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Sample records for agnews state hospital

  1. KINGS RIVER, RANCHERIA, AGNEW, AND OAT MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Longwell, Warren D.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the Kings River, Rancheria, Agnew, and Oat Mountain Roadless Areas, California were found to have several areas with probable mineral-resource potential for tungsten in tactite, and one area with probable mineral-resource potential for lode gold in quartz veins. The extreme relief and inaccessibility in most of the roadless areas make exploration and mining very difficult. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of energy resources.

  2. Agnew Meets the Student Dissenters: An Experimental Study of Ego-Involvement and Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Timothy P.; Cronen, Vernon E.

    1972-01-01

    Study deals with effects of David Frost show of September 25, 1970, featuring Vice President Spiro Agnew and five student dissenters on the attitudes of students. Results showed that students exposed to the program were significantly less negative in attitudes toward Agnew. (DS)

  3. A Partial Test of Agnew's General Theory of Crime and Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yan; Day, George; Cao, Liqun

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, Agnew introduced a new integrated theory, which he labels a general theory of crime and delinquency. He proposes that delinquency is more likely to occur when constraints against delinquency are low and motivations for delinquency are high. In addition, he argues that constraints and motivations are influenced by variables in five life…

  4. The Psychiatric Aide in State Mental Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Manpower Studies Unit.

    Benchmark data essential to further study and action were obtained in 1963 from personnel records and interviews with representative samples of aides and nurses. Some findings were: (1) State and county mental hospitals employed approximately 96,000 psychiatric aides with eight states acccounting for one-half, (2) Although there were wide…

  5. New York State Hospital Manpower Survey, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Health, Albany.

    Data presented in this survey are in the form of tables and indicate the hospital manpower situation in New York State in May 1969. A total of 330,959 persons were employed, 65 0/0 in health professional and technical occupations. An additional 25,720 fulltime employees were needed. The categories showing the greatest percents of vacant budgeted…

  6. Leptospirosis-Associated Hospitalizations, United States, 1998–2009

    PubMed Central

    Callinan, Laura S.; Holman, Robert C.; Steiner, Claudia; Guerra, Marta A.

    2014-01-01

    A small percentage of persons with leptospirosis, a reemerging zoonosis, experience severe complications that require hospitalization. The number of leptospirosis cases in the United States is unknown. Thus, to estimate the hospitalization rate for this disease, we analyzed US hospital discharge records for 1998–2009 for the total US population by using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. During that time, the average annual rate of leptospirosis-associated hospitalizations was 0.6 hospitalizations/1,000,000 population. Leptospirosis-associated hospitalization rates were higher for persons >20 years of age and for male patients. For leptospirosis-associated hospitalizations, the average age of patients at admission was lower, the average length of stay for patients was longer, and hospital charges were higher than those for nonleptospirosis infectious disease–associated hospitalizations. Educating clinicians on the signs and symptoms of leptospirosis may result in earlier diagnosis and treatment and, thereby, reduced disease severity and hospitalization costs. PMID:25076111

  7. Rural Hospital Patient Safety Systems Implementation in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Daniel R.; Hewett, John E.; Ge, Bin; Schubert, Shari

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: With heightened attention to medical errors and patient safety, we surveyed Utah and Missouri hospitals to assess the "state of the art" in patient safety systems and identify changes over time. This study examines differences between urban and rural hospitals. Methods: Survey of all acute care hospitals in Utah and…

  8. Hospital librarianship in the United States: at the crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Diane G.; Chastain-Warheit, Christine C.; Easterby-Gannett, Sharon; Chayes, Marion C.; Long, Bradley A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines recent developments in hospital librarianship in the United States, including the current status of hospital-based clinical library services. Several examples of hospital library services are presented that demonstrate some characteristics of struggling and thriving services. The implications of the informationist concept are considered. The continuation of the hospital librarian's primary role in support of patient care is explored, as core competencies are reexamined for relevancy in the new millennium. PMID:11838458

  9. Daptomycin Use in United States Children's Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Larru, Beatriz; Cowden, Carter L; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Gerber, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-01

    We described 1035 pediatric hospitalizations with daptomycin use in 794 patients since 2004. Daptomycin use was uncommon but increased over time. A minority of hospitals accounted for the majority of use. This variability of daptomycin use highlights the need for future studies to assess the efficacy and safety of daptomycin in children.

  10. Creedmore State Hospital, Building Y, 8045 Winchester Boulevard (site ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    - Creedmore State Hospital, Building Y, 80-45 Winchester Boulevard (site bounded by Union Turnpike on north, Hillside Avenue on south, Winchester Boulevard on west, & 240th, 241st, & 242nd Streets on east), Queens (subdivision), Queens County, NY

  11. Creedmoor State Hospital, 8045 Winchester Boulevard (site bounded by Union ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Creedmoor State Hospital, 80-45 Winchester Boulevard (site bounded by Union Turnpike on north, Hillside Avenue on south, Winchester Boulevard on west, & 240th, 241st, & 242nd Streets on east), Queens (subdivision), Queens County, NY

  12. Meanings of state hospital nursing. I: Facing challenges.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M D; Beaven, J; Blacksmith, J; Ekland, E; Hein, J; Osborne, O H; Reno, J

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of work for nurses employed in two state psychiatric hospitals. Nurses at both hospitals participated in designing and carrying out the research. In Phase I, nurses described situations in which they had been observers or participant observers and the way that they understood what was occurring in the situations described. The data from these descriptions were analyzed in collaboration with small groups of nurse co-investigators at each hospital. In Phase II, patterns of meaning identified in Phase I were checked and further refined based on focus groups and interviews with nurses at both hospitals. The interrelated dilemmas faced by nurses are discussed as (1) challenges in clinical decision making, (2) challenges regarding personal control, and (3) challenges of maintaining professional standards. Ways of meeting these challenges, coping, and making meaning are discussed in a companion article, "Meanings of State Hospital Nursing II: Coping and Making Meaning".

  13. The Effects of Life Domains, Constraints, and Motivations on Academic Dishonesty: A Partial Test and Extension of Agnew's General Theory.

    PubMed

    Cochran, John K

    2015-11-27

    Recently, Robert Agnew introduced a new general theory of crime and delinquency in which he attempted to corral the vast array of theoretical "causes" of criminal conduct into a more parsimonious statement organized into one of five life domains: self, family, peers, school, and work as well as constraints against crime and motivation for it. These domains are depicted as the source of constraints and motivations and whose effects are, in part, mediated by these constraints and motivations. Based on self-report data on academic dishonesty from a sample of college students, the present study attempts to test this general theory. While several of the life domain variables had significant effects of cheating in the baseline model, all of these effects were fully mediated by constraints and motivations. In the final model, academic dishonesty was observed to be most significantly affected by the perceived severity of formal sanction threats, the number of credit hours enrolled, the frequency of skipping classes, and pressure from friends.

  14. Measuring prescribing practices in a state mental hospital system.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K; Allison, J; Hartig, P

    1979-07-01

    To determine the degree to which Nebraska's three state mental hospitals complied with recognized guidelines for prescription of psychotropic medications, a study was made for 1326 drug orders issued over a five-year period. The prescribing practices in the hospital were then reviewed in relation to the guidelines in areas of polypharmacy, daily dose frequency, time of day, use of p.r.n. orders, drug form, dosages for children and the elderly, dosages during acute and stabilized stages of illness, and brand versus generic names. The study highlighted areas of progress in drug use practices and identified areas for improvement.

  15. Incidence and trends of blastomycosis-associated hospitalizations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Amy E; Younes, Naji; Steiner, Claudia A; Prevots, D Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    We used the State Inpatient Databases from the United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to provide state-specific age-adjusted blastomycosis-associated hospitalization incidence throughout the entire United States. Among the 46 states studied, states within the Mississippi and Ohio River valleys had the highest age-adjusted hospitalization incidence. Specifically, Wisconsin had the highest age-adjusted hospitalization incidence (2.9 hospitalizations per 100,000 person-years). Trends were studied in the five highest hospitalization incidence states. From 2000 to 2011, blastomycosis-associated hospitalizations increased significantly in Illinois and Kentucky with an average annual increase of 4.4% and 8.4%, respectively. Trends varied significantly by state. Overall, 64% of blastomycosis-associated hospitalizations were among men and the median age at hospitalization was 53 years. This analysis provides a complete epidemiologic description of blastomycosis-associated hospitalizations throughout the endemic area in the United States.

  16. Histoplasmosis-Associated Hospitalizations in the United States, 2001–2012

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Derado, Gordana; Mody, Rajal K.

    2016-01-01

    We examined trends in histoplasmosis-associated hospitalizations in the United States using the 2001–2012 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. An estimated 50 778 hospitalizations occurred, with significant increases in hospitalizations overall and in the proportion of hospitalizations associated with transplant, diabetes, and autoimmune conditions often treated with biologic therapies; therefore, histoplasmosis remains an important opportunistic infection. PMID:26894201

  17. Skinner boxes for psychotics: Operant conditioning at Metropolitan state hospital

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    Between 1953 and 1965, Ogden Lindsley and his associates conducted free-operant research with psychiatric inpatients and normal volunteers at Metropolitan State Hospital in Waltham, Massachusetts. Their project, originally named “Studies in Behavior Therapy,” was renamed “Harvard Medical School Behavior Research Laboratory” in 1955. This name change and its implications were significant. The role of the laboratory in the history of the relationship between the experimental analysis of behavior and applied behavior analysis is discussed. A case is made for viewing Lindsley's early work as foundational for the subfield of the experimental analysis of human behavior that formally coalesced in the early 1980s. The laboratory's work is also contextualized with reference to the psychopharmacological revolution of the 1950s. Finally, a four-stage framework for studying the historical and conceptual development of behavior analysis is proposed. PMID:22478407

  18. Skinner boxes for psychotics: operant conditioning at Metropolitan State Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    Between 1953 and 1965, Ogden Lindsley and his associates conducted free-operant research with psychiatric inpatients and normal volunteers at Metropolitan State Hospital in Waltham, Massachusetts. Their project, originally named "Studies in Behavior Therapy," was renamed "Harvard Medical School Behavior Research Laboratory" in 1955. This name change and its implications were significant. The role of the laboratory in the history of the relationship between the experimental analysis of behavior and applied behavior analysis is discussed. A case is made for viewing Lindsley's early work as foundational for the subfield of the experimental analysis of human behavior that formally coalesced in the early 1980s. The laboratory's work is also contextualized with reference to the psychopharmacological revolution of the 1950s. Finally, a four-stage framework for studying the historical and conceptual development of behavior analysis is proposed.

  19. All Prime Contract Awards by State or Country, Place, and Contractor. Part 2 (Agnew, California-Loma Linda, California)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

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  20. Rural Residents Who Are Hospitalized in Rural and Urban Hospitals: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... the factors influencing hospital choice, merit continued study. Definitions Urban and rural residents and hospitals : Using ZIP ... categories reported here are very broad using this definition, analysis of more refined categories would not be ...

  1. Structural, mineralogical and geochemical constraints on the atypical komatiite-hosted Turret deposit in the Agnew-Mt. White district, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voute, F.; Thébaud, N.

    2015-08-01

    In the Norseman-Wiluna belt, Yilgarn Craton, the Agnew-Mt. White district is the host of many gold deposits. Located in the hinge of the regional Lawlers anticline, the Turret gold deposit is structurally controlled by the Table Hill shear zone that transects the Agnew Ultramafic unit. Geochemistry, coupled with petrographic data, allowed the delineation of the paragenetic sequence associated with gold mineralisation and include (1) a pervasive talc-carbonate alteration assemblage, (2) a pre-mineralisation stage associated with pervasive arsenopyrite + chalcopyrite + pyrrhotite + pyrite alteration, followed by (3) a late deformation event along a dilatational segment of the main Table Hill shear zone, leading to the formation of a breccia hosting a Cu-Bi-Mo-Au (± Ag ± Zn ± Te ± W) metal assemblage. The presence of Au-Ag-Cu alloys, native bismuth, chalcopyrite and other Bi-Te-S phases in the mineralisation stage suggest that gold may have been scavenged from the hydrothermal fluids by composite Bi-Te-Cu-Au-Ag-S liquids or melts. Using this mineral paragenetic sequence, together with mineralogical re-equilibration textures observed, we show that the gold deposition at Turret occurred over a temperature range approximately between c. 350 and 270 °C. This temperature range, together with the structural control and typical mesothermal alteration pattern including carbonate-chlorite alteration, shows that the Turret deposit shares common characteristics with the orogenic gold deposit class. However, the metal association of Cu, Au, Bi, and Mo, the quartz-poor, and high copper-sulphide content (up to 15 %) are characteristics that depart from the typical orogenic gold deposit mineralogy. Through comparison with similar deposits in the Yilgarn Craton and worldwide, we propose that the Turret deposit represents an example of a porphyry-derived Au-Cu-Bi-Mo deposit.

  2. Epidemiology of Abusive Abdominal Trauma Hospitalizations in United States Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Wendy Gwirtzman; Dubowitz, Howard; Langenberg, Patricia; Dischinger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To estimate the incidence of abusive abdominal trauma (AAT) hospitalizations among US children age 0-9 years. (2) To identify demographic characteristics of children at highest risk for AAT. Design: Secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional, national hospitalization database. Setting: Hospitalization data from the 2003 and 2006…

  3. Variation in Tracheal Reintubations Among Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery Across Washington State Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Nita; Dale, Christopher R.; Benkeser, David C.; Joffe, Aaron M.; Yanez, N. David; Treggiari, Miriam M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients requiring endotracheal reintubation have higher mortality, increased hospital length of stay and costs. To our knowledge, little is known about the variation in reintubation across hospitals among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives The objectives of this study were to: (1) Examine the variation in reintubations across Washington State hospitals that perform cardiac surgery, and (2) Explore hospital and patient characteristics associated with variation in reintubation. Design Retrospective cohort study Setting All non-federal hospitals performing cardiac surgery in Washington State Participants 15,103 patients undergoing CABG or valvular surgery between January 1, 2008 and September 30, 2011 Measurements and Main Results Patient and hospital characteristics were compared between hospitals that had a reintubation frequency ≥ 5% or < 5%. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare the odds of reintubation across the hospitals. We tested for heterogeneity of odds of reintubation across hospitals by performing a likelihood ratio test on the hospital factor. After adjusting for patient-level characteristics and procedure type, significant heterogeneity in reintubations across hospitals was present (p=0.005). Our exploratory analyses suggested that hospitals with lower reintubations were more likely to have greater acute care days and teaching ICUs. Conclusions After accounting for patient and procedure characteristics, significant heterogeneity in the relative odds of requiring reintubation was present across 16 non-federal hospitals performing cardiac surgery in Washington State. Our findings suggest that greater hospital volume and ICU teaching status are associated with less reintubations. PMID:25802193

  4. Hospital resource intensity and cirrhosis mortality in United States

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Amit K; Chakrabarti, Apurba K; Mellinger, Jessica L; Volk, Michael L; Day, Ryan; Singer, Andrew L; Hewitt, Winston R; Reddy, Kunam S; Moss, Adyr A

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine whether hospital characteristics predict cirrhosis mortality and how much variation in mortality is attributable to hospital differences. METHODS We used data from the 2005-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample and the American Hospital Association Annual survey to identify hospitalizations for decompensated cirrhosis and corresponding facility characteristics. We created hospital-specific risk and reliability-adjusted odds ratios for cirrhosis mortality, and evaluated patient and facility differences based on hospital performance quintiles. We used hierarchical regression models to determine the effect of these factors on mortality. RESULTS Seventy-two thousand seven hundred and thirty-three cirrhosis admissions were evaluated in 805 hospitals. Hospital mean cirrhosis annual case volume was 90.4 (range 25-828). Overall hospital cirrhosis mortality rate was 8.00%. Hospital-adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for mortality ranged from 0.48 to 1.89. Patient characteristics varied significantly by hospital aOR for mortality. Length of stay averaged 6.0 ± 1.6 days, and varied significantly by hospital performance (P < 0.001). Facility level predictors of risk-adjusted mortality were higher Medicaid case-mix (OR = 1.00, P = 0.029) and LPN staffing (OR = 1.02, P = 0.015). Higher cirrhosis volume (OR = 0.99, P = 0.025) and liver transplant program status (OR = 0.83, P = 0.026) were significantly associated with survival. After adjusting for patient differences, era, and clustering effects, 15.3% of variation between hospitals was attributable to differences in facility characteristics. CONCLUSION Hospital characteristics account for a significant proportion of variation in cirrhosis mortality. These findings have several implications for patients, providers, and health care delivery in liver disease care and inpatient health care design. PMID:28348492

  5. Perceptions of the hospital ethical environment among hospital social workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Greg L

    2015-01-01

    Hospital social workers are in a unique context of practice, and one where the ethical environment has a profound influence on the ethical behavior. This study determined the ratings of ethical environment by hospital social workers in large nationwide sample. Correlates suggest by and compared to studies of ethical environment with nurses are explored. Positive ratings of the ethical environment are primarily associated with job satisfaction, as well as working in a centralized social work department and for a non-profit hospital. Religiosity and MSW education were not predictive. Implications and suggestions for managing the hospital ethical environment are provided.

  6. Sporotrichosis-Associated Hospitalizations, United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Jeremy A.W.; Derado, Gordana; Mody, Rajal K.

    2016-01-01

    To determine frequency and risk for sporotrichosis-associated hospitalizations, we analyzed the US 2000–2013 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. An estimated 1,471 hospitalizations occurred (average annual rate 0.35/1 million persons). Hospitalizations were associated with HIV/AIDS, immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although rare, severe sporotrichosis should be considered for at-risk patients. PMID:27648881

  7. Architectural design of a secure forensic state psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Dvoskin, Joel A; Radomski, Steven J; Bennett, Charles; Olin, Jonathan A; Hawkins, Robert L; Dotson, Linda A; Drewnicky, Irene N

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the architectural design of a secure forensic state psychiatric hospital. The project combined input from staff at all levels of the client organization, outside consultants, and a team of experienced architects. The design team was able to create a design that maximized patient dignity and privacy on one hand, and the ability of staff to observe all patient activity on the other. The design centers around 24-bed units, broken into smaller living wings of eight beds each. Each eight-bed living wing has its own private bathrooms (two) and showers (two), as well as a small living area solely reserved for these eight patients and their guests. An indoor-outdoor dayroom allows patients to go outside whenever they choose, while allowing staff to continue observing them. The heart of the facility is a large treatment mall, designed to foster the acquisition of social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral skills that will help patients to safely return to their communities.

  8. General Surgery Programs in Small Rural New York State Hospitals: A Pilot Survey of Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Randall; Doty, Brit; Gold, Michael; Bordley, James; Dietz, Patrick; Jenkins, Paul; Heneghan, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitals play a central role in small rural communities and are frequently one of the major contributors to the local economy. Surgical services often account for a substantial proportion of hospital revenues. The current shortage of general surgeons practicing in rural communities may further threaten the financial viability of rural…

  9. Prevalence and Correlates of Autism in a State Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, David S.; Lawer, Lindsay J.; Branch, Kira; Brodkin, Edward S.; Healey, Kristin; Witalec, Robert; Johnson, Donielle N.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2012-01-01

    This study estimated the ASD prevalence in a psychiatric hospital and evaluated the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) combined with other information for differential diagnosis. Chart review, SRS and clinical interviews were collected for 141 patients at one hospital. Diagnosis was determined at case conference. Receiver operating characteristic…

  10. Hospital use in France and the United States.

    PubMed

    Kozak, L J; McCarthy, E; Mizrahi, A; Mizrahi, A; Sandier, S

    1989-01-01

    This report presents national statistics on hospital use from the U.S. National Hospital Discharge Survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics and the national survey of hospitalization conducted by CREDES, Centre de Recherche d'Etude et de Documentation en Economie de la Santé, previously the Medical Economics Division of CREDOC. The use statistics compared between the two countries include rates and percent distributions of discharges and days of care and average lengths of stay. These statistics are shown by sex, age, diagnostic category, and other hospital and patient characteristics. The similarities and differences between the two countries in population characteristics, causes of death, health care systems, and hospital systems are also described.

  11. Management of hospitals solid waste in Khartoum State.

    PubMed

    Saad, Suhair A Gayoum

    2013-10-01

    This research had been conducted during year 2012 to review existing data on hospital waste management for some of Khartoum town hospitals and to try to produce appropriate proposals acceptable for waste management and final treatment methods. The overall status of hospital waste management in Khartoum has been assessed through direct visits and designated questionnaires. Eight main hospitals were covered in the study with an overall bed capacity of 2,978. The current waste management practice observed at all studied hospitals was that most of waste, office, general, food, construction debris, and hazardous chemical materials were all mixed together as they are generated, collected, and finally disposed of. Only a small portion of waste in some hospitals (part of potentially infectious, body parts, and sharps) are collected separately and treated in a central incinerator. The estimated value of per bed generation rate in the studied hospitals was found to be 0.87 kg/day, which lies within the range for the low-income countries. In all studied hospitals, it was found that workers were working under very poor unsafe conditions with very low salaries ($35 to $45 per month on average). About 90 % were completely illiterate or had very low education levels. At the national level, no laws considering hospital waste, or even hazardous waste, were found; only some federal general environmental regulations and some procedures from town and city localities for controlling general municipal waste exist. At the hospital level, no policies or rules were found, except in the radiotherapy center, where they manage radioactive wastes under the laws of the Sudanese Atomic Agency. Urgent actions are needed for the remediation and prevention of hazards associated with this type of waste.

  12. Hospital closures and survivals: an analysis of operating characteristics and regulatory mechanisms in three states.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, L; Dumas, M B

    1983-01-01

    This article examines factors related to hospital closures, using a longitudinal sample of surviving and closed hospitals. The hospitals are drawn from three states with different regulatory programs. Size of hospital and occupancy rate are shown to be related to likelihood of closure, while ownership, length of stay, and expenditures are not. These findings are observed both in the aggregate and within the individual states between 1960 and 1980. The three states--Arizona, Pennsylvania, and Maryland--represent different population trends and regulatory mechanisms and goals. The findings indicate that some programs appear to guarantee survival, whereas others are more neutral. PMID:6668180

  13. 42 CFR 489.34 - Allowable charges: Hospitals participating in State reimbursement control systems or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reimbursement control systems or demonstration projects. 489.34 Section 489.34 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participating in State reimbursement control systems or demonstration projects. A hospital receiving payment for a covered hospital stay under either a State reimbursement control system approved under 1886(c)...

  14. 42 CFR 489.34 - Allowable charges: Hospitals participating in State reimbursement control systems or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reimbursement control systems or demonstration projects. 489.34 Section 489.34 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participating in State reimbursement control systems or demonstration projects. A hospital receiving payment for a covered hospital stay under either a State reimbursement control system approved under 1886(c)...

  15. 42 CFR 403.321 - State systems for hospital outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State systems for hospital outpatient services. 403.321 Section 403.321 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Control Systems § 403.321 State systems for hospital outpatient services. CMS may approve a...

  16. Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders in State Mental Hospitals: Data from a Nationwide Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moak, Gary S.; Fisher, William H.

    1990-01-01

    Reports data from nationwide survey of state mental hospitals, providing exploratory look at patients with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders currently residing in state hospitals. Describes admissions trends, reasons for admission, and sources of referral. Discusses civil commitment of nursing home patients with dementing illnesses and…

  17. Reconstructing the pre-Quaternary landscape in Agnew-Lawlers area, Western Australia with emphasis on the Permo-Carboniferous glaciation and post-glacial weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Walid; Anand, Ravi R.

    2017-01-01

    The pre-Quaternary stratigraphic section in Agnew-Lawlers area consists of Permo-Carboniferous glacial sediments, unconformably overlain by Tertiary clastics of palaeochannel sequence and Quaternary alluvial and colluvial sediments. The unique Permo-Carboniferous glacial sedimentary succession in the Yilgarn Craton has not been studied in detail in terms of vertical chemostratigraphic variations, basin and landscape evolution, diagenesis and post-Permian weathering overprints. In Agnew-Lawlers district, continental facies of glacial diamictites, glaciofluvial sandstones and glaciolacustrine rhythmites vary in thickness from 28 m to 181 m and is preserved beneath Cenozoic sediments as relict landforms in highly irregular, asymmetrical and poorly drained basins. The Permo-Carboniferous sediments were mechanically weathered and eroded by glaciers from the surrounding Archaean basement palaeohighs under a cold arid climate. Textural relationships of diamictites indicate that they were derived from proximal and distal source rocks. The denuded palaeotopography of the basement palaeohighs (source rocks) and Permo-Carboniferous sediments were subjected simultaneously to an intensive, post-Permian chemical weathering. The exposed basement rocks were deeply weathered into residual saprolite, whereas the Permo-Carboniferous sediments were differentiated into three chemostratigraphic units. The diamictite and rhythmite of the lower unit are unweathered and preserves the signature of the glacial/interglacial weathering. Mineralogical and geochemical changes dominated in this unit are related mainly to diagenesis at shallow depth (eogenesis) with no significant compaction. The formation of a paragenetic diagenetic sequence of chlorite, ferroan dolomite and pyrite indicates diagenesis has occurred under reducing and alkaline conditions below the permafrost and modern water table. Mineralogical and geochemical changes dominated in the middle unit are linked mainly to eogenetic

  18. 42 CFR 447.298 - State disproportionate share hospital allotments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... growth, as specified in paragraph (d) of this section. (2) For high-DSH States, the dollar amount of DSH... State DSHs allotment by— (i) State growth, as specified in paragraph (d) of this section; and (ii) A... 12 percent or less, the State will be reclassified as a low-DSH State. (d) State growth. (1)...

  19. Hospital compliance with a state unfunded mandate: the case of California's Earthquake Safety Law.

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J; Thompson, Jon M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, community hospitals have experienced heightened regulation with many unfunded mandates. The authors assessed the market, organizational, operational, and financial characteristics of general acute care hospitals in California that have a main acute care hospital building that is noncompliant with state requirements and at risk of major structural collapse from earthquakes. Using California hospital data from 2007 to 2009, and employing logistic regression analysis, the authors found that hospitals having buildings that are at the highest risk of collapse are located in larger population markets, possess smaller market share, have a higher percentage of Medicaid patients, and have less liquidity.

  20. HOSPITALIZATIONS FOR CHOLECYSTITIS AND CHOLELITHIASIS IN THE STATE OF RIO GRANDE DO SUL, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    NUNES, Emeline Caldana; ROSA, Roger dos Santos; BORDIN, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The cholelithiasis is disease of surgical resolution with about 60,000 hospitalizations per year in the Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS - Brazilian National Health System) of the Rio Grande do Sul state. Aim: To describe the profile of hospitalizations for cholecystitis and cholelithiasis performed by the SUS of Rio Grande do Sul state, 2011-2013. Methods: Hospital Information System data from the National Health System through morbidity list for cholelithiasis and cholecystitis (ICD-10 K80-K81). Variables studied were sex, age, number of hospitalizations and approved Hospitalization Authorizations (AIH), total amount and value of hospital services generated, days and average length of stay, mortality, mortality and case fatality ratio, from health regions of the Rio Grande do Sul. Results: During 2011-2013 there were 60,517 hospitalizations for cholecystitis and cholelithiasis, representing 18.86 hospitalizations per 10,000 inhabitants/year, most often in the age group from 60 to 69 years (41.34 admissions per 10,000 inhabitants/year) and female (27.72 hospitalizations per 10,000 inhabitants/year). The fatality rate presented an inverse characteristic: 13.52 deaths per 1,000 admissions/year for males, compared with 7.12 deaths per 1,000 admissions/year in females. The state had an average total amount spent and value of hospital services of R$ 16,244,050.60 and R$ 10,890,461.31, respectively. The health region "Capital/Gravataí Valley" exhibit the highest total expenditure and hospital services, and the largest number of deaths, and average length of stay. Conclusion: The hospitalization and lethality coefficients, the deaths, the length of stay and spending related to admissions increased from 50 years old. Females had a higher frequency and higher values ​​spent on hospitalization, while the male higher coefficient of mortality and mean hospital stay. PMID:27438030

  1. Current State of Antimicrobial Stewardship in Children's Hospital Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rakesh D; Newland, Jason G; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Hersh, Adam L; May, Larissa; Perman, Sarah M; Kuppermann, Nathan; Dayan, Peter S

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) effectively optimize antibiotic use for inpatients; however, the extent of emergency department (ED) involvement in ASPs has not been described. OBJECTIVE To determine current ED involvement in children's hospital ASPs and to assess beliefs and preferred methods of implementation for ED-based ASPs. METHODS A cross-sectional survey of 37 children's hospitals participating in the Sharing Antimicrobial Resistance Practices collaboration was conducted. Surveys were distributed to ASP leaders and ED medical directors at each institution. Items assessed included beliefs regarding ED antibiotic prescribing, ED prescribing resources, ASP methods used in the ED such as clinical decision support and clinical care guidelines, ED participation in ASP activities, and preferred methods for ED-based ASP implementation. RESULTS A total of 36 ASP leaders (97.3%) and 32 ED directors (86.5%) responded; the overall response rate was 91.9%. Most ASP leaders (97.8%) and ED directors (93.7%) agreed that creation of ED-based ASPs was necessary. ED resources for antibiotic prescribing were obtained via the Internet or electronic health records (EHRs) for 29 hospitals (81.3%). The main ASP activities for the ED included production of antibiograms (77.8%) and creation of clinical care guidelines for pneumonia (83.3%). The ED was represented on 3 hospital ASP committees (8.3%). No hospital ASPs actively monitored outpatient ED prescribing. Most ASP leaders (77.8%) and ED directors (81.3%) preferred implementation of ED-based ASPs using clinical decision support integrated into the EHR. CONCLUSIONS Although ED involvement in ASPs is limited, both ASP and ED leaders believe that ED-based ASPs are necessary. Many children's hospitals have the capability to implement ED-based ASPs via the preferred method: EHR clinical decision support. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:469-475.

  2. Hospital Schools in the United States. Bulletin, 1938, No. 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheison, Clele Lee

    1939-01-01

    Among the exceptional children for whom special educational facilities are essential are those who must spend weeks or months or years in a hospital or a sanatorium. Many of these children, while undergoing physical treatment, can very profitably engage in school work. Comparatively little has been written about this phase of educational activity,…

  3. Hospital closure in the United States, 1976-1980: a descriptive overview.

    PubMed Central

    Mullner, R; Byre, C S; Kubal, J D

    1983-01-01

    This paper is an overview of hospital closure in the United States for the five-year period 1976-1980. We describe the distributional patterns of closings among noncommunity and community hospitals classified according to institutional characteristics such as bed size, control, and location. We also examine the ten percent of community hospitals operating at the beginning of the period which were shown to have combined institutional characteristics strongly associated with closure via a method of regression analysis. PMID:6360955

  4. Hospitalization of Nursing Home Residents with Cognitive Impairments: The Influence of Organizational Features and State Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruneir, Andrea; Miller, Susan C.; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of specific nursing home features and state Medicaid policies on the risk of hospitalization among cognitively impaired nursing home residents. Design and Methods: We used multilevel logistic regression to estimate the odds of hospitalization among long-stay (greater than 90 days)…

  5. Healthcare before Welfare States: Hospitals in Early Twentieth Century England and France.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Barry M

    2016-01-01

    Following the. Second World War, many west European nations developed welfare states to enhance the health and security of their populations, but the systems that were created differed significantly in form and function. This article will provide a comparative overview of the development of hospital services in urban England and France in the first forty years of the 20th century using evidence from two case study cities to enhance our understanding of how these welfare systems developed. It will consider the structure of the two hospital systems; governance and accountability; institutional finance; patients; and the role of the central and local state to argue that the maintenance of two separate providers and the exclusion of hospitals from state health insurance in England prompted a different set of responses to the delivery of hospital care compared to what was found in the unified and increasingly state-funded French system.

  6. The impact of a state hospital closure on local jails: the Kansas experience.

    PubMed

    Severson, M E

    2000-12-01

    In 1990, Kansas's Mental Health Reform legislation began transferring fiscal support for the delivery of mental health services away from state institutions and into the local community, culminating in the closure of one state hospital facility in 1997. Kansas jails were studied to determine the resulting impact of that hospital closure on the State's jail systems, including whether an increase in incarceration rates of persons with severe and persistent mental illnesses followed the closure of the hospital. Though a relationship between the hospital closure and incarceration rates cannot be substantiated, the results do provide a rare birds-eye view of the extent of and problems associated with the incarceration of persons with mental illness in a predominantly rural state.

  7. Proposed standards for professional health sciences library services in hospitals of New York State.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, A P; O'Connell, M; Richards, B B; Thompson, J L; Wheeler, R A

    1981-01-01

    Hospital libraries are considered to be the basic unit of the medical information system. A major statewide effort was begun in 1978 to introduce and support legislation in the New York State Legislature which would encourage hospitals to establish and maintain libraries that meet minimum services standards. Included in this legislation is the concept that the Commissioner of Education in consultation with the Commissioner of Health shall have the power to establish standards for hospital libraries. The Ad Hoc Committee for the Promotion of Hospital Library Services, Western New York Library Resources Council, proposes The Standards for Professional Health Sciences Library Services in Hospitals of New York State to clarify and to strengthen existing hospital library standards. These standards differ specifically from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals standards in that they place equal and specific emphasis on eleven points: administration, qualifications of library staff, continuing education of library staff, requirement for a library advisory committee, required library services, required library resources, library space requirements, library budget, library network and consortium membership, documentation of library policy, and continued evaluation of the needs of the hospital for library service. Detailed interpretations are provided. An appendix describes the qualifications of a hospital library consultant. PMID:7248591

  8. Trends in hospitalization with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-United States, 1990-2005.

    PubMed

    Brown, David W; Croft, Janet B; Greenlund, Kurt J; Giles, Wayne H

    2010-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and a major cause of morbidity and disability. To update national estimates and examine trends for hospitalization with COPD between 1990 and 2005, we analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS). The results indicated that an estimated 715,000 hospitalizations with COPD, or 23.6 per 10,000 population, occurred during 2005, an increase in the number and the rate of COPD hospitalizations since 1990 (370,000 hospitalizations; rate = 15.9 per 10,000 population). To reverse increases in the number of COPD hospitalizations and decrease the burden of COPD, public health programs should continue focused efforts to reduce total personal exposure to tobacco smoke, including passive smoke exposure; to occupational dusts and chemicals; and to other indoor and outdoor air pollutants linked to COPD.

  9. Inpatient Hospitalization Costs Associated with Birth Defects Among Persons of All Ages - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Arth, Annelise C; Tinker, Sarah C; Simeone, Regina M; Ailes, Elizabeth C; Cragan, Janet D; Grosse, Scott D

    2017-01-20

    In the United States, major structural or genetic birth defects affect approximately 3% of live births (1) and are responsible for 20% of infant deaths (2). Birth defects can affect persons across their lifespan and are the cause of significant lifelong disabilities. CDC used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) 2013 National Inpatient Sample (NIS), a 20% stratified sample of discharges from nonfederal community hospitals, to estimate the annual cost of birth defect-associated hospitalizations in the United States, both for persons of all ages and by age group. Birth defect-associated hospitalizations had disproportionately high costs, accounting for 3.0% of all hospitalizations and 5.2% of total hospital costs. The estimated annual cost of birth defect-associated hospitalizations in the United States in 2013 was $22.9 billion. Estimates of the cost of birth defect-associated hospitalizations offer important information about the impact of birth defects among persons of all ages on the overall health care system and can be used to prioritize prevention, early detection, and care.

  10. Development of the breastfeeding quality improvement in hospitals learning collaborative in New York state.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Eileen; Dennison, Barbara A; Welge, Sara Bonam; Hisgen, Stephanie; Boyce, Patricia Simino; Waniewski, Patricia A

    2013-06-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is a public health priority. A strong body of evidence links maternity care practices, based on the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, to increased breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. Despite having written breastfeeding policies, New York (NY) hospitals vary widely in reported maternity care practices and in prevalence rates of breastfeeding, especially exclusive breastfeeding, during the birth hospitalization. To improve hospital maternity care practices, breastfeeding support, and the percentage of infants exclusively breastfeeding, the NY State Department of Health developed the Breastfeeding Quality Improvement in Hospitals (BQIH) Learning Collaborative. The BQIH Learning Collaborative was the first to use the Institute for Health Care Improvement's Breakthrough Series methodology to specifically focus on increasing hospital breastfeeding support. The evidence-based maternity care practices from the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding provided the basis for the Change Package and Data Measurement Plan. The present article describes the development of the BQIH Learning Collaborative. The engagement of breastfeeding experts, partners, and stakeholders in refining the Learning Collaborative design and content, in defining the strategies and interventions (Change Package) that drive hospital systems change, and in developing the Data Measurement Plan to assess progress in meeting the Learning Collaborative goals and hospital aims is illustrated. The BQIH Learning Collaborative is a model program that was implemented in a group of NY hospitals with plans to spread to additional hospitals in NY and across the country.

  11. Hospital Based Emergency Department Visits Attributed to Child Physical Abuse in United States: Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Asad, Rahimullah; Lee, Min Kyeong; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Rampa, Sankeerth; Speicher, David G.; Rotta, Alexandre T.; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe nationally representative outcomes of physical abuse injuries in children necessitating Emergency Department (ED) visits in United States. The impact of various injuries on mortality is examined. We hypothesize that physical abuse resulting in intracranial injuries are associated with worse outcome. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), the largest all payer hospital based ED database, for the years 2008–2010. All ED visits and subsequent hospitalizations with a diagnosis of “Child physical abuse” (Battered baby or child syndrome) due to various injuries were identified using ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification) codes. In addition, we also examined the prevalence of sexual abuse in this cohort. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to examine the association between mortality and types of injuries after adjusting for a multitude of patient and hospital level factors. Results Of the 16897 ED visits that were attributed to child physical abuse, 5182 (30.7%) required hospitalization. Hospitalized children were younger than those released treated and released from the ED (1.9 years vs. 6.4 years). Male or female partner of the child’s parent/guardian accounted for >45% of perpetrators. Common injuries in hospitalized children include- any fractures (63.5%), intracranial injuries (32.3%) and crushing/internal injuries (9.1%). Death occurred in 246 patients (13 in ED and 233 following hospitalization). Amongst the 16897 ED visits, 1.3% also had sexual abuse. Multivariable analyses revealed each 1 year increase in age was associated with a lower odds of mortality (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81–0.96, p<0.0001). Females (OR = 2.39, 1.07–5.34, p = 0.03), those with intracranial injuries (OR = 65.24, 27.57–154.41, p<0.0001), or crushing/internal injury (OR = 4.98, 2.24–11.07, p<0

  12. Surveillance of hospital-acquired infections in Australia--One Nation, Many States.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael J; Russo, Phillip L

    2007-06-01

    Surveillance programmes for hospital-acquired infections differ amongst the Australian states. Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia have recent substantial initiatives in development of statewide programmes. Whilst the definitions for surgical site infections (SSIs) and bloodstream infections (BSI) developed by the Australian Infection Control Association (AICA) do not differ from the US National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) programme definitions for SSI and intensive care unit (ICU) acquired central line-associated BSI, only two states use NNIS risk adjustment methods in reporting infection rates. Differences exist in the surgical procedures under surveillance, ICU surveillance, hospital-wide BSI surveillance, staff health immunization surveillance, process measures such us surgical antibiotic prophylaxis and small hospital programmes. Only in the area of antibiotic use surveillance has national consensus been reached. In Victoria, NNIS risk adjustment had limited usefulness in predicting SSIs, especially after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) surveillance had limited acceptance, and is not undertaken in other states. Regular reporting of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis data has been followed by improvement in choice of antibiotic in some procedures. The South Australian programme for the surveillance of multiresistant organisms (MROs) has documented substantial improvement in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) morbidity over time coincident with the introduction of hand hygiene programmes and other measures. In Queensland, statewide monitoring of needlestick injuries is established. In Victoria, the small hospital programme concentrated on process measures, and in Queensland with a standardized investigation pathways for "signal" events. Data quality presented substantial challenges in small Victorian hospitals. Whilst state-based programmes have facilitated

  13. Hospitalization flow in the public and private systems in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Moreira, Marizélia Leão

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the migration flows of demand for public and private hospital care among the health regions of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. METHODS Study based on a database of hospitalizations in the public and private systems of the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. We analyzed data from 17 health regions of the state, considering people hospitalized in their own health region and those who migrated outwards (emigration) or came from other regions (immigration). The index of migration effectiveness of patients from both systems was estimated. The coverage (hospitalization coefficient) was analyzed in relation to the number of inpatient beds per population and the indexes of migration effectiveness. RESULTS The index of migration effectiveness applied to the hospital care demand flow allowed characterizing health regions with flow balance, with high emigration of public and private patients, and with high attraction of public and private patients. CONCLUSIONS There are differences in hospital care access and opportunities among health regions in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. PMID:26465661

  14. Hospitalization flow in the public and private systems in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Moreira, Marizélia Leão

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the migration flows of demand for public and private hospital care among the health regions of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.METHODS Study based on a database of hospitalizations in the public and private systems of the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. We analyzed data from 17 health regions of the state, considering people hospitalized in their own health region and those who migrated outwards (emigration) or came from other regions (immigration). The index of migration effectiveness of patients from both systems was estimated. The coverage (hospitalization coefficient) was analyzed in relation to the number of inpatient beds per population and the indexes of migration effectiveness.RESULTS The index of migration effectiveness applied to the hospital care demand flow allowed characterizing health regions with flow balance, with high emigration of public and private patients, and with high attraction of public and private patients.CONCLUSIONS There are differences in hospital care access and opportunities among health regions in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  15. Trends in pediatric pulmonary hypertension–related hospitalizations in the United States from 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Matthew A.; Morales, David L. S.; Gerald, Ken; Hanna, Brian D.; Mallory, George B.; Rossano, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There are few data on the epidemiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH)–related hospitalizations in children in the United States. Our aim was to determine hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, and hospital charges pertaining to PH-related hospitalizations and also the effects of codiagnoses and comorbidities. A retrospective review of the Kids’ Inpatient Database during the years 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009 was analyzed for patients ≤20 years of age with a diagnosis of PH by ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) codes, along with associated diagnoses and comorbidities. Descriptive statistics, including Rao-Scott χ2, ANOVA, and logistic regression models, were utilized on weighted values with survey analysis procedures. The number of PH-related hospital admissions is rising, from an estimated 7,331 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5,556–9,106) in 2000 to 10,792 (95% CI: 8,568–13,016) in 2009. While infant age and congenital heart disease were most commonly associated with PH-related hospitalizations, they were not associated with mortality. Overall mortality for PH-related hospitalizations was greater than that for hospitalizations not associated with PH, 5.7% versus 0.4% (odds ratio: 16.22 [95% CI: 14.78%–17.8%], P < 0.001), but mortality is decreasing over time. Sepsis, respiratory failure, acute renal failure, hepatic insufficiency, arrhythmias, and the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are associated with mortality. The number of PH-related hospitalizations is increasing in the United States. The demographics of PH in this study are evolving. Despite the increasing prevalence, mortality is improving. PMID:26064460

  16. The divergence of federal and state policies on the charitable tax exemption of nonprofit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Potter, M A; Longest, B B

    1994-01-01

    Nonprofit hospitals have traditionally enjoyed charitable exemption from real estate taxes because they provide specific social benefits. However, in the past three decades, major health policy changes at the federal level--most significantly, implementation of the Medicare and Medicaid programs--have weakened this rationale. Federal tax regulations during this period have changed in ways that complement these federal health programs and the accompanying federal interests in encouraging efficiency and performance uniformity among hospitals. States and local governments, however, have different interests, and these may favor a strict set of tax exemption standards that disregard efficiency and elevate the importance of a measurable level of charitable service. Their divergent policies rest on a fundamental value judgment about whether nonprofit hospital care is intrinsically charitable or not. Increasingly, this judgment may be forced upon state courts and legislation by local governments seeking new tax revenues through the elimination of hospitals' exemption from real estate taxes.

  17. Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations in Children With Chronic Pancreatitis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pant, Chaitanya; Sferra, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed 2 national databases to assess the use of health care resources by children with chronic pancreatitis (CP). In 2012, the hospital discharge rate for pediatric CP was 2.73/100,000 children. Patients with CP were sicker with a greater burden of illness than age- and sex-matched counterparts. Acute pancreatitis occurred frequently in hospitalized children with CP. Abdominal pain and nausea, and vomiting were the most common gastrointestinal symptoms associated with emergency department visits in children with CP. A significant proportion of these visits resulted in a hospitalization. These findings add to our understanding of the epidemiology of CP in the United States.

  18. Depreciating and stating the value of hospital buildings what you need to know.

    PubMed

    Holmes, John R; Felsenthal, David

    2009-10-01

    Healthcare financial executives of not-for-profit hospitals may be overdepreciating and understating the value of the hospital building on their financial statements. Changing the remaining lives of assets and their depreciation will help enhance the bottom line for many organizations. Ensuring that they are correctly stating the investment value of their assets is one way CFOs can have a positive impact on their organization's bottom line in a tough economy.

  19. Epidemiology of Hospitalizations Associated with Invasive Candidiasis, United States, 2002–20121

    PubMed Central

    Strollo, Sara; Lionakis, Michail S.; Adjemian, Jennifer; Steiner, Claudia A.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is a major nosocomial fungal disease in the United States associated with high rates of illness and death. We analyzed inpatient hospitalization records from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project to estimate incidence of invasive candidiasis–associated hospitalizations in the United States. We extracted data for 33 states for 2002–2012 by using codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, for invasive candidiasis; we excluded neonatal cases. The overall age-adjusted average annual rate was 5.3 hospitalizations/100,000 population. Highest risk was for adults >65 years of age, particularly men. Median length of hospitalization was 21 days; 22% of patients died during hospitalization. Median unadjusted associated cost for inpatient care was $46,684. Age-adjusted annual rates decreased during 2005–2012 for men (annual change –3.9%) and women (annual change –4.5%) and across nearly all age groups. We report a high mortality rate and decreasing incidence of hospitalizations for this disease. PMID:27983497

  20. Hospital care and capacity in the tri-state region of Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio: analysis and insights.

    PubMed

    Burns, David J; Chinta, Ravi; Kashyap, Vishal; Manolis, Chris; Sen, Amit

    2008-01-01

    Hospitals are a significant part of the burgeoning healthcare sector in the United States (U.S.) economy. Despite the availability of what some describe as the world's best healthcare, the U.S. suffers from wide discrepancies in healthcare provision across hospitals and regions of the country. Specifically, capacity, utilization, quality, and even financial performance of hospitals vary widely. Based on secondary data from 533 hospitals in the adjoining states of Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio, this study develops several comparative metrics that enable benchmarking, which, in turn, leads to several inferences and implications for hospital administrators. The paper concludes with implications for hospital administrators and suggestions for future research.

  1. South front and west side, storage (bldg. no. 217) and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South front and west side, storage (bldg. no. 217) and refrigeration shop (bldg. no. 216) to right, looking northeast. - Agnews State Hospital, Truck Garage, Fourth Street near Avenue A, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, CA

  2. Hospitalization Frequency and Charges for Neurocysticercosis, United States, 2003–2012

    PubMed Central

    Flecker, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis, brain infection with Taenia solium larval cysts, causes substantial neurologic illness around the world. To assess the effect of neurocysticercosis in the United States, we reviewed hospitalization discharge data in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2003–2012 and found an estimated 18,584 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis and associated hospital charges totaling >US $908 million. The risk for hospitalization was highest among Hispanics (2.5/100,000 population), a rate 35 times higher than that for the non-Hispanic white population. Nearly three-quarters of all hospitalized patients with neurocysticercosis were Hispanic. Male sex and age 20–44 years also incurred increased risk. In addition, hospitalizations and associated charges related to cysticercosis far exceeded those for malaria and were greater than for those for all other neglected tropical diseases combined. Neurocysticercosis is an increasing public health concern in the United States, especially among Hispanics, and costs the US health care system a substantial amount of money. PMID:25988221

  3. Patient safety culture in two Finnish state-run forensic psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Anssi; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Eronen, Markku; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture refers to the way patient safety is regarded and implemented within an organization and the structures and procedures in place to support this. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient safety culture, identify areas for improvement, and establish a baseline for improving state hospitals in Finland. Cross-sectional design data were collected from two state-run forensic hospitals in Finland using an anonymous, Web-based survey targeted to hospital staff based on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire. The response rate was 43% (n = 283). The overall patient safety level was rated as excellent or very good by 58% of respondents. The highest positive grade was for "teamwork within units" (72%). The lowest rating was for "nonpunitive response to errors" (26% positive). Good opportunities for supplementary education had a statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) effect on 9 of 12 Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture dimensions. Statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences in patient safety culture were also found in the staff's educational background, manager status, and between the two hospitals. These findings suggest there are a number of patient safety problems related to cultural dimensions. Supplementary education was shown to be a highly significant factor in transforming patient safety culture and should therefore be taken into account alongside sufficient resources.

  4. Economic Burden of Hospitalizations for Heat-Related Illnesses in the United States, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Schmeltz, Michael T.; Petkova, Elisaveta P.; Gamble, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how heat waves affect morbidity and mortality, as well as the associated economic costs, is essential for characterizing the human health impacts of extreme heat under a changing climate. Only a handful of studies have examined healthcare costs associated with exposures to high temperatures. This research explores costs associated with hospitalizations for heat-related illness (HRI) in the United States using the 2001 to 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Descriptive statistics of patient data for HRI hospitalizations were examined and costs of hospitalizations were reported using the all-payer inpatient cost-to-charge ratio. Costs were examined using a log-gamma model with patient and hospital characteristics included as fixed effects. Adjusted mean costs were then compared across racial groups. The mean costs of HRI hospitalizations were higher among racial/ethnic minorities compared to Whites, who accounted for almost 65% of all HRI hospitalizations. Observed differences in costs based on income, insurance, and gender were also significant. These results suggest that these populations are suffering disproportionately from health inequity, thus, they could shoulder greater disease and financial burdens due to climate change. These findings may have important implications in understanding the economic impact public health planning and interventions will have on preventing hospitalizations related to extreme heat. PMID:27618079

  5. Cysticercosis-Related Hospitalizations in the United States, 1998–2011

    PubMed Central

    O'Keefe, Kaitlin A.; Eberhard, Mark L.; Shafir, Shira C.; Wilkins, Patricia; Ash, Lawrence R.; Sorvillo, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysticercosis has become increasingly recognized as an important infection in the United States in recent decades. Despite its potential impact, there is a lack of comprehensive information on the nationwide burden of disease. To better define the burden of cysticercosis in the United States, we analyzed in-patient records using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 1998–2011 to estimate cysticercosis-related hospitalizations and patient/institutional characteristics. There were an estimated 33,060 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 29,610.5–36,510.3) cysticercosis-related hospitalizations nationwide, representing a hospitalization rate of 8.03 per million population. The highest proportion of cases were male (54.8%), Hispanic (62.0%), aged 18–44 (58.8%), and occurred in the West (45.1%). An estimated 459 deaths occurred, representing an in-hospital case-fatality rate of 1.4%. These findings indicate the burden of cysticercosis-related hospitalizations in the United States is considerable and may be greater than currently appreciated. Cysticercosis should be a nationally reportable disease. PMID:25385857

  6. Cysticercosis-related hospitalizations in the United States, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Kaitlin A; Eberhard, Mark L; Shafir, Shira C; Wilkins, Patricia; Ash, Lawrence R; Sorvillo, Frank J

    2015-02-01

    Cysticercosis has become increasingly recognized as an important infection in the United States in recent decades. Despite its potential impact, there is a lack of comprehensive information on the nationwide burden of disease. To better define the burden of cysticercosis in the United States, we analyzed in-patient records using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 1998-2011 to estimate cysticercosis-related hospitalizations and patient/institutional characteristics. There were an estimated 33,060 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 29,610.5-36,510.3) cysticercosis-related hospitalizations nationwide, representing a hospitalization rate of 8.03 per million population. The highest proportion of cases were male (54.8%), Hispanic (62.0%), aged 18-44 (58.8%), and occurred in the West (45.1%). An estimated 459 deaths occurred, representing an in-hospital case-fatality rate of 1.4%. These findings indicate the burden of cysticercosis-related hospitalizations in the United States is considerable and may be greater than currently appreciated. Cysticercosis should be a nationally reportable disease.

  7. Diabetes Mellitus and Infection: An Evaluation of Hospital Utilization and Management Costs in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2014-01-01

    Aims The objective of this study is to evaluate the number of diabetics that seek medical treatment in emergency departments or require hospitalization for infection management in the United States. This study also assesses the socioeconomic impact of inpatient infection management among diabetics. Methods We accessed the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database to perform a retrospective analysis on diabetics presenting to the emergency department or hospitalized for infection management from 2006-2011. Results Emergency Department Since 2006, nearly 10 million diabetics were annually evaluated in the emergency department. Infection was the primary reason for presentation in 10% of these visits. Among those visits, urinary tract infection was the most common infection, accounting for over 30% of emergency department encounters for infections. Other common infections included sepsis, skin and soft tissue infections, and pneumonia. Diabetics were more than twice as likely to be hospitalized for infection management than patients without diabetes. Hospitalization Since 2006, nearly 6 million diabetics were annually hospitalized. 8-12% of these patients were hospitalized for infection management. In 2011, the inpatient care provided to patients with DM and infection was responsible for over $48 billion dollars in aggregate hospital charges. Conclusions Diabetics commonly present to the emergency department and require hospitalization for infection management. The care provided to diabetics for infection management has a large economic impact on the United States healthcare system. More efforts are needed to develop cost-effective strategies for the prevention of infection in patients with diabetes. PMID:25488325

  8. The diffusion of two diagnostic technologies among hospitals in New York state.

    PubMed

    Haddock, C C; Begun, J W

    1988-01-01

    Using combined data from an independent survey by the American Hospital Association and the State of New York, the diffusion of two diagnostic technologies--the automated chemistry analyzer and the computed tomography (CT) scanner--among hospitals in New York State was analyzed. A linearized form of the logistic function was estimated using cumulative diffusion data for each. Diffusion patterns of both technologies fit the logistic curve well, with the coefficient of diffusion for the CT scanner being greater than that for the automated analyzer. Further analysis examined characteristics of early adopters of each technology. Similar hospital characteristics (e.g., high volume of admissions and medical school affiliation) were important in explaining early adoption of both technologies.

  9. Hospital Exemption for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products: Issue in Application in the European Union Member States.

    PubMed

    Ivaskiene, Tatjana; Mauricas, Mykolas; Ivaska, Justinas

    2017-01-01

    Regulation (EC) 1394/2007 of the European Parliament and the Council on advanced therapy medicinal products and amending Directive 2001/83/EC and Regulation (EC) No 726/2004 allowed the use of non - authorized advanced therapy medicinal products under the certain circumstances. This socalled hospital exemption rule needs to be applied in the each Member State of the European Union individually and for this purpose Member States should provide national procedures and control measures. The aim of this article is to clear up the criteria for hospital exemption listed in Regulation (EC) 1394/2007 and to contrast the difference in implementing hospital exemption rule into national legal regimes on examples of the United Kingdom, Lithuania and Poland.

  10. Assaultive Behavior in State Psychiatric Hospitals: Differences Between Forensic and Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhorst, Donald M.; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-01-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two…

  11. Business-IT Alignment: A Current-State Evaluation of Strategic Alignment within the Hospital Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Kevin W.

    2010-01-01

    More than thirty years of research has shown that the practical value of business-IT alignment is significant and that its importance derives from strategic impact on business outcomes. The purpose of this exploratory study is to identify the current-state of business-IT alignment maturity within the hospital organization. Data for this study was…

  12. State Hospital-University Collaborations: A 25-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbott, John A.; Faulkner, Larry R.; Buckley, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A formative survey of psychiatry departments 25 years ago showed strong and valued relationships between these departments and state hospitals. The authors sought to evaluate the extent of present-day collaborative relationships. Methods: A repeat of a similar survey was sent in 2005 to 119 chairs of departments of psychiatry. Results:…

  13. Influenza Hospitalizations Among American Indian/Alaska Native People and in the United States General Population

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Prabhu P.; Callinan, Laura S.; Holman, Robert C.; Cheng, Po-Yung; Bruce, Michael G.; Redd, John T.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bresee, Joseph; Hennessy, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Background.  Historically, American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people have experienced a disproportionate burden of infectious disease morbidity compared with the general US population. We evaluated whether a disparity in influenza hospitalizations exists between AI/AN people and the general US population. Methods.  We used Indian Health Service hospital discharge data (2001–2011) for AI/AN people and 13 State Inpatient Databases (2001–2008) to provide a comparison to the US population. Hospitalization rates were calculated by respiratory year (July–June). Influenza-specific hospitalizations were defined as discharges with any influenza diagnoses. Influenza-associated hospitalizations were calculated using negative binomial regression models that incorporated hospitalization and influenza laboratory surveillance data. Results.  The mean influenza-specific hospitalization rate/100 000 persons/year during the 2001–2002 to 2007–2008 respiratory years was 18.6 for AI/AN people and 15.6 for the comparison US population. The age-adjusted influenza-associated hospitalization rate for AI/AN people (98.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 51.6–317.8) was similar to the comparison US population (58.2; CI, 34.7–172.2). By age, influenza-associated hospitalization rates were significantly higher among AI/AN infants (<1 year) (1070.7; CI, 640.7–2969.5) than the comparison US infant population (210.2; CI, 153.5–478.5). Conclusions.  American Indian/Alaska Native people had higher influenza-specific hospitalization rates than the comparison US population; a significant influenza-associated hospitalization rate disparity was detected only among AI/AN infants because of the wide CIs inherent to the model. Taken together, the influenza-specific and influenza-associated hospitalization rates suggest that AI/AN people might suffer disproportionately from influenza illness compared with the general US population. PMID:25734102

  14. Underreporting of Driver Alcohol Involvement in United States Police and Hospital Records: Capture-Recapture Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ted R.; Gibson, Rekaya; Zaloshnja, Eduard; Blincoe, Lawrence J.; Kindelberger, John; Strashny, Alexander; Thomas, Andrea; Ho, Shiu; Bauer, Michael; Sperry, Sarah; Peng, Justin; Singleton, Mike; Smith, Tracy J.; Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes what portion of US nonfatal crashes are alcohol-involved and how well police and hospitals detect involvement. A capture recapture model estimated alcohol involvement from levels detected by police and hospitals and the extent of detection overlap. We analyzed 550,933 Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System driver records from 2006–2008 police crash report censuses probabilistically linked to hospital inpatient and emergency department (ED) discharge censuses for CT, KY (admissions only), MD, NE, NY, SC, and UT. We computed national estimates from NHTSA’s General Estimates System. Nationally an estimated 7.5% of drivers in nonfatal crashes and 12.9% of nonfatal crashes were alcohol-involved. (Crashes often involve multiple drivers but rarely are two alcohol-involved.) Police correctly identified an estimated 32% of alcohol-involved drivers in non-fatal crashes including 48% in injury crashes. Excluding KY, police in the six states reported 47% of alcohol involvement for cases treated in EDs and released and 39% for admitted cases. In contrast, hospitals reported 28% of involvement for ED cases and 51% for admitted cases. Underreporting varied widely between states. Police reported alcohol involvement for 44% of those who hospitals reported were alcohol-involved, while hospitals reported alcohol involvement for 33% of those who police reported were alcohol-involved. Police alcohol reporting completeness rose with police-reported driver injury severity. At least one system reported 62% of alcohol involvement. Police and hospitals need to communicate better about alcohol involvement. Despite the proven effectiveness of brief alcohol intervention, EDs rarely detect, much less intervene with crash-involved drinking drivers. Both police and EDs particularly need to assess alcohol involvement in minor injury better. PMID:23169120

  15. Hospital Utilization and Cost Trends in Canada and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Ronald; Hull, John T.

    1969-01-01

    Differences in hospital costs and utilization between the United States and Canada are analyzed and an attempt made to measure the significance of various demographic, economic, and other factors thought to be related to the differences. Increases in utilization are traced to population increases and to actual increased use per person; and cost increases tied to general inflationary trends are separated from those attributable to specific hospital price increases. Differences in the financing and reimbursement mechanisms in the two countries are shown to have had little effect on relative cost increases, which in the period under consideration were parallelled by similar or greater increases in other industrialized nations. PMID:4981616

  16. The State and Trends of Barcode, RFID, Biometric and Pharmacy Automation Technologies in US Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Uy, Raymonde Charles Y; Kury, Fabricio P; Fontelo, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The standard of safe medication practice requires strict observance of the five rights of medication administration: the right patient, drug, time, dose, and route. Despite adherence to these guidelines, medication errors remain a public health concern that has generated health policies and hospital processes that leverage automation and computerization to reduce these errors. Bar code, RFID, biometrics and pharmacy automation technologies have been demonstrated in literature to decrease the incidence of medication errors by minimizing human factors involved in the process. Despite evidence suggesting the effectivity of these technologies, adoption rates and trends vary across hospital systems. The objective of study is to examine the state and adoption trends of automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) methods and pharmacy automation technologies in U.S. hospitals. A retrospective descriptive analysis of survey data from the HIMSS Analytics® Database was done, demonstrating an optimistic growth in the adoption of these patient safety solutions.

  17. The State and Trends of Barcode, RFID, Biometric and Pharmacy Automation Technologies in US Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Raymonde Charles Y.; Kury, Fabricio P.; Fontelo, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The standard of safe medication practice requires strict observance of the five rights of medication administration: the right patient, drug, time, dose, and route. Despite adherence to these guidelines, medication errors remain a public health concern that has generated health policies and hospital processes that leverage automation and computerization to reduce these errors. Bar code, RFID, biometrics and pharmacy automation technologies have been demonstrated in literature to decrease the incidence of medication errors by minimizing human factors involved in the process. Despite evidence suggesting the effectivity of these technologies, adoption rates and trends vary across hospital systems. The objective of study is to examine the state and adoption trends of automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) methods and pharmacy automation technologies in U.S. hospitals. A retrospective descriptive analysis of survey data from the HIMSS Analytics® Database was done, demonstrating an optimistic growth in the adoption of these patient safety solutions. PMID:26958264

  18. Hospital Use by Children in the United States and Canada. Comparative International Vital and Health Statistics Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Lola Jean; McCarthy, Eileen

    1984-01-01

    This document presents a statistical study of hospital use by children in the United States and Canada designed to determine why the hospital discharge rate of children in the United States is lower than many other Western industrialized nations, although the discharge rate for the general U.S. population is higher. Several reasons for the lower…

  19. Korean nurses' adjustment to hospitals in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Yi, M; Jezewski, M A

    2000-09-01

    Korean nurses' adjustment to hospitals in the United States of America Due to shortage of nurses, more nurses from other countries are employed in health care settings in the United States of America (USA). Little attention has been paid to understanding how culturally different international nurses adjust to USA hospitals. The purpose of this study was to investigate how Korean nurses adjust to USA hospital settings. Grounded theory method was used for sampling procedure, data collection and analysis in order to describe Korean nurses' experiences from their perspective and to develop a substantive theory that explains their process of adjustment. Data were collected using semi-structured formal interviews with a purposive sample of 12 Korean nurses. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Analysis of data, using the constant comparative method, revealed 'adjustment to USA hospitals' as the basic social psychological process. Five categories composed the process: (1) relieving psychological stress; (2) overcoming the language barrier; (3) accepting USA nursing practice; (4) adopting the styles of USA problem-solving strategies; and (5) adopting the styles of USA interpersonal relationships. These five categories capture the essential aspects of the adjustment process and each category contains a set of sub-categories that describe Korean nurses' day-to-day experiences that are critical and also problematic to their adjustment. The process evolves in two stages. In the initial stage, the first three of the five categories greatly influenced the nurses' adjustment. From the perspective of the nurses in the study, the initial stage lasts about 2 to 3 years. The remaining two categories are principal components of the later stage. It takes an additional 5 to 10 years to complete this stage. This model highlights both distress and accomplishments of Korean nurses during their adjustment to USA hospitals. The results of the study may help USA nurses gain

  20. Estimated influenza illnesses and hospitalizations averted by influenza vaccination - United States, 2012-13 influenza season.

    PubMed

    2013-12-13

    Influenza is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality each year in the United States. From 1976 to 2007, annual deaths from influenza ranged from approximately 3,300 to 49,000. Vaccination against influenza has been recommended to prevent illness and related complications, and since 2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended that all persons aged ≥6 months be vaccinated against influenza each year. In 2013, CDC published a model to quantify the annual number of influenza-associated illnesses and hospitalizations averted by influenza vaccination during the 2006-11 influenza seasons. Using that model with 2012-13 influenza season vaccination coverage rates, influenza vaccine effectiveness, and influenza hospitalization rates, CDC estimated that vaccination resulted in 79,000 (17%) fewer hospitalizations during the 2012-13 influenza season than otherwise might have occurred. Based on estimates of the percentage of influenza illnesses that involve hospitalization or medical attention, vaccination also prevented approximately 6.6 million influenza illnesses and 3.2 million medically attended illnesses. Influenza vaccination during the 2012-13 season produced a substantial reduction in influenza-associated illness. However, fewer than half of persons aged ≥6 months were vaccinated. Higher vaccination rates would have resulted in prevention of a substantial number of additional cases and hospitalizations.

  1. Health professionals’ knowledge about relative prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in Delta State of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oli, Angus Nnamdi; Okoli, Kelechi Christian; Ujam, Nonye Treasure; Adje, Dave Ufuoma; Ezeobi, Ifeanyi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) constitute a serious global public health challenge, causing great suffering to many people across the globe at any given time. This study ascertains the knowledge of health professionals on the challenge and their compliance with infection control measures. Methods Validated questionnaires were administered to 660 health professionals and supported with face-to-face interview. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0 (SPSS Inc, USA). Chi-square was used to test association between the independent and the outcome variables. Cut-off point for statistical significance was 5% (p value<0.05). Results UTIs (61.4%) followed by Hospital-acquired Pneumonia (55.6%) were known to be the most prevalent HAIs in government hospitals while Staphylococcus aureus (54.4%) was reported the most microbial agent. In private health facilities, Hospital-acquired Pneumonia was known to be the most common (66.1%) while Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most reported culprit. HAIs were reported to have occurred more in government hospitals and catheterization was the commonest modes of transmission in both health facilities. Conclusion The prevalence of HAIs in this state was reported to be high. Although health-care professionals have good knowledge of HAIs, active effort is not always made to identify and resolve them. Standardized surveillance of HAIs is urgently needed. PMID:27642486

  2. Strained local and state government finances among current realities that threaten public hospitals' profitability.

    PubMed

    Kane, Nancy M; Singer, Sara J; Clark, Jonathan R; Eeckloo, Kristof; Valentine, Melissa

    2012-08-01

    This study demonstrates that some safety-net hospitals--those that provide a large share of the care to low-income, uninsured, and Medicaid populations--survived and even thrived before the recent recession. We analyzed the financial performance and governance of 150 hospitals during 2003-07. We found, counterintuitively, that those directly governed by elected officials and in highly competitive markets were more profitable than other safety-net hospitals. They were financially healthy primarily because they obtained subsidies from state and local governments, such as property tax transfers or supplemental Medicaid payments, including disproportionate share payments. However, safety-net hospitals now face a new market reality. The economic downturn, slow recovery, and politics of deficit reduction have eroded the ability of local governments to support the safety net. Many safety-net hospitals have not focused on effective management, cost control, quality improvement, or services that attract insured patients. As a result, and coupled with new uncertainties regarding Medicaid expansion stemming from the recent Supreme Court decision on the Affordable Care Act, many are likely to face increasing financial and competitive pressures that may threaten their survival.

  3. Tax-exempt hospitals and community benefits: a review of state reporting requirements.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Fred Joseph

    2009-02-01

    In June 2007 the Internal Revenue Service proposed a major overhaul of its reporting requirements for tax-exempt hospitals and released draft Form 990 (the IRS form filed by tax-exempt organizations each year). In December 2007 the IRS promulgated the final Form 990 after incorporating some of the recommendations made in the almost seven hundred public comments on the discussion draft. One recommendation adopted in the final Form 990 is the postponement until tax year 2009 (returns filed in 2010) of the requirement for hospitals to submit detailed information on the percentage of total expenses attributable to charity care, unreimbursed Medicaid costs, and community-health improvement programs (the discussion draft required this information for tax year 2007). Although the IRS will not require tax-exempt hospitals to provide detailed information about community benefits until the 2009 tax year, sixteen states have laws requiring tax-exempt hospitals to enumerate the benefits that they provide to the community. Information about the impact of these laws on the provision of community benefits (e.g., charity and uncompensated care) is examined in this study whose primary purpose is to highlight information policy makers may glean from states that have adopted community-benefit reporting laws.

  4. Assaultive behavior in state psychiatric hospitals: differences between forensic and nonforensic patients.

    PubMed

    Linhorst, Donald M; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-08-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two groups of forensic patients including 469 patients found not guilty by reason of insanity and 76 pretrial patients. Consistent with other studies, nonforensic patients had higher rates of assaults than either group of forensic patients. However, being a forensic patient did not affect the odds of assault when controlling for the effects of demographic and clinical variables in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Factors associated with assaults in each of the three patient groups were identified using multivariate analyses. Implications are presented for treatment of assaultive behavior, mixing of forensic and nonforensic patients within state hospitals, forensic release policies, and future research.

  5. Access, quality, and costs of care at physician owned hospitals in the United States: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Orav, E John; Jena, Anupam B; Dudzinski, David M; Le, Sidney T; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare physician owned hospitals (POHs) with non-POHs on metrics around patient populations, quality of care, costs, and payments. Design Observational study. Setting Acute care hospitals in 95 hospital referral regions in the United States, 2010. Participants 2186 US acute care hospitals (219 POHs and 1967 non-POHs). Main outcome measures Proportions of patients using Medicaid and those from ethnic and racial minority groups; hospital performance on patient experience metrics, care processes, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, and readmission rates; costs of care; care payments; and Medicare market share. Results The 219 POHs were more often small (<100 beds), for profit, and in urban areas. 120 of these POHs were general (non-specialty) hospitals. Compared with patients from non-POHs, those from POHs were younger (77.4 v 78.4 years, P<0.001), less likely to be admitted through an emergency department (23.2% v. 29.0%, P<0.001), equally likely to be black (5.1% v 5.5%, P=0.85) or to use Medicaid (14.9% v 15.4%, P=0.75), and had similar numbers of chronic diseases and predicted mortality scores. POHs and non-POHs performed similarly on patient experience scores, processes of care, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, 30 day readmission rates, costs, and payments for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia. Conclusion Although POHs may treat slightly healthier patients, they do not seem to systematically select more profitable or less disadvantaged patients or to provide lower value care. PMID:26333819

  6. An Evaluation and Ranking of Children’s Hospital Websites in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Daniel M; Ford, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Background Children’s hospitals are faced with the rising need for technological innovation. Their prospective health care consumers, who increasingly depend on the Web and social media for communication and consumer engagement, drive this need. As patients and family members navigate the Web presence of hospitals, it is important for these specialized organizations to present themselves and their services efficiently. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the website content of children’s hospitals in order to identify opportunities to improve website design and create benchmarks to judge improvement. Methods All websites associated with a children’s hospital were identified using a census list of all children’s hospitals in the United States. In March of 2014, each website and its social media were evaluated using a Web crawler that provided a 5-dimensional assessment that included website accessibility, marketing, content, technology, and usability. The 5-dimensional assessment was scored on a scale ranging from 0 to 10 with positive findings rated higher on the scale. Websites were ranked by individual dimensions as well as according to their average ranking across all dimensions. Results Mean scores of 153 websites ranged from 5.05 to 8.23 across all 5 dimensions. Results revealed that no website scored a perfect 10 on any dimension and that room exists for meaningful improvement. Conclusions Study findings allow for the establishment of baseline benchmarks for tracking future website and social media improvements and display the need for enhanced Web-based consumer engagement for children’s hospitals. PMID:27549074

  7. [Case reports of drug-induced liver injury in a reference hospital of Zulia state, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Mengual-Moreno, Edgardo; Lizarzábal-García, Maribel; Ruiz-Soler, María; Silva-Suarez, Niniveth; Andrade-Bellido, Raúl; Lucena-González, Maribel; Bessone, Fernando; Hernández, Nelia; Sánchez, Adriana; Medina-Cáliz, Inmaculada

    2015-03-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with varied geographical differences. The aim of this prospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study was to identify and characterize cases of DILI in a hospital of Zulia state, Venezuela. Thirteen patients with a presumptive diagnosis of DILI attended by the Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Universitario, Zulia state, Venezuela, from December-2012 to December-2013 were studied. Ibuprofen (n = 3; 23.1%), acetaminophen (n = 3; 23.1), isoniazid (n = 2; 15.4%) and Herbalife products (n = 2; 15.4%) were the main drugs involved with DILI. Acetaminophen and ibuprofen showed a mixed pattern of liver injury (n = 3; 23.1%) and isoniazid presented a hepatocellular pattern (n = 2; 15.4%). The CIOMS/RUCAMS allowed the identification of possible (n = 7; 53.9%), probable (n = 4; 30.8%) and highly-probable cases (n = 2; 15.4%) of DILI. Amoxicillin/clavulanate, isoniazid, isotretinoin, methotrexate and Herbalife nutritional products were implicated as highly-probable and probable agents. The highest percentage of DILI corresponded to mild cases that recovered after the discontinuation of the agent involved (n = 9; 69.3%). The consumption of Herbalife botanical products is associated with probable causality and fatality (n = 1; 7.7%). In conclusion, the frequency of DILI cases controlled by the Department of Gastroenterology of the Hospital Universitario of Maracaibo was low, being ibuprofen, acetaminophen, isoniazid and products Herbalife the products most commonly involved. It is recommended to continue with the prospective registration of cases, with an extended follow up monitoring period and to facilitate the incorporation of other hospitals in the Zulia State and Venezuela.

  8. Epidemiology of Acute Pancreatitis in Hospitalized Children in the United States from 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Chaitanya; Deshpande, Abhishek; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Anderson, Michael P.; Bitar, Anas; Steele, Marilyn I.; Bass, Pat F.; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Single-center studies suggest an increasing incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) in children. Our specific aims were to (i) estimate the recent secular trends, (ii) assess the disease burden, and (iii) define the demographics and comorbid conditions of AP in hospitalized children within the United States. Methods We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids’ Inpatient Database, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for the years 2000 to 2009. Extracted data were weighted to generate national-level estimates. We used the Cochrane-Armitage test to analyze trends; cohort-matching to evaluate the association of AP and in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and charges; and multivariable logistic regression to test the association of AP and demographics and comorbid conditions. Results We identified 55,012 cases of AP in hospitalized children (1–20 years of age). The incidence of AP increased from 23.1 to 34.9 (cases per 10,000 hospitalizations per year; P<0.001) and for all-diagnoses 38.7 to 61.1 (P<0.001). There was an increasing trend in the incidence of both primary and all-diagnoses of AP (P<0.001). In-hospital mortality decreased (13.1 to 7.6 per 1,000 cases, P<0.001), median length of stay decreased (5 to 4 days, P<0.001), and median charges increased ($14,956 to $22,663, P<0.001). Children with AP compared to those without the disease had lower in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, aOR 0.86, 95% CI, 0.78–0.95), longer lengths of stay (aOR 2.42, 95% CI, 2.40–2.46), and higher charges (aOR 1.62, 95% CI, 1.59–1.65). AP was more likely to occur in children older than 5 years of age (aORs 2.81 to 5.25 for each 5-year age interval). Hepatobiliary disease was the comorbid condition with the greatest association with AP. Conclusions These results demonstrate a rising incidence of AP in hospitalized children. Despite improvements in mortality and length of stay, hospitalized children with AP have significant morbidity. PMID

  9. Hospitalizations and mortality in the United States for adults with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Baraona, Fernando; Gurvitz, Michelle; Landzberg, Michael J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2013-04-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is common in patients with Down syndrome (DS), and these patients are living longer lives. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of hospitalizations in adults with DS and CHD in the United States. Hospitalizations from 1998 to 2009 for adults aged 18 to 64 years with and without DS with CHD diagnoses associated with DS (atrioventricular canal defect, ventricular septal defect, tetralogy of Fallot, and patent ductus arteriosus) were analyzed using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Outcomes of interest were (1) in-hospital mortality, (2) common co-morbidities, (3) cardiac procedures, (4) hospital charges, and (5) length of stay. Multivariate modeling adjusted for age, gender, CHD diagnosis, and co-morbidities. There were 78,793 ± 2,653 CHD admissions, 9,088 ± 351 (11.5%) of which were associated with diagnoses of DS. The proportion of admissions associated with DS (DS/CHD) decreased from 15.2 ± 1.3% to 8.5 ± 0.9%. DS was associated with higher in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4 to 2.4), especially in women (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.7 to 3.4). DS/CHD admissions were more commonly associated with hypothyroidism (OR 7.7, 95% CI 6.6 to 9.0), dementia (OR 82.0, 95% CI 32 to 213), heart failure (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.9 to 2.5), pulmonary hypertension (OR 2.5, 95% CI 2.2 to 2.9), and cyanosis or secondary polycythemia (OR 4.6, 95% CI 3.8 to 5.6). Conversely, DS/CHD hospitalizations were less likely to include cardiac procedures or surgery (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.4) and were associated with lower charges ($23,789 ± $1,177 vs $39,464 ± $1,371, p <0.0001) compared to non-DS/CHD admissions. In conclusion, DS/CHD hospitalizations represent a decreasing proportion of admissions for adults with CHD typical of DS; patients with DS/CHD are more likely to die during hospitalization but less likely to undergo a cardiac procedure.

  10. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-Related Hospitalizations in the United States (2002-2011): Rates, Co-Occurring Illnesses, Suicidal Ideation/Self-Harm, and Hospital Charges.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Mark G; Banta, Jim E; Sonne, Janet L; Przekop, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related hospitalizations in the United States (2002-2011). Over this period, there were an estimated 1,477,944 hospitalizations (915,591 women) with either a primary (reason for hospitalization) or secondary PTSD diagnosis. Population-based hospitalization rates rose from 2002 to 2011; women in the age range of 20 to 44 years had the highest rates and the steepest rise. Most of the hospitalizations for men and women younger than 45 years had been assigned a primary diagnosis of mental illness (including PTSD). Mood and substance use disorders were among the most commonly co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses with PTSD. Suicidal ideation/suicide attempts declined with increasing age. The strongest predictor of this criterion was mood disorder, and its importance as a predictor increased as people aged. Total inflation-adjusted charges for all PTSD-related hospitalizations were $34.9 billion, with 36% being for hospitalizations where a mental illness (including PTSD) was the primary diagnosis.

  11. Trends in Prevalence of Diabetes Among Delivery Hospitalizations, United States, 1993–2009

    PubMed Central

    Bardenheier, Barbara; Elixhauser, Anne; Geiss, Linda S.; Gregg, Edward

    2015-01-01

    To describe recent trends in prevalence of pre-existing diabetes mellitus (PDM) (i.e., type 1 or type 2 diabetes) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among delivery hospitalizations in the United States. Data on delivery hospitalizations from 1993 through 2009 were obtained from the Health Care Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Diagnosis-Related Group codes were used to identify deliveries and diagnosis codes on presence of diabetes. Rates of hospitalizations with diabetes were calculated per 100 deliveries by type of diabetes, hospital geographic region, patient’s age, degree of urbanicity of patient’s residence, categorized median household income for patient’s ZIP Code, expected primary payer, and type of delivery. From 1993 to 2009, age-standardized prevalence of diabetes per 100 deliveries increased from 0.62 to 0.90 for PDM (trend p < 0.001) and from 3.09 to 5.57 for GDM (trend p < 0.001). In 2009, correlates of PDM at delivery included older age [40–44 vs. 15–24: odds ratio 6.45 (95 % CI 5.27–7.88)], Medicaid/Medicare versus private payment sources [1.77 (95 % CI 1.59–1.98)], patient’s ZIP Code with a median household income in bottom quartile versus other quartiles [1.54 (95 % CI 1.41, 1.69)], and C-section versus vaginal delivery [3.36 (95 % CI 3.10–3.64)]. Correlates of GDM at delivery were similar. Among U.S. delivery hospitalizations, the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. In 2009, the prevalence of diabetes was higher among women in older age groups, living in ZIP codes with lower household incomes, or with public insurance. PMID:24996952

  12. Hospital Website Rankings in the United States: Expanding Benchmarks and Standards for Effective Consumer Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Hefner, Jennifer L; Ford, Eric W; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Menachemi, Nir

    2014-01-01

    .19) and 6.49 (SD 0.96). Based on these scores, rank order calculations for the top 100 websites are presented. Additionally, a link to raw data, including AHA ID, is provided to enable researchers and practitioners the ability to further explore relationships to other dynamics in health care. Conclusions This census assessment of US hospitals and their health systems provides a clear indication of the state of the sector. While stakeholder engagement is core to most discussions of the role that hospitals must play in relation to communities, management of an online presence has not been recognized as a core competency fundamental to care delivery. Yet, social media management and network engagement are skills that exist at the confluence of marketing and technical prowess. This paper presents performance guidelines evaluated against best-demonstrated practice or independent standards to facilitate improvement of the sector’s use of websites and social media. PMID:24568892

  13. 42 CFR 412.235 - Criteria for all hospitals in a State seeking a statewide wage index redesignation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criteria for all hospitals in a State seeking a statewide wage index redesignation. 412.235 Section 412.235 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES The...

  14. Public reporting of hospital infection rates: ranking the states on credibility and user friendliness.

    PubMed

    Amini, Ava; Birnbaum, David W; Black, Bernard; Hyman, David A

    2013-01-01

    Health-care associated infections ("HAIs") kill about 100,000 people annually; most are preventable, but many hospitals have not aggressively addressed the problem. In response, twenty-five states and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services require public reporting of hospital infection rates for at least some types of infections, and other states and private entities are implementing such reporting. The websites and related reports vary widely in ease of access, ease of use, usefulness of information, timeliness of updates, and credibility. We report on work in progress, in which we assess the quality and suitability of different state websites and reports for different target audiences (ordinary consumers; physicians, and infection control professionals) and the extent to which they meet best practices for online communication, including Stanford's "Fogg" Guidelines for Web Credibility and user-friendliness metrics developed by other researchers. We find wide variation in quality, and substantial correlation between measures of website credibility and user-friendliness. We identify ways to improve usability, usefulness, and tailoring for information to different target audiences. Our analysis suggests that the "one website (and report format) fits all users" model may not work well in delivering complex, technical information to users with widely varying needs and sophistication.

  15. Mortality and Morbidity During Delivery Hospitalization Among Pregnant Women With Epilepsy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Sarah C.; Bateman, Brian T.; McElrath, Thomas F.; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Between 0.3% and 0.5% of all pregnancies occur among women with epilepsy. Evidence suggests an increase in perinatal morbidity and mortality among women with epilepsy. However, these risks have not been quantified in large population-based samples. OBJECTIVE To report on the risk for death and adverse outcomes at the time of delivery for women with epilepsy in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study of pregnant women identified through delivery hospitalization records from the 2007-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. From this representative sample of 20% of all US hospitals, we obtained a weighted sample of delivery hospitalizations from 69 385 women with epilepsy and 20 449 532 women without epilepsy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Obstetrical outcomes including maternal death, cesarean delivery, length of stay, preeclampsia, preterm labor, and stillbirth. RESULTS Women with epilepsy had a risk of death during delivery hospitalization of 80 deaths per 100 000 pregnancies, significantly higher than the 6 deaths per 100 000 pregnancies found among women without epilepsy (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 11.46 [95% CI, 8.64-15.19]). Women with epilepsy were also at a heightened risk for other adverse outcomes, including preeclampsia (adjusted OR, 1.59 [95% CI, 1.54-1.63]), preterm labor (adjusted OR, 1.54 [95% CI, 1.50-1.57]), and stillbirth (adjusted OR, 1.27 [95% CI, 1.17-1.38]), and had increased health care utilization, including an increased risk of cesarean delivery (adjusted OR, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.38-1.42]) and prolonged length of hospital stay (>6 days) among both women with cesarean deliveries (adjusted OR, 2.13 [95% CI, 2.03-2.23]) and women with vaginal deliveries (adjusted OR, 2.60 [95% CI, 2.41-2.80]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Findings suggest that women with epilepsy are at considerably heightened risk for many adverse outcomes during their delivery hospitalization, including a more than 10-fold increased risk of

  16. Nutrition Screening and Assessment in Hospitalized Patients: A Survey of Current Practice in the United States.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vihas; Romano, Michelle; Corkins, Mark R; DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Earthman, Carrie; Malone, Ainsley; Miller, Sarah; Sabino, Kim; Wooley, Jennifer; Guenter, Peggi

    2014-08-01

    Background: The Joint Commission has mandated universal screening and assessment of hospitalized patients for malnutrition since 1995. Although various validated and nonvalidated tools are available, implementation of this mandate has not been well characterized. We report results of a survey of hospital-based professionals in the United States describing their perspective on the current range of nutrition screening and assessment practices as well as associated gaps in knowledge. Methods and Materials: Data from a 2012-2013 cross-sectional, web-based survey targeting members of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, and the Society of Hospital Medicine were collected with non-hospital-based members excluded. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Survey data from 1777 unique email addresses are included in this report. A majority of respondents were dietitians, nearly half were A.S.P.E.N. members, and 69.4% reported caring for a mix of adult and pediatric patients. Most respondents answered affirmatively about nutrition screening being performed in alignment with The Joint Commission mandate, but only 50% were familiar with the 2012 Consensus Statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/A.S.P.E.N. on adult malnutrition. In most cases, nurses were primarily responsible for nutrition screening, while dietitians had primary responsibility for assessment. No one specific assessment tool or International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code was identified as being used a majority of the time in assessing or coding a patient for malnutrition. Conclusions: The survey findings affirmed compliance with accreditation standards in completing a nutrition screen within 24 hours of admission, and most hospitals appear to have a process to perform a nutrition assessment once a screen is completed. However, there is considerable heterogeneity in both use of tools and

  17. Under-reporting of pelvic inflammatory disease in Hawaii: a comparison of state surveillance and hospitalization data.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Misty; Sentell, Tetine; Katz, Alan R

    2014-04-01

    Hawaii is one of only 19 states for which pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a mandated notifiable disease. In order to assess the completeness of PID reporting, we compared the number of hospitalized PID cases in the state of Hawaii with the total number of PID cases reported to the Hawaii State Department of Health surveillance system from 2007 through 2010. While 828 unique PID cases were diagnosed in Hawaii hospitals, only 240 unique PID cases were reported through the state's surveillance system. Severe PID underreporting was seen despite mandatory reporting laws.

  18. Current state of practice for colonic diverticular bleeding in 37 hospitals in Japan: A multicenter questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    Niikura, Ryota; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Doyama, Hisashi; Ota, Ryosuke; Ishii, Naoki; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hikichi, Takuto; Sumiyama, Kazuki; Nishikawa, Jun; Uraoka, Toshio; Kiyotoki, Shu; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify the current state of practice for colonic diverticular bleeding (CDB) in Japan. METHODS We conducted multicenter questionnaire surveys of the practice for CDB including clinical settings (8 questions), diagnoses (8 questions), treatments (7 questions), and outcomes (4 questions) in 37 hospitals across Japan. The answers were compared between hospitals with high and low number of inpatient beds to investigate which factor influenced the answers. RESULTS Endoscopists at all 37 hospitals answered the questions, and the mean number of endoscopists at these hospitals was 12.7. Of all the hospitals, computed tomography was performed before colonoscopy in 67% of the hospitals. The rate of bowel preparation was 46.0%. Early colonoscopy was performed within 24 h in 43.2% of the hospitals. Of the hospitals, 83.8% performed clipping as first-line endoscopic therapy. More than half of the hospitals experienced less than 20% rebleeding events after endoscopic hemostasis. No significant difference was observed in the annual number of patients hospitalized for CDB between high- (≥ 700 beds) and low-volume hospitals. More emergency visits (P = 0.012) and endoscopists (P = 0.015), and less frequent participation of nursing staff in early colonoscopy (P = 0.045) were observed in the high-volume hospitals. CONCLUSION Some practices unique to Japan were found, such as performing computed tomography before colonoscopy, no bowel preparation, and clipping as first-line therapy. Although, the number of staff differed, the practices for CDB were common irrespective of hospital size. PMID:28042393

  19. Evaluation of demographic characteristics, and general disease state of patients affliated with home health care unit of Malatya State Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Oksuz, Ersoy; Onat, Elif; Shahzadi, Andleeb; Yazici, Zeliha; Cetin, Cumali

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Home Health Care Unit a unit provides health services for elderly, bedridden and individuals with chronic diseases at home along within the frame of the diagnosis, and treatments of the relevant experts. Therefore, it is intended to reduce the probable physical and emotional burden related to the patient that arise by commuting to the hospital, to increase the number of empty beds for other patients and to improve the living standard by reducing the risk of hospital infection. In this study, the demographic characteristics of housebound patients, their general disease and its relationship with age and gender was investigated. METHODS: The following study was performed on 626 active patients of Malatya State Hospital Home Health Care Unit from January to November 2014. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel Program. RESULTS: The study included 60.5% (n=379) female and 39.5% (n=247) male patients. The highest group consisted of patients with 80 years or above 37.7% (n=236). Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (n=95; 25.0%), senility (n=56; 14.8%) and Alzheimer’s disease (n=50; 13.2%) were commonly observed in women. Male patients had CVD (n=54; 21.8%), femur fracture or gonarthrosis which required surgery (n=28; 11.3%), and fracture due to trauma or traffc accidents (n=28; 11.3%), senility and Alzheimer’s disease (n=218.5%). CONCLUSION: In recent years home health care units became even more important after the gradual increase in the elderly population and injuries due to accidents. This study can help to provide home health care units in a more effcient manner by educating the staff and relatives who take care of the patients. PMID:28058324

  20. Security aspects of electronic data interchange between a state health department and a hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, J A; Klockner, Rocke; Ladd-Wilson, Stephen; Zechnich, Andrew; Bangs, Christopher; Kohn, Melvin A

    2004-01-01

    Electronic emergency department reporting provides the potential for enhancing local and state surveillance capabilities for a wide variety of syndromes and reportable conditions. The task of protecting data confidentiality and integrity while developing electronic data interchange between a hospital emergency department and a state public health department proved more complex than expected. This case study reports on the significant challenges that had to be resolved to accomplish this goal; these included application restrictions and incompatibilities, technical malfunctions, changing standards, and insufficient dedicated resources. One of the key administrative challenges was that of coordinating project security with enterprise security. The original project has evolved into an ongoing pilot, with the health department currently receiving secure data from the emergency department at four-hour intervals. Currently, planning is underway to add more emergency departments to the project.

  1. Cost inefficiency under financial strain: a stochastic frontier analysis of hospitals in Washington State through the Great Recession.

    PubMed

    Izón, Germán M; Pardini, Chelsea A

    2015-12-17

    The importance of increasing cost efficiency for community hospitals in the United States has been underscored by the Great Recession and the ever-changing health care reimbursement environment. Previous studies have shown mixed evidence with regards to the relationship between linking hospitals' reimbursement to quality of care and cost efficiency. Moreover, current evidence suggests that not only inherently financially disadvantaged hospitals (e.g., safety-net providers), but also more financially stable providers, experienced declines to their financial viability throughout the recession. However, little is known about how hospital cost efficiency fared throughout the Great Recession. This study contributes to the literature by using stochastic frontier analysis to analyze cost inefficiency of Washington State hospitals between 2005 and 2012, with controls for patient burden of illness, hospital process of care quality, and hospital outcome quality. The quality measures included in this study function as central measures for the determination of recently implemented pay-for-performance programs. The average estimated level of hospital cost inefficiency before the Great Recession (10.4 %) was lower than it was during the Great Recession (13.5 %) and in its aftermath (14.1 %). Further, the estimated coefficients for summary process of care quality indexes for three health conditions (acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, and heart failure) suggest that higher quality scores are associated with increased cost inefficiency.

  2. The federal government's use of Title VI and Medicare to racially integrate hospitals in the United States, 1963 through 1967.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, P P

    1997-11-01

    Explicit discrimination against minorities existed in the 1960s in hospital patient admissions and physician and nurse staff appointments. With passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, along with Medicare legislation in 1965, civil rights advocates within the federal government had both a legislative mandate to guarantee equal access to programs funded by the federal government in Title VI and a federal program that affected every hospital in the country in Medicare. This study was conducted to determine the extent to which the Medicare hospital certification program was a major determinant in the racial integration of hospitals throughout the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with individuals involved in hospital and health care policy in the 1950s and 1960s. Other primary resources include archival and personal manuscripts, government documents, newspapers, and periodicals.

  3. The federal government's use of Title VI and Medicare to racially integrate hospitals in the United States, 1963 through 1967.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, P P

    1997-01-01

    Explicit discrimination against minorities existed in the 1960s in hospital patient admissions and physician and nurse staff appointments. With passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, along with Medicare legislation in 1965, civil rights advocates within the federal government had both a legislative mandate to guarantee equal access to programs funded by the federal government in Title VI and a federal program that affected every hospital in the country in Medicare. This study was conducted to determine the extent to which the Medicare hospital certification program was a major determinant in the racial integration of hospitals throughout the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with individuals involved in hospital and health care policy in the 1950s and 1960s. Other primary resources include archival and personal manuscripts, government documents, newspapers, and periodicals. PMID:9366643

  4. Influenza-Related Hospitalizations and Poverty Levels - United States, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Hadler, James L; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly; Pérez, Alejandro; Anderson, Evan J; Bargsten, Marisa; Bohm, Susan R; Hill, Mary; Hogan, Brenna; Laidler, Matt; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lung, Krista L; Mermel, Elizabeth; Miller, Lisa; Morin, Craig; Parker, Erin; Zansky, Shelley M; Chaves, Sandra S

    2016-02-12

    Annual influenza vaccine is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months in the United States, with recognition that some persons are at risk for more severe disease (1). However, there might be previously unrecognized demographic groups that also experience higher rates of serious influenza-related disease that could benefit from enhanced vaccination efforts. Socioeconomic status (SES) measures that are area-based can be used to define demographic groups when individual SES data are not available (2). Previous surveillance data analyses in limited geographic areas indicated that influenza-related hospitalization incidence was higher for persons residing in census tracts that included a higher percentage of persons living below the federal poverty level (3-5). To determine whether this association occurs elsewhere, influenza hospitalization data collected in 14 FluSurv-NET sites covering 27 million persons during the 2010-11 and 2011-12 influenza seasons were analyzed. The age-adjusted incidence of influenza-related hospitalizations per 100,000 person-years in high poverty (≥20% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts was 21.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.7-22.4), nearly twice the incidence in low poverty (<5% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts (10.9, 95% CI: 10.3-11.4). This relationship was observed in each surveillance site, among children and adults, and across racial/ethnic groups. These findings suggest that persons living in poorer census tracts should be targeted for enhanced influenza vaccination outreach and clinicians serving these persons should be made aware of current recommendations for use of antiviral agents to treat influenza (6).

  5. State Aids to Medical Libraries in Hospitals. Report of the Council on Library and Network Development. Bulletin No. 3209.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. of Library Services.

    This report presents an overview of health science libraries and the biomedical communications network in Wisconsin, and a list of goals and recommendations related to the role of the state government in the development of health science library services. It is noted that health science libraries in the state range from hospital and academic…

  6. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...' revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators...

  7. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan... revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators...

  8. Charity care in nonprofit urban hospitals: analysis of the role of size and ownership type in Washington State for 2011.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Joseph S; Ogle, Natalie M; McPherson, Sterling; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Gary J; Davidson, Gregg Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Nonprofit hospitals are expected to serve their communities as charitable organizations in exchange for the tax exemption benefits they receive. With the passage into law of the Affordable Care Act, additional guidelines were generated in 2010 to ensure nonprofit hospitals are compliant. Nonetheless, the debate continues on whether nonprofit hospitals provide adequate charity care to their patient population. In this study, charity care provided by 29 Washington State nonprofit urban hospitals was examined for 2011 using financial data from the Washington State Department of Health. Charity care levels were compared to both income tax savings and gross revenues to generate two financial ratios that were analyzed according to hospital bed size and nonprofit ownership type. For the first ratio, 97% of the hospitals (28 of 29) were providing charity care in greater amounts than the tax savings they accrued. The average ratio value using total charity care and total income tax savings of all the hospitals in the study was 6.10, and the median value was 3.46. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test results by bed size and nonprofit ownership type indicate that ownership type has a significant effect on charity care to gross revenue ratios (p = .020). Our analysis indicates that church-owned hospitals had higher ratios of charity care to gross revenues than did the other two ownership types--government and voluntary--in this sample. Policy implications are offered and further studies are recommended to analyze appropriate levels of charity care in nonprofit hospitals given new requirements for maintaining a hospital's tax-exempt status.

  9. Hospitalization of the Elderly in the United States for Nonspecific Gastrointestinal Diseases: A Search for Etiological Clues

    PubMed Central

    Jagai, Jyotsna S.; Griffiths, Jeffrey K.; Naumova, Elena N.

    2011-01-01

    The frequency of hospitalization among the elderly in the United States caused by gastrointestinal diseases between 1991 and 2004 increased dramatically, especially hospitalization of elderly individuals with nonspecific diagnoses. We analyzed 6 640 304 gastrointestinal disease–associated hospitalization records in this 14-year period by comparing the peak times of nonspecific gastrointestinal diseases with those of specific diseases. We found that most nonspecific gastrointestinal diseases peak concurrently with viral enteritis, suggesting a lack of diagnostic testing for viruses, which may adversely affect the efficiency of prevention, surveillance, and treatment efforts. PMID:21653903

  10. States turn up the heat. As self-regulation sputters, state legislatures are leading charge for more accountability in governance of not-for-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mantone, Joseph

    2006-01-30

    Recent scandals have pushed some states to tackle transparency and governance issues at healthcare not-for-profits, which the federal government has been reluctant to touch. Rhode Island Lt. Gov. Charles Fogarty, left, supports a bill in his state that would establish a code of ethics for hospital boards. Fogarty sees leaders as getting too comfortable in their jobs and working without accountability.

  11. Health science libraries in the United States: III. Hospital health science libraries, 1969-1979.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, S

    1983-01-01

    Health sciences libraries in hospitals were examined from longitudinal data collected in 1969, 1973, and 1979, to derive parameters for the universe and for resources, services, and manpower. The surveys show that during this period, the number of hospitals decreased whereas the number of libraries increased. Growth in the number of community hospital libraries was counterbalanced by changes in federal, psychiatric, tuberculosis, and chronic illness hospitals. PMID:6831083

  12. Excessive Heat and Respiratory Hospitalizations in New York State: Estimating Current and Future Public Health Burden Related to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wan-Hsiang; Van Zutphen, Alissa R.; Saha, Shubhayu; Luber, George; Hwang, Syni-An

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although many climate-sensitive environmental exposures are related to mortality and morbidity, there is a paucity of estimates of the public health burden attributable to climate change. Objective: We estimated the excess current and future public health impacts related to respiratory hospitalizations attributable to extreme heat in summer in New York State (NYS) overall, its geographic regions, and across different demographic strata. Methods: On the basis of threshold temperature and percent risk changes identified from our study in NYS, we estimated recent and future attributable risks related to extreme heat due to climate change using the global climate model with various climate scenarios. We estimated effects of extreme high apparent temperature in summer on respiratory admissions, days hospitalized, direct hospitalization costs, and lost productivity from days hospitalized after adjusting for inflation. Results: The estimated respiratory disease burden attributable to extreme heat at baseline (1991–2004) in NYS was 100 hospital admissions, US$644,069 in direct hospitalization costs, and 616 days of hospitalization per year. Projections for 2080–2099 based on three different climate scenarios ranged from 206–607 excess hospital admissions, US$26–$76 million in hospitalization costs, and 1,299–3,744 days of hospitalization per year. Estimated impacts varied by geographic region and population demographics. Conclusions: We estimated that excess respiratory admissions in NYS due to excessive heat would be 2 to 6 times higher in 2080–2099 than in 1991–2004. When combined with other heat-associated diseases and mortality, the potential public health burden associated with global warming could be substantial. PMID:22922791

  13. The impact of chaplaincy services in selected hospitals in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Parkum, K H

    1985-09-01

    Surveys a stratified sample of patients in six different hospitals and compares their perceptions of hospital chaplaincy and other pastoral care efforts with related hospital services. Reports the presence of a strong impact of pastoral care services and discusses these findings from the perspective of a theory of expressive and instrumental social orientations as explicated by the sociologist Talcott Parsons.

  14. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Kimberley S.; Lee, Leslie K.; Mak, Raymond H.; Wang, Shuang; Pile-Spellman, John; Abrahm, Janet L.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC

  15. The epidemiology of shoulder dislocation in a state-hospital: a review of 106 cases.

    PubMed

    Hazmy, C H Wan; Parwathi, A

    2005-07-01

    This retrospective study was conducted in a state hospital set-up and aimed at identifying the magnitude of shoulder dislocations and their demographic data, characteristics of the injury, mechanism and predisposing factors, and the instituted treatment. Patients with radiographic evidence of shoulder dislocation admitted to the hospital from January 1999 to December 2002 were included. Data were recorded from the case notes. There were 105 shoulder dislocations with male predomination in 77% cases and age ranged between 11 and 90 years (average 30.9 years). The right shoulder was affected in 68% of the cases. The contributing events were fall in 37% of cases, road traffic accident 23%, sports 17% and pathological conditions 13%. Anterior dislocation occurred in 96.2% of the cases. Posterior and inferior dislocations encountered in two patients for each type. Twelve dislocations were associated fracture of the greater tuberosity, two each with humeral neck fracture and cerebral injuries. First time dislocation occurred in 73.6% of the cases. The recurrences ranged between 2 to 6 times (average 3.4 times). Closed manipulative reduction and strapping was the definitive treatment in 92.4% of the cases and the remaining needed surgical reconstruction. Four patients had open reduction and internal fixation of the associated fractures while another four had arthroscopic Bankart's repair. In conclusion, shoulder dislocation represents the most common shoulder problems. It afflicted young adults of reproductive age (21-40 years) and participation in sports was a risk factor in men. Women over 40 years and fall were at risk to develop shoulder dislocation.

  16. The rise of pathophysiologic research in the United States: the role of two Harvard hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tishler, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiologic research, the major approach to understanding and treating disease, was created in the 20th century, and two Harvard-affiliated hospitals, the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and Boston City Hospital, played a key role in its development. After the Flexner Report of 1910, medical students were assigned clinical clerkships in teaching hospitals. Rockefeller-trained Francis Weld Peabody, who was committed to investigative, pathophysiologic research, was a critical leader in these efforts. At the Brigham, Harvard medical students observed patients closely and asked provocative questions about their diseases. Additionally, physicians returned from World War I with questions concerning the pathophysiology of wartime injuries. At the Boston City Hospital's new Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Peabody fostered investigative question-based research by physicians. These physicians expanded pathophysiologic investigation from the 1920s. Post-war, Watson and Crick's formulation of the structure of DNA led shortly to modern molecular biology and new research approaches that are being furthered at the Boston Hospitals.

  17. 75 FR 9102 - Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ..., or dental care. This change responds to the increase in medical costs since 1992, when the current... Part 43 Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States... intervening period, the cost of medical care and treatment has increased substantially. That increase...

  18. 20 CFR 404.462 - Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more than 6 months. 404.462 Section 404.462 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Deductions; Reductions; and Nonpayments...

  19. 20 CFR 404.462 - Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more than 6 months. 404.462 Section 404.462 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Deductions; Reductions; and Nonpayments...

  20. 20 CFR 404.462 - Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more than 6 months. 404.462 Section 404.462 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Deductions; Reductions; and Nonpayments...

  1. Health Facilities: New York State's Oversight of Nursing Homes and Hospitals. Report to the Honorable Bill Green, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, New York, NY. Regional Office.

    At the request of Congressman William Green, the General Accounting Office (GAO) evaluated the validity of allegations about deficiencies in the New York State Department of Health's nursing home and hospital inspection processes for certification for participation in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Health Care Financing Administration and…

  2. Curriculum Guide for the Chronic Mentally Ill in the Pre-Discharge Program at East Mississippi State Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagle, Allyson; Shannon, Cheryl

    The paper describes the pre-discharge program for chronically mentally ill patients at East Mississippi State Hospital and outlines program curriculum units. The program's requirements for admission, enrollment capacity, length of stay, program standards (on such matters as referral, assessment, and case records) and the typical activity schedule…

  3. A Study of Power Relations in Doctor-Patient Interactions in Selected Hospitals in Lagos State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Qasim

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores power relations in clinical interactions in Nigeria. It seeks to investigate the use of power between doctors and patients during consultations on patient-centred approach to medicine in selected public and private hospitals in Lagos State, Nigeria. The objective is to establish how doctors' projection of power, using the…

  4. 42 CFR 412.235 - Criteria for all hospitals in a State seeking a statewide wage index redesignation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criteria for all hospitals in a State seeking a statewide wage index redesignation. 412.235 Section 412.235 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS...

  5. 42 CFR 412.235 - Criteria for all hospitals in a State seeking a statewide wage index redesignation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criteria for all hospitals in a State seeking a statewide wage index redesignation. 412.235 Section 412.235 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS...

  6. Accuracy of reporting maternal in-hospital diagnoses and intrapartum procedures in Washington State linked birth records.

    PubMed

    Lydon-Rochelle, Mona T; Holt, Victoria L; Nelson, Jennifer C; Cárdenas, Vicky; Gardella, Carolyn; Easterling, Thomas R; Callaghan, William M

    2005-11-01

    While the impact of maternal morbidities and intrapartum procedures is a common topic in perinatal outcomes research, the accuracy of the reporting of these variables in the large administrative databases (birth certificates, hospital discharges) often utilised for such research is largely unknown. We conducted this study to compare maternal diagnoses and procedures listed on birth certificates, hospital discharge data, and birth certificate and hospital discharge data combined, with those documented in a stratified random sample of hospital medical records of 4541 women delivering liveborn infants in Washington State in 2000. We found that birth certificate and hospital discharge data combined had substantially higher true positive fractions (TPF, proportion of women with a positive medical record assessment who were positive using the administrative databases) than did birth certificate data alone for labour induction (86% vs. 52%), cephalopelvic disproportion (83% vs. 35%), abruptio placentae (85% vs. 68%), and forceps-assisted delivery (89% vs. 55%). For procedures available only in hospital discharge data, TPFs were generally high: episiotomy (85%) and third and fourth degree vaginal lacerations (91%). Except for repeat caesarean section without labour (TPF, 81%), delivery procedures available only in birth certificate data had low TPFs, including augmentation (34%), repeat caesarean section with labour (61%), and vaginal birth after caesarean section (62%). Our data suggest that researchers conducting perinatal epidemiological studies should not rely solely on birth certificate data to detect maternal diagnoses and intrapartum procedures accurately.

  7. Component analysis report: Line shaft pump bushings, Warm Springs State Hospital, Warm Springs, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    McAlpin, Ron

    1981-03-01

    On 29 January 1981, the Failure Analysis Laboratory at Radian Corporation received two spider bushings from the State Hospital at Warm Springs, Montana, for metallurgical analysis. The bushings are from a 19 stage, 200 hp Worthington line shaft vertical turbine pump. The pump was set at 830 feet to test a low temperature geothermal well. One bushing was originally set near the top of the well; the other bushing had been set deep in the well. The bushings were reportedly manufactured from bronze sleeve-bearing material. After approximately 50 hours of intermittent operation, the pump began to experience severe vibration. The vibration appeared random in that it sometimes occurred immediately upon start up and other times occurred after several hours of operation. A Worthington service engineer tested the pump and made several recommendations to alleviate the problem. He concluded that excessive packing box friction, overloading, and shaft unscrewing caused the vibration. He also adjusted the vertical shaft and impeller clearances. The purposes of this analysis is to examine the shaft bushings for evidence of mechanical or corrosion damage that might have been related to the vibration problem.

  8. Effect of United States buckwheat honey on antibiotic-resistant hospital acquired pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Eric Nee-Armah; Duster, Megan; Musuuza, Jackson Ssentalo; Safdar, Nasia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to an upsurge in antibiotic-resistant infections and lack of therapeutic options, new approaches are needed for treatment. Honey may be one such potential therapeutic option. We investigated the susceptibility of hospital acquired pathogens to four honeys from Wisconsin, United States, and then determined if the antibacterial effect of each honey against these pathogens is primarily due to the high sugar content. Methods Thirteen pathogens including: four Clostridium difficile, two Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, two Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, two Vancomycin-resistance Enterococcus, one Enterococcus faecalis and one Klebsiella pneumoniae were exposed to 1-50% (w/v) four Wisconsin honeys and Artificial honey to determine their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) using the broth dilution method. Results Buckwheat honey predominantly exhibited a bactericidal mode of action against the tested pathogens, and this varied with each pathogen. C. difficile isolates were more sensitive to the Wisconsin buckwheat honey as compared to the other pathogens. Artificial honey at 50% (w/v) failed to kill any of the pathogens. The high sugar content of Wisconsin buckwheat honey is not the only factor responsible for its bactericidal activity. Conclusion Wisconsin buckwheat honey has the potential to be an important addition to therapeutic armamentarium against resistant pathogens and should be investigated further. PMID:28292167

  9. The United States does a poor job of evaluating Medicare hospitals: perhaps Australia can help.

    PubMed

    Bogart, G

    1992-01-01

    The United States spends more money per person on healthcare than does any other country in the world, and this rate of spending is increasing. Healthcare expenses currently absorb more than 12 percent of the American gross national product, and recent projections indicate that such expenses will exceed 16 percent by the year 2000. By the year 2005, the U.S. Medicare program is expected to absorb more of the national budget than either Social Security or defense. One justification for the high rate of spending has been that, for those who receive it, U.S. healthcare is the best in the world. There is, however, no way to validate this view because no national or international agreed-upon set of criteria for measuring quality of care exists. Proponents of the American system seem to assume that if it costs more, it must be better. If this is true, it is certainly not reflected in American consumer satisfaction: a recent poll of citizens of ten developed countries indicated that Americans were by far the least satisfied with their healthcare system. This article focuses on the American oversight of Medicare hospitals to determine it, in this narrow area, dissatisfied American consumers are justified.

  10. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Roberto Damian Pacheco; Lira, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; de Castro, Rosane Silvestre; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Viral conjunctivitis is a common, highly contagious disease that is often caused by an adenovirus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis by analyzing data from a prospective clinical study of 122 consecutively enrolled patients who were treated at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) after a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis between November 2011 and June 2012. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate all cases of clinically diagnosed infectious conjunctivitis and based on the laboratory findings, the prevalence of adenoviral infections was determined. The incidence of subepithelial corneal infiltrates was also investigated. RESULTS: Of the 122 patients with acute infectious conjunctivitis included, 72 had positive polymerase chain reaction results for adenoviruses and 17 patients developed subepithelial corneal infiltrates (13.93%). CONCLUSIONS: The polymerase chain reaction revealed that the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis was 59% in all patients who presented with a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis from November 2011 to June 2012. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis in the study population was similar to its prevalence in other regions of the world. PMID:26602522

  11. On-site availability of Legionella testing in acute care hospitals, United States.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Laurel E; Shaw, Kristin M S; McCollum, Jeffrey T; Dexter, Carol; Vagnone, Paula M Snippes; Thompson, Jamie H; Giambrone, Gregory; White, Benjamin; Thomas, Stepy; Carpenter, L Rand; Nichols, Megin; Parker, Erin; Petit, Susan; Hicks, Lauri A; Langley, Gayle E

    2014-07-01

    We surveyed 399 US acute care hospitals regarding availability of on-site Legionella testing; 300 (75.2%) did not offer Legionella testing on site. Availability varied according to hospital size and geographic location. On-site access to testing may improve detection of Legionnaires disease and inform patient management and prevention efforts.

  12. Tactical hospital marketing: a survey of the state of the art.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, P K; Shields, L A

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of acute care hospitals which was undertaken to: (1) identify and establish the organizational positioning of key hospital marketing personnel; (2) measure the role of these personnel in influencing the traditional marketing mix decisions; and, (3) identify tactical marketing activities most frequently undertaken.

  13. [State of emergency plans for massive influx of injured (PEMAF) in Italian hospitals. Pilot study].

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, D; Fizzano, M R; Barletta, C; Pietrantonio, F

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this study is to assess the level of implementation of plans for the massive influx of injured (PEMAF) in Italian hospitals. An anonymous questionnaire was administered to a sample of 100 hospitals selected through the network of the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU). Each answer of the questionnaire was assigned a score, then reported on a scale of compliance (maximum 65 points, threshold 35 points). The average scores were analyzed by hospital's venue, level of activity and previous experience of managing a real emergency. Student's t-test was used to compare means. Thirty-two hospitals sent the questionnaire, representing 33% of those selected. Five were excluded for incomplete data. The data analyzed refers to 27 hospitals of various levels of complexity, from all around the country: 55.6% from the Northern Section, 22.2% from the Centre and 22.2% from the Southern section and the Islands; and only 55.6% are above the minimum threshold of compliance. The weakest PEMAF's area is the one related to the specific training of health workers, therefore the percentage of hospitals complying the requirements in this field is down to 37%. Ten hospitals (37%) had managed a real maxi-emergence in the past: belonging to such group of hospitals is associated with an average level of compliance significantly higher than the others (p < 0.005). Due to a limited percentage of responders, the study involved so far a too small amount of hospitals; happily, they were evenly distributed in the different sections of the Country; therefore it will be appropriate to obtain a larger compliance before reaching clear-cut conclusions, but it already appears that the most critical point is the lack of specific education to maxi-emergencies in the hospital personnel.

  14. Lobotomy at a state mental hospital in Sweden. A survey of patients operated on during the period 1947-1958.

    PubMed

    Ogren, Kenneth; Sandlund, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    This retrospective survey aims at describing patients subjected to prefrontal lobotomies and the general treatment conditions at Umedalen State Mental Hospital during the period 1947-1958. Data collected from psychiatric and surgical medical records was analysed using quantitative and qualitative content analysis. A total of 771 patients subjected to lobotomy during the years 1947-1958 were identified. From these, a sample of 105 patients was selected for the purpose of obtaining detailed data on socio-economic status, diagnosis, symptomatology, other psychiatric treatments applied before the pre-frontal lobotomy operation, time spent in hospital before operation, praxis of consent and mortality. The diagnosis of schizophrenia was found in 84% of the 771 lobotomized patients. The post-operative mortality was 7.4% (57 deaths), with the highest rate in 1949 (17%). The mean age of the patient at the time of operation was 44.8 years for females and 39.5 years for male patients. The average length of pre-operative time in hospital for females was 10.7 years and for males 3.5 years. It remains unclear why this mental hospital conducted the lobotomy operation to such a comparatively great extent. Factors such as overcrowding of wards and its status as a modern mental hospital may have contributed.

  15. Quality-quantity decomposition of income elasticity of U.S. hospital care expenditure using state-level panel data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Okunade, Albert; Lubiani, Gregory G

    2014-11-01

    Economic theory suggests that income growth could lead to changes in consumption quantity and quality as the spending on a commodity changes. Similarly, the volume and quality of healthcare consumption could rise with incomes because of demographic changes, usage of innovative medical technologies, and other factors. Hospital healthcare spending is the largest component of aggregate US healthcare expenditures. The novel contribution of our paper is estimating and decomposing the income elasticity of hospital care expenditures (HOCEXP) into its quantity and quality components. By using a 1999-2008 panel dataset of the 50 US states, results from the seemingly unrelated regressions model estimation reveal the income elasticity of HOCEXP to be 0.427 (std. error=0.044), with about 0.391 (calculated std. error=0.044) arising from care quality improvements and 0.035 (std. error=0.050) emanating from the rise in usage volume. Our novel research findings suggest the following: (i) the quantity part of hospital expenditure is inelastic to income change; (ii) almost the entire income-induced rise in hospital expenditure comes from care quality changes; and (iii) the 0.427 income elasticity of HOCEXP, the largest component of total US healthcare expenditure, makes hospital care a normal commodity and a much stronger technical necessity than aggregate healthcare. Policy implications are discussed.

  16. The founding of Walter Reed General Hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals.

  17. Hospitalizations in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Michael D.; Danese, Mark; Klaassen, Robert J.; Duryea, Jennifer; Eisen, Melissa; Bussel, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine utilization and outcomes in pediatric immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) hospitalizations, we used ICD-9 code 287.31 to identify hospitalizations in patients with ITP in the 2009 HCUP KID, an all-payer sample of pediatric hospitalizations from US community hospitals. Diagnosis and procedure codes were used to estimate rates of ITP-related procedures, comorbidity prevalence, costs, length of stay (LOS), and mortality. In 2009, there were an estimated 4499 hospitalizations in children aged 6 months–17 years with ITP; 43% in children aged 1–5 years; and 47% with emergency department encounters. The mean hospitalization cost was $5398, mean LOS 2.0 days, with 0.3% mortality (n = 13). With any bleeding (15.2%, including gastrointestinal 2.0%, hematuria 1.3%, intracranial hemorrhage [ICH] 0.6%), mean hospitalization cost was $7215, LOS 2.5 days, with 1.5% mortality. For ICH (0.6%, n = 27), mean cost was $40 209, LOS 8.5 days, with 21% mortality. With infections (14%, including upper respiratory 5.2%, viral 4.9%, bacterial 1.9%), the mean cost was $6928, LOS 2.9 days, with 0.9% mortality. Septic shock was reported in 0.3% of discharges. Utilization included immunoglobulin administration (37%) and splenectomies (2.3%). Factors associated with higher costs included age >6 years, ICH, hematuria, transfusion, splenectomy, and bone marrow diagnostics (p < 0.05). In conclusion, of the 4499 hospitalizations with ITP, mortality rates of 1.5%, 21%, and 0.9% were seen with any bleeding, ICH, and infection, respectively. Higher costs were associated with clinically significant bleeding and procedures. Future analyses may reveal effects of the implementation of more recent ITP guidelines and use of additional treatments. PMID:26941022

  18. Third-party reimbursement of therapeutic recreation services within a national sample of United States hospitals.

    PubMed

    Teaff, J D; Van Hyning, T E

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the status of third-party reimbursement for therapeutic recreation services within three types of hospital classifications: Government, nonfederal (GNF); non-government, not-for-profit (NFP); and investor-owned (IO). A sample of 580 hospitals was drawn by the American Hospital Association through a randomly selected, proportionate sample from the universe of 5,799 GNF, NFP, and IO hospitals. Three hundred-twenty hospitals (55.2 percent) returned usable instruments. Based upon the analysis of 33 therapeutic recreation services approved for third-party reimbursement, it was found that: Significantly more therapeutic recreation directors who gave financing a higher priority tended to direct programs whose services were approved for third-party reimbursement; significantly more therapeutic recreation services were successful in their efforts to obtain third-party reimbursement even though they were denied approval in their initial efforts and approaches to obtain third-party reimbursement; and significantly more IO hospitals with therapeutic recreation services were approved for third-party reimbursement than either GNF or NFP therapeutic recreation services.

  19. Job satisfaction and turnover intent among hospital social workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Greg L

    2016-08-01

    Feelings of job satisfaction and turnover intentions among social workers affect work quality for both social workers and the people for whom they provide services. Existing literature on job satisfaction among hospital social workers is limited, and is overly focused on issues of compensation. There is job satisfaction research with hospital nurses available for comparison. Other informative social work research on job satisfaction and turnover exists in mental health and generally, across settings. Research on turnover intent in social work is primarily from child welfare settings and may not generalize. The literature notes gaps and contradictions about predictors of job satisfaction and turnover intent. Using a large national dataset of hospital social workers, this research clarifies and fills gaps regarding hospital social workers, and explores how Herzberg's theory of work can clarify the difference between sources of job dissatisfaction and job satisfaction. Findings include hospital social workers reporting high job satisfaction and that demographics do not contribute to the predictive models. The findings do support centralized social work departments and variety in the job functions of hospital social workers, and are consistent with the theoretical framework.

  20. Assessment of knowledge and practice of nutritional and life style risk factors associated with cancer among hospital workers at two university teaching hospitals in Osun State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ojofeitimi, E O; Aderounmu, A O; Lomuwagun, A F; Owolabi, O O; Fadiora, A O; Asa, S S; Bamiwuye, S O; Ihedioha, O D

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess both the predisposing and precipitating risk factors in the aetiology of any form of cancer among hospital workers at two teaching Hospitals in Osun State, Nigeria. Pre-tested and modified questionnaires were administered to 250 respondents. One hundred and seventy questionnaires were duly filled and completed. Less than 9% of the respondents consumed fruits and vegetables on a daily basis; while the highest percentage (65%) regularly consumed butter/margarine, followed with consumption of red meat. Twenty nine percent (29%) from both locations were classified as overweight and obese. Half did physical exercise twice a week. Of the 168 respondents. 34 (20.2%) did meet the criteria for completely emptying their bowels within a specified time of three minutes. It is concluded that whilst predisposing risk factors do not pose a threat to the onset of any form of cancer among respondents, precipitating factors are real major factors that need to be addressed through information, education and communication (I.E.C). Such an I.E.C. should be geared towards promotion of healthy eating and life style strategies. Alter all, 'the first step in cancer prevention is knowing the risk profile'.

  1. Infection rates following initial cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement across pediatric hospitals in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Tamara D.; Hall, Matthew; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Albert, J. Elaine; Jeffries, Howard E.; LaFleur, Bonnie; Dean, J. Michael; Kestle, John R. W.

    2010-01-01

    Object Reported rates of CSF shunt infection vary widely across studies. The study objective was to determine the CSF shunt infection rates after initial shunt placement at multiple US pediatric hospitals. The authors hypothesized that infection rates between hospitals would vary widely even after adjustment for patient, hospital, and surgeon factors. Methods This retrospective cohort study included children 0–18 years of age with uncomplicated initial CSF shunt placement performed between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2005, and recorded in the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) longitudinal administrative database from 41 children's hospitals. For each child with 24 months of follow-up, subsequent CSF shunt infections and procedures were determined. Results The PHIS database included 7071 children with uncomplicated initial CSF shunt placement during this time period. During the 24 months of follow-up, these patients had a total of 825 shunt infections and 4434 subsequent shunt procedures. Overall unadjusted 24-month CSF shunt infection rates were 11.7% per patient and 7.2% per procedure. Unadjusted 24-month cumulative incidence rates for each hospital ranged from 4.1 to 20.5% per patient and 2.5–12.3% per procedure. Factors significantly associated with infection (p < 0.05) included young age, female sex, African-American race, public insurance, etiology of intraventricular hemorrhage, respiratory complex chronic condition, subsequent revision procedures, hospital volume, and surgeon case volume. Malignant lesions and trauma as etiologies were protective. Infection rates for each hospital adjusted for these factors decreased to 8.8–12.8% per patient and 1.4–5.3% per procedure. Conclusions Infections developed in > 11% of children who underwent uncomplicated initial CSF shunt placements within 24 months. Patient, hospital, and surgeon factors contributed somewhat to the wide variation in CSF shunt infection rates across hospitals. Additional

  2. The evolution of orthopaedic nursing at the Hospital for Special Surgery: the first orthopaedic institution in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Barbara A

    2005-01-01

    The history of nursing began in London in the late 1800s with the reform of unsanitary conditions by Florence Nightingale. During the same period, the United States was bitterly fighting the Civil War. Nursing had not developed as a profession, and most of the duties performed by nurses were conducted by men. Casualties of war required rehabilitation and care. Crippled children were left to die because they were considered a burden to society. Dr. James Knight founded the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled in his home on Second Avenue. This would later become a world-renowned orthopaedic institution with exceptional nursing care. A historical analysis of nursing education and practice are reviewed, along with the evolution of the first orthopaedic hospital in the United States.

  3. Impacts of health education on knowledge and practice of hospital staff with regard to Healthcare waste management at White Nile State main hospitals, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Elnour, Ahmed Mohammed; Moussa, Mayada Mohamed Reda; El-Borgy, Mohamed Darwish; Fadelella, Nur Eldin Eltahir; Mahmoud, Aleya Hanafy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study aims at assessing nursing and sanitation staff knowledge and practice regarding Healthcare Waste (HCW) management before and after the implementation of an educational intervention program at the main hospitals of the White Nile State in Sudan. Methodology Quasi-experimental study design was applied to assess the impact of an intervention program on knowledge and practice regarding HCW management. The same questionnaire used in the pre-test was used immediately after the end of the intervention program and then again three months later for a second post-test. Results The results showed that the majority of nursing and sanitation staff had fair knowledge regarding HCW management before the educational intervention program (17% good, 58% fair, and 25% poor). After implementation of the educational program, the majority had good knowledge (56% good, 34% fair, and 10% poor) in the immediate post-test, and also in the post-test three months later (59% good, 35% fair, and 6% poor). More than half the nursing and sanitation staff had fair level of practice before the educational intervention program (42% good, 55% fair, and 3% poor). After the implementation of the intervention program, the immediate post-test showed a similar result (45% good, 54% fair, and 1% poor), while the post-test three months later showed that the majority demonstrated good practice level (55% good, 42% fair, and 3% poor). Conclusion The nursing and sanitation staff at the main hospitals of the White Nile State in Sudan recorded significant improvement in their knowledge and practice with regard to HCW management immediately after the educational intervention program and three months later. PMID:26609296

  4. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  5. [Nutritional care in public hospitals of four Brazilian states: contributions of health evaluation to health surveillance services].

    PubMed

    De Seta, Marismary Horsth; O'Dwyer, Gisele; Henriques, Patrícia; de Sales, Gizene Luciana Pereira

    2010-11-01

    Considering the importance of nutritional care for the quality of care provided to hospitalized patients, the study aims to assess health care in eight public hospitals that have received support from QualiSUS in four Brazilian states. There were semi-structured interviews with nutritionists, direct observation and review of 219 records of patients admitted to the medical clinics. The findings suggest weaknesses in the hospital nutritional care, poor integration between the production of food and nutritional care in the surveyed hospitals, in addition to structural deficiencies. We highlight problems related to the nutritional care process, including its documentation. In 93% of the records there were no records on the nutritional status on admission, or nutritional assessment of patients in nutritional therapy. It was observed that the assessment made by the health surveillance in routine inspections, focusing on the verification of compliance and structural aspects, does not include the detection of a possible nutritional risk for the patient. We suggest the inclusion of other criteria and strategies for surveillance, among them a review of open medical records.

  6. An Outcome Evaluation of Reality Orientation Therapy with Geriatric Patients in a State Mental Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Clarke S.; Ivory, Peter B. C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Reality Orientation (RO) Therapy, a recently developed mode of treatment for use with geriatric patients was discussed. A controlled study was conducted comparing the effects of RO with those of traditional hospital care. The results indicated that RO is a promising technique for use with a chronic geriatric patient population. (Author)

  7. Information Needs and Seeking Behaviours of Nurses: A Survey of Two Hospitals in Bayelsa State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baro, Emmanuel E.; Ebhomeya, Loveth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the information needs of nurses in two hospitals in Nigeria and the ways in which they went about attempting to meet those needs. Design/methodology/approach: The study is a descriptive survey of nurses at the Federal Medical Center (FMC), Yenagoa, and Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital…

  8. Global initiatives for improving hospital care for children: state of the art and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Harry; Duke, Trevor; Weber, Martin; English, Mike; Carai, Susanne; Tamburlini, Giorgio

    2008-04-01

    Deficiencies in the quality of health care are major limiting factors to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals for child and maternal health. Quality of patient care in hospitals is firmly on the agendas of Western countries but has been slower to gain traction in developing countries, despite evidence that there is substantial scope for improvement, that hospitals have a major role in child survival, and that inequities in quality may be as important as inequities in access. There is now substantial global experience of strategies and interventions that improve the quality of care for children in hospitals with limited resources. The World Health Organization has developed a toolkit that contains adaptable instruments, including a framework for quality improvement, evidence-based clinical guidelines in the form of the Pocket Book of Hospital Care for Children, teaching material, assessment, and mortality audit tools. These tools have been field-tested by doctors, nurses, and other child health workers in many developing countries. This collective experience was brought together in a global World Health Organization meeting in Bali in 2007. This article describes how many countries are achieving improvements in quality of pediatric care, despite limited resources and other major obstacles, and how the evidence has progressed in recent years from documenting the nature and scope of the problems to describing the effectiveness of innovative interventions. The challenges remain to bring these and other strategies to scale and to support research into their use, impact, and sustainability in different environments.

  9. Social Relations and Innovation: Changing the State of Play in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, David J.

    Data on the process and impact of introducing play therapy in children's hospitals in England and Wales are presented in this book. The effects of the introduction of play therapy on children's behaviors in children's wards and on the relationships between parents, doctors, nurses, ancillary staff, and playleaders are described. The responsiveness…

  10. A profile of hospital union election activity, 1985--1994 NLRB rulemaking and results in right-to-work states.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Thomas; Rakich, Jonathon S

    2004-01-01

    The authors present union election results in non-governmental, short-term hospitals for the 10-year period 1985--1994. The authors include profiles for the periods before (1985--1989) and after (1990--1994) the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) rulemaking. When comparing the period data, they found that the impact of rulemaking was a reduction in mean bargaining unit size, an increase in the absolute number of elections in hospitals, and an increase in the percentage of union wins. Their examination of hospital union election results in right-to-work (RTW) versus non-RTW states revealed that unions did not aggressively try to organize workers in non-RTW states and, when they did, they were not very successful. When the authors examined only initial recognition elections during the periods before and after rulemaking, as well as the whole 10 years, regression analysis identified three variables significantly related to union wins: the 1989 NLRB rule change, bargaining unit size, and employee participation rates.

  11. Influence of atmospheric states in semi-arid areas on hospital admission in cardio-surgical department.

    PubMed

    Yackerson, Naomy S; Zilberman, Arkadi; Aizenberg, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The influence of the changes in atmospheric state, typical for areas close to big deserts, on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was analyzed. Under test was the group of 3256 patients (77 % males, 23 % females), hospitalized in the Cardio-Surgical Department of Soroka Medical Center at Ben-Gurion University (BGU, Israel) during 2000-2008. To explore the relationship between atmospheric parameters and AMI, multivariate regression analysis has been performed. AMI was most frequent in winter to spring and least in summer. The highest number of cases was recorded in December and the lowest in September. Hospital admissions showed a higher prevalence in men than in women; the ratio is 3.3/1.0. About 60 % of males were aged between 45 and 65 years old with maximum ∼55 (21 %), whereas 60 % of women hospital admissions were aged between 65 and 80 years old with maximum ∼72 (24 %). The result suggested that the monthly mean relative humidity at daytime and its overall daily differences, wind speed, and respirable fraction of particulate concentration are associated with the admission for AMI. The results of the study confirm the importance of atmospheric state variability for cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Influence of atmospheric states in semi-arid areas on hospital admission in cardio-surgical department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yackerson, Naomy S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Aizenberg, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    The influence of the changes in atmospheric state, typical for areas close to big deserts, on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was analyzed. Under test was the group of 3256 patients (77 % males, 23 % females), hospitalized in the Cardio-Surgical Department of Soroka Medical Center at Ben-Gurion University (BGU, Israel) during 2000-2008. To explore the relationship between atmospheric parameters and AMI, multivariate regression analysis has been performed. AMI was most frequent in winter to spring and least in summer. The highest number of cases was recorded in December and the lowest in September. Hospital admissions showed a higher prevalence in men than in women; the ratio is 3.3/1.0. About 60 % of males were aged between 45 and 65 years old with maximum ˜55 (21 %), whereas 60 % of women hospital admissions were aged between 65 and 80 years old with maximum ˜72 (24 %). The result suggested that the monthly mean relative humidity at daytime and its overall daily differences, wind speed, and respirable fraction of particulate concentration are associated with the admission for AMI. The results of the study confirm the importance of atmospheric state variability for cardiovascular diseases.

  13. International Symposium on Ion Therapy: Planning the First Hospital-Based Heavy Ion Therapy Center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron; Pompos, Arnold; Story, Michael; Jiang, Steve; Timmerman, Robert; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of heavy ions for therapeutic purposes was initially pioneered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1970s [1, 2]. More recently, however, significant advances in determining the safety and efficacy of using heavy ions in the hospital setting have been reported in Japan and Germany [3, 4]. These promising results have helped to resurrect interest in the establishment of hospital-based heavy ion therapy in the United States. In line with these efforts, world experts in the field of heavy ion therapy were invited to attend the first annual International Symposium on Ion Therapy, which was held at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, from November 12 to 14, 2014. A brief overview of the results and discussions that took place during the symposium are presented in this article. PMID:27110586

  14. FREQUENCY OF Candida SPECIES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN TRIANGULO MINEIRO, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    MENEZES, Ralciane de Paula; FERREIRA, Joseane Cristina; de SÁ, Walkiria Machado; MOREIRA, Tomaz de Aquino; MALVINO, Lucivânia Duarte Silva; de ARAUJO, Lucio Borges; RÖDER, Denise Von Dolinger de Brito; PENATTI, Mario Paulo Amante; CANDIDO, Regina Celia; PEDROSO, Reginaldo dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Infections by Candida species are a high-impact problem in public health due to their wide incidence in hospitalized patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate frequency, susceptibility to antifungals, and genetic polymorphism of Candida species isolated from clinical specimens of hospitalized patients. The Candida isolates included in this study were obtained from blood cultures, abdominal fluids, and central venous catheters (CVC) of hospitalized patients at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Uberlândia during the period of July 2010 - June 2011. Susceptibility tests were conducted by the broth microdilution method. The RAPD-PCR tests used employed initiator oligonucleotides OPA09, OPB11, and OPE06. Of the 63 Candida isolates, 18 (28.5%) were C. albicans, 20 (31.7%) were C. parapsilosis complex species, 14 (22.2%) C. tropicalis, four (6.4%) C. glabrata, four (6.4%) C. krusei, two (3.3%) C. kefyr, and one (1.6%) C. lusitaniae. In vitro resistance to amphotericin B was observed in 12.7% of isolates. In vitroresistance to azoles was not detected, except for C. krusei. The two primers, OPA09 and OPB11, were able to distinguish different species. Isolates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complex species presented six and five clusters, respectively, with the OPA09 marker by RAPD-PCR, showing the genetic variability of the isolates of those species. It was concluded that members of the C. parapsilosis complex were the most frequent species found, and most isolates were susceptible to the antifungals amphotericin B, flucozanole, and itraconazole. High genetic polymorphisms were observed for isolates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complex species, mainly with the OPA09 marker. PMID:26200956

  15. Variations in labor supply between female and male hospital physicians: results from a modern welfare state.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Karl-Arne; Hagen, Terje P

    2012-09-01

    In industrialized countries, female physicians have up to 10h lower labor supply a week than male physicians. At the same time, the number of female physicians is increasing. The question analyzed in this article is whether these differences in labor supply for female and male hospital physicians persist in a modern welfare society, such as Norway, where comprehensive welfare reforms aim to reduce gender inequality are implemented. Information on weekly working hours from all hospital physicians in Norway during the period 2001-2007 was merged with economic variables (wages, income from other sources, net personal dept), demographic variables (age, sex, marital status, children born in the year, number of children), managerial positions and variables describing the hospital, specialty and time (year). The estimation method employed both random and fixed-effects models. Labor supply for women was 10-11 percent or 4-4.5 h per week lower than among men. The effects of children diverged strongly between the sexes. For instance, childbirth in a given year reduced the supply of working hours by women by approximately 80% but had no effects for men. After controlling for children and other factors, female physicians worked some 3-4% or 1-1.5 fewer hours than comparable male physicians. Although significant, variation in labor supply between female and male physicians is much lower in Norway then in other advanced industrialized countries.

  16. Report: Hospital waste management--awareness and practices: a study of three states in India.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Hanumantha

    2008-06-01

    The study was conducted in Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh in India. Hospitals/nursing homes and private medical practitioners in urban as well as rural areas and those from the private as well as the government sector were covered. Information on (a) awareness of bio-medical waste management rules, (b) training undertaken and (c) practices with respect to segregation, use of colour coding, sharps management, access to common waste management facilities and disposal was collected. Awareness of Bio-medical Waste Management Rules was better among hospital staff in comparison with private medical practitioners and awareness was marginally higher among those in urban areas in comparison with those in rural areas. Training gained momentum only after the dead-line for compliance was over. Segregation and use of colour codes revealed gaps, which need correction. About 70% of the healthcare facilities used a needle cutter/destroyer for sharps management. Access to Common Waste Management facilities was low at about 35%. Dumping biomedical waste on the roads outside the hospital is still prevalent and access to Common Waste facilities is still limited. Surveillance, monitoring and penal machinery was found to be deficient and these require strengthening to improve compliance with the Bio-medical Waste Management Rules and to safeguard the health of employees, patients and communities.

  17. Intranet usage and potential in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring Intranet and its potential in health care. The survey measured the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. Business-to-business electronic commerce and electronic commerce for customers were measured. Since the Intranet was not studied in survey-1997, no comparisons could be made. Therefore the results were presented and discussed. The Intranet data were compared with the Internet data and statistically significant differences were presented and analyzed. This information will assist hospitals to plan Internet and Intranet technology. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the Survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.(1) The first article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2) The second article based upon the survey results discusses distribution of Internet usage and rating of Internet usage applied to specific applications. Homepages, advertising, and electronic commerce are discussed from an Internet perspective.

  18. 78 FR 57293 - Medicaid Program; State Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotment Reductions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... commenter recommended that we analyze state-by-state Medicaid and Medicare payment ] differentials to lower... establish a DHRM that does not include a method to account for differential coverage expansions in Medicaid... that the data used will reflect differential state decisions to implement the new low- income...

  19. "Cost creep due to age creep" phenomenon: pattern analyses of in-patient hospitalization costs for various age brackets in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chinta, Ravi; Burns, David J; Manolis, Chris; Nighswander, Tristan

    2013-01-01

    The expectation that aging leads to a progressive deterioration of biological functions leading to higher healthcare costs is known as the healthcare cost creep due to age creep phenomenon. The authors empirically test the validity of this phenomenon in the context of hospitalization costs based on more than 8 million hospital inpatient records from 1,056 hospitals in the United States. The results question the existence of cost creep due to age creep after the age of 65 years as far as average hospitalization costs are concerned. The authors discuss implications for potential knowledge transfer for cost minimization and medical tourism.

  20. Questions and Answers Regarding the 2009 New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emissions Guidelines, and State Plan Process for Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This July 2011 document contains questions and answers on the Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI) regulations. The questions cover topics such as state plan requirements, compliance, applicability, operator training, and more.

  1. Teaching literacy and mathematics skills to adult psychiatric inpatients: an evaluation of the adult literacy program at Hawaii State Hospital.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Todd N; Meyer, Kim A; Samarasinghe, Roshani

    2005-01-01

    The Adult Literacy Program at Hawaii State Hospital utilized techniques drawn from the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction. In a study involving psychiatric inpatients, participants were taught reading, mathematics, or both over a 6- to 8-month time span. Using the Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-Revised, it was determined that nearly half of the participants demonstrated academic gains during the study period. Further, a behavioral observation system indicated that participants were on-task 80% of the observation time and staff engaged in positive interactions nearly 20% of the observation time. This study is the first of its kind to document any efficacy for academic instruction with a psychiatric inpatient population.

  2. Increasing Incidence of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Community Hospitals throughout the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Thaden, Joshua T.; Fowler, Vance G.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Anderson, Deverick J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the epidemiology of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP) infections DESIGN Retrospective cohort SETTING Inpatient care at community hospitals PATIENTS All patients with ESBL-EC or ESBL-KP infections METHODS ESBL-EC and ESBL-KP infections from 26 community hospitals were prospectively entered into a centralized database from January 2009 to December 2014. RESULTS A total of 925 infections caused by ESBL-EC (10.5 infections per 100,000 patient days) and 463 infections caused by ESBL-KP (5.3 infections per 100,000 patient days) were identified during 8,791,243 patient days of surveillance. The incidence of ESBL-EC infections increased from 5.28 to 10.5 patients per 100,000 patient days during the study period (P =.006). The number of community hospitals with ESBL-EC infections increased from 17 (65%) in 2009 to 20 (77%) in 2014. The median ESBL-EC infection rates among individual hospitals with ≥1 ESBL-EC infection increased from 11.1 infections/100,000 patient days (range, 2.2–33.9 days) in 2009 to 22.1 infections per 100,000 patient days (range, 0.66–134 days) in 2014 (P =.05). The incidence of ESBL-KP infections remained constant over the study period (P = .14). Community-associated and healthcare-associated ESBL-EC infections trended upward (P =.006 and P = .02, respectively), while hospital-onset infections remained stable (P = .07). ESBL-EC infections were more common in females (54% vs 44%, P < .001) and Caucasians (50% vs 40%, P < .0001), and were more likely to be isolated from the urinary tract (61% vs 52%, P < .0001) than ESBL-KP infections. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of ESBL-EC infection has increased in community hospitals throughout the southeastern United States, while the incidence of ESBL-KP infection has remained stable. Community- and healthcare-associated ESBL-EC infections are driving the upward trend. PMID:26458226

  3. Ebola Preparedness Resources for Acute-Care Hospitals in the United States: A Cross-Sectional Study of Costs, Benefits, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Smit, Michael A; Rasinski, Kenneth A; Braun, Barbara I; Kusek, Linda L; Milstone, Aaron M; Morgan, Daniel J; Mermel, Leonard A

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess resource allocation and costs associated with US hospitals preparing for the possible spread of the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in the United States. METHODS A survey was sent to a stratified national probability sample (n=750) of US general medical/surgical hospitals selected from the American Hospital Association (AHA) list of hospitals. The survey was also sent to all children's general hospitals listed by the AHA (n=60). The survey assessed EVD preparation supply costs and overtime staff hours. The average national wage was multiplied by labor hours to calculate overtime labor costs. Additional information collected included challenges, benefits, and perceived value of EVD preparedness activities. RESULTS The average amount spent by hospitals on combined supply and overtime labor costs was $80,461 (n=133; 95% confidence interval [CI], $56,502-$104,419). Multivariate analysis indicated that small hospitals (mean, $76,167) spent more on staff overtime costs per 100 beds than large hospitals (mean, $15,737; P<.0001). The overall cost for acute-care hospitals in the United States to prepare for possible EVD cases was estimated to be $361,108,968. The leading challenge was difficulty obtaining supplies from vendors due to shortages (83%; 95% CI, 78%-88%) and the greatest benefit was improved knowledge about personal protective equipment (89%; 95% CI, 85%-93%). CONCLUSIONS The financial impact of EVD preparedness activities was substantial. Overtime cost in smaller hospitals was >3 times that in larger hospitals. Planning for emerging infectious disease identification, triage, and management should be conducted at regional and national levels in the United States to facilitate efficient and appropriate allocation of resources in acute-care facilities. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:405-410.

  4. Patterns of financing for the largest hospital systems in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cleverley, William O; Baserman, Sarah Jane

    2005-01-01

    The ten large systems reviewed in this column have greater degrees of financial leverage than do most freestanding hospitals. Larger firms typically have both greater capital access and lower costs of financing. Both voluntary and IO systems make extensive use of variable rate financing, but the percentage of variable rate financing is slightly higher for voluntary systems. This difference may be attributable to larger yield curve spreads for tax-exempt versus taxable securities. Interest rate swaps were used by 70 percent of the systems, but the actual amount swapped was relatively minor. This may change in the future as financial officers become more comfortable and familiar with interest rate swap arrangements. When compared to IO systems, voluntary systems have extensive levels of cash relative to their debt positions. Cash balances are more critical in the bond-rating process for voluntary hospitals, and the ability to raise new equity is much more limited in the voluntary sector. Very little capital leasing was used in any of the systems.

  5. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases at Reference and High-Specialty Hospitals in the State of Guanajuato, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Guaní-Guerra, Eduardo; García-Ramírez, Ulises Noel; Jiménez-Romero, Ana Isabel; Velázquez-Ávalos, José Manuel; Gallardo-Martínez, Gabriela; Mendoza-Espinoza, Francisco-Javier

    2013-01-01

    Background. In general, primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) are underdiagnosed in most countries. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency and clinical spectrum of PID in the most important tertiary hospitals in our region. Methods. An observational, cross-sectional, with retrospective chart, review study was conducted. A total of 26 patients were included and grouped according to the updated classification of PIDs. Results. PIDs spectra were as follows: predominantly antibody deficiency diseases were the most common category (65.38%), followed by other well-defined immunodeficiency syndromes (11.55%), congenital defects of phagocyte number and/or function (7.69%), complement deficiencies (3.85%), combined T- and B-cell immunodeficiencies (3.85%), and defects in innate immunity (3.85%). The mean time elapsed from the onset of symptoms to the reference and diagnosis by a tertiary hospital was of 4.65 ± 6.95 years. Conclusions. Predominant antibody deficiency disease was the most common group of PIDs, agreeing with international reports. Awareness of underdiagnosis by physicians is crucial for a prompt diagnosis and treatment, which in turn should improve the quality of life among patients with PIDs. PMID:24073395

  6. Promoting infant development during neonatal hospitalization: critiquing the state of the science.

    PubMed

    Gorski, P A

    1991-01-01

    Contemporary neonatal intensive care units treat infants with very different medical conditions from those of a decade ago. Approaches to ensuring optimal outcome following high-risk birth must reflect the changing conditions and needs of these infants. This paper will review the cause and nature of change in infant status and attempt to reconcile the increasing demand for supporting stages of neuromaturation and social-emotional development during hospitalization with our current limited understanding of how fragile infants process and respond to interventions. Special cautions will be directed to well-meaning caregivers who may unwittingly jeopardize infant health and development by implementing new clinical models without empirical support. Opportunities for integrating psychosocial and medical care of these infants will also be highlighted.

  7. Coding of Electronic Laboratory Reports for Biosurveillance, Selected United States Hospitals, 2011.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Sanjaya; Burrer, Sherry L; Winston, Carla A; Dey, Achintya; Ajani, Umed; Groseclose, Samuel L

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electronic laboratory reporting has been promoted as a public health priority. The Office of the U.S. National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has endorsed two coding systems: Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for laboratory test orders and Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for test results. Materials and Methods We examined LOINC and SNOMED CT code use in electronic laboratory data reported in 2011 by 63 non-federal hospitals to BioSense electronic syndromic surveillance system. We analyzed the frequencies, characteristics, and code concepts of test orders and results. Results A total of 14,028,774 laboratory test orders or results were reported. No test orders used SNOMED CT codes. To describe test orders, 77% used a LOINC code, 17% had no value, and 6% had a non-informative value, "OTH". Thirty-three percent (33%) of test results had missing or non-informative codes. For test results with at least one informative value, 91.8% had only LOINC codes, 0.7% had only SNOMED codes, and 7.4% had both. Of 108 SNOMED CT codes reported without LOINC codes, 45% could be matched to at least one LOINC code. Conclusion Missing or non-informative codes comprised almost a quarter of laboratory test orders and a third of test results reported to BioSense by non-federal hospitals. Use of LOINC codes for laboratory test results was more common than use of SNOMED CT. Complete and standardized coding could improve the usefulness of laboratory data for public health surveillance and response.

  8. Coding of Electronic Laboratory Reports for Biosurveillance, Selected United States Hospitals, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Sanjaya; Burrer, Sherry L.; Winston, Carla A.; Dey, Achintya; Ajani, Umed; Groseclose, Samuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electronic laboratory reporting has been promoted as a public health priority. The Office of the U.S. National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has endorsed two coding systems: Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for laboratory test orders and Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for test results. Materials and Methods We examined LOINC and SNOMED CT code use in electronic laboratory data reported in 2011 by 63 non-federal hospitals to BioSense electronic syndromic surveillance system. We analyzed the frequencies, characteristics, and code concepts of test orders and results. Results A total of 14,028,774 laboratory test orders or results were reported. No test orders used SNOMED CT codes. To describe test orders, 77% used a LOINC code, 17% had no value, and 6% had a non-informative value, “OTH”. Thirty-three percent (33%) of test results had missing or non-informative codes. For test results with at least one informative value, 91.8% had only LOINC codes, 0.7% had only SNOMED codes, and 7.4% had both. Of 108 SNOMED CT codes reported without LOINC codes, 45% could be matched to at least one LOINC code. Conclusion Missing or non-informative codes comprised almost a quarter of laboratory test orders and a third of test results reported to BioSense by non-federal hospitals. Use of LOINC codes for laboratory test results was more common than use of SNOMED CT. Complete and standardized coding could improve the usefulness of laboratory data for public health surveillance and response. PMID:26392850

  9. Rehab rounds: overcoming barriers to individualized psychosocial rehabilitation in an acute treatment unit of a state hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, A S; Dollieslager, L P

    2000-03-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation begins during the acute stages of a psychiatric disorder and continues throughout the person's lifetime, with the types of services flexibly keyed to the person's phase of illness, needs, and personal goals. During periods of relapse and exacerbation of symptoms, when hospitalization is often required, psychiatric rehabilitation should include the following five objectives: * Clarify how the person's own goals in life, such as a desire for more self-control, freedom of choice, privacy, and time with friends and family, can be served by inpatient treatment and symptom stabilization. * Educate the patient about the nature of his or her illness and how medications work to restore self-control. * Teach the patient about side effects and self-monitoring and negotiating about medication and its effects in a collaborative way with the psychiatrist and other members of the treatment team. * Connect with the family or other natural supports that the person has in the community. * Enable the patient to make appropriate aftercare plans for residential and continuing treatment needs after discharge. When rehabilitation is viewed from the vantage point of these objectives, the inextricable interweaving of "treatment" with "rehabilitation" becomes clear. Treatment and rehabilitation are two sides of the same. It is much easier to integrate psychiatric rehabilitation into more traditional methods of treatment than it is to reorganize a treatment program or facility so that it blends rehabilitation with prevailing treatment imperatives of pharmacotherapy, supervision, and security and safety. In previous Rehab Rounds columns, we have described examples of creative methods for bringing the principles and practices of psychiatric rehabilitation into the treatment milieu (1,2,3). Faced with regulatory criticism from governmental agencies, Dr. Dhillon and his colleagues at Eastern State Hospital in Williamsburg, Virginia, launched a vigorous initiative to

  10. University teaching hospital and private clinic collaboration to enhance veterinary educational opportunities at Mississippi State University.

    PubMed

    Tyner, C Lee; Harkness, John; Hoblet, Kent; Zumwalt, Lauren; Templeton, Karen; McLaughlin, Ron

    2014-01-01

    The College of Veterinary Medicine at Mississippi State University established a not-for-profit corporation (MSU-CVM-COS) to develop and manage private specialty clinics that would enhance teaching and student learning, increase caseload, and generate revenue. The corporation currently operates the Animal Emergency and Referral Center (AERC) and the Veterinary Specialty Center (VSC) as affiliates of Mississippi State University. These privately managed facilities provide access to advanced medical equipment, enhance clinical service and teaching, and promote the College's One Health initiative.

  11. Impact of the NOx SIP Call on Respiratory Hospitalizations in New York State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a serious public health problem in New York State (NYS), affecting 8.4% (370,000) children and 7.6% (more than 1.1 million) adults. Asthma burden in New York's urban areas is consistently higher than the national average, with marked differences in prevalence and seve...

  12. Trends and In-Hospital Outcomes Associated With Adoption of the Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Parzynski, Craig S.; Varosy, Paul D.; Prutkin, Jordan M.; Patton, Kristen K.; Mithani, Ali; Russo, Andrea M.; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Trends and in-hospital outcomes associated with early adoption of the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) in the United States have not been described. OBJECTIVES To describe early use of the S-ICD in the United States and to compare in-hospital outcomes among patients undergoing S-ICD vs transvenous (TV)-ICD implantation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective analysis of 393 734 ICD implants reported to the National Cardiovascular Data Registry ICD Registry, a nationally representative US ICD registry, between September 28, 2012 (US Food and Drug Administration S-ICD approval date), and March 31, 2015, was conducted. A 1:1:1 propensity-matched analysis of 5760 patients was performed to compare in-hospital outcomes among patients with S-ICD with those of patients with single-chamber (SC)–ICD and dual-chamber (DC)–ICD. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of trends in S-ICD adoption as a function of total ICD implants and comparison of in-hospital outcomes (death, complications, and defibrillation threshold [DFT] testing) among S-ICD and TV-ICD recipients. RESULTS Of the 393 734 ICD implants evaluated during the study period, 3717 were S-ICDs (0.9%). A total of 109 445 (27.8%) of the patients were female; the mean (SD) age was 67.03 (13.10) years. Use of ICDs increased from 0.2%during the fourth quarter of 2012 to 1.9% during the first quarter of 2015. Compared with SC-ICD and DC-ICD recipients, those with S-ICDs were more often younger, female, black, undergoing dialysis, and had experienced prior cardiac arrest. Among 2791 patients with S-ICD who underwent DFT testing, 2588 (92.7%), 2629 (94.2%), 2635 (94.4%), and 2784 (99.7%) were successfully defibrillated (≤65, ≤70, ≤75, and≤80 J, respectively). In the propensity-matched analysis of 5760 patients, in-hospital complication rates associated with S-ICDs (0.9%) were comparable to those of SC-ICDs (0.6%) (P = .27) and DC-ICD rates (1.5%) (P = .11). Mean (SD

  13. [Analysis of the implementation of a mobile pre-hospital treatment system in five Brazilian state capitals].

    PubMed

    Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza; Deslandes, Suely Ferreira

    2008-08-01

    The article presents a description and analysis of the implementation of a pre-hospital treatment system (SAMU) as part of the research project Diagnostic Analysis of the Implementation of a National Policy for the Reduction of Violence and Accidents. Implementation and organization of the SAMU service, together with the related materials, human resources, and equipment, was studied in five Brazilian State capitals with high morbidity and mortality rates from external causes: Curitiba (Paraná), Recife (Pernambuco), Brasília (Federal District), Rio de Janeiro, and Manaus (Amazonas). The study involved four phases, each developing exploratory and analytical cycles, combined with fieldwork, triangulating quantitative and qualitative data. Implementation of the pre-hospital treatment system is now a key health sector asset. Further necessary steps include: comprehensive legislation covering vehicles, personnel, and equipment; closer networking between mobile units and healthcare facilities; focus on information generated in this sub-system, thus facilitating planning; and maintaining and upgrading high qualifications for SAMU crews. The service is officially establishing, standardizing, and regulating a sub-system that is crucial for saving lives.

  14. Tobacco smoke exposure in nonsmoking hospitality workers before and after a state smoking ban.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Joni A; Schillo, Barbara A; Moilanen, Molly M; Lindgren, Bruce R; Murphy, Sharon; Carmella, Steven; Hecht, Stephen S; Hatsukami, Dorothy K

    2010-04-01

    Secondhand smoke exposure is estimated to account for 3,000 cancer deaths per year. Although several countries and states in the United States have passed comprehensive smoke-free laws to protect all employees, a significant number of workers are still not protected. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of passing a comprehensive smoking ban that included bars and restaurants on biomarkers of nicotine and carcinogen exposure. The urines of nonsmoking employees (n = 24) of bars and restaurants that allowed smoking before the smoke-free law were analyzed before and after the law was passed in Minnesota. The results showed significant reductions in both total cotinine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (free plus glucuronidated) after the ban was instituted. These results provide further support for the importance of protecting employees working in all venues.

  15. Trends in Aortic Dissection Hospitalizations, Interventions, and Outcomes among Medicare Beneficiaries in the United States, 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Purav S.; Wang, Yun; Geirsson, Arnar; Kim, Nancy; Desai, Mayur M.; Gupta, Aakriti; Dodson, John A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of aortic dissection (AD) has not been well-described among older persons in the United States. It is not known whether advancements in AD care over the last decade have been accompanied by changes in outcomes. Methods and Results The Inpatient Medicare data from 2000 to 2011 were used to determine trends in hospitalization rates for AD. Mortality rates were ascertained through corresponding vital status files. A total of 32,057 initial AD hospitalizations were identified between 2000 and 2011. The overall hospitalization rate for AD remained unchanged at 10 per 100,000 person-years. For 30-day and 1-year mortality associated with AD, the observed rate decreased from 31.8% to 25.4% (difference, 6.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.2–6.5; adjusted, 6.4%; 95% CI, 5.7–6.9) and from 42.6% to 37.4% (difference, 5.2%; 95% CI, 5.1–5.2; adjusted, 6.2%; 95% CI, 5.3–6.7) respectively. For patients undergoing surgical repair for type A dissections, the observed 30-day mortality decreased from 30.7% to 21.4% (difference, 9.3%; 95% CI, 8.3–10.2; adjusted, 7.3%; 95% CI, 5.8–7.8) and the observed 1-year mortality decreased from 39.9% to 31.6% (difference, 8.3%; 95% CI, 7.5–9.1%; adjusted, 8.2%; 95% CI, 6.7 – 9.1). The 30-day mortality decreased from 24.9% to 21% (difference, 3.9%; 95% CI, 3.5–4.2; adjusted, 2.9%; 95% CI, 0.7–4.4) and 1-year decreased from 36.4% to 32.5% (difference, 3.9%; 95% CI, 3.3–4.3; adjusted, 3.9%; 95% CI, 2.5–6.3) for surgical repair of type B dissection. Conclusions While AD hospitalization rates remained stable, improvement in mortality was noted, particularly in patients undergoing surgical repair. PMID:25336626

  16. Short Term Effects of Particle Exposure on Hospital Admissions in the Mid-Atlantic States: A Population Estimate

    PubMed Central

    Kloog, Itai; Nordio, Francesco; Zanobetti, Antonella; Coull, Brent A.; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies report significant associations between PM2.5 (particulate matter <2.5 micrometers) and hospital admissions. These studies mostly rely on a limited number of monitors which introduces exposure error, and excludes rural and suburban populations from locations where monitors are not available, reducing generalizability and potentially creating selection bias. Methods Using prediction models developed by our group, daily PM2.5 exposure was estimated across the Mid-Atlantic (Washington D.C., and the states of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York and West Virginia). We then investigated the short-term effects of PM2.5 exposures on emergency hospital admissions of the elderly in the Mid-Atlantic region.We performed case-crossover analysis for each admission type, matching on day of the week, month and year and defined the hazard period as lag01 (a moving average of day of admission exposure and previous day exposure). Results We observed associations between short-term exposure to PM2.5 and hospitalization for all outcomes examined. For example, for every 10-µg/m3 increase in short-term PM 2.5 there was a 2.2% increase in respiratory diseases admissions (95% CI = 1.9 to 2.6), and a 0.78% increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD) admission rate (95% CI = 0.5 to 1.0). We found differences in risk for CVD admissions between people living in rural and urban areas. For every10-µg/m3 increase in PM 2.5 exposure in the ‘rural’ group there was a 1.0% increase (95% CI = 0.6 to 1.5), while for the ‘urban’ group the increase was 0.7% (95% CI = 0.4 to 1.0). Conclusions Our findings showed that PM2.5 exposure was associated with hospital admissions for all respiratory, cardio vascular disease, stroke, ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admissions. In addition, we demonstrate that our AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) based exposure models can be successfully applied to epidemiological

  17. Attribution of foodborne illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths to food commodities by using outbreak data, United States, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Painter, John A; Hoekstra, Robert M; Ayers, Tracy; Tauxe, Robert V; Braden, Christopher R; Angulo, Frederick J; Griffin, Patricia M

    2013-03-01

    Each year, >9 million foodborne illnesses are estimated to be caused by major pathogens acquired in the United States. Preventing these illnesses is challenging because resources are limited and linking individual illnesses to a particular food is rarely possible except during an outbreak. We developed a method of attributing illnesses to food commodities that uses data from outbreaks associated with both simple and complex foods. Using data from outbreak-associated illnesses for 1998-2008, we estimated annual US foodborne illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths attributable to each of 17 food commodities. We attributed 46% of illnesses to produce and found that more deaths were attributed to poultry than to any other commodity. To the extent that these estimates reflect the commodities causing all foodborne illness, they indicate that efforts are particularly needed to prevent contamination of produce and poultry. Methods to incorporate data from other sources are needed to improve attribution estimates for some commodities and agents.

  18. Symptomatic Gallstones in the Young: Changing Trends of the Gallstone Disease-Related Hospitalization in the State of New York: 1996 - 2010

    PubMed Central

    Chilimuri, Sridhar; Gaduputi, Vinaya; Tariq, Hassan; Nayudu, Suresh; Vakde, Trupti; Glandt, Mariela; Patel, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate if the gallstone-related hospitalizations in the young (< 20 years of age) have increased over time in both the Bronx County and New York State as a whole. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 15 years (1996 - 2010) of Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) data of New York State Department of Health. Patients with ICD-9 code diagnosis of 574 (cholelithiasis) among the first three discharge diagnoses were reviewed. Results Total number of all cause admissions to hospitals had increased from 2.44 million to 2.77 million (1996 - 2010). However, gallstone-related hospitalizations had decreased from 1.7% to 1.2%. It was noted that there was a 30% increment in the proportion of those below 20 years of age with gallstone disease requiring hospitalization over the same period. This young patient population contributed only 2.04% to all gallstone-related hospitalizations in 1996, whereas it had increased to 2.96% in 2010. This trend was more pronounced in women, Hispanics and in those who were residing in the Bronx County as compared to all other New York counties combined. Conclusion The gallstone-related hospitalizations in the young (< 20 years of age) have increased over time in both the Bronx County and New York State as a whole. This could be due to increasing prevalence of risk factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, diabetes and early pregnancy. PMID:28090227

  19. Impact of El Niño Southern Oscillation on infectious disease hospitalization risk in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fisman, David N; Tuite, Ashleigh R; Brown, Kevin A

    2016-12-20

    Although the global climate is changing at an unprecedented rate, links between weather and infectious disease have received little attention in high income countries. The "El Niño Southern Oscillation" (ENSO) occurs irregularly and is associated with changing temperature and precipitation patterns. We studied the impact of ENSO on infectious diseases in four census regions in the United States. We evaluated infectious diseases requiring hospitalization using the US National Hospital Discharge Survey (1970-2010) and five disease groupings that may undergo epidemiological shifts with changing climate: (i) vector-borne diseases, (ii) pneumonia and influenza, (iii) enteric disease, (iv) zoonotic bacterial disease, and (v) fungal disease. ENSO exposure was based on the Multivariate ENSO Index. Distributed lag models, with adjustment for seasonal oscillation and long-term trends, were used to evaluate the impact of ENSO on disease incidence over lags of up to 12 mo. ENSO was associated more with vector-borne disease [relative risk (RR) 2.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-8.48] and less with enteric disease (0.73, 95% CI 0.62-0.87) in the Western region; the increase in vector-borne disease was attributable to increased risk of rickettsioses and tick-borne infectious diseases. By contrast, ENSO was associated with more enteric disease in non-Western regions (RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.02-1.15). The periodic nature of ENSO may make it a useful natural experiment for evaluation of the impact of climatic shifts on infectious disease risk. The impact of ENSO suggests that warmer temperatures and extreme variation in precipitation events influence risks of vector-borne and enteric disease in the United States.

  20. Impact of El Niño Southern Oscillation on infectious disease hospitalization risk in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fisman, David N.; Tuite, Ashleigh R.; Brown, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Although the global climate is changing at an unprecedented rate, links between weather and infectious disease have received little attention in high income countries. The “El Niño Southern Oscillation” (ENSO) occurs irregularly and is associated with changing temperature and precipitation patterns. We studied the impact of ENSO on infectious diseases in four census regions in the United States. We evaluated infectious diseases requiring hospitalization using the US National Hospital Discharge Survey (1970–2010) and five disease groupings that may undergo epidemiological shifts with changing climate: (i) vector-borne diseases, (ii) pneumonia and influenza, (iii) enteric disease, (iv) zoonotic bacterial disease, and (v) fungal disease. ENSO exposure was based on the Multivariate ENSO Index. Distributed lag models, with adjustment for seasonal oscillation and long-term trends, were used to evaluate the impact of ENSO on disease incidence over lags of up to 12 mo. ENSO was associated more with vector-borne disease [relative risk (RR) 2.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–8.48] and less with enteric disease (0.73, 95% CI 0.62–0.87) in the Western region; the increase in vector-borne disease was attributable to increased risk of rickettsioses and tick-borne infectious diseases. By contrast, ENSO was associated with more enteric disease in non-Western regions (RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.02–1.15). The periodic nature of ENSO may make it a useful natural experiment for evaluation of the impact of climatic shifts on infectious disease risk. The impact of ENSO suggests that warmer temperatures and extreme variation in precipitation events influence risks of vector-borne and enteric disease in the United States. PMID:27791069

  1. Interpreting the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: United States Emergency Department Opioid Prescribing, 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kea, Bory; Fu, Rochelle; Lowe, Robert A.; Sun, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prescription opioid overdoses are a leading cause of death in the United States. Emergency departments (EDs) are potentially high risk environments for doctor shopping and diversion. We hypothesized that opioid prescribing rates from the ED have increased over time. Methods We analyzed data on ED discharges from the 2006–2010 NHAMCS, a probability sample of all United States EDs. The outcome was documentation of an opioid prescription on discharge. The primary independent predictor was time. Covariates included severity of pain, a pain-related discharge diagnosis, age, gender, race, payer, hospital ownership, and geographic location of hospital. Up to three discharge diagnoses were available in NHAMCS to identify ‘pain-related’ (e.g. back pain, fracture, dental/jaw pain, nephrolithiasis) ED visits. We performed multivariate logistic regression to assess the independent associations between opioid prescribing and predictors. All analyses incorporated NHAMCS survey weights, and all results are presented as national estimates. Results Opioids were prescribed for 18.7% (95% CI: 17.7–19.7%) of all ED discharges, representing 18.8 million prescriptions per year. There were no significant temporal trends in opioid prescribing overall (adjusted p=0.93). Painful discharge diagnoses that received the top 3 highest proportion of opioids prescriptions included: nephrolithiasis (62.1%), neck pain (51.6%), and dental/jaw pain (49.7%). A pain-related discharge diagnosis, non-Hispanic white race, older age, male gender, uninsured status and Western region were associated with opioid prescribing (p<0.05). Conclusions We found with no temporal trend towards increased prescribing from 2006–2012. Our results suggest that problems with opioid over-prescribing are multifactorial and not solely rooted in the ED. PMID:26802501

  2. Stating Appointment Costs in SMS Reminders Reduces Missed Hospital Appointments: Findings from Two Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hallsworth, Michael; Berry, Dan; Sanders, Michael; Sallis, Anna; King, Dominic; Vlaev, Ivo; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Missed hospital appointments are a major cause of inefficiency worldwide. Healthcare providers are increasingly using Short Message Service reminders to reduce ‘Did Not Attend’ (DNA) rates. Systematic reviews show that sending such reminders is effective, but there is no evidence on whether their impact is affected by their content. Accordingly, we undertook two randomised controlled trials that tested the impact of rephrasing appointment reminders on DNA rates in the United Kingdom. Trial Methods Participants were outpatients with a valid mobile telephone number and an outpatient appointment between November 2013 and January 2014 (Trial One, 10,111 participants) or March and May 2014 (Trial Two, 9,848 participants). Appointments were randomly allocated to one of four reminder messages, which were issued five days in advance. Message assignment was then compared against appointment outcomes (appointment attendance, DNA, cancellation by patient). Results In Trial One, a message including the cost of a missed appointment to the health system produced a DNA rate of 8.4%, compared to 11.1% for the existing message (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.61–0.89, P<0.01). Trial Two replicated this effect (DNA rate 8.2%), but also found that expressing the same concept in general terms was significantly less effective (DNA rate 9.9%, OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.00–1.48, P<0.05). Moving from the existing reminder to the more effective costs message would result in 5,800 fewer missed appointments per year in the National Health Service Trust in question, at no additional cost. The study’s main limitations are that it took place in a single location in England, and that it required accurate phone records, which were only obtained for 20% of eligible patients. We conclude that missed appointments can be reduced, for no additional cost, by introducing persuasive messages to appointment reminders. Future studies could examine the impact of varying reminder messages in other health

  3. Risk factors associated with calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chika C; Lefebvre, Sandra L; Pearl, David L; Yang, Mingyin; Wang, Mansen; Blois, Shauna L; Lund, Elizabeth M; Dewey, Cate E

    2014-08-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis results from the formation of aggregates of calcium salts in the urinary tract. Difficulties associated with effectively treating calcium oxalate urolithiasis and the proportional increase in the prevalence of calcium oxalate uroliths relative to other urolith types over the last 2 decades has increased the concern of clinicians about this disease. To determine factors associated with the development of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States, a retrospective case-control study was performed. A national electronic database of medical records of all dogs evaluated between October 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 at 787 general care veterinary hospitals in the United States was reviewed. Dogs were selected as cases at the first-time diagnosis of a laboratory-confirmed urolith comprised of at least 70% calcium oxalate (n=452). Two sets of control dogs with no history of urolithiasis diagnosis were randomly selected after the medical records of all remaining dogs were reviewed: urinalysis examination was a requirement in the selection of one set (n=1808) but was not required in the other set (n=1808). Historical information extracted included urolith composition, dog's diet, age, sex, neuter status, breed size category, hospital location, date of diagnosis, and urinalysis results. Multivariable analysis showed that the odds of first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were significantly (P<0.05) greater for dogs<7 years, males (OR: 7.77, 95% CI: 4.93-12.26), neutered (OR: 2.58, 1.44-4.63), toy- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.15, 1.90-5.22), small- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.05, 1.83-5.08), large- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 0.05, 0.01-0.19), and those with a diagnosis of cystitis within the previous year (OR: 6.49, 4.14-10.16). Urinary factors significantly associated with first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were acidic vs. basic pH (OR: 1.94, 1

  4. Relating weather types to asthma-related hospital admissions in New York State.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cameron C; Sheridan, Scott C; Lin, Shao

    2012-12-01

    Many previous studies have looked into the relationship between asthma and individual weather variables, but comparatively few have looked at this relationship using holistic weather types (WTs). Utilizing the Spatial Synoptic Classification, this research considers up to 6 days of lag time while investigating the asthma-to-WT relationship in two age groups (under 18 and 18 and over) throughout New York State. Results indicate that a cold and dry WT in autumn corresponds to increased asthma admissions and spike days in admissions in New York City (NYC) for the school-aged population, while hot and dry WTs in summer correspond to spike days in asthma admissions in both age groups. However, results vary considerably for other regions, seasons and WTs, and spike day analysis yields clearer results than the analysis of total anomalous admissions. When stratified by multiple regions and age groups, the sample size of daily asthma admissions is a limiting factor outside of NYC.

  5. An analysis of admissions from 155 United States hospitals to determine the influence of weather on stroke incidence.

    PubMed

    Cowperthwaite, Matthew C; Burnett, Mark G

    2011-05-01

    Weather is the most frequently proposed factor driving apparent seasonal trends in stroke admissions. Here, we present the largest study of the association between weather and ischemic stroke in the USA to date. We consider admissions to 155 United States hospitals in 20 states during the five-year period from 2004 to 2008. The data set included 196,439 stroke admissions, which were classified as ischemic (n=98,930), hemorrhagic (n=18,960), or transient ischemic attack (n=78,549). Variations in stroke admissions were tested to determine if they tracked seasonal and transient weather patterns over the same time period. Using autocorrelation analyses, no significant seasonal changes in stroke admissions were observed over the study period. Using time-series analyses, no significant association was observed between any weather variable and any stroke subtype over the five-year study. This study suggests that seasonal associations between weather and stroke are highly confounded, and an association between weather and stroke is virtually non-existent. Therefore, previous studies reporting an association between specific weather patterns and stroke should be interpreted with caution.

  6. Predictors of Recurrent Hospital Admission for Patients Presenting With Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Annabel L.; Crider, Courtney Champagne; Xu, Xizheng; Naqvi, Syed Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) are two serious, preventable complications of diabetes mellitus. Analysis of variables associated with recurrent DKA and HHS admission has the potential to improve patient outcomes by identifying possible areas for intervention. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential predictors of recurrent DKA or HHS admission. Methods This was a retrospective case-control study of 367 patients presenting during a 5-year period with DKA or HHS at a US tertiary academic medical center. Six potential readmission risk factors identified via literature review were coded as “1” if present and “0” if absent. Readmission odds ratios (ORs) for each risk factor and for the combined score of significant risk factors were calculated by logistic regression. Results Readmission odds were significantly increased for patients with age < 35, history of depression or substance/alcohol abuse, and self-pay/publicly funded insurance. HbA1C > 10.6% on admission and ethnic minority status did not significantly increase readmission odds, with inadequate study power for these variables. A total “ABCD” score, based on Age (< 35 years), Behavioral health (depression), insurance Coverage (self-pay/publicly funded insurance), and Drug/alcohol abuse, also had a significant effect on readmission odds. Conclusions Consideration of individual risk factors and the use of a scoring system based on objective predictors of recurrent DKA and HHS admission could be of value in helping identify patients with high readmission risk, allowing interventions to be targeted most effectively to reduce readmission rates, associated morbidity, and mortality. PMID:27924173

  7. Effect of glycemic state on hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Chi, Albert; Lissauer, Matthew E; Kirchoffner, Jill; Scalea, Thomas M; Johnson, Steven B

    2011-11-01

    Intensive insulin therapy can reduce mortality. Hypoglycemia related to intensive therapy may worsen outcomes. This study compared risk adjusted mortality for different glycemic states. A retrospective review of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit over 4 years was performed. Patients were divided into glycemic groups: HYPER (≥1 episode > 180 mg/dL, any <60), HYPO (≥1 episode < 60 mg/dL, any >180), BOTH (≥1 episode < 60 and ≥1 episode > 180 mg/dL), NORMO (all episodes 60-180 mg/dL), HYPER-Only (≥1 episode > 180, none <60 mg/dL), and HYPO-Only (≥1 episode < 60, none >180 mg/dL). Observed to expected Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III mortality ratios (O/E) were studied. Number of adverse glycemic events was compared with mortality. Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia occurred in 18 per cent and 50 per cent of patients. Mortality was 12.4 per cent (O/E = 0.88). BOTH had the highest O/E ratio (1.43) with HYPO the second highest (1.30). Groups excluding hypoglycemia (NORMO and HYPER-only) had the lowest O/E ratios: 0.56 and 0.88. Increasing number of hypoglycemic events were associated with increasing O/E ratio: 0.69 O/E for no events, 1.19 for 1-3 events, 1.35 for 4-6 events, 1.9 for 7-9 events, and 3.13 for ≥ 10 events. Ten or more hyperglycemic events were needed to significantly associate with worse mortality (O/E 1.53). Hyper- and hypoglycemia increase mortality compared with APACHE III expected mortality, with highest mortality risk if both are present. Hypoglycemia is associated with worse risk. Glucose control may need to be loosened to prevent hypoglycemia and reduce glucose variability.

  8. Hospitalizations for Alcohol and Drug Overdoses in Young Adults Ages 18–24 in the United States, 1999–2008: Results From the Nationwide Inpatient Sample

    PubMed Central

    White, Aaron M.; Hingson, Ralph W.; Pan, I-jen; yi, Hsiao-ye

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Recent reports indicate an increase in rates of hospitalizations for drug overdoses in the United States. The role of alcohol in hospitalizations for drug overdoses remains unclear. Excessive consumption of alcohol and drugs is prevalent in young adults ages 18–24. The present study explores rates and costs of inpatient hospital stays for alcohol overdoses, drug overdoses, and their co-occurrence in young adults ages 18–24 and changes in these rates between 1999 and 2008. Method: Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were used to estimate numbers, rates, and costs of inpatient hospital stays stemming from alcohol overdoses (and their subcategories, alcohol poisonings and excessive consumption of alcohol), drug overdoses (and their subcategories, drug poisonings and nondependent abuse of drugs), and their co-occurrence in 18- to 24-year-olds. Results: Hospitalization rates for alcohol overdoses alone increased 25% from 1999 to 2008, reaching 29,412 cases in 2008 at a cost of $266 million. Hospitalization rates for drug overdoses alone increased 55%, totaling 113,907 cases in 2008 at a cost of $737 million. Hospitalization rates for combined alcohol and drug overdoses increased 76%, with 29,202 cases in 2008 at a cost of $198 million. Conclusions: Rates of hospitalizations for alcohol overdoses, drug overdoses, and their combination all increased from 1999 to 2008 among 18- to 24-year-olds. The cost of such hospitalizations now exceeds $1.2 billion annually. The steepest increase occurred among cases of combined alcohol and drug overdoses. Stronger efforts are needed to educate medical practitioners and the public about the risk of overdoses, particularly when alcohol is combined with other drugs. PMID:21906505

  9. Seasonal Variations and Trends in Hospitalization for Peptic Ulcer Disease in the United States: A 12-Year Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Moiz; Patel, Nileshkumar; Thakkar, Badal; Solanki, Shantanu; Tareen, Sarah; Fasullo, Matthew J; Kesavan, Mayurathan; Nalluri, Nikhil; Khan, Ahsan; Pau, Dhaval; Deeb, Liliane; Abergel, Jeffrey; Das, Ananya

    2016-01-01

    Background Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is a major public health burden significantly impacting the cost of hospitalization in the United States (US). We examined the trends, characteristics, complications, cost, and seasonality of PUD-related hospitalizations from 2000 to 2011. Methods With the use of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2000 through 2011, we identified PUD-related hospitalizations using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9), 9th Revision, and the Clinical Modification code 531.00 to 534.91 as the principal discharge diagnosis. The total number of hospitalizations for each calendar month of the year were added over a 12-year period, and this number was divided by the number of days in that particular month to obtain the mean hospitalizations per day for each month. Results The study found that 351,921 hospitalizations with the primary discharge diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) occurred in the US between 2000 and 2011. This number dropped significantly from 49,524 to 17,499 between 2000 and 2011, and the rate of PUD-related mortality decreased from 4.3% to 3.1%. The mean age of the study population was 66.2 ± 17.4 years; 52.3% were males, and 56.8% were white. The number of hospitalizations in the US peaked in the spring season (916/day), and reached a nadir in the fall season (861/day). The mean cost of PUD hospitalization increased significantly from $11,755 in 2001 to $13,803 in 2011 (relative increase of 17%; p <0.001). Conclusion The incidence of PUD and its mortality has decreased significantly in the last decade, but its economic burden on the healthcare system remains high. A seasonal pattern of PUD hospitalization showed a peak in PUD-related admissions in the spring season and a trough in the fall season. PMID:27909642

  10. Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: cross sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sermeus, Walter; Van den Heede, Koen; Sloane, Douglas M; Busse, Reinhard; McKee, Martin; Bruyneel, Luk; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Griffiths, Peter; Moreno-Casbas, Maria Teresa; Tishelman, Carol; Scott, Anne; Brzostek, Tomasz; Kinnunen, Juha; Schwendimann, Rene; Heinen, Maud; Zikos, Dimitris; Sjetne, Ingeborg Strømseng; Smith, Herbert L; Kutney-Lee, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether hospitals with a good organisation of care (such as improved nurse staffing and work environments) can affect patient care and nurse workforce stability in European countries. Design Cross sectional surveys of patients and nurses. Setting Nurses were surveyed in general acute care hospitals (488 in 12 European countries; 617 in the United States); patients were surveyed in 210 European hospitals and 430 US hospitals. Participants 33 659 nurses and 11 318 patients in Europe; 27 509 nurses and more than 120 000 patients in the US. Main outcome measures Nurse outcomes (hospital staffing, work environments, burnout, dissatisfaction, intention to leave job in the next year, patient safety, quality of care), patient outcomes (satisfaction overall and with nursing care, willingness to recommend hospitals). Results The percentage of nurses reporting poor or fair quality of patient care varied substantially by country (from 11% (Ireland) to 47% (Greece)), as did rates for nurses who gave their hospital a poor or failing safety grade (4% (Switzerland) to 18% (Poland)). We found high rates of nurse burnout (10% (Netherlands) to 78% (Greece)), job dissatisfaction (11% (Netherlands) to 56% (Greece)), and intention to leave (14% (US) to 49% (Finland, Greece)). Patients’ high ratings of their hospitals also varied considerably (35% (Spain) to 61% (Finland, Ireland)), as did rates of patients willing to recommend their hospital (53% (Greece) to 78% (Switzerland)). Improved work environments and reduced ratios of patients to nurses were associated with increased care quality and patient satisfaction. In European hospitals, after adjusting for hospital and nurse characteristics, nurses with better work environments were half as likely to report poor or fair care quality (adjusted odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.61) and give their hospitals poor or failing grades on patient safety (0.50, 0.44 to 0.56). Each additional

  11. Alternative models of hospital-physician affiliation as the United States moves away from tight managed care.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence; Robinson, James C

    2003-01-01

    Using concepts from organizational economics and sociology, this article compares the medical staff, hospital-owned physician practice, and hybrid models of hospital-physician coordination, as well as the pressures for affiliation during the premanaged care, tight managed care, and loose managed care eras. Case studies of two hospital systems in New York City and two in San Diego illustrate the concepts. Although pressures for tighter hospital-physician affiliation now are weaker than during the era of tight managed care, they are greater than they were before managed care. Hospitals are not reverting to exclusive use of the medical staff model of affiliation but rather are maintaining a mix of medical staff, owned physician practice, and hybrid models. Hospitals probably will continue to seek tighter affiliations with physicians to increase coordination, enhance negotiating leverage with health plans, and gain admissions.

  12. Hospitals--A Current Analysis of the Right to Abortions and Sterilizations in the Fourth Circuit: State Action and the Church Amendment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malpass, Susie

    1976-01-01

    The U. S. Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade found that the right of privacy guarantees a woman the prerogative of having an abortion free of interference by the state; but in Doe v. Bolton it allowed a hospital to refuse to admit a patient for an abortion. This conflict is discussed with reference to the Church Amendment. (LBH)

  13. [Unified National Health System costs in São José dos Campos, São Paulo State, Brazil, for hospital admissions due to external causes].

    PubMed

    Melione, Luís Paulo Rodrigues; Mello-Jorge, Maria Helena Prado de

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify direct expenditures for hospitalizations due to external causes in the Unified National Health System (SUS) in the city of São José dos Campos, São Paulo State, Brazil. Admissions to the Dr. José de Carvalho Florence Municipal Hospital resulting from external causes or injuries - ICD-10, chapters XIX and XX respectively - were analyzed for the first semester of 2003. 976 patient admission forms were analyzed, after data evaluation. Admissions with the highest total cost were those resulting from motor vehicle accidents and falls. The highest mean cost for hospitalization for injury was due to motor vehicle accidents (BRL 614.63), followed by assault (BRL 594.90). The highest mean cost for hospitalization due to injury was for cervical fractures (BRL 1,191.42) and head injuries (BRL 1,000.44). Hospitalizations with the highest daily cost were skull and facial fractures (BRL 166.72) and abdominal trauma (BRL 148.26). The study confirmed that motor vehicle accidents, falls, and assault are an important source of costs due to hospitalization for injuries.

  14. [Assessment of airborne mycoflora in critical areas of the Principal Hospital of Cumaná, state of Sucre, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Centeno, Sara; Machado, Sandra

    2004-06-01

    The study of the nosocomial infections of fungic origin has attained importance in the last years, due to the rise in the number of patients that are inmunocompromised and susceptible to suffer this kind of infection. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of filamentous fungi and yeast, present in the environment of the Intensive Care Unit, operating and newborn children rooms of the Hospital Universitario "Antonio Patricio de Alcalá" (HUAPA) from the city of Cumaná. Suere State, Venezuela. The recount of colony forming units/plate (UCF/plate) of the filamentous fungi and yeast was done in Petri plates with Sabouraud dextrose agar, which were exposed in the different studied areas. Eventually, the fungus colonies found were isolated and identified. The area that presented the highest average of UCF/plate was the Intensive Care Unit (9 UCF/plate). The isolated genus of filamentous fungus in higher proportion were Aspergillus (46.80%), Penicillium (19.19%) and Fusarium (11.06%). The isolated species with more frequency were Aspergillus niger (24.80%), Aspergillus flavus (10.54%) and Fusarium solani (9.52%). Rhodotorula glutinis was the isolated yeast with most frequency and different species of the genus Candida and the genus Criptococcus were isolated as well.

  15. United States - The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: Working with patients, carers and hospital professionals to improve awareness, treatment and patient choice.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    By working locally with patients and carers from diagnosis and treatment through to aftercare, helping professionals to improve their knowledge and awareness about blood cancers and best practice treatment, while also advocating at the national level, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is working to strengthen coordination between patients, carers and professionals along the whole care pathway. By helping patients to become more engaged and empowered to make informed choices, improve treatment for blood cancers through education, LLS is working to enhance patient-centred care in a largely privatized and fragmented health services system in the United States. By providing web-based resources and a free national helpline, alongside a face to face local support network, LLS is helping patients to learn more about their condition, treatment choices and the care pathways they can access. Free professional development and education seminars are also offered to nurses, oncologists and social workers in hospitals, highlighting new approaches to treatment and care with a patient-centred approach.

  16. Analysis of outcome variables of a token economy system in a state psychiatric hospital: a program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Comaty, J E; Stasio, M; Advokat, C

    2001-01-01

    This study describes the outcome of a token economy treatment applied to 2 distinct patient populations on the same unit of a state psychiatric hospital: individuals with a dual diagnosis of mental retardation and a DSM-IV Axis I diagnosis of either (a) a severe behavior disorder (BD) or (b) a serious and persistent psychiatric disorder (PD). Results showed that patients in the PD group were more likely to complete the treatment (17/20) than those in the BD group (17/31) who were more likely to be terminated from the program (14/31). Individuals who did not complete the program were distinguished early, within the first 3 weeks of treatment. These noncompleters received significantly more fines and earned significantly fewer tokens than those who completed the program. At an average of 2.7 years post-discharge, there was no difference in the proportion of PD (12/16) and BD completers (9/11) and BD noncompleters (3/7) remaining in the community. These data show that diverse populations of patients can be treated within the same token economy program, thereby improving cost effectiveness. Future research should be directed toward characterizing those patients (e.g., BD) less likely to succeed when they enter treatment, and determining if modifications in the program can improve that outcome.

  17. [Ehrlichia canis in dogs attended in a veterinary hospital from Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tatiana E H; Aguiar, Daniel M; Pacheco, Richard C; Richtzenhain, Leonardo J; Ribeiro, Márcio G; Paes, Antônio C; Megid, Jane; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the etiology of canine ehrlichiosis and possible clinical and epidemiological data associated with the infection in 70 dogs suspect of ehrlichiosis attended at the Veterinary Hospital of the São Paulo State University in Botucatu city during 2001 and 2002. Dogs were evaluated by clinical-epidemiological and hematological data and molecular analysis by partial amplification and DNA sequencing of the ehrlichial dsb gene. E. canis DNA was amplified and sequenced in 28 (40.0%) dogs. Dogs younger than 12 months old showed significantly higher infection rates (65.0%; P < 0.05). Diarrhea, apathy, and anorexia were the major clinical signs observed in 55.2% (P = 0.05), 47.0% (P > 0.05), and 42.4% (P > 0.05) of the PCR-positive dogs, respectively. Twenty-five anemic (<5.5 x 10(6) RBC x microL (-1)), and 8 leukopenic (<5.5 x 103 WBC x microL (-1)) dogs were PCR-positive (P > 0.05). All 28 PCR-positive dogs showed thrombocytopenia (< 175 x 103 platelets x microL (-1)) and revealed statistical significance (P < 0.05). E. canis was the only Ehrlichia species found in dogs in the studied region, with higher infection rates in younger dogs, and statistically associated with thrombocytopenia.

  18. A time comparison study of the New York State Safety Belt Use Law utilizing hospital admission and police accident report information.

    PubMed

    States, J D; Annechiarico, R P; Good, R G; Lieou, J; Andrews, M; Cushman, L; Ingersoll, G

    1990-12-01

    New York state enacted the first safety belt use law in the United States in 1984. We evaluated the effects of the law by reviewing all hospital admissions from motor vehicle crashes in Monroe County, New York. We compared admissions for the 18 months prior to the effective date of the law with those for the 18 months after the law became effective. Police accident reports and hospital records were coupled and intensively reviewed. Motorcyclists, pedestrians, and bicyclists (bicycle collisions with motor vehicles) became controls for the study. Seat belt usage was determined from police and hospital record information. Analysis of the data revealed that safety belt use among patients hospitalized because of motor vehicle accidents increased from 11.2% before the law became effective to 53% after the law became effective. Hospital admissions decreased 11.9% among motor vehicle occupants and increased 2.6% among controls. The ISS decreased from 16.01 to 14.55 for motor vehicle occupants and increased from 14.77 to 15.11 among controls. Among subjects all injuries decreased except injuries of the spine and abdomen, which increased in the postlaw period.

  19. Hospitals, finance, and health system reform in Britain and the United States, c. 1910-1950: historical revisionism and cross-national comparison.

    PubMed

    Gorsky, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Comparative histories of health system development have been variously influenced by the theoretical approaches of historical institutionalism, political pluralism, and labor mobilization. Britain and the United States have figured significantly in this literature because of their very different trajectories. This article explores the implications of recent research on hospital history in the two countries for existing historiographies, particularly the coming of the National Health Service in Britain. It argues that the two hospital systems initially developed in broadly similar ways, despite the very different outcomes in the 1940s. Thus, applying the conceptual tools used to explain the U.S. trajectory can deepen appreciation of events in Britain. Attention focuses particularly on working-class hospital contributory schemes and their implications for finance, governance, and participation; these are then compared with Blue Cross and U.S. hospital prepayment. While acknowledging the importance of path dependence in shaping attitudes of British bureaucrats toward these schemes, analysis emphasizes their failure in pressure group politics, in contrast to the United States. In both countries labor was also crucial, in the United States sustaining employment-based prepayment and in Britain broadly supporting system reform.

  20. Causality analysis on health care evaluation criteria for state-operated mental hospitals in Korea using Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang-Kyun; Oh, Hyun-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Hospitals today are pressured to move away from the conventional health services management techniques and provide higher-quality health care to survive in intense competition. In our study, we aimed to develop health care evaluation criteria for the mental health care sector based on the existing Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award model, and verify the causality of the evaluation model to lay groundwork for future research on the outcomes of national quality awards for mental health care. We focused on comparison groups comprising five state-operated mental hospitals in Korea using 92 survey questions derived from the MBNQA criteria for health care through structural equation modeling techniques. We verified that Leadership drives Foundation and Direction, which affect System that creates Results with 15 hypotheses supported out of 18 hypotheses established. We believe our findings will provide valuable implications to the top management of mental hospitals for self-examining quality management and promoting competitiveness.

  1. Impact of NO(x) emissions reduction policy on hospitalizations for respiratory disease in New York State.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao; Jones, Rena; Pantea, Cristian; Özkaynak, Halûk; Rao, S Trivikrama; Hwang, Syni-An; Garcia, Valerie C

    2013-01-01

    To date, only a limited number of studies have examined the impact of ambient pollutant policy on respiratory morbidities. This accountability study examined the effect of a regional pollution control policy, namely, the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) Budget Trading Program (NBP), on respiratory health in New York State (NYS). Time-series analysis using generalized additive models was applied to assess changes in daily hospitalizations for respiratory diseases in NYS after the implementation of the NBP policy. Respiratory end points in the summers during the baseline period (1997-2000) were compared with those during the post-intervention period (2004-2006). Stratified analyses were also conducted to examine whether health impacts of the NBP differed by socio-demographic, regional, or clinical characteristics. Following the implementation of EPA's NBP policy, there were significant reductions in mean ozone levels (-2% to -9%) throughout NYS. After adjusting for time-varying variables, PM(2.5) concentration, and meteorological factors, significant post-intervention declines in respiratory admissions were observed in the Central (-10.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): -14.18, -6.01), Lower Hudson (-11.05, 95% CI: -16.54, -5.19), and New York City Metro regions (-5.71, 95% CI: -7.39, -4.00), consistent with wind trajectory patterns. Stratified analyses suggest that admissions for asthma, chronic airway obstruction, among those 5-17 years old, self-payers, Medicaid-covered, and rural residents declined the most post-NBP. This study suggests that the NO(x) control policy may have had a positive impact on both air pollution levels statewide and respiratory health in some NYS regions. However, the effect varied by disease subgroups, region, and socio-demographic characteristics.

  2. Medical psychology services in dutch general hospitals: state of the art developments and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Soons, Paul; Denollet, Johan

    2009-06-01

    In this article an overview is presented of the emergence of medical psychology in the care of somatically ill patients. The situation in the Netherlands can be considered as prototypical. For 60 years, clinical psychologists have been working in general, teaching and academic hospitals. Nowadays, they are an integrated non-medical specialism working in the medical setting of hospitals in the Netherlands, and are a full-member of the medical board. This paper discusses several topics: the position of the general hospital in the health care system in the Netherlands, the emergence of medical psychology in Dutch hospitals, the role of the professional association of medical psychologists, and the characteristics of patients seen by clinical psychologists. Following the discussion about the situation of medical psychology in other countries, recommendations are formulated for the further development of medical psychology in the Netherlands as well as in other countries.

  3. The Relationship between Local Economic Conditions and Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Utilization by Adults and Seniors in the United States, 1995–2011

    PubMed Central

    Carls, Ginger Smith; Henke, Rachel Mosher; Karaca, Zeynal; Marder, William D; Wong, Herbert S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between aggregate unemployment and hospital discharges for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among adults and seniors, 1995–2011. Data Sources/Study Setting Community hospital discharge data from states collected for the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases (SID) and economic data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1995–2011. Study Design Quarterly time series study of unemployment and aggregate hospital discharges in local areas using fixed effects to control for differences between local areas. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Secondary data on inpatient stays and unemployment rates aggregated to micropolitan and metropolitan areas. Principal Findings For both adults and seniors, a 1 percentage point increase in the contemporaneous unemployment rate was associated with a statistically significant 0.80 percent (adults) to 0.96 percent (seniors) decline in AMI hospitalization during the first half of the study but was unrelated to the economic cycle in the second half of the study period. Conclusions The study found evidence that the aggregate relationship between health and the economy may be shifting for cardiovascular events, paralleling recent research that has shown a similar shift for some types of mortality (Ruhm 2013), self-reported health, and inpatient use among seniors (McInerney and Mellor 2012). PMID:25772510

  4. Lessons learned in using hospital discharge data for state and national public health surveillance: implications for Centers for Disease Control and prevention tracking program.

    PubMed

    Love, Denise; Rudolph, Barbara; Shah, Gulzar H

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Program is to build a nationwide network of integrated health and environmental data to measure impact of environmental factors on public health. This article describes how hospital discharge data can provide essential information for public health programs, including EPHT. The state inpatient hospital discharge data systems have properties that are highly desirable for surveillance and multistate initiatives, like EPHT, yet accessing and using the data can create challenges for the end user. This article highlights the strengths and limitations of hospital discharge data and references crash outcome data and evaluation system and Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project as models for accessing, linking, and aggregating hospital discharge data. These federal-state data partnerships have overcome many of these challenges and have the potential to serve as models for the EPHT Program. The lessons learned from these "early adopters" can shortcut the implementation period for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention EPHT Program.

  5. The current state of physical activity and exercise programs in German-speaking, Swiss psychiatric hospitals: results from a brief online survey

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Serge; Colledge, Flora; Beeler, Nadja; Pühse, Uwe; Kalak, Nadeem; Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Mikoteit, Thorsten; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Gerber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity and exercise programs (PAEPs) are an important factor in increasing and maintaining physical and mental health. This holds particularly true for patients with psychiatric disorders undergoing treatment in a psychiatric hospital. To understand whether the benefits reported in the literature are mirrored in current treatment modalities, the aim of the present study was to assess the current state of PAEPs in psychiatric hospitals in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Methods All psychiatric hospitals (N=55) in the German-speaking part of Switzerland were contacted in spring 2014. Staff responsible for PAEPs were asked to complete an online questionnaire covering questions related to PAEPs such as type, frequency, staff training, treatment rationale, importance of PAEPs within the treatment strategy, and possible avenues to increase PAEPs. Results Staff members of 48 different psychiatric hospitals completed the survey. Hospitals provided the following therapeutic treatments: relaxation techniques (100%), sports therapy (97%), activity-related psychotherapeutic interventions (95%), physiotherapy (85%), body therapies (59%), far-east techniques (57%), and hippotherapy (22%). Frequencies ranged from once/week to five times/week. Approximately 25% of patients participated in the PAEPs. Interventions were offered irrespective of psychiatric disorders. PAEP providers wanted and needed more vocational training. Conclusion All participating psychiatric hospitals offer a broad variety of PAEPs in their treatment curricula. However, the majority of inpatients do not participate in PAEPs. Furthermore, those who do participate cannot continue to do so following discharge. PAEP providers need specific extended vocational trainings and believe that the potential of PA should be improved. PMID:27350748

  6. Prevalence of hospitalized live births affected by alcohol and drugs and parturient women diagnosed with substance abuse at liveborn delivery: United States, 1999-2008.

    PubMed

    Pan, I-Jen; Yi, Hsiao-ye

    2013-05-01

    To describe prevalence trends in hospitalized live births affected by placental transmission of alcohol and drugs, as well as prevalence trends among parturient women hospitalized for liveborn delivery and diagnosed with substance abuse problems in the United States from 1999 to 2008. Comparison of the two sets of trends helps determine whether the observed changes in neonatal problems over time were caused by shifts in maternal substance abuse problems. This study independently identified hospitalized live births and maternal live born deliveries from discharge records in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, one of the largest hospital administrative databases. Substance-related diagnosis codes on the records were used to identify live births affected by alcohol and drugs and parturient women with substance abuse problems. The analysis calculated prevalence differences and percentage changes over the 10 years, with Loess curves fitted to 10-year prevalence estimates to depict trend patterns. Linear and quadratic trends in prevalence were simultaneously tested using logistic regression analyses. The study also examined data on costs, primary expected payer, and length of hospital stays. From 1999 to 2008, prevalence increased for narcotic- and hallucinogen-affected live births and neonatal drug withdrawal syndrome but decreased for alcohol- and cocaine-affected live births. Maternal substance abuse at delivery showed similar trends, but prevalence of alcohol abuse remained relatively stable. Substance-affected live births required longer hospital stays and higher medical expenses, mostly billable to Medicaid. The findings highlight the urgent need for behavioral intervention and early treatment for substance-abusing pregnant women to reduce the number of substance-affected live births.

  7. Patterns of scheduled follow-up appointments following hospitalization for heart failure: insights from an urban medical center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Parag; Sterling, Madeline R; Beecy, Ashley N; Ruffino, John T; Mehta, Sonal S; Jones, Erica C; Lachs, Mark S; Horn, Evelyn M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although postdischarge outpatient follow-up appointments after a hospitalization for heart failure represent a potentially effective strategy to prevent heart failure readmissions, patterns of scheduled follow-up appointments upon discharge are poorly described. We aimed to characterize real-world patterns of scheduled follow-up appointments among adult patients with heart failure upon hospital discharge. Patients and methods This was a retrospective cohort study performed at a large urban academic center in the United States among adults hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of congestive heart failure between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014. Patient demographics, administrative data, clinical parameters, echocardiographic indices, and scheduled postdischarge outpatient follow-up appointments were collected. Results Of the 796 patients hospitalized for heart failure, just over half of the cohort had a scheduled follow-up appointment upon discharge. Follow-up appointments were less likely among patients who were white and had heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and more likely among patients with Medicaid and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In an adjusted multivariable regression model, age ≥65 years was inversely associated with a scheduled follow-up appointment upon hospital discharge, despite higher rates of several cardiovascular and noncardiovascular comorbidities. Conclusion Just half of the patients discharged home following a hospitalization for heart failure had a follow-up appointment scheduled, representing a missed opportunity to provide a recommended care transition intervention. Despite a greater burden of both cardiovascular and noncardiovascular comorbidities, older adults (age ≥65 years) were less likely to have a follow-up appointment scheduled upon discharge compared with younger adults, revealing a disparity that warrants further investigation. PMID:27713623

  8. Technology transfer with system analysis, design, decision making, and impact (Survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring technology transfer for management information systems in health care. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, usersatisfaction, and decision-making were measured and are presented. The survey also measured the levels Internet and Intranet presents in acute care hospitals, which will be discussed in future articles. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and customers. These results are compared, where appropriate, with results from survey 1997 and changes are discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the first of three articles based upon the results of the Srvey-2000. Readers are referred to a prior article by the author that discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.

  9. The relationship between business process re-engineering and Internet usage: survey of acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    1999-12-01

    The data from a national survey of acute care hospitals was used for analysis. Hatcher discusses the complete questionnaire, data collection procedure, and sample selection. The relationship between business process re-engineering, total quality management, innovation system approaches, and Internet usage and potential usage will be reported and discussed.

  10. Asthma Hospitalization Rates among Children, and School Building Conditions, by New York State School Districts, 1991-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Erin; Kielb, Christine; Lin, Shao

    2006-01-01

    School-age children spend a significant portion of their day at school where they can be exposed to asthma triggers, but little information exists regarding potential relationships between childhood asthma and school environmental factors. This study examined patterns of asthma hospitalization and possible factors contributing to asthma…

  11. What Would Be the Effect of Referral to High-Volume Hospitals in a Largely Rural State?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Marcia M.; Jaana, Mirou; Wakefield, Douglas S.; Ohsfeldt, Robert L.; Schneider, John E.; Miller, Thomas; Lei, Yang

    2004-01-01

    Volume of certain surgical procedures has been linked to patient outcomes. The Leapfrog Group and others have recommended evidence-based referral using specific volume thresholds for nonemergent cases. The literature is limited on the effect of such referral on hospitals, especially in rural areas. To examine the impact of evidence-based referral…

  12. Hospitalizations of the elderly in the United States for non-specific gastrointestinal diseases: A search for etilogical clues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonspecific gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a common cause of GI-related hospitalizations in U.S. elderly (82.9% of all cases) and it peaks concurrently with viral enteritis, suggesting a lack of diagnostic testing. The lack of etiological specificity in the current coding syste...

  13. What is the current state of care for older people with dementia in general hospitals? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Dewing, Jan; Dijk, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises a literature review focusing on the literature directly pertaining to the acute care of older people with dementia in general hospitals from 2007 onwards. Following thematic analysis, one overarching theme emerged: the consequences of being in hospital with seven related subthemes. Significantly, this review highlights that overall there remains mostly negative consequences and outcomes for people with dementia when they go into general hospitals. Although not admitted to hospital directly due to dementia, there are usually negative effects on the dementia condition from hospitalisation. The review suggests this is primarily because there is a tension between prioritisation of acute care for existing co-morbidities and person-centred dementia care. This is complicated by insufficient understanding of what constitutes person-centred care in an acute care context and a lack of the requisite knowledge and skills set in health care practitioners. The review also reveals a worrying lack of evidence for the effectiveness of mental health liaison posts and dementia care specialist posts in nursing. Finally, although specialist posts such as liaison and clinical nurse specialists and specialist units/shared care wards can enhance quality of care and reduce adverse consequences of hospitalisation (they do not significantly) impact on reducing length of stay or the cost of care.

  14. The information security needs in radiological information systems-an insight on state hospitals of Iran, 2012.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Akram; Ahmadi, Maryam

    2013-12-01

    Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) was originally developed for radiology services over 20 years ago to capture medical images electronically. Medical diagnosis methods are based on images such as clinical radiographs, ultrasounds, CT scans, MRIs, or other imaging modalities. Information obtained from these images is correlated with patient information. So with regards to the important role of PACS in hospitals, we aimed to evaluate the PACS and survey the information security needed in the Radiological Information system. First, we surveyed the different aspects of PACS that should be in any health organizations based on Department of Health standards and prepared checklists for assessing the PACS in different hospitals. Second, we surveyed the security controls that should be implemented in PACS. Checklists reliability is affirmed by professors of Tehran Science University. Then, the final data are inputted in SPSS software and analyzed. The results indicate that PACS in hospitals can transfer patient demographic information but they do not show route of information. These systems are not open source. They don't use XML-based standard and HL7 standard for exchanging the data. They do not use DS digital signature. They use passwords and the user can correct or change the medical information. PACS can detect alternation rendered. The survey of results demonstrates that PACS in all hospitals has the same features. These systems have the patient demographic data but they do not have suitable flexibility to interface network or taking reports. For the privacy of PACS in all hospitals, there were passwords for users and the system could show the changes that have been made; but there was no water making or digital signature for the users.

  15. "We are talking about saving lives": the welfare state, health care policy, and nongovernability--a case study of an Israeli Hospital.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nissim

    2013-01-01

    Literature about welfare states worldwide, and specifically in Israel, emphasizes economic and political variables and the importance of ideology in explaining a given social policy in those societies. According to this literature, ideology and strategic long-term goals account for the waning of the Israeli welfare state since the 1970s. At the same time, for upwards of a decade, the literature dealing with Israeli public policy has emphasized that Israeli society suffers from a crisis of "nongovernability" and a political culture that is characterized by illegality. The author defines nongovernability as the inability to formulate public policy and implement it effectively over time. In such an environment, long-term strategic considerations based on a coherent ideology take a back seat to short-term considerations in the conduct of the various players in the public policy arena. The author discusses the building of a hospital in Ashdod as a case study in nongovernability. The hospital's construction was steeped in political intrigue based wholly on short-term considerations and was built in a political culture characterized by either illegality or outright rejection of the law. This behavior is characteristic of Israeli politicians, bureaucrats, and interest groups. The author maintains that the creation of this hospital is emblematic of the Israeli health care policy overall, a policy shaped by bottom-up processes whose defining characteristic is a political culture based on illegality and narrow, short-term interests.

  16. Orthopedic board certification and physician performance: an analysis of medical malpractice, hospital disciplinary action, and state medical board disciplinary action rates.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Mininder S; Dichtel, Laura; Kasser, James R; Gebhardt, Mark C; Katz, Jeffery N

    2008-02-01

    Specialty board certification status has become the de facto standard of competency by which the profession and the public recognize physician specialists. However, the relationship between orthopedic board certification and physician performance has not been established. Rates of medical malpractice claims, hospital disciplinary actions, and state medical board disciplinary actions were compared between 1309 board-certified (BC) and 154 non-board-certified (NBC) orthopedic surgeons in 3 states. There was no significant difference between BC and NBC surgeons in medical malpractice claim proportions (BC, 19.1% NBC, 16.9% P = .586) or in hospital disciplinary action proportions (BC, 0.9% NBC, 0.8% P = 1.000). There was a significantly higher proportion of state medical board disciplinary action for NBC surgeons (BC, 7.6% NBC, 13.0% P = .028). An association between board certification status and physician performance is necessary to validate its status as the de facto standard of competency. In this study, BC surgeons had lower rates of state medical board disciplinary action.

  17. Trends in hospitalization of preterm infants with intraventricular hemorrhage and hydrocephalus in the United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Christian, Eisha A; Jin, Diana L; Attenello, Frank; Wen, Timothy; Cen, Steven; Mack, William J; Krieger, Mark D; McComb, J Gordon

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Even with improved prenatal and neonatal care, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) occurs in approximately 25%-30% of preterm infants, with a subset of these patients developing hydrocephalus. This study was undertaken to describe current trends in hospitalization of preterm infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) and the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). METHODS The KID and NIS were combined to generate data for the years 2000-2010. All neonatal discharges with ICD-9-CM codes for preterm birth with IVH alone or with IVH and hydrocephalus were included. RESULTS There were 147,823 preterm neonates with IVH, and 9% of this group developed hydrocephalus during the same admission. Of patients with Grade 3 and 4 IVH, 25% and 28%, respectively, developed hydrocephalus in comparison with 1% and 4% of patients with Grade 1 and 2 IVH, respectively. Thirty-eight percent of patients with PHH had permanent ventricular shunts inserted. Mortality rates were 4%, 10%, 18%, and 40%, respectively, for Grade 1, 2, 3, and 4 IVH during initial hospitalization. Length of stay has been trending upward for both groups of IVH (49 days in 2000, 56 days in 2010) and PHH (59 days in 2000, 70 days in 2010). The average hospital cost per patient (adjusted for inflation) has also increased, from $201,578 to $353,554 (for IVH) and $260,077 to $495,697 (for PHH) over 11 years. CONCLUSIONS The number of neonates admitted with IVH has increased despite a decrease in the number of preterm births. Rates of hydrocephalus and mortality correlated closely with IVH grade. The incidence of hydrocephalus in preterm infants with IVH remained stable between 8% and 10%. Over an 11-year period, there was a progressive increase in hospital cost and length of stay for preterm neonates with IVH and PHH that may be explained by a concurrent increase in the proportion of patients with congenital cardiac anomalies.

  18. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  19. The current state of genetic counseling before and after amniocentesis for fetal karyotyping in Japan: a survey of obstetric hospital clients of a prenatal testing laboratory.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Miyuki; Sawai, Hideaki; Kosugi, Shinji

    2013-12-01

    Pregnant women undergoing prenatal genetic testing should receive genetic counseling so they can make informed decisions. We examined the current state of providing genetic counseling in Japan to pregnant women before they elected amniocentesis for prenatal diagnosis of chromosome abnormalities and after test results were completed, and explored the opportunity for expanding access to certified genetic counselors (CGC) at clinical practices offering amniocentesis. An anonymous survey was mailed to the 298 hospitals that referred amniotic fluid specimens to LabCorp Japan in 2009. Most genetic counseling was provided by the obstetrician alone; 73.8 % (76/103) of pre-amniocentesis, 82.5 % (85/103) if normal results, and 49.4 % (44/89) if abnormal results. Respondents spent limited time in genetic counseling; 57.3 % spent <10 min for pre-amniocentesis, 88.3 % spent <10 min for normal results, and 54.0 % spent <20 min for abnormal results. While 45.8 % indicated that CGC do not have an essential role in clinical practice, responses that supported employment of CGC were more likely to come from hospitals that submitted more than ten specimens annually (p < 0.0001), university hospitals (p < 0.0001), and MD geneticists (p = 0.020). Currently, there is limited genetic counseling available in Japan. This indicates there are opportunities for the employment of CGC to improve the quality of genetic counseling.

  20. The challenge of managing extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis at a referral hospital in the state of São Paulo, Brazil: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Arbex, Marcos Abdo; de Siqueira, Hélio Ribeiro; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the cases of three patients diagnosed with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and admitted to a referral hospital in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, showing the clinical and radiological evolution, as well as laboratory test results, over a one-year period. Treatment was based on the World Health Organization guidelines, with the inclusion of a new proposal for the use of a combination of antituberculosis drugs (imipenem and linezolid). In the cases studied, we show the challenge of creating an acceptable, effective treatment regimen including drugs that are more toxic, are more expensive, and are administered for longer periods. We also show that treatment costs are significantly higher for such patients, which could have an impact on health care systems, even after hospital discharge. We highlight the fact that in extreme cases, such as those reported here, hospitalization at a referral center seems to be the most effective strategy for providing appropriate treatment and increasing the chance of cure. In conclusion, health professionals and governments must make every effort to prevent cases of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:26785966

  1. Death in hospital and at home: population and health policy influences in Londrina, State of Paraná, Brazil (1996-2010).

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Fernando Cesar Iwamoto; Cabrera, Marcos Aparecido Sarria

    2015-03-01

    An aging population and epidemiological transition involves prolonged terminal illnesses and an increased demand for end-stage support in health services, mainly in hospitals. Changes in health care and government health policies may influence the death locations, making it possible to remain at home or in an institution. The scope of this article is to analyze death locations in the city of Londrina, State of Paraná, from 1996 to 2010, and to verify the influence of population and health policy changes on these statistics. An analysis was conducted into death locations in Londrina in Mortality Information System (SIM) considering the main causes and locations of death. There was an increase of 28% in deaths among the population in general, though 48% for the population over 60 years of age. There was an increase of deaths in hospitals, which were responsible for 70% of the occurrences, though death frequencies in others locations did not increase, and deaths in the home remained at about 18%. The locations of death did not change during this period, even with health policies that broadened care in other locations, such as the patient´s home. The predominance of hospital deaths was similar to other Brazilian cities, albeit higher than in other countries.

  2. [Decentralization of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and inter-municipal flow of hospital admissions in the Zona da Mata, Minas Gerais State, Brazil: a spatial analysis].

    PubMed

    Reis, Cláudia Tartaglia; Czeresnia, Dina; Barcellos, Christovam; Tassinari, Wagner Souza

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this article was to analyze the decentralization of the HIV/AIDS epidemic (a shift towards rural areas or away from the coast) and to investigate access to HIV/AIDS services from 1988 to 2002 in the Zona da Mata, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. An ecological study was performed using temporal and spatial approaches. A hospital admissions flow between municipalities developed, and the reference group was AIDS patients over 15 years of age admitted in 1996 and 2004, residing in municipalities in the Zona da Mata. There were 2,469 reported AIDS cases in individuals over 15 during the period. Mean incidence and mortality rates were calculated and recalculated by a local empirical Bayesian method in order to more clearly represent the municipalities with the highest concentration of cases and deaths. Decentralization of the epidemic was observed. Juiz de Fora was the municipality with the most cases and may have acted as a hub for spread of HIV in the region. Hospital care for AIDS cases in the Zona da Mata was concentrated in that municipality. There is a strong need to further investigate why referral hospitals in other municipalities in the region have not participated in providing management and care for HIV/AIDS patients.

  3. Bacteriological Profile and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Neonatal Sepsis at a Teaching Hospital in Bayelsa State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Peterside, Oliemen; Pondei, Kemebradikumo; Akinbami, Felix O

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sepsis is one of the most common causes of neonatal hospital admissions and is estimated to cause 26% of all neonatal deaths worldwide. While waiting for results of blood culture, it is necessary to initiate an empirical choice of antibiotics based on the epidemiology of causative agents and antibiotic sensitivity pattern in a locality. Objective: To determine the major causative organisms of neonatal sepsis at the Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital (NDUTH), as well as their antibiotic sensitivity patterns, with the aim of formulating treatment protocols for neonates. Methods: Within a 27-month period (1st of October 2011 to the 31st of December 2013), results of blood culture for all neonates screened for sepsis at the Special Care Baby Unit of the hospital were retrospectively studied. Results: Two hundred and thirty-three (49.6%) of the 450 neonates admitted were screened for sepsis. Ninety-seven (43.5%) of them were blood culture positive, with 52 (53.6%) of the isolated organisms being Gram positive and 45 (46.4%) Gram negative. The most frequently isolated organism was Staphylococcus aureus (51.5%) followed by Escherichia coli (16.5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.4%). All isolated organisms demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the quinolones. Conclusion: Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity among neonates admitted at the NDUTH. There is a need for regular periodic surveillance of the causative organisms of neonatal sepsis as well as their antibiotic susceptibility pattern to inform the empirical choice of antibiotic prescription while awaiting blood culture results. PMID:26543394

  4. Prevalence and hospital discharge status of human immunodeficiency virus–associated pulmonary arterial hypertension in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Annangi, Srinadh; Farber, Harrison W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a noninfectious complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that has gained in importance since the advent of antiretroviral therapy. HIV-associated PAH (HIV-PAH) has a higher prevalence than idiopathic PAH (IPAH), although the vascular pathology seen in HIV-PAH is virtually identical to that seen in IPAH. Initiating therapy for PAH at an early stage is associated with a better prognosis; however, because of the nonspecific symptoms associated with PAH, the diagnosis is often delayed. In addition, because of the low prevalence of HIV-PAH, routine screening for this condition has never been recommended. We hypothesize that the failure to create screening guidelines for HIV-PAH has resulted in underdiagnosis of the condition. This, in turn, results in individuals with HIV-PAH remaining undetected, allowing the disease to progress to more advanced stages or even remain unrecognized until death. If this hypothesis is correct, it may provide a strong argument for HIV-PAH screening guidelines, because HIV-PAH portends a poor prognosis and creates a significant economic burden if left untreated. To address this issue, we conducted a retrospective review of the National Hospital Discharge Survey data and the multiple-cause mortality data to determine the prevalence of HIV-PAH at hospital discharge and death. Using these large data sets, we observed that the prevalence of HIV-PAH among HIV-infected individuals at hospital discharge and death was significantly lower than the reported prevalence in the literature. In addition, we found that PAH was designated as the most common cause of mortality in patients with HIV-PAH. PMID:26401251

  5. [Present state of predictive genetic testing for neuromuscular diseases: an overview by a neurologist in a local hospital].

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Genetic tests for asymptomatic persons, who have family members with hereditary neuromuscular diseases, should be done carefully by following strict rules. For example, an examinee should be given a clear plan for clinico-psychological and social support services in case of testing positive. It is very important to assess the potential impact of genetic test results, so the anticipatory guidance should be provided times without number.It is difficult for local hospitals however, to fulfill such conditions during a primary genetic counseling, as they have limited staff. Our hospital is a case in point, where just one neurologist, who is also a certified clinical geneticist, provides the counseling, with the help of nurses, and social workers.The availability of second and third level genetic counseling systems have made it possible for us to carry out primary counseling, and we make every effort to ensure that clients and patients can avail our services any time, and without any constraints.In my opinion, a comprehensive education system to train primary care physicians in genetic testing and primary genetic counseling would prove beneficial for a lot of clients and also reduce the burden on neurologists.

  6. Design and implementation of a structural health monitoring and alerting system for hospital buildings in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ulusoy, Hasan S.; Kalkan, Erol; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Friberg, Paul; Leith, W. K.; Banga, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the current progress in the development of a structural health monitoring and alerting system to meet the needs of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to monitor hospital buildings instrumented in high and very high seismic hazard regions in the U.S. The system, using the measured vibration data, is primarily designed for post-earthquake condition assessment of the buildings. It has two essential components – sensing and analysis. The sensing component includes all necessary firmware and sensors to measure the response of the building; while the analysis component consists of several data processing modules integrated into an open source software package which compresses a large amount of measured data into useful information to assess the building’s condition before and after an event. The information can be used for a rapid building safety assessment, and to support decisions for necessary repairs, replacements, and other maintenance and rehabilitation measures.

  7. Healthcare Data Analytics for Parkinson’s Disease Patients: A Study of Hospital Cost and Utilization in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sunanda; Wu, Huanmei; Jones, Josette

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD), a prevalent problem, especially for the aged populations, is a progressive but non-fatal nervous system disorder. PD patients have special motor as well as non-motor symptoms over time. There are several limitations in the study of PD such as unavailability of data, proper diagnosis and treatment methods. These limitations significantly reduce the quality of PD patient life quality, either directly or indirectly. PD also imposes great financial burdens to PD patients and their family. This project aims to analyze the most common reasons for PD patient hospitalization, review complications that occur during inpatient stays, and measure the costs associated with PD patient characteristics. Using the HCUP NIS data, comprehensive data analysis has been performed. The results are customized visualized using Tableau and other software systems. The preliminary findings sheds light into how to improve the life quality of PD patients. PMID:28269954

  8. Questions and Answers Regarding the 1997 State Plan Requirements for Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This November 1997 document contains questions and answers on the state plan requirements for HMIWI regulations. The questions cover topics such as re-opening existing sources, timelines for submission, consequences for failure to submit, and more.

  9. The knowledge, attitude and behaviours of nurses about pharmacovigilance, adverse drug reaction and adverse event reporting in a state hospital

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Fisun; Ciftci, Seval; Vural, Birol

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: With the use of any drug comes the possibility of unintended consequences which when harmful are referred to as adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The development of national pharmacovigilance systems is the responsibility of all health workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge of nurses about pharmacovigilance and attitudes about ADR and adverse event reporting. METHODS: This descriptive-cross sectional study was performed in 112 nurses working in a public hospital. The questionnaire was applied about pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reactions. The knowledge, attitudes and practices about adverse drug reactions were asked. RESULTS: The 74.1% of the nurses definition of “severe adverse effect” of drug therapy. The ratio of participants who knew that ADRs are reported to contact person responsible from pharmacovigilance was 34.9%. Although 70.5% of nurses knew the necessity of ADR reporting, the 8% of the nurses knew Turkish Pharmacovigilance Center (TÜFAM). Only 8% of nurses reported ADRs in their professionality. CONCLUSION: Although most of the participants knew the importance of ADR event reporting, event reporting was low. Thiese results showed that there is a lack of knowledge about pharmacovigilance. Futher studies with different settings and healthcare staff are needed to improve awareness about pharmacovigilance. PMID:28058321

  10. Experience in running a Diarrhoeal Training cum Treatment Unit (DTTU) in a state teaching hospital in Calcutta.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, B; Dasgupta, S; Saha, I; Mandal, A K; Palodhi, P K

    1998-04-01

    The performance of the Diarrhoeal Training cum Treatment Unit (DTTU) of NRS Medical College and Hospital, Calcutta, in a 2-year period was evaluated by record analysis. The study revealed that 73.6% cases out of a total 4349 could be successfully managed at the oral rehydration therapy (ORT) area and only 16.5% cases required indoor admission. Rest of the cases (9.9%) with "no dehydration" were sent home with advice. There were 84.7% cases out 3919 dehydration cases who could be successfully treated by ORT and only 15.3% required intravenous (i.v.) therapy. A definite decline was also evident in the proportion of diarrhoea cases requiring antibiotic therapy (13.5% in 1991 to 6.8% in 1992). The case fatality rate due to diarrhoea was 1.7% in 1992. Had all cases of diarrhoea with dehydration being admitted and treated with i.v. fluids and antibiotics, the estimated cost would have been Rs 14.2 lakhs, which with ORT, actually cost Rs 2.4 lakhs. Thus estimated total cost reduction was to the extent of Rs 11.8 lakhs in a 2-year period.

  11. Quality of acute asthma care in two tertiary hospitals in a state in South Western Nigeria: A report of clinical audit

    PubMed Central

    Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Adeoti, Adekunle Olatayo; Ogunmola, Olarinde Jeffrey; Fadare, Joseph Olusesan; Kolawole, Tolutope Fasanmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: To audit the quality of acute asthma care in two tertiary hospitals in a state in the southwestern region of Nigeria and to compare the clinical practice against the recommendations of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guideline. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of 101 patients who presented with acute exacerbation of asthma to the hospital between November 2010 and October 2015. Results: Majority of the cases were females (66.3%), <45 years of age (60.4%), and admitted in the wet season (64.4%). The median duration of hospital stay was 2 days (interquartile range; 1–3 days) and the mortality was 1.0%. At admission, 73 (72.3%) patients had their triggering factors documented and 33 (32.7%) had their severity assessed. Smoking status, medication adherence, serial oxygen saturation, and peak expiratory flow rate measurement were documented in less than half of the cases, respectively. Seventy-six (75.2%) patients had nebulized salbutamol, 89 (88.1%) had systemic corticosteroid, and 78 (77.2%) had within 1 h. On discharge, 68 (67.3%) patients were given follow-up appointment and 32 (31.7%) were reviewed within 30 days after discharge. Less than half were prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), a self-management plan, or had their inhaler technique reviewed or controller medications adjusted. Overall, adherence to the GINA guideline was not satisfactory and was very poor among the medical officers. Conclusion: The quality of acute asthma care in our setting is not satisfactory, and there is a low level of compliance with most recommendations of asthma guidelines. This audit has implicated the need to address the non-performing areas and organizational issues to improve the quality of care. PMID:27942102

  12. An Examination of Information Technology and Its Perceived Quality Issues in Single System Hospitals in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Linda W.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and quality of healthcare is of great concern in the United States. The positive effects of information technology reported in past research, especially case studies, has encouraged expectations that information technology may increase the quality of healthcare while reducing costs of healthcare. The goals of this study was to examine…

  13. No Mountains...Nor Seashore...Just Hoosier Hospitality: An Elderhostel Case Study at Ball State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murk, Peter J.

    The Elderhostel program has provided many older persons with a stimulating learning experience at colleges throughout the United States and 46 other countries since its beginning in 1975. Participants in Elderhostel--who usually are retired, are more likely to be women than men, and range in age from 60 to the mid-90s--study topics of interest to…

  14. Driver and Traffic Safety Education: A Lesson Plan for the Residents of Gracewood State School and Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Jonathan L.

    Outlined is a course of driver education and traffic safety taught to retarded residents of a state institution. Stressed is the importance of driver education for residents able to leave the institution. The philosophy of the program is given to emphasize individualizing instruction, instructing students who possess the potential for driving,…

  15. Training and Organizational Commitment among Nurses in New Zealand and United States Public Hospitals Experiencing Industry and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Kenneth; Kang, Dae-seok

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between employee attitudes towards training and organizational commitment among a sample of nurses in New Zealand and the United States. Results show that perceived access to training, training frequency, motivation to learn from training, benefits of training, and supervisory support for training were…

  16. 77 FR 24403 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    .... Nash, Chief, Toxics and Global Atmosphere Section, Air Toxics and Assessment Branch (AT-18J), U.S.... Nash, Chief, Toxics and Global Atmosphere Section, Air Toxics and Assessment Branch (AT-18J), U.S... HMIWI State Plan and identification of the enforceable mechanisms. Illinois has provided a detailed...

  17. 77 FR 24405 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ....carlton@epa.gov . 3. Fax: (312) 886-6030. 4. Mail: Carlton T. Nash, Chief, Toxics and Global Atmosphere... Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604. 5. Hand Delivery: Carlton T. Nash, Chief, Toxics and Global Atmosphere... out the HMIWI State Plan and identified the enforceable mechanisms. Indiana has provided a...

  18. Understanding hospitality.

    PubMed

    Patten, C S

    1994-03-01

    Bridging patient/"customer" issues and business aspects can be aided through developing a specific nursing basis for hospitality. The ancient practice of hospitality has evolved into three distinct levels: public, personal and therapeutic. Understanding these levels is helpful in integrating various dimensions of guest relations programs in hospitals into a more comprehensive vision. Hospitality issues must become a greater part of today's nursing management.

  19. [Care for patients with altered states of consciousness in a hospital for chronic and long-stay patients].

    PubMed

    Más-Sesé, Gemma; Sanchis-Pellicer, M José; Tormo-Micó, Esther; Vicente-Más, Josep; Vallalta-Morales, Manuel; Rueda-Gordillo, Diego; Conejo-Alba, Antonia; Berbegal-Serra, Juan; Martínez-Avilés, Pedro; Oltra-Masanet, Joan A; Femenia-Pérez, Miquel

    2015-03-16

    Introduccion. Un 30-40% de los pacientes con daño cerebral presenta alteraciones del nivel de conciencia, y algunos casos, estados alterados de conciencia: sindrome de vigilia sin respuesta (SVSR) o estado de minima conciencia (EMC). La recuperacion es variable y la supervivencia esta amenazada por multiples complicaciones. Objetivos. Presentar la metodologia de trabajo del Hospital La Pedrera (HLP) para pacientes en SVSR o EMC y analizar las caracteristicas clinicas de los pacientes atendidos, la evolucion, y la situacion funcional y cognitiva en el momento del alta. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio descriptivo prospectivo de pacientes atendidos en el HLP durante el periodo 2009-2013, con diagnostico de SVSR o EMC. Resultados. El HLP trabaja mediante el metodo gestion de caso, ofreciendo una atencion integral por un equipo multidisciplinar. Los pacientes se clasifican segun objetivos asistenciales. Los pacientes con SVSR o EMC se incluyen en el programa de cuidados integrales y adaptacion. Se atendio a 23 pacientes (86,9% varones), con una edad media de 54,9 años. Etiologia: hemorragia cerebral, 30,4%; encefalopatia anoxica, 26,6%; encefalopatia metabolica, 17,3%; y otras causas, 17,3%. El 73,9% ingreso en SVSR y el resto en EMC. Evolucion: el 43,4% mejoro su situacion cognitiva inicial y el 88,8% presentaba una situacion de dependencia total en el momento del alta. Las complicaciones mas frecuentes fueron infecciones respiratorias y urinarias (53,6%). El 65,2% de los casos fueron exitus. Conclusiones. La asistencia en SVSR o EMC es compleja y precisa cuidados multidisciplinares. Casi la mitad de los pacientes mejoro su situacion cognitiva, lo que justifica una actitud proactiva que intente mejorar la calidad de vida de los pacientes y sus familias.

  20. A Study of an Appointment Scheduling System for Outpatients at the United States Air Force Academy Hospital.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-30

    The regulation states that "each medical treatment facility (MTF) must have an appointment system which is responsive to the health care needs of the...Force Medical Treatment Facility, which one of the following best explains why not?" (3) Survey question number 31: "Using the scale below, please tell us...are providing medical care. Your comments will be compiled and will be used by the executive management of this medical treatment facility in making

  1. The push to increase the use of EHR technology by hospitals and physicians in the United States through the HITECH Act and the Medicare incentive program.

    PubMed

    Pipersburgh, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews key health care spending and electronic health records (EHR) statistics in the United States (Section II); highlights positive and negative aspects of EHR technology (Sections III and IV); briefly reviews the passage of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) (Section V); discusses the rule passed by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONCHIT) and to implement the goals of HITECH (Section VI); discusses the rule passed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to implement the goals of HITECH and focuses on significant requirements of the Medicare incentive program rule as it applies to hospitals and physicians (Section VII); and finally, concludes by highlighting certain issues that have been raised regarding the goals of HITECH (Section VIII).

  2. Notes from the field: hospitalizations for respiratory disease among unaccompanied children from Central America - multiple States, June-July 2014.

    PubMed

    Nyangoma, Edith N; Arriola, Carmen Sofia; Hagan, Jose; Socias, Christina; Tomczyk, Sara; Watkins, Louise Francois; Westercamp, Matthew; Kim, Curi

    2014-08-15

    During October 2013-June 2014, approximately 54,000 unaccompanied children, mostly from the Central American countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, were identified attempting entry into the United States from Mexico, exceeding numbers reported in previous years. Once identified in the United States, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, an agency of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, processes the unaccompanied children and transfers them to the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), an office of the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ORR cares for the children in shelters until they can be released to a sponsor, typically a parent or relative, who can care for the child while their immigration case is processed. In June 2014, in response to the increased number of unaccompanied children, U.S. Customs and Border Protection expanded operations to accommodate children at a processing center in Nogales, Arizona. ORR, together with the U.S. Department of Defense, opened additional large temporary shelters for the children at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas; U.S. Army Garrison Ft. Sill, Oklahoma; and Naval Base Ventura County, California.

  3. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  4. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  5. Analyzing the some biochemical parameters of diabetes mellitus and obese patients who applied to Siirt State Hospital endocrine polyclinic and their prevalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karageçili, Hasan; Yerlikaya, Emrah; Aydin, Ruken Zeynep

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems throughout the World. Obese individuals body mass index (BMI) is >30 kg/m2. Obesity is characterized by increased waist circumference, total body fat and hyperglycemia. The increased triglyceride and cholesterol level is also shown in obese individuals. The development of obesity is largely due to the consumption of high energy food and sedentary lifestyle. This study was held with the participation of patients applied to Siirt State Hospital endocrine policlinic for treatment. Our aim is to try to determine the biochemical relation and border line of obese and obese+diabetes mellitus patients. Patients and control group lipid profiles were studied in the hospital biochemisty laboratory. Laboratory results of diabetes+obese, obese and control groups were evaluated. Patients and control samples blood serum levels were compared according to their lipid profiles. In 2015, 735 diabetes mellitus type 2 patients applied to Endocrine polyclinic. Some of these patient's serum levels were evaluated. Difference between diabetes+obese and diabetes groups were near critical level for LDL and trigliserid. There were not observed statistically significant difference between groups in terms of HDL and cholesterol. There were found significant difference between groups for blood glucose p<0.003, age p<0.001. According to gender between women and men serum levels, ALT and AST levels; p<0.006 and cholesterol; p<0.04 were detected. According to participants education level blood biochemistry levels were observed statisticaly different p<0.001 with non-literacy group. In conclusion, obese and obese+diabetes patients blood serum values nearly close to each other. Obese subjects were been diabetic obese with age. In women obesity and diabetes mellitus prevalence were seen too much.

  6. Prevalence and associated risk factors for Giardia lamblia infection among children hospitalized for diarrhea in Goiânia, Goiás State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Maria das Graças Cabral; Atwill, Edward Robert; Barbosa, Alverne Passos

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and to identify risk factors associated with Giardia lamblia infection in diarrheic children hospitalized for diarrhea in Goiânia, State of Goiás, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted and a comprehensive questionnaire was administered to the child's primary custodian. Fixed effects logistic regression was used to determine the association between infection status for G. lamblia and host, sociodemographic, environmental and zoonotic risk factors. A total of 445 fecal samples were collected and processed by the DFA methodology, and G. lamblia cysts were present in the feces of 44 diarrheic children (9.9%). A variety of factors were found to be associated with giardiasis in these population: age of children (OR, 1.18; 90% CI, 1.0 - 1.36; p = 0.052), number of children in the household (OR 1.45; 90% CI, 1.13 - 1.86; p = 0.015), number of cats in the household (OR, 1.26; 90% CI, 1.03 -1.53; p = 0.059), food hygiene (OR, 2.9; 90% CI, 1.34 - 6.43; p = 0.024), day-care centers attendance (OR, 2.3; 90% CI, 1.20 - 4.36; p = 0.034), living on a rural farm within the past six months prior hospitalization (OR, 5.4; CI 90%, 1.5 - 20.1; p = 0.03) and the number of household adults (OR, 0.59; 90% CI, 0.42 - 0.83; p = 0.012). Such factors appropriately managed may help to reduce the annual incidence of this protozoal infection in the studied population.

  7. A Six-Year Study of the Clinical Presentation of Cervical Cancer and the Management Challenges Encountered at a State Teaching Hospital in Southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eze, Justus N.; Emeka-Irem, Esther N.; Edegbe, Felix O.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is still a major contributor to cancer-related mortality amongst women living in poor, rural communities of developing countries. The objective of this study is to establish the clinical presentation of cervical cancer and the management challenges encountered in Abakaliki, southeast Nigeria, with a view to finding intervention strategies. This study is a retrospective descriptive assessment of cases of clinically diagnosed cervical cancer managed at a state teaching hospital over six years. Of 76 cases managed, 61 (80.3%) cases notes were available for study. The mean age and parity of patients were 53.8 years and 6.8 years, respectively. The majority (75.4%) were illiterate. All had been married, but 42.6% were widowed. The main occupations were farming or petty trading. One patient (1.6%) had had a single Pap smear in her life. The major presenting complaints were abnormal vaginal bleeding (86.9%), offensive vaginal discharge (41.0%), and weight loss. Twenty patients (32.8%) were lost to follow-up prior to staging. Of the remaining 41 patients, 16 (39.0%) had stage III disease and 17.1% stage IV. Fifteen patients (24.6%) with late stage disease accepted referral, and were referred for radiotherapy. Those who declined were discharged home on request, though 4 (9.8%) died in the hospital. There was no feedback from referred patients confirming that they went and benefitted from the referral. The presentation followed known trends. Illiteracy, poverty, early marriages, high parity, widowhood, non-use of screening methods, late presentation, non-acceptance of referral, and lack of communication after referral were some of the major challenges encountered. These underscore the needs for health education and awareness creation, women educational and economic empowerment, legislation against early marriages and in protection of widows, and creation of a well-staffed and well-equipped dedicated gynecologic oncology unit to forestall further referral

  8. Prevalence of anti-hepatitis C virus antibody among pregnant women and blood donors at Bowen University Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Hilda, Awoyelu E; Kola, Oloke Julius; Kolawole, Oladipo E

    2016-09-27

    Hepatitis C virus is one of the emerging infectious diseases that can be transmitted through blood-to-blood contact. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies among potential blood donors and pregnant women attending Bowen University Teaching Hospital (BUTH), Ogbomoso, Oyo State. This hospital-based study was conducted from December 2014 to September 2015. The study group (N = 279) included potential blood donors and pregnant women. Data on socio-demographic characteristics and potential risk factors were collected using a structured questionnaire. The presence of anti-HCV antibodies in serum samples of the studied subjects were detected using third-generation Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) (WKEA Med Supplies Corp, China). Chisquare test was utilized to assess the association between the socio-demographic variables and HCV status. Logistic regression was done to determine the strength of association between risk factors and HCV status. Statistical significance was set at P ˂ 0.05. Overall seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus infection was found to be 1.79% consisting 0.36% of pregnant women and 1.43% of blood donors. None of the socio-demographic characteristics and potential risk factors among the study groups were significantly associated with hepatitis C virus infection. This study found a seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody to be 1.79%, thus, screening of pregnant women and blood donors for HCV infections with the use of ELISA is recommended because of its important role in detecting the presence of anti-HCV antibody with utmost specificity and sensitivity. HCV, Pregnant women, Blood donors, Seroprevalence, Socio-demographic factor, BOWEN, Ogbomoso.

  9. A pilot validation in 10 European Union Member States of a point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use in acute hospitals in Europe, 2011.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J S; Price, L; Godwin, J; Cairns, S; Hopkins, S; Cookson, B; Malcolm, W; Hughes, G; Lyytikainen, O; Coignard, B; Hansen, S; Suetens, C

    2015-02-26

    We present a pilot validation study performed on 10 European Union (EU) Member States, of a point prevalence survey (PPS) of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and antimicrobial use in Europe in 2011 involving 29 EU/European Economic Area (EEA) countries and Croatia. A total of 20 acute hospitals and 1,950 patient records were included in the pilot study, which consisted of validation and inter-rater reliability (IRR) testing using an in-hospital observation approach. In the validation, a sensitivity of 83% (95% confidence interval (CI): 79–87%) and a specificity of 98% (95% CI: 98–99%) were found for HAIs. The level of agreement between the primary PPS and validation results were very good for HAIs overall (Cohen’s κappa (κ):0.81) and across all the types of HAIs (range: 0.83 for bloodstream infections to 1.00 for lower respiratory tract infections). Antimicrobial use had a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI: 93–95%) and specificity of 97% (95% CI: 96–98%) with a very good level of agreement (κ:0.91). Agreement on other demographic items ranged from moderate to very good (κ: 0.57–0.95): age (κ:0.95), sex (κ: 0.93), specialty of physician (κ: 0.87) and McCabe score (κ: 0.57). IRR showed a very good level of agreement (κ: 0.92) for both the presence of HAIs and antimicrobial use. This pilot study suggested valid and reliable reporting of HAIs and antimicrobial use in the PPS dataset. The lower level of sensitivity with respect to reporting of HAIs reinforces the importance of training data collectors and including validation studies as part of a PPS in order for the burden of HAIs to be better estimated.

  10. Does outsourcing affect hospital profitability?

    PubMed

    Danvers, Kreag; Nikolov, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Organizations outsource non-core service functions to achieve cost reductions and strategic benefits, both of which can impact profitability performance. This article examines relations between managerial outsourcing decisions and profitability for a multi-state sample of non-profit hospitals, across 16 states and four regions of the United States. Overall regression results indicate that outsourcing does not necessarily improve hospital profitability. In addition, we identify no profitability impact from outsourcing for urban hospitals, but somewhat positive effects for teaching hospitals. Our regional analysis suggests that hospitals located in the Midwest maintain positive profitability effects with outsourcing, but those located in the South realize negative effects. These findings have implications for cost reduction efforts and the financial viability of non-profit hospitals.

  11. Low Coverage of Hepatitis B Vaccine and Determinants Among Health Professionals Working in Amhara Regional State Hospitals, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    More than two billion people have been infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 360 million have chronic infection and 600,000 die each year from HBV-related liver disease or hepatocellular carcinoma. Each year more than 66,000 health professionals are infected by hepatitis b virus and vaccination against hepatitis B saves the life’s of these health professionals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of hepatitis B vaccine coverage in a resource limited settings. A cross sectional study design was conducted. The study was conducted on 1184 health professionals at Amhara national regional state, Ethiopia. Simple random sampling technique was used. Structured questionnaire was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistics were used to identify the prevalence while Binary logistic regression was used to assess the determinants of hepatitis B vaccine coverage. The coverage of hepatitis B vaccine was 4%. Vaccination were affected by work load (AOR=0.19, 95%CI= 0.08-0.46; P<0.01), negligence (AOR=0.04, 95%CI=0.01-0.11: P<0.01), universal precaution training (AOR=14.75, 95%CI=5.66-38.44: P<0.01), perception that they are not at risk of infection (AOR=0.34, 95%CI=0.15-0.79: P=0.01), unaffordable cost (AOR=0.12, 95%CI=0.05-0.28: P<0.01), awareness about the vaccine (AOR=4.55, 95%CI=1.53-13.49: P<0.01), peer pressure (AOR=3.8, 95%CI=1.34-10.74: P=0.01), knowledge about where to get the vaccine (AOR=5.13, 95%CI=1.87-14.11: P=0.02), unavailability of the vaccine (AOR=0.25, 95%CI=0.1-0.63: P=0.03), year of experience (AOR=7.27, 95%CI=2.23-23.72: P<0.01). Low hepatitis B vaccine coverage was observed. The ministry of health should avail the vaccine to all those health professionals, develop awareness on HBV and improve the affordability of the vaccine. PMID:28299157

  12. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: a pilot study to examine its latent structure and the link between psychological state and symptom severity in transient ischaemic attack patients.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Laura; James, Gill; Sackley, Cath

    2016-07-01

    Transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is often associated with anxiety and depression, which may precipitate secondary stroke and interfere with treatment. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to assess these states and to inform the management of any associated psychological problems, but there is considerable debate about what it actually measures. The HADS scores from a range of different clinical groups have been reviewed in order to assess its psychometric properties, but so far, no research has examined either its latent structure when used with TIA patients, or the association between symptom severity and the test's validity. The aims of this study, therefore, were to investigate: (a) the underlying structure of the HADS when used with TIA patients; and (b) the impact of symptom severity on the validity of the HADS. The HADS and a functional capacity measure were administered by post to a sample of 542 confirmed TIA patients. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the HADS scores to establish its underlying structure for this clinical group, and then, sub-sample correlations were undertaken between the anxiety/depression scores for different levels of functional capacity. Two factors emerged, with 13 of the 14 HADS items loading significantly on both, suggesting there is a common affective state underlying the standard anxiety and depression scales. Further data-exploration indicated that convergence between these affective states increased as functional capacity deteriorated. The results suggest firstly that the HADS measures general subjective distress when used with TIA patients, and secondly that the higher reported symptom severity in this clinical group may be associated with reduced affective differentiation. As the ability to retain clear affective discrimination is associated with health and well-being, this could provide a focus for post-TIA rehabilitation.

  13. Hospital closure and economic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Capps, Cory; Dranove, David; Lindrooth, Richard C

    2010-01-01

    We present a new framework for assessing the effects of hospital closures on social welfare and the local economy. While patient welfare necessarily declines when patients lose access to a hospital, closures also tend to reduce costs. We study five hospital closures in two states and find that urban hospital bailouts reduce aggregate social welfare: on balance, the cost savings from closures more than offset the reduction in patient welfare. However, because some of the cost savings are shared nationally, total surplus in the local community may decline following a hospital closure.

  14. Comparison of computing capability and information system abilities of state hospitals owned by Ministry of Labor and Social Security and Ministry of Health.

    PubMed

    Tengilimoğlu, Dilaver; Celik, Yusuf; Ulgü, Mahir

    2006-08-01

    The main purpose of this study is to give an idea to the readers about how big and important the computing and information problems that hospital managers as well as policy makers will face with after collecting the Ministry of Labor and Social Security (MoLSS) and Ministry of Health (MoH) hospitals under single structure in Turkey by comparing the current level of computing capability of hospitals owned by two ministries. The data used in this study were obtained from 729 hospitals that belong to both ministries by using a data collection tool. The results indicate that there have been considerable differences among the hospitals owned by the two ministries in terms of human resources and information systems. The hospital managers and decision makers making their decisions based on the data produced by current hospital information system (HIS) would more likely face very important difficulties after merging MoH and MoLSS hospitals in Turkey. It is also possible to claim that the level and adequacy of computing abilities and devices do not allow the managers of public hospitals to use computer technology effectively in their information management practices. Lack of technical information, undeveloped information culture, inappropriate management styles, and being inexperienced are the main reasons of why HIS does not run properly and effectively in Turkish hospitals.

  15. The Short and Active History of The Agnew Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The field of business education has been driven by the needs of society since the beginnings of the nation's history--from apprenticeship training, to factory vestibule settings, to the emergence of the for-profit private business schools, to specialized vocational high schools, to the comprehensive secondary school, to business teacher…

  16. [Nutritional status of patients with breast cancer attended in the Mastology Service of Belo Horizonte's Hospital das Clínicas in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Dirce Ribeiro; Carvalho, Erika Simone Coelho; Campos, Liliane Cunha; Leal, José Adalberto; Sampaio, Estela Viana; Cassali, Geovanni Dantas

    2014-05-01

    The scope of this article is to evaluate the nutritional status, body composition and tumor characteristics of 31 patients with breast cancer attended at the Mastology Service of Hospital das Clínicas of the Federal University of Minas Gerais. Dietary data were obtained from the 24-hour dietary recall in the pre-operative state and analyzed by the DietWin Professional 2008 Nutrition Software. Body composition was assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis. The tumor characterization data were collected from medical records. The mean age of patients was 50.75 ± 14.34 years. Excess body weight was found in 58% and waist circumference greater than 80 cm in 64.5% of patients Excessive consumption of oils and sugars was observed in 90.3% and 83.8%, respectively. Most had low intakes of calcium and vitamins B6, B12 and A. The predominant diagnosis was type II histological grade invasive ductal carcinoma in stage II or III. The prevalence of overweight and inadequate dietary intake demonstrate the need for individualized nutritional guidance and monitoring to improve the prognosis and quality of the life of patients.

  17. Direct utilization of geothermal resources at Warm Springs State Hospital, Warm Springs, Montana. Final report, January 31, 1979-June 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Several decades ago the water from a natural hot spring was piped to the Warm Springs State Hospital barn and greenhouse and eventually into the domestic water supply for showers. The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) funded a feasibility study on potential development of the geothermal resource from monies originating from coal severence taxes. The results of the feasibility study were subsequently utilized in obtaining a $721,122 award from the Department of Energy Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program to identify and develop the geothermal resource at Warm Springs. The study included environmental and legal considerations, geophysical surveys, and the subsequent development of the resource. The well produces 60 to 64 gpm of 154/sup 0/F geothermal water which is utilized in a heat exchanger to heat domestic water. The system became fully operational on January 13, 1983 and the calculated yearly energy savings represent approximately 17.6 million cubic feet of natural gas which is equivalent to $77,000, based on current prices.

  18. Comparison of seclusion and restraint prevalence between hearing patients and deaf or hard of hearing patients in a state hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Brian; Blalock, Ann

    2011-01-01

    The present study is an effort to obtain preliminary data to assess the validity of the long-standing claim that the rate of seclusion and restraint is higher among deaf and hard of hearing individuals than among hearing individuals. This difference has been claimed repeatedly despite there being no research to support it. The sample was comprised of 22 deaf or hard of hearing individuals who had been committed to a large state hospital, all but three of whom had been discharged prior to data collection. The deaf and hard of hearing subjects were matched to subjects with no hearing loss on factors believed to be associated with behaviors that can result in seclusion or restraint. Archived clinical records of both groups of subjects were reviewed to determine the rates of seclusion and restraint for the two groups, as well as to assess the length of time each group was in seclusion or restraint. The results indicate a significantly higher frequency of seclusion and restraint for the deaf and hard of hearing group than for the hearing group. Of note is that the hearing individuals spent longer in seclusion and restraint than did the deaf and hard of hearing. The hypothesis of a higher rate of restrictive events among deaf and hard of hearing individuals is supported. The results of this study suggest that further research be undertaken to determine the generalizability of these results as well as possible sources of the differences between these two groups.

  19. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  20. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise.

  1. [Protein-calorie nutritional state in elderly patients hospitalized in Lomé Campus university hospital: pilot study about 33 patients versus 30 reference cases registered in three care units].

    PubMed

    Kouassi, K C; Lamboni, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the protein-calorie nutritional status of elderly hospitalized patients admitted to the hepato-gastroenterology, cardiology and internal medicine departments of the Lomé Campus University Hospital and identify the endogenous and mixed undernutrition to provide patients with better nutrition and assistance. Methodology. This cross-sectional study conducted between April 1 and July 31, 2009, included 33 hospitalized case patients aged at least 55 years and 30 age-matched outpatient control subjects. Patients were evaluated according to body mass index (BMI), the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and their serum albumin, serum prealbumin and orosomucoid levels. Results. Among the hospitalized case patients, 37% had protein-calorie undernutrition (low serum albumin), and 73% were at risk of this undernutrition (low serum prealbumin). Five patients (16%) were endogenously undernourished and 17 (57%) exogenously undernourished. Six to 13% of the oupatient controls were undernourished and 33% at risk of undernutrition according to the MNA scale. A significant difference existed between the mean albumin values of case patients and controls (38 ± 9 g/L vs 46 ± 7 g/L, p = 0.002). Conclusion. Our results confirm that the elderly inpatients were regularly malnourished. Knowledge of their nutritional profile has allowed us to launch an improved nutritional assistance program and to supervise it properly.

  2. Metadata - National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) is an annual probability survey that collects information on the characteristics of inpatients discharged from non-federal short-stay hospitals in the United States.

  3. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  4. Suicidal Behavior in Hospitalized Schizophrenics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Ashoka Jahnavi; Kumar, Nirmal

    1988-01-01

    Compared 131 hospitalized schizophrenics who had attempted suicide within past year to 70 hospitalized schizophrenics who had not attempted suicide, using the Present State Examination depressive symptoms. Found that schizophrenics who had attempted suicide had significantly higher number of symptoms indicative of a depressive disorder. (Author/NB)

  5. Pattern of Skin Diseases at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, South-South Nigeria: A 12 Month Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ukonu, B. A.; Eze, E. U

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: This study aims to look at the pattern and incidence of skin diseases seen in Dermatology/Venereology clinic at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, South-South Zone, Nigeria and compare it with other zones of Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study on pattern and incidence of skin diseases in new patients presenting at the Dermatology/Venereology outpatient clinic of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, South-South, Nigeria, from September 2006 to August 2007. All patients were seen by the researchers. Diagnosis were made clinically and sometimes with the support of histopathology. Results: A total number of 4786 patients were seen during the study period and these comprised 2647 HIV/AIDS patients and 2112 pure Dermatological patients. Out of 4786 patients, 755 (15.8%) were new patients. The new patients comprised 96 (12.7%) children patients (< 15 years) and 659 (83.7%) adult patients (>15years). The ages of the patients ranged from 2 weeks to 80 years and more than two-third were < 40 years. There were 354 males (46.9%) and 401 females (53.1%). This represents female: male ratio of 1.1: 1. Eczematous dermatitis accounted for 20.9% of the skin diseases and was the most common of the skin diseases observed. This is consistent with observation from other zones in Nigeria. Other skin diseases observed in order of frequencies include: Papulosqamous disorder (9.0%), Infectious skin diseases like fungal, viral, bacterial and parasitic infestation, at 7.9%, 7.7%, 2.3% and 2.1% respectively. Pigmentary disorders (5.0%), hair disorders (4.2%) and Benign neoplastic skin disease (6.5%). All the patients that had neurofibromatosis were females (1.9%). HIV-related skin diseases were observed to have increased remarkably (7.9%) with Kaposi’s sarcoma, papular pruritic eruptions and drug eruptions being the commonest mode of presentation. Conclusion: The current pattern of

  6. Health in a fragile state: a five-year review of mortality patterns and trends at Somalia’s Banadir Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kulane, Asli; Sematimba, Douglas; Mohamed, Lul M; Ali, Abdirashid H; Lu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background The recurrent civil conflict in Somalia has impeded progress toward improving health and health care, with lack of data and poor performance of health indicators. This study aimed at making inference about Banadir region by exploring morbidity and mortality trends at Banadir Hospital. This is one of the few functional hospitals during war. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted with data collected at Banadir Hospital for the period of January 2008–December 2012. The data were aggregated from patient records and summarized on a morbidity and mortality surveillance form with respect to age groups and stratified by sex. The main outcome was the number of patients that died in the hospital. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association between sex and hospital mortality. Results Conditions of infectious origin were the major presentations at the hospital. The year 2011 recorded the highest number of cases of diarrhea and mortality due to diarrhea. The stillbirth rate declined during the study period from 272 to 48 stillbirths per 1,000 live births by 2012. The sum of total cases that were attended to at the hospital by the end of 2012 was four times the number at the baseline year of the study in 2008; however, the overall mortality rate among those admitted declined between 2008 and 2012. Conclusion There was reduction in patient mortality at the hospital over the study period. Data from Banadir Hospital are consistent with findings from Banadir region and could give credible public health reflections for the region given the lack of data on a population level. PMID:27621664

  7. Availability of hospital dental care services under sedation or general anesthesia for individuals with special needs in the Unified Health System for the State of Minas Gerais (SUS-MG), Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jacqueline Silva; Valle, Déborah Andrade; Palmier, Andréa Clemente; do Amaral, João Henrique Lara; de Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães

    2015-02-01

    This study identified the demographic characteristics of individuals and dental treatment care under sedation/general anesthesia in a hospital environment in the Unified Health System in the State of Minas Gerais (SUS-MG). All Hospitalization Authorizations (AIHs) for Dental Treatment for Patients with Special Needs procedures were evaluated between July 2011 and June 2012. Demographic and health care variables for treatment were also assessed. Hospitalization rates per 10,000 inhabitants, and health care coverage provided in the state of Minas Gerais and in each of the Broader Health Regions were calculated. Descriptive analysis of data was carried out by calculating the central trend and variability frequency and measurements. All 1,063 AIHs paid during the study period were evaluated, which is equivalent to a rate of 0.54 hospitalizations per 10,000 individuals. The majority of the patients were adult, male, diagnosed with mental or behavioral disorders and resident in 27.7% of the municipalities in Minas Gerais. The procedures were performed in 39 municipalities and the care coverage was equal to 1.58%. The study reveals a classic demographic and clinical profile of patient attendance. Difficulties in establishing a network of dental care were identified.

  8. Union Density and Hospital Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koys, Daniel J; Martin, Wm Marty; LaVan, Helen; Katz, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    The authors address the hospital outcomes of patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income per bed. They define union density as the percentage of a hospital's employees who are in unions, healthcare quality as its 30-day acute myocardial infraction (AMI; heart attack) mortality rate, and patient satisfaction as its overall Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems score. Using a random sample of 84 union and 84 nonunion hospitals from across the United States, multiple regression analyses show that union density is negatively related to patient satisfaction. Union density is not related to healthcare quality as measured by the AMI mortality rate or to net income per bed. This implies that unions per se are not good or bad for hospitals. The authors suggest that it is better for hospital administrators to take a Balanced Scorecard approach and be concerned about employee satisfaction, patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income.

  9. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  10. Hospital finance.

    PubMed

    Herman, M J

    1998-01-01

    This article summarizes key areas of focus for the analysis of risk in the hospital segment of the health care industry. The article is written from a commercial bank lending perspective. Both for-profit (C-corporations) and 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit segments are addressed.

  11. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  12. 38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17... to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be paid to the designated State official for hospital care furnished in a recognized State home for any veteran if: (a)...

  13. Prevalence and Predictors of Gastrostomy Tube and Tracheostomy Placement in Anoxic/Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathic Survivors of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Rampa, Sankeerth; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Martinez-Schlurmann, Natalia I.; Lidsky, Karen B.; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Rotta, Alexandre T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current prevalence estimates of gastrostomy tube (GT) /tracheostomy placement in hospitalized patients with anoxic/hypoxic ischemic encephalopathic injury (AHIE) post cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are unknown. We sought, to estimate the prevalence of AHIE in hospitalized patients who had CPR and to identify patient/hospital level factors that predict the performance of GT/tracheostomy in those with AHIE. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 2004–2010). All patients who developed AHIE following CPR were included. In this cohort the odds of having GT and tracheostomy was computed by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Patient and hospital level factors were the independent variables. Results During the study period, a total of 686,578 CPR events occurred in hospitalized patients. Of these, 94,336 (13.7%) patients developed AHIE. In this AHIE cohort, 6.8% received GT and 8.3% tracheostomy. When compared to the 40–49 yrs age group, those aged >70 yrs were associated with lower odds for GT (OR = 0.65, 95% CI:0.53–0.80, p<0.0001). Those aged <18 years & those >60 years were associated with lower odds for having tracheostomy when compared to the 40–49 years group (p<0.0001). Each one unit increase in co-morbid burden was associated with higher odds for having GT (OR = 1.23,p<0.0001) or tracheostomy (OR = 1.17, p<0.0001). Blacks, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and other races were associated with higher odds for having GT or tracheostomy when compared to whites (p<0.05). Hospitals located in northeastern regions were associated with higher odds for performing GT (OR = 1.48, p<0.0001) or tracheostomy (OR = 1.63, p<0.0001) when compared to those in Western regions. Teaching hospitals (TH) were associated with higher odds for performing tracheostomy when compared to non-TH (OR = 1.36, 1.20–1.54, p<0.0001). Conclusions AHIE injury occurs in a significant number of in-hospital arrests

  14. [Considering the current state of fire safety in Taiwan's care environment from the perspective of the nation's worst recent hospital fire].

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Wen; Shih, Chung-Liang; Chien, Shen-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Taiwan's worst hospital fire in history on October 23rd, 2012 at Sinying Hospital's Bei-Men Branch resulted in 13 elderly patient deaths and over 70 injuries. The heavy casualties were due in part to the serious condition of patients. Some patients on life-support machines were unable to move or be moved. This disaster highlights the issue of fire safety in small-scale hospitals that have transformed existing hospital space into special care environments for elderly patients. Compared with medical centers and general hospitals, these small-scale health facilities are ill equipped to deal properly with fire safety management and emergency response issues due to inadequate fire protection facilities, fire safety equipment, and human resources. Small-scale facilities that offer health care and medical services to mostly immobile patients face fire risks that differ significantly from general health care facilities. This paper focuses on fire risks in small-scale facilities and suggests a strategy for fire prevention and emergency response procedures, including countermeasures for fire risk assessment, management, and emergency response, in order to improve fire safety at these institutions in Taiwan.

  15. [Detection of metallo-beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized patients in Goiânia, State of Goiás].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Diana Christina Pereira Santos; Lima, Ana Beatriz Mori; Leão, Lara Stefania Netto de Oliveira; Filho, José Rodrigues do Carmo; Pimenta, Fabiana Cristina; Vieira, José Daniel Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium frequently isolated from hospital environments. This study had the aims of evaluating the susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa previously isolated from patients in a hospital in Goiânia (Goiás, Brazil), performing phenotypic screening for metallo-beta-lactamase production and detecting its genes using the polymerase chain reaction technique. Seventy-five 75 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were evaluated between January 2005 and January 2007. Biochemical identification was performed using the API 20E system and an antibiogram was produced using the Kirby-Bauer method. Among the 62 isolates that were resistant to imipenem and ceftazidime, 35 (56.4%) produced metallo-beta-lactamase, while 26 (74.3%) showed the bla(SPM-1) gene. The frequency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that produces metallo-beta-lactamase suggests that greater control over the dissemination of resistance in hospital environments is needed.

  16. Ambulatory care for cancer in the United States: results from two national surveys comparing visits to physicians' offices and hospital outpatient departments.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lisa C.; Tangka, Florence K.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the general population, type of health insurance has been reported to affect the location of ambulatory visits and the content of those visits. We examined where cancer patient visits occurred (physicians' offices or hospital clinics), and whether anticancer therapy is administered or prescribed. METHODS: Cross-sectional study using National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey (NAMCS/NHAMCS) data to characterize ambulatory cancer patient visits from 2001-2003. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with where a cancer patient went for care (office practice versus hospital clinic) and anticancer therapy received. RESULTS: Thirteen percent of patients visited hospital clinics, with the remainder visiting office-based settings. Younger cancer patients and those with Medicaid were more likely to visit hospital clinics compared to older and privately insured cancer patients. Cancer patients with <6 visits in the last year were less likely to be seen in the office setting. Patients with lung cancer, lymphoma/leukemia and melanoma were less likely to have anticancer therapy administered or prescribed compared to breast cancer patients. The uninsured were less likely to have anticancer administered or prescribed compared with the privately insured. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer patients with Medicaid were more likely to visit hospital clinics than privately insured patients. Treatment was associated with cancer type, not where care occurred and health insurance type, though there was a trend for the uninsured and those insured by Medicaid to be less likely to be administered or be prescribed anticancer therapy. PMID:18229771

  17. Predictors of Complications of Tonsillectomy With or Without Adenoidectomy in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2001-2010: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Martinez-Schlurmann, Natalia; Rampa, Sankeerth; Nalliah, Romesh P; Lidsky, Karen B; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Rotta, Alexandre T

    2016-06-01

    Outcomes of tonsillectomy (with or without adenoidectomy [w/woA]) in hospitalized children are unclear. We sought, to describe the characteristics of hospitalized children who underwent tonsillectomy (w/woA), to estimate the prevalence of complications and to evaluate the relative impact of different comorbid conditions (CMC) on the risk of occurrence of common complications following these procedures. All patients aged ≤21years who underwent a tonsillectomy (w/woA) were selected from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS 2001-2010). The associations between several patient/hospital-level factors and occurrence of complications were generated using multivariable logistic regression models. Over a decade, a total of 141 599 hospitalized patients underwent tonsillectomy (w116 319; woA 25 280). A total of 58.1% were males. Majority of the procedures were performed in teaching hospitals (TH, 73.7%), in large (bed-size) hospitals (LH, 57.8%), and in those who were electively admitted (EA, 67.3%). Frequently present CMC in patients included obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, 26.4%), chronic pulmonary disease (CPD, 14.6%), neurological disorders (ND, 6.7%), and obesity (4.8%). Majority of patients were discharged routinely (98%). Overall complication rate was 6.4% with common complications being postoperative pneumonia (2.3%), bacterial infections (1.4%), respiratory complications (1.3%), and hemorrhage (1.2%). All-cause mortality included a total of 60 patients. Patients in TH (odds ratio [OR] = 0.72, 95%CI = 0.62-0.85), LH (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.69-0.93), and those who had the procedures during EA (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.56-0.74) had significantly lower odds of complications compared with their counterparts. CMC such as anemia, CPD, coagulopathy, HT, ND, and fluid/electrolyte disorders were independent predictors of significantly higher complication risk (P < .05). In conclusion, hospitalized children who underwent tonsillectomy (w/woA) in large or teaching hospitals, or

  18. [Incidence of congenital heart disease and factors associated with mortality in children born in two Hospitals in the State of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Mendieta-Alcántara, Gustavo Gabriel; Santiago-Alcántara, Elia; Mendieta-Zerón, Hugo; Dorantes-Piña, Ramsés; Ortiz de Zárate-Alarcón, Gabriela; Otero-Ojeda, Gloria A

    2013-01-01

    We studied the incidence, survival, and risk factors for mortality in a cohort of infants for a period of five years, born in two hospitals, one a second-level General Hospital, the second a tertiary perinatal hospital, both in the City of Toluca. The analysis of survival was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression was used to estimate the risk of death according to different factors. We found an overall incidence of 7.4 per 1,000 live births; in preterm infants, the rate was 35.6 per 1,000, and in term newborns it was 3.68 per 1,000. The most common heart disease was the ductus arteriosus in the overall group and in preterm infants; in term newborns the most common was the atrial septal defect. The specific mortality was 18.64%, follow-up was 579 days, where we found, according to Kaplan-Meier, survival of an average of 437.92 days, with 95% confidence intervals of 393.25 to 482.6 days, with a standard error of 22.79 days; the cumulative probability of survival was 0.741, with a standard error of 0.44. In Cox regression, two variables had a high hazard ratio (HR): these were the presence or absence of cyanosis and the hospital where they were treated as newborns.

  19. What Is the Impact of Health Reforms on Uncompensated Care in Critical Access Hospitals? A 5-Year Forecast in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Joseph; Fry, Benjamin; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Gary; Short, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Context: The 2008 financial crisis had a far-reaching impact on nearly every sector of the economy. As unemployment increased so did the uninsured. Already operating on a slim margin and poor payer mix, many critical access hospitals are facing a tough road ahead. Purpose: We seek to examine the increasing impact of uncompensated care on the…

  20. Is Walk Score associated with hospital admissions from chronic diseases? Evidence from a cross-sectional study in a high socioeconomic status Australian city-state

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Soumya; Learnihan, Vincent; Cochrane, Thomas; Phung, Hai; O'Connor, Bridget; Davey, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore patterns of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT).To ascertain the effect of the neighbourhood built environmental features and especially walkability on health outcomes, specifically for hospital admissions from NCDs. Design A cross-sectional analysis of public hospital episode data (2007–2013). Setting Hospitalisations from the ACT, Australia at very small geographic areas. Participants Secondary data on 75 290 unique hospital episodes representing 39 851 patients who were admitted to ACT hospitals from 2007 to 2013. No restrictions on age, sex or ethnicity. Main exposure measures Geographic Information System derived or compatible measures of general practitioner access, neighbourhood socioeconomic status, alcohol access, exposure to traffic and Walk Score walkability. Main outcome measures Hospitalisations of circulatory diseases, specific endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, respiratory diseases and specific cancers. Results Geographic clusters with significant high and low risks of NCDs were found that displayed an overall geographic pattern of high risk in the outlying suburbs of the territory. Significant relationships between neighbourhood walkability as measured by Walk Score and the likelihood of hospitalisation with a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction (heart attack) were found. A possible relationship was also found with the likelihood of being hospitalised with 4 major lifestyle-related cancers. Conclusions Our research augments the growing literature underscoring the relationships between the built environment and health outcomes. In addition, it supports the importance of walkable neighbourhoods, as measured by Walk Score, for improved health. PMID:27932340

  1. National trends in inpatient admissions following stereotactic radiosurgery and the in-hospital patient outcomes in the United States from 1998 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Allen L.; Li, Alexander Y.; Sussman, Eric S.; Pendharkar, Arjun V.; Iyer, Aditya; Thompson, Patricia A.; Tayag, Armine T.; Chang, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to examine trends in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and in-hospital patient outcomes on a national level by utilizing national administrative data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. Methods and materials Using the NIS database, all discharges where patients underwent inpatient SRS were included in our study from 1998 – 2011 as designated by the ICD9-CM procedural codes. Trends in the utilization of primary and adjuvant SRS, in-hospital complications and mortality, and resource utilization were identified and analyzed. Results Our study included over 11,000 hospital discharges following admission for primary SRS or for adjuvant SRS following admission for surgery or other indication. The most popular indication for SRS continues to be treatment of intracranial metastatic disease (36.7%), but expansion to primary CNS lesions and other non-malignant pathology beyond trigeminal neuralgia has occurred over the past decade. Second, inpatient admissions for primary SRS have declined by 65.9% over this same period of time. Finally, as inpatient admissions for SRS become less frequent, the complexity and severity of illness seen in admitted patients has increased over time with an increase in the average comorbidity score from 1.25 in the year 2002 to 2.29 in 2011, and an increase in over-all in-hospital complication rate of 2.8 times over the entire study period. Conclusions As the practice of SRS continues to evolve, we have seen several trends in associated hospital admissions. Overall, the number of inpatient admissions for primary SRS has declined while adjuvant applications have remained stable. Over the same period, there has been associated increase in complication rate, length of stay, and mortality in inpatients. These associations may be explained by an increase in the comorbidity-load of admitted patients as more high-risk patients are selected for admission at inpatient centers while more stable patients are

  2. Assessing the effect of increased managed care on hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mowll, C A

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a new relative risk methodology developed by the author to assess and compare certain performance indicators to determine a hospital's relative degree of financial vulnerability, based on its location, to the effects of increased managed care market penetration. The study also compares nine financial measures to determine whether hospital in states with a high degree of managed-care market penetration experience lower levels of profitability, liquidity, debt service, and overall viability than hospitals in low managed care states. A Managed Care Relative Financial Risk Assessment methodology composed of nine measures of hospital financial and utilization performance is used to develop a high managed care state Composite Index and to determine the Relative Financial Risk and the Overall Risk Ratio for hospitals in a particular state. Additionally, financial performance of hospitals in the five highest managed care states is compared to hospitals in the five lowest states. While data from Colorado and Massachusetts indicates that hospital profitability diminishes as the level of managed care market penetration increases, the overall study results indicate that hospitals in high managed care states demonstrate a better cash position and higher profitability than hospitals in low managed care states. Hospitals in high managed care states are, however, more heavily indebted in relation to equity and have a weaker debt service coverage capacity. Moreover, the overall financial health and viability of hospitals in high managed care states is superior to that of hospitals in low managed care states.

  3. [Promotion plan for the promotion of cancer: coping measures at Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital in Ehime prefecture - the current state of affairs at the hospital's cancer treatment promotion office].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Motohiro

    2013-05-01

    Recent cancer control strategies in Japan have been aimed at lowering morbidity and mortality rates, based on the Thirdterm Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control initiated by the Japanese government. In April 2007, the Cancer Control Basic Law was promulgated to necessitate promotion of cancer control by national and local authorities. In June 2007, the Japanese Health Ministry released a plan for the promotion of measures to cope with cancer. The cancer control measures adopted by the Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital(MRCH)in Ehime Prefecture were as follows: ·Progress in the promotion of measures to cope with cancer in Ehime, including a review of 2012, problems with new treatment methods for childhood cancer, employment of cancer patients, and promotion of home care. ·Cancer treatment measures adopted by MRCH as a hub medical institution for the past 5 years. ·The distinctive efforts of the intensive professionals team at the Cancer Treatment Promotion Office for cancer treatment at MRCH, and its work on cancer care from the 4 perspectives of the balanced scorecard in accordance with the basic policy of MRCH.

  4. Patterns and loss of sexual activity in the year following hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (a United States National Multisite Observational Study).

    PubMed

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Abramsohn, Emily; Gosch, Kensey; Wroblewski, Kristen; Spatz, Erica S; Chan, Paul S; Spertus, John; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2012-05-15

    A multisite observational study of sexual activity-related outcomes in patients enrolled in the TRIUMPH registry during hospitalization for an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was conducted to identify patterns and loss of sexual activity 1 year after hospitalization for AMI. Gender-specific multivariable hierarchical models were used to identify correlates of loss of sexual activity including physician counseling. Main outcome measurements included "loss of sexual activity" (less frequent or no sexual activity 1 year after an AMI in those who were sexually active in the year before the AMI) and 1-year mortality. Mean ages were 61.1 years for women (n = 605) and 58.6 years for men (n = 1,274). Many were sexually active in the year before and 1 year after hospitalization (44% and 40% of women, 74% and 68% of men, respectively). One third of women and 47% of men reported receiving hospital discharge instructions about resuming sex. Those who did not receive instructions were more likely to report loss of sexual activity (women, adjusted relative risk 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 1.79; men, adjusted relative risk 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.11 to 1.46). One year mortality after AMI was similar in those who reported sexual activity in the first month after AMI (2.1%) and those who were sexually inactive (4.1%, p = 0.08). In conclusion, although many patients were sexually active before AMI, only a minority received discharge counseling about resuming sexual activity. Lack of counseling was associated with loss of sexual activity 1 year later. Mortality was not significantly increased in patients who were sexually active soon after their AMI.

  5. A Comparative Study of the Lengths of Stay of Matched Groups of Inpatients Treated in Civilian, United States Army, Navy, and Air Force Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-03-01

    average length of stay for surgical, medical, and orthopedic service patients, in addition to...the 3 average length of stay for all patients. The lengths of stay for the two hospital categories were then compared by 3 using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov...Naval hospi- 4D tals were experiencing an average length of stay which?, • was, in most diagnostic categories, two to three times greater than that

  6. Hospital demand for licensed practical nurses.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Dyer, Wendy T; Chapman, Susan; Seago, Jean Ann

    2006-10-01

    Despite evidence that hospital use of licensed practical nurses (LPNs) declined in the 1990s, the current registered nurse (RN) shortage has prompted interest in LPNs as substitutes for RNs. Hospitals, being the dominant employer of RNs, have an economic incentive to use less expensive LPNs as substitutes. Beside wages, there are several forces underlying hospital demand for LPNs. In this article, the authors model and estimate hospital demand for LPNs as a function of nurse wages and hospital, market, and patient characteristics using a longitudinal data set of short-term general hospitals in the United States. The authors find evidence that higher RN wages increase hospital demand for LPNs, both in levels and relative to RNs, suggesting that hospitals at least partially substitute RNs with LPNs.

  7. Managing hospitals in turbulent times: do organizational changes improve hospital survival?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S Y; Alexander, J A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine (1) the degree to which organizational changes affected hospital survival; (2) whether core and peripheral organizational changes affected hospital survival differently; and (3) how simultaneous organizational changes affected hospital survival. DATA SOURCES: AHA Hospital Surveys, the Area Resource File, and the AHA Hospital Guides, Part B: Multihospital Systems. STUDY DESIGN: The study employed a longitudinal panel design. We followed changes in all community hospitals in the continental United States from 1981 through 1994. The dependent variable, hospital closure, was examined as a function of multiple changes in a hospital's core and peripheral structures as well as the hospital's organizational and environmental characteristics. Cox regression models were used to test the expectations that core changes increased closure risk while peripheral changes decreased such risk, and that simultaneous core and peripheral changes would lead to higher risk of closure. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Results indicated more peripheral than core changes in community hospitals. Overall, findings contradicted our expectations. Change in specialty, a core change, was beneficial for hospitals, because it reduced closure risk. The two most frequent peripheral changes, downsizing and leadership change, were positively associated with closure. Simultaneous organizational changes displayed a similar pattern: multiple core changes reduced closure risk, while multiple peripheral changes increased the risk. These patterns held regardless of the level of uncertainty in hospital environments. CONCLUSIONS: Organizational changes are not all beneficial for hospitals, suggesting that hospital leaders should be both cautious and selective in their efforts to turn their hospitals around. PMID:10536977

  8. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care.

  9. Cross-sectional descriptive study of topical self-medication in a hospital dermatology department in the state of São Paulo.

    PubMed

    Padoveze, Emerson Henrique; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando Costa; Ferreira, Flávia Regina; Neves, Viviane Scarpa da Costa

    2012-01-01

    Self-medication involves individuals or their carers administering a medical drug of their own choice for symptomatic relief and in the hope of a "cure", without seeking professional medical advice.The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study conducted at the Dermatology Department of the Taubaté University Hospital was to identify the occurrence of self-medication for the topical treatment of skin diseases in young people under 18, and to analyze the difficulties encountered in the clinical diagnosis of these individuals.We examined 29 cases of self-medication (from a total of 480 attendances). Although self-medication is a common practice in Brazil our study showed that users were not significantly harmed by it.

  10. Hospitalizations due to selected infections caused by opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPP) and reported drug resistance in the United States older adult population in 1991-2006.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Elena N; Liss, Alexander; Jagai, Jyotsna S; Behlau, Irmgard; Griffiths, Jeffrey K

    2016-12-01

    The Flint Water Crisis-due to changes of water source and treatment procedures-has revealed many unsolved social, environmental, and public health problems for US drinking water, including opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPP). The true health impact of OPPP, especially in vulnerable populations such as the elderly, is largely unknown. We explored 10(8) claims in the largest US national uniformly collected data repository to determine rates and costs of OPPP-related hospitalizations. In 1991-2006, 617,291 cases of three selected OPPP infections resulted in the elderly alone of $0.6 billion USD per year of payments. Antibiotic resistance significantly increased OPPP illness costs that are likely to be underreported. More precise estimates for OPPP burdens could be obtained if better clinical, microbiological, administrative, and environmental monitoring data were cross-linked. An urgent dialog across governmental and disciplinary divides, and studies on preventing OPPP through drinking water exposure, are warranted.

  11. Hospitalizations due to selected infections caused by opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPP) and reported drug resistance in the United States older adult population in 1991-2006.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Elena N; Liss, Alexander; Jagai, Jyotsna S; Behlau, Irmgard; Griffiths, Jeffrey K

    2016-09-12

    The Flint Water Crisis-due to changes of water source and treatment procedures-has revealed many unsolved social, environmental, and public health problems for US drinking water, including opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPP). The true health impact of OPPP, especially in vulnerable populations such as the elderly, is largely unknown. We explored 10(8) claims in the largest US national uniformly collected data repository to determine rates and costs of OPPP-related hospitalizations. In 1991-2006, 617,291 cases of three selected OPPP infections resulted in the elderly alone of $0.6 billion USD per year of payments. Antibiotic resistance significantly increased OPPP illness costs that are likely to be underreported. More precise estimates for OPPP burdens could be obtained if better clinical, microbiological, administrative, and environmental monitoring data were cross-linked. An urgent dialog across governmental and disciplinary divides, and studies on preventing OPPP through drinking water exposure, are warranted.

  12. The prevalence and determinants of HIV seroconversion among booked ante natal clients in the University of Uyo teaching hospital, Uyo Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nyoyoko, Nsikak Paul; Umoh, Augustine Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Prevention of Mother to Child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV, an important intervention in the fight against HIV/AIDS can only be of benefit if the HIV status of the mother is known. Unfortunately, some women receive HIV counseling and testing (HCT) during the window period or prior to new infection in pregnancy and therefore, miss-out on the gains of PMTCT. A repeat HIV test would identify this later seroconversion and ensure early intervention. This study aimed at determining the prevalence of HIV seroconversion during pregnancy and assessing the factors associated with HIV seroconversion in clients who attended ante-natal clinic (ANC) in University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Uyo. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional design was used to study 502 HIV negative clients who consecutively presented for ANC in the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital Uyo over a 3 months period (July -September 2013). Results Fifteen (3%) of the 502 women who were HIV negative at booking visit tested positive (seroconverted) to HIV. Determinants of seroconversion at multivariate level were age bracket of 25-29 years (OR: 3.20; 95%CI: 2.39-4.29) clients’ partners who had sexually transmitted infections, as evidenced by penile discharge (OR: 0.09; 95%CI: 0.01-0.45); Clients in polygamous setting (OR: 3.98; CI: 1.64-9.65); those taking alcohol (OR: 0.12; CI: 0.20-0.80) and those with partners taking recreational drugs (OR: 0.05, 95%CI: 0.002-0.995). Conclusion The study revealed a high seroconversion rate. Re-screening of pregnant women after the booking HCT is a very cost effective and beneficial strategy for the elimination of mother to child transmission of HIV. PMID:28293363

  13. Announcement of ruling: implementing United States v.Windsor for purposes of entitlement and enrollment in Medicare hospital insurance and supplementary medical insurance. Notice of CMS ruling.

    PubMed

    2015-02-13

    This document announces a CMS Ruling that states the CMS policies for implementing United States v. Windsor ("Windsor''), in which the Supreme Court held that section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), enacted in 1996, is unconstitutional. Section 3 of DOMA defined ``marriage'' and "spouse'' as excluding same-sex marriages and same-sex spouses, and effectively precluded the Federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages and spouses.

  14. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples.

  15. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  16. Changing hospital payments: implications for teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J D

    1983-09-01

    Hospitals cannot continue to view themselves only as social institutions whose performance will be assessed on the good they do. Teaching hospitals, in particular, cannot view themselves simply as distinctive combinations of social and educational institutions. Under Medicare's prospective pricing system, the hospital's role as production system is enhanced, and all hospitals must learn to balance the new economic realities as they work with their medical staff to adapt to a changed future.

  17. Going to the Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital KidsHealth > For Kids > Going to the Hospital Print ... you flowers, balloons, or other treats! previous continue Hospital People You'll meet lots of people in ...

  18. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... use requirements for Critical Access Hospitals related to Electronic Health Records (EHRs)? Critical Access Hospital (CAH) are eligible for Electronic Health Record (EHR) incentive payments and can receive ...

  19. Reforming the Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital Program

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Teresa A.; Ku, Leighton; Kim, Johnny

    2000-01-01

    Since 1991, three Federal laws have sought to reform the Medicaid disproportionate share hospital (DSH) program, which is designed to help safety net hospitals. This article provides findings from a 40-State survey about Medicaid DSH and supplemental payment programs in 1997. Results indicate that the overall size of the DSH program did not grow from 1993 to 1997, but the composition of DSH revenues and expenditures changed substantially: A much higher share of the DSH funds were being paid to local hospitals and relatively less was being retained by the States. The study also revealed that large differences in States' use of DSH still persist. PMID:12500325

  20. Hospital Closure and Insights into Patient Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N.; Husk, G.; Nguyen, T.; Onyile, A.; Echezona, S.; Kuperman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hospital closures are becoming increasingly common in the United States. Patients who received care at the closing hospitals must travel to different, often farther hospitals for care, and nearby remaining hospitals may have difficulty coping with a sudden influx of patients. Objectives Our objectives are to analyze the dispersion patterns of patients from a closing hospital and to correlate that with distance from the closing hospital for three specific visit types: emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory. Methods In this study, we used data from a health information exchange to track patients from Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, a hospital in New York City that closed in 2010, to determine where they received emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory care following the closure. Results We found that patients went to the next nearest hospital for their emergency and inpatient care, but ambulatory encounters did not correlate with distance. Discussion It is likely that patients followed their ambulatory providers as they transitioned to another hospital system. Additional work should be done to determine predictors of impact on nearby hospitals when another hospital in the community closes in order to better prepare for patient dispersion. PMID:25848422

  1. 45 CFR 211.8 - Continuing hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CARE AND TREATMENT OF MENTALLY ILL NATIONALS OF THE UNITED STATES, RETURNED FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 211.8 Continuing hospitalization... in need of continuing care and treatment in a hospital cannot be accomplished under § 211.7, or...

  2. Specialty hospitals: can general hospitals compete?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2005-07-13

    The rapid increase in specialty cardiac, surgical, and orthopedic hospitals has captured the attention of general hospitals and policymakers. Although the number of specialty hospitals remains small in absolute terms, their entry into certain health care markets has fueled arguments about the rules of "fair" competition among health care providers. To allow the smoke to clear, Congress effectively stalled the growth in new specialty hospitals by temporarily prohibiting physicians from referring Medicare or Medicaid patients to specialty hospitals in which they had an ownership interest. During this 18-month moratorium, which expired June 8, 2005, two mandated studies of specialty hospitals provided information to help assess their potential effect on health care delivery. This issue brief discusses the research on specialty hospitals, including their payments under Medicare's hospital inpatient payment system, the quality and cost of care they deliver, their effect on general hospitals and on overall health care delivery, and the regulatory and legal environment in which they have proliferated. It concludes with open issues concerning physician self-referral and the role of general hospitals in providing a range of health care services.

  3. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  4. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature.

  5. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Noether, M

    1988-09-01

    The traditional view of hospital competition has posited that hospitals compete primarily along 'quality' dimensions, in the form of fancy equipment to attract admitting physicians and pleasant surroundings to entice patients. Price competition among hospitals is thought to be non-existent. This paper estimates the effects of various hospital market characteristics on hospital prices and expenses in an attempt to determine the form of hospital competition. The results suggest that both price and quality competition are greater in markets that are less concentrated, although the net effect of the two on prices is insignificant. It appears, therefore, that, despite important distortions, hospital markets are not immune to standard competitive forces.

  6. Overdependence on For-Profit Pharmacies: A Descriptive Survey of User Evaluation of Medicines Availability in Public Hospitals in Selected Nigerian States

    PubMed Central

    Ugal, David Betelwhobel; Ingwu, Justin Agorye

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lower availability of medicines in Nigerian public health facilities—the most affordable option for the masses—undermines global health reforms to improve access to health for all, especially the chronically ill and poor. Thus, a sizeable proportion of healthcare users, irrespective of purchasing power, buy medicines at higher costs from for-profit pharmacies. We examined user evaluation of medicine availability in public facilities and how this influences their choice of where to buy medicines in selected states—Cross River, Enugu and Oyo—in Nigeria. Methods We approached and interviewed 1711 healthcare users using a semi-structured, interviewer-administered questionnaire as they exited for-profit pharmacies after purchasing medicines. This ensured that both clients who had presented at health facilities (private/public) and those who did not were included. Information was collected on why respondents could not buy medicines at the hospitals they attended, their views of medicine availability and whether their choice of where to buy medicines is influenced by non-availability. Principal Findings Respondents’ mean age was 37.7±14.4 years; 52% were males, 59% were married, 82% earned ≥NGN18, 000 (US$57.19) per month, and 72% were not insured. Majority (66%) had prescriptions; of this, 70% were from public facilities. Eighteen percent of all respondents indicated that all their medicines were usually available at the public facilities, most (29%), some (44%) and not always available (10%). Reasons for using for-profit pharmacies included: health workers attitudes (43%), referral by providers (43%); inadequate money to purchase all prescribed drugs (42%) and cumbersome processes for obtaining medicines. Conclusions Lower availability of medicines has serious implications for healthcare behavior, especially because of poverty. It is crucial for government to fulfill its mandate of equitable access to care for all by making medicines available and

  7. Pricing objectives in nonprofit hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Bauerschmidt, A D; Jacobs, P

    1985-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of 60 financial managers of nonprofit hospitals in the eastern United States relating to the importance of a number of factors which influence their pricing decisions and the pricing objectives which they pursue. Among the results uncovered by the responses: that trustees are the single most important body in the price-setting process (doctors play a relatively unimportant role); that hospital pricing goals are more related to target net revenue than profit maximizing; and that regional factors seem to play an important role in management differences. PMID:4008272

  8. Hospital Contracts: Important Issues for Medical Groups.

    PubMed

    Rosolio, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Relationships with hospitals and outpatient medical facilities have always been an important part of the business model for private medical practices. As healthcare delivery to patients has evolved in the United States (much of it driven by the new government mandates, regulations, and the Affordable Care Act), the delivery of such services is becoming more and more centered on the hospital or institutional setting, thus making contractual relationships with hospitals even more important for medical practices. As a natural outgrowth of this relationship, attention to hospital contracts is becoming more important.

  9. Reporting hospital adverse events using the Alfred Hospital's morbidity data.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Rhonda; McLean, Jenny; Walsh, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Hospital morbidity data were analysed to determine their usefulness for reporting adverse events. The entire ICD-10-AM classification system was reviewed in conjunction with the Australian Coding Standards to identify external cause codes and code prefixes associated with adverse events. For the 50,712 separations registered at The Alfred from July 2000-June 2001, 4,740 external cause codes were associated with adverse events. Place of occurrence code CY92.22 was considered the best indicator of the number of separations associated with adverse events. Approximately 4% of all separations were associated with adverse events occurring during an episode of care. Results suggest that hospital morbidity data are useful for monitoring adverse events at hospital level. Reliable reporting across the health care industry requires consistent reporting requirements at state and national levels and the adoption of standard code prefixes nationally.

  10. Guide to Choosing a Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... your condition? Should you consider a specialty hospital, teaching hospital (usually part of a university), community hospital, ... been approved by Medicare. Hospitals may choose either method of evaluation. You can check with a hospital ...

  11. Evaluation of polymorphisms in pbp4 gene and genetic diversity in penicillin-resistant, ampicillin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis from hospitals in different states in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Infante, Victor Hugo Pacagnelli; Conceição, Natália; de Oliveira, Adriana Gonçalves; Darini, Ana Lúcia da Costa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify whether penicillin-resistant, ampicillin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis (PRASEF) occurred in Brazil prior to the beginning of the 21st century, and to verify whether ampicillin susceptibility can predict susceptibility to other β-lactams in E. faecalis with this inconsistent phenotype. The presence of polymorphisms in the pbp4 gene and genetic diversity among the isolates were investigated. Of 21 PRASEF analyzed, 5 (23.8%) and 4 (19.0%) were imipenem and piperacillin resistant simultaneously by disk diffusion and broth dilution respectively, contradicting the current internationally accepted standards of susceptibility testing. Sequencing of pbp4 gene revealed an amino acid substitution (Asp-573→Glu) in all PRASEF isolates but not in the penicillin-susceptible, ampicillin-susceptible E. faecalis. Most PRASEF (90.5%) had related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles, but were different from other PRASEF described to date. Results demonstrate that penicillin-resistant, ampicillin-susceptible phenotype was already a reality in the 1990s in E. faecalis isolates in different Brazilian states, and some of these isolates were also imipenem- and piperacillin-resistant; therefore, internationally accepted susceptibility criteria cannot be applied to these isolates. According to pbp4 gene sequencing, this study suggests that a specific amino acid substitution in pbp4 gene found in all PRASEF analyzed is associated with penicillin resistance.

  12. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority.

  13. Needs Assessment of Hospitality/Tourism Industry in Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Shirley

    This report of an assessment of the hospitality/tourism industry in Kentucky begins with a history/description of the hospitality/tourism industry written from research; the hospitality/tourism training programs conducted by various institutions in the state are also described. For the assessment itself, two survey instruments were prepared and…

  14. 24 CFR 242.72 - Leasing of hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.72 Leasing of hospital. Leasing of a hospital in... entire facility is a factor due to state law prohibitions against the mortgaging of health...

  15. Help prevent hospital errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23330698 . The Joint Commission. Hospital: 2014 National Patient Safety Goals. www.jointcommission. ... October 24, 2014. Accessed October 27, 2016. The Joint Commission. Hospital: 2016 National Patient Safety Goals. Updated January ...

  16. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  17. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  18. Medical staff contracting: legal issues in physician-hospital arrangements.

    PubMed

    Caesar, N B

    1993-01-01

    This article--the third in a series analyzing the physician-hospital contracting process from the physician's perspective--addresses the legal issues involved in physician-hospital arrangements, including those arising under federal and state illegal remuneration, antitrust, and tax laws. New applications of these issues to physician-hospital organizations and practice management/practice acquisitions by hospitals are also addressed, as well as other recent hospital efforts to maximize the benefits to be gained from the physician-hospital relationship.

  19. Community-level risk factors for depression hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Fortney, John; Rushton, Gerard; Wood, Scott; Zhang, Lixun; Xu, Stan; Dong, Fran; Rost, Kathryn

    2007-07-01

    This study measured geographic variation in depression hospitalizations and identified community-level risk factors. Depression hospitalizations were identified from the Statewide Inpatient Database. The dependent variable was specified as the indirectly standardized hospitalization rate. County-level data for 14 states were collected from federal agencies. The Bayesian spatial regression model included socio-demographic, economic, and health system characteristics as independent variables. There were 8.5 depression hospitalizations per 1,000 residents. 8.8% of counties had hospitalization rates 33% greater than the standardized rate. Significant risk factors included unemployment, poverty, physician supply, and hospital bed supply. Significant protective factors included rurality, economic dependence, and housing stress.

  20. Hospital Dermatology, Introduction.

    PubMed

    Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has many additional components that are critical to its success.

  1. Hospital mergers and reproductive health care.

    PubMed

    Donovan, P

    1996-01-01

    In the US, when one of the two hospitals involved in a merger is a Catholic hospital, comprehensive reproductive health care tends to suffer. The Catholic Church forbids its hospitals from providing and making direct referrals for many reproductive health services (i.e., reversible contraception, infertility treatments, male and female sterilization, abortion, condoms for HIV prevention, and emergency contraception). These mergers are especially severe in small towns and rural areas. Several groups have formed to address this hidden crisis. In Troy, New York, a settlement was reached about 12 months after a law suit was filed against the conditions of a merger between a Catholic hospital and a nonsectarian hospital. After a long fight, the settlement essentially guaranteed that patients who are dependent on religious institutions obtain the contraceptive and sterilization services they need and want, but abortion services and referrals continued to be denied. The state of Montana considered the impact of a merger of a Catholic institution and a nonsectarian institution, yet continued availability of all reproductive health services was not guaranteed. The American Civil Liberties Union asked the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate the merger's impact on reproductive health care, since the merger created a monopoly on acute care in Great Falls. FTC took no action. Key factors to provision of reproductive health services other than abortion in cases of mergers between a Catholic hospital and a nonsectarian hospital include the type of association the two hospitals enter into, the local bishop's willingness to accept a creative solution, and the willingness of the state to consider the implications of such a merger and take steps to guarantee the continued availability of services. State reproductive health care advocacy groups (e.g., MergerWatch in New York) are increasing public awareness of the risks these mergers pose and helping residents ensure that

  2. Community-, Healthcare- and Hospital-Acquired Severe Sepsis Hospitalizations in the University HealthSystem Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Page, David B.; Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Severe sepsis poses a major burden on the U.S. healthcare system. Previous epidemiologic studies have not differentiated community-acquired severe sepsis from healthcare-associated severe sepsis or hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations. We sought to compare and contrast community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations in a national hospital sample. Setting United States Interventions None Measurements & Main Results Prevalence of community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis, adjusted hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, length of stay in an ICU, and hospital costs. Among 3,355,753 hospital discharges, there were 307,491 with severe sepsis, including 193,081 (62.8%) community-acquired severe sepsis, 79,581 (25.9%) healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and 34,829 (11.3%) hospital-acquired severe sepsis. Hospital-acquired severe sepsis and healthcare-associated severe sepsis exhibited higher in-hospital mortality than community-acquired severe sepsis (hospital-acquired [19.2%] vs healthcare-associated [12.8%] vs community-acquired [8.6%]). Hospital-acquired severe sepsis had greater resource utilization than both healthcare-associated severe sepsis and community-acquired severe sepsis, with higher median length of hospital stay (hospital acquired [17 d] vs healthcare associated [7 d] vs community-acquired [6 d]), median length of ICU stay (hospital-acquired [8 d] vs healthcare-associated [3 d] vs community-acquired [3 d]), and median hospital costs (hospital-acquired [$38,369] vs healthcare-associated [$8,796] vs community-acquired [$7,024]). Conclusions In this series, severe sepsis hospitalizations included CA-SS (62.8%), HCA-SS (25.9%) and HA-SS (11.3%) cases. HA-SS was associated with both higher mortality and resource utilization than CA-SS and HCA-SS. PMID:26110490

  3. Positioning hospitals: a model for regional hospitals.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A C; Campbell, D P

    1993-01-01

    In an age of marketing warfare in the health care industry, hospitals need creative strategies to compete successfully. Lately, positioning concepts have been added to the health care marketer's arsenal of strategies. To blend theory with practice, the authors review basic positioning theory and present a framework for developing positioning strategies. They also evaluate the marketing strategies of a regional hospital to provide a case example.

  4. Hospital finances and patient safety outcomes.

    PubMed

    Encinosa, William E; Bernard, Didem M

    2005-01-01

    Hospitals recently have experienced greater financial pressures. Whether these financial pressures have led to more patient safety problems is unknown. Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Data for Florida from 1996 to 2000, this study examines whether financial pressure at hospitals is associated with increases in the rate of patient safety events (e.g., medical errors) for major surgeries. Findings show that patients have significantly higher odds of having adverse patient safety events (nursing-related patient safety events, surgery-related patient safety events, and all likely preventable patient safety events) when hospital profit margins decline over time. The finding that a within-hospital erosion of hospital operating profits increases the rate of adverse patient safety events suggests that any cost-cutting efforts be carefully designed and managed.

  5. Changes in addressing inequalities in access to hospital care in Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra states of India: a difference-in-differences study using repeated cross-sectional surveys

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mala; Katyal, Anuradha; Singh, Prabal V; Samarth, Amit; Bergkvist, Sofi; Kancharla, Manjusha; Wagstaff, Adam; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Renton, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effects of the Rajiv Aarogyasri Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh (AP) with health financing innovations including the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY) in Maharashtra (MH) over time on access to and out-of-pocket expenditure (OOPE) on hospital inpatient care. Study design A difference-in-differences (DID) study using repeated cross-sectional surveys with parallel control. Setting National Sample Survey Organisation of India (NSSO) urban and rural ‘first stratum units’, 863 in AP and 1008 in MH. Methods We used two cross-sectional surveys: as a baseline, the data from the NSSO 2004 survey collected before the Aarogyasri and RSBY schemes were launched; and as postintervention, a survey using the same methodology conducted in 2012. Participants 8623 households in AP and 10 073 in MH. Main outcome measures Average OOPE, large OOPE and large borrowing per household per year for inpatient care, hospitalisation rate per 1000 population per year. Results Average expenditure, large expenditures and large borrowings on inpatient care had increased in MH and AP, but the increase was smaller in AP across these three measures. DIDs for average expenditure and large borrowings were significant and in favour of AP for the rural and the poorest households. Hospitalisation rates also increased in both states but more so in AP, although the DID was not significant and the subgroup analysis presented a mixed picture. Conclusions Health innovations in AP had a greater beneficial effect on inpatient care-related expenditures than innovations in MH. The Aarogyasri scheme is likely to have contributed to these impacts in AP, at least in part. However, OOPE increased in both states over time. Schemes such as the Aarogyasri and RSBY may result in some positive outcomes, but additional interventions may be required to improve access to care for the most vulnerable sections of the population. PMID:24898084

  6. Emergency contraception and Catholic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bucar, L; Nolan, D

    1999-01-01

    The "Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care," which outline policies for Catholic hospitals in the US, are ambiguous on the topic of emergency contraception. Recent evidence suggests that, in the absence of definitive guidelines, Catholic hospitals are erring on the side of not providing emergency contraception. A survey of 589 US Catholic hospitals conducted by Catholics for a Free Choice found that 82% refused to supply emergency contraception--even to rape victims. Directive 36, which governs cases of sexual assault, could be argued to sanction the provision of emergency contraception. It states, "A female who has been raped should be able to defend herself against a potential conception from the sexual assault. If, after appropriate testing, there is no evidence that conception has occurred already, she may be treated with medications that would prevent ovulation, sperm capacitation, or fertilization. It is not permissible, however, to initiate or to recommend treatments that have as their purpose or direct effect the removal, destruction, or interference with the implantation of a fertilized ovum." Because the process of conception takes approximately 2 days, it would be consistent with the Catholic Church's position to offer emergency contraception within 24 hours of a rape. Since no currently available test can confirm or deny conception as early as 72 hours after unprotected intercourse, the timetable for emergency contraception, Catholic hospitals should be able to provide this service to all women and still abide by the directives.

  7. Recognizing Differences in Hospital Quality Performance for Pediatric Inpatient Care

    PubMed Central

    Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Toomey, Sara L.; Chien, Alyna T.; Jang, Jisun; Bryant, Maria C.; Klein, David J.; Kaplan, William J.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital quality-of-care measures are publicly reported to inform consumer choice and stimulate quality improvement. The number of hospitals and states with enough pediatric hospital discharges to detect worse-than-average inpatient care remains unknown. METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of hospital discharges for children aged 0 to 17 years from 3974 hospitals in 44 states in the 2009 Kids’ Inpatient Database. For 11 measures of all-condition or condition-specific quality, we assessed the number of hospitals and states that met a “power standard” of 80% power for a 5% level significance test to detect when care is 20% worse than average over a 3-year period. For this assessment, we approximated volume as 3 times actual 2009 admission volumes. RESULTS: For all-condition quality, 1380 hospitals (87% of all pediatric discharges) and all states met the power standard for the family experience-of-care measure; 1958 hospitals (95% of discharges) and all states met the standard for adverse drug events. For condition-specific quality measures of asthma, birth, and mental health, 203 to 482 hospitals (52%–90% of condition-specific discharges) met the power standard and 40 to 44 states met the standard. One hospital and 16 states met the standard for sickle cell disease. No hospital and ≤27 states met the standard for the remaining measures studied (appendectomy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt surgery, gastroenteritis, heart surgery, and seizure). CONCLUSIONS: Most children are admitted to hospitals in which all-condition measures of quality have adequate power to show modest differences in performance from average, but most condition-specific measures do not. Policies regarding incentives for pediatric inpatient quality should take these findings into account. PMID:26169435

  8. Segmenting hospitals for improved management strategy.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, N K

    1989-09-01

    The author presents a conceptual framework for the a priori and clustering-based approaches to segmentation and evaluates them in the context of segmenting institutional health care markets. An empirical study is reported in which the hospital market is segmented on three state-of-being variables. The segmentation approach also takes into account important organizational decision-making variables. The sophisticated Thurstone Case V procedure is employed. Several marketing implications for hospitals, other health care organizations, hospital suppliers, and donor publics are identified.

  9. Nursing administration in small rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Henry, B M; Moody, L E

    1986-01-01

    Most of the world's population is rural and 45% of all United States hospitals are small or located outside of urban centers. The interdependence of rapidly changing rural communities and hospitals is described in this study of nursing directors' jobs. Findings provide needed information about the challenges and demands of nursing administration in small organizations useful for development of curriculums sensitive to values, politics, and economies; and for all nurse executives eager to understand the complexity of decisions and actions, whether in small organizations or in large multi-institutional systems comprising hospitals of varying sizes.

  10. The financial performance of diversified hospital subsidiaries.

    PubMed Central

    Clement, J P; D'Aunno, T; Poyzer, B L

    1993-01-01

    Despite its proliferation, we know relatively little about the impact of hospital restructuring to offer new services. This exploratory study examines the relationship between types of services offered and financial performance among separately incorporated subsidiaries of acute care hospitals. We draw data from the subsidiaries of all hospital firms operating in one state (Virginia) that requires reporting by all such firms. Results from multiple regression analyses of 1987 data indicate that units that existed longer, produced health care or related products, or were nonprofit subsidiaries of nonprofit firms tended to be more profitable than the other subsidiaries. PMID:8428811

  11. Costs of surgical procedures in Indian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite a growing volume of surgical procedures in low-income and middle-income countries, the costs of these procedures are not well understood. We estimated the costs of 12 surgical procedures commonly conducted in five different types of hospitals in India from the provider perspective, using a microcosting method. Design Cost and utilisation data were collected retrospectively from April 2010 to March 2011 to avoid seasonal variability. Setting For this study, we chose five hospitals of different types: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital and a 778-bed tertiary care teaching hospital based on their willingness to cooperate and data accessibility. The hospitals were from four states in India. The private, charitable and tertiary care hospitals serve urban populations, the district hospital serves a semiurban area and the private teaching hospital serves a rural population. Results Costs of conducting lower section caesarean section ranged from rupees 2469 to 41 087; hysterectomy rupees 4124 to 57 622 and appendectomy rupees 2421 to 3616 (US$1=rupees 52). We computed the costs of conducting lap and open cholecystectomy (rupees 27 732 and 44 142, respectively); hernia repair (rupees 13 204); external fixation (rupees 8406); intestinal obstruction (rupees 6406); amputation (rupees 5158); coronary artery bypass graft (rupees 177 141); craniotomy (rupees 75 982) and functional endoscopic sinus surgery (rupees 53 398). Conclusions Estimated costs are roughly comparable with rates of reimbursement provided by the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY)—India's government-financed health insurance scheme that covers 32.4 million poor families. Results from this type of study can be used to set and revise the reimbursement rates. PMID:23794591

  12. Cost of hospital-acquired infection.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mahmud; Tuckman, Howard P; Patrick, Robert H; Kountz, David S; Kohn, Jennifer L

    2010-01-01

    The authors assessed the costs of hospital-acquired infections using rigorous econometric methods on publicly available data, controlling for the interdependency of length of stay and the incidence of hospital acquired infection, and estimated the cost shares of different payers. They developed a system of equations involving length of stay, incidence of infection, and the total hospital care cost to be estimated using simultaneous equations system. The main data came from the State of New Jersey UB 92 for 2004, complimented with data from the Annual Survey of Hospitals by the American Hospital Association and the Medicare Cost Report of 2004. The authors estimated that an incidence of hospital acquired infection increases the hospital care cost of a patient by $10,375 and it increases the length of stay by 3.30 days, and that a disproportionately higher portion of the cost is attributable to Medicare. They conclude that reliable cost estimates of hospital-acquired infections can be made using publicly available data. Their estimate shows a much larger aggregate cost of $16.6 billion as opposed to $5 billion reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention but much less than $29 billion as reported elsewhere in the literature.

  13. Hospitals as complex adaptive systems: A case study of factors influencing priority setting practices at the hospital level in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Barasa, Edwine W; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike; Cleary, Susan

    2017-02-01

    There is a dearth of literature on priority setting and resource allocation (PSRA) practices in hospitals, particularly in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Using a case study approach, we examined PSRA practices in 2 public hospitals in coastal Kenya. We collected data through a combination of in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), review of documents such as hospital plans and budgets, minutes of meetings and accounting records, and non-participant observations of PSRA practices in case study hospitals over a period of 7 months. In this paper, we apply complex adaptive system (CAS) theory to examine the factors that influence PSRA practices. We found that PSRA practices in the case hospitals were influenced by, 1) inadequate financing level and poorly designed financing arrangements, 2) limited hospital autonomy and decision space, and 3) inadequate management and leadership capacity in the hospital. The case study hospitals exhibited properties of complex adaptive systems (CASs) that exist in a dynamic state with multiple interacting agents. Weaknesses in system 'hardware' (resource scarcity) and 'software' (including PSRA guidelines that reduced hospitals decision space, and poor leadership skills) led to the emergence of undesired properties. The capacity of hospitals to set priorities should be improved across these interacting aspects of the hospital organizational system. Interventions should however recognize that hospitals are CAS. Rather than rectifying isolated aspects of the system, they should endeavor to create conditions for productive emergence.

  14. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  15. Measuring hospital competition.

    PubMed

    White, S L; Chirikos, T N

    1988-03-01

    This paper appraises the use of the Herfindahl market share index as an exogenous competition variable in empirical studies of the hospital sector. An analysis of cross-sectional Florida data shows that this index itself is significantly influenced by the demand and supply factors commonly included in econometric models of hospital performance. The analysis then illustrates that biased inferences about the effects of market competition on the costs of hospital care may result unless the values of the Herfindahl Index are treated endogenously in hospital cost models.

  16. The effect of chain membership on hospital costs.

    PubMed Central

    Menke, T J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the cost structures of hospitals in multihospital systems and independently owned hospitals. DATA SOURCES: The American Hospital Association's Annual Survey from 1990 for data on hospital costs and attributes. Area characteristics came from the Area Resource File, and the Medicare case-mix index came from the Health Care Financing Administration. Data on wages are from the Bureau of the Census' State and Metropolitan Area Data Book. The Guide to Hospital Performance from HCIA, Inc. provided data on quality of care. STUDY DESIGN: Separate cost functions were estimated for chain and independent hospitals. Hybrid translog cost functions included measures of outputs, input prices, and hospital and area characteristics. The estimation method accounted for the simultaneous determination of costs and chain membership, and for any nonrandom selection of hospitals into chains. Several economic cost measures were calculated to compare the cost structures of the two types of hospitals. DATA EXTRACTION METHODS: Data from all sources were merged at the hospital level to form the study sample. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hospitals in multihospital systems were less costly than independently owned hospitals. Among independent hospitals, for-profits had the highest costs. There were no statistically significant differences in costs by ownership among chain members. Economies of scale were enjoyed in both types of hospitals only at high volumes of output, while economies of scope occurred at all volumes for chain hospitals, but only at low and medium volumes for independent hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides support for the idea that growth of the multihospital system sector can provide a market solution to the problem of constraining costs. It does not, however, support the property rights theory that proprietary hospitals are more efficient than nonprofit hospitals. PMID:9180615

  17. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  18. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  19. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  20. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  1. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  2. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  3. Hospital benefit segmentation.

    PubMed

    Finn, D W; Lamb, C W

    1986-12-01

    Market segmentation is an important topic to both health care practitioners and researchers. The authors explore the relative importance that health care consumers attach to various benefits available in a major metropolitan area hospital. The purposes of the study are to test, and provide data to illustrate, the efficacy of one approach to hospital benefit segmentation analysis.

  4. Leading a hospital closure.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Paula A

    2002-01-01

    Hospital closures have become more common. The challenges facing a nursing leader in this situation are complex and difficult. This author suggests that looking for new beginnings rather than focusing on endings created an approach to closing a public hospital. The article includes approaches to employee morale, staffing, and patient care.

  5. Tutorial on technology transfer and survey design and data collection for measuring Internet and Intranet existence, usage, and impact (survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-02-01

    This paper provides a tutorial of technology transfer for management information systems in health care. Additionally it describes the process for a national survey of acute care hospitals using a random sample of 813 hospitals. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and with customers. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, user satisfaction and decision-making will be studied. Changes with results of a prior survey conducted in 1997 can be studied and enabling and inhabiting factors identified. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals.

  6. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Martin; Vogt, William B

    2003-01-01

    We examine competition in the hospital industry, in particular the effect of ownership type (for-profit, not-for-profit, government). We estimate a structural model of demand and pricing in the hospital industry in California, then use the estimates to simulate the effect of a merger. California hospitals in 1995 face an average price elasticity of demand of -4.85. Not-for-profit hospitals face less elastic demand and act as if they have lower marginal costs. Their prices are lower than those of for-profits, but markups are higher. We simulate the effects of the 1997 merger of two hospital chains. In San Luis Obispo County, where the merger creates a near monopoly, prices rise by up to 53%, and the predicted price increase would not be substantially smaller were the chains not-for-profit.

  7. A Study to Identify the Causes of Decreasing Surgical Suite Productivity and Recommend Methods Which May Restore Surgical Output to Previous Levels at the United States Air Force Academy Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-16

    residency in his hospital. The experience has been invaluable to me, and I hope the Air Force. The Air Force has been especially generous to me and I...boasts an unusually large array of specialties for a 0 0 small hospital. This range of services includes General Surgery, OB/GYN, m z Orthopedics...Patients requiring specialty care not available at the USAFAH are generally referred to Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center in Aurora CO, 60 miles away

  8. [Review of admissions to the emergency unit of the specialist hospital of the Institute of Social Security responsible for the treatment of civil servants in the Puebla State, 1996 (Mexico)].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, G; Ramirez-Fernandez, F A

    2000-01-01

    In a review carried out in a specialist hospital of the city of Puebla, it was found that of the 26,005 patients that required attention from the emergency unit during 1996, only 9333 (35.8%) were "real emergencies". "Real emergencies" were considered those where the patient had to be admitted into hospital. The study also found that the morning shift had the highest percentage (29) of patients requesting treatment. The paper gives guidance regarding planning and funding.

  9. Local public hospitals: changing with the times.

    PubMed

    Felland, Laurie E; Stark, Lucy

    2012-11-01

    Over the last 15 years, public hospitals have pursued multiple strategies to help maintain financial viability without abandoning their mission to care for low-income people, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Local public hospitals serve as core safety net providers in five of these communities--Boston, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Miami and Phoenix--weathering increased demand for care from growing numbers of uninsured and Medicaid patients and fluctuations in public funding over the past 15 years. Generally, these public hospitals have adopted six key strategies to respond to growing capacity and financial pressures: establishing independent governance structures; securing predictable local funding sources; shoring up Medicaid revenues; increasing attention to revenue collection; attracting privately insured patients; and expanding access to community-based primary care. These strategies demonstrate how public hospitals often benefit from functioning somewhat independently from local government, while at the same time, relying heavily on policy decisions and funding from local, state and federal governments. While public hospitals appear poised for changes under national health reform, they will need to adapt to changing payment sources and reduced federal subsidies and compete for newly insured people. Moreover, public hospitals in states that do not expand Medicaid eligibility to most low-income people as envisioned under health reform will likely face significant demand from uninsured patients with less federal Medicaid funding.

  10. The Old Library of the Pennsylvania Hospital *

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Whitfield J.

    1972-01-01

    The first medical book acquired by the Pennsylvania Hospital was William Lewis's Experimental History of the Materia Medica. Dr. John Fothergill of London donated it in 1762. The next year the Managers resolved to establish a library, and the physicians assigned their fees from hospital students for the purchase of books. Books were regularly ordered from William Strahan in London, and gifts and bequests added still more volumes. From 1790 to 1810 Dr. John Coakley Lettsom of London was the hospital's principal adviser on purchases. As the library grew, it expanded beyond purely medical works to include some in natural history, many purchased in 1817 from the estate of Dr. Benjamin Smith Barton. Catalogues were printed in the years 1790-94, 1806, 1829, and 1857. At midcentury the hospital library numbered about 9,000 volumes. At that time it was the largest medical library in the United States. PMID:4563538

  11. [Civil hospital of Zamora de Hidalgo].

    PubMed

    Gómez de Lara, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The city of Zamora de Hidalgo is home to one of the most important hospitals in the region, built in 1841 and named the Civil Hospital of Zamora. Built following demand for municipal health needs and with the support of the City Council of Zamora and private donations, it functioned as a hostel for pilgrims, the destitute and the sick. It was administered and maintained by residents, subsequently by the mothers of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and finally by the federal Government. It currently gives the Zamorano community services, and admits sick people from other locations such as Jacona, Jiquilpan, Patamban Ocumicho, Chavinda, Tangancicuaro, Chilchota, and Tangamandapio, among others. It was called the Civil hospital because as the only hospital that operated in Zamora, it ceased to be administered by the Ecclesiastic Chapter, and passed into the hands of the State.

  12. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  13. Mold remediation in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tang G

    2009-01-01

    As occupants in a hospital, patients are susceptible to air contaminants that can include biological agents dispersed throughout the premise. An exposed patient can become ill and require medical intervention. A consideration for patients is that they may have become environmentally sensitive and require placement in an environment that does not compromise their health. Unfortunately, the hospital environment often contains more biological substances than can be expected in an office or home environment. When a hospital also experiences water intrusion such as flooding or water leaks, resulting mold growth can seriously compromise the health of patients and others such as nursing staff and physicians (Burge, Indoor Air and Infectious Disease. Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews, 1980; Lutz et al., Clinical Infectious Diseases 37: 786-793, 2003). Micro-organism growth can propagate if the water is not addressed quickly and effectively. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk when subjected to fungal infection such that the US Center for Disease Control issued guideline for building mold in health care facilities (Centers for Disease and Control [CDC], Centers for Disease and Control: Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds, 2000). This paper is based on mold remediation of one portion of a hospital unit due to water from construction activity and inadequate maintenance, resulting in mold growth. A large proportion of the hospital staff, primarily nurses in the dialysis unit, exhibited health symptoms consistent with mold exposure. Unfortunately, the hospital administrators did not consider the mold risk to be serious and refused an independent consultant retained by the nurse's union to examine the premise (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [CBC], Nurses file complaints over mold at Foothills. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2003). The nurse's union managed to have the premise examined by submitting a court order of

  14. Hospital service recovery.

    PubMed

    Gutbezahl, Cary; Haan, Perry

    2006-01-01

    An organization's ability to correct service errors is an important factor in achieving success in today's service economy. This paper examines service recovery in hospitals in the U.S. First is a general review of service recovery theories. Next is a discussion of specific service issues related to the hospital environment. The literature on service recovery is used to make specific recommendations to hospitals for ways to improve their ability to remedy service errors when they occur. Suggestions for future research in the field of service recovery are also made.

  15. Predicting hospital accounting costs

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Joseph P.; Cretin, Shan; Witsberger, Christina J.

    1989-01-01

    Two alternative methods to Medicare Cost Reports that provide information about hospital costs more promptly but less accurately are investigated. Both employ utilization data from current-year bills. The first attaches costs to utilization data using cost-charge ratios from the previous year's cost report; the second uses charges from current year's bills. The first method is the more accurate of the two, but even using it, only 40 percent of hospitals had predicted costs within plus or minus 5 percent of actual costs. The feasibility and cost of obtaining cost reports from a small, fast-track sample of hospitals should be investigated. PMID:10313352

  16. An alternate approach to hospital cost control: the Rochester project.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, A A; Saward, E W

    1978-01-01

    The rapid escalation in health care costs has demonstrated a need to control costs in general and hospital costs in particular. In New York State, efforts at control have followed one of several paths, including reduction of Medicaid program expenditures, elimination of hospital beds, and prospective reimbursement of hospital costs. Although some success has been achieved in each of these areas, hospital costs containment has not been as successful as had been hoped. A new project called MAXICAP, being developed in the Rochester region, seeks to link payment with regional hospital planning. MAXICAP represents a voluntary attempt by hospitals, third party payers, planners, consumers, and governmental agencies to devise a prospective hospital payment system. Under this system community hospital plans in the Rochester region would be integrated and a cap imposed on both revenues and expenses for acute hospital care. The principal advantage of the MAXICAP is that it offers a mechanism for linking hospital planning with payment functions on a regional basis. The principal disadvantage is that the success of the MAXICAP depends upon the voluntary cooperation of the vast majority of the acute care hospitals in the area--hospitals that may be scattered throughout a relatively large region. PMID:98805

  17. Cutting Medicare Hospital Prices Leads to a Spillover Reduction in Hospital Discharges for the Nonelderly

    PubMed Central

    White, Chapin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure spillover effects of Medicare inpatient hospital prices on the nonelderly (under age 65). Primary Data Sources Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases (10 states, 1995–2009) and Medicare Hospital Cost Reports. Study Design Outcomes include nonelderly discharges, length of stay and case mix, staffed hospital bed-days, and the share of discharges and days provided to the elderly. We use metropolitan statistical areas as our markets. We use descriptive analyses comparing 1995 and 2009 and panel data fixed-effects regressions. We instrument for Medicare prices using accumulated changes in the Medicare payment formula. Principal Findings Medicare price reductions are strongly associated with reductions in nonelderly discharges and hospital capacity. A 10-percent reduction in the Medicare price is estimated to reduce discharges among the nonelderly by about 5 percent. Changes in the Medicare price are not associated with changes in the share of inpatient hospital care provided to the elderly versus nonelderly. Conclusions Medicare price reductions appear to broadly constrain hospital operations, with significant reductions in utilization among the nonelderly. The slow Medicare price growth under the Affordable Care Act may result in a spillover slowdown in hospital utilization and spending among the nonelderly. PMID:24850524

  18. Hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christine M; Cuker, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The development of thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with increased mortality. Frequent and important causes of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients include etiologies related to the underlying illness for which the patient is admitted, such as infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation, and iatrogenic etiologies such as drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, hemodilution, major surgery, and extracorporeal circuitry. This review presents a brief discussion of the pathophysiology, distinguishing clinical features, and management of these etiologies, and provides a diagnostic approach to hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia that considers the timing and severity of the platelet count fall, the presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis, the clinical context, and the peripheral blood smear. This approach may offer guidance to clinicians in distinguishing among the various causes of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia and providing management appropriate to the etiology.

  19. Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... products that are not commonly stocked in hospital pharmacies. Examples include: Salagen ® , Evoxac ® , and Restasis ® Eye drops, ... prescription and OTC medications/products in their labeled pharmacy container or packaging. This is important in case ...

  20. Home versus hospital confinement

    PubMed Central

    Barry, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    The case for hospital rather than home delivery has been powerfully argued, especially in and since the Report of the Peel Committee. Nevertheless, evidence of comparison with other countries, notably the Netherlands, suggests the choice is not necessarily simple. Some general practitioner units are now reporting perinatal mortality rates which are consistently lower than those of specialist units, and recent statistical analyses suggest that the presence of more high risk cases in consultant units does not explain this. The only big controlled home-versus-hospital trial did not lead to a significantly lower perinatal mortality rate in the hospital group. The onus of proof now seems to lie with those who advocate 100 per cent hospital confinement. PMID:7373581

  1. Objections to hospital philosophers.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddick, W; Finn, W

    1985-01-01

    Like morally sensitive hospital staff, philosophers resist routine simplification of morally complex cases. Like hospital clergy, they favour reflective and principled decision-making. Like hospital lawyers, they refine and extend the language we use to formulate and defend our complex decisions. But hospital philosophers are not redundant: they have a wider range of principles and categories and a sharper eye for self-serving presuppositions and implicit contradictions within our practices. As semi-outsiders, they are often best able to take an 'external point of view,' unburdened by routine, details, and departmental loyalties. Their clarifications can temporarily disrupt routine, but can eventually improve staff morale, hence team practice and patient welfare. PMID:3981573

  2. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms.

  3. American Hospital Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hospitals & Health Networks H & HN Daily Trustee Research & Trends AHA Policy Research Health Research & Educational Trust AHA ... Associations unless otherwise indicated. AHA does not claim ownership of any content, including content incorporated by permission ...

  4. [The development of private hospital in modern Korea, 1885-1960].

    PubMed

    Sihn, Kyu Hwan; Seo, Hong Gwan

    2002-06-01

    Modern hospital in Korea was the space of competition and comprise among different forces such as the state power and social forces, imperialism and nationalism, and the traditional and modern medicine. Hospital in the Japanese colonialism was the object of control for establishing the colonial medical system. Japanese colonialism controlled not only the public hospital but also the private hospital which had to possess more than 10 infectious beds in the isolation building by the Controlling Regulation of Private Hospital. In fact, the private hospital had to possess more than 20 beds for hospital management. As a result, its regulation prevented the independent development of the private hospital. But because the public hospital could not accommodate many graduates of medical school, most of them had to serve as practitioner. Although some practitioners had more than 20 beds in their clinics, they were not officially included in the imperial medicine. By concentrating on the trend of the number of beds in the hospital, this paper differs from most previous studies of the system of hospital, which have argued that the system of hospital was converted the public-centered hospital system under the colonial medical system into the private-centered hospital system under the U. S. medical system after the Liberation in 1945. After Liberation, medical reformers discussed arranging the public and the private hospital. Lee Yong-seol, who was a Health-Welfare minister, disagreed the introduction of the system of state medicine. Worrying about the flooding of practitioners, he did not want to intervene the construction of hospital by state power. Because the private hospital run short of the medical leadership and the fundamental basis, the state still controlled the main disease in the public health and the prevention of epidemics. This means the state also played important part in the general medical examination and treatment. The outbreak of Korean War in 1950 reinforced

  5. Hospital Ship Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    designed to operate primarily when anchored to reduce the effects of roll. Quantum markets two separate zero speed active roll fin models for small ...ships. Feasibility of scaling fins to the size of the hospital ship requires validation. 3.12 Lifeboats and Liferafts The safety appliances designated ...for Innovation in Ship Design Technical Report Hospital Ship Replacement By Hannah Allison, Christopher Mehrvarzi, Rebecca Piks, Beau Lovdahl

  6. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made.

  7. MANPOWER FOR CALIFORNIA HOSPITALS, 1964-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Commission on Manpower, Automation, and Technology, Sacramento.

    AN EXAMINATION OF THE HOSPITAL AND NURSING AND CONVALESCENT HOME INDUSTRY IN 1964 AND EMPLOYMENT PROJECTIONS ARE PRESENTED AS AN INITIAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN ONGOING MANPOWER INFORMATION PROGRAM IN THE STATE. DATA WERE COMPILED FROM POPULATION PROJECTIONS BY THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, WAGE SURVEY STUDIES BY THE…

  8. Hospitals look to hospitality service firms to meet TQM goals.

    PubMed

    Hard, R

    1992-05-20

    Hospitals that hire contract service firms to manage one or all aspects of their hospitality service departments increasingly expect those firms to help meet total quality management goals as well as offer the more traditional cost reduction, quality improvement and specialized expertise, finds the 1992 Hospital Contract Services Survey conducted by Hospitals.

  9. 3. Hospital Point, general view toward Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Hospital Point, general view toward Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building showing cannon (at left) and Saunders Monument (at right in distance), view to southwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  10. Acceptability of identification bracelets for hospital inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Cleopas, A; Kolly, V; Bovier, P; Garnerin, P; Perneger, T

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether hospitalised patients would agree to wear an identification bracelet and whether patient acceptability is improved by more detailed explanations or by using a code instead of a name on the bracelet. Design: Patient survey that tested two variables in a randomised factorial design. Explanations about identification bracelets were given (a) with or without examples of situations where patient identification may be important, and (b) with the patient name or an anonymous code appearing on the bracelet. Setting: Swiss teaching hospital where wearing of identification bracelets was not systematic. Participants: Adult patients discharged from hospital (n = 1411). Main outcome measures: Patients' responses to the questions: (a) should the hospital introduce a compulsory identification bracelet? and (b) would the patient agree to wear such a bracelet? Results: Globally, 83.9% of patients thought that the hospital should introduce bracelets and 90.2% stated that they would agree to wear one. Providing examples increased support for both the hospital policy (87.9% v 79.2%, p<0.001) and personal acceptance (92.2% v 88.1%, p = 0.015). Whether or not the bracelet carried the patient's name or an anonymous code did not influence patient choice. Conclusions: The majority of patients were in favour of wearing an identification bracelet during their hospital stay. This proportion increased significantly when an explanation based on examples of the consequences of incorrect patient identification had been provided. PMID:15465937

  11. The impact of hospital discharge on inappropriate hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Panis, Lambert J G G; Verheggen, Frank W S M; Pop, Peter; Prins, Martin H

    2004-01-01

    Appropriate hospital stay should be effective, efficient and tailored to patient needs. Previous studies have found that on average 20 per cent of hospital stay is inappropriate. Within obstetrics, inappropriate hospital stay consists mostly of delays in hospital discharge. The specific goals of this study were to reduce inappropriate hospital stay by fine-tuning patient logistics, increasing efficiency and providing more comfortable surroundings. New policies using strict discharge criteria were implemented. Total inappropriate hospital stay decreased from 13.3 to 7.2 per cent. The delay in discharge procedures halved. P-charts showed a decrease in inappropriate hospital stay, indicating the current process to be stable. Concludes that a significant reduction in inappropriate hospital stay was found following the implementation of innovative hospital discharge policies, indicating greater efficiency and accessibility of hospital services.

  12. Hospitality and Tourism Education Skill Standards: Grade 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Ryan; Spann, Lynda; Erickson, Karin; Povilaitis, Judy; Menditto, Louis; Jones, Terri; Sario, Vivienne; Verbeck, Kimberlee; Jacobi, Katherine; Michnal, Kenneth; Shelton-Meader, Sheree; Richens, Greg; Jones, Karin Erickson; Tighe, Denise; Wilhelm, Lee; Scott, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    The standards in this document are for Hospitality and Tourism programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. Minimally, the student will complete a two-year program to achieve all standards. The Hospitality and Tourism Standards Writing Team followed…

  13. Can alternative schools succeed where Benjamin Spock, Spiro Agnew, and B. F. Skinner have failed?

    PubMed

    Duke, D L; Perry, C

    1978-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether student behavior was as great a problem in a sample of 18 California alternative high schools. As a result of on-site observations and interviews with students and teachers, the authors concluded that discipline rarely was a major concern in the alternative schools. General agreement existed among both students and teachers. Fourteen possible reasons to account for the basic finding were hypothesized. The reasons included small school size, flexible schedules, frequent informal interaction between students and teachers, and fewer rules.

  14. Hospital Views of Factors Affecting Telemedicine Use.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Kimberly A S; Ward, Marcia M; Mueller, Keith J

    2015-04-01

    Telemedicine (also known as telehealth) is a means to increase access to care, one of the foundations of the Triple Aim. However, the expansion of telemedicine services in the United States has been relatively slow. We previously examined the extent of uptake of hospital based telemedicine using the 2013 HIMSS (Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society) Analytics national database of 4,727 non-specialty hospitals. Our analysis indicated that the largest percentage of operational telemedicine implementations (15.7 percent) was in radiology departments, with a substantial number in emergency/trauma care (7.5 percent) and cardiology/stroke/heart attack programs (6.8 percent). However, existing databases are limited because they do not identify whether a respondent hospital is a "hub" (providing telemedicine services) or a "spoke" (receiving telemedicine services). Therefore, we used data from interviews with hospital representatives to deepen the research and understanding of telemedicine use and the factors affecting that use. Interviews were conducted with key informants at 18 hub hospitals and 18 spoke hospitals to explore their perceptions of barriers and motivators to telemedicine adoption and expansion. Key Findings. (1) Respondents from both hub and spoke hospitals reported that telemedicine helps them meet their mission, enhances access, keeps lower-acuity patients closer to home, and helps head off competition. (2) Respondents from both hub and spoke hospitals reported licensing and credentialing to be significant barriers to telemedicine expansion. Thus, half of hubs provide services only within their state. (3) A variety of one-time funding sources have been used to initiate and grow telemedicine services among hubs and spokes. However, reimbursement issues have impeded the development of workable business models for sustainability. Hub hospitals shoulder the responsibility for identifying sustainable business models. (4) Although respondents

  15. Average length of stay in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Egawa, H

    1984-03-01

    The average length of stay is essentially an important and appropriate index for hospital bed administration. However, from the position that it is not necessarily an appropriate index in Japan, an analysis is made of the difference in the health care facility system between the United States and Japan. Concerning the length of stay in Japanese hospitals, the median appeared to better represent the situation. It is emphasized that in order for the average length of stay to become an appropriate index, there is need to promote regional health, especially facility planning.

  16. A proposal to redistribute the cost of hospital charity care.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, H P; Chang, C F

    1991-01-01

    Policy analysts debate whether providers of hospital services should share the responsibility of financing care for those who cannot pay for it. Many nonprofit and public hospitals, meanwhile, find it necessary to fund some of the services they deliver. A proposal to redistribute the costs of charity care more equitably is offered, taking into account the benefits an institution receives and its ability to pay. Hospitals would be required to quantify the charity care they provide and to make this information publicly available; in reviewing the information, legislatures are encouraged to set priorities on how much unmet need each state and each hospital should finance.

  17. Marketing the hospital library.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Many librarians do not see themselves as marketers, but marketing is an essential role for hospital librarians. Library work involves education, and there are parallels between marketing and education as described in this article. It is incumbent upon hospital librarians actively to pursue ways of reminding their customers about library services. This article reinforces the idea that marketing is an element in many of the things that librarians already do, and includes a list of suggested marketing strategies intended to remind administrators, physicians, and other customers that they have libraries in their organizations.

  18. Tiered hospital networks.

    PubMed

    Yegian, Jill M

    2003-01-01

    As a result of rising health care costs, health plans are experimenting with insurance products that shift greater financial responsibility for medical care to consumers and create incentives for consumers to consider cost differences when choosing among providers. Based on an October 2002 roundtable discussion, this paper discusses insurance product trends, particularly tiered hospital networks. Issues addressed include these product features' potential to reduce system costs, the effect on the hospital-health plan relationship, consumers' ability to consider cost and quality in decision making, and financial barriers to care for the chronically ill.

  19. POLICE STATION LOOKING SOUTH WEST, HOSPITAL BUILDING IN BACKGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POLICE STATION LOOKING SOUTH WEST, HOSPITAL BUILDING IN BACKGROUND - New York State Soldiers & Sailors Home, Police and Voluntary Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 76 Veterans Avenue, Bath, Steuben County, NY

  20. Opioid Overdoses Burden U.S. Hospitals: Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... U.S. Hospitals: Report Admissions due to heroin, painkillers rose 64 percent over decade To use the sharing ... related to overdoses from heroin and other opioids rose 64 percent in the United States between 2005 ...

  1. [The psychiatric hospital circuit: the trajectories of young people prior to psychiatric hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Scisleski, Andrea Cristina Coelho; Maraschin, Cleci; Silva, Rosane Neves da

    2008-02-01

    This article analyzes psychiatric hospitalization of young patients from a contemporary social-subjective (rather than a psychopathological) perspective, following the trajectory of these youth prior to their admission. The study was conducted at the Center for Comprehensive Psychosocial Care for Children and Adolescents, São Pedro Psychiatric Hospital, in the city of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Recurrent traits in the trajectory of these youth expressed how the health care network functioned with them prior to their hospitalization, with a consistent pattern of socioeconomic deprivation, low schooling, and drug use. Another key aspect was the role of the court system in referring them for hospitalization, adhering to a kind of logic that punished both the youth and the services and paradoxically formed a strategy for access to health services.

  2. A More Detailed Understanding Of Factors Associated With Hospital Profitability.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ge; Anderson, Gerard F

    2016-05-01

    To identify the characteristics of the most profitable US hospitals, we examined the profitability of acute care hospitals in fiscal year 2013, measured as net income from patient care services per adjusted discharge. Based on Medicare Cost Reports and Final Rule Data, the median hospital lost $82 for each such discharge. Forty-five percent of hospitals were profitable, with 2.5 percent earning more than $2,475 per adjusted discharge. The ten most profitable hospitals, seven of which were nonprofit, each earned more than $163 million in total profits from patient care services. Hospitals with for-profit status, higher markups, system affiliation, or regional power, as well as those located in states with price regulation, tended to be more profitable than other hospitals. Hospitals that treated a higher proportion of Medicare patients, had higher expenditures per adjusted discharge, were located in counties with a high proportion of uninsured patients, or were located in states with a dominant insurer or greater health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration had lower profitability than hospitals that did not have these characteristics. These findings can inform policy reforms, while providing a baseline against which to measure the impact of any subsequent reforms.

  3. Factors associated with variation in financial condition among voluntary hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Brecher, C; Nesbitt, S

    1985-01-01

    This article uses multiple regression analysis to identify factors which affect variations in the financial condition of voluntary hospitals in New York State. Six separate ratios are used to measure financial condition and 18 independent variables are considered. The factors affecting financial conditions were found to vary among dimensions of financial health, and different causal relationships were evident among hospitals in New York City than among those in the rest of the state. PMID:4019212

  4. Incorporating efficiency in hospital-capacity planning in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Ludwig; Scholtes, Stefan; Vera, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    Hospital occupancy is a key metric in hospital-capacity planning in Germany, even though this metric neglects important drivers of economic efficiency, for example treatment costs and case mix. We suggest an alternative metric, which incorporates economic efficiency explicitly, and illustrate how this metric can be used in the hospital-capacity planning cycle. The practical setting of this study is the hospital capacity planning process in the German federal state of Rheinland-Pfalz. The planning process involves all 92 acute-care hospitals of this federal state. The study is based on standard hospital data, including annual costs, number of cases--disaggregated by medical departments and ICD codes, respectively--length-of-stay, certified beds, and occupancy rates. Using the developed metric, we identified 18 of the 92 hospitals as inefficient and targets for over-proportional capacity cuts. On the upside, we identified 15 efficient hospitals. The developed model and analysis has affected the federal state's most recent medium term planning cycle.

  5. Hospital infection prevention and control issues relevant to extensive floods.

    PubMed

    Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Mundy, Linda M; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Glen Mayhall, C

    2013-02-01

    The devastating clinical and economic implications of floods exemplify the need for effective global infection prevention and control (IPC) strategies for natural disasters. Reopening of hospitals after excessive flooding requires a balance between meeting the medical needs of the surrounding communities and restoration of a safe hospital environment. Postflood hospital preparedness plans are a key issue for infection control epidemiologists, healthcare providers, patients, and hospital administrators. We provide recent IPC experiences related to reopening of a hospital after extensive black-water floods necessitated hospital closures in Thailand and the United States. These experiences provide a foundation for the future design, execution, and analysis of black-water flood preparedness plans by IPC stakeholders.

  6. Toilet privacy in hospital.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    Good practice in toilet management and continence promotion can help hospital patients to maintain their dignity. This article reports on an audit that highlighted the issues important to patients and nurses in terms of improving privacy and dignity for inpatients using the toilet.

  7. Drama Therapies in Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Judith; Prosperi, Mario

    1976-01-01

    Explores the use of drama as a therapeutic tool at various hospitals and records specific therapy groups dialogues. Available from: The Drama Review, 51 West 4th Street, Room 300, New York, N.Y. 10012. Subscription Rates: $12.50 per year. (MH)

  8. Mechanical engineering in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wallington, J W

    1980-10-01

    The design of a modern hospital owes more to engineering than the layman may realize. In this context, many engineers are in the position of laymen, being unfamiliar with the multitude of services that lies behind the impressive facade of a modern hospital. In recent years medicine and surgery themselves have taken on many of the characteristics of a technology. This has required a matching development of the services both mechanical and electrical that are required in modern health care buildings. In medical terms, if the architectural features provide the 'skin' of the hospital, the mechanical and electrical engineering services provide the nerves and sinews. If we take as an example the recently completed Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, (Fig. 1), which cost 10 million pounds at current cost, the service network was responsible for about half the total cost. About 400 miles (643 km) of electrical wiring and more than 40 mile (64.5 km) of copper and steel piping were used to service 3000 separate rooms. This compares with percentages of between 18 and 25 per cent for other large buildings such as office blocks, hotels and sports complexes.

  9. Speech intelligibility in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ryherd, Erica E; Moeller, Michael; Hsu, Timothy

    2013-07-01

    Effective communication between staff members is key to patient safety in hospitals. A variety of patient care activities including admittance, evaluation, and treatment rely on oral communication. Surprisingly, published information on speech intelligibility in hospitals is extremely limited. In this study, speech intelligibility measurements and occupant evaluations were conducted in 20 units of five different U.S. hospitals. A variety of unit types and locations were studied. Results show that overall, no unit had "good" intelligibility based on the speech intelligibility index (SII > 0.75) and several locations found to have "poor" intelligibility (SII < 0.45). Further, occupied spaces were found to have 10%-15% lower SII than unoccupied spaces on average. Additionally, staff perception of communication problems at nurse stations was significantly correlated with SII ratings. In a targeted second phase, a unit treated with sound absorption had higher SII ratings for a larger percentage of time as compared to an identical untreated unit. Taken as a whole, the study provides an extensive baseline evaluation of speech intelligibility across a variety of hospitals and unit types, offers some evidence of the positive impact of absorption on intelligibility, and identifies areas for future research.

  10. Innovations in Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzhandzhugazova, Elena A.; Blinova, Ekaterina A.; Orlova, Liubov N.; Romanova, Marianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the study of the role and importance of innovation, its classification, the problems of its application in the hotel industry with emphasis on the application of sensory marketing tools in the development of the innovative marketing mix within the hospitality industry. The article provides an analysis of the "seven…

  11. Going to the Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking care of you — to explain. continue Your Room Once you're in the hospital, you may have a room all to yourself or you might share one with another kid. Your room will have a bed, usually with buttons to ...

  12. Responsible Hospitality. Prevention Updates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colthurst, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Responsible Hospitality (RH)--also called Responsible Beverage Service (RBS)--encompasses a variety of strategies for reducing risks associated with the sale and service of alcoholic beverages. RH programs have three goals: (1) to prevent illegal alcohol service to minors; (2) to reduce the likelihood of drinkers becoming intoxicated; and (3) to…

  13. Hospital perceived value.

    PubMed

    Moliner, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    The creation, distribution and communication of value have been considered to be the key element of marketing (American Marketing Association, 2004, www.marketingpower.com). The aim of this article is to identify the indicators of perceived value in a hospital context. The results show that perceived quality and emotions are key dimensions of perceived value.

  14. Cost characteristics of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smet, Mike

    2002-09-01

    Modern hospitals are complex multi-product organisations. The analysis of a hospital's production and/or cost structure should therefore use the appropriate techniques. Flexible functional forms based on the neo-classical theory of the firm seem to be most suitable. Using neo-classical cost functions implicitly assumes minimisation of (variable) costs given that input prices and outputs are exogenous. Local and global properties of flexible functional forms and short-run versus long-run equilibrium are further issues that require thorough investigation. In order to put the results based on econometric estimations of cost functions in the right perspective, it is important to keep these considerations in mind when using flexible functional forms. The more recent studies seem to agree that hospitals generally do not operate in their long-run equilibrium (they tend to over-invest in capital (capacity and equipment)) and that it is therefore appropriate to estimate a short-run variable cost function. However, few studies explicitly take into account the implicit assumptions and restrictions embedded in the models they use. An alternative method to explain differences in costs uses management accounting techniques to identify the cost drivers of overhead costs. Related issues such as cost-shifting and cost-adjusting behaviour of hospitals and the influence of market structure on competition, prices and costs are also discussed shortly.

  15. Reengineering hospital materiel management.

    PubMed

    Giunipero, L C

    1995-08-01

    Reengineering involves significant change and dramatic rethinking of the business process. The expected result of these changed processes is dramatic improvement. Hospital cost pressures and technological change necessitate review or reengineering the process to enhance customer service at a lower cost. Three areas that yield significant results include reducing the cost of purchasing, implementing new technologies, and empowering teams to accomplish customer driven goals.

  16. Contribution of patient and hospital characteristics to adverse patient incidents.

    PubMed Central

    Elnicki, R A; Schmitt, J P

    1980-01-01

    The 1974 medical malpractice "crisis" brought about extensive legislation and insurance regulation in the United States. Hospitals in many states are now required to support risk management programs that include investigation and systematic analyses of adverse patient incidents. However, no research supports the hypothesis that systematic analysis of adverse patient incidents can identify contributory factors. In this study, a simple prediction model was used to estimate relationships between adverse incidents and selected patient and environmental characteristics in a large hospital. While some of the incident-characteristic relationships were significant, none of the estimated equations yielded results that could be logically translated into policy recommendations for the hospital. These results point to the need for further research. The benefits that positive research results would have for patients, hospitals, an the bill-paying public are obvious. Additional negative results would suggest that many legislative bodies and regulatory agencies were presumptions in requiring hospitals to conduct analyses of incidents. PMID:7461973

  17. Integrating COPD into Patient-Centered Hospital Readmissions Reduction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Gussin, Hélène A.; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Sullivan, Jamie L.; Zaidi, Farhan; Thomashow, Byron M.

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 5 patients hospitalized for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the United States are readmitted within 30 days. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently expanded its Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program to financially penalize hospitals with higher than expected all-cause 30-day readmission rates following a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. In October 2013, the COPD Foundation convened a multi-stakeholder National COPD Readmissions Summit to summarize our understanding of how to reduce hospital readmissions in patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbations. Over 225 individuals participated in the Summit, including patients, clinicians, health service researchers, policy makers and representatives of academic health care centers, industry, and payers. Summit participants recommend that programs to reduce hospital readmissions: 1) Include specific recommendations about how to promote COPD self-management skills training for patients and their caregivers; 2) Adequately address co-existing disorders common to COPD in care plans during and after hospitalizations; 3) Include an evaluation of adverse events when implementing strategies to reduce hospital readmissions; and 4) Develop a strategy (e.g., a learning collaboratory) to connect groups who are engaged in developing, testing, and implementing programs to reduce hospital readmissions for COPD and other conditions. PMID:25927076

  18. The Effect of Rural Hospital Closures on Community Economic Health

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, George M; Slifkin, Rebecca T; Randolph, Randy K; Poley, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of rural hospital closures on the local economy. Data Sources U.S. Census Bureau, OSCAR, Medicare Cost Reports, and surveys of individuals knowledgeable about local hospital closures. Study Design Economic data at the county level for 1990–2000 were combined with information on hospital closures. The study sample was restricted to rural counties experiencing a closure during the sample period. Longitudinal regression methods were used to estimate the effect of hospital closure on per-capita income, unemployment rate, and other community economic measures. Models included both leading and lagged closure terms allowing a preclosure economic downturn as well as time for the closure to be fully realized by the community. Data Collection Information on closures was collected by contacting every state hospital association, reconciling information gathered with that contained in the American Hospital Association file and OIG reports. Principal Findings Results indicate that the closure of the sole hospital in the community reduces per-capita income by $703 (p<0.05) or 4 percent (p<0.05) and increases the unemployment rate by 1.6 percentage points (p<0.01). Closures in communities with alternative sources of hospital care had no long-term economic impact, although income decreased for 2 years following the closure. Conclusions The local economic effects of a hospital closure should be considered when regulations that affect hospitals' financial well-being are designed or changed. PMID:16584460

  19. Improving Hospital Discharge Time

    PubMed Central

    El-Eid, Ghada R.; Kaddoum, Roland; Tamim, Hani; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Delays in discharging patients can impact hospital and emergency department (ED) throughput. The discharge process is complex and involves setting specific challenges that limit generalizability of solutions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using Six Sigma methods to improve the patient discharge process. This is a quantitative pre and post-intervention study. Three hundred and eighty-six bed tertiary care hospital. A series of Six Sigma driven interventions over a 10-month period. The primary outcome was discharge time (time from discharge order to patient leaving the room). Secondary outcome measures included percent of patients whose discharge order was written before noon, percent of patients leaving the room by noon, hospital length of stay (LOS), and LOS of admitted ED patients. Discharge time decreased by 22.7% from 2.2 hours during the preintervention period to 1.7 hours post-intervention (P < 0.001). A greater proportion of patients left their room before noon in the postintervention period (P < 0.001), though there was no statistical difference in before noon discharge. Hospital LOS dropped from 3.4 to 3.1 days postintervention (P < 0.001). ED mean LOS of patients admitted to the hospital was significantly lower in the postintervention period (6.9 ± 7.8 vs 5.9 ± 7.7 hours; P < 0.001). Six Sigma methodology can be an effective change management tool to improve discharge time. The focus of institutions aspiring to tackle delays in the discharge process should be on adopting the core principles of Six Sigma rather than specific interventions that may be institution-specific. PMID:25816029

  20. [Leadership in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Current concepts in leadership and governance on the level of supervisory board, management and departments are often considered as insufficient to cope with the profound structural change which actually takes place in the German health care system. While vertical and horizontal disconnecting is typical of the professional bureaucracy of hospitals, transition from functional to divisional structure further increases this risk. Accordingly, medical experts are oriented towards their professional peers and patient care on the one side; on the other side the management gets isolated and looses operative and strategic control. Several studies provide evidence for the relevance of role models to serve as agents of change, which are now developed into the concept of "Clinical Governance": evidence-based medicine, guidelines, continuous quality improvement, safety culture, resource accountability and organisational learning. The present situation makes it necessary to extend this conception, which focuses on the departmental level in an organisation with divisional features, to one of "Clinical Corporate Governance". This term, which also includes supervisory structures and the management board and is relevant for the total hospital and company, respectively, is based on the corporate governance concept. Inside the hospital, the management and the heads of the departments have to agree that (1) experts really need to be integrated into the decision process, and that (2) the outcomes of the entire hospital have to be regarded as equal or superior to the aims of a single department. The public image of the hospital should be one of a strong and reliable partner in health care and health care business on a local, regional and national level. Members of the supervisory board should clearly put corporate aspects above political and other implications and pay attention to personal independence from the leaders of the medical departments.

  1. The frontline hospital.

    PubMed

    Mein, P

    1983-01-01

    This brief description of the planning process for a frontline hospital is intended as a guide only: there will be a variety of approaches depending on local conditions. However, certain of the principles raised have universal relevance for the construction of health facilities where resources are limited. In brief, these: - The changing role of the frontline hospital should not be allowed to obscure the fact that the small hospital still has a significant role to play and that future, as yet undefined, functional changes will take place necessitating generalized designs that can accommodate those changes. - The erection of new buildings is not always the appropriate solution to apparent problems with facilities. Often a more relevant course is to adapt existing buildings or to provide community-level primary health care services not based on facilities. - The development of standardized, though flexible, briefs for hospitals of different sizes is essential, since ther will, for some years to come, be a shortage of the professional manpower needed to enable completely individual designs to be produced for each facility. Standardized briefs are infinitely preferable to standard or type plans, which tend to be inflexible and lead to overbuilding. - Local involvement in the planning process is essential, not only because it provides useful knowledge but primarily because local commitment is the only way of avoiding the construction of inappropriate facilities. - Architectural expertise must be available within the health system, since very often outside consultants are unable or unwilling, because of the system of payment, to design suitable hospital buildings. - The type of construction used should be the simplest and most economical that will provide an effective environment for the health tasks to be carried out so that the limited resources available can be stretched to serve as many people as possible. - Local building materials should always be preferred- to

  2. 'The hospital was just like a home': self, service and the 'McCord Hospital Family'.

    PubMed

    Noble, Vanessa; Parle, Julie

    2014-04-01

    For more than a century, McCord Hospital, a partly private and partly state-subsidised mission hospital has provided affordable health-care services, as well as work and professional training opportunities for thousands of people in Durban, a city on the east coast of South Africa. This article focuses on one important aspect of the hospital's longevity and particular character, or 'organisational culture': the ethos of a 'McCord Family', integral to which were faith and a commitment to service. While recognising that families - including 'hospital families' like that at McCord - are contentious social constructs, with deeply embedded hierarchies and inequalities based on race, class and gender, we also consider however how the notion of 'a McCord family' was experienced and shared in complex ways. Indeed, during the twentieth century, this ethos was avidly promoted by the hospital's founders and managers and by a wide variety of employees and trainees. It also extended to people at a far geographical remove from Durban. Moreover, this ethos became so powerful that many patients felt that it shaped their convalescence experience positively. This article considers how this 'family ethos' was constructed and what made it so attractive to this hospital's staff, trainees and patients. Furthermore, we consider what 'work' it did for this mission hospital, especially in promoting bonds of multi-racial unity in the contexts of segregation and apartheid society. More broadly, it suggests that critical histories of the ways in which individuals, hospitals, faith and 'families' intersect may be of value for the future of hospitals as well as of interest in their past.

  3. Hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Aline Pinto; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of the hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions according to their structure, magnitude and causes. METHODS Cross-sectional study based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System and from the Primary Care Information System, referring to people aged 60 to 74 years living in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Souhteastern Brazil. The proportion and rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions were calculated, both the global rate and, according to diagnoses, the most prevalent ones. The coverage of the Family Health Strategy and the number of medical consultations attended by older adults in primary care were estimated. To analyze the indicators’ impact on hospitalizations, a linear correlation test was used. RESULTS We found an intense reduction in hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions for all causes and age groups. Heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases concentrated 50.0% of the hospitalizations. Adults older than 69 years had a higher risk of hospitalization due to one of these causes. We observed a higher risk of hospitalization among men. A negative correlation was found between the hospitalizations and the indicators of access to primary care. CONCLUSIONS Primary healthcare in the state of Rio de Janeiro has been significantly impacting the hospital morbidity of the older population. Studies of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions can aid the identification of the main causes that are sensitive to the intervention of the health services, in order to indicate which actions are more effective to reduce hospitalizations and to increase the population’s quality of life. PMID:25372173

  4. How consumers view hospital advertising.

    PubMed

    Johns, H E; Moser, H R

    1988-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine: (a) consumers' attitudes toward advertising by hospitals; (b) which media consumers feel are appropriate for hospital advertising; and (c) whether consumers are seeing hospital advertisements, and if so, through which media. It was found that consumers indeed have a favorable attitude toward hospitals that advertise. It was also found that consumers feel that most media are appropriate for hospital advertising. Finally, it was found that most consumers have seen hospitals advertise their services, especially on television and radio and in the newspaper.

  5. The politics of hospital payment.

    PubMed

    Feder, J; Spitz, B

    1979-01-01

    This paper analyzes the politics of hospital payment over the last decade. The authors explain how provider interests and judgments became a standard for appropriate hospital payment: the impact of that standard on hospital costs; and the political obstacles to imposing an alternative standard and controlling hospital costs. The authors draw lessons from this experience, here and in other countries, to propose an alternative approach to hospital payment that would allow policymakers, accountable to the public, to make explicit choices about the level and nature of hospital expenditures.

  6. Strategic planning processes and hospital financial performance.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer A; Begun, James W

    2008-01-01

    Many common management practices in healthcare organizations, including the practice of strategic planning, have not been subject to widespread assessment through empirical research. If management practice is to be evidence-based, evaluations of such common practices need to be undertaken. The purpose of this research is to provide evidence on the extent of strategic planning practices and the association between hospital strategic planning processes and financial performance. In 2006, we surveyed a sample of 138 chief executive officers (CEOs) of hospitals in the state of Texas about strategic planning in their organizations and collected financial information on the hospitals for 2003. Among the sample hospitals, 87 percent reported having a strategic plan, and most reported that they followed a variety of common practices recommended for strategic planning-having a comprehensive plan, involving physicians, involving the board, and implementing the plan. About one-half of the hospitals assigned responsibility for the plan to the CEO. We tested the association between these planning characteristics in 2006 and two measures of financial performance for 2003. Three dimensions of the strategic planning process--having a strategic plan, assigning the CEO responsibility for the plan, and involving the board--are positively associated with earlier financial performance. Further longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the cause-and-effect relationship between planning and performance.

  7. Hospital-acquired infections - when are hospitals legally liable?

    PubMed

    McQuoid-Mason, David

    2012-04-12

    Hospital-acquired infections (nosocomial infections) are acquired in healthcare settings by patients admitted for reasons unrelated to the infection or not previously infected when admitted to the facility. Liability for hospital-acquired infections depends on whether the hospital: (i) has introduced best practice infection control measures; (ii) has implemented best practice infection control measures; or (iii) will be vicariously liable for negligent or intentional failures by staff to comply with the infection control measures implemented. A hospital and hospital administrators may be held directly liable for not introducing or implementing best practice infection control measures, resulting in harm to patients. The hospital may also be held vicariously liable where patients have been harmed because hospital staff negligently or intentionally failed to comply with the infection control measures that have been implemented by the hospital, during the course and scope of their employment.

  8. Mobile technology in rural hospitals: the case of the CT scanner.

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, D; Moscovice, I; Christianson, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study evaluates the relationship between hospital and regional characteristics and the prevalence of mobile computed tomography in rural hospitals. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. Primary data were gathered from all rural hospitals in eight northwestern states (n = 471) in 1991. Secondary data sources include the AHA Annual Survey, the Area Resource File, and HCFA's PPS data sets for 1987-1990. STUDY DESIGN. Primary data are a single observation taken in the summer of 1991. Key hospital characteristics include patient volume, distance to the nearest referral center, distance to the nearest hospital, financial performance, and medical staff size. Key regional variables include beds per unit area, hospitals per unit area, and physician supply. DATA COLLECTION. A structured telephone interview was conducted with the hospital administrator at each hospital. For many hospitals, detailed information was gathered with additional calls to hospital personnel. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Where hospitals are closely spaced, mobile CT suppliers are more readily available, and hospitals are more likely to choose mobile CT than in areas where hospitals are farther apart. Hospitals may realize economies of scale and scope in their decisions about CT adoption. CONCLUSIONS. Transportation costs are an important determinant of hospital decisions about acquiring CT, but may be less important for higher-priced medical technologies. There is no support for the proposition that rural hospitals compete with referral centers for patients by purchasing technological equipment. PMID:8675440

  9. Hospital malnutrition: a 33-hospital screening study.

    PubMed

    Kamath, S K; Lawler, M; Smith, A E; Kalat, T; Olson, R

    1986-02-01

    A collaborative study involving nutrition screening of 3,047 patients (excluding 125 pregnant women) at admission to 33 hospitals in and around the greater Chicago area was carried out to identify patients at nutritional risk. Information on sex, age, admitting diagnosis, serum albumin, hemoglobin, total lymphocyte count, and height and weight was collected from the medical chart within 48 hours of admission. Nutrition screening could not be completed for a larger number of patients (60%) because data at admission were not available. Of the remaining 40% of patients, more than 50% had below normal values for one or more of the variables studied: serum albumin, hemoglobin, and total lymphocyte count. A large number of the patients (40%) also were considered at nutritional risk as judged by the criteria of weight/height (measured only). Early nutrition intervention for high-risk patients cannot be implemented, nor can the efficacy of nutrition services be evaluated, unless nutrition screening is carried out on patients at admission.

  10. [Hospital clinical ethics committees].

    PubMed

    Gómez Velásquez, Luis; Gómez Espinosa, Luis Néstor

    2007-01-01

    The scientific and technological advances have been surprising, more in the two last decades, but they don't go united with to the ethical values of the medical professional practice, it has been totally escaped, specially when the biological subsistence, the maintenance of the life through apparatuses and the mechanisms that prolong the existence are who undergoes an alteration that until recently time was mortal shortly lapse. It is common listening that exist a crisis in the medical profession, but what really is it of human values, which as soon and taken into nowadays, actually professional account, which gives rise to a dehumanization towards the life, the health, the disease, the suffering and the death. The ideal of the doctor to give to service to the man in its life and health, as well to be conscious that the last biological process that must fulfill is the death, and when it appears, does not have considered as a actually professional failure. It has protect to the patient as the extreme cruelty therapeutic, that it has right a worthy death. It's taking to the birth of the hospital ethics committees, they have like function to analyze, to advise and to think about the ethical dilemmas that appear actually clinical or in the biomedical investigation. In 1982 in the UEA only 1% of its hospitals had a ethics committees; by 1988, it was 67% and the 100% in 2000. In Mexico the process of the formation by these committees begins, only in the Military Central Hospital, to count the ethics committee on 1983, also the Hospital no. 14 of the IMSS in Guadalajara, it works with regularity from 1995, with internal teaching of bioethic. The Secretariat of Health has asked the formation of the bioethical committees in each hospital, and order the it was be coordinated by the National Committee of Bioética. The integration of these committees is indispensable that their members have the knowledge necessary of bioética. The Mexican Society of Ortopedia, conscious of

  11. Hospital Library Development. Hospital Library Handbooks No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    Addressed to the administrator of the hospital as well as the librarian, this handbook covers aspects of library service policy and long-range planning. While hospitals of all sizes are discussed, a special effort is made to cover problems of small hospitals (17 to 100 beds) in sparsely-settled regions. Contents: The library as a clinical service,…

  12. Texas hospitals riding tall. While hospitals post robust profit margins, HMOs are saddled with mounting losses.

    PubMed

    Saphir, A

    1999-02-08

    In Texas, they do things differently, and they do things big. Hospitals in the Lone Star State have been banding together more often and more effectively than elsewhere. Swinging their lassos, they are riding herd on HMOs, enjoying record profits and making ever-larger deals.

  13. 78 FR 8329 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA): Hospital Mortgage Insurance Program-Refinancing Hospital Loans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... variable interest rates) constitutes a type of debt eligible for refinancing. The commenter stated that the... capital debt of a hospital.'' HUD Response: HUD has added new definitions to clarify the types of costs..., the regulations provide that ``the mortgagor shall not enter into any * * * derivative-...

  14. Facing the Recession: How Did Safety-Net Hospitals Fare Financially Compared with Their Peers?

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Kristin L; Jiang, H Joanna; Wang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of the recession on the financial performance of safety-net versus non-safety-net hospitals. Data Sources/Study Setting Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases, Medicare Cost Reports, American Hospital Association Annual Survey, InterStudy, and Area Health Resource File. Study Design Retrospective, longitudinal panel of hospitals, 2007–2011. Safety-net hospitals were identified using percentage of patients who were Medicaid or uninsured. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate average effects of the recession on hospital operating and total margins, revenues and expenses in each year, 2008–2011, comparing safety-net with non-safety-net hospitals. Data Collection/Extraction Methods 1,453 urban, nonfederal, general acute hospitals in 32 states with complete data. Principal Findings Safety-net hospitals, as identified in 2007, had lower operating and total margins. The gap in operating margin between safety-net and non-safety-net hospitals was sustained throughout the recession; however, total margin was more negatively affected for non-safety-net hospitals in 2008. Higher percentages of Medicaid and uninsured patients were associated with lower revenue in private hospitals in all years, and lower revenue and expenses in public hospitals in 2011. Conclusions Safety-net hospitals may not be disproportionately vulnerable to macro-economic fluctuations, but their significantly lower margins leave less financial cushion to weather sustained financial pressure. PMID:25220012

  15. Access to hospitals with high-technology cardiac services: how is race important?

    PubMed Central

    Blustein, J; Weitzman, B C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Relatively few hospitals in the United States offer high-technology cardiac services (cardiac catheterization, bypass surgery, or angioplasty). This study examined the association between race and admission to a hospital offering those services. METHODS. Records of 11,410 patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to hospitals in New York State in 1986 were analyzed. RESULTS. Approximately one third of both White and Black patients presented to hospitals offering high-technology cardiac services. However, in a multivariate model adjusting for home-to-hospital distance, the White-to-Black odds ratio for likelihood of presentation to such a hospital was 1.68 (95% confidence interval = 1.42, 1.98). This discrepancy between the observed and "distance-adjusted" probabilities reflected three phenomena: (1) patients presented to nearby hospitals; (2) Blacks were more likely to live near high-technology hospitals; and (3) there were racial differences in travel patterns. For example, when the nearest hospitals did not include a high-technology hospital, Whites were more likely than Blacks to travel beyond those nearest hospitals to a high-technology hospital. CONCLUSIONS. Whites and Blacks present equally to hospitals offering high-technology cardiac services at the time of acute myocardial infarction. However, there are important underlying racial differences in geographic proximity and tendencies to travel to those hospitals. PMID:7892917

  16. Hospitals report on cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., is first-place winner among cancer centers. Holy Cross Hospital's Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., is named second; and, Cardinal Health System's Ball Cancer Center, Muncie, Ind., third.

  17. Variation in Hospital Length of Stay: Do Physicians Adapt Their Length of Stay Decisions to What Is Usual in the Hospital Where They Work?

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Judith D; Westert, Gert P; Lagoe, Ronald; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2006-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that physicians who work in different hospitals adapt their length of stay decisions to what is usual in the hospital under consideration. Data Sources Secondary data were used, originating from the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS). SPARCS is a major management tool for assisting hospitals, agencies, and health care organizations with decision making in relation to financial planning and monitoring of inpatient and ambulatory surgery services and costs in New York state. Study Design Data on length of stay for surgical interventions and medical conditions (a total of seven diagnosis-related groups [DRGs]) were studied, to find out whether there is more variation between than within hospitals. Data (1999, 2000, and 2001) from all hospitals in New York state were used. The study examined physicians practicing in one hospital and physicians practicing in more than one hospital, to determine whether average length of stay differs according to the hospital of practice. Multilevel models were used to determine variation between and within hospitals. A t-test was used to test whether length of stay for patients of each multihospital physician differed from the average length of stay in each of the two hospitals. Principal Findings There is significantly (p<.05) more variation between than within hospitals in most of the study populations. Physicians working in two hospitals had patient lengths of stay comparable with the usual practice in the hospital where the procedure was performed. The proportion of physicians working in one hospital did not have a consistent effect for all DRGs on the variation within hospitals. Conclusion Physicians adapt to their colleagues or to the managerial demands of the particular hospital in which they work. The hospital and broader work environment should be taken into account when developing effective interventions to reduce variation in medical practice. PMID:16584454

  18. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    project involving the purchase of a neonatal retinal camera . This clinic transmits images from Lake Charles Memorial Hospital to a neonatal...ophthalmologist in New Orleans and assists in diagnosing Retinopathy of prematurity ( ROP ), a potentially blinding eye disorder that primarily affects...weeks). The smaller a baby is at birth, the more likely that baby is to develop ROP . This disorder—which usually develops in both eyes—is one of

  19. [Homicide crimes in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dürwald, W

    1993-02-01

    Report of some cases of willful homicide in hospitals of the former GDR. In no case the patient has wished his death. Besides compassion the cause of the homicide was a large carefully expense and in two cases the attempt to prove the incapability of the competent doctor. The patients were only means to an end. All the cases are discovered by the great number of obscure death.

  20. The Impact of Hospital Closures and Hospital and Population Characteristics on Increasing Emergency Department Volume: A Geographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brendan G.; Smith, Tony E.; Tran, Van C.; Polsky, Daniel; Branas, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Emergency visits are rising nationally, whereas the number of emergency departments is shrinking. However, volume has not increased uniformly at all emergency departments. It is unclear what factors account for this variability in emergency volume growth rates. The objective of this study was to test the association of hospital and population characteristics and the effect of hospital closures with increases in emergency department volume. The study team analyzed emergency department volume at New York State hospitals from 2004 to 2010 using data from cost reports and administrative databases. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate characteristics associated with emergency volume growth. Spatial analytics and distances between hospitals were used in calculating the predicted impact of hospital closures on emergency department use. Among the 192 New York hospitals open from 2004 to 2010, the mean annual increase in emergency department visits was 2.7%, but the range was wide (-5.5% to 11.3%). Emergency volume increased nearly twice as fast at tertiary referral centers (4.8%) and nonurban hospitals (3.7% versus urban at 2.1%) after adjusting for other characteristics. The effect of hospital closures also strongly predicted variation in growth. Emergency volume is increasing faster at specific hospitals: tertiary referral centers, nonurban hospitals, and those near hospital closures. This study provides an understanding of how emergency volume varies among hospitals and predicts the effect of hospital closures in a statewide region. Understanding the impact of these factors on emergency department use is essential to ensure that these populations have access to critical emergency services. (Population Health Management 2015;18:459–466) PMID:25658768

  1. Children's hospitals and PACS: six profiles of planning and implementation.

    PubMed

    Keen, C

    1999-01-01

    Six pediatric hospitals were interviewed at length about the status of PACS in their facilities. Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio entered electronic imaging communications in 1993. Several nearby clinics were connected through teleradiology and by 1998, the radiology department had developed a business plan for the implementation of PACS. Two hospitals in Atlanta, Egleston Hospital and Scottish Rite Children's. Medical Center, merged in 1998 to become one entity with two medical campuses. They now treat 60 percent of Atlanta's pediatric patients. Merging incompatible systems has been the administrator's most immediate problem. One director of imaging services is responsible for the recently merged Mary Bridge Children's Hospital and Tacoma General Hospital, plus a network of clinics and medical facilities scatted throughout Tacoma and the South Puget Sound area in Washington state. A state-of-the-art mini-PACS and teleradiology system were implemented at Primary Children's Medical Center, Salt Lake City, in 1991. Over the years, it has added modalities into an electronic system that now results in significantly improved use of physicians' time and patient relations. St. Louis Children's Hospital, with both a director of radiology and a PACS administrator, has implemented teleradiology and an ultrasound mini-PACS, and has plans for an enterprise-wide PACS. Children's Hospital in Birmingham, Ala., a major trauma center, provides specialized pediatric care to nearly all 67 counties in Alabama. With a 20-year history of online computerization, it is now reengineering its emergency department and will implement CR there first.

  2. The paradox of the not-for-profit hospital.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jeffrey P; Sexton, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    This quantitative research study assesses the organizational characteristics, market factors, and performance of not-for-profit hospitals in the United States. These results have managerial implications related to hospital efficiency, organizational performance, and the role of not-for-profit hospitals within local communities. The study has policy implications on access to clinical services within local communities, the availability of charity care, and the long-term viability of the not-for-profit health care industry due to potential bankruptcy and closure. This study clearly demonstrates that not-for-profit hospital managers are faced with declining profitability and are challenged to reduce hospital-operating expenses while meeting their charitable mission. Additionally, the greater size and increased clinical complexity of not-for-profit hospitals are increasing organizational overhead. In many cases, the increased clinical complexity is a commitment to the organizational mission of providing a full range of services to the community. From a policy perspective, the study suggests that not-for-profit hospitals have aging facilities and reduced cash flow due to lower profit margins. As a result, many not-for-profit hospitals face potential bankruptcy and closure. This study clearly documents a threat to the provision of charity care in local communities and the long-term viability of the not-for-profit health care industry in the United States.

  3. [Medical record management and risk management processes. State of the art and new normative guidelines about the organization and the management of the sanitary documentation in the National Health System or Hospital Trusts].

    PubMed

    Spolaore, P; Murolo, G; Sommavilla, M

    2003-01-01

    Recent health care reforms, the start of accreditation processes of health institutions, and the introduction also in the health system of risk management concepts and instruments, borrowed from the enterprise culture and the emphasis put on the protection of privacy, render evident the need and the urgency to define and to implement improvement processes of the organization and management of the medical documentation in the hospital with the aim of facilitation in fulfilment of regional and local health authorities policies about protection of the safety and improvement of quality of care. Currently the normative context that disciplines the management of medical records inside the hospital appears somewhat fragmentary, incomplete and however not able to clearly orientate health operators with the aim of a correct application of the enforced norms in the respect of the interests of the user and of local health authority. In this job we individuate the critical steps in the various phases of management process of the clinical folder and propose a new model of regulations, with the purpose to improve and to simplify the management processes and the modalities of compilation, conservation and release to entitled people of all clinical documentation.

  4. Relationships between in-hospital and 30-day standardized hospital mortality: implications for profiling hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, G. E.; Baker, D. W.; Norris, D. G.; Way, L. E.; Harper, D. L.; Snow, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates and the association between in-hospital mortality and hospital discharge practices. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: A secondary analysis of data for 13,834 patients with congestive heart failure who were admitted to 30 hospitals in northeast Ohio in 1992-1994. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study was conducted. DATA COLLECTION: Demographic and clinical data were collected from patients' medical records and were used to develop multivariable models that estimated the risk of in-hospital and 30-day (post-admission) mortality. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for in-hospital and 30-day mortality were determined by dividing observed death rates by predicted death rates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In-hospital SMRs ranged from 0.54 to 1.42, and six hospitals were classified as statistical outliers (p <.05); 30-day SMRs ranged from 0.63 to 1.73, and seven hospitals were outliers. Although the correlation between in-hospital SMRs and 30-day SMRs was substantial (R = 0.78, p < .001), outlier status changed for seven of the 30 hospitals. Nonetheless, changes in outlier status reflected relatively small differences between in-hospital and 30-day SMRs. Rates of discharge to nursing homes or other inpatient facilities varied from 5.4 percent to 34.2 percent across hospitals. However, relationships between discharge rates to such facilities and in-hospital SMRs (R = 0.08; p = .65) and early post-discharge mortality rates (R = 0.23; p = .21) were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: SMRs based on in-hospital and 30-day mortality were relatively similar, although classification of hospitals as statistical outliers often differed. However, there was no evidence that in-hospital SMRs were biased by differences in post-discharge mortality or discharge practices. PMID:10737447

  5. Library Hospitality: Some Preliminary Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric D. M.; Kazmer, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Library scholars and practitioners have frequently reflected on the various factors that in combination make up a hospitable library, but there has been little theoretical synthesis of the notion of the library as a place of hospitality. The hospitality industry provides a rich vein of theoretical material from which to draw definitions of…

  6. Childrens Hospital Inservice Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Joan

    A description is provided of a 15-month, in-service nursing education program at Childrens Hospital (Los Angeles, California). The first sections of the paper describe Childrens Hospital and provide a rationale for the hospital-based program. A listing of program goals and objectives is also provided, indicating that the curriculum is designed to…

  7. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  8. Hospitality Studies: Escaping the Tyranny?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashley, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore current strands in hospitality management education and research, and suggest that future programs should reflect a more social science informed content. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews current research in hospitality management education and in the study of hospitality and…

  9. HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A REVIEW OF GOVERNMENTAL AND PRIVATE AGENCY ENERGY CONSERVATION INITIATIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, Robert S.; Rainer, David

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the results of a recent research project originally concerned with review of governmental initiatives for changes to hospital design and operation standards at both the federal and state levels. However. it quickly became apparent that concern with energy conservation was not impacting hospital environmental standards, especially at the state level, irrespective of the energy implications. Consequently, the study was redirected to consider all energy conservation initiatives directed toward design and operating practices unique to the hospital environment. The scope was limited to agency programs (i.e., not undertaken at the initiative of individual hospitals), applicable to non-federal public and private hospitals.

  10. Health care markets in Australia: ownership of the private hospital sector.

    PubMed

    White, K; Collyer, F

    1998-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Australian hospital sector has undergone a massive economic and administrative reorganization with ramifications for both the private and the public sectors. Changes such as privatization, deregulation, and the entry of foreign capital into the hospital sector are occurring in the hospital systems of many countries, including Australia, the United States, and the United Kingdom. These developments are radically transforming the hospital sector, altering established relationships between the state, the medical profession, the consumer, and the corporate investor, and raising important questions about the future of hospital services in regard to equity, accessibility, and quality.

  11. North Carolina State Plan for Technical Assistance and Energy Conservation Measures: Grant Programs for Schools and Hospitals and for Buildings Owned by Units of Local Government and Public Care Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Commerce, Raleigh. Energy Div.

    State guidelines for grant applications that follow the regulations of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 are presented for North Carolina institutions. Among the 17 procedures spelled out in detail are several that concern eligible institutions' involvement in the development of the state plan, notification of the plan, and…

  12. Hospitalization in Small-Scale Contingency Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    That Don’t): Creating Conditions for Effective Teamwork . San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Hellriegel, Don, John W. Slocum, Jr., and Richard W...General Accounting Office. 1995. GAO. 1996. See United States General Accounting Office. 1996. Hackman , J. Richard, ed. 1990 . Groups That Work (and Those...on the characteristics and capabilities that echelon-III hospital units need in order to deploy and support SSCs under present and emerging conditions

  13. Health care communication networks: disseminating employee information for hospital security.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Jennifer; Liberman, Aaron; Rotarius, Timothy; Wan, Thomas T H; Eaglin, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Health care in the United States is a system that, organizationally speaking, is fragmented. Each hospital facility is independently operated and is responsible for the hiring of its own employees. Corrupt individuals can take advantage of this fragmentation and move from hospital to hospital, gaining employment while hiding previous employment history. However, the need to exchange pertinent information regarding employees will become necessary as hospitals seek to fill positions throughout their organizations. One way to promote this information exchange is to develop trusted information sharing networks among hospital units. This study examined the problems surrounding organizational information sharing and the cultural factors necessary to enhance the exchange of employee information. Surveys were disseminated to 2,603 hospital chief executive officers and chief information officers throughout the nation. A sample of 154 respondents provided data into their current hiring practices and on their willingness to engage in the sharing of employee information. Findings indicated that, although fear of defamation and privacy violations do hinder the exchange of information between hospitals during the hiring process, by increasing external trust, linking the sharing process with the organizational goals of the hospital, and developing a "sharing culture" among hospitals, the exchange of employee information could be enhanced.

  14. Marketing the charitable image of the non-profit hospital.

    PubMed

    Kolu, S; Parsons, R J

    1992-01-01

    Because of nonprofit hospitals' charitable contribution to communities, the great majority of these nonprofit hospitals deserve their tax-exempt status. In order for them to maintain this status, hospitals must promote their charitable image in the community. The hospital that is successful in promoting this image will benefit in several ways: 1. The citizens of the community will look on the hospital in a favorable light. 2. The local and state government officials will not feel compelled to vigorously pursue hospital tax dollars. 3. Those people in the community who need charity care will know of its availability. 4. New taxing legislation is less likely to be passed if the legislators know that their public is well educated on the benefits the hospitals provide. Over the years, the image of the hospital has become that of a business rather than that of a charitable service organization. The public has been inundated with information by the media on the business of healthcare rather than the social service role of the hospital. In order for nonprofit institutions to survive, they will need to communicate otherwise the public will remain ignorant, and the repercussions could be disastrous.

  15. Roles for children's hospitals in pediatric collaborative improvement networks.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marlene

    2013-06-01

    Children's hospitals represent a significant opportunity to reduce morbidity, mortality, and costs, particularly for children with complex chronic conditions (CCCs) who comprise a disproportionate and growing share of admissions, readmissions, and resource use. Most children with CCCs are in some way associated with a children's hospital, and the subspecialists who care for them are primarily concentrated in the ≈ 200 children's hospitals in the United States. Children's hospitals and their associated subspecialty clinics are uniquely positioned to achieve significant outcomes and cost savings through coordinated quality-improvement efforts. However, even the largest children's hospital has relatively small volumes of patients with any given condition. Only by linking children's hospitals in networks can a sufficient "N" be achieved to build the evidence for what works for children. Large-scale pediatric collaborative network exemplars have demonstrated the ability to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and spread changes found to be effective. Substantial opportunities exist for networks to expand to additional conditions, improvement topics, and sites, but financial barriers exist. Although much of their participation has been funded as "pay to participate" efforts by the hospitals themselves, most financial benefits accrue to payers. As health care reform becomes a reality and financial pressures intensify, it will become increasingly difficult for children's hospitals to serve as the primary source of support for networks. Partnerships between children's hospitals and national payers to support collaborative networks are needed, and these partnerships have the potential to significantly improve pediatric care and outcomes, particularly for children with CCCs.

  16. The evolution of freestanding children’s hospitals in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Antonia S; Joshi, Arvind

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of the present article is to examine the evolution of freestanding children’s hospitals in Canada over the past century. The results include documentation of the number of freestanding children’s hospitals in Canada that have since closed, merged with other institutions or remained freestanding. Similar data are presented for the United States (US). Also included is an analysis of factors in the internal and external environment that contributed to the changing structure of children’s hospitals. METHODS Sources of information included a review of the literature, publicly available data and statistics on children’s hospitals in Canada and the US. RESULTS Nine of the 16 children’s hospitals in Canada were freestanding at one time. Today, only two remain freestanding. Three formerly freestanding children’s hospitals have merged with maternal health facilities and four formerly freestanding children’s hospitals have merged with adult institutions. Similar trends are seen in the US. CONCLUSIONS The structure of children’s hospitals in North America has changed significantly over the past century. This can be attributed to a number of factors, including the evolution of the health status of children due to medical advances, as well as external forces such as demographics and the rising cost of health care. The impact on the health of children and the mission of children’s hospitals in terms of patient care, teaching and research remains to be seen. PMID:19030317

  17. Mother-baby friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Aragon-choudhury, P

    1996-01-01

    In Manila, the Philippines, the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital has been a maternity hospital for 75 years. It averages 90 deliveries a day. Its fees are P200-P500 for a normal delivery and P800-P2000 for a cesarean section. Patients pay what they can and pay the balance when they can. The hospital provides a safe motherhood package that encompasses teaching responsible parenthood, prenatal care, labor, delivery, postpartum care, breast feeding, family planning, and child survival. In 1986, the hospital introduced innovative policies and procedures that promote, protect, and support breast feeding. It has a rooming-in policy that has saved the hospital P6.5 million so far. In the prenatal stage, hospital staff inform pregnant women that colostrum protects the newborn against infections, that suckling stimulates milk production, and that there is no basis to the claim of having insufficient breast milk. Sales representatives of milk substitutes are banned from the hospital. Staff confiscate milk bottles or formula. A lactation management team demonstrates breast feeding procedures. Mothers also receive support on the correct way of breast feeding from hospital staff, volunteers from the Catholic Women's League, consumer groups, and women lawyers. The hospital's policy is no breast milk, no discharge. This encourages mothers to motivate each other to express milk immediately after birth. The hospital has received numerous awards for its breast feeding promotion efforts. UNICEF has designated Fabella Hospital as a model of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The hospital serves as the National Lactation Management Education Training Center. People from other developing countries have received training in lactation management here. The First Lady of the Philippines, the First Lady of the US, and the Queen of Spain have all visited the hospital. The hospital has also integrated its existing services into a women's health care center.

  18. How have mandated nurse staffing ratios affected hospitals? Perspectives from California hospital leaders.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Susan A; Spetz, Joanne; Seago, Jean Ann; Kaiser, Jennifer; Dower, Catherine; Herrera, Carolina

    2009-01-01

    In 1999, California became the first state to pass legislation mandating minimum nurse-to-patient ratios. Regulations detailing specific ratios by type of hospital unit were released in 2002, with phased-in implementation beginning in 2004 and completed in 2008. These ratios were implemented at a time of severe registered nurse (RN) shortage in the state and a worsening financial position for many hospitals. This article presents an analysis of qualitative data from interviews with healthcare leaders about the impact of nurse staffing ratios. Twenty hospitals (including public, not-for-profit, and for-profit institutions) representing major geographic regions of California were approached. Twelve agreed to participate; semistructured in-person and telephone interviews were conducted with 23 hospital leaders. Several key themes emerged from the analysis. Most hospitals found it difficult and expensive to find more RNs to hire to meet the ratios. Meeting the staffing requirements on all units, at all times, was challenging and had negative impacts, such as a backlog of patients in the emergency department and a decrease of other ancillary staff. Hospital leaders do not believe that ratios have had an impact on patient quality of care. Findings related to nurse satisfaction were mixed. Increased RN staffing improved satisfaction with patient workload, but dissatisfaction with issues of decision-making control (e.g., decisions on when best to take a meal break) were taken out of the nurse's hands to meet ratio requirements. Further research should continue to monitor patient outcomes as other states consider similar ratio regulations. Results of this study will be useful to healthcare managers searching for ways to reduce unnecessary administrative costs while continuing to maintain the level of administrative activities required for the provision of safe, effective, high-quality care.

  19. Use of Social Media by Western European Hospitals: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Berben, Sivera AA; Samsom, Melvin; Engelen, Lucien JLPG; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients increasingly use social media to communicate. Their stories could support quality improvements in participatory health care and could support patient-centered care. Active use of social media by health care institutions could also speed up communication and information provision to patients and their families, thus increasing quality even more. Hospitals seem to be becoming aware of the benefits social media could offer. Data from the United States show that hospitals increasingly use social media, but it is unknown whether and how Western European hospitals use social media. Objective To identify to what extent Western European hospitals use social media. Methods In this longitudinal study, we explored the use of social media by hospitals in 12 Western European countries through an Internet search. We collected data for each country during the following three time periods: April to August 2009, August to December 2010, and April to July 2011. Results We included 873 hospitals from 12 Western European countries, of which 732 were general hospitals and 141 were university hospitals. The number of included hospitals per country ranged from 6 in Luxembourg to 347 in Germany. We found hospitals using social media in all countries. The use of social media increased significantly over time, especially for YouTube (n = 19, 2% to n = 172, 19.7%), LinkedIn (n =179, 20.5% to n = 278, 31.8%), and Facebook (n = 85, 10% to n = 585, 67.0%). Differences in social media usage between the included countries were significant. Conclusions Social media awareness in Western European hospitals is growing, as well as its use. Social media usage differs significantly between countries. Except for the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, the group of hospitals that is using social media remains small. Usage of LinkedIn for recruitment shows the awareness of the potential of social media. Future research is needed to investigate how social media lead to improved health

  20. The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled Renamed The Hospital for Special Surgery 1940; The War Years 1941–1945

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In 1939, the 75th anniversary program marking the founding of the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R & C), the oldest orthopaedic hospital in the nation, was held at the hospital site in New York City. Dr. Philip D. Wilson, Surgeon-in-Chief since 1935, used this event to mark the return of the hospital to its leadership role in the country. When the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled first opened its doors on May 1, 1863, the name of the hospital was not unusual; it described the type of patients treated. In 1940, the Board of Managers with guidance from Dr. Wilson changed the name to the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). In 1941, with Britain engaged in a European war, Dr. Wilson felt there was a need for the Americans to support the British. He personally organized the American Hospital in Britain, a privately funded voluntary unit, to help care for the wounded. After the United States actually entered World War II in December 1941, HSS quickly organized support at all levels with a significant number of professional and auxiliary staff, eventually enlisting in the military. Even with such staff turnover, the hospital continued to function under Dr. Wilson’s leadership. After the war ended in 1945, Wilson forged ahead to further restore HSS as a leader in musculoskeletal medicine and surgery. PMID:19048348

  1. [ The hospitalization of Jews in mental hospitals under Vichy in the department of the Seine].

    PubMed

    Caire, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The author presents the state of his research about a question not very studied till now in a French départment whose specificities have to be considered. The studying of some fifty medical records and some unpublished documents allows to point out how people persecuted by racial laws have been set in psychiatric hospitals and protected. As for their goods it seems that the system intending to protect psychiatric in-patients during their stay at the hospital has been turned away and used to despoil the patents "claimed or alleged Jews".

  2. [Success factors in hospital management].

    PubMed

    Heberer, M

    1998-12-01

    The hospital environment of most Western countries is currently undergoing dramatic changes. Competition among hospitals is increasing, and economic issues have become decisive factors for the allocation of medical care. Hospitals therefore require management tools to respond to these changes adequately. The balanced scorecard is a method of enabling development and implementation of a business strategy that equally respects the financial requirements, the needs of the customers, process development, and organizational learning. This method was used to derive generally valid success factors for hospital management based on an analysis of an academic hospital in Switzerland. Strategic management, the focus of medical services, customer orientation, and integration of professional groups across the hospital value chain were identified as success factors for hospital management.

  3. Hospital clowning: a paediatrician's view.

    PubMed

    van Venrooij, Lennard T; Barnhoorn, Pieter C

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the current position of hospital clowns from the perspective of paediatricians and paediatric residents. A total of 14 attending paediatricians and paediatric residents participated in two focus group sessions. Data were analysed using Atlas.ti 5.0. In general, physicians reported positive experiences regarding the interaction between hospital clowns and paediatric patients on the ward. Physicians were more interested in research on children's perception of hospital clowns than in research on the clinical efficacy of hospital clowning. No direct collaboration between physicians and hospital clowns was reported. However, physicians proposed conditions which may streamline their encounters with hospital clowns such as clear communication prior to hospital clown visits, and the condition that visits do not impede medical interventions.

  4. A Study to Determine if Ethics Committees Should be a Decision-Making and Review Mechanism for Matters Relating to No-Code Orders in the Continental United States Army Medical Department Hospitals with over One Hundred Total Operating Beds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    consultative body agrees that there is no reasonable possibility of Karen’s ever emerging from her present comatose condition to a cognitive, sapient ...possibility that the patient will avoid deoth and return to a normal cognitive and sapient state. 9. Action. Chiefs of directorates are required to...patient will avoid death and return to a normal cognitive and sapient state. 10. Action. Chiefs of directorates are required to ensure that the

  5. Dementia in older people admitted to hospital: a regional multi-hospital observational study of prevalence, associations and case recognition

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Suzanne; Manning, Edmund; Barrett, Aoife; Brady, Noeleen M.; Browne, Vanessa; O’Shea, Emma; Molloy, David William; O'Regan, Niamh A.; Trawley, Steven; Cahill, Suzanne; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; Woods, Noel; Meagher, David; Ni Chorcorain, Aoife M.; Linehan, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: previous studies have indicated a prevalence of dementia in older admissions of ∼42% in a single London teaching hospital, and 21% in four Queensland hospitals. However, there is a lack of published data from any European country on the prevalence of dementia across hospitals and between patient groups. Objective: to determine the prevalence and associations of dementia in older patients admitted to acute hospitals in Ireland. Methods: six hundred and six patients aged ≥70 years were recruited on admission to six hospitals in Cork County. Screening consisted of Standardised Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE); patients with scores <27/30 had further assessment with the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). Final expert diagnosis was based on SMMSE, IQCODE and relevant medical and demographic history. Patients were screened for delirium and depression, and assessed for co-morbidity, functional ability and nutritional status. Results: of 598 older patients admitted to acute hospitals, 25% overall had dementia; with 29% in public hospitals. Prevalence varied between hospitals (P < 0.001); most common in rural hospitals and acute medical admissions. Only 35.6% of patients with dementia had a previous diagnosis. Patients with dementia were older and frailer, with higher co-morbidity, malnutrition and lower functional status (P < 0.001). Delirium was commonly superimposed on dementia (57%) on admission. Conclusion: dementia is common in older people admitted to acute hospitals, particularly in acute medical admissions, and rural hospitals, where services may be less available. Most dementia is not previously diagnosed, emphasising the necessity for cognitive assessment in older people on presentation to hospital. PMID:26420638

  6. Factors associated with lease financing in the hospital industry.

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to capital leases, which are reported on the balance sheet as debt, operating leases are a form of off-balance sheet financing only reported in the notes to the financial statement and have limited disclosure requirements. Following the perpetuity method of corporate finance, this study developed a capitalized operating lease value for hospitals. Evaluating the substitutability between lease and debt financing, the findings show a marginal displacement of debt by lease financing. Assessing the relationship of market, mission, operating, and financial factors on lease financing for all short-term, acute-care hospitals across the United States, the results indicate that investor-owned hospital management companies and hospitals located in CON markets are less likely to lease and that smaller hospitals with fewer unoccupied beds, higher proportion of government payers, low liquidity, and lower capital expenditures are more likely to lease.

  7. Hospitality and Collegial Community: An Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Explains a collegial ethic of hospitality as a cardinal academic virtue and suggests a way of building a "collegium," the covenantal community of academe. Discusses how academicians can develop hospitable teaching, hospitable scholarship, and hospitable service. (Author/SLD)

  8. Radiation decontamination unit for the community hospital.

    PubMed

    Waldron, R L; Danielson, R A; Shultz, H E; Eckert, D E; Hendricks, K O

    1981-05-01

    "Freestanding" radiation decontamination units including surgical capability can be developed and made operational in small/medium sized community hospitals at relatively small cost and with minimal plant reconstruction. Because of the development of nuclear power plants in relatively remote areas and widespread transportation of radioactive materials it is important for hospitals and physicians to be prepared to handle radiation accident victims. The Radiological Assistance Program of the United States Department of Energy and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center Training Site of Oak Ridge Associated Universities are ready to support individual hospitals and physicians in this endeavor. Adequate planning rather than luck, should be used in dealing with potential radiation accident victims. The radiation emergency team is headed by a physician on duty in the hospital. It is important that the team leader be knowledgeable in radiation accident management and have personnel trained in radiation accident management as members of this team. The senior administrative person on duty is responsible for intramural and extramural communications. Rapid mobilization of the radiation decontamination unit is important. Periodic drills are necessary for this mobilization and the smooth operation of the unit.

  9. [What does a hospital building tell?].

    PubMed

    Larsen, O

    2000-12-10

    Hospital architecture may be seen as an artistic expression and interpreted as such. In general, architecture is more dependent than other form of art on external forces: The requested function of the building normally puts important constraints on the implementation of architectural ideas. In addition, buildings are often rebuilt and altered in ways that make a retrospective analysis of the basic ideas behind them difficult. Hospital buildings usually reflect the state of the art of medicine at the time of construction or reconstruction, and their architecture should be interpreted in the light of the medical setting of the time. Other elements and influences, such as general views on health and sickness, religion, economy, style etc. should also be taken into consideration. This article discusses examples that show some of the possible pitfalls when we attempt to give a cultural interpretation of hospital buildings. The conflict between charity and rationality seems to be a basic problem in modern hospitals, an example is given where this conflict is reflected in the architecture.

  10. Hospital Management of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Ashraf S

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of hospitalizations for elderly adults in the United States. One in 5 Americans will be >65 years of age by 2050. Because of the high prevalence of HF in this group, the number of Americans requiring hospitalization for this disorder is expected to rise significantly. We reviewed the most recent and ongoing studies and recommendations for the management of patients hospitalized due to decompensated HF. The Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry, together with the 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association heart failure guidelines, earlier retrospective and prospective studies including the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation (DOSE), the Trial of Intensified vs Standard Medical Therapy in the Elderly Patients With Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF), the Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Failure (OPTIMIZE-HF), the Rapid Emergency Department Heart Failure Outpatient Trial (REDHOT) and the Comparison of Medical, Pacing and Defibrillation Therapies in Heart Failure (COMPANION) trial were reviewed for current practices pertaining to these patients. Gaps in our knowledge of optimal use of patient-specific information (biomarkers and comorbid conditions) still exist.

  11. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    PubMed

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department.

  12. [The motives for hospitalization at Adauto Botelho Hospital (Cariacica, ES) in the second half of the twentieth century].

    PubMed

    Carrion, Carla Torres Pereira; Margotto, Lilian Rose; Aragão, Elizabeth Maria Andrade

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the procedures for referring patients to Adauto Botelho Hospital, in Cariacica, Espírito Santo state, Brazil. The research is based on the medical records since its inauguration in 1954 and statements by people who worked there in the second half of the twentieth century. One hundred and two records were analyzed and four people were interviewed. The records revealed the active involvement of the Chief of Police in hospitalizations. The interviews corroborate this, while also showing the long duration of the hospitalizations. The tone of the paper is set by the life stories of the people hospitalized there. The conclusion is that this hospital served not so much for treatment as for confinement.

  13. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    PubMed Central

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M.; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O.

    2015-01-01

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors. PMID:26729142

  14. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses.

    PubMed

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O

    2015-12-29

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  15. Managing care, incentives, and information: an exploratory look inside the "black box" of hospital efficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, D; Wickizer, T; Maynard, C; Klastorin, T; Lessler, D; Ross, A; Soderstrom, N; Sullivan, S; Alexander, J; Travis, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We sought to estimate the impact of individual dimensions of hospitals' managed care strategies on the cost per hospital discharge. STUDY SETTING/DATA SOURCES. Thirty-seven member hospitals of seven health systems in the Pacific, Rocky Mountain, and Southwest regions of the United States were studied. STUDY DESIGN. Separate cross-sectional regression analyses of 21,135 inpatient discharges were performed in 1991 and 23,262 discharges in 1992. The multivariate model was estimated with hospital cost per discharge as the dependent variable. Model robustness was checked by comparing regression results at the individual discharge level with those at the level of the hospital/clinical condition pair. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Information on hospitals' managed care strategies was provided by mail and phone survey of key informants in 1991 and 1992. Other hospital characteristics were collected from AHA Annual Survey data, and discharge data from hospital abstracting systems. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The pooled discharge analysis indicated three dimensions of hospital managed care strategy that consistently related to lower costs per hospital discharge: the proportion of hospital revenues derived from per case or capitation payment, the hospital's mechanisms for sharing information on resource consumption with clinicians, and the use of formalized, systematic care coordination mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS. Three strategies appear to hold promise for enhancing the efficiency of inpatient resource use: (1) "fixed price" hospital payment incentives, (2) hospital approaches to sharing resource use information with clinicians, and (3) the application of formal care management mechanisms for specific clinical conditions. PMID:8698584

  16. The First Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt International Scientific Conference.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S

    2009-10-01

    A wide gathering of scientists, clinicians, pharmacists and nurses specialized in pediatric oncology practice met to celebrate the second anniversary of Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt (CCHE). The celebration was in the form of high-brow teaching lectures and reports presented by international experts in the fields of pediatric CNS tumors, solid tumors (neuroblastoma, nephroblastoma, soft tissue and bone tumors, lymphoma, leukemia and pediatric oncology nursing. The conference extends its activities to hospital management, clinical pharmacy and telemedicine. Furthermore, CCHE experts presented the efforts performed to establish a state-of-the-art pediatric oncology hospital equipped with all needed facilities to raise the standard of care to the highest levels.

  17. Modeling hospitals' adaptive capacity during a loss of infrastructure services.

    PubMed

    Vugrin, Eric D; Verzi, Stephen J; Finley, Patrick D; Turnquist, Mark A; Griffin, Anne R; Ricci, Karen A; Wyte-Lake, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Resilience in hospitals - their ability to withstand, adapt to, and rapidly recover from disruptive events - is vital to their role as part of national critical infrastructure. This paper presents a model to provide planning guidance to decision makers about how to make hospitals more resilient against possible disruption scenarios. This model represents a hospital's adaptive capacities that are leveraged to care for patients during loss of infrastructure services (power, water, etc.). The model is an optimization that reallocates and substitutes resources to keep patients in a high care state or allocates resources to allow evacuation if necessary. An illustrative example demonstrates how the model might be used in practice.

  18. Epidemiology of Hospitalizations and Deaths from Heat Illness in Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    compared with Caucasians (incidence density ratio, 0.76 [95% confidence interval , 0.71-0.82]; greater rates of hospitalizations and heat strokes among...recruits from northern than southern states (incidence density ratio, 1.69 [95% confidence interval , 1.42-1 .90]; and greater rates of hospitalizations...and heat strokes among women than men (incidence density ratio, 1.18 [95% confidence interval , 1.09-1.27]). Exertional heat illness continues to be a

  19. Pre-Hospital and In-Hospital Thoracostomy: Indications and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Aylwin, Christopher J; Brohi, Karim; Davies, Gareth D; Walsh, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pleural drainage with chest tube insertion for thoracic trauma is a common and often life-saving technique. Although considered a simple procedure, complication rates have been reported to be 2–25%. We conducted a prospective cohort observational study of emergency pleural drainage procedures to validate the indications for pre-hospital thoracostomy and to identify complications from both pre- and in-hospital thoracostomies. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data were collected over a 7-month period on all patients receiving either pre-hospital thoracostomy or emergency department tube thoracostomy. Outcome measures were appropriate indications, errors in tube placement and subsequent complications. RESULTS Ninety-one chest tubes were placed into 52 patients. Sixty-five thoracostomies were performed in the field without chest tube placement. Twenty-six procedures were performed following emergency department identification of thoracic injury. Of the 65 pre-hospital thoracostomies, 40 (61%) were for appropriate indications of suspected tension pneumothorax or a low output state. The overall complication rate was 14% of which 9% were classified as major and three patients required surgical intervention. Twenty-eight (31%) chest tubes were poorly positioned and 15 (17%) of these required repositioning. CONCLUSIONS Pleural drainage techniques may be complicated and have the potential to cause life-threatening injury. Pre-hospital thoracostomies have the same potential risks as in-hospital procedures and attention must be paid to insertion techniques under difficult scene conditions. In-hospital chest tube placement complication rates remain uncomfortably high, and attention must be placed on training and assessment of staff in this basic procedure. PMID:18201502

  20. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations. A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points) at each hospitalization. We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization. Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among cancer

  1. Polish-American Children's Hospital in Krakow, Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Secrest, T.J.; Szydlowski, R.F. ); Wade, D. )

    1993-03-01

    In late 1990 staff from the US Department of Energy's Office of Technical and Financial Assistance identified the Polish-American Children's Hospital as a potential site for application of DOE expertise to reduce the Hospital's energy requirements. Visits to the hospital in the fall and winter of 1991--1992 provided initial scoping of the energy related activities that would be supported by DOE. In addition to reducing energy requirements, the Hospital staff expressed a need for assistance in the areas of power quality and medical waste incineration. Subsequently, a power quality study supported by the Electric Power and Research Institute has been initiated and medical waste incineration will be provided by a Polish organization. The resulting scope of work for this effort is to survey the Hospital's thermal energy supply and demand systems to identify no-cost and low-cost measures that will reduce the Hospital's energy requirements. Applicable measures would then be demonstrated in the Hospital through a partnership with US and Polish organizations and a sister hospital in the United States.

  2. Dynamics of ambulatory surgery centers and hospitals market entry.

    PubMed

    Housman, Michael; Al-Amin, Mona

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we investigate the diversity of healthcare delivery organizations by comparing the market determinants of hospitals entry rates with those of ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). Unlike hospitals, ASCs is one of the growing populations of specialized healthcare delivery organizations. There are reasons to believe that firm entry patterns differ within growing organizational populations since these markets are characterized by different levels of organizational legitimacy, technological uncertainty, and information asymmetry. We compare the entry patterns of firms in a mature population of hospitals to those of firms within a growing population of ASCs. By using patient-level datasets from the state of Florida, we break down our explanatory variables by facility type (ASC vs. hospital) and utilize negative binomial regression models to evaluate the impact of niche density on ASC and hospital entry. Our results indicate that ASCs entry rates is higher in markets with overlapping ASCs while hospitals entry rates are less in markets with overlapping hospitals and ASCs. These results are consistent with the notion that firms in growing populations tend to seek out crowded markets as they compete to occupy the most desirable market segments while firms in mature populations such as general hospitals avoid direct competition.

  3. The evolution of the PSRO hospital review system.

    PubMed

    Goran, M J

    1979-05-01

    Over the past several years, the PSRO hospital review system has evolved to such an extent as to merit re-examination of its objectives, accomplishments and potential, as well as the obstacles to success that still remain. The combination of review experience, political and funding pressures has reshaped the hospital review system. There is still controversy concerning the relative emphasis of the program on quality or costs, but there is no longer any question about the priority goal of the program for the remainder of this decade--to reduce the excessive use of hospital care and services that exists throughout the country. There is widespread and growing evidence of significant variation in hospital practice patterns from region to region and hospital to hospital. Elimination of much of the variation would benefit the quality of patient care and help to contain costs. Improvements in PSRO hospital review, particularly profile analysis and medical care evaluation studies, make possible the exposure of apparent local problems in hospital quality and utilization and the precise definitions of their causes. Many PSROs have made substantial progress in the application and refinement of these techniques. The current state of the art is described in detail. Still to be determined over the next several years is the extent to which PSROs will be able to succeed in correcting these problems and whether the support and cooperation PSROs need form sister agencies and the political process will be adequate.

  4. Payment schemes and cost efficiency: evidence from Swiss public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims at analysing the impact of prospective payment schemes on cost efficiency of acute care hospitals in Switzerland. We study a panel of 121 public hospitals subject to one of four payment schemes. While several hospitals are still reimbursed on a per diem basis for the treatment of patients, most face flat per-case rates-or mixed schemes, which combine both elements of reimbursement. Thus, unlike previous studies, we are able to simultaneously analyse and isolate the cost-efficiency effects of different payment schemes. By means of stochastic frontier analysis, we first estimate a hospital cost frontier. Using the two-stage approach proposed by Battese and Coelli (Empir Econ 20:325-332, 1995), we then analyse the impact of these payment schemes on the cost efficiency of hospitals. Controlling for hospital characteristics, local market conditions in the 26 Swiss states (cantons), and a time trend, we show that, compared to per diem, hospitals which are reimbursed by flat payment schemes perform better in terms of cost efficiency. Our results suggest that mixed schemes create incentives for cost containment as well, although to a lesser extent. In addition, our findings indicate that cost-efficient hospitals are primarily located in cantons with competitive markets, as measured by the Herfindahl-Hirschman index in inpatient care. Furthermore, our econometric model shows that we obtain biased estimates from frontier analysis if we do not account for heteroscedasticity in the inefficiency term.

  5. Hospital marketing orientation and managed care processes: are they coordinated?

    PubMed

    White, K R; Thompson, J M; Patel, U B

    2001-01-01

    The hospital marketing function has been widely adopted as a way to learn about markets, attract sufficient resources, develop appropriate services, and communicate the availability of such goods to those who may be able to purchase such services. The structure, tasks, and effectiveness of the marketing function have been the subject of increased inquiry by researchers and practitioners alike. A specific understanding of hospital marketing in a growing managed care environment and the relationship between marketing and managed care processes in hospitals is a growing concern. Using Kotler and Clarke's framework for assessing marketing orientation, we examined the marketing orientation of hospitals in a single state at two points in time--1993 and 1999. Study findings show that the overall marketing orientation score decreased from 1993 to 1999 for the respondent hospitals. The five elements of the Kotler and Clarke definition of marketing orientation remained relatively stable, with slightly lower scores related to customer philosophy. In addition, we evaluated the degree to which selected managed care activities are carried out as part of its marketing function. A significant (p < .05) decrease in managed care processes coordinated with the formal marketing function was evident from 1993 to 1999. With increasing numbers of managed care plan enrollees, hospitals are likely focusing on organizational buyers as important customers. In order to appeal to organizational buyers, hospital executives may be focusing more on clinical quality and cost efficiency in the production of services, which will improve a hospital's position with organizational buyers.

  6. Financial Analysis of National University Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Munjae

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper provides information for decision making of the managers and the staff of national university hospitals. Methods In order to conduct a financial analysis of national university hospitals, this study uses reports on the final accounts of 10 university hospitals from 2008 to 2011. Results The results of comparing 2008 and 2011 showed that there was a general decrease in total assets, an increase in liabilities, and a decrease in total medical revenues, with a continuous deficit in many hospitals. Moreover, as national university hospitals have low debt dependence, their management conditions generally seem satisfactory. However, some individual hospitals suffer severe financial difficulties and thus depend on short-term debts, which generally aggravate the profit and loss structure. Various indicators show that the financial state and business performance of national university hospitals have been deteriorating. Conclusion These research findings will be used as important basic data for managers who make direct decisions in this uncertain business environment or by researchers who analyze the medical industry to enable informed decision-making and optimized execution. Furthermore, this study is expected to contribute to raising government awareness of the need to foster and support the national university hospital industry. PMID:26730356

  7. Strategies and performance in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Madorrán García, Cristina; de Val Pardo, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Today, more than ever in the past, the variables within the health care environment (demand, costs, system deregulation) are undergoing such rapid change that hospital administrators are finding it necessary to develop and implement competitive strategies in order to survive in the increasingly competitive hospital environment. The primary aim of this paper is to answer the following question: Is it possible to transfer strategic management research from other sectors into the hospital industry? The first objective was to identify strategies in hospital management. A questionnaire was designed and sent to hospital CEOs and the data extracted were used to construct the variables needed to identify strategies and perform the subsequent analyses. The second aim was to try to identify groups of organizations using similar strategies and, finally, analyse the impact of these on hospital performance.

  8. Hospitalizations for Suicide-Related Drug Poisonings and Co-Occurring Alcohol Overdoses in Adolescents (Ages 12-17) and Young Adults (Ages 18-24) in the United States, 1999-2008: Results from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Aaron M.; MacInnes, Erin; Hingson, Ralph W.; Pan, I-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Drug poisoning is the leading method of suicide-related deaths among females and third among males in the United States. Alcohol can increase the severity of drug poisonings, yet the prevalence of alcohol overdoses in suicide-related drug poisonings (SRDP) remains unclear. Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample was examined to determine rates…

  9. Cross hospital bed management system.

    PubMed

    Abedian, S; Kazemi, H; Riazi, H; Bitaraf, E

    2014-01-01

    The lack of adequate numbers of hospital beds to accommodate the injured is a main problem in public hospitals. For control of occupancy of bed, we design a dynamic system that announces status of bed when it change with admission or discharge of a patient. This system provide a wide network in country for bed management, especially for ICU and CCU beds that help us to distribute injured patient in the hospitals.

  10. Controlling hospital library theft.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Theresa M; Marchok, Catherine

    2003-04-01

    At Capital Health System/Fuld Campus (formerly Helene Fuld Medical Center), the Health Sciences Library lost many books and videocassettes. These materials were listed in the catalog but were missing when staff went to the shelves. The hospital had experienced a downsizing of staff, a reorganization, and a merger. When the library staff did an inventory, $10,000 worth of materials were found to be missing. We corrected the situation through a series of steps that we believe will help other libraries control their theft. Through regularly scheduling inventories, monitoring items, advertising, and using specific security measures, we have successfully controlled the library theft. The January 2002 inventory resulted in meeting our goal of zero missing books and videocassettes. We work to maintain that goal.

  11. Controlling hospital library theft

    PubMed Central

    Cuddy, Theresa M.; Marchok, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    At Capital Health System/Fuld Campus (formerly Helene Fuld Medical Center), the Health Sciences Library lost many books and videocassettes. These materials were listed in the catalog but were missing when staff went to the shelves. The hospital had experienced a downsizing of staff, a reorganization, and a merger. When the library staff did an inventory, $10,000 worth of materials were found to be missing. We corrected the situation through a series of steps that we believe will help other libraries control their theft. Through regularly scheduling inventories, monitoring items, advertising, and using specific security measures, we have successfully controlled the library theft. The January 2002 inventory resulted in meeting our goal of zero missing books and videocassettes. We work to maintain that goal. PMID:12883573

  12. Enhancing the therapeutic potential of hospital environments by increasing the personal control and emotional comfort of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anne M; Irurita, Vera F

    2005-02-01

    Previous literature has revealed that patients in various health-care facilities worldwide have experienced dissatisfaction with aspects of the hospital environment. This article focuses on the impact of the hospital environment on patients' perceptions of personal control. The grounded theory method was used, and interviews with 40 patient participants and 75 hours of field observations provided data for this study. Personal control was found to be a central feature of emotional comfort, a therapeutic state that was considered to be an integral part of recovery. This study outlines some new directions for enhancing the therapeutic potential of hospital environments.

  13. Hospital Ethics Committees in Poland.

    PubMed

    Czarkowski, Marek; Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Szymańska, Beata

    2015-12-01

    According to UNESCO guidelines, one of the four forms of bioethics committees in medicine are the Hospital Ethics Committees (HECs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate how the above guidelines are implemented in real practice. There were 111 hospitals selected out of 176 Polish clinical hospitals and hospitals accredited by Center of Monitoring Quality in Health System. The study was conducted by the survey method. There were 56 (50%) hospitals that responded to the survey. The number of HECs members fluctuated between 3 and 16 members, where usually 5 (22% of HECs) members were part of the board committee. The composition of the HECs for professions other than physicians was diverse and non-standardized (nurses-in 86% of HECs, clergy-42%, lawyers-38%, psychologists-28%, hospital management-23%, rehab staff-7 %, patient representatives-3%, ethicists-2%). Only 55% of HECs had a professional set of standards. 98% of HECs had specific tasks. 62% of HECs were asked for their expertise, and 55% prepared <6.88% of the opinions were related to interpersonal relations between hospital personnel, patients and their families with emphasis on the interactions between superiors and their inferiors or hospital staff and patients and their families. Only 12% of the opinions were reported by the respondents as related to ethical dilemmas. In conclusion, few Polish hospitals have HECs, and the structure, services and workload are not always adequate. To ensure a reliable operation of HECs requires the development of relevant legislation, standard operating procedures and well trained members.

  14. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  15. [Hospitals and surgeons: Madrid 1940].

    PubMed

    de Quevedo, Francisco Vázquez

    2007-01-01

    The history of the hospitals and general surgeons that best represent the centres in Madrid are here in reviewed, comprising the period between 1940 and the closure of the Hospital Clinico (1957) as well as the Hospital General (General Hospital) (1967), both in Atocha. Other hospitals which are reviewed and highlighted are: the H. de la Princesa (the Princess Hospital), the H. del Nifio Jesus (Hospital of the Child Jesus), the H. Militar (Military Hospital) and the Cruz Roja (Red Cross). Data is provided on the permanent surgeons in the following centres: H. General: J. Goyanes, J. Die, J. de la Villa, T. Rodriguez, E. Diaz, G. Bueno e H. Huerta; H. Clinico: L. de la Peña, L. Cardenal, L. Olivares, R. Argüelles, J. Estella y M. F. Zumel; H. Militar: M. G. Ulla, M. Bastos, M. G. Durán, J. S. Galindo, y A. G. Durán; Hospital de la Cruz Roja: V. M. Noguera, L. Serrada, F. Luque y L. L. Durán; H. de la Princesa: P. Cifuentes, P. G. Duarte, L. Estella y R. Aiguabella; H. del Niño Jesús: J. Garrido Lestache; H. Clinico, last time, Atocha: F. M. Lagos, R. Vara y A. de la Fuente.

  16. Relationship between Hospital Policies for Labor Induction and Cesarean Delivery and Perinatal Care Quality among Rural U.S. Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Hung, Peiyin; Casey, Michelle M; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Prasad, Shailendra; Moscovice, Ira S

    2016-01-01

    Many hospitals are adopting quality improvement strategies in obstetrics. This study characterized rural U.S. hospitals based on their hospital staffing and clinical management policies for labor induction and cesarean delivery, and assessed the relationship between policies and performance on maternity care quality. We surveyed all 306 rural maternity hospitals in nine states and used data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Statewide Inpatient Database hospital discharge database. We found staffing policies were more prevalent at lower-volume hospitals (92% vs. 86% for cesarean and 82% vs. 79%, both p < .01). Using multivariable logistic regression, we found hospitals with policies for cesarean delivery had up to 24% lower odds of low-risk cesarean (adjusted odds ratio = 0.76; 95% confidence interval=[0.67-0.86]) and non-indicated cesarean (0.78 [0.70-0.88]), with variability across birth volume. Clinical management and staffing policies are common, but not universal, among rural U.S. hospitals providing obstetric services and are generally positively associated with quality.

  17. Closure of a home hospital program: impact on hospitalization rates.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeremy M; Cohen, Aaron; Rozengarten, Ora; Meiller, Ludmila; Azoulay, Daniel; Hammerman-Rozenberg, Robert; Stessman, Jochanan

    2007-01-01

    Home hospitalization (HH), as a substitute to in-patient care, is an area of growing interest, particularly amongst the elderly. Debate nonetheless exists concerning its economic justification. This study describes a natural experiment that arose following spending cuts and closure of the 400 patient Jerusalem HH program. It examines the hypothesis that HH closure would cause increasing geriatric and general medical hospital utilization amongst the 45,000 beneficiaries of the Jerusalem Clalit Health Fund (HMO) aged 65 years and over. Hospitalization rates were measured prior to and following HH closure, and analysis of variance confirmed the significance of the differences in both geriatric (p<0.0001) and general medical hospitalization rates (p=0.02) over the study period. Linear regression analyses of the hospitalization rates prior to HH closure were performed to determine the expected trajectory of hospitalization rates following HH closure. The observed hospital utilization in the year following HH closure cost 6.2 million US dollars in excess of predicted expenditure; closure of the HH resulted in the saving of 1.3 million USdollars. The ratio of direct increased costs to savings was 5:1 thus confirming the hypothesis that HH closure would result in increased hospital utilization rates among the local elderly population.

  18. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care.

  19. 10 CFR 455.131 - State ranking of grant applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....131 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND... least 30 percent of the total funds allocated for schools and hospitals to the State in any grant... hospitals to the State in any grant program cycle. (g) If there are insufficient applications from...

  20. Taking the next step to privacy compliance for hospitals: implementing the OHA guidelines.

    PubMed

    Beardwood, John

    2003-01-01

    The recently released "Guidelines for Managing Privacy, Data Protection and Security for Ontario Hospitals," prepared by the Ontario Hospital eHealth Council Privacy and Security Working Group (the "Guidelines") are useful in that they provide a comprehensive overview of the types of issues raised for hospitals by existing and pending privacy legislation, and a very high-level framework for addressing same. However, the Guidelines are, as stated high-level guidelines only,--leaving hospital management to grapple with the next big step towards privacy compliance: how to operationalize the Guidelines within their particular hospital.

  1. Regional Differences in Hospitalizations and Cholecystectomies for Biliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Published studies suggest that socioeconomic factors contribute to increasing cholecystectomy rates for biliary dyskinesia (BD). The aim of this study was to identify factors driving admissions and operations for BD by examining regional variability in hospitalizations and cholecystectomies for this disorder. Methods Annual hospitalizations and cholecystectomy rates for biliary diseases were assessed using the State Inpatient Databases of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality based on diagnosis codes for biliary dyskinesia, cholecystolithiasis and cholecystitis. Results Annual admissions for BD varied nearly sevenfold among different states within the United States. Hospitalizations for gallstone disease and its complication showed less variability, differing 2-fold between states. Nearly 70% of admissions for BD and about 85% of admissions for gallstone disease resulted in cholecystectomies. Higher admission rates for BD were best predicted by high overall hospitalization rates, admission rate for gallstone disease and the physician workforce within a state. Cholecystectomy rates for BD were higher in states with low population density and high rates of cholecystectomy for gallstone disease. Conclusions These data suggest that established medical practice patterns significantly contribute to the variability in admissions and operations for biliary dyskinesia. The findings also indicate that lower thresholds for operative interventions are an important determinant in the approach to this disorder. Considering the benign course of functional illnesses, the bar for surgical interventions should be raised rather than lowered; in addition active conservative treatment options should be developed for these patients. PMID:23875106

  2. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  3. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

  4. Management of the Hospital Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Alvis G.

    1976-01-01

    Hospital studies indicate the need for an environmental/sanitarian specialist for control of nosocomial infection and maintenance of a quality environment. The author recommends these requirements for certification as a hospital environmentalist: academic studies including toxicology, epidemiology, hygiene, management, and an internship in…

  5. Segmentation in local hospital markets.

    PubMed

    Dranove, D; White, W D; Wu, L

    1993-01-01

    This study examines evidence of market segmentation on the basis of patients' insurance status, demographic characteristics, and medical condition in selected local markets in California in the years 1983 and 1989. Substantial differences exist in the probability patients may be admitted to particular hospitals based on insurance coverage, particularly Medicaid, and race. Segmentation based on insurance and race is related to hospital characteristics, but not the characteristics of the hospital's community. Medicaid patients are more likely to go to hospitals with lower costs and fewer service offerings. Privately insured patients go to hospitals offering more services, although cost concerns are increasing. Hispanic patients also go to low-cost hospitals, ceteris paribus. Results indicate little evidence of segmentation based on medical condition in either 1983 or 1989, suggesting that "centers of excellence" have yet to play an important role in patient choice of hospital. The authors found that distance matters, and that patients prefer nearby hospitals, moreso for some medical conditions than others, in ways consistent with economic theories of consumer choice.

  6. Occupational hazards to hospital personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, W.B.; Craven, D.E.; Schwartz, D.A.; Nardell, E.A.; Kasmer, J.; Noble, J.

    1985-05-01

    Hospital personnel are subject to various occupational hazards. Awareness of these risks, compliance with basic preventive measures, and adequate resources for interventions are essential components of an occupational health program. Physical, chemical, and radiation hazards; important infectious risks; and psychosocial problems prevalent in hospital workers are reviewed. A rational approach to managing and preventing these problems is offered. 370 references.

  7. [Obstetric analgesia in Norwegian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dahl, V; Hagen, I E; Raeder, J C

    1998-04-30

    We report the results of a questionnaire sent to anaesthetists and midwives on the use of obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in Norwegian hospitals in 1996. 95% of the 49 hospitals involved responded to the questionnaire, representing a total of 56,884 births. The use of epidural analgesia in labour varied from 0 to 25% in the different hospitals with a mean value of 15%. Epidural analgesia was much more widely used in university and regional hospitals than in local hospitals (p < 0.001). Five of the local hospitals did not offer epidural analgesia during labour at all. The combination of low-dose local anaesthetic and an opioid (either sufentanil or fentanyl) had not been introduced in nine of the hospitals (20%). The optimal use of epidural analgesia to relieve labour pain was judged to be more frequent by the anaesthetists than by the midwives (19% versus 11%, p < 0.01). In response to what factors limited the frequency of epidural analgesia, the anaesthetists specified factors related to the attitude of the midwife, and the midwives specified factors related to the anaesthetist. Only five of the hospitals provided written information on the various analgesic methods that could be employed during labour. The majority of midwives considered the analgesic methods employed on their maternity ward to be good or excellent. The frequency of Caesarean section was 12%; spinal anaesthesia was used in 55%, epidural anaesthesia in 17%, and general anaesthesia in 28% of the cases.

  8. Comparing Candidate Hospital Report Cards

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.L.; Rivenburgh, R.D.; Scovel, J.C.; White, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    We present graphical and analytical methods that focus on multivariate outlier detection applied to the hospital report cards data. No two methods agree which hospitals are unusually good or bad, so we also present ways to compare the agreement between two methods. We identify factors that have a significant impact on the scoring.

  9. Practicing Hospitality in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burwell, Rebecca; Huyser, Mackenzi

    2013-01-01

    This article explores pedagogical approaches to teaching students how to practice hospitality toward the other. Using case examples from the college classroom, the authors discuss the roots of Christian hospitality and educational theory on transformative learning to explore how students experience engaging with others after they have…

  10. [Hospitals as vital links].

    PubMed

    Klink, A

    2013-01-01

    The reform of the system in 2006 aimed at reducing waiting lists in an efficient manner. Performance-linked funding and regulated competition did indeed lead to improved efficiency. The other side of the coin is overtreatment, and expensive and not infrequently damaging growth in volume. In order to control costs, three strategies have been determined: agreements with an annual cap on volume; (b) collaboration of regional health-care providers with the mission of improving results in health care (with profit-sharing if costs fall); and (c) fusions reducing the number of hospitals which reduces the burden of injuries (supply no longer creates its own demand). This article comments on these strategies. The author argues for a fourth approach: if the quality of health care improves, the number of complications will fall, overtreatment will decline and the outcome will be a decrease in burden of injuries. This requires the health care insurers to modify the way they manage their contracts and methods of payment, and stimulates competition based on quality.

  11. The single-hospital county: is its hospital at risk?

    PubMed

    Chang, C F; Tuckman, H P

    1991-06-01

    This article focuses on a hospital group that has not received adequate attention in the literature: the sole provider of short-term, acute hospital care located in a county. In Tennessee, SPHs (single provider hospitals) are fewer in number but are present in more counties than multiprovider hospitals (MPHs). They are smaller in size, less labor and capital intensive, more likely to be a government hospital, and more likely to be in a rural area with low income and limited health care resources. SPHs operate with lower costs, charge patients less, and have lower revenue write-offs than MPHs. As a result, their cash flow is sufficient to fund their depreciation and they consistently earn modest returns. Between 1982 and 1988, a total of 16 hospitals failed in Tennessee but only 3 were SPHs. While SPHs have not been profitable enough to make them ideal candidates for takeover by major hospital systems, they are not a population that is unduly at risk.

  12. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  13. Hospitals: Soft Target for Terrorism?

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, Harald; Somville, Francis; Sabbe, Marc; Mortelmans, Luc J

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the world has been rocked repeatedly by terrorist attacks. Arguably, the most remarkable were: the series of four coordinated suicide plane attacks on September 11, 2001 on buildings in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, USA; and the recent series of two coordinated attacks in Brussels (Belgium), on March 22, 2016, involving two bombings at the departure hall of Brussels International Airport and a bombing at Maalbeek Metro Station located near the European Commission headquarters in the center of Brussels. This statement paper deals with different aspects of hospital policy and disaster response planning that interface with terrorism. Research shows that the availability of necessary equipment and facilities (eg, personal protective clothing, decontamination rooms, antidotes, and anti-viral drugs) in hospitals clearly is insufficient. Emergency teams are insufficiently prepared: adequate and repetitive training remain necessary. Unfortunately, there are many examples of health care workers and physicians or hospitals being targeted in both political or religious conflicts and wars. Many health workers were kidnapped and/or killed by insurgents of various ideology. Attacks on hospitals also could cause long-term effects: hospital units could be unavailable for a long time and replacing staff could take several months, further compounding hospital operations. Both physical and psychological (eg, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) after-effects of a terrorist attack can be detrimental to health care services. On the other hand, physicians and other hospital employees have shown to be involved in terrorism. As data show that some offenders had a previous history with the location of the terror incident, the possibility of hospitals or other health care services being targeted by insiders is discussed. The purpose of this report was to consider how past terrorist incidents can inform current hospital preparedness and disaster response planning

  14. Hospital-affiliated and hospital-owned retail clinics: strategic opportunities and operational challenges.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer

    2010-01-01

    Retail clinics have experienced an exponential growth in the last few years. While the majority of retail clinics are freestanding, venture-backed companies affiliated with retail hosts, an increasing number of hospital systems have decided to develop their own retail clinics or partner with existing national companies. Using a stakeholder approach, the purpose of this article is to assess the strategic considerations behind these decisions and the operational challenges associated with them and to use the results to develop a questionnaire that can be applied in future research in a national sample of healthcare executives. We conducted eight in-depth interviews with administrative and clinical leaders in seven hospital systems across the United States that have or had a relationship with retail clinics in the last three years. Our findings show that the hospital systems' association with retail clinics involves two main models: an affiliation with retail chains that operate the clinics and ownership of the clinics with an arms-length relationship with the retail chain. Hospital systems are engaging in these relationships for several strategic reasons: to increase market share through enhanced referrals to physician offices and hospitals, to become closer to consumers, and to experiment with nontraditional ways of delivering health care. Operational challenges included physician resistance and skepticism, poor financial performance, people's perception of retail clinics, staffing issues, and the newness of the business model. Six out of eight respondents thought that hospital affiliation with/ownership of retail clinics is a trend that is here to stay, although many provided caveats and stipulations. Further research is needed to provide more evidence about this emerging way of healthcare delivery.

  15. Measuring Returns to Hospital Care: Evidence from Ambulance Referral Patterns.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Joseph; Graves, John; Gruber, Jonathan; Kleiner, Samuel

    2015-02-01

    Medicare spending exceeds 4% of GDP in the US each year, and there are concerns that moral hazard problems have led to overspending. This paper considers whether hospitals that treat patients more aggressively and receive higher payments from Medicare improve health outcomes for their patients. An innovation is a new lens to compare hospital performance for emergency patients: plausibly exogenous variation in ambulance-company assignment among patients who live near one another. Using Medicare data from 2002-2010, we show that ambulance company assignment importantly affects hospital choice for patients in the same ZIP code. Using data for New York State from 2000-2006 that matches exact patient addresses to hospital discharge records, we show that patients who live very near each other but on either side of ambulance service area boundaries go to different types of hospitals. Both identification strategies show that higher-cost hospitals achieve better patient outcomes for a variety of emergency conditions. Using our Medicare sample, the estimates imply that a one standard deviation increase in Medicare reimbursement leads to a 4 percentage point reduction in mortality (10% compared to the mean). Taking into account one-year spending after the health shock, the implied cost per at least one year of life saved is approximately $80,000. These results are found across different types of hospitals and patients, as well across both identification strategies.

  16. Human milk use in Australian hospitals, 1949-1985.

    PubMed

    Thorley, Virginia

    2012-07-01

    This paper will draw mainly on the experiences of fourteen women to explore the use of expressed human milk by hospitals in Australia from the postwar period through to 1985. The purpose is to provide a snapshot of common practices before the decline of human milk banking and other uses of expressed breastmilk in Australian hospitals, thus providing a source for future comparison against the more rigorous, uniform practices being instituted in the new milk banks of the early-21st century. The ten mothers included were a convenience sample drawn from the author's networks, with recruitment continuing till a range of hospital types and a majority of states were included. Three of the mothers also had experience as trainee midwives and midwives, and four midwives contributed their experiences as staff members, only. The hospitals ranged from large teaching hospitals to small private hospitals and were in metropolitan, regional and country locations. The practices included routine expression and expression for specific purposes, whether for the mother's own baby or to donate. Some hospitals pooled the donor milk for premature or sick babies.

  17. What do we know about noise in hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, James E.; Busch-Vishniac, Ilene

    2005-09-01

    Little is known about noise levels inside hospitals and its effect on healing, safety, staff, and doctors. Many independent studies of noise levels in a wide range of hospital venues in many countries have been reported in the literature authored mainly by physicians and nurses. The World Health Organization (WHO) has set guidelines for noise levels in hospitals, but none of the reported studies meet WHO guidelines. In most cases noise levels are more then 15 dB A-weighted higher then those specified by WHO guidelines. Since 1960 the average noise levels in hospitals has increased an average of 0.38 dB per year during daytime hours and 0.42 dB during the night. This talk reviews the state of the art on interior hospital noise control and the remaining challenging issues. Equivalent sound pressure levels as a function of location, frequency and time of day were measured in five different venues at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore Maryland. Results of our measurements, which confirm the trends seen in prior studies, will be used to describe patterns of hospital interior noise and avenues ripe for further investigation.

  18. Hospital loses battle to strike suit over HIV disclosure.

    PubMed

    1996-05-31

    Superior Court Judge Richard J. Tobin refused to dismiss four counts of a seven-count lawsuit filed by [name removed] against Stamford Hospital. Tobin charged the hospital with breaching her HIV-antibody testing confidentiality following a needlestick accident that occurred at the hospital. [Name removed] said she pricked herself with a needle she found on the floor of the hospital. When she returned to the hospital to be tested for HIV antibodies, a hospital employee stated, in a loud voice that was within earshot of bystanders, that the patient was here for an HIV-antibody test. Balzac then asked the employee to explain that she was there because of the needlestick injury. The employee refused. The focal point of the lawsuit was the alleged establishment of willful misconduct. The court relied on a 1995 ruling defining the term as conduct that displays a reckless disregard for the safety and rights of others and the consequences of one's actions. The hospital succeeded in striking down one of the contested counts involving invasion of privacy.

  19. Benchmarking for hospital evacuation: a critical data collection tool.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Auf der Heide, Erik; Olson, Robert

    2005-01-01

    In events such as earthquakes or terrorist attacks, hospitals may be victims of disasters. They may need to transfer patients to outside facilities rather than continue to provide on-site care. Following the Northridge earthquake, eight hospitals in the damaged area were the foci of a United States National Science Foundation study that examined the status of the hospitals' pre-event planning, post-event evacuation decision-making, and internal and external evacuation processes. Building on this experience, this paper offers a standardized data collection tool, which will enable researchers to record hospital evacuation information in a systematic manner so that comparable data can be accumulated, evacuation research methods can be improved, and consensus on methods can be reached. The study's principal subjects include: (1) hospital demographics; (2) description of existing disaster response plans; (3) an event's impacts on hospital operations; (4) decision-making and incident command; (5) movement of patients within the facility; (6) movement of patients to off-site institutions; and (7) hospital recovery.

  20. The HOSPITAL score and LACE index as predictors of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university-affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hudali, Tamer

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hospital readmissions are common, expensive, and a key target of the Medicare Value Based Purchasing (VBP) program. Validated risk assessment tools such as the HOSPITAL score and LACE index have been developed to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission so they can be targeted for interventions aimed at reducing the rate of readmission. This study aims to evaluate the utility of HOSPITAL score and LACE index for predicting hospital readmission within 30 days in a moderate-sized university affiliated hospital in the midwestern United States. Materials and Methods All adult medical patients who underwent one or more ICD-10 defined procedures discharged from the SIU-SOM Hospitalist service from Memorial Medical Center (MMC) from October 15, 2015 to March 16, 2016, were studied retrospectively to determine if the HOSPITAL score and LACE index were a significant predictors of hospital readmission within 30 days. Results During the study period, 463 discharges were recorded for the hospitalist service. The analysis includes data for the 432 discharges. Patients who died during the hospital stay, were transferred to another hospital, or left against medical advice were excluded. Of these patients, 35 (8%) were readmitted to the same hospital within 30 days. A receiver operating characteristic evaluation of the HOSPITAL score for this patient population shows a C statistic of 0.75 (95% CI [0.67–0.83]), indicating good discrimination for hospital readmission. The Brier score for the HOSPITAL score in this setting was 0.069, indicating good overall performance. The Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness of fit test shows a χ2 value of 3.71 with a p value of 0.59. A receiver operating characteristic evaluation of the LACE index for this patient population shows a C statistic of 0.58 (95% CI [0.48–0.68]), indicating poor discrimination for hospital readmission. The Brier score for the LACE index in this setting was 0.082, indicating good overall performance