introduction, when there were substantial state differences in coverage among <5-year-olds, states with greater coverage had significantly fewer influenza-associated pneumonia hospitalizations among children, suggesting that PCV7 use also reduces influenza-attributable pneumonia hospitalizations. PMID:21264063

  19. Physician Assistant and Advance Practice Nurse Care in Hospital Outpatient Departments: United States, 2008-2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard Technical Notes Other Publications Advance Data From Vital and ... Vital Statistics of the United States: 1890-1938 Technical Appendices Miscellaneous Publications National Conference on Health Statistics ...

  20. Differential Time Trends of Outcomes and Costs of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospitalizations by ST Elevation and Type of Intervention in the United States, 2001–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Takehiro; Hasegawa, Kohei; Kobayashi, Yasuki; Takahashi, Osamu; Fukui, Tsuguya; Tsugawa, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known whether time trends of in‐hospital mortality and costs of care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) differ by type of AMI (ST‐elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] vs. non‐ST‐elevation [NSTEMI]) and by the intervention received (percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI], coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG], or no intervention) in the United States. Methods and Results We conducted a serial cross‐sectional study of all hospitalizations for AMI aged 30 years or older using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2001–2011 (1 456 154 discharges; a weighted estimate of 7 135 592 discharges). Hospitalizations were stratified by type of AMI and intervention, and the time trends of in‐hospital mortality and hospital costs were examined for each combination of the AMI type and intervention, after adjusting for both patient‐ and hospital‐level characteristics. Compared with 2001, adjusted in‐hospital mortality improved significantly for NSTEMI patients in 2011, regardless of the intervention received (PCI odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.83; CABG OR 0.57, 0.45 to 0.72; without intervention OR 0.61, 0.57 to 0.65). As for STEMI, a decline in adjusted in‐hospital mortality was significant for those who underwent PCI (OR 0.83; 0.73 to 0.94); however, no significant improvement was observed for those who received CABG or without intervention. Hospital costs per hospitalization increased significantly for patients who underwent intervention, but not for those without intervention. Conclusions In the United States, the decrease in in‐hospital mortality and the increase in costs differed by the AMI type and the intervention received. These non‐uniform trends may be informative for designing effective health policies to reduce the health and economic burdens of AMI. PMID:25801759

  1. [Waste management in hospitals. Current situation in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia].

    PubMed

    Popp, W; Hansen, D; Hilgenhöner, M; Grandek, M; Heinemann, A; Blättler, T

    2009-07-01

    In 20 hospitals in North Rhine-Westphalia in-plant handling wastes and the delivery of the waste to the disposer were examined. Deficits were seen regarding risk assessment and operating instructions, support by company doctors, personal protection equipment, and break areas for the waste collecting personnel. Also the qualification of the waste management officer and his/her time contingent, correct declaration of the wastes, the training of the waste collecting personnel, the cleaning of multi-use containers and transportation vehicles, storage of the wastes at the collecting points, and the use of sharp collecting boxes were to be partly criticized. Consequences and recommendations are given, concerning the company's obligations (e.g., provide risk assessment, operating instructions), waste management officer (e.g., qualification, enough time contingent, regular inspections), waste collecting personnel (e.g., training courses), industrial safety (e.g., protection equipment, break area wash places), company doctors, transportation vehicles in the house (e.g., regular cleaning), one-way collectors (e.g., labelling at the site of the collection), multi-use collectors (e.g., cleaning), and compressing containers (e.g., larger maintenance openings). PMID:19626285

  2. [Adherence to standard precautions by the public pre-hospital health team in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Lopes, Aline Cristine Souza; Oliveira, Adriana Cristina; Silva, Jussara Teixeira; Paiva, Maria Henriqueta Rocha Siqueira

    2008-06-01

    This was a cross-sectional study of workers in the pre-hospital care team in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, aimed at evaluating adherence to precautions. The study instrument included questions on knowledge, attitudes, and facilitating factors for adherence to standard precautions. Adherence was verified by percentage of adequacy: > 75% correct answers. Drivers showed the lowest degree of knowledge and physicians the highest. In self-reported answers, none of the workers demonstrated adequate use of face masks, goggles, or personal protective equipment (PPE), and drivers reported inadequate attitudes on all the items. In the univariate analysis, job position, gender, and specific rescue unit were associated with adoption of precautions. Meanwhile, in the multivariate analysis, only job position was related (drivers and nurse technicians/aides). The most frequently cited facilitating factors for improvement of adherence were: training focusing on infections, occupational risks, and use of PPE; periodic team meetings; and creation of a central unit for cleaning, disinfecting, and sterilizing equipment and materials. Workers in the pre-hospital care service demonstrated attitudes that were compatible with knowledge, but professional class affected knowledge on standard precautions and self-reported adequate attitudes. PMID:18545764

  3. 78 FR 57293 - Medicaid Program; State Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotment Reductions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... published on December 19, 2008 (73 FR 77904) (and herein referred to as the 2008 DSH final rule) requiring... United States; in that regard, the annual sample size for the ACS is over 30 times larger than that for... considers the respondents as uninsured if they are uninsured at any time during the year whereas the...

  4. Impact of the NOx SIP Call on Respiratory Hospitalizations in New York State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a serious public health problem in New York State (NYS), affecting 8.4% (370,000) children and 7.6% (more than 1.1 million) adults. Asthma burden in New York's urban areas is consistently higher than the national average, with marked differences in prevalence and seve...

  5. Attribution of Foodborne Illnesses, Hospitalizations, and Deaths to Food Commodities by using Outbreak Data, United States, 1998–2008

    PubMed Central

    Hoekstra, Robert M.; Ayers, Tracy; Tauxe, Robert V.; Braden, Christopher R.; Angulo, Frederick J.; Griffin, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    Each year, >9 million foodborne illnesses are estimated to be caused by major pathogens acquired in the United States. Preventing these illnesses is challenging because resources are limited and linking individual illnesses to a particular food is rarely possible except during an outbreak. We developed a method of attributing illnesses to food commodities that uses data from outbreaks associated with both simple and complex foods. Using data from outbreak-associated illnesses for 1998–2008, we estimated annual US foodborne illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths attributable to each of 17 food commodities. We attributed 46% of illnesses to produce and found that more deaths were attributed to poultry than to any other commodity. To the extent that these estimates reflect the commodities causing all foodborne illness, they indicate that efforts are particularly needed to prevent contamination of produce and poultry. Methods to incorporate data from other sources are needed to improve attribution estimates for some commodities and agents. PMID:23622497

  6. Characterization of Nasal and Blood Culture Isolates of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Patients in United States Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Tickler, Isabella A.; Goering, Richard V.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Mediavilla, José R.; Persing, David H.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 299 nares and 194 blood isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), each recovered from a unique patient, were collected from 23 U.S. hospitals from May 2009 to March 2010. All isolates underwent spa and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing; a subset of 84 isolates was typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SmaI. Seventy-six spa types were observed among the isolates. Overall, for nasal isolates, spa type t002-SCCmec type II (USA100) was the most common strain type (37% of isolates), while among blood isolates, spa type t008-SCCmec type IV (USA300) was the most common (39%). However, the proportion of all USA100 and USA300 isolates varied by United States census region. Nasal isolates were more resistant to tobramycin and clindamycin than blood isolates (55.9% and 48.8% of isolates versus 36.6% and 39.7%, respectively; for both, P < 0.05). The USA300 isolates were largely resistant to fluoroquinolones. High-level mupirocin resistance was low among all spa types (<5%). SCCmec types III and VIII, which are rare in the United States, were observed along with several unusual PFGE types, including CMRSA9, EMRSA15, and the PFGE profile associated with sequence type 239 (ST239) isolates. Typing data from this convenience sample suggest that in U.S. hospitalized patients, USA100 isolates of multiple spa types, while still common in the nares, have been replaced by USA300 isolates as the predominant MRSA strain type in positive blood cultures. PMID:22155818

  7. Risk factors associated with calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chika C; Lefebvre, Sandra L; Pearl, David L; Yang, Mingyin; Wang, Mansen; Blois, Shauna L; Lund, Elizabeth M; Dewey, Cate E

    2014-08-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis results from the formation of aggregates of calcium salts in the urinary tract. Difficulties associated with effectively treating calcium oxalate urolithiasis and the proportional increase in the prevalence of calcium oxalate uroliths relative to other urolith types over the last 2 decades has increased the concern of clinicians about this disease. To determine factors associated with the development of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States, a retrospective case-control study was performed. A national electronic database of medical records of all dogs evaluated between October 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 at 787 general care veterinary hospitals in the United States was reviewed. Dogs were selected as cases at the first-time diagnosis of a laboratory-confirmed urolith comprised of at least 70% calcium oxalate (n=452). Two sets of control dogs with no history of urolithiasis diagnosis were randomly selected after the medical records of all remaining dogs were reviewed: urinalysis examination was a requirement in the selection of one set (n=1808) but was not required in the other set (n=1808). Historical information extracted included urolith composition, dog's diet, age, sex, neuter status, breed size category, hospital location, date of diagnosis, and urinalysis results. Multivariable analysis showed that the odds of first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were significantly (P<0.05) greater for dogs<7 years, males (OR: 7.77, 95% CI: 4.93-12.26), neutered (OR: 2.58, 1.44-4.63), toy- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.15, 1.90-5.22), small- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.05, 1.83-5.08), large- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 0.05, 0.01-0.19), and those with a diagnosis of cystitis within the previous year (OR: 6.49, 4.14-10.16). Urinary factors significantly associated with first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were acidic vs. basic pH (OR: 1.94, 1

  8. Interview with a quality leader: Carol Wagner on Washington State Hospital Association (WSHA) and their statewide improvement. Interview by Susan V. White.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Carol Wagner, RN, MBA is the Vice President for Patient Safety at the Washington State Hospital Association (WSHA). She is recognized nationally as an innovative patient safety leader. She led the development of WSHA's Patient Safety Program and Rural Healthcare Quality Network. Under Carol's leadership, the WSHA received the 2010 John Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Award for national innovation given by The Joint Commission and the National Quality Forum. The association also received the 2011 Dick Davidson Award for Allied Association Leadership. These national awards are two of the highest honors an organization can receive for patient safety and quality. Through close working relationships with national and state regulatory bodies and professional organizations, Carol designs programs to improve quality and safety in every hospital in Washington State. Under Carol's leadership, all hospitals in Washington participated in the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's (IHI) 5 Million Lives Campaign. The effort led to implementation of the largest number of rapid response teams in a geographic area. Carol also created the first statewide learning collaborative to reduce hospital-acquired infections. Carol is a registered nurse with an MBA focusing on finance and operations. She worked clinically in a variety of settings, provided leadership as a nursing administrator, and transitioned to lead hospital strategic planning, budgeting, and cost accounting. She studied management and system change at The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Her quality training was with Dr. W. Edwards Deming and at Intermountain Health Care with Dr. Brent James. Her experience includes work in for-profit and not-for-profit environments and supporting community, tertiary, and academic medical centers. This includes Huntington Hospital in Pasadena, California and a national for-profit hospital system with more than 100 hospitals. PMID:22092919

  9. Stating Appointment Costs in SMS Reminders Reduces Missed Hospital Appointments: Findings from Two Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hallsworth, Michael; Berry, Dan; Sanders, Michael; Sallis, Anna; King, Dominic; Vlaev, Ivo; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Missed hospital appointments are a major cause of inefficiency worldwide. Healthcare providers are increasingly using Short Message Service reminders to reduce ‘Did Not Attend’ (DNA) rates. Systematic reviews show that sending such reminders is effective, but there is no evidence on whether their impact is affected by their content. Accordingly, we undertook two randomised controlled trials that tested the impact of rephrasing appointment reminders on DNA rates in the United Kingdom. Trial Methods Participants were outpatients with a valid mobile telephone number and an outpatient appointment between November 2013 and January 2014 (Trial One, 10,111 participants) or March and May 2014 (Trial Two, 9,848 participants). Appointments were randomly allocated to one of four reminder messages, which were issued five days in advance. Message assignment was then compared against appointment outcomes (appointment attendance, DNA, cancellation by patient). Results In Trial One, a message including the cost of a missed appointment to the health system produced a DNA rate of 8.4%, compared to 11.1% for the existing message (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.61–0.89, P<0.01). Trial Two replicated this effect (DNA rate 8.2%), but also found that expressing the same concept in general terms was significantly less effective (DNA rate 9.9%, OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.00–1.48, P<0.05). Moving from the existing reminder to the more effective costs message would result in 5,800 fewer missed appointments per year in the National Health Service Trust in question, at no additional cost. The study’s main limitations are that it took place in a single location in England, and that it required accurate phone records, which were only obtained for 20% of eligible patients. We conclude that missed appointments can be reduced, for no additional cost, by introducing persuasive messages to appointment reminders. Future studies could examine the impact of varying reminder messages in other health

  10. Treatment of Gastric Adenocarcinoma May Differ Among Hospital Types in the United States, a Report from the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Greer; Patel-Parekh, Lina; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Donohue, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The concept that complex surgical procedures should be performed at high-volume centers to improve surgical morbidity and mortality is becoming widely accepted. We wanted to determine if there were differences in the treatment of patients with gastric cancer between community cancer centers and teaching hospitals in the United States. Data from the 2001 Gastric Cancer Patient Care Evaluation Study of the National Cancer Data Base comprising 6,047 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma treated at 691 hospitals were assessed. The mean number of patients treated was larger at teaching hospitals (14/year) when compared to community centers (5–9/year) (p < 0.05). The utilization of laparoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography were significantly more common at teaching centers (p < 0.01). Pathologic assessment of greater than 15 nodes was documented in 31% of specimen at community hospitals and 38% at teaching hospitals (p < 0.01). Adjusted for cancer stage, chemotherapy and radiation therapy were utilized with equal frequency at all types of treatment centers. The 30-day postoperative mortality was lowest at teaching hospitals (5.5%) and highest at community hospitals (9.9%) (p < 0.01). These data support previous publications demonstrating that patients with diseases requiring specialized treatment have lower operative mortality when treated at high-volume centers. PMID:17436123

  11. Regulatory, policy and quality update for venous thromboembolism and stroke in United States hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Charles E

    2012-10-01

    Stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) have a large impact on the United States (US) healthcare system. It is estimated that up to 1.7million new and recurrent stroke and VTE events are occurring in the US on an annual basis with the combined cost approaching over $200billion per year. A significant amount of stroke and VTE are preventable from appropriate antithrombotic use in at-risk patients and the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services, the Joint Commission, the National Quality Forum and other key quality and regulatory entities have prioritized minimizing the impact of morbidity, mortality and avoidable costs related to these diseases. This review provides a brief history, overview, and update for the development of quality measures, quality systems, and regulatory and policy changes as related to stroke and VTE within the US healthcare system. PMID:22841661

  12. Tobacco Smoke Exposure in Non-smoking Hospitality Workers Before and After a State Smoking Ban

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Joni A.; Schillo, Barbara A.; Moilanen, Molly M.; Lindgren, Bruce R.; Murphy, Sharon; Carmella, Steven; Hecht, Stephen S.; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.

    2010-01-01

    Secondhand smoke exposure is estimated to account for 3000 cancer deaths per year. While several countries and states in the U.S. have passed comprehensive smoke-free laws to protect all employees, a significant number of workers are still not protected. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of passing a comprehensive smoking ban that included bars and restaurants on biomarkers of nicotine and carcinogen exposure. The urines of non-smoking employees (N=24) of bars and restaurants that allowed smoking prior to the smoke-free law were analyzed before and after the law was passed in Minnesota. The results showed significant reductions in both total cotinine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) (free plus glucuronidated) after the ban was instituted. These results provide further support for the importance of protecting employees working in all venues. PMID:20354127

  13. Surveillance of the short-term impact of fine particle air pollution on cardiovascular disease hospitalizations in New York State

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that the effects of particulate matter on health vary based on factors including the vulnerability of the population, health care practices, exposure factors, and the pollutant mix. Methods We used time-stratified case-crossover to estimate differences in the short-term impacts of PM2.5 on cardiovascular disease hospital admissions in New York State by geographic area, year, age, gender, co-morbid conditions, and area poverty rates. Results PM2.5 had a stronger impact on heart failure than other cardiovascular diagnoses, with 3.1% of heart failure admissions attributable to short-term PM2.5 exposure over background levels of 5 ug/m3. Older adults were significantly more susceptible to heart failure after short-term ambient PM2.5 exposure than younger adults. Conclusion The short-term impact of PM2.5 on cardiovascular disease admissions, and modifications of that impact, are small and difficult to measure with precision. Multi-state collaborations will be necessary to attain more precision to describe spatiotemporal differences in health impacts. PMID:19772650

  14. Molecular Detection and Characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Among Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maureen H; Benitez, Alvaro J; Cross, Kristen E; Hicks, Lauri A; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The molecular characteristics of M pneumoniae detected in patients hospitalized with CAP in the United States are poorly described. Methods.  We performed molecular characterization of M pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs from children and adults hospitalized with CAP in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, including P1 typing, multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), and macrolide susceptibility genotyping. Results.  Of 216 M pneumoniae polymerase chain reaction-positive specimens, 40 (18.5%) were obtained from adults and 176 (81.5%) from children. P1 type distribution differed between adults (64% type 1 and 36% type 2) and children (84% type 1, 13% type 2, and 3% variant) (P < .05) and among sites (P < .01). Significant differences in the proportions of MLVA types 4/5/7/2 and 3/5/6/2 were also observed by age group (P < .01) and site (P < .01). A macrolide-resistant genotype was identified in 7 (3.5%) specimens, 5 of which were from patients who had recently received macrolide therapy. No significant differences in clinical characteristics were identified among patients with various strain types or between macrolide-resistant and -sensitive M pneumoniae infections. Conclusions.  The P1 type 1 genotype and MLVA type 4/5/7/2 predominated, but there were differences between children and adults and among sites. Macrolide resistance was rare. Differences in strain types did not appear to be associated with differences in clinical outcomes. Whole genome sequencing of M pneumoniae may help identify better ways to characterize strains. PMID:26284257

  15. Racial/Ethnic Specific Trends in Pediatric Firearm-Related Hospitalizations in the United States, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    Kalesan, Bindu; Dabic, Stefan; Vasan, Sowmya; Stylianos, Steven; Galea, Sandro

    2016-05-01

    Objectives To determine the temporal patterns and the difference in trends by race/ethnicity of pediatric firearm hospitalizations (FH) among those aged 15 years or younger in the United States. Methods Data on pediatric FH was retrieved from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 1998 and 2011 (n = 16,998,470) using external cause of injury codes (E-codes) of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical modification, (assault: E9650-E9654, unintentional: E9220-E9224, E9228, and E9229, suicide: E9550-E9554, E9556, and E9559, undetermined: E9850-E9854, and E9856 and legal: E970). Meta-regression was used to determine the significance of temporal trends. Survey logistic regression adjusted for survey year was used to examine association of pediatric FH with social and demographic characteristics. Results An annual reduction of 1.07 per 100,000 hospitalizations (p-trend = 0.011) was observed between 1998 and 2011. There was reduction in rate of unintentional-FH (p-trend = 0.013), suicide-FH (p-trend = 0.029), and undetermined-FH (p-trend = 0.002), but not assault-FH (p-trend = 0.18). A decline in rates of FH was observed among whites (p-trend = 0.021) and Hispanics (p-trend = 0.03) while an increase in rates of assault-FH was observed among black children. All other intents and all other racial/ethnic groups showed declining rates during this interval. Conclusions There was an overall decline in rates of pediatric FHs in this time period driven by a decline in unintentional-FHs. However there was an increase in assault FH among black children during this same time period. PMID:26645619

  16. Hospitals--A Current Analysis of the Right to Abortions and Sterilizations in the Fourth Circuit: State Action and the Church Amendment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malpass, Susie

    1976-01-01

    The U. S. Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade found that the right of privacy guarantees a woman the prerogative of having an abortion free of interference by the state; but in Doe v. Bolton it allowed a hospital to refuse to admit a patient for an abortion. This conflict is discussed with reference to the Church Amendment. (LBH)

  17. Alcohol-Related Diagnoses and All-Cause Hospitalization Among HIV-Infected and Uninfected Patients: A Longitudinal Analysis of United States Veterans from 1997 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Rentsch, Christopher; Tate, Janet P; Akgün, Kathleen M; Crystal, Stephen; Wang, Karen H; Ryan Greysen, S; Wang, Emily A; Bryant, Kendall J; Fiellin, David A; Justice, Amy C; Rimland, David

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with HIV infection are living substantially longer on antiretroviral therapy, but hospitalization rates continue to be relatively high. We do not know how overall or diagnosis-specific hospitalization rates compare between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals or what conditions may drive hospitalization trends. Hospitalization rates among United States Veterans were calculated and stratified by HIV serostatus and principal diagnosis disease category. Because alcohol-related diagnoses (ARD) appeared to have a disproportional effect, we further stratified our calculations by ARD history. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to assess the relative risk of hospitalization controlling for demographic and other comorbidity variables. From 1997 to 2011, 46,428 HIV-infected and 93,997 uninfected patients were followed for 1,497,536 person-years. Overall hospitalization rates decreased among HIV-infected and uninfected patients. However, cardiovascular and renal insufficiency admissions increased for all groups while gastrointestinal and liver, endocrine, neurologic, and non-AIDS cancer admissions increased among those with an alcohol-related diagnosis. After multivariable adjustment, HIV-infected individuals with an ARD had the highest risk of hospitalization (hazard ratio 3.24, 95 % CI 3.00, 3.49) compared to those free of HIV infection and without an ARD. Still, HIV alone also conferred increased risk (HR 2.08, 95 % CI 2.04, 2.13). While decreasing overall, risk of all-cause hospitalization remains higher among HIV-infected than uninfected individuals and is strongly influenced by the presence of an ARD. PMID:25711299

  18. Transfer of hospitals and "additional premises" to the state: questionable morality in the implementation of the National Health Service Act (1946).

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    2004-12-01

    The National Health Service Act of 1946, pioneered by Aneurin Bevan, came into being on the "appointed day", 5 July 1948. Hospitals with their "additional premises" throughout Britain were "seized" by the state and incorporated into this vast socialist enterprise. While the majority of the population welcomed this new initiative in the creation of a welfare state, associated with medical care from cradle to grave, not all (especially members of various Hospital Boards of Management) were so enthusiastic. The hospitals for "incurables" (long stay patients) were unhappy and lost a vast proportion of their income owing to a great deal of procrastination; but most of them ultimately managed to escape nationalisation after a prolonged period of negotiation, by a claim that they were "homes" rather than "hospitals". The confiscation of property which had been built as a result of voluntary subscription was another huge and highly contentious matter, which has been highlighted in recent years. The future of the Seamen's Hospital Society's properties represents a good example of this. PMID:15579611

  19. Guide to Choosing a Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... the following and more: • Find hospitals by name, city, county, state, or ZIP code. • Check the results ... by the hospital name, or by ZIP Code, City, State or Territory, or County. • Select General Search, ...

  20. 20 CFR 404.462 - Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Deductions; Reductions; and Nonpayments of Benefits § 404.462 Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpayment of hospital and medical...

  1. Hospitals, finance, and health system reform in Britain and the United States, c. 1910-1950: historical revisionism and cross-national comparison.

    PubMed

    Gorsky, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Comparative histories of health system development have been variously influenced by the theoretical approaches of historical institutionalism, political pluralism, and labor mobilization. Britain and the United States have figured significantly in this literature because of their very different trajectories. This article explores the implications of recent research on hospital history in the two countries for existing historiographies, particularly the coming of the National Health Service in Britain. It argues that the two hospital systems initially developed in broadly similar ways, despite the very different outcomes in the 1940s. Thus, applying the conceptual tools used to explain the U.S. trajectory can deepen appreciation of events in Britain. Attention focuses particularly on working-class hospital contributory schemes and their implications for finance, governance, and participation; these are then compared with Blue Cross and U.S. hospital prepayment. While acknowledging the importance of path dependence in shaping attitudes of British bureaucrats toward these schemes, analysis emphasizes their failure in pressure group politics, in contrast to the United States. In both countries labor was also crucial, in the United States sustaining employment-based prepayment and in Britain broadly supporting system reform. PMID:22323233

  2. Mental health care policy environment in Rivers State: experiences of mental health nurses providing mental health care services in neuro-psychiatric hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental health services for Rivers State and surrounding States in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria are provided only at the neuropsychiatric Rumuigbo Hospital in Port Harcourt City, Rivers State, Nigeria. The study explored mental health nurses’ experiences of providing mental health services at the hospital in an attempt to understand policy implications, identify difficulties and challenges of delivering mental health care services. Methods A qualitative study using in-depth interview was conducted among 20 mental health nurses working at the neuropsychiatric Rumuigbo Hospital. This was reviewed within the Townsend mental health policy template of context and resources domains. Results A lack of political support and senior position in the Ministry of Health hinders service delivery, the prevalence of institutionalized stigma, a lack of training, and system failure to provide services at all levels of care is hampering service delivery. The inadequate allocation of resources for hospital renovations and equipment is preventing appropriate client care, as does the lack of funding for drugs, the cost of which makes them unaffordable, affecting clients staying on treatment. Conclusion Education and training of mental health care professionals should be given priority to remedy human resource shortage, provide incentives to motivate health professionals for psychiatric practice, and move toward decentralization of care into general health care services. Information should be provided at all levels to overcome the myths surrounding the causes of mental illnesses, to reduce stigma and discrimination of the affected and their families. PMID:23414640

  3. [A DRG based future hospital funding scheme: state of implementation and impact in the field of rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Rochell, B; Roeder, N

    2002-02-01

    With the statutory health insurance reform act 2000 the German government started to introduce a new hospital funding system based on an internationally used diagnosis related groups (DRGs) system. In June 2000 the German self-administration board (consisting of the German hospital federation, the German statutory health insurance funds and the association of private health insurers), which is in charge of realizing this project, decided to develop the future German (Refined) DRG System (G-DRG) with reference to the Australian Refined DRG System (AR-DRG) Version 4.1. Replacement of the previous German hospital reimbursement system by the new DRG-based hospital funding system is planned for January 2003 on a voluntary basis. From January 2004 on, the change of the reimbursement system is to become mandatory for all hospitals with the exception of psychiatry. The new reimbursement system is intended to not only cover acute hospital care but also parts of early rehabilitation, palliative and sub-acute care. Because of its economic incentives the effects of DRG introduction in Germany will not only be limited to the hospital scene but will also affect rehabilitation. PMID:11830787

  4. Increase in nonhepatic diagnoses among persons with hepatitis C hospitalized for any cause, United States, 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Tong, X; Spradling, P R

    2015-11-01

    Although persons with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may experience nonhepatic illnesses, little is known about the frequency of and trends in such conditions in a population-based sample of HCV-infected persons. Using hospitalization data collected during 2004-2011 from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we examined trends in comorbidities among all hospitalizations that included either a principal or secondary HCV diagnostic code (i.e., HCV was not necessarily the cause for hospitalization). We also compared comorbidities among all persons aged 45-64 years hospitalized with and without principal or secondary HCV diagnostic codes. The estimated number of hospitalizations among persons with HCV infection increased from 850,490 in 2004-2005 to 1,178,633 in 2010-2011; mean age at hospitalization was 50 years in 2004-2005 and 52.5 years in 2010-2011. There were significant increases in the prevalence of most medical and psychiatric comorbidities; the largest were for lipid disorders, chronic kidney disease and obesity. Among HCV-infected aged 45-64 persons hospitalized for any cause, the prevalence of alcohol /substance abuse, mental disorders, chronic kidney disease, pneumonia, hepatitis B virus infection and HIV infection were significantly higher than those aged 45-64 persons hospitalized without HCV infection (P < 0.001 for all). The prevalence of cryoglobulinaemia, vasculitis, nephrotic syndrome or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and porphyria cutanea tarda among hospitalizations with HCV infection was consistently low during the study period (i.e., <0.5%). The increase we observed in nonhepatic comorbidities associated with a high risk of HCV-related complications has important implications for the current HCV treatment recommendations in a greatly expanded treatment population. PMID:25894392

  5. Medical psychology services in dutch general hospitals: state of the art developments and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Soons, Paul; Denollet, Johan

    2009-06-01

    In this article an overview is presented of the emergence of medical psychology in the care of somatically ill patients. The situation in the Netherlands can be considered as prototypical. For 60 years, clinical psychologists have been working in general, teaching and academic hospitals. Nowadays, they are an integrated non-medical specialism working in the medical setting of hospitals in the Netherlands, and are a full-member of the medical board. This paper discusses several topics: the position of the general hospital in the health care system in the Netherlands, the emergence of medical psychology in Dutch hospitals, the role of the professional association of medical psychologists, and the characteristics of patients seen by clinical psychologists. Following the discussion about the situation of medical psychology in other countries, recommendations are formulated for the further development of medical psychology in the Netherlands as well as in other countries. PMID:19266269

  6. Hospital ship doctrine in the United States Navy: the Halsey effect on scoop- and-sail tactics.

    PubMed

    Lane, D A

    1997-06-01

    Although hospital ships have a long history, naval strategists have paid little attention to their tactical employment in naval and amphibious warfare. Often employed as floating ambulances, operational doctrine for hospital ships did not permit their use as floating combat surgical hospitals until the final amphibious campaigns of World War II. Based on operational archives-ships' logs, war diaries, battle plans, and other official records-this essay traces the evolution of tactical doctrine on hospital ships from Guadalcanal to Inchon. Early in World War II, there were insufficient hospital ships to permit much flexibility in their employment. By the Philippine campaign in 1944, the increased availability of afloat medical assets prompted Third Fleet Commander Vice Admiral William F. Halsey to propose that the ships be used as acute surgical hospitals at the amphibious landing sites rather than as sea-going ambulances. Facing the prospect of a growing number of casualties for the major assaults being planned, Halsey needed to maximize medical and surgical efficacy and return-to-duty rates to conserve the fighting strength of his invasion forces. Admiral Chester A. Nimitz approved Halsey's proposal, and the battle plan at Iwo Jima combined the careful triage of casualties at the waterfront with early, forward employment of hospital ships. Despite more than 21,000 casualties at Iwo Jima, they were handled better than at any previous operation in the Pacific theater. The tactical doctrine for hospital ships suggested by Halsey has since been employed in every major amphibious operation, including Okinawa and Inchon, and has also been used in modern-era contingency and humanitarian missions. PMID:9183159

  7. Leaching of S, Cu, and Fe from disseminated Ni-(Fe)-(Cu) sulphide ore during serpentinization of dunite host rocks at Mount Keith, Agnew-Wiluna belt, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gole, Martin J.

    2014-10-01

    Komatiite-hosted disseminated Ni sulphide deposits in the Agnew-Wiluna greenstone belt occur both above and below the olivine isograd that was imposed on the greenstone sequence during the M2 metamorphic/deformation event. Deposits in the northern and central part of the belt and that are located below the isograd (Mount Keith, Honeymoon Well and West Jordan) have complex sulphide mineralogy and strongly zoned sulphide assemblages. These range from least-altered assemblages of pentlandite-pyrrhotite-chalcopyrite±pyrite to altered assemblages of pentlandite±chalcopyrite, pentlandite-heazlewoodite (or millerite), heazlewoodite (or millerite), and rarely to heazlewoodite-native Ni. Deposits to the south and that are above of the olivine isograd (Six Mile, Goliath North) are dominated by less complex magmatic assemblages with a lower proportion of weakly altered pentlandite±chalcopyrite assemblages. More altered assemblages are uncommon in these deposits and occur as isolated patches around the periphery of the deposits. The sulphide zonation is reflected by whole-rock reductions in S, Cu, Fe and Zn, whereas Ni, Pt and Pd and, with some exceptions, Co are conservative. The leaching of S, Cu, Fe and Zn from sulphide assemblages and the whole rock was initiated by highly reduced conditions that were produced during low fluid/rock ratio serpentinization. Consumption of H2O resulted in Cl, a component of the fluid, being concentrated sufficiently to stabilise iowaite as part of lizardite-rich assemblages. Once the rate of olivine hydration reactions declined and during and after expansion and associated fracturing of the ultramafic sequence allowed higher fluid access, a more fluid-dominated environment formed and new carbonate-bearing fluid gained access to varying extents to the ultramafic rock sequence. This drove Cl from iowaite (to form pyroaurite) and caused the sulphide assemblages to be altered from the original magmatic assemblages and compositions to those

  8. The current state of physical activity and exercise programs in German-speaking, Swiss psychiatric hospitals: results from a brief online survey

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Serge; Colledge, Flora; Beeler, Nadja; Pühse, Uwe; Kalak, Nadeem; Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Mikoteit, Thorsten; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Gerber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity and exercise programs (PAEPs) are an important factor in increasing and maintaining physical and mental health. This holds particularly true for patients with psychiatric disorders undergoing treatment in a psychiatric hospital. To understand whether the benefits reported in the literature are mirrored in current treatment modalities, the aim of the present study was to assess the current state of PAEPs in psychiatric hospitals in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Methods All psychiatric hospitals (N=55) in the German-speaking part of Switzerland were contacted in spring 2014. Staff responsible for PAEPs were asked to complete an online questionnaire covering questions related to PAEPs such as type, frequency, staff training, treatment rationale, importance of PAEPs within the treatment strategy, and possible avenues to increase PAEPs. Results Staff members of 48 different psychiatric hospitals completed the survey. Hospitals provided the following therapeutic treatments: relaxation techniques (100%), sports therapy (97%), activity-related psychotherapeutic interventions (95%), physiotherapy (85%), body therapies (59%), far-east techniques (57%), and hippotherapy (22%). Frequencies ranged from once/week to five times/week. Approximately 25% of patients participated in the PAEPs. Interventions were offered irrespective of psychiatric disorders. PAEP providers wanted and needed more vocational training. Conclusion All participating psychiatric hospitals offer a broad variety of PAEPs in their treatment curricula. However, the majority of inpatients do not participate in PAEPs. Furthermore, those who do participate cannot continue to do so following discharge. PAEP providers need specific extended vocational trainings and believe that the potential of PA should be improved. PMID:27350748

  9. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  10. Impact of Age and Sex on Outcomes and Hospital Cost of Acute Asthma in the United States, 2011-2012

    PubMed Central

    Teague, W. Gerald; Koroukian, Siran M.; Schlitz, Nicholas K.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Busse, William B.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Comhair, Suzy A.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Israel, Elliot; Wenzel, Sally E.; Holguin, Fernando; Gaston, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Worldwide, asthma is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and economic burden, with significant gender and racial disparities. However, little attention has been given to the independent role of age on lifetime asthma severity and hospitalization. We aimed to assess the effect of age, gender, race and ethnicity on indicators of asthma severity including asthma related hospitalization, mortality, hospital cost, and the rate of respiratory failure. Methods We analyzed the 2011 and 2012 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project- National Inpatient Sample (NIS). We validated and extended those results using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP; 2002–2011) database. Severe asthma was prospectively defined using the stringent American Thoracic Society (ATS) definition. Results Hospitalization for asthma was reported in 372,685 encounters in 2012 and 368,528 in 2011. The yearly aggregate cost exceeded $2 billion. There were distinct bimodal distributions for hospitalization age, with an initial peak at 5 years and a second at 50 years. Likewise, this bimodal age distribution of patients with severe asthma was identified using SARP. Males comprised the majority of individuals in the first peak, but women in the second. Aggregate hospital cost mirrored the bimodal peak distribution. The probability of respiratory failure increased with age until the age of 60, after which it continued to increase in men, but not in women. Conclusions Severe asthma is primarily a disease of young boys and middle age women. Greater understanding of the biology of lung aging and influence of sex hormones will allow us to plan for targeted interventions during these times in order to reduce the personal and societal burdens of asthma. PMID:27294365

  11. Hospital costs associated with atrial fibrillation for ischemic stroke patients aged 18-64 years in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guijing; Joo, Heesoo; Tong, Xin; George, Mary G.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Hospital costs associated with atrial fibrillation (AFib) among stroke patients have not been well-studied, especially among people younger than 65 years. We estimated the AFib-associated hospital costs in U.S. patients aged 18-64 years. Methods We identified hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of ischemic stroke from the 2010-2012 MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters inpatient datasets, excluding those with capitated health insurance plans, aged <18 or >64, missing geographic region, hospital costs below the 1st or above 99th percentile, and having carotid intervention (N=40,082). We searched the data for AFib and analyzed the costs for non-repeat and repeat stroke admissions separately. We estimated the AFib-associated costs using multivariate regression models controlling for age, sex, geographic region, and Charlson comorbidity index. Results Of the 33,500 non-repeat stroke admissions, 2,407 (7.2%) had AFib. Admissions with AFib cost $4,991 more than those without AFib ($23,770 vs. $18,779). For the 6,582 repeat stroke admissions, 397 (6.0%) had AFib. The costs were $3,260 more for those with AFib than those without ($24,119 vs. $20,929). After controlling for potential confounders, AFib-associated costs for non-repeat stroke admissions were $4,905, representing 20.6% of the total costs for the admissions. Both the hospital costs and the AFib-associated costs were associated with age, but not sex. AFib-associated costs for repeat stroke admissions were not significantly higher than for non-AFib patients, except for those aged 55-64 ($3,537). Conclusions AFib increased the hospital cost of ischemic stroke substantially. Further investigation on AFib-associated costs for repeat stroke admissions is needed. PMID:25851767

  12. Lower respiratory tract infection hospitalizations among American Indian/Alaska Native children and the general United States child population

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Eric M.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Holman, Robert C.; Seeman, Sara M.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bartholomew, Michael; Hennessy, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI)-associated hospitalization rate in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children aged <5 years declined during 1998–2008, yet remained 1.6 times higher than the general US child population in 2006–2008. Purpose Describe the change in LRTI-associated hospitalization rates for AI/AN children and for the general US child population aged <5 years. Methods A retrospective analysis of hospitalizations with discharge ICD-9-CM codes for LRTI for AI/AN children and for the general US child population <5 years during 2009–2011 was conducted using Indian Health Service direct and contract care inpatient data and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, respectively. We calculated hospitalization rates and made comparisons to previously published 1998–1999 rates prior to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction. Results The average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined from 1998–1999 to 2009–2011 in AI/AN (35%, p<0.01) and the general US child population (19%, SE: 4.5%, p<0.01). The 2009–2011 AI/AN child average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate was 20.7 per 1,000, 1.5 times higher than the US child rate (13.7 95% CI: 12.6–14.8). The Alaska (38.9) and Southwest regions (27.3) had the highest rates. The disparity was greatest for infant (<1 year) pneumonia-associated and 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza-associated hospitalizations. Conclusions Although the LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined, the 2009–2011 AI/AN child rate remained higher than the US child rate, especially in the Alaska and Southwest regions. The residual disparity is likely multi-factorial and partly related to household crowding, indoor smoke exposure, lack of piped water and poverty. Implementation of interventions proven to reduce LRTI is needed among AI/AN children. PMID:26547082

  13. Multidisciplinary case management for patients at high risk of hospitalization: comparison of virtual ward models in the United kingdom, United States, and Canada.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Geraint; Wright, Lorraine; Vaithianathan, Rhema

    2012-10-01

    Virtual wards are a model for delivering multidisciplinary case management to people who are at high predicted risk of unplanned acute care hospitalization. First introduced in Croydon, England, in 2006, this concept has since been adopted and adapted by health care organizations in other parts of the United Kingdom and internationally. In this article, the authors review the model of virtual wards as originally described-with its twin pillars of (1) using a predictive model to identify people who are at high risk of future emergency hospitalization, and (2) offering these individuals a period of intensive, multidisciplinary preventive care at home using the systems, staffing, and daily routines of a hospital ward. The authors then describe how virtual wards have been modified and implemented in 6 sites in the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada where they are subject to formal evaluation. Like hospital wards, virtual wards vary in terms of patient selection, ward configuration, staff composition, and ward processes. Policy makers and researchers should be aware of these differences when considering the evaluation results of studies investigating the cost-effectiveness of virtual wards. PMID:22788975

  14. Assessment of the Needs of Caregivers of Stroke Patients at State-Owned Acute-Care Hospitals in Southern Vietnam, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Hoang Hoa; Tai, Nguyen Anh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Care for stroke patients has improved steadily in southern Vietnam. Medical treatments such as thrombolytic therapy have been implemented at several hospitals, and stroke-care units composed of a team of various health professionals have been created. However, little attention has been focused on providing support to caregivers of stroke patients. This study aimed to characterize the caregivers of stroke patients who were treated in state-owned acute-care hospitals and to learn about their needs when patients are discharged. Such information can be used to enhance the caregiver’s support system. Methods We used questionnaires to conduct a descriptive study in 2011 at a state-owned acute-care hospital in southern Vietnam. We recruited study participants from among caregivers of stroke patients who had been informed of their hospital discharge date. We assessed 8 caregiver characteristics, and caregiver participants selected their needs from the survey’s list of 15 possible needs. We analyzed the data by using the independent sample t test and logistic regression. Results Of the 93 caregivers who consented to participate, 86 (92.5%) completed the survey and indicated their concerns at discharge. The most frequently cited need was information on how to prevent stroke recurrence (72, 83.7%), followed by which drugs are most effective in preventing a relapse (62, 72.1%), how long recovery would take (61, 70.9%), and availability of hospitals in the patient’s hometown (60, 69.8%). A little over half of caregivers indicated financial concerns. A caregiver’s need for information on diet for a stroke survivor increased with the caregiver’s education level. Conclusions This study revealed several needs among caregivers of stroke survivors in southern Vietnam that are similar to those found by studies of caregivers of stroke survivors in high-income countries. Our findings suggest that comprehensive stroke care that includes caregiver education about

  15. What Would Be the Effect of Referral to High-Volume Hospitals in a Largely Rural State?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Marcia M.; Jaana, Mirou; Wakefield, Douglas S.; Ohsfeldt, Robert L.; Schneider, John E.; Miller, Thomas; Lei, Yang

    2004-01-01

    Volume of certain surgical procedures has been linked to patient outcomes. The Leapfrog Group and others have recommended evidence-based referral using specific volume thresholds for nonemergent cases. The literature is limited on the effect of such referral on hospitals, especially in rural areas. To examine the impact of evidence-based referral…

  16. Asthma Hospitalization Rates among Children, and School Building Conditions, by New York State School Districts, 1991-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Erin; Kielb, Christine; Lin, Shao

    2006-01-01

    School-age children spend a significant portion of their day at school where they can be exposed to asthma triggers, but little information exists regarding potential relationships between childhood asthma and school environmental factors. This study examined patterns of asthma hospitalization and possible factors contributing to asthma…

  17. Hospitalizations of the elderly in the United States for non-specific gastrointestinal diseases: A search for etilogical clues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonspecific gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a common cause of GI-related hospitalizations in U.S. elderly (82.9% of all cases) and it peaks concurrently with viral enteritis, suggesting a lack of diagnostic testing. The lack of etiological specificity in the current coding syste...

  18. 75 FR 9102 - Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... purposes of the reporting requirement of 5 U.S.C. 801. List of Subjects in 28 CFR Part 43 Claims, Health... Department of Justice. * * * * * Dated: February 23, 2010. Eric H. Holder, Jr., Attorney General. BILLING... Part 43 Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United...

  19. The information security needs in radiological information systems-an insight on state hospitals of Iran, 2012.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Akram; Ahmadi, Maryam

    2013-12-01

    Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) was originally developed for radiology services over 20 years ago to capture medical images electronically. Medical diagnosis methods are based on images such as clinical radiographs, ultrasounds, CT scans, MRIs, or other imaging modalities. Information obtained from these images is correlated with patient information. So with regards to the important role of PACS in hospitals, we aimed to evaluate the PACS and survey the information security needed in the Radiological Information system. First, we surveyed the different aspects of PACS that should be in any health organizations based on Department of Health standards and prepared checklists for assessing the PACS in different hospitals. Second, we surveyed the security controls that should be implemented in PACS. Checklists reliability is affirmed by professors of Tehran Science University. Then, the final data are inputted in SPSS software and analyzed. The results indicate that PACS in hospitals can transfer patient demographic information but they do not show route of information. These systems are not open source. They don't use XML-based standard and HL7 standard for exchanging the data. They do not use DS digital signature. They use passwords and the user can correct or change the medical information. PACS can detect alternation rendered. The survey of results demonstrates that PACS in all hospitals has the same features. These systems have the patient demographic data but they do not have suitable flexibility to interface network or taking reports. For the privacy of PACS in all hospitals, there were passwords for users and the system could show the changes that have been made; but there was no water making or digital signature for the users. PMID:23852637

  20. Adult surgical emergencies in a developing country: the experience of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chianakwana, Gabriel U; Ihegihu, Chima C; Okafor, Pius I S; Anyanwu, Stanley N C; Mbonu, Okechukwu O

    2005-06-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the adult surgical emergencies seen at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, with a view to proffering preventive solutions where appropriate and improving outcome. From the register of patients seen at the Casualty department and from the operations register in the main operation room of NAUTH, names and hospital numbers of adult patients treated as emergencies over a 5-year period, from 7 September 1998 to 6 September 2003, were obtained. The hospital folders were then retrieved from the Records Department. From each folder, the following details about each patient were extracted: age, sex, diagnosis at presentation, causative factors, treatment given, and outcome. A total of 902 adult patients were treated during the period. The commonest emergency operation was appendectomy for acute appendicitis in 139 patients (97 women and 42 men), followed closely by road traffic accidents (RTAs) involving 137 patients (103 men and 34 women). Gunshot injuries, which resulted mainly from armed robbery attacks, accounted for 127 cases. More men (113) sustained gunshot injuries than women (14). Of the 92 cases of acute intestinal obstruction seen, 62 occurred in women and 30 in men. Some 126 men presented with acute urinary retention, and two others presented with priapism. Governments at various levels should provide modern diagnostic tools for the accurate preoperative diagnosis of surgical emergencies in hospitals. Governments should also inculcate strict discipline into drivers using the highways, particularly in relation to abuse of alcohol and drugs. Good roads and adequate security should be provided for the people. The need for Pre-Hospital Care for the efficient evacuation of accident victims is emphasized. These measures will help to improve the management and outcome of surgical emergencies, and decrease the number of surgical emergencies resulting from RTAs and gunshot wounds. PMID:15880283

  1. Length of hospital stay after hip fracture and risk of early mortality after discharge in New York state: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nikkel, Lucas E; Kates, Stephen L; Schreck, Michael; Maceroli, Michael; Mahmood, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Study question Can the length of hospital stay for hip fracture affect a patient’s risk of death 30 days after discharge? Methods In a retrospective cohort study, population based registry data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) were used to investigate 188 208 patients admitted to hospital for hip fracture in New York state from 2000 to 2011. Patients were aged 50 years and older, and received surgical or non-surgical treatment. The main outcome measure was the mortality rate at 30 days after hospital discharge. Study answer and limitations Hospital stays of 11-14 days for hip fracture were associated with a 32% increased odds of death 30 days after discharge, compared with stays lasting one to five days (odds ratio 1.32 (95% confidence interval 1.19 to 1.47)). These odds increased to 103% for stays longer than 14 days (2.03 (1.84 to 2.24)). Other risk factors associated with early mortality included discharge to a hospice facility, older age, metastatic disease, and non-surgical management. The 30 day mortality rate after discharge was 4.5% for surgically treated patients and 10.7% for non-surgically treated patients. These findings might not be generalizable to populations in other US states or in other countries. The administrative claims data used could have been incomplete or include inaccurate coding of diagnoses and comorbid conditions. The database also did not include patient socioeconomic status, which could affect access to care to a greater extent in New York state than in European countries. Specific cause of death was not available because few autopsies are performed in this population. What this study adds By contrast with recent findings in Sweden, decreased length of hospital stay for hip fracture was associated with reduced rates of early mortality in a US cohort in New York state. This could reflect critical system differences in the treatment of hip fractures between Europe and the USA. Funding

  2. The effect of severity of illness on total joint arthroplasty costs across New York state hospitals: an analysis of 172,738 cases.

    PubMed

    Adrados, Murillo; Lajam, Claudette; Hutzler, Lorraine; Slover, James; Bosco, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    We explored the average cost of 94,197 total knee and 78,541 total hip arthroplasties (TKA and THA) using the New York State Hospital Inpatient Cost Transparency database to evaluate the effect of beneficiary health status on hospital reported cost for the two operations. Using the 3M APR-DRG severity of illness index as a measure of patient's health status, we found a significant increase in cost for both TKA and THA for patients with higher severity of illness index. This study confirms the greater cost and variability of TKA and THA for patients with increased severity of illness and illustrates the inherent unpredictability in cost forecasting and budgeting for these same patients. PMID:25269683

  3. Hospital Prices Increase in California, Especially Among Hospitals in the Largest Multi-hospital Systems.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Glenn A; Fonkych, Katya

    2016-01-01

    A surge in hospital consolidation is fueling formation of ever larger multi-hospital systems throughout the United States. This article examines hospital prices in California over time with a focus on hospitals in the largest multi-hospital systems. Our data show that hospital prices in California grew substantially (+76% per hospital admission) across all hospitals and all services between 2004 and 2013 and that prices at hospitals that are members of the largest, multi-hospital systems grew substantially more (113%) than prices paid to all other California hospitals (70%). Prices were similar in both groups at the start of the period (approximately $9200 per admission). By the end of the period, prices at hospitals in the largest systems exceeded prices at other California hospitals by almost $4000 per patient admission. Our study findings are potentially useful to policy makers across the country for several reasons. Our data measure actual prices for a large sample of hospitals over a long period of time in California. California experienced its wave of consolidation much earlier than the rest of the country and as such our findings may provide some insights into what may happen across the United States from hospital consolidation including growth of large, multi-hospital systems now forming in the rest of the rest of the country. PMID:27284126

  4. Comparison of Substance-Use Prevalence among Rhode Island and The Miriam Hospital Emergency Department Patients to State and National General Population Prevalence Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Bernardino, Vera L.; Baird, Janette R.; Liu, Tao; Merchant, Roland C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Compare the prevalence of recent alcohol, tobacco, and drug use among patients from two Rhode Island emergency departments (EDs) to Rhode Island state and United States national general population estimates between 2010 and 2012. Methods Secondary analysis of ED patient data and the National Survey of Drug Use and Health. Results Alcohol was the most commonly reported substance, and prevalence of its use was higher among ED patients than those in the national, but not the Rhode Island, general population. Drug use was higher among ED patients than in the state and national general population. For ED patients, tobacco and opioid use was highest among 26–34 year-olds, alcohol and marijuana highest among 18–25 years-olds, and cocaine highest among 35–49 years-olds. Conclusion Rhode Island Hospital and The Miriam Hospital ED patients report a greater prevalence of substance use than the national population and in many cases the state general population. PMID:25830171

  5. Evaluation of antioxidant status of female diabetic patients in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Anambra State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okuonghae, E O P; Onyenekwe, C C; Ahaneku, J E; Ukibe, N R; Nwani, P O; Asomugha, A L; Osakue, N O; Aidomeh, F; Awalu, C C

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become an onerous disease to developing countries such as Nigeria. Rapid acceptance of urbanisation and sedentary life styles pose an encumbrance to its prevention and management. Increased oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus has been implicated as a culprit in perpetuating antioxidant depletion and diabetic complications in diabetes mellitus individuals. This study aims to evaluate the level of antioxidant status in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) female participants visiting the out-patient diabetic clinic of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria. A total of 86 participants aged 51±10 years were recruited for this study. The test group consists of 43 already confirmed type 2 diabetes mellitus females, while the control group consists of 43 apparently healthy females. The test subjects were further subgrouped into good and poor glycaemic control groups, using a cut-off of <7% for HbA1c. Whole blood was collected from participants and aliquoted into specified sample containers for analysis of the following parameters: random blood glucose (RBG; mg/dL), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c; %), glutathione reductase (GR; U/L) and total antioxidant status (TAS; mmol/L). Results from this study showed that the mean differences in RBG (197.74±49.29 mg/dL) and HbA1c (9.86±1.44%) were significantly higher in the test group compared to the control group RBG (104.79±11.33 mg/dL) and HbA1c (5.21±1.23%) (P<0.05). The mean differences of GR (45.81±20.45 U/L) and TAS (1.81±1.04 mmol/L) were significantly lower in the test group compared to the control group GR (61.21±14.34 U/L) and TAS (2.73±2.08 mmol/L) (P<0.05). The poor glycaemic test group was observed to have the highest RBG (200.34±50.4 mg/dL) and HbA1c (10.23±1.33%) compared both to good glycaemic test group RBG (186.38±45.39 mg/dL), HbA1c (6.54±0.45%) and non-diabetic group RBG (104.79±11.33 mg/dL) and HbA1c (5.21±1.23%) (P<0.05). Glutathione

  6. Relation of Callous-Unemotional Traits to Length of Stay among Youth Hospitalized at a State Psychiatric Inpatient Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellwagen, Kurt K.; Kerig, Patricia K.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the association of callous-unemotional (C/U) traits with length of psychiatric hospitalization among two samples each with 50 participants: a group of 7-11 year-olds (39 males and 11 females) receiving services on a children's unit, and a group of 12-17 year-olds (27 males and 23 females) receiving services on an adolescent unit. Our…

  7. Trends in hospitalization of preterm infants with intraventricular hemorrhage and hydrocephalus in the United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Christian, Eisha A; Jin, Diana L; Attenello, Frank; Wen, Timothy; Cen, Steven; Mack, William J; Krieger, Mark D; McComb, J Gordon

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Even with improved prenatal and neonatal care, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) occurs in approximately 25%-30% of preterm infants, with a subset of these patients developing hydrocephalus. This study was undertaken to describe current trends in hospitalization of preterm infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) and the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). METHODS The KID and NIS were combined to generate data for the years 2000-2010. All neonatal discharges with ICD-9-CM codes for preterm birth with IVH alone or with IVH and hydrocephalus were included. RESULTS There were 147,823 preterm neonates with IVH, and 9% of this group developed hydrocephalus during the same admission. Of patients with Grade 3 and 4 IVH, 25% and 28%, respectively, developed hydrocephalus in comparison with 1% and 4% of patients with Grade 1 and 2 IVH, respectively. Thirty-eight percent of patients with PHH had permanent ventricular shunts inserted. Mortality rates were 4%, 10%, 18%, and 40%, respectively, for Grade 1, 2, 3, and 4 IVH during initial hospitalization. Length of stay has been trending upward for both groups of IVH (49 days in 2000, 56 days in 2010) and PHH (59 days in 2000, 70 days in 2010). The average hospital cost per patient (adjusted for inflation) has also increased, from $201,578 to $353,554 (for IVH) and $260,077 to $495,697 (for PHH) over 11 years. CONCLUSIONS The number of neonates admitted with IVH has increased despite a decrease in the number of preterm births. Rates of hydrocephalus and mortality correlated closely with IVH grade. The incidence of hydrocephalus in preterm infants with IVH remained stable between 8% and 10%. Over an 11-year period, there was a progressive increase in hospital cost and length of stay for preterm neonates with IVH and PHH that may be explained by a concurrent increase in the proportion of patients with congenital cardiac anomalies. PMID:26544084

  8. The challenge of managing extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis at a referral hospital in the state of São Paulo, Brazil: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Arbex, Marcos Abdo; de Siqueira, Hélio Ribeiro; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the cases of three patients diagnosed with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and admitted to a referral hospital in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, showing the clinical and radiological evolution, as well as laboratory test results, over a one-year period. Treatment was based on the World Health Organization guidelines, with the inclusion of a new proposal for the use of a combination of antituberculosis drugs (imipenem and linezolid). In the cases studied, we show the challenge of creating an acceptable, effective treatment regimen including drugs that are more toxic, are more expensive, and are administered for longer periods. We also show that treatment costs are significantly higher for such patients, which could have an impact on health care systems, even after hospital discharge. We highlight the fact that in extreme cases, such as those reported here, hospitalization at a referral center seems to be the most effective strategy for providing appropriate treatment and increasing the chance of cure. In conclusion, health professionals and governments must make every effort to prevent cases of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:26785966

  9. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ...EPA is proposing to approve, through direct final rulemaking, Illinois' revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency submitted the revised State Plan on November 8, 2011 and supplemented it on December 28, 2011, following the required public process. The revised State Plan is consistent......

  10. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ...EPA is proposing to approve, through direct final rulemaking, Indiana's revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The Indiana Department of Environmental Management submitted the revised State Plan on December 19, 2011, following the required public process. The revised State Plan is consistent with Emission Guidelines......

  11. Bacteriological Profile and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Neonatal Sepsis at a Teaching Hospital in Bayelsa State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Peterside, Oliemen; Pondei, Kemebradikumo; Akinbami, Felix O

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sepsis is one of the most common causes of neonatal hospital admissions and is estimated to cause 26% of all neonatal deaths worldwide. While waiting for results of blood culture, it is necessary to initiate an empirical choice of antibiotics based on the epidemiology of causative agents and antibiotic sensitivity pattern in a locality. Objective: To determine the major causative organisms of neonatal sepsis at the Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital (NDUTH), as well as their antibiotic sensitivity patterns, with the aim of formulating treatment protocols for neonates. Methods: Within a 27-month period (1st of October 2011 to the 31st of December 2013), results of blood culture for all neonates screened for sepsis at the Special Care Baby Unit of the hospital were retrospectively studied. Results: Two hundred and thirty-three (49.6%) of the 450 neonates admitted were screened for sepsis. Ninety-seven (43.5%) of them were blood culture positive, with 52 (53.6%) of the isolated organisms being Gram positive and 45 (46.4%) Gram negative. The most frequently isolated organism was Staphylococcus aureus (51.5%) followed by Escherichia coli (16.5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.4%). All isolated organisms demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the quinolones. Conclusion: Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity among neonates admitted at the NDUTH. There is a need for regular periodic surveillance of the causative organisms of neonatal sepsis as well as their antibiotic susceptibility pattern to inform the empirical choice of antibiotic prescription while awaiting blood culture results. PMID:26543394

  12. Risk factors for severe outcomes among members of the United States military hospitalized with pneumonia and influenza, 2000–2012

    PubMed Central

    Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Cooper, Michael J.; Eick-Cost, Angelia A.; Sanchez, Jose L.; Riley, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background The progression from hospitalization for a respiratory infection to requiring substantial supportive therapy is a key stage of the influenza severity pyramid. Respiratory infections are responsible for 300,000 to 400,000 medical encounters each year among US military personnel, some of which progress to severe acute respiratory infections. Methods We obtained data on 11,086 hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza (P&I) among non-recruit US military service members during the period of 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2012. From these, we identified 512 P&I hospitalizations that progressed to severe episodes using standard case definitions. We evaluated the effect of demographic and occupational characteristics, comorbid conditions, and history of influenza vaccination on the risk of a hospitalized P&I case becoming a severe case. We also evaluated the risk of a severe outcome and the length of time since influenza vaccination (within 180, 60 and 30 days). Results The median age of subjects at the time of the P&I episode was 32 years (range, 28–40) and subjects were predominantly male (89.5%). In a univariate analysis, demographic risk factors for a severe episode included service in the US Air Force (RR=1.6 relative to US Army, 95%CI 1.3-2.1), US Coast Guard (RR=2.1, 1.2-3.7) or US Navy (RR=1.4, 1.1-1.8). Being born in the US and recent influenza vaccination (within 180 days of episode) were protective against developing severe disease. Among comorbid conditions, univariate risk factors for severe disease included chronic renal or liver disease (RR=4.98, 95%CI 4.1-6.1), diseases of the circulatory system (RR=3.1, 95%CI 2.6-3.7), diabetes mellitus (RR=2.3, 95%CI 1.5-3.6), obesity (RR=1.6, 95%CI 1.2-2.1), cancer (RR=1.6, 95%CI 1.3-2.0) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (RR=1.4, 95%CI 1.1-1.7). Although many of the risk factors found to be significant in univariate analysis were no longer significant under a multivariate analysis, receipt

  13. The general NFP hospital model.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the past 30 years, there has been a lot of controversy surrounding the proliferation of new forms of health care delivery organizations that challenge and compete with general NFP community hospitals. Traditionally, the health care system in the United States has been dominated by general NFP (NFP) voluntary hospitals. With the number of for-profit general hospitals, physician-owned specialty hospitals, and ambulatory surgical centers increasing, a question arises: “Why is the general NFP community hospital the dominant model?” In order to address this question, this paper reexamines the history of the hospital industry. By understanding how the “general NFP hospital” model emerged and dominated, we attempt to explain the current dominance of general NFP hospitals in the ever changing hospital industry in the United States. PMID:22324062

  14. Design and implementation of a structural health monitoring and alerting system for hospital buildings in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ulusoy, Hasan S.; Kalkan, Erol; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Friberg, Paul; Leith, W. K.; Banga, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the current progress in the development of a structural health monitoring and alerting system to meet the needs of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to monitor hospital buildings instrumented in high and very high seismic hazard regions in the U.S. The system, using the measured vibration data, is primarily designed for post-earthquake condition assessment of the buildings. It has two essential components – sensing and analysis. The sensing component includes all necessary firmware and sensors to measure the response of the building; while the analysis component consists of several data processing modules integrated into an open source software package which compresses a large amount of measured data into useful information to assess the building’s condition before and after an event. The information can be used for a rapid building safety assessment, and to support decisions for necessary repairs, replacements, and other maintenance and rehabilitation measures.

  15. The Pattern of Pediatric Respiratory Illnesses Admitted in Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital South-East Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ezeonu, CT; Uneke, CJ; Ojukwu, JO; Anyanwu, OU; Okike, CO; Ezeanosike, OB; Agumadu, HU

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reports from the developed nations reveal respiratory tract infections as the leading cause of childhood hospital admissions. Children may be admitted for a variety of respiratory illnesses. Data on the spectrum of pediatric respiratory illnesses admitted in the hospital is scarce. Aim: To determine the pattern of pediatrics respiratory illness admissions, seasonal frequency, underlying risk factors and outcome. Subjects and Methods: A retrospective assessment of respiratory cases admitted in the pediatric ward from 2005 to 2010 was conducted using case notes. Parameters considered included month of presentation, age, sex, immunization and nutritional status, tools of diagnosis and patient outcome. Results were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences with the level of significance P ≤ 0.05. Results: Of the 239 cases admitted, there were more males than females (1.4:1). The commonest case was Bronchopneumonia, 71.6% (171/239 out of which 161 were uncomplicated, 5 had effusions and 6 were associated with measles). Other cases were Pulmonary Tuberculosis, 10.9% (26/239), Lobar pneumonia 8.8% (21/239), Bronchiolitis, 5% (12/239), Aspiration pneumonitis 2.1% (5/239) and Bronchial asthma, 0.8% (2/239). Mortality was 7.5% (18/239) mostly from Bronchopneumonia amongst the 1–5 years old. Mortality was significantly associated with malnutrition (P < 0.001) and poor immunization status (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Bronchopneumonia was found to be the commonest illness with significant mortality and peak occurrence in the rainy season. More emphasis must be laid on anticipatory guidance and prevention by encouraging the immunization, good nutrition and increased attention on children even after 1 year of age. PMID:25745580

  16. Respiratory tract pathogens isolated from patients hospitalized with suspected pneumonia: frequency of occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (United States and Canada, 1997).

    PubMed

    Jones, R N; Croco, M A; Kugler, K C; Pfaller, M A; Beach, M L

    2000-06-01

    Thirty-seven sentinel hospitals (29 in the United States [US]; eight in Canada) collected bacterial isolates from hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia. The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of these pathogens were determined to more than 60 agents (40 reported) using the reference broth microdilution method described by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The five most frequently recorded species among the 2757 isolates collected during the study were (no. tested/%): Staphylococcus aureus (632/22.9%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (498/18. 1%), Haemophilus influenzae (284/10.3%), Klebsiella spp. (240/8.7%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (213/7.7%). There was a significant difference in the susceptibility to antimicrobials between the US and Canada for S. aureus to oxacillin (50.1% versus 93.8% susceptible, respectively), gentamicin (78.7% versus 97.8%), and fluoroquinolones (49.5 to 53.0% versus 89.8 to 94.9%). Amikacin (92. 8% susceptible) was the most active antimicrobial agent against P. aeruginosa, and meropenem was the most potent beta-lactam. Against H. influenzae, most drugs retained a high level of activity, whilst against the S. pneumoniae, only the newer fluoroquinolones (gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin) remained highly effective in vitro. Only two antimicrobial agents (imipenem and meropenem) were >99% active against the Klebsiella spp. and Enterobacter spp. isolated in this survey (possess extended spectrum beta-lactamases or hyperproduction of Amp C cephalosporins); cefepime (95.6-100.0% susceptible) was significantly more active than other cephalosporins tested. Clonal, epidemic outbreaks of multiply resistant strains were very rare in monitored hospitals. In conclusion, important differences exist between the US and Canada in the susceptibility patterns of some respiratory tract pathogens to commonly used antimicrobial agents with Canadian strains generally being more susceptible to currently available

  17. Hospital financing in Norway.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, F

    1994-05-01

    The Norwegian block grant reform of 1980 replaced state reimbursements to hospitals by block grants allocated to counties according to objective criteria. The reform was accompanied by a general decentralization of budget authority to local level. The reform aimed to promote primary care, equalize the supply of health care across regions and give counties incentives to improve hospital efficiency. A decade later, the reform was reversed. The government has imposed restrictions which reduce the budget discretion of the counties and part of the block grant has been made dependent on the performance of the hospitals in the counties. The government has also issued a 'waiting-list guarantee' which states that patients who suffer from a serious disease are entitled to medical treatment within six months. This paper provides an overview of hospital financing in Norway during the last two decades and discusses why the block grant system did not fulfil the expectations of its architects. PMID:10136059

  18. Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Rate and Associated Factors among People Living with HIV in Dubti Hospital, Afar Regional State, East Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Negus, Rahma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Antiretroviral Therapy has transformed HIV infection into a chronic manageable disease; it requires near perfect adherence rates (as high as 95%). In this study, we assessed antiretroviral treatment adherence rate and associated factors among people living with HIV in Dubti Hospital. Methods. A retrospective cross-sectional study design was conducted within February 1–30, 2014. All HIV-infected patients above the age of 18 years who took first line Antiretroviral Therapy were eligible for inclusion of the study. Adherence Scale was used for labeling patients as adherent or nonadherent. All HIV-infected patients record data were collected from the medical records, entered, and analyzed using Epi Info 7 and SPSS Version 20. Multivariable analysis was used to identify the relative effect of explanatory variables on low adherence rate. Results. A total of 370 patients aged 18 years and above, who started ART, were included in this study. The self-reported adherence rate of the patient on ART was 81.1%. Independent predictors of adherence were treatment duration. Conclusion. Adherence rate was associated with time to ART. That is, the longer they were on ART, the lesser they adhered.

  19. Driver and Traffic Safety Education: A Lesson Plan for the Residents of Gracewood State School and Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Jonathan L.

    Outlined is a course of driver education and traffic safety taught to retarded residents of a state institution. Stressed is the importance of driver education for residents able to leave the institution. The philosophy of the program is given to emphasize individualizing instruction, instructing students who possess the potential for driving,…

  20. 77 FR 24403 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... compliance schedules for the control of emissions from HMIWI units. See 74 FR 51368. EPA codified these... Executive Order Reviews A. General Requirements Under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993...'' (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001). This action merely approves state law as meeting Federal requirements...

  1. An Examination of Information Technology and Its Perceived Quality Issues in Single System Hospitals in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Linda W.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and quality of healthcare is of great concern in the United States. The positive effects of information technology reported in past research, especially case studies, has encouraged expectations that information technology may increase the quality of healthcare while reducing costs of healthcare. The goals of this study was to examine…

  2. Poisoning due to Philodryas olfersii (Lichtenstein, 1823) attended at Restauração Hospital in Recife, State of Pernambuco, Brazil: case report.

    PubMed

    Correia, Juliana Mendes; Santana Neto, Pedro de Lima; Pinho, Milena Sardou Sabino; Silva, José Afrânio da; Amorim, Maria Lucineide Porto; Escobar, José Arturo Costa

    2010-01-01

    Few papers have been published on snake bites caused by Philodryas olfersii. We report here the first case identified at the Centro de Assistência Toxicológica do Hospital da Restauração, Recife, State of Pernambuco. This case was described based on medical protocols, interviewing the patient and identifying the animal that caused the bite. The patient presented pain, heat, erythema, edema and ecchymosis, without other laboratory abnormalities or coagulation disorders. The treatment consisted of administration of eight ampoules of antibothropic serum, and post-administration allergenic reactions were observed. The importance of bites by opistoglyph snakes needs to be reconsidered in research and at specialized treatment centers. PMID:20563508

  3. Financing hospital disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Disaster preparedness and response have gained increased attention in the United States as a result of terrorism and disaster threats. However, funding of hospital preparedness, especially surge capacity, has lagged behind other preparedness priorities. Only a small portion of the money allocated for national preparedness is directed toward health care, and hospitals receive very little of that. Under current policy, virtually the entire funding stream for hospital preparedness comes from general tax revenues. Medical payers (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance) directly fund little, if any, of the current bill. Funding options to improve preparedness include increasing the current federal grants allocated to hospitals, using payer fees or a tax to subsidize preparedness, and financing other forms of expansion capability, such as mobile hospitals. Alternatively, the status quo of marginal preparedness can be maintained. In any event, achieving higher levels of preparedness likely will take the combined commitment of the hospital industry, public and private payers, and federal, state, and local governments. Ultimately, the costs of preparedness will be borne by the public in the form of taxes, higher healthcare costs, or through the acceptance of greater risk. PMID:18087914

  4. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  5. [Variation in hospital performance according to payment sources in the states of São Paulo and do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Machado, Juliana Pires; Martins, Mônica; Leite, Iuri da Costa

    2016-07-21

    In Brazil, the combined presence of public and private interests in financing and provision of healthcare services stands out clearly in hospital care. Financing arrangements adopted by hospitals (the public Brazilian Unified National Health System - SUS and/or health plans and/or out-of-pocket payment) can affect quality of care. Studies have analyzed the hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR) in relation to quality improvements. The objective was to analyze HSMR according to source of payment for the hospitalization and the hospital's financing arrangement. The study analyzed secondary data and causes that accounted for 80% of hospital deaths. HSMR was calculated for each hospital and payment source. Hospitals with worse-than-expected performance (HSMR > 1) were mostly large public hospitals. HSMR was higher in the SUS, including between admissions in the hospital. Despite the study's limitations, the findings point to inequalities in results of care. Efforts are needed to improve the quality of hospital services, regardless of the payment sources. PMID:27462852

  6. A pilot validation in 10 European Union Member States of a point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use in acute hospitals in Europe, 2011.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J S; Price, L; Godwin, J; Cairns, S; Hopkins, S; Cookson, B; Malcolm, W; Hughes, G; Lyytikainen, O; Coignard, B; Hansen, S; Suetens, C

    2015-01-01

    We present a pilot validation study performed on 10 European Union (EU) Member States, of a point prevalence survey (PPS) of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and antimicrobial use in Europe in 2011 involving 29 EU/European Economic Area (EEA) countries and Croatia. A total of 20 acute hospitals and 1,950 patient records were included in the pilot study, which consisted of validation and inter-rater reliability (IRR) testing using an in-hospital observation approach. In the validation, a sensitivity of 83% (95% confidence interval (CI): 79–87%) and a specificity of 98% (95% CI: 98–99%) were found for HAIs. The level of agreement between the primary PPS and validation results were very good for HAIs overall (Cohen’s κappa (κ):0.81) and across all the types of HAIs (range: 0.83 for bloodstream infections to 1.00 for lower respiratory tract infections). Antimicrobial use had a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI: 93–95%) and specificity of 97% (95% CI: 96–98%) with a very good level of agreement (κ:0.91). Agreement on other demographic items ranged from moderate to very good (κ: 0.57–0.95): age (κ:0.95), sex (κ: 0.93), specialty of physician (κ: 0.87) and McCabe score (κ: 0.57). IRR showed a very good level of agreement (κ: 0.92) for both the presence of HAIs and antimicrobial use. This pilot study suggested valid and reliable reporting of HAIs and antimicrobial use in the PPS dataset. The lower level of sensitivity with respect to reporting of HAIs reinforces the importance of training data collectors and including validation studies as part of a PPS in order for the burden of HAIs to be better estimated. PMID:25742434

  7. A six-year study of the clinical presentation of cervical cancer and the management challenges encountered at a state teaching hospital in southeast Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Eze, Justus N; Emeka-Irem, Esther N; Edegbe, Felix O

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is still a major contributor to cancer-related mortality amongst women living in poor, rural communities of developing countries. The objective of this study is to establish the clinical presentation of cervical cancer and the management challenges encountered in Abakaliki, southeast Nigeria, with a view to finding intervention strategies. This study is a retrospective descriptive assessment of cases of clinically diagnosed cervical cancer managed at a state teaching hospital over six years. Of 76 cases managed, 61 (80.3%) cases notes were available for study. The mean age and parity of patients were 53.8 years and 6.8 years, respectively. The majority (75.4%) were illiterate. All had been married, but 42.6% were widowed. The main occupations were farming or petty trading. One patient (1.6%) had had a single Pap smear in her life. The major presenting complaints were abnormal vaginal bleeding (86.9%), offensive vaginal discharge (41.0%), and weight loss. Twenty patients (32.8%) were lost to follow-up prior to staging. Of the remaining 41 patients, 16 (39.0%) had stage III disease and 17.1% stage IV. Fifteen patients (24.6%) with late stage disease accepted referral, and were referred for radiotherapy. Those who declined were discharged home on request, though 4 (9.8%) died in the hospital. There was no feedback from referred patients confirming that they went and benefitted from the referral. The presentation followed known trends. Illiteracy, poverty, early marriages, high parity, widowhood, non-use of screening methods, late presentation, non-acceptance of referral, and lack of communication after referral were some of the major challenges encountered. These underscore the needs for health education and awareness creation, women educational and economic empowerment, legislation against early marriages and in protection of widows, and creation of a well-staffed and well-equipped dedicated gynecologic oncology unit to forestall further referral

  8. Analyzing the some biochemical parameters of diabetes mellitus and obese patients who applied to Siirt State Hospital endocrine polyclinic and their prevalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karageçili, Hasan; Yerlikaya, Emrah; Aydin, Ruken Zeynep

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems throughout the World. Obese individuals body mass index (BMI) is >30 kg/m2. Obesity is characterized by increased waist circumference, total body fat and hyperglycemia. The increased triglyceride and cholesterol level is also shown in obese individuals. The development of obesity is largely due to the consumption of high energy food and sedentary lifestyle. This study was held with the participation of patients applied to Siirt State Hospital endocrine policlinic for treatment. Our aim is to try to determine the biochemical relation and border line of obese and obese+diabetes mellitus patients. Patients and control group lipid profiles were studied in the hospital biochemisty laboratory. Laboratory results of diabetes+obese, obese and control groups were evaluated. Patients and control samples blood serum levels were compared according to their lipid profiles. In 2015, 735 diabetes mellitus type 2 patients applied to Endocrine polyclinic. Some of these patient's serum levels were evaluated. Difference between diabetes+obese and diabetes groups were near critical level for LDL and trigliserid. There were not observed statistically significant difference between groups in terms of HDL and cholesterol. There were found significant difference between groups for blood glucose p<0.003, age p<0.001. According to gender between women and men serum levels, ALT and AST levels; p<0.006 and cholesterol; p<0.04 were detected. According to participants education level blood biochemistry levels were observed statisticaly different p<0.001 with non-literacy group. In conclusion, obese and obese+diabetes patients blood serum values nearly close to each other. Obese subjects were been diabetic obese with age. In women obesity and diabetes mellitus prevalence were seen too much.

  9. Hospital Hints

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... have to spend the night in the hospital. Learning more about what to expect and about people ...

  10. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  11. Comparison of computing capability and information system abilities of state hospitals owned by Ministry of Labor and Social Security and Ministry of Health.

    PubMed

    Tengilimoğlu, Dilaver; Celik, Yusuf; Ulgü, Mahir

    2006-08-01

    The main purpose of this study is to give an idea to the readers about how big and important the computing and information problems that hospital managers as well as policy makers will face with after collecting the Ministry of Labor and Social Security (MoLSS) and Ministry of Health (MoH) hospitals under single structure in Turkey by comparing the current level of computing capability of hospitals owned by two ministries. The data used in this study were obtained from 729 hospitals that belong to both ministries by using a data collection tool. The results indicate that there have been considerable differences among the hospitals owned by the two ministries in terms of human resources and information systems. The hospital managers and decision makers making their decisions based on the data produced by current hospital information system (HIS) would more likely face very important difficulties after merging MoH and MoLSS hospitals in Turkey. It is also possible to claim that the level and adequacy of computing abilities and devices do not allow the managers of public hospitals to use computer technology effectively in their information management practices. Lack of technical information, undeveloped information culture, inappropriate management styles, and being inexperienced are the main reasons of why HIS does not run properly and effectively in Turkish hospitals. PMID:16978006

  12. Impact of Hospital Teaching Status on Mortality, Length of Stay and Cost Among Patients With Cardiac Arrest in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dolmatova, Elena V; Moazzami, Kasra; Klapholz, Marc; Kothari, Neil; Feurdean, Mirela; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-09-01

    Limited data exist regarding the in-hospital outcomes in patients with cardiac arrest (CA) in teaching versus nonteaching hospital settings. Using the Nationwide (National) Inpatient Sample (2008 to 2012), 731,107 cases of CA were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition codes. Among these patients, 348,368 (47.6%) were managed in teaching hospitals and 376,035 (51.4%) in nonteaching hospitals. Patients in teaching hospitals with CA were younger (62.42 vs 68.08 years old), had less co-morbidities (p <0.001), were less likely to be white (54.6% vs 65.5%) and more likely to be uninsured (9.1% vs 7.6%). Mortality in patients with CA was significantly lower in teaching hospitals than in nonteaching hospitals (55.3% vs 58.8%; all p <0.001). The mortality remained significantly lower after adjusting for baseline patient and hospital characteristics (odds ratio 0.917, CI 0.899 to 0.937, p <0.001). However, the survival benefit was no longer present after adjusting for in-hospital procedures (OR 0.997, CI 0.974 to 1.02, p = 0.779). In conclusion, teaching status of the hospital was associated with decreased in-hospital mortality in patients with CA. The differences in mortality disappeared after adjusting for in-hospital procedures, indicating that routine application of novel therapeutic methods in patients with CA in teaching hospitals could translate into improved survival outcomes. PMID:27378144

  13. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: a pilot study to examine its latent structure and the link between psychological state and symptom severity in transient ischaemic attack patients.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Laura; James, Gill; Sackley, Cath

    2016-07-01

    Transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is often associated with anxiety and depression, which may precipitate secondary stroke and interfere with treatment. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to assess these states and to inform the management of any associated psychological problems, but there is considerable debate about what it actually measures. The HADS scores from a range of different clinical groups have been reviewed in order to assess its psychometric properties, but so far, no research has examined either its latent structure when used with TIA patients, or the association between symptom severity and the test's validity. The aims of this study, therefore, were to investigate: (a) the underlying structure of the HADS when used with TIA patients; and (b) the impact of symptom severity on the validity of the HADS. The HADS and a functional capacity measure were administered by post to a sample of 542 confirmed TIA patients. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the HADS scores to establish its underlying structure for this clinical group, and then, sub-sample correlations were undertaken between the anxiety/depression scores for different levels of functional capacity. Two factors emerged, with 13 of the 14 HADS items loading significantly on both, suggesting there is a common affective state underlying the standard anxiety and depression scales. Further data-exploration indicated that convergence between these affective states increased as functional capacity deteriorated. The results suggest firstly that the HADS measures general subjective distress when used with TIA patients, and secondly that the higher reported symptom severity in this clinical group may be associated with reduced affective differentiation. As the ability to retain clear affective discrimination is associated with health and well-being, this could provide a focus for post-TIA rehabilitation. PMID:26291749

  14. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  15. Direct utilization of geothermal resources at Warm Springs State Hospital, Warm Springs, Montana. Final report, January 31, 1979-June 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Several decades ago the water from a natural hot spring was piped to the Warm Springs State Hospital barn and greenhouse and eventually into the domestic water supply for showers. The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) funded a feasibility study on potential development of the geothermal resource from monies originating from coal severence taxes. The results of the feasibility study were subsequently utilized in obtaining a $721,122 award from the Department of Energy Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program to identify and develop the geothermal resource at Warm Springs. The study included environmental and legal considerations, geophysical surveys, and the subsequent development of the resource. The well produces 60 to 64 gpm of 154/sup 0/F geothermal water which is utilized in a heat exchanger to heat domestic water. The system became fully operational on January 13, 1983 and the calculated yearly energy savings represent approximately 17.6 million cubic feet of natural gas which is equivalent to $77,000, based on current prices.

  16. Prevalence of weathering nodules of the ear in patients treated at the state civil servant's hospital of São Paulo, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Cilento, Juliana Nunes Maciel; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Weathering nodules of the ear are pale yellow, asymptomatic lesions which predominate on the helices of the ears. Although their pathogenesis remains unknown, there is an association with chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation, age and thermal injuries. Few studies have been conducted to date, and these involved a very small number of patients. OBJECTIVE Study the prevalence of weathering nodules of the ear in patients treated in the Dermatology Service of the State Civil Servant's Hospital of São Paulo, and evaluate their probable relationship with sun exposure, age and phototypes I and II. METHODS Four hundred patients older than 20 years of age were examined between July 2008 and December 2008. A questionnaire evaluating age, sex, place of birth, origin, occupation and history of sun exposure was applied. All patients were examined and evaluated for the presence of lesions by only one person. RESULTS The data showed that 155 (38.8%) patients had a lesion in at least one of the ears. The Chi-Square Test was used for the comparative analysis between the groups of patients with and without lesions. In the group of patients with lesions, 29% were 70 to 79 years old, 78.1% had a history of sun exposure and 45.1% belonged to FITZPATRICK skin phototypes I and II (p<0.05%). CONCLUSION The findings suggest relevant prevalence, probable association with chronic sun exposure, advanced age and phototypes I and II. PMID:23539005

  17. [Laennec Hospital].

    PubMed

    Dauphin, A; Mazin-Deslandes, C

    2000-01-01

    When the Laennec Hospital of Paris closed, after 366 years of activities for the patients, the articles about the circumstances of the foundation and the main stapes of the institution which became an very famous university hospital it present the available information of the history of the apothecaries, of the "gagnants-maitrise", pharmacists and the pharmacy's interns who succeeded themselves to create and dispense the medicaments necessary to the patients hospitalized or welcomed in ambulatory. It describes the evolution of the places, of the material, of forms, of the organization, of the medicaments and of the missions of what became the Pharmacy department after the recent individualization of the biological analysis in the biochemistry. PMID:11625687

  18. 24 CFR 242.72 - Leasing of hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leasing of hospital. 242.72 Section... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.72 Leasing of hospital. Leasing of a hospital in... facilities by state entities shall be considered on a case-by-case basis. Also, leasing of a hospital...

  19. Union Density and Hospital Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koys, Daniel J; Martin, Wm Marty; LaVan, Helen; Katz, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    The authors address the hospital outcomes of patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income per bed. They define union density as the percentage of a hospital's employees who are in unions, healthcare quality as its 30-day acute myocardial infraction (AMI; heart attack) mortality rate, and patient satisfaction as its overall Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems score. Using a random sample of 84 union and 84 nonunion hospitals from across the United States, multiple regression analyses show that union density is negatively related to patient satisfaction. Union density is not related to healthcare quality as measured by the AMI mortality rate or to net income per bed. This implies that unions per se are not good or bad for hospitals. The authors suggest that it is better for hospital administrators to take a Balanced Scorecard approach and be concerned about employee satisfaction, patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income. PMID:26652043

  20. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  1. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  2. Health in a fragile state: a five-year review of mortality patterns and trends at Somalia’s Banadir Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kulane, Asli; Sematimba, Douglas; Mohamed, Lul M; Ali, Abdirashid H; Lu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background The recurrent civil conflict in Somalia has impeded progress toward improving health and health care, with lack of data and poor performance of health indicators. This study aimed at making inference about Banadir region by exploring morbidity and mortality trends at Banadir Hospital. This is one of the few functional hospitals during war. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted with data collected at Banadir Hospital for the period of January 2008–December 2012. The data were aggregated from patient records and summarized on a morbidity and mortality surveillance form with respect to age groups and stratified by sex. The main outcome was the number of patients that died in the hospital. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association between sex and hospital mortality. Results Conditions of infectious origin were the major presentations at the hospital. The year 2011 recorded the highest number of cases of diarrhea and mortality due to diarrhea. The stillbirth rate declined during the study period from 272 to 48 stillbirths per 1,000 live births by 2012. The sum of total cases that were attended to at the hospital by the end of 2012 was four times the number at the baseline year of the study in 2008; however, the overall mortality rate among those admitted declined between 2008 and 2012. Conclusion There was reduction in patient mortality at the hospital over the study period. Data from Banadir Hospital are consistent with findings from Banadir region and could give credible public health reflections for the region given the lack of data on a population level. PMID:27621664

  3. Pattern of Skin Diseases at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, South-South Nigeria: A 12 Month Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ukonu, B. A.; Eze, E. U

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: This study aims to look at the pattern and incidence of skin diseases seen in Dermatology/Venereology clinic at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, South-South Zone, Nigeria and compare it with other zones of Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study on pattern and incidence of skin diseases in new patients presenting at the Dermatology/Venereology outpatient clinic of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, South-South, Nigeria, from September 2006 to August 2007. All patients were seen by the researchers. Diagnosis were made clinically and sometimes with the support of histopathology. Results: A total number of 4786 patients were seen during the study period and these comprised 2647 HIV/AIDS patients and 2112 pure Dermatological patients. Out of 4786 patients, 755 (15.8%) were new patients. The new patients comprised 96 (12.7%) children patients (< 15 years) and 659 (83.7%) adult patients (>15years). The ages of the patients ranged from 2 weeks to 80 years and more than two-third were < 40 years. There were 354 males (46.9%) and 401 females (53.1%). This represents female: male ratio of 1.1: 1. Eczematous dermatitis accounted for 20.9% of the skin diseases and was the most common of the skin diseases observed. This is consistent with observation from other zones in Nigeria. Other skin diseases observed in order of frequencies include: Papulosqamous disorder (9.0%), Infectious skin diseases like fungal, viral, bacterial and parasitic infestation, at 7.9%, 7.7%, 2.3% and 2.1% respectively. Pigmentary disorders (5.0%), hair disorders (4.2%) and Benign neoplastic skin disease (6.5%). All the patients that had neurofibromatosis were females (1.9%). HIV-related skin diseases were observed to have increased remarkably (7.9%) with Kaposi’s sarcoma, papular pruritic eruptions and drug eruptions being the commonest mode of presentation. Conclusion: The current pattern of

  4. 38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17... to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be paid to the designated State official for hospital care furnished in a recognized State home for any veteran if: (a)...

  5. Trends in Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Bronchiolitis Hospitalization Rates in High-Risk Infants in a United States Nationally Representative Database, 1997–2012

    PubMed Central

    Doucette, Abigail; Jiang, Xiaohui; Fryzek, Jon; Coalson, Jenna; McLaurin, Kimmie; Ambrose, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes significant pediatric morbidity and is the most common cause of bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis hospitalizations declined among US infants from 2000‒2009; however, rates in infants at high risk for RSV have not been described. This study examined RSV and unspecified bronchiolitis (UB) hospitalization rates from 1997‒2012 among US high-risk infants. Methods The Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) infant annual RSV (ICD-9 079.6, 466.11, 480.1) and UB (ICD-9 466.19, 466.1) hospitalization rates were estimated using weighted counts. Denominators were based on birth hospitalizations with conditions associated with high-risk for RSV: chronic perinatal respiratory disease (chronic lung disease [CLD]); congenital airway anomalies (CAA); congenital heart disease (CHD); Down syndrome (DS); and other genetic, metabolic, musculoskeletal, and immunodeficiency conditions. Preterm infants could not be identified. Hospitalizations were characterized by mechanical ventilation, inpatient mortality, length of stay, and total cost (2015$). Poisson and linear regression were used to test statistical significance of trends. Results RSV and UB hospitalization rates were substantially elevated for infants with higher-risk CHD, CLD, CAA and DS without CHD compared with all infants. RSV rates declined by 47.0% in CLD and 49.7% in higher-risk CHD infants; no other declines in high-risk groups were observed. UB rates increased in all high-risk groups except for a 22.5% decrease among higher-risk CHD. Among high-risk infants, mechanical ventilation increased through 2012 to 20.4% and 13.5% of RSV and UB hospitalizations; geometric mean cost increased to $31,742 and $25,962, respectively, and RSV mortality declined to 0.9%. Conclusions Among high-risk infants between 1997 and 2012, RSV hospitalization rates declined among CLD and higher-risk CHD infants, coincident with widespread RSV immunoprophylaxis use in these populations. UB

  6. Hospital utilization and expenditures in a Medicaid population

    PubMed Central

    Buczko, William

    1989-01-01

    Determinants of hospital utilization and expenditures are analyzed for Medicaid enrollees in the State Medicaid household sample portion of the National Medical Care Utilization and Expenditure Survey who were continuously enrolled throughout 1980. Health status measures were the best predictors of both the probability of hospitalization and total hospitalizations. Children covered by Aid to Families with Dependent Children were the Medicaid enrollees least likely to be hospitalized. Number of hospital days, surgery, and California residence directly increased hospital expenditures. Conditions responsible for hospitalization increased hospital expenditures indirectly by increasing the number of hospital days and the probability of surgery. PMID:10313353

  7. Prevalence and Predictors of Gastrostomy Tube and Tracheostomy Placement in Anoxic/Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathic Survivors of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Rampa, Sankeerth; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Martinez-Schlurmann, Natalia I.; Lidsky, Karen B.; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Rotta, Alexandre T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current prevalence estimates of gastrostomy tube (GT) /tracheostomy placement in hospitalized patients with anoxic/hypoxic ischemic encephalopathic injury (AHIE) post cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are unknown. We sought, to estimate the prevalence of AHIE in hospitalized patients who had CPR and to identify patient/hospital level factors that predict the performance of GT/tracheostomy in those with AHIE. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 2004–2010). All patients who developed AHIE following CPR were included. In this cohort the odds of having GT and tracheostomy was computed by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Patient and hospital level factors were the independent variables. Results During the study period, a total of 686,578 CPR events occurred in hospitalized patients. Of these, 94,336 (13.7%) patients developed AHIE. In this AHIE cohort, 6.8% received GT and 8.3% tracheostomy. When compared to the 40–49 yrs age group, those aged >70 yrs were associated with lower odds for GT (OR = 0.65, 95% CI:0.53–0.80, p<0.0001). Those aged <18 years & those >60 years were associated with lower odds for having tracheostomy when compared to the 40–49 years group (p<0.0001). Each one unit increase in co-morbid burden was associated with higher odds for having GT (OR = 1.23,p<0.0001) or tracheostomy (OR = 1.17, p<0.0001). Blacks, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and other races were associated with higher odds for having GT or tracheostomy when compared to whites (p<0.05). Hospitals located in northeastern regions were associated with higher odds for performing GT (OR = 1.48, p<0.0001) or tracheostomy (OR = 1.63, p<0.0001) when compared to those in Western regions. Teaching hospitals (TH) were associated with higher odds for performing tracheostomy when compared to non-TH (OR = 1.36, 1.20–1.54, p<0.0001). Conclusions AHIE injury occurs in a significant number of in-hospital arrests

  8. [Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) as vectors for bacteria in two hospitals in the municipality of Divinópolis, State of Minas Gerais].

    PubMed

    Santos, Paula Fernandes dos; Fonseca, Alysson Rodrigo; Sanches, Newton Moreno

    2009-01-01

    The presence of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in hospital environments may constitute a public health problem, especially since they are mechanical vectors for pathogenic organisms. This study aimed to survey the ant populations and analyze the presence of bacteria associated with them in two medium-sized regional hospitals in the municipality of Divinópolis, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Specimens were collected every monthly over a six-month period. The following ant species were found: Pheidole sp1 and sp2, Linepithema humile, Wasmannia auropunctata, Camponotus sp1 and sp2, Odontomachus sp, Solenopsis sp, Acromyrmex sp and Tapinoma melenocephalum. It was observed that these ants mechanically transported Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Escherichia coli and non-pathogenic and pathogenic Staphylococcus. These results show the propensity for occurrences of hospital infections at these sites caused by mechanical transmission of pathogens by ants. PMID:19967241

  9. Cervical Sagittal Alignment Parameters of Patients Admitted to Neurosurgery and Emergency Clinics in a State Hospital at Eastern Part of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Sümeyye Çoruh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cervical spine encompasses a bridge role between the head and the lower parts of the spine and therefore has unique properties. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the cervical sagittal alignment parameters in pediatric and adult non-surgical patients and to find any differences in respect of age, sex and admission type. Methods All patients who were admitted to emergency and neurosurgery clinics of Diyarbakir Bismil State Hospital due to cervical spine problems (trauma, radiculopathy, paraspinal pain) in 2014 were enrolled retrospectively into the study. Cervical anterior-posterior and lateral X-rays were obtained. Our exclusion criteria were cervical coronal deformity, multitrauma, Glasgow Coma Scale <15, traumatic disruption of the cervical spine, history of malignancy, spinal infection, metabolic or rheumatologic diseases. Results There were 44 female and 55 male patients (n=99) in the study. Thirty-five (35.35%) of the patients were younger than 18 years of age. Mean cervical spinal alignment parameters were as follows: -42.81±11.23° (OC2), -17.15±11.48° (C2-C7), -29.82±7.60° (T1 slope), -3.62±3.05° (C3), -3.14±3.05 (C4), -3.80±2.74° (C5), -3.12±2.36° (C6), -3.43±2.53° (C7). Positive correlations were observed between age-C2C7 angle, C2C7 angle-T1 slope, C3 angle-C4 angle, C4 angle-OC2 angle, C4 angle-T1 slope, C4 angle-C5 angle. The one only negative correlation was between OC2 angle-C2C7 angle. Conclusion In this regional study, it has been observed that global cervical lordosis increases as age increases. C4 vertebra is in the middle of this evaluation as it has many correlations with other cervical segments, which should be kept in mind when making surgical plans for this delicate spine region. PMID:26217386

  10. Predictors of Complications of Tonsillectomy With or Without Adenoidectomy in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2001-2010: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Martinez-Schlurmann, Natalia; Rampa, Sankeerth; Nalliah, Romesh P; Lidsky, Karen B; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Rotta, Alexandre T

    2016-06-01

    Outcomes of tonsillectomy (with or without adenoidectomy [w/woA]) in hospitalized children are unclear. We sought, to describe the characteristics of hospitalized children who underwent tonsillectomy (w/woA), to estimate the prevalence of complications and to evaluate the relative impact of different comorbid conditions (CMC) on the risk of occurrence of common complications following these procedures. All patients aged ≤21years who underwent a tonsillectomy (w/woA) were selected from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS 2001-2010). The associations between several patient/hospital-level factors and occurrence of complications were generated using multivariable logistic regression models. Over a decade, a total of 141 599 hospitalized patients underwent tonsillectomy (w116 319; woA 25 280). A total of 58.1% were males. Majority of the procedures were performed in teaching hospitals (TH, 73.7%), in large (bed-size) hospitals (LH, 57.8%), and in those who were electively admitted (EA, 67.3%). Frequently present CMC in patients included obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, 26.4%), chronic pulmonary disease (CPD, 14.6%), neurological disorders (ND, 6.7%), and obesity (4.8%). Majority of patients were discharged routinely (98%). Overall complication rate was 6.4% with common complications being postoperative pneumonia (2.3%), bacterial infections (1.4%), respiratory complications (1.3%), and hemorrhage (1.2%). All-cause mortality included a total of 60 patients. Patients in TH (odds ratio [OR] = 0.72, 95%CI = 0.62-0.85), LH (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.69-0.93), and those who had the procedures during EA (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.56-0.74) had significantly lower odds of complications compared with their counterparts. CMC such as anemia, CPD, coagulopathy, HT, ND, and fluid/electrolyte disorders were independent predictors of significantly higher complication risk (P < .05). In conclusion, hospitalized children who underwent tonsillectomy (w/woA) in large or teaching hospitals, or

  11. Energy audits at 48 hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, E.

    1981-11-01

    Staff at the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted energy audits at 48 hospitals in four states (New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee) between 1978 and 1980. Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ORAU developed and organized a computerized data base containing information from these audits. This paper describes the ORAU audit process; summarizes the data collected from these audits on hospital characteristics annual energy use, and the audit recommendations; and analyzes the audit data in terms of cost effectiveness, type of recommendations, and the relationship between potential energy saving and characteristics of the individual hospital.

  12. [Incidence pityriasis rosea of Gibert in the Dermatology Service of the Hospital do Servidor Público in the state of São Paulo].

    PubMed

    de Souza Sittart, J A; Tayah, M; Soares, Z

    1984-01-01

    The authors present a retrospective study on the incidence of Pitiriase Rosea in the Dermatology Department of the Hospital do Servidor Público do Estado de São Paulo, covering a 17 years span. Figures concerning race, sex, age, mensal and anual incidence as well the distribution in the seasons of the year are analysed. PMID:6392788

  13. What Is the Impact of Health Reforms on Uncompensated Care in Critical Access Hospitals? A 5-Year Forecast in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Joseph; Fry, Benjamin; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Gary; Short, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Context: The 2008 financial crisis had a far-reaching impact on nearly every sector of the economy. As unemployment increased so did the uninsured. Already operating on a slim margin and poor payer mix, many critical access hospitals are facing a tough road ahead. Purpose: We seek to examine the increasing impact of uncompensated care on the…

  14. National Trends in Pulmonary Embolism Hospitalization Rates and Outcomes for Adults Aged ≥65 Years in the United States (1999 to 2010).

    PubMed

    Minges, Karl E; Bikdeli, Behnood; Wang, Yun; Kim, Nancy; Curtis, Jeptha P; Desai, Mayur M; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about national trends of pulmonary embolism (PE) hospitalizations and outcomes in older adults in the context of recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of 100% Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries hospitalized from 1999 to 2010 with a principal discharge diagnosis code for PE. The adjusted PE hospitalization rate increased from 129/100,000 person-years in 1999 to 302/100,000 person-years in 2010, a relative increase of 134% (p <0.001). Black patients had the highest rate of increase (174 to 548/100,000 person-years) among all age, gender, and race categories. The mean (standard deviation) length of hospital stay decreased from 7.6 (5.7) days in 1999 to 5.8 (4.4) days in 2010, and the proportion of patients discharged to home decreased from 51.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50.5 to 51.6) to 44.1% (95% CI 43.7 to 44.6), whereas more patients were discharged with home health care and to skilled nursing facilities. The in-hospital mortality rate decreased from 8.3% (95% CI 8.0 to 8.6) in 1999 to 4.4% (95% CI 4.2 to 4.5) in 2010, as did adjusted 30-day (from 12.3% [95% CI 11.9 to 12.6] to 9.1% [95% CI 8.5 to 9.7]) and 6-month mortality rates (from 23.0% [95% CI 22.5 to 23.4] to 19.6% [95% CI 18.8 to 20.5]). There were no significant racial differences in mortality rates by 2010. There was no change in the adjusted 30-day all-cause readmission rate from 1999 to 2010. In conclusion, PE hospitalization rates increased substantially from 1999 to 2010, with a higher rate for black patients. All mortality rates decreased but remained high. The increase in hospitalization rates and continued high mortality and readmission rates confirm the significant burden of PE for older adults. PMID:26409636

  15. Adults with myelomeningocele and other forms of spinal dysraphism: hospital care in the United States since the turn of the millennium.

    PubMed

    Piatt, Joseph H

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The natural history and management of myelomeningocele (MM) in children is fairly well understood. There is a deficiency of knowledge regarding the care of adults, however, even though there are now more adults than children living with MM. The purpose of this study was to characterize the hospital care of adults with MM and hydrocephalus on a nationwide population base. Adults with other forms of spina bifida (SB) were studied for contrast. METHODS The Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 2001, 2004, 2007, and 2010 was queried for admissions with diagnostic ICD-9-CM codes for MM with hydrocephalus and for other forms of SB. RESULTS There were 4657 admissions of patients with MM and 12,369 admissions of patients with SB in the sample. Nationwide rates of admission increased steadily for both MM and SB patients throughout the study period. Hospital charges increased faster than the health care component of the Consumer Price Index. Patients with MM were younger than patients with SB, but annual admissions of MM patients older than 40 years increased significantly during the study period. With respect to hospital death and discharge home, outcomes of surgery for hydrocephalus were superior at high-volume hospitals. Patients with MM and SB were admitted to the hospital more frequently than the general population for surgery to treat degenerative spine disease. CONCLUSIONS Patients with MM and SB continue to require neurosurgical attention in adulthood, and the demand for services for older patients with MM is increasing. Management of hydrocephalus at high-volume centers is advantageous for this population. Patients with MM or SB may experience high rates of degenerative spine disease. PMID:26926705

  16. Hospitals for sale.

    PubMed

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve. PMID:21864058

  17. Managing hospitals in turbulent times: do organizational changes improve hospital survival?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S Y; Alexander, J A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine (1) the degree to which organizational changes affected hospital survival; (2) whether core and peripheral organizational changes affected hospital survival differently; and (3) how simultaneous organizational changes affected hospital survival. DATA SOURCES: AHA Hospital Surveys, the Area Resource File, and the AHA Hospital Guides, Part B: Multihospital Systems. STUDY DESIGN: The study employed a longitudinal panel design. We followed changes in all community hospitals in the continental United States from 1981 through 1994. The dependent variable, hospital closure, was examined as a function of multiple changes in a hospital's core and peripheral structures as well as the hospital's organizational and environmental characteristics. Cox regression models were used to test the expectations that core changes increased closure risk while peripheral changes decreased such risk, and that simultaneous core and peripheral changes would lead to higher risk of closure. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Results indicated more peripheral than core changes in community hospitals. Overall, findings contradicted our expectations. Change in specialty, a core change, was beneficial for hospitals, because it reduced closure risk. The two most frequent peripheral changes, downsizing and leadership change, were positively associated with closure. Simultaneous organizational changes displayed a similar pattern: multiple core changes reduced closure risk, while multiple peripheral changes increased the risk. These patterns held regardless of the level of uncertainty in hospital environments. CONCLUSIONS: Organizational changes are not all beneficial for hospitals, suggesting that hospital leaders should be both cautious and selective in their efforts to turn their hospitals around. PMID:10536977

  18. Massachusetts law gives hospitals energy incentives

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, L.

    1982-08-30

    A new law allowing hospitals to retain the difference between pre-paid insurer's rates over actual costs reverses a cost-cutting disincentive into a financial incentive for the Massachusetts General Hospital and the American Hospital Association. If hospital costs exceed the insurer's preset reimbursements, however, hospitals must make up the difference. The new law creates incentives for energy management and could serve as a model for other states if it proves effective. The federal government may apply the concept to the Medicare-Medicaid reimbursement formula. (DCK)

  19. Corporate visual identity: a case in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alkibay, Sanem; Ozdogan, F Bahar; Ermec, Aysegul

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present a perspective to better understand corporate identity through examining the perceptions of Turkish patients and develop a corporate visual identity scale. While there is no study related to corporate identity research on hospitals in Turkey as a developing country, understanding consumer's perceptions about corporate identity efforts of hospitals could provide different perspectives for recruiters. When the hospitals are considered in two different groups as university and state hospitals, the priority of the characteristics of corporate visual identity may change, whereas the top five characteristics remain the same for all the hospitals. PMID:19042532

  20. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care. PMID:17244509

  1. In-hospital complications and mortality after elective spinal fusion surgery in the united states: a study of the nationwide inpatient sample from 2001 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Roth, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Spinal fusion surgery has increased dramatically and patients presenting for surgery are often more medically challenging. We hypothesized that advanced age and coexisting morbidities have increased in the population undergoing spinal fusion and are associated with greater risks for immediate complications and mortality. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was retrospectively reviewed for discharges after a principal procedure code for elective spinal fusion. Total records meeting study inclusion criteria were 254,640. Coexisting morbidities were tabulated using Elixhauser comorbidities and the Charlson comorbidity index. Logistic regression identified risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality and early complications. The largest increase in spinal fusion surgery was in patients >65 years. Overall, those with at least 1 comorbidity increased (49% to 62%; P=0.002), as did mean Charlson index (0.146 to 0.202; P<0.001). In-hospital mortality was 0.13%, but 0.29%, and 0.64% for patients of 65 to 74, and those >or=75 years, respectively. Adjusted odds ratios for complications in 65-year to 74-year olds versus <65 years was 1.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.71-1.84; P<0.001), and for mortality 3.81 (95% confidence interval, 2.62-5.55; P<0.001); risks increased with the number of coexisting morbidities. Congestive heart failure, chronic pulmonary disease, coagulopathy, metastatic cancer, renal failure, and weight loss significantly correlated with in-hospital mortality, whereas hypertension or hypothyroidism had, unexpectedly, the opposite effect. Although it is known for some other forms of complex surgery, we showed that elderly and medically complex spinal fusion patients were at increased risk for in-hospital mortality and early complications. The majority of complications were operative, pulmonary, cardiovascular, or genito-urinary. Patient risk correlated with the number and nature of coexisting morbidities. PMID:19098620

  2. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples. PMID:25711185

  3. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  4. Hospital corporate restructuring and financial performance.

    PubMed

    Clement, J P; D'Aunno, T A; Poyzer, B L

    1993-11-01

    In the last decade, an important innovation in the organizational structure of acute care hospitals occurred. Many hospitals restructured by creating subsidiaries that segment assets or services into separate corporations. We know relatively little about the effects of such restructuring. This paper examines the association of restructuring with financial performance of not-for-profit hospital firms. The study uses data from all not-for-profit acute care hospital firms in Virginia, the only state for which the unique study data are available. We find that the consolidated financial performance of hospital firms is influenced by factors that affect the hospital's financial performance (i.e., payer-mix, staffing and service mix) but not the number or size of non-hospital subsidiaries. Future research should examine the effect of restructuring on other types of performance. PMID:8231338

  5. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  6. Acute Infections, Cost per Infection and Turnaround Time in Three United States Hospital Laboratories Using Fourth-Generation Antigen-Antibody Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Laura G; Nasrullah, Muazzam; Coombs, Robert W; Rosenberg, Eric; Ethridge, Steven F; Hutchinson, Angela B; Dragavon, Joan; Rychert, Jennifer; Nolte, Frederick S; Madory, James E; Werner, Barbara G

    2016-01-01

    Background.  To improve clinical and public health outcomes through early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection, fourth-generation antigen/antibody immunoassay (4IA) and supplemental testing results must be returned rapidly. Methods.  We examined HIV testing data at Harborview Medical Center (HMC), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), which used 4IA and supplemental antibody and nucleic acid tests (NATs). At MGH and MUSC, HIV-1 Western blot (WB) and HIV-2 testing were conducted at a reference laboratory. We compared time from specimen collection to laboratory result for established (positive WB) and acute infections (reactive 4IA, negative/indeterminate WB, detectable NAT), and we calculated testing cost per positive-test result. Results.  From 3731 (MUSC) to 19 774 (MGH) tests were conducted; 0.01% (MGH) to 0.05% (HMC) were acute infections. Each laboratory had reactive 4IA, WB-negative, or indeterminate specimens without NAT (ie, potential acute infections). Time to result was 1.5 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for acute and 1.0 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for established infections. Costs were $1054 (MGH) to $1521 (MUSC). Conclusions.  Conducting supplemental testing in-house lowered turnaround times, which may be further reduced with rapid HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation tests. Hospitals may benefit from quantitative NATs not requiring physician orders, so all potential acute infections receive NAT. PMID:26798766

  7. Acute Infections, Cost per Infection and Turnaround Time in Three United States Hospital Laboratories Using Fourth-Generation Antigen-Antibody Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Laura G.; Nasrullah, Muazzam; Coombs, Robert W.; Rosenberg, Eric; Ethridge, Steven F.; Hutchinson, Angela B.; Dragavon, Joan; Rychert, Jennifer; Nolte, Frederick S.; Madory, James E.; Werner, Barbara G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. To improve clinical and public health outcomes through early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection, fourth-generation antigen/antibody immunoassay (4IA) and supplemental testing results must be returned rapidly. Methods. We examined HIV testing data at Harborview Medical Center (HMC), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), which used 4IA and supplemental antibody and nucleic acid tests (NATs). At MGH and MUSC, HIV-1 Western blot (WB) and HIV-2 testing were conducted at a reference laboratory. We compared time from specimen collection to laboratory result for established (positive WB) and acute infections (reactive 4IA, negative/indeterminate WB, detectable NAT), and we calculated testing cost per positive-test result. Results. From 3731 (MUSC) to 19 774 (MGH) tests were conducted; 0.01% (MGH) to 0.05% (HMC) were acute infections. Each laboratory had reactive 4IA, WB-negative, or indeterminate specimens without NAT (ie, potential acute infections). Time to result was 1.5 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for acute and 1.0 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for established infections. Costs were $1054 (MGH) to $1521 (MUSC). Conclusions. Conducting supplemental testing in-house lowered turnaround times, which may be further reduced with rapid HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation tests. Hospitals may benefit from quantitative NATs not requiring physician orders, so all potential acute infections receive NAT. PMID:26798766

  8. Hospital Closure and Insights into Patient Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N.; Husk, G.; Nguyen, T.; Onyile, A.; Echezona, S.; Kuperman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hospital closures are becoming increasingly common in the United States. Patients who received care at the closing hospitals must travel to different, often farther hospitals for care, and nearby remaining hospitals may have difficulty coping with a sudden influx of patients. Objectives Our objectives are to analyze the dispersion patterns of patients from a closing hospital and to correlate that with distance from the closing hospital for three specific visit types: emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory. Methods In this study, we used data from a health information exchange to track patients from Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, a hospital in New York City that closed in 2010, to determine where they received emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory care following the closure. Results We found that patients went to the next nearest hospital for their emergency and inpatient care, but ambulatory encounters did not correlate with distance. Discussion It is likely that patients followed their ambulatory providers as they transitioned to another hospital system. Additional work should be done to determine predictors of impact on nearby hospitals when another hospital in the community closes in order to better prepare for patient dispersion. PMID:25848422

  9. Knowledge, Practice, and Associated Factors towards Prevention of Surgical Site Infection among Nurses Working in Amhara Regional State Referral Hospitals, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Teshager, Freahiywot Aklew; Engeda, Eshetu Haileselassie; Worku, Workie Zemene

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge and practice of nurses about surgical site infections (SSIs) are not well studied in Ethiopia. This paper contains findings about Northwest Ethiopian nurses' knowledge and practice regarding the prevention of SSIs. The main objective of the study was to assess knowledge, practice, and associated factors of nurses towards the prevention of SSIs. The study was done using a questionnaire survey on randomly selected 423 nurses who were working in referral hospitals during the study period. The study showed that more than half of the nurses who participated in the survey had inadequate knowledge about the prevention of SSIs. Moreover, more than half of them were practicing inappropriately. The most important associated factors include lack of training on evidence based guidelines and sociodemographic variables (age, year of service, educational status, etc.). Training of nurses with the up-to-date SSIs guidelines is recommended. PMID:26788549

  10. A multi-year study of air pollution and respiratory hospital admissions in three New York State metropolitan areas: results for 1988 and 1989 summers

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.D.; Ito, K.; Kinney, P.L.; Lippmann, M. )

    1992-10-01

    As part of a multi-year study of air pollution and respiratory hospital admissions in the Buffalo, Albany, and New York City, New York, metropolitan areas, filter samples were collected daily at suburban air monitoring sites and analyzed for their content of particulate phase aerosol strong acidity (i.e., hydrogen ion, H+) and sulfate (SO4 =). In addition, daily hospital admissions for respiratory causes, other community air pollutant measurements (e.g., ozone, O3), and meteorological data (e.g., temperature) were also obtained for these metropolitan areas. The summer months (June-August) were selected for analysis because that is when the highest H+ (and O3) are usually experienced at these sites, and because these months are rarely complicated by other major influences (e.g., high pollen counts). Thus, any pollution-admissions relationships were expected to be most clearly discernible in this season. Prior to the health effects analysis, the summer admissions and environmental data were first detrended to eliminate long-wave autocorrelations, and day-of-week effects were removed via regression. Cross-correlations of the filtered 1988 and 1989 admissions and environmental data revealed strong associations between elevated summer haze pollution (i.e., H+, SO4 =, and O3) and increased total respiratory and asthma admissions on the same day and/or on subsequent days in Buffalo and New York City, especially during the summer of 1988 (when pollution levels were more extreme). Regression analyses indicated that the pollution-admissions associations remained significant (p < 0.05) even after the simultaneous inclusion of lagged daily maximum temperature. Mean effects calculations for these cities indicated that summertime haze can play a significant role in the occurrence of respiratory admissions in that season: accounting for an average 6 to 24% of 1988 Buffalo and NYC asthma admissions. O3 consistently had the highest mean effects estimates.

  11. The use of the partograph in labor monitoring: a cross-sectional study among obstetric caregivers in General Hospital, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Asibong, Udeme; Okokon, Ita B; Agan, Thomas U; Oku, Affiong; Opiah, Margaret; Essien, E James; Monjok, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged and obstructed labor is a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in Nigeria, one of the six countries contributing significantly to the global maternal mortality crisis. The use of the partograph would engender a remarkable reduction in the number of these deaths since abnormal markers in the progress of labor would be identified early on. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the non-physician obstetric caregivers’ (OCGs) knowledge of partograph use, assess the extent of its use, determine the factors that impede its usage, and unravel the relationship between years of experience and partograph use among the respondents (OCGs) in General Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria. Methodology Using a self-administered semi-structured questionnaire, a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among 130 purposely selected and consenting OCGs working in the General Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria. Results The majority of the respondents (70.8%) had good general knowledge of the partograph but lacked detailed and in-depth knowledge of the component parts of the partograph. Knowledge of partograph (χ2=12.05, P=0.0001) and partograph availability (χ2=56.5, P=0.0001) had a significant relationship with its utilization. Previous training (χ2=9.43, P=0.002) was significantly related to knowledge of partograph. Factors affecting utilization were: little or no knowledge of the partograph (85.4%), nonavailability (70%), shortage of staff (61.5%), and the fact that it is time-consuming to use (30%). Conclusion Lack of detailed knowledge of the partograph, nonavailability of the partograph, poor staff numbers, and inadequate training are factors that work against the effective utilization of the partograph in the study facility. Usage of this tool for labor monitoring can be enhanced by periodic training, making partographs available in labor wards, provision of reasonable staff numbers, and mandatory institutional policy. PMID:25342920

  12. Hospital Library Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  13. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  14. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature. PMID:10283019

  15. Hospital Contracts: Important Issues for Medical Groups.

    PubMed

    Rosolio, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Relationships with hospitals and outpatient medical facilities have always been an important part of the business model for private medical practices. As healthcare delivery to patients has evolved in the United States (much of it driven by the new government mandates, regulations, and the Affordable Care Act), the delivery of such services is becoming more and more centered on the hospital or institutional setting, thus making contractual relationships with hospitals even more important for medical practices. As a natural outgrowth of this relationship, attention to hospital contracts is becoming more important. PMID:27039636

  16. Announcement of ruling: implementing United States v.Windsor for purposes of entitlement and enrollment in Medicare hospital insurance and supplementary medical insurance. Notice of CMS ruling.

    PubMed

    2015-02-13

    This document announces a CMS Ruling that states the CMS policies for implementing United States v. Windsor ("Windsor''), in which the Supreme Court held that section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), enacted in 1996, is unconstitutional. Section 3 of DOMA defined ``marriage'' and "spouse'' as excluding same-sex marriages and same-sex spouses, and effectively precluded the Federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages and spouses. PMID:25735052

  17. Clinical nurses' perception of continuing professional education as a tool for quality service delivery in public hospitals Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nsemo, Alberta D; John, Mildred E; Etifit, Rita E; Mgbekem, Mary A; Oyira, Emilia J

    2013-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the perception of nurses on various aspects of continuing professional education (CPE). A mixed method design (quantitative/qualitative) was adopted. A self-explanatory, semi-structured questionnaire was validated and used to collect data in addition to unstructured interview. One hundred and fifty nurses were selected through stratified random sampling from two hospitals in Calabar, Nigeria and served as participants. Participants generally perceived CPE as valuable and worthwhile and participated because it is mandatory and helps them to retain their jobs. The content of CPE were perceived to be more relevant for clinicians than for nurse educators; clinical skills and quantitative research methodology were adequately covered while evidence-based practice, attitudinal issues, nursing theories and patient safety were inadequately covered. CPE was perceived to be fragmented without gaining points, follow-up monitoring and evaluation after CPE which make it difficult to objectively assess the influence of CPE on quality of care. It is recommended that nurse leaders in Nigeria should develop online CPE modules for nursing, and allocate points to them so that participation may contribute to career progression. Effective monitoring and evaluation systems should be put in place to assess impact of CPE on staff competence and patient outcomes. PMID:23664784

  18. Financial management of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Speranzo, A J

    1984-05-01

    The effect of hospital reimbursement systems on the financial management of hospitals is briefly discussed, and the organization of hospital financial operations is reviewed. The implementation of Medicare prospective pricing will change the way in which hospital finances are managed. Health-care managers will be concerned with the profitability of product lines, or diagnosis-related groups, in future strategic planning efforts. The hospital's finance department consists of several traditional areas that exist in almost all financial organizations. The functions and interactions of these various areas are discussed in light of previous and current hospital reimbursement strategies. Staffing of the finance department and the duties of the hospital's chief financial officer are also described. The prospective pricing system of hospital reimbursement and increasing pressure from the business community to stem the rising costs of health care will produce changes in the medical and financial operations of the hospital industry over the next decade. PMID:6375357

  19. Tree-structured Risk Stratification of In-hospital Mortality Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Report From the New York State Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Database

    PubMed Central

    Negassa, Abdissa; Monrad, E. Scott; Bang, Ji Yon; Srinivas, V.S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous risk scores have shown excellent performance. However, the need for real-time risk score computation makes their implementation in an emergent situation challenging. A more simplified approach can provide practitioners with a practical bedside risk stratification tool. METHODS: We developed an easy-to-use tree-structured risk stratification model for patients undergoing early Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) for Acute Myocardial Infraction (AMI). The model was developed on the New York State PCI database for 1999-2000 (consisting of 5385 procedures) and was validated using the subsequent 2001-2002 database (consisting of 7414 procedures). RESULTS: Tree-structured modeling identified three key presenting features: cardiogenic shock, congestive heart failure and age. In the validation dataset, this risk stratification model identified patient groups with in-hospital mortality ranging from 0.5% to 20.6%, more than a twenty-fold increased risk. The performance of this model was similar to the Mayo Clinic Risk Score with a discriminative capacity of 82% (95% CI: 79%, 84%) versus 80% (95% CI: 77%, 82%), respectively. CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing PCI for AMI can be readily stratified into risk categories using the tree-structured model. This provides practicing cardiologists with an internally validated and easy-to-use scheme for in-hospital mortality risk stratification. PMID:17643583

  20. Development and use of mobile containment units for the evaluation and treatment of potential Ebola virus disease patients in a United States hospital.

    PubMed

    Sugalski, Gregory; Murano, Tiffany; Fox, Adam; Rosania, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) has been the subject of recent attention due to the current outbreak in West Africa, as well as the appearance of a number of cases within the United States. The presence of EVD patients in the United States required health care systems to prepare for the identification and management of both patients under investigation and patients with confirmed EVD infection. This article discusses the development and use of a mobile containment unit in an extended treatment area as a novel approach to isolation and screening of potential EVD patients. PMID:25900204

  1. Hospital demand for physicians.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, M A; Jensen, G A

    1990-01-01

    This article develops a derived demand for physicians that is general enough to encompass physician control, simple profit maximization and hospital utility maximization models of the hospital. The analysis focuses on three special aspects of physician affiliations: the price of adding a physician to the staff is unobserved; the physician holds appointments at multiple hospitals, and physicians are not homogeneous. Using 1983 American Hospital Association data, a system of specialty-specific demand equations is estimated. The results are consistent with the model and suggest that physicians should be concerned about reduced access to hospitals, particularly as the stock of hospitals declines. PMID:10104050

  2. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  3. Reducing Medical Students' Stigmatization of People with Chronic Mental Illness: A Field Intervention at the "Living Museum" State Hospital Art Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Janis L.; Harding, Kelli J.; Hutner, Lucy A.; Cortland, Clarissa; Graham, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors designed an intervention to reduce beginning medical students' stigmatization of people with chronic mental illness (CMI). Methods: Pre-clinical medical students visited a state psychiatric facility's "Living Museum," a combination patient art studio/display space, as the intervention. During the visit, students interacted…

  4. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority. PMID:23424818

  5. Neuropathological research at the "Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Psychiatrie" (German Institute for Psychiatric Research) in Munich (Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute). Scientific utilization of children's organs from the "Kinderfachabteilungen" (Children's Special Departments) at Bavarian State Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Steger, Florian

    2006-09-01

    During National Socialism, the politically motivated interest in psychiatric genetic research lead to the founding of research departments specialized in pathological-anatomical brain research, the two Kaiser Wilhelm-Institutes (KWI) in Berlin and Munich. The latter was indirectly provided with brain material by Bavarian State Hospitals, to three of which "Kinderfachabteilungen" (Special Pediatric Units) were affiliated. As children became victims of the systematically conducted child "euthanasia" in these Special Pediatric Units, this paper will address the question whether and to which extent the organs from victims of child "euthanasia" were used for (neuro-) pathological research at the KWI in Munich. By means of case studies and medical histories (with focus on the situation in Kaufbeuren-Irsee), I will argue that pediatric departments on a regular base delivered slide preparations, that the child "euthanasia" conduced in these departments systematically contributed to neuropathological research and that slide preparations from victims of child "euthanasia" were used in scientific publications after 1945. PMID:16887759

  6. A variable-radius measure of local hospital market structure.

    PubMed Central

    Phibbs, C S; Robinson, J C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To provide a radius measure of the structure of local hospital markets that varies with hospital characteristics and is available for all hospitals in the United States. DATA SOURCES. 1982 American Hospital Association (AHA) Survey of Hospitals, 1982 Area Resource File (ARF), and 1983 California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) discharge abstracts. STUDY DESIGN. The OSHPD data were used to measure the radii necessary to capture 75 percent and 90 percent of each hospital's admissions. These radii were used as the dependent variables in regression models in which the independent variables were from the AHA and ARF. To estimate predicted market radii, the estimated parameters from the California models were applied to all nonfederal, short-term, general hospitals in the continental United States. These radii were used to define each hospital's service area, and all other hospitals within the calculated radii were considered potential competitors. Using this definition, we calculated two measures of local market structure: the number of other hospitals within the radius and a Herfindahl-Hirschman Index based on the distribution of hospital bed shares in the market. DATA EXTRACTION METHODS. These measures were calculated for all nonfederal, short-term, acute care hospitals in the continental United States for whom complete data were available (N = 4,884). CONCLUSIONS. These measures are available from the authors on computer-readable diskette, matched to hospital identifiers. PMID:8344822

  7. Steady-state serum salicylate levels in hospitalized patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Comparison of two dosage schedules of choline magnesium trisalicylate.

    PubMed

    Cassell, S; Furst, D; Dromgoole, S; Paulus, H

    1979-04-01

    When the total daily drug dose was individualized to produce a steady-state serum salicylate concentration between 20 and 35 mg/dl, clinically acceptable fluctuations of serum concentrations occurred during both twice daily and three times daily administration. In 6 rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving choline magnesium trisalicylate, mean steady-state serum levels were the same, and the ranges of hourly mean concentrations during 8 and 12 hour dosage intervals were 19 to 27 mg/dl and 17 to 30 mg/dl, respectively. Changing the dosing interval from 8 to 12 hours required a 50% increase in the fractional doses, but resulted in an increase of only 3 mg/dl in mean peak concentration and a ddecrease of 1 mg/dl in mean minimum concentration. PMID:426883

  8. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  9. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  10. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting the help you need, consider hiring a medical-billing advocate. Advocates charge an hourly fee or a ... American Hospital Association. Hospital Billing and Collection ... 15, 2015. Family Doctor.org. Understanding your Medical Bills. ...

  11. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  12. Prevalence and risk factors for Giardia spp. infection in a large national sample of pet dogs visiting veterinary hospitals in the United States (2003-2009).

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ahmed S; Glickman, Larry T; Camp, Joseph W; Lund, Elizabeth; Moore, George E

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of the prevalence of intestinal infection of dogs with Giardia spp. in the United States vary widely. Risk factors for infection in a large sample of dogs over an extended period of time have not been well characterized. A national, electronic database of medical records was used to estimate the prevalence and identify risk factors for Giardia spp. infection among dogs visiting Banfield Pet Hospital™ located in 43 states in the United States. The overall prevalence of Giardia spp. Infection was 0.44% (95% CI: 0.43-0.45%) in approximately 2.5 million owned dogs who had a fecal flotation test performed from January 2003 to December 2009. A steady decrease in annual prevalence was observed, from a high of 0.61% in 2003 to 0.27% in 2009. Seasonal increases in prevalence were noted during the winter and summer months. Giardia spp. prevalence was highest in the Mountain region, especially Colorado (2.63%; 95% CI: 2.53-2.73%), and in puppies ≤0.5 year of age (0.63%; 95% CI: 0.61-0.64%). It was lowest for dogs of mixed breeding compared with pure breeds. Infection risk was 25-30% greater in sexually intact dogs compared to spayed and neutered dogs. PMID:23337331

  13. Needs Assessment of Hospitality/Tourism Industry in Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Shirley

    This report of an assessment of the hospitality/tourism industry in Kentucky begins with a history/description of the hospitality/tourism industry written from research; the hospitality/tourism training programs conducted by various institutions in the state are also described. For the assessment itself, two survey instruments were prepared and…

  14. Medical staff contracting: legal issues in physician-hospital arrangements.

    PubMed

    Caesar, N B

    1993-01-01

    This article--the third in a series analyzing the physician-hospital contracting process from the physician's perspective--addresses the legal issues involved in physician-hospital arrangements, including those arising under federal and state illegal remuneration, antitrust, and tax laws. New applications of these issues to physician-hospital organizations and practice management/practice acquisitions by hospitals are also addressed, as well as other recent hospital efforts to maximize the benefits to be gained from the physician-hospital relationship. PMID:10128459

  15. Management strategies and financial performance in rural and urban hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wang, B B; Wan, T T; Falk, J A; Goodwin, D

    2001-08-01

    This study identifies the difference in financial performance between rural and urban hospitals and examines whether or not that difference may be attributed to the emphasis of revenue enhancement over cost management strategies. Hospitals in Virginia were included in this study except for the two state university medical centers. Rural and urban hospitals were compared on 10 performance indicators grouped into four categories: revenues, costs, profits, and productivity. The results suggest that rural hospital profitability is dependent on cost management. Since rural hospitals achieved lower cost, better efficiency and productivity level than urban hospitals in Virginia, they demonstrate a significant higher level of profit. PMID:11463201

  16. The politics of local hospital reform: a case study of hospital reorganization following the 2002 Norwegian hospital reform

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Norwegian hospital reform of 2002 was an attempt to make restructuring of hospitals easier by removing politicians from the decision-making processes. To facilitate changes seen as necessary but politically difficult, the central state took over ownership of the hospitals and stripped the county politicians of what had been their main responsibility for decades. This meant that decisions regarding hospital structure and organization were now being taken by professional administrators and not by politically elected representatives. The question raised here is whether this has had any effect on the speed of restructuring of the hospital sector. Method The empirical part is a case study of the restructuring process in Innlandet Hospital Trust (IHT), which was one of the largest enterprise established after the hospital reform and where the vision for restructuring was clearly set. Different sources of qualitative data are used in the analysis. These include interviews with key actors, observational data and document studies. Results The analysis demonstrates how the new professional leaders at first acted in accordance with the intentions of the hospital reform, but soon chose to avoid the more ambitious plans for restructuring the hospital structure and in fact reintroduced local politics into the decision-making process. The analysis further illustrates how local networks and engagement of political representatives from all levels of government complicated the decision-making process surrounding local structural reforms. Local political representatives teamed up with other actors and created powerful networks. At the same time, national politicians had incentives to involve themselves in the processes as supporters of the status quo. Conclusion Because of the incentives that faced political actors and the controversial nature of major hospital reforms, the removal of local politicians and the centralization of ownership did not necessarily facilitate

  17. The effects of hospital-physician integration strategies on hospital financial performance.

    PubMed Central

    Goes, J B; Zhan, C

    1995-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION. This study investigated the longitudinal relations between hospital financial performance outcomes and three hospital-physician integration strategies: physician involvement in hospital governance, hospital ownership by physicians, and the integration of hospital-physician financial relationships. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. Using secondary data from the State of California, integration strategies in approximately 300 California short-term acute care hospitals were tracked over a ten-year period (1981-1990). STUDY DESIGN. The study used an archival design. Hospital performance was measured on three dimensions: operational profitability, occupancy, and costs. Thirteen control variables were used in the analyses: market competition, affluence, and rurality; hospital ownership; teaching costs and intensity; multihospital system membership; hospital size; outpatient service mix; patient volume case mix; Medicare and Medicaid intensity; and managed care intensity. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION. Financial and utilization data were obtained from the State of California, which requires annual hospital reports. A series of longitudinal regressions tested the hypotheses. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Considerable variation was found in the popularity of the three strategies and their ability to predict hospital performance outcomes. Physician involvement in hospital governance increased modestly from 1981-1990, while ownership and financial integration declined significantly. Physician governance was associated with greater occupancy and higher operating margins, while financial integration was related to lower hospital operating costs. Direct physician ownership, particularly in small hospitals, was associated with lower operating margins and higher costs. Subsample analyses indicate that implementation of the Medicare prospective payment system in 1983 had a major impact on these relationships, especially on the benefits of financial integration. CONCLUSIONS. The

  18. 2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  19. Unsafe driving behaviors and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Van Tuinen, M

    1994-04-01

    The medical costs associated with motor vehicle crashes are difficult to measure. Most attempts have used crash data and cost data that are only indirectly related to each other or have followed patients in a few hospitals or trauma centers. These studies produce localized estimates or rough national estimates of limited use to policy makers. The result has been a dependence on more readily available mortality data, such as the Fatal Accident Reporting System, to guide automotive safety efforts. The limitations of mortality data and the increasing sophistication of medical care data bases have resulted in a strong interest in obtaining crash-linked morbidity data. Hence, in 1993, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) awarded the Missouri Department of Health and six other applicants grants to link automotive crash records to statewide ambulance trip, outpatient care, hospitalization and mortality records. By identifying an individual across multiple data sets, states would be able to determine directly the relationship of driver behaviors and crash characteristics to hospitalization rates and other medical outcomes. Examination of hospital pay source information would expose the toll of automotive crashes on public tax dollars. Having recently completed the record linkage phase of this project, Missouri Department of Health staff are beginning to analyze the impact of automotive crashes on health care costs in Missouri. In this report, three unsafe driving behaviors, failure to use a safety device (seatbelts and motorcycle helmets), driving under the influence of alcohol, and speeding, are related to the risk of hospitalization or death, hospital costs, and expected pay source. PMID:8202067

  20. Sterilization and contraceptive services in Catholic hospitals.

    PubMed

    O'Lane, J M

    1979-02-15

    Sterilization and contraceptive practices in United States Catholic hospitals were surveyed by anonymous mail questionnaires, obtaining a 57% response rate (340 of 598). Twenty per cent of the hospitals permitted medically indicated sterilization operations. Forty-seven per cent of those hospitals not allowing sterilization procedures reported that their medical staffs were interested in performing medically indicated sterilizations. The types of contraceptive services offered varied widely. The rhythm method was most frequently available, with oral contraceptives in second place; many hospitals did not provide any family-planning services; 13% utilized all types of contraception. The thesis is advanced that improvement in availability of sterilization and contraceptive services is a duty of hospital medical staffs. PMID:433994

  1. Work-related stress perception and hypertension amongst health workers of a mission hospital in Oyo State, south-western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Owolabi, Mojisola O.; OlaOlorun, Akintayo D.; Olofin, Ayo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Globalisation and changes in the nature of work have resulted in increasing work-related stress in people in developing countries. Work stress is at present already acknowledged as one of the epidemics of modern working life. It is associated with a number of disease conditions, such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, affective disorders, depression, disturbed metabolism (risk of Type II diabetes) and musculoskeletal disorders. Objective This study was a work site cross-sectional descriptive study carried out amongst the health workers at the Baptist Medical Centre Ogbomoso, Oyo State, south-western Nigeria. The aim of the study was to discern the prevalence of perceived work stress and to explore the relationship between perceived work stress and the presence of hypertension. Methods A total of 324 consenting health workers of the institution were administered the job demand-control questionnaire to assess work stress. A standardised questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data and other personal data. Measurements of blood pressure, weight and height were carried out and body mass indices were calculated. Results More than a quarter (26.2%) of the subjects perceived themself as stressed at work. The single largest group of hypertensive subjects was seen amongst subjects with work stress. Conclusion A significant number of health workers in this study is afflicted by work-related stress and perceived work stress was found to be significantly associated with higher hypertension prevalence.

  2. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. PMID:25223156

  3. Hospital board and management practices are strongly related to hospital performance on clinical quality metrics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Thomas C; Jha, Ashish K; Gawande, Atul A; Huckman, Robert S; Bloom, Nicholas; Sadun, Raffaella

    2015-08-01

    National policies to improve health care quality have largely focused on clinical provider outcomes and, more recently, payment reform. Yet the association between hospital leadership and quality, although crucial to driving quality improvement, has not been explored in depth. We collected data from surveys of nationally representative groups of hospitals in the United States and England to examine the relationships among hospital boards, management practices of front-line managers, and the quality of care delivered. First, we found that hospitals with more effective management practices provided higher-quality care. Second, higher-rated hospital boards had superior performance by hospital management staff. Finally, we identified two signatures of high-performing hospital boards and management practice. Hospitals with boards that paid greater attention to clinical quality had management that better monitored quality performance. Similarly, we found that hospitals with boards that used clinical quality metrics more effectively had higher performance by hospital management staff on target setting and operations. These findings help increase understanding of the dynamics among boards, front-line management, and quality of care and could provide new targets for improving care delivery. PMID:26240243

  4. Possible adverse drug events leading to hospital admission in a Brazilian teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Varallo, Fabiana Rossi; Capucho, Helaine Carneiro; da Silva Planeta, Cleópatra; de Carvalho Mastroianni, Patrícia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Drug safety problems can lead to hospital admission. In Brazil, the prevalence of hospitalization due to adverse drug events is unknown. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of hospitalization due to adverse drug events and to identify the drugs, the adverse drug events, and the risk factors associated with hospital admissions. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was performed in the internal medicine ward of a teaching hospital in São Paulo State, Brazil, from August to December 2008. All patients aged ≥18 years with a length of stay ≥24 hours were interviewed about the drugs used prior to hospital admission and their symptoms/complaints/causes of hospitalization. RESULTS: In total, 248 patients were considered eligible. The prevalence of hospitalization due to potential adverse drug events in the ward was 46.4%. Overprescribed drugs and those indicated for prophylactic treatments were frequently associated with possible adverse drug events. Frequently reported symptoms were breathlessness (15.2%), fatigue (12.3%), and chest pain (9.0%). Polypharmacy was a risk factor for the occurrence of possible adverse drug events. CONCLUSION: Possible adverse drug events led to hospitalization in a high-complexity hospital, mainly in polymedicated patients. The clinical outcomes of adverse drug events are nonspecific, which delays treatment, hinders causality analysis, and contributes to the underreporting of cases. PMID:24626940

  5. The Use of the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Clock-Drawing Test for Dementia in a Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Khaled; AMR, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An early and a quick identification of dementia is desirable to improve the overall care to the affected persons in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminative abilities of the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Clock Drawing Test (CDT) in differentiating the demented patients from the controls and also the differentiation between the different types of dementia. Patients and Methods: This study was designed to evaluate the patients with varied types and severities of dementia, who were diagnosed by using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale. All the patients completed the MMSE and the simplified CDT. Results: This study included 197 patients with an age range of 43-79 years. Fifty-one patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with Alzheimer Dementia (AD), 37 patients (18.8%) with Vascular Dementia (VD), 23 patients (11.7%) with Parkinson’s Disease Dementia (PDD) and 86 patients (43.6%) with other variants of dementia. The total MMSE score of the enrolled patients was significantly lower as compared to that of the control subjects, with a non-significant difference between the varied diagnoses. The total CDT scores were significantly lower in the patients as compared to those in the controls, with significantly lower scores in the PDD group as compared to those in the AD group. The patients who had AD showed non-significantly higher CDT scores as compared to the patients who had vascular and other types of dementia. Conclusion: A combined application of both MMSE and CDT can identify the persons with a cognitive affection and this may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of the non Alzheimer’s type of dementia. PMID:23634401

  6. Costs of surgical procedures in Indian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite a growing volume of surgical procedures in low-income and middle-income countries, the costs of these procedures are not well understood. We estimated the costs of 12 surgical procedures commonly conducted in five different types of hospitals in India from the provider perspective, using a microcosting method. Design Cost and utilisation data were collected retrospectively from April 2010 to March 2011 to avoid seasonal variability. Setting For this study, we chose five hospitals of different types: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital and a 778-bed tertiary care teaching hospital based on their willingness to cooperate and data accessibility. The hospitals were from four states in India. The private, charitable and tertiary care hospitals serve urban populations, the district hospital serves a semiurban area and the private teaching hospital serves a rural population. Results Costs of conducting lower section caesarean section ranged from rupees 2469 to 41 087; hysterectomy rupees 4124 to 57 622 and appendectomy rupees 2421 to 3616 (US$1=rupees 52). We computed the costs of conducting lap and open cholecystectomy (rupees 27 732 and 44 142, respectively); hernia repair (rupees 13 204); external fixation (rupees 8406); intestinal obstruction (rupees 6406); amputation (rupees 5158); coronary artery bypass graft (rupees 177 141); craniotomy (rupees 75 982) and functional endoscopic sinus surgery (rupees 53 398). Conclusions Estimated costs are roughly comparable with rates of reimbursement provided by the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY)—India's government-financed health insurance scheme that covers 32.4 million poor families. Results from this type of study can be used to set and revise the reimbursement rates. PMID:23794591

  7. Hospital response during the Red Dragon drill.

    PubMed

    Martz, Marcum D; Moulder, John E; Knight-Wiegert, Kimberly

    2011-05-01

    From March 2009 to June 2009, a series of drills involving a hypothetical radiological dispersal device (RDD) detonation were conducted in the metropolitan area of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Named Red Dragon, the drill constituted the largest multi-agency RDD scenario attempted to date in the United States. Froedtert Hospital and the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin comprise the Level One trauma center that served as the site for triage, decontamination, and treatment of approximately 80 victims who participated in the exercise. Examined are hospital resources, plans, interaction with external agencies, communications, and lessons learned. PMID:21451308

  8. Tax-exempt challenges warrant hospitals' attention.

    PubMed

    Henry, W

    1991-01-01

    The tax-exempt status of not-for-profit healthcare organizations is being questioned and sometimes challenged on Federal, state, and local fronts. While the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has created a special program for randomly auditing not-for-profit organizations, Congress is expected to consider legislation that would mandate the amount of charity care and community benefits a tax-exempt hospital must provide in relation to its tax-exemption value. Familiarity with IRS and Congressional activity, as well as with cases in which a hospital's tax-exempt status has been challenged in court, may provide guidelines for hospitals to assess their vulnerability. PMID:10145367

  9. The financial performance of diversified hospital subsidiaries.

    PubMed Central

    Clement, J P; D'Aunno, T; Poyzer, B L

    1993-01-01

    Despite its proliferation, we know relatively little about the impact of hospital restructuring to offer new services. This exploratory study examines the relationship between types of services offered and financial performance among separately incorporated subsidiaries of acute care hospitals. We draw data from the subsidiaries of all hospital firms operating in one state (Virginia) that requires reporting by all such firms. Results from multiple regression analyses of 1987 data indicate that units that existed longer, produced health care or related products, or were nonprofit subsidiaries of nonprofit firms tended to be more profitable than the other subsidiaries. PMID:8428811

  10. Segmenting hospitals for improved management strategy.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, N K

    1989-09-01

    The author presents a conceptual framework for the a priori and clustering-based approaches to segmentation and evaluates them in the context of segmenting institutional health care markets. An empirical study is reported in which the hospital market is segmented on three state-of-being variables. The segmentation approach also takes into account important organizational decision-making variables. The sophisticated Thurstone Case V procedure is employed. Several marketing implications for hospitals, other health care organizations, hospital suppliers, and donor publics are identified. PMID:10303934

  11. Recognizing Differences in Hospital Quality Performance for Pediatric Inpatient Care

    PubMed Central

    Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Toomey, Sara L.; Chien, Alyna T.; Jang, Jisun; Bryant, Maria C.; Klein, David J.; Kaplan, William J.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital quality-of-care measures are publicly reported to inform consumer choice and stimulate quality improvement. The number of hospitals and states with enough pediatric hospital discharges to detect worse-than-average inpatient care remains unknown. METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of hospital discharges for children aged 0 to 17 years from 3974 hospitals in 44 states in the 2009 Kids’ Inpatient Database. For 11 measures of all-condition or condition-specific quality, we assessed the number of hospitals and states that met a “power standard” of 80% power for a 5% level significance test to detect when care is 20% worse than average over a 3-year period. For this assessment, we approximated volume as 3 times actual 2009 admission volumes. RESULTS: For all-condition quality, 1380 hospitals (87% of all pediatric discharges) and all states met the power standard for the family experience-of-care measure; 1958 hospitals (95% of discharges) and all states met the standard for adverse drug events. For condition-specific quality measures of asthma, birth, and mental health, 203 to 482 hospitals (52%–90% of condition-specific discharges) met the power standard and 40 to 44 states met the standard. One hospital and 16 states met the standard for sickle cell disease. No hospital and ≤27 states met the standard for the remaining measures studied (appendectomy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt surgery, gastroenteritis, heart surgery, and seizure). CONCLUSIONS: Most children are admitted to hospitals in which all-condition measures of quality have adequate power to show modest differences in performance from average, but most condition-specific measures do not. Policies regarding incentives for pediatric inpatient quality should take these findings into account. PMID:26169435

  12. Ceftolozane/tazobactam activity tested against aerobic Gram-negative organisms isolated from intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections in European and United States hospitals (2012).

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Farrell, David J; Flamm, Robert K; Jones, Ronald N

    2014-09-01

    Ceftolozane/tazobactam is under clinical development for treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections (IAI), complicated urinary tract infections (UTI) and ventilator-associated pneumonia. We evaluated the in vitro activity of ceftolozane/tazobactam and comparator agents tested against Gram-negative aerobic bacteria causing IAI and healthcare-associated UTI (HCA-UTI). The organisms were consecutively collected from January to December 2012 from 59 medical centers located in the United States (USA) and 15 European countries by the Program to Assess Ceftolozane/Tazobactam Susceptibility (PACTS). The collection included 809 organisms from IAI and 2474 organisms from HCA-UTI, and susceptibility testing was performed by reference broth microdilution methods as described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M07-A9 document. Overall, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most frequently isolated pathogens from both infection types. Ceftolozane/tazobactam was very active against E. coli (MIC50/90, 0.25/0.5 mg/L; 98.5-99.9% inhibited at an MIC of ≤8 mg/L) and retained activity against many of the multidrug-resistant (MDR; MIC50/90, 0.5/2->32 mg/L) and ESBL-phenotype strains (MIC50/90, 0.5/2-32 mg/L). Ceftolozane/tazobactam was active against most K. pneumoniae strains (MIC50/90, 0.25/16 mg/L, 88.9-89.6% inhibited at an MIC of ≤8 mg/L), but some ESBL-phenotype (MIC50/90, 4-8/>32 mg/L) and MDR (MIC50/90, 16/>32 mg/L) isolates exhibited elevated MIC values. Ceftolozane/tazobactam was the most active agent tested against P. aeruginosa (MIC50/90, 0.5/4 mg/L; 93.4-95.7% inhibited at ≤8 mg/L) and retained potency against many MDR (MIC50/90, 2-4/>32 mg/L), ceftazidime-nonsusceptible (MIC50/90, 2-4/>32 mg/L) and meropenem-nonsusceptible (MIC50/90, 2/>32 mg/L) strains. Ceftolozane/tazobactam was also active against Klebsiella oxytoca (MIC50/90, ≤0.12-0.25/0.5-1 mg/L), Enterobacter spp. (MIC50/90, 0

  13. Measuring Hospital Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Leveson, Irving

    1974-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive method for quantifying hospital output and estimating hospital productivity. A number of less comprehensive productivity measures that can be quantified from data available from regional third-party payers and from the American Hospital Association are also developed and evaluated as proxies for the comprehensive measure, which is based on local area data. Methods are discussed for estimating the necessary variables on a regional or national level. PMID:4461703

  14. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  15. Union activity in hospitals: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Becker, E R; Sloan, F A; Steinwald, B

    1982-06-01

    Between 1970 and 1980, the percentage of hospitals with one or more collective bargaining contracts increased from 15.7 percent to 27.4 percent. A substantial amount of variation exists in the extent of unionism on the basis of hospital ownership, bed size, and location. Employees are more likely to organize when hospitals in the State are regulated by a mandatory rate-setting program. Unions raise hospital employee's wages--a modal estimate for RNs is about 6 percent; the corresponding figure for nonprofessional employees is about 10 percent. Growth of union activity in hospitals has generally not been a major contributor to hospital wage inflation, and less than 10 percent of the increase in real (relative to the Consumer Price Index) spending for hospital care that occurred during the 1970s can be attributed to union growth. We project that between 45 and 50 percent of all hospitals will have at least one union by 1990. PMID:10309636

  16. Union Activity in Hospitals: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Edmund R.; Sloan, Frank A.; Steinwald, Bruce

    1982-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1980, the percentage of hospitals with one or more collective bargaining contracts increased from 15.7 percent to 27.4 percent. A substantial amount of variation exists in the extent of unionism on the basis of hospital ownership, bed size, and location. Employees are more likely to organize when hospitals in the State are regulated by a mandatory rate-setting program. Unions raise hospital employee's wages—a modal estimate for RNs is about 6 percent; the corresponding figure for nonprofessional employees is about 10 percent. Growth of union activity in hospitals has generally not been a major contributor to hospital wage inflation, and less than 10 percent of the increase in real (relative to the Consumer Price Index) spending for hospital care that occurred during the 1970s can be attributed to union growth. We project that between 45 and 50 percent of all hospitals will have at least one union by 1990. PMID:10309636

  17. 38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... quarters of nursing home care patients or domiciliary members, and meet such other minimum standards as the... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17... to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be paid to...

  18. 38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... quarters of nursing home care patients or domiciliary members, and meet such other minimum standards as the... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17... to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be paid to...

  19. 38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... quarters of nursing home care patients or domiciliary members, and meet such other minimum standards as the... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17... to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be paid to...

  20. [Barriers upon providing assistance with making arrangements for discharging and changing from hospitals while a patient is undergoing cancer therapy--when he is in the state of depression (from the perspective of psycho- oncologist)].

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Hideo; Motokawa, Nahomi; Takahashi, Kenta; Hanawa, Kazue; Kimura, Tomoko

    2010-12-01

    During a cancer therapy, a fine-tuned response is necessary for a patient to stay home with family for a longer period of time. Especially the patient is near the end of life. Based on the Basic Plan to Promote Cancer Control programs, our hospital established a cancer consulting support center and a palliative care team in June 2009, and staffed them with multidisciplinary personnel. With medical staffs involved as a team, we considered a shared decision making repeatedly in compliance with inpatient 's wishes for home care. One of the problems the author experienced frequently was that a patient would take a long time for a decision making due to the state of mental depression. Hence, we simply couldn't send him home, or we would fail to make a right timing for sending him home. Due to a patient's inability to make own decision, a home care period could not be shortened, so that a careful daily observation is desired to keep an eye for signs of depression and to provide appropriate responses. PMID:21368532

  1. Comparative Genomics of Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains and Their Positions within the Clade Most Commonly Associated with Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Hospital-Acquired Infection in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Veronica N.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Griggs, Allison; Cerqueira, Gustavo; Van Tonder, Andries; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Godfrey, Paul; Palmer, Kelli L.; Bodi, Kip; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Wortman, Jennifer; Feldgarden, Michael; Lawley, Trevor; Gill, Steven R.; Haas, Brian J.; Birren, Bruce; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are leading causes of hospital-acquired infections in the United States, and clonal cluster 5 (CC5) is the predominant lineage responsible for these infections. Since 2002, there have been 12 cases of vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) infection in the United States—all CC5 strains. To understand this genetic background and what distinguishes it from other lineages, we generated and analyzed high-quality draft genome sequences for all available VRSA strains. Sequence comparisons show unambiguously that each strain independently acquired Tn1546 and that all VRSA strains last shared a common ancestor over 50 years ago, well before the occurrence of vancomycin resistance in this species. In contrast to existing hypotheses on what predisposes this lineage to acquire Tn1546, the barrier posed by restriction systems appears to be intact in most VRSA strains. However, VRSA (and other CC5) strains were found to possess a constellation of traits that appears to be optimized for proliferation in precisely the types of polymicrobic infection where transfer could occur. They lack a bacteriocin operon that would be predicted to limit the occurrence of non-CC5 strains in mixed infection and harbor a cluster of unique superantigens and lipoproteins to confound host immunity. A frameshift in dprA, which in other microbes influences uptake of foreign DNA, may also make this lineage conducive to foreign DNA acquisition. PMID:22617140

  2. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital...: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services. (a) The State plan must provide that each mental hospital...

  3. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under...

  4. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital...: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services. (a) The State plan must provide that each mental hospital...

  5. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital...: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services. (a) The State plan must provide that each mental hospital...

  6. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital...: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services. (a) The State plan must provide that each mental hospital...

  7. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital...: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services. (a) The State plan must provide that each mental hospital...

  8. General surgery at rural Tennessee hospitals: a survey of rural Tennessee hospital administrators.

    PubMed

    Cofer, Joseph B; Petros, Tommy J; Burkholder, Hans C; Clarke, P Chris

    2011-07-01

    Rural communities face an impending surgical workforce crisis. The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of rural Tennessee hospital administrators regarding the importance of surgical services to their hospitals. In collaboration with the Tennessee Hospital Association, we developed and administered a 13-item survey based on a recently published national survey to 80 rural Tennessee hospitals in August 2008. A total of 29 responses were received for an overall 36.3 per cent response rate. Over 44 per cent of rural surgeons were older than 50 years of age, and 27.6 per cent of hospitals reported they would lose at least one surgeon in the next 2 years. The responding hospitals reported losing 10.4 per cent of their surgical workforce in the preceding 2 years. Over 53 per cent were actively recruiting a general surgeon with an average time to recruit a surgeon of 11.8 months. Ninety-seven per cent stated that having a surgical program was very important to their financial viability with the mean and median reported revenue generated by a single general surgeon being $1.8 million and $1.4 million, respectively. Almost 11 per cent of the hospitals stated they would have to close if they lost surgical services. Although rural Tennessee hospitals face similar difficulties to national rural hospitals with regard to retaining and hiring surgeons, slightly more Tennessee hospitals (54 vs 36%) were actively attempting to recruit a general surgeon. The shortage of general surgeons is a threat to the accessibility of comprehensive hospital-based care for rural Tennesseans. PMID:21944341

  9. Changes in addressing inequalities in access to hospital care in Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra states of India: a difference-in-differences study using repeated cross-sectional surveys

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mala; Katyal, Anuradha; Singh, Prabal V; Samarth, Amit; Bergkvist, Sofi; Kancharla, Manjusha; Wagstaff, Adam; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Renton, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effects of the Rajiv Aarogyasri Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh (AP) with health financing innovations including the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY) in Maharashtra (MH) over time on access to and out-of-pocket expenditure (OOPE) on hospital inpatient care. Study design A difference-in-differences (DID) study using repeated cross-sectional surveys with parallel control. Setting National Sample Survey Organisation of India (NSSO) urban and rural ‘first stratum units’, 863 in AP and 1008 in MH. Methods We used two cross-sectional surveys: as a baseline, the data from the NSSO 2004 survey collected before the Aarogyasri and RSBY schemes were launched; and as postintervention, a survey using the same methodology conducted in 2012. Participants 8623 households in AP and 10 073 in MH. Main outcome measures Average OOPE, large OOPE and large borrowing per household per year for inpatient care, hospitalisation rate per 1000 population per year. Results Average expenditure, large expenditures and large borrowings on inpatient care had increased in MH and AP, but the increase was smaller in AP across these three measures. DIDs for average expenditure and large borrowings were significant and in favour of AP for the rural and the poorest households. Hospitalisation rates also increased in both states but more so in AP, although the DID was not significant and the subgroup analysis presented a mixed picture. Conclusions Health innovations in AP had a greater beneficial effect on inpatient care-related expenditures than innovations in MH. The Aarogyasri scheme is likely to have contributed to these impacts in AP, at least in part. However, OOPE increased in both states over time. Schemes such as the Aarogyasri and RSBY may result in some positive outcomes, but additional interventions may be required to improve access to care for the most vulnerable sections of the population. PMID:24898084

  10. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  11. Library Services in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Social Security, London (England).

    The memorandum gives guidance to the provision and organization of library services at hospitals both for staff and for patients. It also draws attention to the assistance available from outside sources towards the development and maintenance of these services so hospital authorities may make the most effective use of the available facilities.…

  12. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  13. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  14. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  15. [Music in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy. PMID:20684389

  16. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider. PMID:10127850

  17. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  18. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  19. Hospital efficiency and debt.

    PubMed

    Bernet, Patrick Michael; Rosko, Michael D; Valdmanis, Vivian G

    2008-01-01

    U.S. Hospitals rely heavily on debt financing to fund major capital investments. Hospital efficiency is at least partly determined by the amount and quality of plant and equipment it uses. As such, a hospital's access to debt and credit rating may be related to its efficiency. This study explores this relationship using a broad sample of hospitals and associated bond issuance histories. Employing stochastic frontier analysis (SFA), we measure cost inefficiency to gauge the impact of debt issuance and debt rating. We find that hospitals with recent bond issues were less inefficient. Although we do not find a perfectly linear relationship between debt rating and inefficiency, we have evidence that hints at such a relation. Finally, we find an increase in inefficiency in the years following bond issues, consistent with the possibility of a debt death spiral. PMID:21110482

  20. [Hospital medicine in Chile].

    PubMed

    Eymin, Gonzalo; Jaffer, Amir K

    2013-03-01

    After 15 years of development of Hospital Medicine in Chile, there are several benefits of this discipline. Among others, a reduction in the length of hospital stay, readmissions, costs, and improved medical teaching of students, residents and fellows have been observed. However, in South América there are only isolated groups dedicated to Hospital Medicine in Chile, Argentina and Brazil, with a rather slow growth. The unjustified fear of competition from sub specialists, and the fee for service system of payment in our environment may be important factors to understand this phenomenon. The aging of the population makes imperative to improve the safety of our patients and to optimize processes and resources within the hospital, to avoid squandering healthcare resources. The following is a detailed and evidence-based article, on how hospital medicine might benefit both the public and prívate healthcare systems in Chile. PMID:23900327

  1. Hospitality as an Environmental Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwood, Bert

    1991-01-01

    Compares stewardship and hospitality as they relate to the biosphere. Traces the origin of the word "hospitality," discusses cultural traditions of hospitality, and applies the concept of hospitality to the natural world. Considers forms of symbiosis in nature: commensals, mutualism, and parasitism. Hospitality promotes respect, humility, and…

  2. Philanthropy and hospital financing.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Clement, J P; Wheeler, J R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explores the relationships among donations to not-for-profit hospitals, the returns provided by these hospitals, and fund-raising efforts. It tests a model of hospital behavior and addresses an earlier debate regarding the supply price of donations. DATA SOURCES. The main data source is the California Office of Statewide Health Planning data tapes of hospital financial disclosure reports for fiscal years 1980/1981 through 1986/1987. Complete data were available for 160 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. Three structural equations (donations, returns, and fund-raising) are estimated as a system using a fixed-effects, pooled cross-section, time-series least squares regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Estimation results reveal the expected positive relation between donations and returns. The reverse relation between returns and donations is insignificant. The estimated effect of fund-raising on donations is insignificantly different from zero, and the effect of donations on fund-raising is negative. Fund-raising and returns are negatively associated with one another. CONCLUSION. The empirical results presented here suggest a positive donations-returns relations and are consistent with a positive supply price for donations. Hospitals appear to view a trade-off between providing returns and soliciting donations, but donors do not respond equally to these two activities. Attempts to increase free cash flow through expansion of community returns or fund-raising activity, at least in the short run, are not likely to be highly successful financing strategies for many hospitals. PMID:8537223

  3. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  4. Hospitals' internal accountability.

    PubMed

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  5. Differences among hospitals in Medicare patient mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, M R; Park, R E; Lohr, K N; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1989-01-01

    Using hospital discharge abstract data for fiscal year 1984 for all acute care hospitals treating Medicare patients (age greater than or equal to 65), we measured four mortality rates: inpatient deaths, deaths within 30 days after discharge, and deaths within two fixed periods following admission (30 days, and the 95th percentile length of stay for each condition). The metric of interest was the probability that a hospital would have as many deaths as it did (taking age, race, and sex into account). Differences among hospitals in inpatient death rates were large and significant (p less than .05) for 22 of 48 specific conditions studied and for all conditions together; among these 22 "high-variation" conditions, medical conditions accounted for far more deaths than did surgical conditions. We compared pairs of conditions in terms of hospital rankings by probability of observed numbers of inpatient deaths; we found relatively low correlations (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.3 or lower) for most comparisons except between a few surgical conditions. When we compared different pairs of the four death measures on their rankings of hospitals by probabilities of the observed numbers of deaths, the correlations were moderate to high (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.54 to 0.99). Hospitals with low probabilities of the number of observed deaths were not distributed randomly geographically; a small number of states had significantly more than their share of these hospitals (p less than .01). Information from hospital discharge abstract data is insufficient to determine the extent to which differences in severity of illness or quality of care account for this marked variability, so data on hospital death rates cannot now be used to draw inferences about quality of care. The magnitude of variability in death rates and the geographic clustering of facilities with low probabilities, however, both argue for further study of hospital death rates. These data may prove

  6. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations. A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥4 or ≥7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥4 or ≥7 points) at each hospitalization. We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization. Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among

  7. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  8. Hospital Waste Management in Nonteaching Hospitals of Lucknow City, India

    PubMed Central

    Manar, Manish Kumar; Sahu, Krishna Kumar; Singh, Shivendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on the staffs of nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow from September 2012 to March 2013. A total of eight hospitals were chosen as the study sample size. Simple random sampling technique was used for the selection of the nonteaching hospitals. A pre-structured and pre-tested interview questionnaire was used to collect necessary information regarding the hospitals and biomedical waste (BMW) management of the hospitals. The general information about the selected hospitals/employees of the hospitals was collected. Results: Mean hospital waste generated in the eight nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow was 0.56 kg/bed/day. About 50.5% of the hospitals did not have BMW department and colored dustbins. In 37.5% of the hospitals, there were no BMW records and segregation at source. Incinerator was used only by hospital A for treatment of BMW. Hospital G and hospital H had no facilities for BMW treatment. Conclusion: There is a need for appropriate training of staffs, strict implementation of rules, and continuous surveillance of the hospitals of Lucknow to improve the BMW management and handling practices. PMID:25657950

  9. Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Sjögren’s, Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications The SSF thanks Lynn Petruzzi, RN, MSN, for this Patient Education Sheet. Educate your healthcare givers! • Tell your surgeon, ...

  10. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  11. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know whether your hospital charged a fair price. There are some web sites you can use ... zip code to find an average or estimated price in your area. www.healthcarebluebook.com www.fairhealth. ...

  12. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed? Todd says that there is no standard definition for hospital beds, a fact that consumers shopping ... in retail stores that don’t meet the definition of medical devices under the law, but which ...

  13. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms. PMID:1743965

  14. [Ryazan hospital--80 years].

    PubMed

    Klimov, A S; Gromov, M F

    2012-02-01

    In December 2011 marked 80 years of the founding of the Ryazan garrison hospital, originally housed in two buildings: "Redut housed"--a monument of architecture of the XVIII century and the former almshouses room "for the maimed in the war", was built in 1884 now Ryazan garrison hospital (from 2010--Branch No 6 FSI "in 1586 the district military hospital in the Western Military District", the Defense Ministry of Russia)--a multi-field medical preventive institution on the basis of which soldiers, military retirees, family members and military retirees from Ryazan, Moscow, Tambov regions are treated. Every year more than 7 thousand patients get treatment here. During the counterterrorism operations in Chechnya over 800 wounded were brought to the hospital from the battle area. PMID:22558855

  15. Cutting Medicare Hospital Prices Leads to a Spillover Reduction in Hospital Discharges for the Nonelderly

    PubMed Central

    White, Chapin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure spillover effects of Medicare inpatient hospital prices on the nonelderly (under age 65). Primary Data Sources Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases (10 states, 1995–2009) and Medicare Hospital Cost Reports. Study Design Outcomes include nonelderly discharges, length of stay and case mix, staffed hospital bed-days, and the share of discharges and days provided to the elderly. We use metropolitan statistical areas as our markets. We use descriptive analyses comparing 1995 and 2009 and panel data fixed-effects regressions. We instrument for Medicare prices using accumulated changes in the Medicare payment formula. Principal Findings Medicare price reductions are strongly associated with reductions in nonelderly discharges and hospital capacity. A 10-percent reduction in the Medicare price is estimated to reduce discharges among the nonelderly by about 5 percent. Changes in the Medicare price are not associated with changes in the share of inpatient hospital care provided to the elderly versus nonelderly. Conclusions Medicare price reductions appear to broadly constrain hospital operations, with significant reductions in utilization among the nonelderly. The slow Medicare price growth under the Affordable Care Act may result in a spillover slowdown in hospital utilization and spending among the nonelderly. PMID:24850524

  16. ["Working together" at hospital?].

    PubMed

    Divay, Sophie

    2015-02-01

    Working well together at hospital depends on several factors, on the level of a team as well as that of the ministry in charge of health. How can we encourage and promote cooperation between caregivers? If the hospital is the reflection of society as a whole, an analysis of the functioning of this universe provides a better understanding of the challenges and the missions of each player for the benefit of the patient. PMID:26144821

  17. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made. PMID:23513759

  18. Management of Feedyard Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fox, J T

    2015-11-01

    There are many considerations when managing feedyard hospitals. The type of hospital system must fit the facility design, the type of cattle fed at the feedyard, the crew that is employed by the feedyard, and the protocol established by the veterinarian. Ensuring the animals are well-cared for and have their basic needs met should be the priority of the feedyard personnel and the veterinarian maintaining the veterinarian-client-patient relationship with the feedyard. PMID:26210766

  19. Hospital air is sick.

    PubMed

    Brownson, K

    2000-11-01

    Indoor air quality has deteriorated so much since the 1970s oil shortage and subsequent energy-efficient construction of buildings that people are becoming seriously ill by just breathing the indoor air. This is a problem with all industrial buildings and hospital staff are at particular risk. There are various things that hospital managers from different departments can do to make the air safe for staff and patients to breathe. PMID:11185833

  20. Defending the next round of non-profit hospital class action lawsuits.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mark D

    2005-01-01

    Recent controversies surrounding how not-for-profit hospitals price to and collect from the uninsured have resulted in class action lawsuits, investigations by state attorneys general, and other governmental investigations. The author argues that oversight at the hospital governing board level has been lax and sets forth a series of specific steps that hospital boards should take to deal with these controversies whether or not their specific hospital or hospital system has been investigated or sued. PMID:18973003

  1. Recurrent psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, G.; Denault, S.

    1978-01-01

    Undue emphasis has been placed on rising rates of readmission to psychiatric facilities. After a decade of preoccupation with discharge rates, readmission statistics have been singled out in the last 15 years as the key factor for assessing hospital effectiveness. A study of a group of patients at high risk for recurrent hospitalization revealed that these patients were characterized more by features relating to environmental supports than by diagnosis. The operational definition for recurrent hospitalization (five or more admissions during the 2-year period preceding the latest admission) was effective in identifying this group; this is the first reported instance in which the definition has specified a certain number of admissions within a time-limited period. The findings of this study, as well as of an analysis of case histories and consumer opinion, led to the design of a pilot program for persons undergoing recurrent hospitalization. Readmission statistics are useless or misleading as measures of hospital effectiveness and efficiency; what matters is the way the former patients function in the community after discharge. Rather than simply trying to reduce the readmission rate psychiatric facilities should be examining the types of persons who are hospitalized recurrently to develop programs aimed at improving the functioning of these people in the community. PMID:630483

  2. Hospital accreditation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C

    1998-01-01

    Health service accreditation systems have explicit standards for organisation against which the participating hospital assesses itself before a structured visit by outside "surveyors". They submit a written report back to the hospital with commendations and recommendations for development prior to a follow-up survey. Accreditation may be awarded for a fixed term or may be with held by an independent assessment Board if the hospital does not meet a defined threshold of standards. In Europe, some government and medical organisations initially distanced themselves from the pilot hospital wide programmes, arguing that they would cost too much and undermine management, or that they were irrelevant to clinical practice. But gradually it became obvious that accreditation worked for hospitals; purchasers and insurers saw its potential for quality and resource management; and professional bodies recognised the links between clinical training, practice and outcome and the environment in which health care is provided. If nothing else, it offered a multi-professional bridge between the existing numerous fragmented systems such as inspecting (statutory safety), visiting (professional training), and monitoring (service contracts). The introduction of accreditation appears to benefit hospitals in many different countries and health systems and provides a vehicle for integrated quality management which is visible to funding agencies, government and the public. Interest is growing within Europe. PMID:10179643

  3. Methodology may help hospitals evaluate ROI for IT investments.

    PubMed

    2006-05-01

    Hospitals are spending millions of dollars to install a variety of information technology (IT) systems to improve patient care, reduce medication errors and track supplies and equipment. But unlike many clinical services, calculating a return on investment (ROI) for IT systems is difficult. Researchers at Florida State University in Tallahassee may have developed a methodology for hospitals to evaluate ROI from a hospital wide perspective. PMID:16789349

  4. Understanding and implementing hospital information systems.

    PubMed

    1995-02-01

    One of a hospital's greatest resources is its information. The hospital's information system, whether computerized or manual, is the means by which data is collected, integrated, and retrieved. However, because optimal patient treatment, financial management, and hospital operation require that decisions be based on current, accurate, complete, and well-organized data, a computerized hospital information system (HIS), when correctly implemented, can be the most effective means of disseminating valuable information to decision makers. Although the systems currently in place in most hospitals are used primarily to manage finances, an integrated HIS is much more than a financial system; it can, in fact, coordinate all of a hospital's information needs. An integrated HIS develops over time, typically several years. Merely automating existing procedures may not provide many of the potential benefits of a new system and may even carry forward most of the drawbacks of the old system. Determining how information is currently processed in the hospital and putting together an effective team to carry out acquisition and implementation of an HIS must precede the purchase of computers, networks, and software applications. In Part 1 of this article, we describe hospitals' general information needs and provide an overview of the current state of HISs and what hospitals can expect to gain from implementing a new system; in Part 2, we describe the steps hospitals can take when putting the system in place. We caution readers that, although we will be discussing many benefits of successful HISs, little documented or quantified evidence exists to show that these benefits are being realized; most evidence is subjective and qualitative, and claims are not thoroughly substantiated. Few, if any, hospitals have achieved the completely integrated system model--or even come close. Nevertheless, this article provides the groundwork for hospitals to make a thoughtful beginning. In upcoming

  5. Planned Out-of-Hospital Birth and Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, Jonathan M.; Tilden, Ellen L.; Snyder, Janice; Quigley, Brian; Caughey, Aaron B.; Cheng, Yvonne W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The frequency of planned out-of-hospital birth in the United States has increased in recent years. The value of studies assessing the perinatal risks of planned out-of-hospital birth versus hospital birth has been limited by cases in which transfer to a hospital is required and a birth that was initially planned as an out-of-hospital birth is misclassified as a hospital birth. Methods We performed a population-based, retrospective cohort study of all births that occurred in Oregon during 2012 and 2013 using data from newly revised Oregon birth certificates that allowed for the disaggregation of hospital births into the categories of planned in-hospital births and planned out-of-hospital births that took place in the hospital after a woman’s intrapartum transfer to the hospital. We assessed perinatal morbidity and mortality, maternal morbidity, and obstetrical procedures according to the planned birth setting (out of hospital vs. hospital). Results Planned out-of-hospital birth was associated with a higher rate of perinatal death than was planned in-hospital birth (3.9 vs. 1.8 deaths per 1000 deliveries, P = 0.003; odds ratio after adjustment for maternal characteristics and medical conditions, 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37 to 4.30; adjusted risk difference, 1.52 deaths per 1000 births; 95% CI, 0.51 to 2.54). The odds for neonatal seizure were higher and the odds for admission to a neonatal intensive care unit lower with planned out-of-hospital births than with planned in-hospital birth. Planned out-of-hospital birth was also strongly associated with unassisted vaginal delivery (93.8%, vs. 71.9% with planned in-hospital births; P<0.001) and with decreased odds for obstetrical procedures. Conclusions Perinatal mortality was higher with planned out-of-hospital birth than with planned in-hospital birth, but the absolute risk of death was low in both settings. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human

  6. Hospital Systems, Convenient Care Strategies, and Healthcare Reform.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer; Shay, Patrick; Roscoe, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Retail clinics (RCs) and urgent care centers (UCCs) are convenient care models that emerged on the healthcare scene in the past 10 to 15 years. Characterized as disruptive innovations, these models of healthcare delivery seem to follow a slightly different path from each other. Hospital systems, the very organizations that were originally threatened by convenient care models, are developing them and partnering with existing models. We posit that legislative changes such as the Affordable Care Act created challenges for hospital systems that accelerated their adoption of these models. In this study, we analyze 117 hospital systems in six states and report on their convenient care strategies. Our data suggest that UCCs are more prevalent than RCs among hospital systems, and that large and unexplained state-by-state variations exist in the adoption of these strategies. We also postulate about the future role of hospital systems in leading these innovations. PMID:27111934

  7. Selective contracting in California: its effect on hospital finances.

    PubMed

    Mennemeyer, S T; Olinger, L

    1989-01-01

    In 1983, the State of California used a modified form of competitive bidding to select hospitals that would supply inpatient care for the Medi-Cal (Medicaid) program. Selective contracting halted a long history of hospital price inflation and won significant price concessions for the state. While the state might have used the bidding program to get the cheapest possible care from the worst possible providers, the evidence shows that it was used to secure price concessions from mainstream hospitals that provided accessible, good-quality care. Various administrative tools of admissions review were important adjuncts to both utilization control and quality assurance. PMID:2533171

  8. Utilization of non-US educated nurses in US hospitals: implications for hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Donna Felber; Cimiotti, Jeannie; Sloane, Douglas M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether, and under what circumstance, US hospital employment of non-US-educated nurses is associated with patient outcomes. Design Observational study of primary data from 2006 to 2007 surveys of hospital nurses in four states (California, Florida, New Jersey and Pennsylvania). The direct and interacting effects of hospital nurse staffing and the percentage of non-US-educated nurses on 30-day surgical patient mortality and failure-to-rescue were estimated before and after controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Participants Data from registered nurse respondents practicing in 665 hospitals were pooled with patient discharge data from state agencies. Main Outcomes Measure(s) Thirty-day surgical patient mortality and failure-to-rescue. Results The effect of non-US-educated nurses on both mortality and failure-to-rescue is nil in hospitals with lower than average patient to nurse ratios, but pronounced in hospitals with average and poor nurse to patient ratios. In hospitals in which patient-to-nurse ratios are 5:1 or higher, mortality is higher when 25% or more nurses are educated outside of the USA than when <25% of nurses are non-US-educated. Moreover, the effect of having >25% non-US-educated nurses becomes increasingly deleterious as patient-to-nurse ratios increase beyond 5:1. Conclusions Employing non-US-educated nurses has a negative impact on patient mortality except where patient-to-nurse ratios are lower than average. Thus, US hospitals should give priority to achieving adequate nurse staffing levels, and be wary of hiring large percentages of non-US-educated nurses unless patient-to-nurse ratios are low. PMID:23736834

  9. Hospital services and casemix in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Hendrie, Delia; Boldy, Duncan

    2002-01-01

    The Health Department of WA currently operates as a single integrated funder and purchaser of health services for the State. Health Service Agreements defining the level of health provision are negotiated with the various health services in WA. During the latter part of the 1990s, the funding of public hospitals for acute inpatient care moved away from a historical basis to output-based funding using a casemix approach based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs). Other hospital services are still mainly purchased using historical funding levels, negotiated block funding or bedday payments, with output-based funding mechanisms under investigation. WA has developed its own approach to classifying admitted patients that recognises differences in complexity of care among episodes grouped to the same DRG. WA also has a unique cost estimation model for calculating DRG cost weights, which is based on a linear estimate of the relationship between nights of stay in hospital and the cost of hospital care for each DRG. Another emerging trend in the provision of public hospital services in WA has been the greater involvement of the private sector through the contracting of private providers to operate public hospitals. While no close examination has been undertaken of the outcomes of these changes in terms of their effect on efficiency or other relevant indicators of hospital performance, current purchasing arrangements are being reviewed following recommendations made in a report by the Health Administrative Review Committee. No decision has yet been made as to future changes to the funding policy of WA public hospitals. PMID:11974956

  10. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instead of waiting for challenges to confront hospital management, doctors and managers should act in advance to optimize and sustain value-based health. This work highlights the importance of scenario planning in hospitals, proposes an elaborated definition of the stakeholders of a hospital and defines the influence factors to which hospitals are exposed to. Methodology: Based on literature analysis as well as on personal interviews with stakeholders we propose an elaborated definition of stakeholders and designed a questionnaire that integrated the following influence factors, which have relevant impact on hospital management: political/legal, economic, social, technological and environmental forces. These influence factors are examined to develop the so-called critical uncertainties. Thorough identification of uncertainties was based on a “Stakeholder Feedback”. Results: Two key uncertainties were identified and considered in this study: the development of workload for the medical staff the profit oriented performance of the medical staff. According to the developed scenarios, complementary education of the medical staff as well as of non-medical top executives and managers of hospitals was the recommended core strategy. Complementary scenario-specific strategic options should be considered whenever needed to optimize dealing with a specific future development of the health care environment. Conclusion: Strategic planning in hospitals is essential to ensure sustainable success. It considers multiple situations and integrates internal and external insights and perspectives in addition to identifying weak signals and “blind spots”. This flows into a sound planning for multiple strategic options. It is a state of the art tool that allows dealing with the increasing challenges facing hospital management. PMID:26504735

  11. The Growth of Palliative Care in U.S. Hospitals: A Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Dumanovsky, Tamara; Augustin, Rachel; Rogers, Maggie; Lettang, Katrina; Meier, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Palliative care is expanding rapidly in the United States. Objective: To examine variation in access to hospital palliative care. Methods: Data were obtained from the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Surveys™ for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013, the National Palliative Care Registry™, the Dartmouth Atlas of Healthcare, the American Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS), web searches, and telephone interviews of hospital administrators and program directors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine predictors of hospital palliative care programs. Results: Sixty-seven percent of hospitals with 50 or more total facility beds reported a palliative care program. Institutional characteristics were strongly associated with the presence of a hospital palliative care program. Ninety percent of hospitals with 300 beds or more were found to have palliative care programs as compared to 56% of hospitals with fewer than 300 beds. Tax status was also a significant predictor. Not-for-profit hospitals and public hospitals were, respectively, 4.8 times and 7.1 times more likely to have a palliative care program as compared to for-profit hospitals. Palliative care penetration was highest in the New England (88% of hospitals), Pacific (77% of hospitals), and mid-Atlantic (77% of hospitals) states and lowest in the west south central (43% of hospitals) and east south central (42% of hospitals) states. Conclusions: This study demonstrates continued steady growth in the number of hospital palliative care programs in the United States, with almost universal access to services in large U.S. hospitals and academic medical centers. Nevertheless access to palliative care remains uneven and depends on accidents of geography and hospital ownership. PMID:26417923

  12. Hospital pharmacy in Canada.

    PubMed

    Bachynsky, J A

    1980-04-01

    The status of Canadian hospital pharmacy and the impact of national hospital insurance on its development are discussed. The provision of health care services for Canadians is shared by the federal and provincial governments. The federal government enacts protective and regulatory legislation, compiles health statistics, promotes research, and provides direct health care for those citizens for whom it is directly responsible. Each province is responsible for hospitals, the education and training of health care professionals, public health, and the financing and administration of health insurance for all its citizens. Largely because of line-item budget allocations and a bureaucratic tendency to equalize services for the whole population, funds for existing pharmaceutical services have been assured but the introduction of upgraded or innovative programs has been difficult to achieve. The result has been an even quality of health care services, including pharmacy, throughout the country and a deficiency in clinical pharmacy programs and the trained personnel to run them. The last decade has brought advances, however, as allocation methods have changed and both hospital and insurance administrators have recognized the patient benefits and cost effectiveness of many of the newer pharmacy programs. The main challenges facing Canadian hospital pharmacy are to upgrade clinical services and education and to improve managerial and bureaucratic competence among department directors. PMID:7377213

  13. Developing financial autonomy in public hospitals in India: Rajasthan's model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Hotchkiss, D R

    2001-01-01

    In India's state-administered health care system, many government decision-makers are exploring the introduction or expansion of hospital autonomy as a means of improving the efficiency and financial sustainability of the overall public health care system. One initiative that has recently received a considerable amount of attention is the introduction of Medicare Relief Societies (MRS) in the state of Rajasthan. The societies are autonomous organizations that are formed with the objective of complementing and supplementing existing service provision in public hospitals. The state has provided incentives for the formation of MRS by relaxing state-imposed restrictions on the collection and use of revenue by hospitals, thereby encouraging the use of alternative financing mechanisms such as user-fee schemes and in-hospital pharmacies. The purpose of this article is to describe and critically evaluate Rajasthan's experience with MRS. Emphasis is placed on whether and how the introduction of these societies have influenced two key aspects of hospital autonomy - operations and management, and financing. Data for the study come from a survey of representatives from each of the 69 hospitals in Rajasthan that contain 100 or more beds. Information was collected on whether a society was operating within the hospital, the management of the society, the range of activities carried out, and the revenue and expenditures of each activity. The results are used to identify key strengths and weakness of the MRS initiative in Rajasthan, and how future hospital autonomy efforts can be strengthened. PMID:11137185

  14. Hospitality and Tourism Education Skill Standards: Grade 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Ryan; Spann, Lynda; Erickson, Karin; Povilaitis, Judy; Menditto, Louis; Jones, Terri; Sario, Vivienne; Verbeck, Kimberlee; Jacobi, Katherine; Michnal, Kenneth; Shelton-Meader, Sheree; Richens, Greg; Jones, Karin Erickson; Tighe, Denise; Wilhelm, Lee; Scott, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    The standards in this document are for Hospitality and Tourism programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. Minimally, the student will complete a two-year program to achieve all standards. The Hospitality and Tourism Standards Writing Team followed…

  15. Psychosocial Research and the Hospitalized Adolescent: Approaches and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denholm, Carey J.; Joschko, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Notes that hospitalized adolescents are often participants in psychosocial research. Presents examples of studies within four approaches (instructional, theoretical, informational, experimental) to describe behaviors of hospitalized adolescents. Discusses impact of various illness states (acute, chronic, terminal) and readiness of adolescent to be…

  16. Hospital Views of Factors Affecting Telemedicine Use.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Kimberly A S; Ward, Marcia M; Mueller, Keith J

    2015-04-01

    Telemedicine (also known as telehealth) is a means to increase access to care, one of the foundations of the Triple Aim. However, the expansion of telemedicine services in the United States has been relatively slow. We previously examined the extent of uptake of hospital based telemedicine using the 2013 HIMSS (Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society) Analytics national database of 4,727 non-specialty hospitals. Our analysis indicated that the largest percentage of operational telemedicine implementations (15.7 percent) was in radiology departments, with a substantial number in emergency/trauma care (7.5 percent) and cardiology/stroke/heart attack programs (6.8 percent). However, existing databases are limited because they do not identify whether a respondent hospital is a "hub" (providing telemedicine services) or a "spoke" (receiving telemedicine services). Therefore, we used data from interviews with hospital representatives to deepen the research and understanding of telemedicine use and the factors affecting that use. Interviews were conducted with key informants at 18 hub hospitals and 18 spoke hospitals to explore their perceptions of barriers and motivators to telemedicine adoption and expansion. Key Findings. (1) Respondents from both hub and spoke hospitals reported that telemedicine helps them meet their mission, enhances access, keeps lower-acuity patients closer to home, and helps head off competition. (2) Respondents from both hub and spoke hospitals reported licensing and credentialing to be significant barriers to telemedicine expansion. Thus, half of hubs provide services only within their state. (3) A variety of one-time funding sources have been used to initiate and grow telemedicine services among hubs and spokes. However, reimbursement issues have impeded the development of workable business models for sustainability. Hub hospitals shoulder the responsibility for identifying sustainable business models. (4) Although respondents

  17. Hospitals as interpretation systems.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J B; McDaniel, R R; Anderson, R A

    1991-01-01

    In this study of 162 hospitals, it was found that the chief executive officer's (CEO's) interpretation of strategic issues is related to the existing hospital strategy and the hospital's information processing structure. Strategy was related to interpretation in terms of the extent to which a given strategic issue was perceived as controllable or uncontrollable. Structure was related to the extent to which an issue was defined as positive or negative, was labeled as controllable or uncontrollable, and was perceived as leading to a gain or a loss. Together, strategy and structure accounted for a significant part of the variance in CEO interpretations of strategic events. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:1991677

  18. A proposal to redistribute the cost of hospital charity care.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, H P; Chang, C F

    1991-01-01

    Policy analysts debate whether providers of hospital services should share the responsibility of financing care for those who cannot pay for it. Many nonprofit and public hospitals, meanwhile, find it necessary to fund some of the services they deliver. A proposal to redistribute the costs of charity care more equitably is offered, taking into account the benefits an institution receives and its ability to pay. Hospitals would be required to quantify the charity care they provide and to make this information publicly available; in reviewing the information, legislatures are encouraged to set priorities on how much unmet need each state and each hospital should finance. PMID:2034181

  19. Policy issues related to prospective payment for pediatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Susan M. C.; Restuccia, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    Children's hospitals have been excluded from the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) because of concerns over the applicability of the DRG case-mix system and PPS payment weights to pediatric hospitalization. Nevertheless, DRG-based payment systems are being adopted by State Medicaid agencies and private third-party payers, and the Health Care Financing Administration has been mandated to report to Congress on the feasibility of including children's hospitals in the Federal PPS. This article summarizes policy research on this issue and discusses options in the design of prospective payment systems for pediatric hospitalization. PMID:10312273

  20. Policy issues related to prospective payment for pediatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Payne, S M; Restuccia, J D

    1987-01-01

    Children's hospitals have been excluded from the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) because of concerns over the applicability of the DRG case-mix system and PPS payment weights to pediatric hospitalization. Nevertheless, DRG-based payment systems are being adopted by State Medicaid agencies and private third-party payers, and the Health Care Financing Administration has been mandated to report to Congress on the feasibility of including children's hospitals in the Federal PPS. This article summarizes policy research on this issue and discusses options in the design of prospective payment systems for pediatric hospitalization. PMID:10312273

  1. Marketing the hospital library.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Many librarians do not see themselves as marketers, but marketing is an essential role for hospital librarians. Library work involves education, and there are parallels between marketing and education as described in this article. It is incumbent upon hospital librarians actively to pursue ways of reminding their customers about library services. This article reinforces the idea that marketing is an element in many of the things that librarians already do, and includes a list of suggested marketing strategies intended to remind administrators, physicians, and other customers that they have libraries in their organizations. PMID:15982957

  2. The influence of hospital integration on hospital financial performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang K; Stoskopf, Carleen H; Glover, Saundra H; Park, Eun C

    2004-01-01

    A clinical and functional integration strategy has a positive influence on increasing hospital revenue, and a solely functional integration strategy has a negative influence on increasing hospital expenses. Functional integration and clinical/functional integration strategies have a positive influence on hospital profit and the overall operations of the hospital. The mechanism of influence differs, however, based on the strategy used. Clinical/functional strategy has an impact on increasing hospital revenue, while functional integration strategy has an impact on reducing hospital expenses. Overall, the study shows that a functional integration strategy is more profitable than a clinical/functional integration strategy. PMID:15816230

  3. [An assessment of hospital services from the perspective of health professionals].

    PubMed

    Lima Júnior, Joel; Maia, Eulália Maria Chaves; Alchieri, João Carlos

    2008-12-01

    This study had the objective of determining the way in which health professionals assess hospital services offered by their institutions, as well as identifying the core of social representations elaborated by those professionals regarding such institutions. A hundred and fifty-three questionnaires, applied in two hospitals (a state hospital and a charity hospital) in the metropolitan area of Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, were analyzed. In the service assessment the Charity Hospital got the highest average score as for Service Quality. The state hospital presented the lowest average in the item "Respect for patient's privacy". The central categories were "Overpopulation" and "Humanized care" in both State and Charity hospitals, respectively. The peripheral categories were "Low wages" and "Overpopulation". Conducting an assessment is a very complex and important task. The assessment should become part of the organizational culture and guide improvements hospital care quality. PMID:19320338

  4. A More Detailed Understanding Of Factors Associated With Hospital Profitability.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ge; Anderson, Gerard F

    2016-05-01

    To identify the characteristics of the most profitable US hospitals, we examined the profitability of acute care hospitals in fiscal year 2013, measured as net income from patient care services per adjusted discharge. Based on Medicare Cost Reports and Final Rule Data, the median hospital lost $82 for each such discharge. Forty-five percent of hospitals were profitable, with 2.5 percent earning more than $2,475 per adjusted discharge. The ten most profitable hospitals, seven of which were nonprofit, each earned more than $163 million in total profits from patient care services. Hospitals with for-profit status, higher markups, system affiliation, or regional power, as well as those located in states with price regulation, tended to be more profitable than other hospitals. Hospitals that treated a higher proportion of Medicare patients, had higher expenditures per adjusted discharge, were located in counties with a high proportion of uninsured patients, or were located in states with a dominant insurer or greater health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration had lower profitability than hospitals that did not have these characteristics. These findings can inform policy reforms, while providing a baseline against which to measure the impact of any subsequent reforms. PMID:27140996

  5. Controlling for quality in the hospital cost function.

    PubMed

    Carey, Kathleen; Stefos, Theodore

    2011-06-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the cost and quality of hospital care from the perspective of applied microeconomics. It addresses both theoretical and practical complexities entailed in incorporating hospital quality into the estimation of hospital cost functions. That literature is extended with an empirical analysis that examines the use of 15 Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) as measures of hospital quality. A total operating cost function is estimated on 2,848 observations from five states drawn from the period 2001 to 2007. In general, findings indicate that the PSIs are successful in capturing variation in hospital cost due to adverse patient safety events. Measures that rely on the aggregate number of adverse events summed over PSIs are found to be superior to risk-adjusted rates for individual PSIs. The marginal cost of an adverse event is estimated to be $22,413. The results contribute to a growing business case for inpatient safety in hospital services. PMID:21086051

  6. Hospital infection prevention and control issues relevant to extensive floods.

    PubMed

    Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Mundy, Linda M; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Glen Mayhall, C

    2013-02-01

    The devastating clinical and economic implications of floods exemplify the need for effective global infection prevention and control (IPC) strategies for natural disasters. Reopening of hospitals after excessive flooding requires a balance between meeting the medical needs of the surrounding communities and restoration of a safe hospital environment. Postflood hospital preparedness plans are a key issue for infection control epidemiologists, healthcare providers, patients, and hospital administrators. We provide recent IPC experiences related to reopening of a hospital after extensive black-water floods necessitated hospital closures in Thailand and the United States. These experiences provide a foundation for the future design, execution, and analysis of black-water flood preparedness plans by IPC stakeholders. PMID:23295568

  7. Community health politics: transition of the Seattle USPHS Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R G; Tompkins, R K

    1984-01-01

    To achieve transition of the Seattle US Public Health Service Hospital from federal to local control, the community overcame large obstacles; the most difficult was federal preference for closing the hospital rather than incurring additional costs essential for transition. The Washington State Congressional Delegation, local officials, hospital staff, patients and numerous community volunteers--individuals and private organizations--worked together to save the hospital and secure federal resources for its transition. Going through the transition influenced the hospital as it developed a new corporate structure, designed new administrative systems, and prepared to operate in a new environment while facing an uncertain future. The hospital has continued to cope with issues arising from transition, such as operating in a competitive context while reaffirming its community service heritage. Despite the difficulties of transition, Seattle preserved a valuable community health resource. PMID:6547029

  8. Hospital structure and consumer satisfaction.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, G V

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between hospital structural characteristics and patient satisfaction with hospital care. Teaching hospitals and private hospitals were expected to receive higher ratings of patient satisfaction than were nonteaching and government-controlled hospitals, because they generally are reputed to be technologically superior. Results show that, in general, most patients are satisfied with their hospital stays, but they are clearly more dissatisfied with their stays in teaching hospitals. Although a number of other correlates of patient satisfaction with the hospital stay are identified, no measure succeeds in reducing to insignificance the strong relationship between teaching status and dissatisfaction. Some suggestions are made as to why teaching hospital receive relatively poor evaluations from their patients. PMID:7228714

  9. Integrating COPD into Patient-Centered Hospital Readmissions Reduction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Gussin, Hélène A.; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Sullivan, Jamie L.; Zaidi, Farhan; Thomashow, Byron M.

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 5 patients hospitalized for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the United States are readmitted within 30 days. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently expanded its Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program to financially penalize hospitals with higher than expected all-cause 30-day readmission rates following a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. In October 2013, the COPD Foundation convened a multi-stakeholder National COPD Readmissions Summit to summarize our understanding of how to reduce hospital readmissions in patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbations. Over 225 individuals participated in the Summit, including patients, clinicians, health service researchers, policy makers and representatives of academic health care centers, industry, and payers. Summit participants recommend that programs to reduce hospital readmissions: 1) Include specific recommendations about how to promote COPD self-management skills training for patients and their caregivers; 2) Adequately address co-existing disorders common to COPD in care plans during and after hospitalizations; 3) Include an evaluation of adverse events when implementing strategies to reduce hospital readmissions; and 4) Develop a strategy (e.g., a learning collaboratory) to connect groups who are engaged in developing, testing, and implementing programs to reduce hospital readmissions for COPD and other conditions. PMID:25927076

  10. Income Analysis of University-Owned Teaching Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Joseph C.

    1979-01-01

    The annual survey, undertaken by the Association of American Medical Colleges, of income, expense and general operating information for university-owned teaching hospitals is discussed. Focus is on sources of income, including state funds, Medicare, and insurance companies. (JMD)

  11. POLICE STATION LOOKING SOUTH WEST, HOSPITAL BUILDING IN BACKGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POLICE STATION LOOKING SOUTH WEST, HOSPITAL BUILDING IN BACKGROUND - New York State Soldiers & Sailors Home, Police and Voluntary Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 76 Veterans Avenue, Bath, Steuben County, NY

  12. Introduction to hospital information systems.

    PubMed

    Vegoda, P R

    1987-01-01

    The phrase, 'hospital information system', is frequently used in discussions about the flow of information throughout a hospital with the assumption that everybody has the same concept in mind. Closer examination shows that this is not necessarily the case. The author draws on his experience as the Chief Information Officer at University Hospital at Stony Brook to define a hospital information system in terms of the implementation at Stony Brook. The University Hospital Information System at University Hospital (UHIS), has received international acclaim and was recently selected by the IBM Quarterly of Australia as the world leader in hospital information systems. This paper answers four questions: What is a hospital information system? How does a hospital information system work? How do you implement a hospital information system? After the system is operational, where do you go, e.g., critical care data management, physician's office management? University Hospital at Stony Brook is located on eastern Long Island and is the tertiary care referral hospital for approximately 1.4 million people. Nothing in the hospital happens without computers. Doctors, nurses, administrators and staff at all levels rely on the system daily. The system operates 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Access to the system is through 300 terminals and 128 printers throughout the hospital. In addition to the UHIS terminals, the critical care management system which is called Patient Data Management System, (PDMS), is available at over 90 ICU beds and in the operating rooms. PMID:3585130

  13. [The founding of Zemun Hospital].

    PubMed

    Milanović, Jasmina; Milenković, Sanja; Pavlović, Momcilo; Stojanović, Dragos

    2014-01-01

    This year Zemun Hospital--Clinical Hospital Center Zemun celebrates 230th anniversary of continuous work, thus becoming the oldest medical facility in Serbia.The exact date of the hospital founding has been often questioned in history. Various dates appeared in the literature, but the most frequent one was 25th of February 1784. Until now, the document which confirms this has never been published. This article represents the first official publication of the document which confirms that Zemun Hospital was indeed founded on this date. The first hospitals started emerging in Zemun when the town became a part of the Habsburg Monarchy. The first sanitary facility ever formed was the"Kontumac"--a quarantine established in 1730. Soon after, two more confessional hospitals were opened.The Serbian (Orthodox) Hospital was founded before 1769, whereas the German (Catholic) Hospital started working in 1758. Both hospitals were financed, amongst others, by the Town Hall--the Magistrate. In order to improve efficiency of these hospitals, a decision was made to merge them into a single City Hospital. It was founded on 25th February 1784, when the General Command ordered the Magistrate of Zemun to merge the financess of all existing hospitals and initiate the construction of a new building. Although financially united, the hospitals continued working in separate buildings over a certain period of time.The final, physical merging of these hospitals was completed in 1795. PMID:25233701

  14. Hospital restructuring and burnout.

    PubMed

    Greenglass, Esther R; Burke, Ronald J

    2002-01-01

    Increasingly, organizations are experiencing changes as a result of extensive downsizing, restructuring, and merging. In Canada, government-sponsored medicine has been affected as hospitals have merged or closed, reducing essential medical services and resulting in extensive job loss for hospital workers, particularly nurses. Hospital restructuring has also resulted in greater stress and job insecurity in nurses. The escalation of stressors has created burnout in nurses. This study examines predictors of burnout in nurses experiencing hospital restructuring using the MBI-General Survey which yields scores on three scales: Emotional exhaustion, Cynicism, and Professional efficacy. Multiple regressions were conducted where each burnout scale was the criterion and stressors (e.g., amount of work, use of generic workers to do nurses' work), restructuring effects, social support, and individual resources (e.g., control coping, self-efficacy, prior organizational commitment) were predictors. There were differences in the amount of variance accounted for in the burnout components by stressors and resources. Stressors contributed most to emotional exhaustion and least to professional efficacy. Individual resources were more likely to contribute to professional efficacy and least to emotional exhaustion. Stressors and resources accounted for approximately equal amounts of variance in cynicism. Three conclusions were drawn. First, present findings parallel others by showing that individual coping patterns contribute to professional efficacy. Second, emotional exhaustion was found to be the prototype of stress. Third, prior organizational commitment, self-efficacy, and control coping resulted in lower burnout. PMID:15137570

  15. Hospital Library Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    Although this handbook is addressed primarily to the hopital administrator, it contains material of interest to the librarian as well. Basic requirements for providing good library services to hospital staff are identified as: (1) well chosen and well trained manpower; (2) a current collection of information materials; and (3) appropriate space in…

  16. Responsible Hospitality. Prevention Updates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colthurst, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Responsible Hospitality (RH)--also called Responsible Beverage Service (RBS)--encompasses a variety of strategies for reducing risks associated with the sale and service of alcoholic beverages. RH programs have three goals: (1) to prevent illegal alcohol service to minors; (2) to reduce the likelihood of drinkers becoming intoxicated; and (3) to…

  17. Cost characteristics of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smet, Mike

    2002-09-01

    Modern hospitals are complex multi-product organisations. The analysis of a hospital's production and/or cost structure should therefore use the appropriate techniques. Flexible functional forms based on the neo-classical theory of the firm seem to be most suitable. Using neo-classical cost functions implicitly assumes minimisation of (variable) costs given that input prices and outputs are exogenous. Local and global properties of flexible functional forms and short-run versus long-run equilibrium are further issues that require thorough investigation. In order to put the results based on econometric estimations of cost functions in the right perspective, it is important to keep these considerations in mind when using flexible functional forms. The more recent studies seem to agree that hospitals generally do not operate in their long-run equilibrium (they tend to over-invest in capital (capacity and equipment)) and that it is therefore appropriate to estimate a short-run variable cost function. However, few studies explicitly take into account the implicit assumptions and restrictions embedded in the models they use. An alternative method to explain differences in costs uses management accounting techniques to identify the cost drivers of overhead costs. Related issues such as cost-shifting and cost-adjusting behaviour of hospitals and the influence of market structure on competition, prices and costs are also discussed shortly. PMID:12220092

  18. Mechanical engineering in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wallington, J W

    1980-10-01

    The design of a modern hospital owes more to engineering than the layman may realize. In this context, many engineers are in the position of laymen, being unfamiliar with the multitude of services that lies behind the impressive facade of a modern hospital. In recent years medicine and surgery themselves have taken on many of the characteristics of a technology. This has required a matching development of the services both mechanical and electrical that are required in modern health care buildings. In medical terms, if the architectural features provide the 'skin' of the hospital, the mechanical and electrical engineering services provide the nerves and sinews. If we take as an example the recently completed Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, (Fig. 1), which cost 10 million pounds at current cost, the service network was responsible for about half the total cost. About 400 miles (643 km) of electrical wiring and more than 40 mile (64.5 km) of copper and steel piping were used to service 3000 separate rooms. This compares with percentages of between 18 and 25 per cent for other large buildings such as office blocks, hotels and sports complexes. PMID:10273268

  19. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  20. HOSPITAL FOOD NEEDS

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, R. G.

    1919-01-01

    There are eight classes of men in the military hospital including attendants, and for each class there should be a different dietary. Major Hoskins explains this, tells clearly the common sources of waste of food, notes the amount, and suggests lines of conservation. Imagesp435-a PMID:18010115

  1. Incorporating efficiency in hospital-capacity planning in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Ludwig; Scholtes, Stefan; Vera, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    Hospital occupancy is a key metric in hospital-capacity planning in Germany, even though this metric neglects important drivers of economic efficiency, for example treatment costs and case mix. We suggest an alternative metric, which incorporates economic efficiency explicitly, and illustrate how this metric can be used in the hospital-capacity planning cycle. The practical setting of this study is the hospital capacity planning process in the German federal state of Rheinland-Pfalz. The planning process involves all 92 acute-care hospitals of this federal state. The study is based on standard hospital data, including annual costs, number of cases--disaggregated by medical departments and ICD codes, respectively--length-of-stay, certified beds, and occupancy rates. Using the developed metric, we identified 18 of the 92 hospitals as inefficient and targets for over-proportional capacity cuts. On the upside, we identified 15 efficient hospitals. The developed model and analysis has affected the federal state's most recent medium term planning cycle. PMID:17216425

  2. DHEW Obligations to Institutions of Higher Education and Other Nonprofit Organizations. Fiscal Year 1973. Volume 5. Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    This volume from the five-part report distributes Fiscal Year 1973 awards by hospital categories, DHEW agencies, census regions, state, and name of individual hospitals and hospital schools of nursing. The Department of Health, Education, and Welfare awarded $339 million to nonprofit hospitals during Fiscal Year 1973, $129 million to 175 teaching…

  3. Hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Aline Pinto; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of the hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions according to their structure, magnitude and causes. METHODS Cross-sectional study based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System and from the Primary Care Information System, referring to people aged 60 to 74 years living in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Souhteastern Brazil. The proportion and rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions were calculated, both the global rate and, according to diagnoses, the most prevalent ones. The coverage of the Family Health Strategy and the number of medical consultations attended by older adults in primary care were estimated. To analyze the indicators’ impact on hospitalizations, a linear correlation test was used. RESULTS We found an intense reduction in hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions for all causes and age groups. Heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases concentrated 50.0% of the hospitalizations. Adults older than 69 years had a higher risk of hospitalization due to one of these causes. We observed a higher risk of hospitalization among men. A negative correlation was found between the hospitalizations and the indicators of access to primary care. CONCLUSIONS Primary healthcare in the state of Rio de Janeiro has been significantly impacting the hospital morbidity of the older population. Studies of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions can aid the identification of the main causes that are sensitive to the intervention of the health services, in order to indicate which actions are more effective to reduce hospitalizations and to increase the population’s quality of life. PMID:25372173

  4. Mobile technology in rural hospitals: the case of the CT scanner.

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, D; Moscovice, I; Christianson, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study evaluates the relationship between hospital and regional characteristics and the prevalence of mobile computed tomography in rural hospitals. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. Primary data were gathered from all rural hospitals in eight northwestern states (n = 471) in 1991. Secondary data sources include the AHA Annual Survey, the Area Resource File, and HCFA's PPS data sets for 1987-1990. STUDY DESIGN. Primary data are a single observation taken in the summer of 1991. Key hospital characteristics include patient volume, distance to the nearest referral center, distance to the nearest hospital, financial performance, and medical staff size. Key regional variables include beds per unit area, hospitals per unit area, and physician supply. DATA COLLECTION. A structured telephone interview was conducted with the hospital administrator at each hospital. For many hospitals, detailed information was gathered with additional calls to hospital personnel. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Where hospitals are closely spaced, mobile CT suppliers are more readily available, and hospitals are more likely to choose mobile CT than in areas where hospitals are farther apart. Hospitals may realize economies of scale and scope in their decisions about CT adoption. CONCLUSIONS. Transportation costs are an important determinant of hospital decisions about acquiring CT, but may be less important for higher-priced medical technologies. There is no support for the proposition that rural hospitals compete with referral centers for patients by purchasing technological equipment. PMID:8675440

  5. Not-for-profit hospitals fight tax-exempt challenges.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T

    1990-10-20

    The message being sent by local tax boards, state agencies, and the Internal Revenue Service is clear: Not-for-profit hospitals will have to justify their tax-exempt status. But complying with this demand can be a costly administrative burden. Just ask the executives who have been through the experience. CEO Richard Anderson, of St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem, PA, is luckier than some executives who have faced tax-exempt challenges. He won his hospital's case. But he still faces a yearly battle: The hospital must prove its compliance annually to the county board of assessors. Other executives report similar experiences. Our cover story takes an in-depth look at how administrators faced challenges to their hospital's tax status and what they learned about their relationship with their communities, as well as a complete state and federal legislative outlook for future developments. PMID:2227856

  6. [Leadership in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Current concepts in leadership and governance on the level of supervisory board, management and departments are often considered as insufficient to cope with the profound structural change which actually takes place in the German health care system. While vertical and horizontal disconnecting is typical of the professional bureaucracy of hospitals, transition from functional to divisional structure further increases this risk. Accordingly, medical experts are oriented towards their professional peers and patient care on the one side; on the other side the management gets isolated and looses operative and strategic control. Several studies provide evidence for the relevance of role models to serve as agents of change, which are now developed into the concept of "Clinical Governance": evidence-based medicine, guidelines, continuous quality improvement, safety culture, resource accountability and organisational learning. The present situation makes it necessary to extend this conception, which focuses on the departmental level in an organisation with divisional features, to one of "Clinical Corporate Governance". This term, which also includes supervisory structures and the management board and is relevant for the total hospital and company, respectively, is based on the corporate governance concept. Inside the hospital, the management and the heads of the departments have to agree that (1) experts really need to be integrated into the decision process, and that (2) the outcomes of the entire hospital have to be regarded as equal or superior to the aims of a single department. The public image of the hospital should be one of a strong and reliable partner in health care and health care business on a local, regional and national level. Members of the supervisory board should clearly put corporate aspects above political and other implications and pay attention to personal independence from the leaders of the medical departments. PMID:19545081

  7. Factors associated with variation in financial condition among voluntary hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Brecher, C; Nesbitt, S

    1985-01-01

    This article uses multiple regression analysis to identify factors which affect variations in the financial condition of voluntary hospitals in New York State. Six separate ratios are used to measure financial condition and 18 independent variables are considered. The factors affecting financial conditions were found to vary among dimensions of financial health, and different causal relationships were evident among hospitals in New York City than among those in the rest of the state. PMID:4019212

  8. Exploring positive hospital ward soundscape interventions.

    PubMed

    Mackrill, J; Jennings, P; Cain, R

    2014-11-01

    Sound is often considered as a negative aspect of an environment that needs mitigating, particularly in hospitals. It is worthwhile however, to consider how subjective responses to hospital sounds can be made more positive. The authors identified natural sound, steady state sound and written sound source information as having the potential to do this. Listening evaluations were conducted with 24 participants who rated their emotional (Relaxation) and cognitive (Interest and Understanding) response to a variety of hospital ward soundscape clips across these three interventions. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the 'Relaxation' response was significantly affected (n(2) = 0.05, p = 0.001) by the interventions with natural sound producing a 10.1% more positive response. Most interestingly, written sound source information produced a 4.7% positive change in response. The authors conclude that exploring different ways to improve the sounds of a hospital offers subjective benefits that move beyond sound level reduction. This is an area for future work to focus upon in an effort to achieve more positively experienced hospital soundscapes and environments. PMID:24768090

  9. New Orleans Charity Hospital--your trauma center at work.

    PubMed

    Stockinger, Zsolt T; Holloway, Vicki L; McSwain, Norman E; Thomas, Dwayne; Fontenot, Cathi; Hunt, John P; Mederos, Eileen; Hewitt, Robert L

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Center of Louisiana at New Orleans-Charity Hospital stands with pride as one of only two level I trauma centers in the state and one of the largest trauma centers in the United States, seeing over 4,000 trauma patients per year. Despite perennial funding issues, Charity Hospital's Emergency Department treated almost 200,000 patients in 2003. This brief report gives an overview of the emergency- and trauma-related services provided by Charity Hospital and underscores its value as a critical asset to healthcare in the Louisiana. PMID:15233385

  10. [Bottlenecks in the provision of inpatient care--caused by the Hospital Funding Act].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    The responsibility of the state for ensuring the provision of hospital care services to its citizens derives from the welfare state principle laid down in Sect. 20 para. 1 GG (Grundgesetz, i.e., the German constitutional law). The state fulfils this responsibility by means of planning and funding regulations in the Hospital Funding Act (KHG), the Hospital Remuneration Act (KHEntG), the National Ordinance on Hospital Rates (BPflV), the Hospital Laws of the German federal states and other supplementary legislation. The funding of hospitals is based on a dual funding system, meaning that hospital investment costs generally need to be borne by the German federal states as required, while operating costs will have to be funded through the remuneration for hospital treatments. Because of the tight budget situation of the German federal states a considerable backlog of investment has built up. After a transition period (between 2005 and 2009) operating costs are now funded on the basis of the so-called DRG system (DRG=Diagnosis Related Groups)--irrespective of the actual costs incurred by each individual hospital, which has led to a commodification of hospital care services. Whether this commodification avoids bottlenecks in the provision of health services to hospital patients or creates additional bottlenecks, is a controversial issue. PMID:20870488

  11. Hospital Library Development. Hospital Library Handbooks No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    Addressed to the administrator of the hospital as well as the librarian, this handbook covers aspects of library service policy and long-range planning. While hospitals of all sizes are discussed, a special effort is made to cover problems of small hospitals (17 to 100 beds) in sparsely-settled regions. Contents: The library as a clinical service,…

  12. Facing the Recession: How Did Safety-Net Hospitals Fare Financially Compared with Their Peers?

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Kristin L; Jiang, H Joanna; Wang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of the recession on the financial performance of safety-net versus non-safety-net hospitals. Data Sources/Study Setting Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases, Medicare Cost Reports, American Hospital Association Annual Survey, InterStudy, and Area Health Resource File. Study Design Retrospective, longitudinal panel of hospitals, 2007–2011. Safety-net hospitals were identified using percentage of patients who were Medicaid or uninsured. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate average effects of the recession on hospital operating and total margins, revenues and expenses in each year, 2008–2011, comparing safety-net with non-safety-net hospitals. Data Collection/Extraction Methods 1,453 urban, nonfederal, general acute hospitals in 32 states with complete data. Principal Findings Safety-net hospitals, as identified in 2007, had lower operating and total margins. The gap in operating margin between safety-net and non-safety-net hospitals was sustained throughout the recession; however, total margin was more negatively affected for non-safety-net hospitals in 2008. Higher percentages of Medicaid and uninsured patients were associated with lower revenue in private hospitals in all years, and lower revenue and expenses in public hospitals in 2011. Conclusions Safety-net hospitals may not be disproportionately vulnerable to macro-economic fluctuations, but their significantly lower margins leave less financial cushion to weather sustained financial pressure. PMID:25220012

  13. Survey: Hospitalization Access for Patients of Migrant Health Centers and Combined Migrant and Community Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David R.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of migrant health centers' access to hospitals uncovered financial barriers to private hospital care when the patient was indigent or without health insurance. This may be exacerbated as private hospitals expand in states with many migrants. Cooperative efforts between public and private institutions are in order. (VM)

  14. How hospitals approach price transparency.

    PubMed

    Houk, Scott; Cleverley, James O

    2014-09-01

    A survey of finance leaders found that hospitals with lower charges were more likely than other hospitals to emphasize making prices defensible rather than simply transparent. Finance leaders of hospitals with higher charges were more likely to express concern that price transparency would cause a reduction in hospital revenue by forcing them to lower charges. Those respondents said commercial payers likely will have to agree to renegotiate contracts for price transparency to be a financially viable proposition. PMID:25647890

  15. Product lines in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Weber, J R

    1986-01-01

    The findings presented in the case study demonstrate that financial analysis is only as valid as the assumptions it is based upon. The single most important task is the definition of the clinical product. All other associated data is suspect and can lead to serious errors in business decisions if the product is poorly defined. A comprehensive case mix system, integrated with other financial systems with flexible reporting capabilities is required. The hospital and physicians must be willing to invest the time and expense necessary to ensure that the data is reliable. The hospital must be prudent in determining what cost finding approach they will elect to use. Although the RCC method has some fundamental problems, care must be taken not to develop a cost system that will require a significant amount of effort to maintain. PMID:10311387

  16. After 9/11: priority focus areas for bioterrorism preparedness in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jenifer K

    2004-01-01

    Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, bioterrorism preparedness was a priority in hospitals, but it did not remain a priority. As a result, hospitals are still unprepared to deal with the effects of a bioterrorist attack. The government has provided initial funding to state and local governments for bioterrorism preparedness; however, much of this money has yet to reach hospitals. With the inadequate funding available to hospitals, four initial measures must be focused on. These focus areas are community involvement, hospital staff education, information technology and disease surveillance improvement, and additional equipment and staff acquisition. Hospitals should also make bioterrorism-preparedness planning a regional effort. PMID:15328657

  17. [Homicide crimes in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dürwald, W

    1993-02-01

    Report of some cases of willful homicide in hospitals of the former GDR. In no case the patient has wished his death. Besides compassion the cause of the homicide was a large carefully expense and in two cases the attempt to prove the incapability of the competent doctor. The patients were only means to an end. All the cases are discovered by the great number of obscure death. PMID:8438538

  18. Hospital successes and failures indicate change in hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Krampf, R F; Miller, D W

    1993-01-01

    Marketing has become an essential management function for hospitals during the past decade. A number of changes have occurred in hospital marketing as they have progressed through the marketing adoption process. A survey of Hospital CEOs reporting hospital successes and failures in the area of marketing have recently placed emphasis on sales and advertising based upon marketing research programs thus indicating entrance into the "Integrated Tactical Marketing" phase. This study also indicates that a few hospitals have entered the "Strategic Marketing Orientation" phase while future plans reported by the CEOs provide evidence that this trend is likely to continue. PMID:10129242

  19. The challenge of corporatisation: the experience of Portuguese public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rego, Guilhermina; Nunes, Rui; Costa, José

    2010-08-01

    The inability of traditional state organisations to respond to new economic, technological and social challenges and the associated emerging problems has made it necessary to adopt new methods of health management. As a result, new directions have emerged in the reform of Public Administration together with the introduction of innovative models. The aim is to achieve a type of management that focuses on results as well as on effort and efficiency. We intend to analyse to what extent the adoption of business management models by hospital healthcare units can improve their performance, mainly in terms of standards of efficiency. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) was used to investigate the efficiency of a set of public Portuguese hospitals. The aim was to evaluate the impact of business management in Portuguese public hospitals with regards to efficiency, specifically taking into account the fact that lack of resources and increased health care needs are a present and future reality. From a total of 83 public hospitals, a sample of 59 hospitals was chosen, of which 21 are state-owned hospital enterprises (SA) and 38 are traditional public administration sector hospitals (SPA). This study evaluates hospital performance by calculating two efficiency measures associated with two categories of inputs. The first efficiency measures the costs associated with hospital production lines and the number of beds (representing fixed capacity) as inputs. The annual costs generated by the hospitals in the consumption of capital and work (direct and indirect costs) are used. A second measure of efficiency is calculated separately. This measure includes in the inputs the number of beds as well as the human resources available (number of doctors, number of nurses and other personnel) in each hospital. With regard to output, the variables that best reflect the hospital services rendered were considered: number of inpatient days, patients discharged, outpatient visits, emergencies

  20. Hospitality in College Composition Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haswell, Janis; Haswell, Richard; Blalock, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    There has been little discussion of hospitality as a practice in college writing courses. Possible misuses of hospitality as an educational and ethical practice are explored, and three traditional and still tenable modes of hospitality are described and historicized: Homeric, Judeo-Christian, and nomadic. Application of these modes to…

  1. Before Hospitalization: A Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Beverly H.

    1974-01-01

    A tour of the hospital, a puppet show, and a discussion period afterwards over lemonade and cookies are all part of one hospital's efforts to prepare children and their families for the hospitalization, surgery, or other experiences young patients must undergo. (Author/CS)

  2. Hospitality Studies: Escaping the Tyranny?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashley, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore current strands in hospitality management education and research, and suggest that future programs should reflect a more social science informed content. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews current research in hospitality management education and in the study of hospitality and…

  3. Childrens Hospital Inservice Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Joan

    A description is provided of a 15-month, in-service nursing education program at Childrens Hospital (Los Angeles, California). The first sections of the paper describe Childrens Hospital and provide a rationale for the hospital-based program. A listing of program goals and objectives is also provided, indicating that the curriculum is designed to…

  4. Library Hospitality: Some Preliminary Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric D. M.; Kazmer, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Library scholars and practitioners have frequently reflected on the various factors that in combination make up a hospitable library, but there has been little theoretical synthesis of the notion of the library as a place of hospitality. The hospitality industry provides a rich vein of theoretical material from which to draw definitions of…

  5. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  6. Measuring comparative hospital performance.

    PubMed

    Griffith, John R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Jelinek, Richard C

    2002-01-01

    Leading healthcare provider organizations now use a "balanced scorecard" of performance measures, expanding information reviewed at the governance level to include financial, customer, and internal performance information, as well as providing an opportunity to learn and grow to provide better strategic guidance. The approach, successfully used by other industries, uses competitor data and benchmarks to identify opportunities for improved mission achievement. This article evaluates one set of nine multidimensional hospital performance measures derived from Medicare reports (cash flow, asset turnover, mortality, complications, length of inpatient stay, cost per case, occupancy, change in occupancy, and percent of revenue from outpatient care). The study examines the content validity, reliability and sensitivity, validity of comparison, and independence and concludes that seven of the nine measures (all but the two occupancy measures) represent a potentially useful set for evaluating most U.S. hospitals. This set reflects correctable differences in performance between hospitals serving similar populations, that is, the measures reflect relative performance and identify opportunities to make the organization more successful. PMID:11836965

  7. [The hospital ship Jutlandia].

    PubMed

    Winge, M

    1996-01-01

    The Danish contribution to the United Nations action during the Korean War (1950-52) was the hospital ship "Jutlandia". The motorvessel Jutlandia - 8.500 tons - was built by the Nakskov Shipyard in 1934, and was rebuilt in three months at the same shipyard to a modern hospital ship with 300 beds, 3 operating theatres, a dental clinic, an x-ray department etc. The crew and the hospital staff consisted approximately each of 100 persons. Jutlandia sailed for Korea on Jan. 23. 1951 and the expedition ended in Copenhagen on Oct. 16. 1953. On the first two cruises the ship was stationed at Pusan. During the first period mostly as an "evacuation sick-bay" and during the second period the ship was opened for Korean military and civil patients, and extensive help was given to the local population on shore. While in Denmark between the second and third cruise a helicopter deck was installed and the operating theatre for neuro-surgery was changed to an opthalmic clinic. This time the ship was stationed at the Bay of Ichon so close to the front, that the wounded could be admitted directly from the advanced dressing stations. On the return journeys to Europe patients were sailed to their home countries. Commodore Kai Hammerich was in charge of the expedition and captain Christen Kondrup was in charge of the ship, throughout the whole expedition. PMID:11625136

  8. The paradox of the not-for-profit hospital.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jeffrey P; Sexton, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    This quantitative research study assesses the organizational characteristics, market factors, and performance of not-for-profit hospitals in the United States. These results have managerial implications related to hospital efficiency, organizational performance, and the role of not-for-profit hospitals within local communities. The study has policy implications on access to clinical services within local communities, the availability of charity care, and the long-term viability of the not-for-profit health care industry due to potential bankruptcy and closure. This study clearly demonstrates that not-for-profit hospital managers are faced with declining profitability and are challenged to reduce hospital-operating expenses while meeting their charitable mission. Additionally, the greater size and increased clinical complexity of not-for-profit hospitals are increasing organizational overhead. In many cases, the increased clinical complexity is a commitment to the organizational mission of providing a full range of services to the community. From a policy perspective, the study suggests that not-for-profit hospitals have aging facilities and reduced cash flow due to lower profit margins. As a result, many not-for-profit hospitals face potential bankruptcy and closure. This study clearly documents a threat to the provision of charity care in local communities and the long-term viability of the not-for-profit health care industry in the United States. PMID:15457836

  9. Hospitalization Among Medicare-Reimbursed Skilled Home Health Recipients

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a summary and critique of the published empirical evidence between the years 2002 and 2011 regarding rehospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed, skilled home health recipients. The knowledge gained will be applied to a discussion regarding ACH among geriatric home health recipients and areas for future research. The referenced literature in MEDLINE, PubMed and Cochrane databases was searched using combinations of the following search terms: home care and home health and Medicare combined with acute care hospitalization, rehospitalization, hospitalization, and adverse events and limited to studies conducted in the United States. Twenty-five research studies published in the last eight years investigated hospitalization among patients receiving Medicare-reimbursed, skilled home health. Empirical findings indicate telehomecare can reduce hospitalizations and emergency room use. The identification of risk factors for hospitalization relate to an elder’s sociodemographic, clinical and functional status that can be identified upon admission and interventions taken in order to reduce hospitalizations. Disease management, frontloading nurse visits, the structure of home health services and OBQI are also among the interventions identified to reduce hospitalizations. However, the body of evidence is limited by a paucity of research and the over reliance on small sample sizes. Few published studies have explored methods that effectively reduce hospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed skilled home health recipients. Further research is needed to clarify the most effective ways to structure home health services to maximize benefits and reduce hospitalization among this chronically ill geriatric population. PMID:26709341

  10. Health care communication networks: disseminating employee information for hospital security.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Jennifer; Liberman, Aaron; Rotarius, Timothy; Wan, Thomas T H; Eaglin, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Health care in the United States is a system that, organizationally speaking, is fragmented. Each hospital facility is independently operated and is responsible for the hiring of its own employees. Corrupt individuals can take advantage of this fragmentation and move from hospital to hospital, gaining employment while hiding previous employment history. However, the need to exchange pertinent information regarding employees will become necessary as hospitals seek to fill positions throughout their organizations. One way to promote this information exchange is to develop trusted information sharing networks among hospital units. This study examined the problems surrounding organizational information sharing and the cultural factors necessary to enhance the exchange of employee information. Surveys were disseminated to 2,603 hospital chief executive officers and chief information officers throughout the nation. A sample of 154 respondents provided data into their current hiring practices and on their willingness to engage in the sharing of employee information. Findings indicated that, although fear of defamation and privacy violations do hinder the exchange of information between hospitals during the hiring process, by increasing external trust, linking the sharing process with the organizational goals of the hospital, and developing a "sharing culture" among hospitals, the exchange of employee information could be enhanced. PMID:19910705

  11. HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A REVIEW OF GOVERNMENTAL AND PRIVATE AGENCY ENERGY CONSERVATION INITIATIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, Robert S.; Rainer, David

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the results of a recent research project originally concerned with review of governmental initiatives for changes to hospital design and operation standards at both the federal and state levels. However. it quickly became apparent that concern with energy conservation was not impacting hospital environmental standards, especially at the state level, irrespective of the energy implications. Consequently, the study was redirected to consider all energy conservation initiatives directed toward design and operating practices unique to the hospital environment. The scope was limited to agency programs (i.e., not undertaken at the initiative of individual hospitals), applicable to non-federal public and private hospitals.

  12. Mother-baby friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Aragon-choudhury, P

    1996-01-01

    In Manila, the Philippines, the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital has been a maternity hospital for 75 years. It averages 90 deliveries a day. Its fees are P200-P500 for a normal delivery and P800-P2000 for a cesarean section. Patients pay what they can and pay the balance when they can. The hospital provides a safe motherhood package that encompasses teaching responsible parenthood, prenatal care, labor, delivery, postpartum care, breast feeding, family planning, and child survival. In 1986, the hospital introduced innovative policies and procedures that promote, protect, and support breast feeding. It has a rooming-in policy that has saved the hospital P6.5 million so far. In the prenatal stage, hospital staff inform pregnant women that colostrum protects the newborn against infections, that suckling stimulates milk production, and that there is no basis to the claim of having insufficient breast milk. Sales representatives of milk substitutes are banned from the hospital. Staff confiscate milk bottles or formula. A lactation management team demonstrates breast feeding procedures. Mothers also receive support on the correct way of breast feeding from hospital staff, volunteers from the Catholic Women's League, consumer groups, and women lawyers. The hospital's policy is no breast milk, no discharge. This encourages mothers to motivate each other to express milk immediately after birth. The hospital has received numerous awards for its breast feeding promotion efforts. UNICEF has designated Fabella Hospital as a model of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The hospital serves as the National Lactation Management Education Training Center. People from other developing countries have received training in lactation management here. The First Lady of the Philippines, the First Lady of the US, and the Queen of Spain have all visited the hospital. The hospital has also integrated its existing services into a women's health care center. PMID:12347466

  13. Use of Social Media by Western European Hospitals: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Berben, Sivera AA; Samsom, Melvin; Engelen, Lucien JLPG; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients increasingly use social media to communicate. Their stories could support quality improvements in participatory health care and could support patient-centered care. Active use of social media by health care institutions could also speed up communication and information provision to patients and their families, thus increasing quality even more. Hospitals seem to be becoming aware of the benefits social media could offer. Data from the United States show that hospitals increasingly use social media, but it is unknown whether and how Western European hospitals use social media. Objective To identify to what extent Western European hospitals use social media. Methods In this longitudinal study, we explored the use of social media by hospitals in 12 Western European countries through an Internet search. We collected data for each country during the following three time periods: April to August 2009, August to December 2010, and April to July 2011. Results We included 873 hospitals from 12 Western European countries, of which 732 were general hospitals and 141 were university hospitals. The number of included hospitals per country ranged from 6 in Luxembourg to 347 in Germany. We found hospitals using social media in all countries. The use of social media increased significantly over time, especially for YouTube (n = 19, 2% to n = 172, 19.7%), LinkedIn (n =179, 20.5% to n = 278, 31.8%), and Facebook (n = 85, 10% to n = 585, 67.0%). Differences in social media usage between the included countries were significant. Conclusions Social media awareness in Western European hospitals is growing, as well as its use. Social media usage differs significantly between countries. Except for the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, the group of hospitals that is using social media remains small. Usage of LinkedIn for recruitment shows the awareness of the potential of social media. Future research is needed to investigate how social media lead to improved health

  14. Health care financing policy for hospitalized pulmonary medicine patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Barrau, L; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1989-01-01

    Several federal bodies provide ongoing analyses of the Medicare DRG prospective hospital payment system. Many states are using DRG prospective "all payor systems" for hospital reimbursement (based on the federal model). In All Payor Systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York State has been All Payor since 1/1/88. This study simulated DRG All Payor methods on a large sample (n = 1,662) of pulmonary medicine patients for a two-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement now in effect at our hospital. Medicare patients had (on average) a longer hospital length of stay and total hospital cost compared to patients from Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial payors. Medicare patients also had a greater severity of illness compared to patients from Blue Cross Medicaid or other payors. All payors, however, (Medicaid, Blue Cross, Medicare and commercial insurers) generated significant financial risk under the DRG All Payor scheme. These data suggest that federal, state, and private payors may be underreimbursing for the care of the hospitalized pulmonary medicine patients using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. Health care financing policy, as demonstrated in this study, may limit both the access and quality of care for many pulmonary medicine patients in the future. PMID:2491799

  15. [Hospital infection--ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Hossne, W S

    1995-01-01

    The author focuses the question of hospital infection, analysing the background on which the control committees were created. The hospital infection is discussed under bioethical principles and the Medical Ethics Code, examining the aspects related to the government, the Hospital Directorship, the Committee and the Control Service of Hospital Infection, and the assisting physician. A closer integration between the activities of the Program of Control of Hospital Infections and those of the Medical Ethics Committee is proposed, aiming at the patient and at the community, "targets of total medical attention". PMID:7550409

  16. The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled Renamed The Hospital for Special Surgery 1940; The War Years 1941–1945

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In 1939, the 75th anniversary program marking the founding of the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R & C), the oldest orthopaedic hospital in the nation, was held at the hospital site in New York City. Dr. Philip D. Wilson, Surgeon-in-Chief since 1935, used this event to mark the return of the hospital to its leadership role in the country. When the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled first opened its doors on May 1, 1863, the name of the hospital was not unusual; it described the type of patients treated. In 1940, the Board of Managers with guidance from Dr. Wilson changed the name to the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). In 1941, with Britain engaged in a European war, Dr. Wilson felt there was a need for the Americans to support the British. He personally organized the American Hospital in Britain, a privately funded voluntary unit, to help care for the wounded. After the United States actually entered World War II in December 1941, HSS quickly organized support at all levels with a significant number of professional and auxiliary staff, eventually enlisting in the military. Even with such staff turnover, the hospital continued to function under Dr. Wilson’s leadership. After the war ended in 1945, Wilson forged ahead to further restore HSS as a leader in musculoskeletal medicine and surgery. PMID:19048348

  17. Hospital Acquisitions Before Healthcare Reform.

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J; Thompson, Jon M; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The hospital industry has experienced increased consolidation in the past 20 years. Since 2010, in particular, there has been a large rise in the number of hospital acquisitions, and observers have suggested this is due in part to the expected impact of federal healthcare reform legislation. This article reports on a study undertaken to identify the market, management, and financial factors affecting acute care, community hospitals acquired between 2010 and 2012. We identified 77 such hospitals and compared them to other acute care facilities. To assess how different factors were associated with acquisitions, the study used multiple logistic regressions whereby market factors were included first, followed by management and financial factors. Study findings show that acquired hospitals were located in markets with lower rates of preferred provider organization (PPO) penetration compared with nonacquired hospitals. Occupancy rate was found to be inversely related to acquisition rate; however, case-mix index was significantly and positively related to a hospital's being acquired. Financial factors negatively associated with a hospital's being acquired included age of plant and cash flow margin. In contrast to the findings from earlier studies of hospital acquisitions, our results showed that acquired hospitals possessed newer assets. However, similar to the findings of other studies, the cash flow margin of acquired hospitals was lower than that of nonacquired facilities. PMID:26554263

  18. [Success factors in hospital management].

    PubMed

    Heberer, M

    1998-12-01

    The hospital environment of most Western countries is currently undergoing dramatic changes. Competition among hospitals is increasing, and economic issues have become decisive factors for the allocation of medical care. Hospitals therefore require management tools to respond to these changes adequately. The balanced scorecard is a method of enabling development and implementation of a business strategy that equally respects the financial requirements, the needs of the customers, process development, and organizational learning. This method was used to derive generally valid success factors for hospital management based on an analysis of an academic hospital in Switzerland. Strategic management, the focus of medical services, customer orientation, and integration of professional groups across the hospital value chain were identified as success factors for hospital management. PMID:10023551

  19. In-Hospital Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Between 2.2% and 17% of all strokes have symptom onset during hospitalization in a patient originally admitted for another diagnosis or procedure. These in-hospital strokes represent a unique population with different risk factors, more mimics, and substantially worsened outcomes compared to community-onset strokes. The fact that these strokes manifest during the acute care hospitalization, in patients with higher rates of thrombolytic contraindications, creates distinct challenges for treatment. However, the best evidence suggests benefit to treating appropriately selected in-hospital ischemic strokes with thrombolysis. Evidence points toward a “quality gap” for in-hospital stroke with longer in-hospital delays to evaluation and treatment, lower rates of evaluation for etiology, and decreased adherence to consensus quality process measures of care. This quality gap for in-hospital stroke represents a focused opportunity for quality improvement. PMID:26288675

  20. Dementia in older people admitted to hospital: a regional multi-hospital observational study of prevalence, associations and case recognition

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Suzanne; Manning, Edmund; Barrett, Aoife; Brady, Noeleen M.; Browne, Vanessa; O’Shea, Emma; Molloy, David William; O'Regan, Niamh A.; Trawley, Steven; Cahill, Suzanne; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; Woods, Noel; Meagher, David; Ni Chorcorain, Aoife M.; Linehan, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: previous studies have indicated a prevalence of dementia in older admissions of ∼42% in a single London teaching hospital, and 21% in four Queensland hospitals. However, there is a lack of published data from any European country on the prevalence of dementia across hospitals and between patient groups. Objective: to determine the prevalence and associations of dementia in older patients admitted to acute hospitals in Ireland. Methods: six hundred and six patients aged ≥70 years were recruited on admission to six hospitals in Cork County. Screening consisted of Standardised Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE); patients with scores <27/30 had further assessment with the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). Final expert diagnosis was based on SMMSE, IQCODE and relevant medical and demographic history. Patients were screened for delirium and depression, and assessed for co-morbidity, functional ability and nutritional status. Results: of 598 older patients admitted to acute hospitals, 25% overall had dementia; with 29% in public hospitals. Prevalence varied between hospitals (P < 0.001); most common in rural hospitals and acute medical admissions. Only 35.6% of patients with dementia had a previous diagnosis. Patients with dementia were older and frailer, with higher co-morbidity, malnutrition and lower functional status (P < 0.001). Delirium was commonly superimposed on dementia (57%) on admission. Conclusion: dementia is common in older people admitted to acute hospitals, particularly in acute medical admissions, and rural hospitals, where services may be less available. Most dementia is not previously diagnosed, emphasising the necessity for cognitive assessment in older people on presentation to hospital. PMID:26420638

  1. Hospital mission and cost differences.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, E A

    1989-01-01

    The results show no significant differences on average length of stay, cost per patient day, or cost per admission among non-profit, government, and for-profit hospitals when controlling for bed capacities, occupancy rates, number of Medicare/Medicaid days, and hospitals without nurseries. For-profit hospital manhours per patient day were significantly lower than non-profit and government hospitals. This is an important finding because patient-care delivery is labor-intensive. A majority of for-profit hospitals do not have nurseries, which means that they should have more manhours per patient day. As indicated earlier, the manhours for hospitals with nurseries are higher than those for hospitals without nurseries. This indicates cost-cutting behavior on the part of a majority of for-profit hospitals. This method of limiting expenditures by decreasing labor costs associated with certain services is consistent with profit-maximization. The findings of this study with regard to cost differences among non-profit and for-profit hospitals contradict previous research. However, a recent study by Kralewski, Gifford and Porter (1988) noted that whereas ownership, when considered alone, differentiates hospitals, when evaluated within each community, most of the investor-owned and non-for-profit hospital differences disappear. Similar questions have been raised as to whether non-profit hospitals truly differ from for-profit hospitals (Pauly 1987). Caution needs to be exercised in attempting to extrapolate the findings of this study, because of the dynamic health care environment. Hospital ownership changes over time, reimbursement rules affect behavior, and internal factors in organizational operation affect outcomes. These should be considered in future studies exploring organizational mission and cost differences. PMID:10293600

  2. Is home health care a substitute for hospital care?

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Frank R

    2012-01-01

    A previous study used aggregate (region-level) data to investigate whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care and concluded that "there is no evidence that services provided at home replace hospital services." However, that study was based on a cross-section of regions observed at a single point of time and did not control for unobserved regional heterogeneity. In this article, state-level employment data are used to reexamine whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care. This analysis is based on longitudinal (panel) data--observations on states in two time periods--which enable the reduction or elimination of biases that arise from use of cross-sectional data. This study finds that states that had higher home health care employment growth during the period 1998-2008 tended to have lower hospital employment growth, controlling for changes in population. Moreover, states that had higher home health care payroll growth tended to have lower hospital payroll growth. The estimates indicate that the reduction in hospital payroll associated with a $1,000 increase in home health payroll is not less than $1,542, and may be as high as $2,315. This study does not find a significant relationship between growth in utilization of home health care and growth in utilization of nursing and residential care facilities. An important reason why home health care may serve as a substitute for hospital care is that the availability of home health care may allow patients to be discharged from the hospital earlier. Hospital discharge data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project are used to test the hypothesis that use of home health care reduces the length of hospital stays. Major Diagnostic Categories with larger increases in the fraction of patients discharged to home health care tended to have larger declines in mean length of stay (LOS). Between 1998 and 2008, mean LOS declined by 4.1%, from 4.78 to 4.59 days

  3. Hospitals, market share, and consolidation.

    PubMed

    Cutler, David M; Scott Morton, Fiona

    2013-11-13

    A large reduction in use of inpatient care combined with the incentives in the Affordable Care Act is leading to significant consolidation in the hospital industry. What was once a set of independent hospitals having arms-length relationships with physicians and clinicians who provide ambulatory care is becoming a small number of locally integrated health systems, generally built around large, prestigious academic medical centers. The typical region in the United States has 3 to 5 consolidated health systems, spanning a wide range of care settings, and a smaller fringe of health care centers outside those systems. Consolidated health systems have advantages and drawbacks. The advantages include the ability to coordinate care across different practitioners and sites of care. Offsetting this is the potential for higher prices resulting from greater market power. Market power increases because it is difficult for insurers to bargain successfully with one of only a few health systems. Antitrust authorities are examining these consolidated systems as they form, but broad conclusions are difficult to draw because typically the creation of a system will generate both benefit and harm and each set of facts will be different. Moreover, the remedies traditionally used (eg, blocking the transaction or requiring that the parties divest assets) by antitrust authorities in cases of net harm are limited. For this reason, local governments may want to introduce new policies that help ensure consumers gain protection in the event of consolidation, such as insurance products that charge consumers more for high-priced clinicians and health care centers, bundling payments to clinicians and health care organizations to eliminate the incentives of big institutions to simply provide more care, and establishing area-specific price or spending targets. PMID:24219952

  4. Hospital library resources in Massachusetts: data collection and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, P J

    1980-01-01

    Hospitals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts were surveyed to establish some ranges and baseline statistics for hospital medical information resources. The data were evaluated in terms of theoretical compliance with the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals standards as well as the more specific proposed appendices to the Canadian Standards for Hospital Libraries. The study quantifies hospital library resources and services in a state with a substantial number of acute care facilities. Of the study universe, 67.6% were judged as meeting either the revised JCAH or the Canadian criteria. The central finding is that the 100- to 299-bed institutions reflect a significant number of deficiencies when evaluated against either quantitative or nonquantitative standards. Further areas of study are suggested. PMID:6934016

  5. The soft budget constraint syndrome in the hospital sector.

    PubMed

    Kornai, János

    2009-06-01

    This study applies the theory and the conceptual framework of the soft budget constraint (SBC) to the hospital sector. The first part deals solely with hospitals in state ownership, but the study moves later onto the problems of ownership relations as well. The question posed is why the SBC phenomenon is so general in the hospital sector (including specialist outpatient clinics and diagnostic or nursing establishments that operate as separate units). The study contains several references to Hungarian experience, but the subject is of a more general nature. The SBC phenomenon is not confined to the Hungarian hospital sector, nor to the socialist system, nor as a vestige of socialism during post-socialist transformation. Soft budget constraints inevitably develop in the hospital sector, even in capitalist market economies. PMID:19377869

  6. Prevalence of hepatitis B serologic markers in community hospital personnel.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, A A; Monahan, G R; Finkelstein, D M

    1987-01-01

    The seroprevalence of hepatitis B markers among predominantly high-risk staff members and personnel of 31 community hospitals located throughout the United States was 8.4 per cent (greater than or equal to 5 per cent in 25 hospitals and greater than or equal to 10 per cent in 13 hospitals). Only two hospitals had seroprevalence rates less than or equal to 3 per cent. The institutional seroprevalence ranged from 0 per cent to 16.7 per cent, with a median of 8.2 per cent. Although there are limitations to this survey, the results suggest that the well established increased risk of contracting HBV infection among certain groups of health-care workers in urban teaching medical centers may also hold true for personnel in similar occupational and professional categories in community hospitals. PMID:3605482

  7. Factors associated with lease financing in the hospital industry.

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to capital leases, which are reported on the balance sheet as debt, operating leases are a form of off-balance sheet financing only reported in the notes to the financial statement and have limited disclosure requirements. Following the perpetuity method of corporate finance, this study developed a capitalized operating lease value for hospitals. Evaluating the substitutability between lease and debt financing, the findings show a marginal displacement of debt by lease financing. Assessing the relationship of market, mission, operating, and financial factors on lease financing for all short-term, acute-care hospitals across the United States, the results indicate that investor-owned hospital management companies and hospitals located in CON markets are less likely to lease and that smaller hospitals with fewer unoccupied beds, higher proportion of government payers, low liquidity, and lower capital expenditures are more likely to lease. PMID:19175234

  8. Simulation in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Proctor, T

    1996-01-01

    Health care costs continue to rise because increased demand for services and limited budgets put pressure on resources, however efficiently they may be used. Proposes discrete event simulation as an effective tool in the search for more efficient health care systems. Looks at the application of a desktop computer simulation package to model part of a hospital subsystem. The simulation package shows how efficiency might be improved by moderating available resources and times taken to complete tasks. Maintains that the principles expounded here are applicable to many different aspects of health care management. PMID:10161783

  9. Hospital board extramural services.

    PubMed

    Wright-St Clair, R E

    1981-12-23

    A hospital board has an obligation to provide services in the community but it is essential that those extramural services act in collaboration with and not in competition with all other services in the community. In particular, it is essential that we maintain the primacy of general practice and in return the general practitioner must accept full responsibility for the care of his patients in their homes, rehabilitation and encouraging the maximum possible independence on the part of the patients and their families must be the constant theme of the extramural services. PMID:6950292

  10. Health care financing policy for hospitalized nephrology patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Barrau, L; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1988-12-01

    The Medicare diagnosis-related group (DRG) prospective payment system is now entering its 6th year, with no reported major adverse effects on the health status of the American people. Currently 13 states are using DRG prospective "all-payer systems" for hospital reimbursement; other state may adopt DRG all payer systems. In DRG all-payer systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York state has been all-payer since January 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG all-payer methods on a large sample (n = 558) of adult nephrology patients for a 2-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursements now in effect. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had (on average) longer hospital lengths of stay and higher total hospital costs compared with patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payers. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had greater severity of illness than patients from Blue Cross or other payers. However, all payers (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, Medicare, and commercial insurers) generated significant financial risk under our DRG all-payer scheme. These data suggest that federal, state, and private payers may be underreimbursing for the care of hospitalized nephrology patients using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. As DRG payment rates are further reduced compared with the real hospital costs of treating patients, both the access to and the quality of care for many nephrology patients may be jeopardized. PMID:3143261

  11. [Family and psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    de Mello, Rita Mello; Schneider, Jacó Fernando

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to identify the reasons that lead relatives to hospitalize patients in a psychiatric unit of a general hospital. It is a qualitative study based on Alfred Schutz' phenomenological sociology. Fourteen relatives, each with one family member hospitalized, were interviewed from August to October 2009. The guiding question of the phenomenological interview was "What do you expect from psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital?". Phenomenological sociology was used to understand and interpret the interviews. Statements showed three concrete categories, that lead to the reasons for: treatment guidelines and continuity; prospects for improvement; ideas about normality. This research shows the experiences of relatives, contributing with mental health professionals' reflection about their actions and about the involvement of families in a general hospital's psychiatric unit. PMID:21987981

  12. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    PubMed Central

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M.; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O.

    2015-01-01

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors. PMID:26729142

  13. Measuring community hospital service in Michigan.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, J R; Restuccia, J D; Tedeschi, P J; Wilson, P A; Zuckerman, H S

    1981-01-01

    Using discharge abstracts from Michigan hospitals, we divided the state into hospital use communities with measured populations. We constructed population-based rates measuring use, cost, and some aspects of quality. The results cover 54 communities comprising 90 percent of the Michigan population and ranging in size from Detroit (population 600,000) to very small (population less than 25,000) communities. Age-adjusted patient days per 1,000 population, length of stay, cost per person per year, hospitalization rates for surgery, trauma and vascular disease, and childbirth problems show large variations, generally ranging from 2 to 1. High values usually are positively associated with each other and with population size. Patient days per 1,000 (mean 1,114, range 600-1,700) and cost per person(mean +223, range +110-+290) are distributed such that almost 75 percent of communities are below the mean. We believe this information will be useful to community hospital trustees, physicians, and administrators. PMID:7263271

  14. Radiation decontamination unit for the community hospital.

    PubMed

    Waldron, R L; Danielson, R A; Shultz, H E; Eckert, D E; Hendricks, K O

    1981-05-01

    "Freestanding" radiation decontamination units including surgical capability can be developed and made operational in small/medium sized community hospitals at relatively small cost and with minimal plant reconstruction. Because of the development of nuclear power plants in relatively remote areas and widespread transportation of radioactive materials it is important for hospitals and physicians to be prepared to handle radiation accident victims. The Radiological Assistance Program of the United States Department of Energy and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center Training Site of Oak Ridge Associated Universities are ready to support individual hospitals and physicians in this endeavor. Adequate planning rather than luck, should be used in dealing with potential radiation accident victims. The radiation emergency team is headed by a physician on duty in the hospital. It is important that the team leader be knowledgeable in radiation accident management and have personnel trained in radiation accident management as members of this team. The senior administrative person on duty is responsible for intramural and extramural communications. Rapid mobilization of the radiation decontamination unit is important. Periodic drills are necessary for this mobilization and the smooth operation of the unit. PMID:6784538

  15. Design of paediatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Veronica

    2016-05-01

    The impact of healthcare environments on children and young people's (CYP) health and psychosocial wellbeing has attracted much attention in recent years. This sits within the realm of the political drive for enhanced awareness of the need to take account of the rights and voice of the child. Perhaps as a direct result of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, and recognition from evidence in adult population studies of the impact of healthcare environments on psychosocial healing, contemporary times have witnessed a discernible movement towards enhancing quality care by promoting child and adolescent-friendly hospital environments. The Council of Europe guidelines on child-friendly health care moved to place the rights and needs of children at the heart of health care. The Council acknowledges that the delivery of child-oriented services, which includes the notion of family-centred care, should be delivered in child and family friendly environments. However, knowledge about what constitutes a child-friendly healthcare environment from CYP's perspective is often lacking with hospital architectural blueprints predominantly designed around adult proxy-reported assumptions about the needs and desires of children. PMID:27214414

  16. [Medical record management and risk management processes. State of the art and new normative guidelines about the organization and the management of the sanitary documentation in the National Health System or Hospital Trusts].

    PubMed

    Spolaore, P; Murolo, G; Sommavilla, M

    2003-01-01

    Recent health care reforms, the start of accreditation processes of health institutions, and the introduction also in the health system of risk management concepts and instruments, borrowed from the enterprise culture and the emphasis put on the protection of privacy, render evident the need and the urgency to define and to implement improvement processes of the organization and management of the medical documentation in the hospital with the aim of facilitation in fulfilment of regional and local health authorities policies about protection of the safety and improvement of quality of care. Currently the normative context that disciplines the management of medical records inside the hospital appears somewhat fragmentary, incomplete and however not able to clearly orientate health operators with the aim of a correct application of the enforced norms in the respect of the interests of the user and of local health authority. In this job we individuate the critical steps in the various phases of management process of the clinical folder and propose a new model of regulations, with the purpose to improve and to simplify the management processes and the modalities of compilation, conservation and release to entitled people of all clinical documentation. PMID:15049537

  17. Hospitalization before and after mini-gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The mini-gastric bypass (MGB) was developed to address some of the limitations of the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass ("RNY"). The RNY has recently been reported to increase the need for hospitalization for complications after RNY surgery. To determine the rates and indications for inpatient hospital use before and after MGB in comparison to similar rates in RNY. The study is a self reported retrospective study of patients from across the United States receiving MGB in Centers for Excellence in Laparoscopic Obesity Surgery ("CELOS") hospitals from 2000 to 2005. Complications and hospitalization in the year before and in the 1 to 5 years after MGB. 1069 patients who underwent MGB were selected for study. The rate of hospitalization in the year following MGB was 67% of the rate in the year preceding MGB (11% vs. 17%, P<0.001). The most common reasons for admission prior to MGB were general medical problems (38%) obstetric and Gynecological issues (36%), orthopedic problems (16%), gallbladder surgery (9%) and renal stones in 2%. The most common reasons for hospital admission after MGB were complications from surgery (29%), gallbladder surgery (20%), renal stones (14%), plastic surgery procedures (11%), appendectomy (9%), Gynecologic issues (9%) and orthopedic problems (6%). Thus while MGB complications made up a third of hospital readmissions following MGB surgery the over all hospitalization rates declined significantly. Previous studies have demonstrated that hospitalization after RNY gastric bypass increases remarkably (20% per year). The present study shows that hospitalization following MGB instead of rising, as reported with RNY, decreases by a third. The MGB has been shown to be a short, safe successful weight loss surgery in previous work. The present study supports the MGB as a low risk procedure that decreases the need for hospitalization. PMID:17386913

  18. Measuring Hospital Quality Using Pediatric Readmission and Revisit Rates

    PubMed Central

    Vittinghoff, Eric; Asteria-Peñaloza, Renée; Edwards, Jeffrey D.; Yazdany, Jinoos; Lee, Henry C.; Boscardin, W. John; Cabana, Michael D.; Dudley, R. Adams

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess variation among hospitals on pediatric readmission and revisit rates and to determine the number of high- and low-performing hospitals. METHODS: In a retrospective analysis using the State Inpatient and Emergency Department Databases from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project with revisit linkages available, we identified pediatric (ages 1–20 years) visits with 1 of 7 common inpatient pediatric conditions (asthma, dehydration, pneumonia, appendicitis, skin infections, mood disorders, and epilepsy). For each condition, we calculated rates of all-cause readmissions and rates of revisits (readmission or presentation to the emergency department) within 30 and 60 days of discharge. We used mixed logistic models to estimate hospital-level risk-standardized 30-day revisit rates and to identify hospitals that had performance statistically different from the group mean. RESULTS: Thirty-day readmission rates were low (<10.0%) for all conditions. Thirty-day rates of revisit to the inpatient or emergency department setting ranged from 6.2% (appendicitis) to 11.0% (mood disorders). Study hospitals (n = 958) had low condition-specific visit volumes (37.0%–82.8% of hospitals had <25 visits). The only condition with >1% of hospitals labeled as different from the mean on 30-day risk-standardized revisit rates was mood disorders (4.2% of hospitals [n = 15], range of hospital performance 6.3%–15.9%). CONCLUSIONS: We found that when comparing hospitals’ performances to the average, few hospitals that care for children are identified as high- or low-performers for revisits, even for common pediatric diagnoses, likely due to low hospital volumes. This limits the usefulness of condition-specific readmission or revisit measures in pediatric quality measurement. PMID:23979094

  19. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations. A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points) at each hospitalization. We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization. Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among cancer

  20. Psychiatric inpatient services in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    HUME, P B; RUDIN, E

    1960-10-01

    Traditional asylum care of psychiatric patients leads to the isolation, confinement, and restraint of the patients, and to isolation of psychiatric practice from the rest of medicine. Modern psychiatric advances have demonstrated the disadvantages to both patients and their families of such isolation, confinement and restraint. It is in the best interests of patients and professional workers that inpatient psychiatric services be continuous with, and contiguous to, other medical services and to rehabilitation services of all kinds. Examination of currently available information reveals a shortage of psychiatric beds in California, particularly for diagnosis and brief treatment. Thus, not only is there a need to develop psychiatric inpatient facilities, but also an opportunity to develop them along several different lines. Since both the Hill-Burton Act (federal) and the Short-Doyle Act (state) give financial assistance to only those psychiatric services established in general hospitals or affiliated with general hospitals, this requirement calls for examination in the light of experience with services so operated. At first, the Short-Doyle Act was perceived as a panacea for the psychiatric ills of the state. Now it is beginning to be recognized as one method of providing additional mental health resources, rather than the exclusive method. As more short-term cases are treated in local, tax-supported, psychiatric units in general hospitals, an impact can be expected on the state hospital program. In its administration of the Short-Doyle Act, the Department of Mental Hygiene attempts to respond to community needs as locally determined. It tries to insure local option and encourage local responsibility while furthering high standards of staffing and of service. PMID:13716797

  1. Hospital profits, a misleading measure of financial health.

    PubMed

    Kane, N M

    1991-01-01

    Over the 1984-1988 period, Massachusetts hospitals complained that operating revenues, regulated by state and federal governments, were inadequate and caused significant declines in profitability. Poor profitability provided a persuasive basis for hospitals' successful lobbying for additional revenues, as well as the rationale for laying off workers and reducing unprofitable programs serving community needs. However, an alternative approach to measuring hospital financial health in the state indicates that the industry was healthy enough to significantly expand capital assets and to accumulate hundreds of millions of dollars of discretionary cash. More effective measures of financial performance are needed to inform policymakers and analysts of the financial health of hospitals. Analysis of cash flow statements provides important insights for proper interpretation of income statements and balance sheets. PMID:10128897

  2. Financial Analysis of National University Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Munjae

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper provides information for decision making of the managers and the staff of national university hospitals. Methods In order to conduct a financial analysis of national university hospitals, this study uses reports on the final accounts of 10 university hospitals from 2008 to 2011. Results The results of comparing 2008 and 2011 showed that there was a general decrease in total assets, an increase in liabilities, and a decrease in total medical revenues, with a continuous deficit in many hospitals. Moreover, as national university hospitals have low debt dependence, their management conditions generally seem satisfactory. However, some individual hospitals suffer severe financial difficulties and thus depend on short-term debts, which generally aggravate the profit and loss structure. Various indicators show that the financial state and business performance of national university hospitals have been deteriorating. Conclusion These research findings will be used as important basic data for managers who make direct decisions in this uncertain business environment or by researchers who analyze the medical industry to enable informed decision-making and optimized execution. Furthermore, this study is expected to contribute to raising government awareness of the need to foster and support the national university hospital industry. PMID:26730356

  3. Dynamics of ambulatory surgery centers and hospitals market entry.

    PubMed

    Housman, Michael; Al-Amin, Mona

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we investigate the diversity of healthcare delivery organizations by comparing the market determinants of hospitals entry rates with those of ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). Unlike hospitals, ASCs is one of the growing populations of specialized healthcare delivery organizations. There are reasons to believe that firm entry patterns differ within growing organizational populations since these markets are characterized by different levels of organizational legitimacy, technological uncertainty, and information asymmetry. We compare the entry patterns of firms in a mature population of hospitals to those of firms within a growing population of ASCs. By using patient-level datasets from the state of Florida, we break down our explanatory variables by facility type (ASC vs. hospital) and utilize negative binomial regression models to evaluate the impact of niche density on ASC and hospital entry. Our results indicate that ASCs entry rates is higher in markets with overlapping ASCs while hospitals entry rates are less in markets with overlapping hospitals and ASCs. These results are consistent with the notion that firms in growing populations tend to seek out crowded markets as they compete to occupy the most desirable market segments while firms in mature populations such as general hospitals avoid direct competition. PMID:25595002

  4. Polish-American Children's Hospital in Krakow, Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Secrest, T.J.; Szydlowski, R.F. ); Wade, D. )

    1993-03-01

    In late 1990 staff from the US Department of Energy's Office of Technical and Financial Assistance identified the Polish-American Children's Hospital as a potential site for application of DOE expertise to reduce the Hospital's energy requirements. Visits to the hospital in the fall and winter of 1991--1992 provided initial scoping of the energy related activities that would be supported by DOE. In addition to reducing energy requirements, the Hospital staff expressed a need for assistance in the areas of power quality and medical waste incineration. Subsequently, a power quality study supported by the Electric Power and Research Institute has been initiated and medical waste incineration will be provided by a Polish organization. The resulting scope of work for this effort is to survey the Hospital's thermal energy supply and demand systems to identify no-cost and low-cost measures that will reduce the Hospital's energy requirements. Applicable measures would then be demonstrated in the Hospital through a partnership with US and Polish organizations and a sister hospital in the United States.

  5. Hospital marketing orientation and managed care processes: are they coordinated?

    PubMed

    White, K R; Thompson, J M; Patel, U B

    2001-01-01

    The hospital marketing function has been widely adopted as a way to learn about markets, attract sufficient resources, develop appropriate services, and communicate the availability of such goods to those who may be able to purchase such services. The structure, tasks, and effectiveness of the marketing function have been the subject of increased inquiry by researchers and practitioners alike. A specific understanding of hospital marketing in a growing managed care environment and the relationship between marketing and managed care processes in hospitals is a growing concern. Using Kotler and Clarke's framework for assessing marketing orientation, we examined the marketing orientation of hospitals in a single state at two points in time--1993 and 1999. Study findings show that the overall marketing orientation score decreased from 1993 to 1999 for the respondent hospitals. The five elements of the Kotler and Clarke definition of marketing orientation remained relatively stable, with slightly lower scores related to customer philosophy. In addition, we evaluated the degree to which selected managed care activities are carried out as part of its marketing function. A significant (p < .05) decrease in managed care processes coordinated with the formal marketing function was evident from 1993 to 1999. With increasing numbers of managed care plan enrollees, hospitals are likely focusing on organizational buyers as important customers. In order to appeal to organizational buyers, hospital executives may be focusing more on clinical quality and cost efficiency in the production of services, which will improve a hospital's position with organizational buyers. PMID:11570344

  6. Hospitals focus on physician relations.

    PubMed

    Rubright, R

    1987-09-01

    Many hospital administrators are shifting their marketing focus from consumers and referral agents to the hospital's attending physicians. These new comprehensive physician relations or retention programs are much broader than those implemented in the past and are used to build mutual exchanges between hospitals and physicians, sharpen the physicians' awareness of the hospital's most appealing attributes, compete with nearby hospitals that develop their own aggressive physician relations programs, and ensure a more promising financial picture for both parties. "Cutting-edge" physician relations plans in Catholic hospitals include the following: Marketing plans for the medical staff alone or with key medical staff sections; A strong physician data base; A physician referral system; A director of medical affairs; Practice enhancement and business assistance services; A young physicians section; Continuing marketing auditing and research into physicians' opinions, attitudes, and behavior patterns; Physician inclusion in all major programs, services, policies, and events; Programs for physician office staff; Marketing committees consisting of physicians. PMID:10283486

  7. Community hospitals and the Internet: lessons from pilot connections.

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, S; Holt, M C; Horner, M; Rambo, N

    1994-01-01

    Community hospitals in rural and isolated areas have had little access to the Internet. In 1992, the National Library of Medicine funded a pilot project to be conducted by the University of Washington and seven community hospitals in the northwestern United States. The goals of the project were to connect the hospitals to the Internet and study the uses made of this resource. A number of administrative, technical, financial, and organizational problems were dealt with in the attempt to establish the Internet connections and introduce this resource to these health care settings. This paper examines these issues and presents conclusions drawn from the experiences of the project team. PMID:7841910

  8. Determinants of interest rates on tax-exempt hospital bonds.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M; Goldman, F; Nesbitt, S W; Mobilia, P

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the determinants of interest rates on tax-exempt hospital bonds. The results highlight the potential and actual roles of Federal and state policy in the determination of these rates. The shift to a Prospective Payment System under Medicare has subsidized the borrowing costs of some hospitals at the expense of others. The selection of underwriters by negotiation rather than by competitive bidding results in higher interest rates. The Federal tax act of 1986 raised the cost of hospital debt by encouraging bond issues to contain call features. PMID:10131753

  9. The second national hospital costing study: background, results and implications.

    PubMed

    Oates, B; Murray, J; Hindle, D

    1998-01-01

    The costing of hospital outputs, and especially of acute admitted patients categorised by DRG, has been the focus of considerable attention in the last decade. Many individual hospitals now routinely estimate the costs of their main products, several State and Territory health authorities undertake periodic multi-site studies, and there have been a few one-off national studies. This paper summarises the methods and results of the most recent national study, which measured costs at a sample of public and private hospitals around Australia for the 1996-97 financial year. We briefly describe the main results and note some implications. PMID:10185689

  10. 45 CFR 211.11 - Request for release from hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., or his legal guardian, spouse, or adult next of kin, requests his release, such request shall be... alleged to be mentally ill as may be in force and applicable generally in the State in which such hospital... period of time falling on a Sunday or a legal holiday observed by the courts of the State in which...

  11. 45 CFR 211.11 - Request for release from hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., or his legal guardian, spouse, or adult next of kin, requests his release, such request shall be... alleged to be mentally ill as may be in force and applicable generally in the State in which such hospital... period of time falling on a Sunday or a legal holiday observed by the courts of the State in which...

  12. Release of information: are hospitals taking a hit?

    PubMed

    Bellenghi, G Michael; Coffey, Bonnie; Fournier, Joseph E; McDavid, Jan P

    2008-11-01

    Outsourcing release-of-information requests helps hospitals alleviate administrative and compliance burdens and expense. Recently, state lawmakers have begun to draft legislation reducing the maximum fee that may be charged for copies of electronically stored records. The reduced fees may not cover expenses. If such legislation makes it difficult for outsourcing companies to make a profit from this service, hospitals ultimately could bear the expense and risk. PMID:18990845

  13. Single and shared accommodation for young patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Helen

    2010-10-01

    This study explores the suitability of 100 per cent single room occupancy for children and young people admitted to hospital in terms of their safety, socialisation and development, and demands on the workforce. A literature search, a sabbatical at Boston Children's Hospital in the United States by the author and surveys of health professionals, children and young people have shown that shared rooms should remain available. PMID:21066944

  14. RFID solution benefits Cambridge hospital.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Keeping track of thousands of pieces of equipment in a busy hospital environment is a considerable challenge, but, according to RFID tagging and asset tracking specialist, Harland Simon, RFID technology can make the task considerably simpler. Here Andrew James, the company's RFID sales manager, describes the positive benefits the technology has brought the Medical Equipment Library (MEL) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, one of the world's most famous teaching hospitals. PMID:24341115

  15. Cottage hospitals: an evident future.

    PubMed

    Davidson, N

    1980-05-23

    When Nick Davidson visited the Yeatman Cottage Hospital in Sherborne, Dorset, he found a beautiful country town with a history and a hospital with its roots in the past. It has grown to be not only part of the present, but a model for the future. As he toured Sherborne Abbey, in the process of restoration thanks to the public's generosity, he reflected on the town's other 'good cause'--the Yeatman Cottage Hospital. PMID:10297860

  16. IK Brunel's Crimean war hospital.

    PubMed

    Merridew, C G

    2014-07-01

    "Those wonderful huts…" (Florence Nightingale). This is the story of the British Civil Hospital, erected in 1855 at Renkioi on the south Dardanelles coast of Turkey. The spectacular hospital was a portable one designed by British engineer IK Brunel. It was his only health-related project, and it was known as a Civil Hospital because its staff were all civilians, despite its patients being military. PMID:25196954

  17. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence—Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared with non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet versus non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor's degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (odds ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.98; P = 0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.77–1.01; P = 0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions The lower mortality we find in Magnet hospitals is largely attributable to measured nursing characteristics but there is a mortality advantage above and beyond what we could measure. Magnet recognition identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:24022082

  18. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence— Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared to non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet vs. non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor’s degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.76-0.98, p=0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-1.01, p=0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions Magnet hospitals have lower mortality than is fully accounted for by measured characteristics of nursing. Magnet recognition likely both identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:23047129

  19. Impact of hospital variables on case mix index as a marker of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Carmen M; Harrington, Darrell W; Christenson, Peter; Spellberg, Brad

    2014-02-01

    Case mix index (CMI) has become a standard indicator of hospital disease severity in the United States and internationally. However, CMI was designed to calculate hospital payments, not to track disease severity, and is highly dependent on documentation and coding accuracy. The authors evaluated whether CMI varied by characteristics affecting hospitals' disease severity (eg, trauma center or not). The authors also evaluated whether CMI was lower at public hospitals than private hospitals, given the diminished financial resources to support documentation enhancement at public hospitals. CMI data for a 14-year period from a large public database were analyzed longitudinally and cross-sectionally to define the impact of hospital variables on average CMI within and across hospital groups. Between 1996 and 2007, average CMI declined by 0.4% for public hospitals, while rising significantly for private for-profit (14%) and nonprofit (6%) hospitals. After the introduction of the Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Group (MS-DRG) system in 2007, average CMI increased for all 3 hospital types but remained lowest in public vs. private for-profit or nonprofit hospitals (1.05 vs. 1.25 vs. 1.20; P<0.0001). By multivariate analysis, teaching hospitals, level 1 trauma centers, and larger hospitals had higher average CMI, consistent with a marker of disease severity, but only for private hospitals. Public hospitals had lower CMI across all subgroups. Although CMI had some characteristics of a disease severity marker, it was lower across all strata for public hospitals. Hence, caution is warranted when using CMI to adjust for disease severity across public vs. private hospitals. PMID:23965045

  20. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  1. [Status of pediatric hospital medicine in Spain: a report by the Spanish Pediatric Hospital Medicine Society (SEPHO)].

    PubMed

    Ramos Fernández, J M; Montiano Jorge, J I; Hernández Marco, R; García García, J J

    2014-11-01

    Few reports are available on the status of pediatric hospital medicine in Spain. This has prompted the Spanish Society of Hospital Pediatrics (SEPHO) to conduct a study to determine the status of pediatric hospital care received. Data released by the Ministry of Health, the National Institute of Statistics have been used in the study, and an analysis was made of the results of a computerized survey designed and developed by SEPHO and available on the Internet for completion from November 2011 to December 2012 among Spanish hospitals. The results of this survey are part of the beginning of our journey as an association, and the current status of child and family welfare during hospitalization needs to be determined in order to consider and, where appropriate, make recommendations for improvement and standardization of care. The study, still unpublished, is to determine the state of pediatric hospital care as seen and analyzed from the perspective of the professionals directly involved in pediatric general hospital care. We included hospitals of different size and complexity of care. The aim of this report is to present the results of the survey and relate it to demographic and health care data from official sources. PMID:24560498

  2. Hunger: a hospital survey.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, E; Bernabo, L

    1992-01-01

    Patients at a New York City municipal hospital were surveyed in 1985 and 1989 to ascertain the extent of hunger and its possible correlates. Twenty-two percent (22%) of the 382 subjects in 1985 and 23% of the 332 subjects in 1989 experienced hunger. Hunger was related significantly to homelessness, social isolation and the physical inability to buy and/or prepare food. Between 1985 and 1989, there was a large increase in the use of institutional resources for food; a decline in reliance on Food Stamps; and an increase in household density. Inpatients were found to be poorer than outpatients, and to rely more heavily upon soup kitchens. Practice, policy and research implications are noted. PMID:1589827

  3. Practice and hospital economics.

    PubMed

    Senagore, Anthony J

    2006-08-01

    There has been a significant effort over the past 10 years to attempt to control the rate of increase in the cost of medical care. However, as is true of any economic system, there are multiple stakeholders involved and often competing motivations. The single largest source of medical inflation is the cost of pharmaceuticals; however, this topic is not directly discussed in this article Similarly, the cost of medical insurance products is not included as these issues cannot be directly addressed by physician behavior. The body of this discussion focuses on costs directly experienced by or potentially controlled by physicians. These areas include practice expense and margin and hospital direct costs and margin. It is essential for physicians to understand fully factors they can potentially control and areas they may be able to influence in this troubling era of cost containment. PMID:20011377

  4. North Carolina State Plan for Technical Assistance and Energy Conservation Measures: Grant Programs for Schools and Hospitals and for Buildings Owned by Units of Local Government and Public Care Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Commerce, Raleigh. Energy Div.

    State guidelines for grant applications that follow the regulations of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 are presented for North Carolina institutions. Among the 17 procedures spelled out in detail are several that concern eligible institutions' involvement in the development of the state plan, notification of the plan, and…

  5. Surgonomics. Health care financing policy for hospitalized otolaryngology patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Zahtz, G; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1988-11-01

    The Medicare diagnosis related group (DRG) prospective payment model is changing hospital payment. Currently many states are using DRG prospective "All Payor Systems" for hospital reimbursement. In All Payor Systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York State has been All Payor since Jan 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG All Payor methods on a large sample (N = 1074) of adult otolaryngology patients for a two-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement now in effect. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had (on average) a longer hospital stay and total hospital cost compared with patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payors. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with patients from Blue Cross or other payors. All payors (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and commercial insurers), except Medicare, generated financial risk under the DRG All Payor scheme. These data suggest that state and private payors may be underreimbursing for the care of the hospitalized otolaryngology patient using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. Health care financing policy described in this study may limit both the access and/or the quality of care for many otolaryngology patients in the future. PMID:3139014

  6. Health care financing policy for hospitalized black patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Johnson, H; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1988-09-01

    The Medicare diagnostic-related group (DRG) prospective payment model is changing hospital payment. Currently many states are using DRG prospective "all payer systems" for hospital reimbursement. In all payer systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York State has had an all payer system since January 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG all payer methods on a large sample (N = 6,134) of adult black medical and surgical patients for a three-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had, on average, a longer hospital stay and total hospital cost compared with patients covered by Blue Cross and other commercial insurers. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with those of Blue Cross and others. All insurers (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, Medicare, and commercial) generated substantial financial risk under the DRG all payer scheme. These data suggest that federal, state, and private payers may be under-reimbursing for the care of the hospitalized black patient using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. Health care financing policy such as that demonstrated in this study may limit both the access and quality of care for many black patients in the future. PMID:3149307

  7. Health care financing policy for hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Munoz, E; Chalfin, D; Goldstein, J; Lackner, R; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1989-03-01

    Prospective hospital payment systems using the federal Medicare DRG payment model are changing hospital reimbursement. Currently, many states have adopted diagnosis related group (DRG) prospective "all payer systems" using the federal model. All payer systems, whereby Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode, prevent cost shifting between payers. New York state has used an all payer system since Jan 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG all payer methods for a large sample (N = 16,084) of pediatric patients for a three-year period using the New York DRG all payer reimbursement system now in effect. Medicaid pediatric patients had (adjusted for DRG weight index) a longer hospital stay and greater total hospital cost compared with pediatric patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payers. Medicaid pediatric patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with patients from Blue Cross and other payers. Pediatric patients in all payment groups (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers) generated financial risk under the DRG all payer scheme. Medicaid pediatric patients generated the greatest financial risk, however. These data suggest that state and private payers may be under-reimbursing for the care of the hospitalized pediatric patient using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. Health care financing policy for pediatric patients may limit both access and quality of care. PMID:2492754

  8. HIV patients in the HCUP database: a study of hospital utilization and costs.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Fred J

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the utilization of hospital care by HIV patients in all hospitals in eight states (California, Colorado, Florida, Kansas, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina), and examines the cost of hospital care for HIV patients in six of these states (California, Colorado, Kansas, New Jersey, New York, and South Carolina). The eight states in the sample account for more than 52% of all persons living with AIDS in the United States; the six states account for 39%. The unit of observation in both studies is a hospital admission by a patient with HIV. Hospital data were obtained from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), State Inpatient Database (SID), which is maintained by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The HCUP contains hospital discharge data and is a federal/state/industry partnership to build a multistate health care data system. Using multivariate analytic techniques and data from 2000, results indicate that cost and length of a hospital stay vary significantly across states after accounting for a patient's gender, insurance type, race, age, and number of diagnoses, as well as the teaching status and ownership category of the hospital. PMID:15224963

  9. Understanding differences between high- and low-price hospitals: implications for efforts to rein in costs.

    PubMed

    White, Chapin; Reschovsky, James D; Bond, Amelia M

    2014-02-01

    Private insurers pay widely varying prices for inpatient care across hospitals. Previous research indicates that certain hospitals use market clout to obtain higher payment rates, but there have been few in-depth examinations of the relationship between hospital characteristics and pricing power. This study used private insurance claims data to identify hospitals receiving inpatient prices significantly higher or lower than the median in their market. High-price hospitals, compared to other hospitals, tend to be larger; be major teaching hospitals; belong to systems with large market shares; and provide specialized services, such as heart transplants and Level I trauma care. High-price hospitals also receive significant revenues from nonpatient sources, such as state Medicaid disproportionate-share hospital funds, and they enjoy healthy total financial margins. Quality indicators for high-price hospitals were mixed: High-price hospitals fared much better than low-price hospitals did in U.S. News & World Report rankings, which are largely based on reputation, while generally scoring worse on objective measures of quality, such as postsurgical mortality rates. Thus, insurers may face resistance if they attempt to steer patients away from high-price hospitals because these facilities have good reputations and offer specialized services that may be unique in their markets. PMID:24476706

  10. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care. PMID:26738719

  11. Taking the next step to privacy compliance for hospitals: implementing the OHA guidelines.

    PubMed

    Beardwood, John

    2003-01-01

    The recently released "Guidelines for Managing Privacy, Data Protection and Security for Ontario Hospitals," prepared by the Ontario Hospital eHealth Council Privacy and Security Working Group (the "Guidelines") are useful in that they provide a comprehensive overview of the types of issues raised for hospitals by existing and pending privacy legislation, and a very high-level framework for addressing same. However, the Guidelines are, as stated high-level guidelines only,--leaving hospital management to grapple with the next big step towards privacy compliance: how to operationalize the Guidelines within their particular hospital. PMID:14674181

  12. [The oldest military hospitals of Saint-Petersburg: good round figure in history].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Shvets, V A; Tsvetkov, S A; Ovchinnikov, D V

    2010-11-01

    In 1710 in a under construction capital of the Russian state the first central military hospital for treatment the soldier of garrison has been organized. Its initial device differed from existed regimental infirmaries a little; however personal home nursing of tsar has helped development of hospital. In 1715 the hospital has been solemnly consecrated. Since 1735 in hospital have started to spend training of future doctors and with the basis in 1798 of Army medical college it became its clinical base. During teamwork the hospital became high-grade clinical base of academy, has developed and became the modem well equipped clinic-diagnostic centre. PMID:21395160

  13. Altruism or moral hazard: the impact of hospital uncompensated care pools.

    PubMed

    Gaskin, D J

    1997-08-01

    Empirical evidence from New Jersey supports theories of hospitals altruism. From 1987 to 1992, New Jersey reimbursed hospitals for uncompensated care through the Uncompensated Care Trust Fund. The Trust Fund reduced the shadow price of charity care, inducing hospitals to increase their provision of uncompensated care. Hospitals increased inpatient uncompensated care by an average of 14.8% and statewide uncompensated care increased by $360 million during 1987-1990. Empirical evidence suggests that the state effectively addressed the moral hazard problem created by the Trust Fund by auditing uncompensated care and regulating hospital collection procedures. PMID:10169098

  14. Evaluation of hospital inpatient complications: a planning approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hospital inpatient complications are one of a number of adverse health care outcomes. Reducing complications has been identified as an approach to improving care and saving resources as part of the health care reform efforts in the United States. An objective of this study was to describe the Potentially Preventable Complications software developed as a tool for evaluating hospital inpatient outcomes. Additional objectives included demonstration of the use of this software to evaluate the connection between health care outcomes and expenses in United States administrative data at the state and local levels and the use of the software to plan and implement interventions to reduce hospital complications in one U.S. metropolitan area. Methods The study described the Potentially Preventable Complications software as a tool for evaluating these inpatient hospital outcomes. Through administrative hospital charge data from California and Maryland and through cost data from three hospitals in Syracuse, New York, expenses for patients with and without complications were compared. These comparisons were based on patients in the same All Patients Refined Diagnosis Related Groups and severity of illness categories. This analysis included tests of statistical significance. In addition, the study included a planning process for use of the Potentially Preventable Complications software in three Syracuse hospitals to plan and implement reductions in hospital inpatient complications. The use of the PPC software in cost comparisons and reduction of complications included tests of statistical significance. Results The study demonstrated that Potentially Preventable Complications were associated with significantly increased cost in administrative data from the United States in California and Maryland and in actual cost data from the hospitals of Syracuse, New York. The implementation of interventions in the Syracuse hospitals was associated with the reduction of

  15. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  16. Comparing Candidate Hospital Report Cards

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.L.; Rivenburgh, R.D.; Scovel, J.C.; White, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    We present graphical and analytical methods that focus on multivariate outlier detection applied to the hospital report cards data. No two methods agree which hospitals are unusually good or bad, so we also present ways to compare the agreement between two methods. We identify factors that have a significant impact on the scoring.

  17. Partners: group practices and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Schryver, D L

    1990-02-01

    Many hospital executives see the emergence of medical group practices as a threat to their autonomy. However, the degree of future success of hospitals and group practices may depend on their willingness and ability to develop common goals and strategies. PMID:10106349

  18. Latex in the Hospital Environment

    MedlinePlus

    LATEX in the Hospital Environment Updated Fall 2015 This list provides a guide to some of the most common objects containing latex and offers some ... remover–Sepha Pharm) 1 LATEX in the Hospital Environment (continued) Frequently contains LATEX OR/Infection Control masks, ...

  19. Management of the Hospital Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Alvis G.

    1976-01-01

    Hospital studies indicate the need for an environmental/sanitarian specialist for control of nosocomial infection and maintenance of a quality environment. The author recommends these requirements for certification as a hospital environmentalist: academic studies including toxicology, epidemiology, hygiene, management, and an internship in…

  20. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…