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Sample records for agnw-rgo hybrid transparent

  1. 2D Hybrid Nanostructured Dirac Materials for Broadband Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunfan; Lin, Li; Zhao, Shuli; Deng, Bing; Chen, Hongliang; Ma, Bangjun; Wu, Jinxiong; Yin, Jianbo; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2015-08-05

    Broadband transparent electrodes based on 2D hybrid nanostructured Dirac materials between Bi2 Se3 and graphene are synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Bi2 Se3 nanoplates are preferentially grown along graphene grain boundaries as "smart" conductive patches to bridge the graphene boundary. These hybrid films increase by one- to threefold in conductivity while remaining highly transparent over broadband wavelength. They also display outstanding chemical stability and mechanical flexibility.

  2. Hybrid Laser Processing of Transparent Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki

    The following chapter is an overview of processing fused silica and other transparent materials by pulsed-laser irradiation: (1) Direct excitation of materials with multi-wavelength excitation processes, and (2) Media-assisted process with a conventional pulsed laser. A method to etch transparent materials by using laserinduced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA), or laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE), has been described in detail.

  3. Graphene-based transparent electrodes for hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengfei; Chen, Caiyun; Zhang, Jie; Li, Shaojuan; Sun, Baoquan; Bao, Qiaoliang

    2014-11-01

    The graphene-based transparent and conductive films were demonstrated to be cost-effective electrodes working in organic-inorganic hybrid Schottky solar cells. Large area graphene films were produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper foils and transferred onto glass as transparent electrodes. The hybrid solar cell devices consist of solution processed poly (3, 4-ethlenedioxythiophene): poly (styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT: PSS) which is sandwiched between silicon wafer and graphene electrode. The solar cells based on graphene electrodes, especially those doped with HNO3, has comparable performance to the reference devices using commercial indium tin oxide (ITO). Our work suggests that graphene-based transparent electrode is a promising candidate to replace ITO.

  4. Optomechanically induced transparency and absorption in hybridized optomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, B. P.; Wei, L. F.; Wang, S. J.

    2015-09-01

    We present the normal-mode splitting and optomechanically induced transparency or absorption phenomena in the strongly tunnel-coupled optomechanical cavities. In the probe output spectrum, there appear central transparency windows or absorption peaks around which two broad sidebands are symmetrically located. It has been confirmed by the quantitative findings that two broad sidebands, which include the distorted absorption peaks, indicate the normal-mode splitting of the two hybridized cavities, and central transparency windows or absorption peaks character the interference induced by the optomechanical interactions. Additionally, the switching from absorption to amplification can be realized by only adjusting the tunnel interaction. These spectrum properties can be used for the coherent control of light pulses via microfabricated optomechanical arrays.

  5. Highly Stretchable and Flexible Graphene/ITO Hybrid Transparent Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juhua; Yi, Yaohua; Zhou, Yihua; Cai, Huafei

    2016-02-01

    The flexible hybrid transparent electrode was prepared by a two-step process: graphene film was firstly grown on Cu foil by modified thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and then transferred onto indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode on the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The quality of the graphene is characterized by various analytic techniques, including the AFM, SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The gradient flux was found to be beneficial to decrease defect. The thickness, morphology, light transmittance, and electromechanical properties of three conductive electrodes were investigated and compared. The outcomes show that the hybrid electrode could resist mechanical force and the results are better than original ITO electrode. It may be a potential trend to apply the graphene to other conducts in the flexible transparent conductive field.

  6. Graphene-ferroelectric hybrid structure for flexible transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guang-Xin; Zheng, Yi; Bae, Sukang; Tan, Chin Yaw; Kahya, Orhan; Wu, Jing; Hong, Byung Hee; Yao, Kui; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2012-05-22

    Graphene has exceptional optical, mechanical, and electrical properties, making it an emerging material for novel optoelectronics, photonics, and flexible transparent electrode applications. However, the relatively high sheet resistance of graphene is a major constraint for many of these applications. Here we propose a new approach to achieve low sheet resistance in large-scale CVD monolayer graphene using nonvolatile ferroelectric polymer gating. In this hybrid structure, large-scale graphene is heavily doped up to 3 × 10(13) cm(-2) by nonvolatile ferroelectric dipoles, yielding a low sheet resistance of 120 Ω/□ at ambient conditions. The graphene-ferroelectric transparent conductors (GFeTCs) exhibit more than 95% transmittance from the visible to the near-infrared range owing to the highly transparent nature of the ferroelectric polymer. Together with its excellent mechanical flexibility, chemical inertness, and the simple fabrication process of ferroelectric polymers, the proposed GFeTCs represent a new route toward large-scale graphene-based transparent electrodes and optoelectronics.

  7. Polymer-metal hybrid transparent electrodes for flexible electronics

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hongkyu; Jung, Suhyun; Jeong, Soyeong; Kim, Geunjin; Lee, Kwanghee

    2015-01-01

    Despite nearly two decades of research, the absence of ideal flexible and transparent electrodes has been the largest obstacle in realizing flexible and printable electronics for future technologies. Here we report the fabrication of ‘polymer-metal hybrid electrodes’ with high-performance properties, including a bending radius <1 mm, a visible-range transmittance>95% and a sheet resistance <10 Ω sq−1. These features arise from a surface modification of the plastic substrates using an amine-containing nonconjugated polyelectrolyte, which provides ideal metal-nucleation sites with a surface-density on the atomic scale, in combination with the successive deposition of a facile anti-reflective coating using a conducting polymer. The hybrid electrodes are fully functional as universal electrodes for high-end flexible electronic applications, such as polymer solar cells that exhibit a high power conversion efficiency of 10% and polymer light-emitting diodes that can outperform those based on transparent conducting oxides. PMID:25790133

  8. Hybrid transparent electrodes of silver nanowires and carbon nanotubes: a low-temperature solution process.

    PubMed

    Tokuno, Takehiro; Nogi, Masaya; Jiu, Jinting; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2012-05-31

    Hybrid transparent electrodes with silver nanowires (AgNWs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were fabricated on plastic films by a low-temperature solution process. The hybrid transparent electrodes exhibited a sheet resistance of 29.2 Ω/sq with a transparency of 80% when 6 wt.% of SWCNTs was mixed with AgNWs. This sheet resistance was less than one-fourth that of the AgNW transparent electrodes that were prepared using the same method. This reduction in sheet resistance is because the SWCNTs formed bridges between the AgNWs, thus, resulting in high conductivity of the hybrid transparent electrodes. The hybrid electrodes formed on plastic films exhibited high conductivity as well as excellent stability in sheet resistance when tested using a repeated bending test.PACS: 62.23.Hj; 61.48.De; 81.15.-z.

  9. Metal{Polymer Hybrid Materials For Flexible Transparent Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Sudarshan

    The field of organic electronics, till recently a mere research topic, is currently making rapid strides and tremendous progress into entering the mainstream electronics industry with several applications and products such as OLED televisions, curved displays, wearable devices, flexible solar cells, etc. already having been commercialized. A major component in these devices, especially for photovoltaic applications, is a transparent conductor used as one of the electrodes, which in most commercial applications are highly doped wide bandgap semiconducting oxides also called Transparent Conducting Oxides (TCOs). However, TCOs exhibit inherent disadvantages such as limited supply, brittle mechanical properties, expensive processing that present major barriers for the more widespread economic use in applications such as exible transparent conductors, owing to which suitable alternative materials are being sought. In this context we present two approaches in realizing alternative TCs using metal-polymer hybrid materials, with high figures of merit that are easily processable, reasonably inexpensive and mechanically robust as well. In this context, our first approach employs laminated metal-polymer photonic bandgap structures to effectively tune optical and electrical properties by an appropriate design of the material stack, factoring in the effect of the materials involved, the number of layers and layer properties. We have found that in the case of a four-bilayer Au/polystyrene (AujPS) laminate structure, an enhancement in optical transmittance of ˜ 500% in comparison to a monolithic A film of equivalent thickness, can be achieved. The high conductivity (˜ 106 O--1cm--1) of the metallic component, Au in this case, also ensures planar conductivity; metallic inclusions in the dielectric polymer layer can in principle give rise to out-of-plane conductivity as well enabling a fully functional TC. Such materials also have immense potential for several other applications

  10. Multimode acoustic transparency and slow sound effects in hybrid subwavelength resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yu-Qiang; Qi, Dong-Xiang; Tuo, Ming-Jun; Liu, Lian-Zi; Zhang, Rui-Li; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a series of hybrid Helmholtz resonators, which introduce “acoustic transparent atoms”, “acoustic nontransparent atoms”, and “acoustic quasitransparent atoms” simultaneously, can generate multimode acoustic transparency and the slow sound effect. Dual-mode acoustic transparency can be achieved by employing a waveguide incorporating three different Helmholtz resonators. Additional modes are introduced by adding further acoustic quasitransparent atoms. This can be explained by the destructive interference among different resonators. Furthermore, slow sound propagation is demonstrated in our multimode acoustic transparency systems by employing time-domain simulations. Our results may have potential applications for sound control in one-dimensional waveguides.

  11. Highly transparent and stretchable field-effect transistor sensors using graphene-nanowire hybrid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joohee; Lee, Mi-Sun; Jeon, Sangbin; Kim, Minji; Kim, Sungwon; Kim, Kukjoo; Bien, Franklin; Hong, Sung You; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-06-03

    Transparent and stretchable electronics with remarkable bendability, conformability, and lightness are the key attributes for sensing or wearable devices. Transparent and stretchable field-effect transistor sensors using graphene-metal nanowire hybrid nanostructures have high mobility (≈3000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ) with low contact resistance, and they are transferrable onto a variety of substrates. The integration of these sensors for RLC circuits enables wireless monitoring.

  12. Preparation of superhydrophobic and transparent micro-nano hybrid coatings from polymethylhydroxysiloxane and silica ormosil aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagappan, Saravanan; Park, Jin Joo; Park, Sung Soo; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2014-12-01

    Superhydrophobic and transparent polymethylhydroxysiloxane (PMHOS)/silica ormosil aerogel hybrids were prepared successfully by mixing of PMHOS with various weight percentages of silica ormosil aerogels (as synthesized from methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) precursors) in separate seal perfume glass vials. The hybrids were spin coated on glass substrate at 1000 rpm for 60 seconds and used for further analysis. The surface morphology and chemical compositions of the hybrids were analyzed by high resolution scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force spectroscopy, adsorption and desorption isotherm, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The transparency, thermal decomposition and static contact angle (SCA) of each sample were measured by UV-Visible spectrophotometer, TGA and drop shape analysis system, respectively. The spin coated substrates showed good superhydrophobic properties, thermal stability as well as transparency on the glass substrates.

  13. Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Citizens now expect access to information, particularly from public institutions like local school districts. They demand input and accountability. Cultural and technological changes, such as the Internet, make it possible for districts to comply. Yet transparency--the easily seen and understood actions of a school district and the thinking behind…

  14. Highly stable and flexible silver nanowire-graphene hybrid transparent conducting electrodes for emerging optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghwa; Lee, Hyungjin; Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Youngu

    2013-09-07

    A new AgNW-graphene hybrid transparent conducting electrode (TCE) was prepared by dry-transferring a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown monolayer graphene onto a pristine AgNW TCE. The AgNW-graphene hybrid TCE exhibited excellent optical and electrical properties as well as mechanical flexibility. The AgNW-graphene hybrid TCE showed highly enhanced thermal oxidation and chemical stabilities because of the superior gas-barrier property of the graphene protection layer. Furthermore, the organic solar cells with the AgNW-graphene hybrid TCE showed excellent photovoltaic performance as well as superior long-term stability under ambient conditions.

  15. A transparent hybrid of nanocrystalline cellulose and amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, Denis; Oliynyk, Vitaliy; Salajkova, Michaela; Sort, Jordi; Zhou, Qi; Bergström, Lennart; Salazar-Alvarez, German

    2011-09-01

    Nanocellulose hybrids are promising candidates for biodegradable multifunctional materials. Hybrids of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles were obtained through a facile chemical approach over a wide range of compositions. Controlling the interactions between NCC and ACC results in hard, transparent structures with tunable composition, homogeneity and anisotropy.Nanocellulose hybrids are promising candidates for biodegradable multifunctional materials. Hybrids of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles were obtained through a facile chemical approach over a wide range of compositions. Controlling the interactions between NCC and ACC results in hard, transparent structures with tunable composition, homogeneity and anisotropy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental procedures and results. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10681c

  16. Graphene Oxide Transparent Hybrid Film and Its Ultraviolet Shielding Property.

    PubMed

    Xie, Siyuan; Zhao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Bowu; Wang, Ziqiang; Ma, Hongjuan; Yu, Chuhong; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2015-08-19

    Herein, we first reported a facile strategy to prepare functional Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hybrid film with well ultraviolet (UV) shielding property and visible light transmittance using graphene oxide nanosheets as UV-absorber. The absorbance of ultraviolet light at 300 nm can be up to 97.5%, while the transmittance of visible light at 500 nm keeps 40% plus. This hybrid film can protect protein from UVA light induced photosensitive damage, remarkably.

  17. Reduced graphene oxide/copper nanowire hybrid films as high-performance transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kholmanov, Iskandar N; Domingues, Sergio H; Chou, Harry; Wang, Xiaohan; Tan, Cheng; Kim, Jin-Young; Li, Huifeng; Piner, Richard; Zarbin, Aldo J G; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2013-02-26

    Hybrid films composed of reduced graphene oxide (RG-O) and Cu nanowires (NWs) were prepared. Compared to Cu NW films, the RG-O/Cu NW hybrid films have improved electrical conductivity, oxidation resistance, substrate adhesion, and stability in harsh environments. The RG-O/Cu NW films were used as transparent electrodes in Prussian blue (PB)-based electrochromic devices where they performed significantly better than pure Cu NW films.

  18. Plasmon-induced multilevel-transparency in two-dimensional hybrid coplanar waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiong-Jun; Wang, Ling-Ling; Zhai, Xiang; Yue, Jing; Luo, Xin; Duan, Hui-Gao

    2016-09-01

    The optical transmission property of a hybrid coplanar waveguide consisting of three quarters of a nanoring (TQNR) and a slot cavity resonator is numerically investigated and theoretically analyzed. In this paper, the apparent multilevel plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) effect can be obtained due to the interaction between the resonance modes of the two elements. Combining the calculated magnetic field distribution with the theoretically fitted parameters, the transparency windows of all resonance modes can be clearly investigated. The results show that the second-order transparency window originates from the destructive interference between the bright and dark mode of the hybrid system, while the first- and third-order transparency windows originate from the suppression effect of the dark mode. As the assessment standard for application, the maximal values of \\text{FO}{{\\text{M}}\\ast} appear at the transmission dips and their highest reaches to near 18. While the \\text{FOM} reaches to an impressive value 270 at the third-order transparent window, and the sensitivity is as high as 2650 nm RIU-1 at the first-order transparent window. This research provides a guide to the practical applications in the visible and near-infrared light region.

  19. An Ag-grid/graphene hybrid structure for large-scale, transparent, flexible heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junmo; Jang, Yonghee; Kim, Youngsoo; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Suhr, Jonghwan; Hong, Byung Hee; Choi, Jae-Boong; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-04-01

    Recently, carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for fabricating transparent conducting materials. However, obtaining low sheet resistance and high transmittance of these carbon materials has been challenging due to the intrinsic properties of the materials. In this paper, we introduce highly transparent and flexible conductive films based on a hybrid structure of graphene and an Ag-grid. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing was used to produce a micro-scale grid consisting of Ag lines less than 10 μm wide. We were able to directly write the Ag-grid on a large-area graphene/flexible substrate due to the high conductivity of graphene. The hybrid electrode could be fabricated using hot pressing transfer and EHD jet printing in a non-vacuum, maskless, and low-temperature environment. The hybrid electrode offers an effective and simple route for achieving a sheet resistance as low as ~4 Ω per square with ~78% optical transmittance. Finally, we demonstrate that transparent flexible heaters based on the hybrid conductive films could be used in a vehicle or a smart window system.Recently, carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for fabricating transparent conducting materials. However, obtaining low sheet resistance and high transmittance of these carbon materials has been challenging due to the intrinsic properties of the materials. In this paper, we introduce highly transparent and flexible conductive films based on a hybrid structure of graphene and an Ag-grid. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing was used to produce a micro-scale grid consisting of Ag lines less than 10 μm wide. We were able to directly write the Ag-grid on a large-area graphene/flexible substrate due to the high conductivity of graphene. The hybrid electrode could be fabricated using hot pressing transfer and EHD jet printing in a non

  20. Highly flexible, hybrid-structured indium tin oxides for transparent electrodes on polymer substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Triambulo, Ross E.; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jin-Woo; Na, Min-Young; Chang, Hye-Jung

    2013-06-17

    We developed highly flexible, hybrid-structured crystalline indium tin oxide (ITO) for use as transparent electrodes on polymer substrates by embedding Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) into the substrate. The hybrid ITO consists of domains in one orientation grown on the AgNPs and a matrix of the other orientation. The domains are stronger than the matrix and function as barriers to crack propagation. As a result, both the critical bending radius (r{sub c}) (under which the resistivity change ({Delta}{rho}) is less than a given value) and the change in {Delta}{rho} with decreasing r significantly decreased in the hybrid ITO compared with homogenous ITO.

  1. Inducing transparency with large magnetic response and group indices by hybrid dielectric metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Kuang; Lai, Yueh-Chun; Yang, Yu-Hang; Chen, Chia-Yun; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2012-03-26

    We present metamaterial-induced transparency (MIT) phenomena with enhanced magnetic fields in hybrid dielectric metamaterials. Using two hybrid structures of identical-dielectric-constant resonators (IDRs) and distinct-dielectric-constant resonators (DDRs), we demonstrate a larger group index (ng~354), better bandwidth-delay product (BDP~0.9) than metallic-type metamaterials. The keys to enable these properties are to excite either the trapped mode or the suppressed mode resonances, which can be managed by controlling the contrast of dielectric constants between the dielectric resonators in the hybrid metamaterials.

  2. Highly transparent, low-haze, hybrid cellulose nanopaper as electrodes for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Jiang, Long; Lubineau, Gilles; Ng, Tienkhee; Ooi, Boon S.; Liao, Hsien-Yu; Shen, Chao; Chen, Long; Zhu, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Paper is an excellent candidate to replace plastics as a substrate for flexible electronics due to its low cost, renewability and flexibility. Cellulose nanopaper (CNP), a new type of paper made of nanosized cellulose fibers, is a promising substrate material for transparent and flexible electrodes due to its potentially high transparency and high mechanical strength. Although CNP substrates can achieve high transparency, they are still characterized by high diffuse transmittance and small direct transmittance, resulting in high optical haze of the substrates. In this study, we proposed a simple methodology for large-scale production of high-transparency, low-haze CNP comprising both long cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and short cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). By varying the CNC/CNF ratio in the hybrid CNP, we could tailor its total transmittance, direct transmittance and diffuse transmittance. By increasing the CNC content, the optical haze of the hybrid CNP could be decreased and its transparency could be increased. The direct transmittance and optical haze of the CNP were 75.1% and 10.0%, respectively, greatly improved from the values of previously reported CNP (31.1% and 62.0%, respectively). Transparent, flexible electrodes were fabricated by coating the hybrid CNP with silver nanowires (AgNWs). The electrodes showed a low sheet resistance (minimum 1.2 Ω sq-1) and a high total transmittance (maximum of 82.5%). The electrodes were used to make a light emitting diode (LED) assembly to demonstrate their potential use in flexible displays.Paper is an excellent candidate to replace plastics as a substrate for flexible electronics due to its low cost, renewability and flexibility. Cellulose nanopaper (CNP), a new type of paper made of nanosized cellulose fibers, is a promising substrate material for transparent and flexible electrodes due to its potentially high transparency and high mechanical strength. Although CNP substrates can achieve high transparency, they are

  3. Handedness Dependent Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Hybrid Chiral Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lei; Hao Jiang, Zhi; Yue, Taiwei; Werner, Douglas H.

    2015-07-01

    We provide the first experimental demonstration of the handedness dependent electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in chiral metamaterials during the interaction with circularly polarized waves. The observed chiral-sensitive EIT phenomena arise from the coherent excitation of a non-radiative mode in the component split ring resonators (SRRs) produced by the corresponding Born-Kuhn type (radiative) resonators that are responsible for the pronounced chirality. The coherent coupling, which is dominated by the bonding and antibonding resonances of the Born-Kuhn type resonators, leads to an extremely steep dispersion for a circularly polarized wave of predefined handedness. Accordingly, retrieved effective medium parameters from simulated results further reveal a difference of 80 in the group indices for left- and right-handed circularly polarized waves at frequencies within the EIT window, which can potentially result in handedness-sensitive pulse delays. These chiral metamaterials which enable a handedness dependent EIT effect may provide more degrees of freedom for designing circular polarization based communication devices.

  4. An Ag-grid/graphene hybrid structure for large-scale, transparent, flexible heaters.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junmo; Jang, Yonghee; Kim, Youngsoo; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Suhr, Jonghwan; Hong, Byung Hee; Choi, Jae-Boong; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-04-21

    Recently, carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for fabricating transparent conducting materials. However, obtaining low sheet resistance and high transmittance of these carbon materials has been challenging due to the intrinsic properties of the materials. In this paper, we introduce highly transparent and flexible conductive films based on a hybrid structure of graphene and an Ag-grid. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing was used to produce a micro-scale grid consisting of Ag lines less than 10 μm wide. We were able to directly write the Ag-grid on a large-area graphene/flexible substrate due to the high conductivity of graphene. The hybrid electrode could be fabricated using hot pressing transfer and EHD jet printing in a non-vacuum, maskless, and low-temperature environment. The hybrid electrode offers an effective and simple route for achieving a sheet resistance as low as ∼4 Ω per square with ∼78% optical transmittance. Finally, we demonstrate that transparent flexible heaters based on the hybrid conductive films could be used in a vehicle or a smart window system.

  5. RF frequency transparent 90° hybrid based on silicon on insulator photonic circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambaraju, Rakesh; Galan-Conejos, Jose Vicente; Herrera, Javier; Griol, Amadeu; Otón, Claudio; Sanchis, Pablo; Martínez, Alejandro

    2010-05-01

    A simple configuration for achieving a radio frequency transparent 90° hybrid, for broadband QAM wireless systems using silicon photonics is proposed. The device consists of a high Q ring resonator which induces an optical 90° phase shift between two adjacent resonant wavelengths. When these optical carriers are modulated by an RF carrier the resulting device behaves as an RF 90° hybrid. Numerical simulations of the phase shift were performed on a 40 GHz carrier, and to demonstrate the frequency transparency phase shift simulations was also performed at a carrier frequency of 60 GHz. One of the main applications of such a device is the generation of millimeter wave 10 Gb/s wireless based on quadrature amplitude modulation.

  6. Hard and Transparent Films Formed by Nanocellulose–TiO2 Nanoparticle Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Christina; Sort, Jordi; Bacsik, Zoltán; Oliynyk, Vitaliy; Pellicer, Eva; Fall, Andreas; Wågberg, Lars; Berglund, Lars; Bergström, Lennart; Salazar-Alvarez, German

    2012-01-01

    The formation of hybrids of nanofibrillated cellulose and titania nanoparticles in aqueous media has been studied. Their transparency and mechanical behavior have been assessed by spectrophotometry and nanoindentation. The results show that limiting the titania nanoparticle concentration below 16 vol% yields homogeneous hybrids with a very high Young’s modulus and hardness, of up to 44 GPa and 3.4 GPa, respectively, and an optical transmittance above 80%. Electron microscopy shows that higher nanoparticle contents result in agglomeration and an inhomogeneous hybrid nanostructure with a concomitant reduction of hardness and optical transmittance. Infrared spectroscopy suggests that the nanostructure of the hybrids is controlled by electrostatic adsorption of the titania nanoparticles on the negatively charged nanocellulose surfaces. PMID:23049689

  7. Hybrid tandem photovoltaic devices with a transparent conductive interconnecting recombination layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taehee; Choi, Jin Young; Jeon, Jun Hong; Kim, Youn-Su; Kim, Bong-Soo; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Kim, Honggon; Han, Seunghee; Kim, Kyungkon

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: ► This work enhanced power conversion efficiency of the hybrid tandem solar cell from 1.0% to 2.6%. ► The interfacial series resistance of the tandem solar cell was eliminated by inserting ITO layer. ► This work shows the feasibility of the highly efficient hybrid tandem solar cells. -- Abstract: We demonstrate hybrid tandem photovoltaic devices with a transparent conductive interconnecting recombination layer. The series-connected hybrid tandem photovoltaic devices were developed by combining hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and polymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In order to enhance the interfacial connection between the subcells, we employed highly transparent and conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) thin layer. By using the ITO interconnecting layer, the power conversion efficiency of the hybrid tandem solar cell was enhanced from 1.0% (V{sub OC} = 1.041 V, J{sub SC} = 2.97 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 32.3%) to 2.6% (V{sub OC} = 1.336 V, J{sub SC} = 4.65 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 41.98%) due to the eliminated interfacial series resistance.

  8. Stretchable and transparent electrodes using hybrid structures of graphene-metal nanotrough networks with high performances and ultimate uniformity.

    PubMed

    An, Byeong Wan; Hyun, Byung Gwan; Kim, So-Yun; Kim, Minji; Lee, Mi-Sun; Lee, Kyongsoo; Koo, Jae Bon; Chu, Hye Yong; Bae, Byeong-Soo; Park, Jang-Ung

    2014-11-12

    Transparent electrodes that can maintain their electrical and optical properties stably against large mechanical deformations are essential in numerous applications of flexible and wearable electronics. In this paper, we report a comprehensive analysis of the electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of hybrid nanostructures based on graphene and metal nanotrough networks as stretchable and transparent electrodes. Compared to the single material of graphene or the nanotrough, the formation of this hybrid can improve the uniformity of sheet resistance significantly, that is, a very low sheet resistance (1 Ω/sq) with a standard deviation of less than ±0.1 Ω/sq, high transparency (91% in the visible light regime), and superb stretchability (80% in tensile strain). The successful demonstration of skin-attachable, flexible, and transparent arrays of oxide semiconductor transistors fabricated using hybrid electrodes suggests substantial promise for the next generation of electronic devices.

  9. Plasmonic electromagnetically induced transparency in metallic nanoparticle-quantum dot hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatef, Ali; Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Singh, Mahi R.

    2012-02-01

    We study the variation of the energy absorption rate in a hybrid semiconductor quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle system doped in a photonic crystal. The quantum dot is taken as a three-level V-configuration system and is driven by two applied fields (probe and control). We consider that one of the excitonic resonance frequencies is near to the plasmonic resonance frequency of the metallic nanoparticle, and is driven by the probe field. The other excitonic resonance frequency is far from both the plasmonic resonance frequency and the photonic bandgap edge, and is driven by the control field. In the absence of the photonic crystal we found that the system supports three excitonic-induced transparencies in the energy absorption spectrum of the metallic nanoparticle. We show that the photonic crystal allows us to manipulate the frequencies of such excitonic-induced transparencies and the amplitude of the energy absorption rate.

  10. Tunable electromagnetically induced transparency in hybrid graphene/all-dielectric metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lei; Dong, Liang; Guo, Jing; Meng, Fan-Yi; Wu, Qun

    2017-03-01

    We proposed a hybrid graphene/dielectric structure to achieve tunable electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect. Unit cell of hybrid structure consists of a graphene strip as bright element and a dielectric split ring resonator (DSRR) as quasi-dark element. The destructive inference between dipolar plasmon resonance induced by graphene strip and Mie resonance induced by DSRR leads to famous EIT effect. By altering physical sizes of two resonant elements and their couplings, EIT resonance can be effectively controlled. In particular, EIT window and effective group index can be dynamically dominated by varying graphene strip's Fermi level. This active manipulation is also confirmed using "two-particle" model. More interestingly, EIT resonance can be also effectively modulated through controlling incident angles for electromagnetic (EM) waves. These results would have promising applications in areas of tunable slow light devices and new filters.

  11. Transparent superhydrophobic/translucent superamphiphobic coatings based on silica-fluoropolymer hybrid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Goo; Ham, Dong Seok; Lee, Dong Yun; Bong, Hyojin; Cho, Kilwon

    2013-12-03

    This paper describes a simple approach to prepare a transparent superhydrophobic coating and a translucent superamphiphobic coating via spraying silica-fluoropolymer hybrid nanoparticles (SFNs) without any pre- or post-treatment of substrates; these nanoparticles create both microscale and nanoscale roughness, and fluoropolymer acts as a low surface energy binder. We also demonstrate the effects of varying the concentration of the SFN sol on the water and hexadecane repellency and on the transparency of the coated glass substrates. An increase in the concentration of the sol facilitates the transition between the superhydrophobic/transparent and superamphiphobic/translucent states. This transition results from an increase in the discontinuities in the three-phase (solid-liquid-gas) contact line and in the light scattering properties due to micropapillae tuned by varying the concentration of the sol. This versatile and controllable approach can be applied to a variety of substrates over large areas and may provide a wide range of applications for self-cleaning coatings of optoelectronics, liquid-repellent coatings, and microfluidic systems.

  12. Oxidation-resistant hybrid metal oxides/metal nanodots/silver nanowires for high performance flexible transparent heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, A.-Young; Kim, Min Kyu; Hudaya, Chairul; Park, Ji Hun; Byun, Dongjin; Lim, Jong Choo; Lee, Joong Kee

    2016-02-01

    Despite its excellent optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal performances, a silver nanowire (AgNW)-based transparent conducting heater (TCH) still demonstrates several drawbacks such as facile nanowire breakdown on application of a high DC voltage, easy oxidation when exposed to harsh environments, leading to increased surface resistivity, and high resistance among wire junctions causing nonhomogeneous temperature profiles. To overcome these issues, the AgNW was hybridized with other transparent heating materials made of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) thin films and NiCr nanodots (FTO/NiCr/AgNW). The dispersed NiCr nanodots (~50 nm) and FTO thin films (~20 nm) electrically bridge the nanowire junctions leading to a decreased sheet resistance and uniform temperature profiles. The hybrid transparent heater shows excellent optical transmittance (>90%) and high saturation temperature (162 °C) at low applied DC voltage (6 V). Moreover, the FTO/NiCr/AgNW heater exhibits a stable sheet resistance in a hostile environment, hence highlighting the excellent oxidation-resistance of the heating materials. These results indicate that the proposed hybrid transparent heaters could be a promising approach to combat the inherent problems associated with AgNW-based transparent heaters for various functional applications.Despite its excellent optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal performances, a silver nanowire (AgNW)-based transparent conducting heater (TCH) still demonstrates several drawbacks such as facile nanowire breakdown on application of a high DC voltage, easy oxidation when exposed to harsh environments, leading to increased surface resistivity, and high resistance among wire junctions causing nonhomogeneous temperature profiles. To overcome these issues, the AgNW was hybridized with other transparent heating materials made of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) thin films and NiCr nanodots (FTO/NiCr/AgNW). The dispersed NiCr nanodots (~50 nm) and FTO thin films

  13. A Flexible and Thin Graphene/Silver Nanowires/Polymer Hybrid Transparent Electrode for Optoelectronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hua; Wu, Zhaoxin; Jiang, Yaqiu; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xin; Jiao, Bo; Abbas, Waseem; Hou, Xun

    2016-11-16

    A typical thin and fully flexible hybrid electrode was developed by integrating the encapsulation of silver nanowires (AgNWs) network between a monolayer graphene and polymer film as a sandwich structure. Compared with the reported flexible electrodes based on PET or PEN substrate, this unique electrode exhibits the superior optoelectronic characteristics (sheet resistance of 8.06 Ω/□ at 88.3% light transmittance). Meanwhile, the specific up-to-bottom fabrication process could achieve the superflat surface (RMS = 2.58 nm), superthin thickness (∼8 μm thickness), high mechanical robustness, and lightweight. In addition, the strong corrosion resistance and stability for the hybrid electrode were proved. With these advantages, we employ this electrode to fabricate the simple flexible organic light-emitting device (OLED) and perovskite solar cell device (PSC), which exhibit the considerable performance (best PCE of OLED = 2.11 cd/A(2); best PCE of PSC = 10.419%). All the characteristics of the unique hybrid electrode demonstrate its potential as a high-performance transparent electrode candidate for flexible optoelectronics.

  14. Synergistically enhanced stability of highly flexible silver nanowire/carbon nanotube hybrid transparent electrodes by plasmonic welding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongsoo; Woo, Ju Yeon; Kim, Ju Tae; Lee, Byung Yang; Han, Chang-Soo

    2014-07-23

    Here, we report highly transparent and flexible AgNW/SWCNT hybrid networks on PET substrates combined with plasmonic welding for securing ultrahigh stability in mechanical and electrical properties under severe bending. Plasmonic welding produces local heating and welding at the junction of AgNWs and leads strong adhesion between AgNW and SWCNT as well as between hybrid structure and substrate. The initial sheet resistance of plasmon treated AgNW/SWCNT hybrid film was 26 Ω sq(-1), with >90% optical transmittance over the wavelength range 400-2700 nm. Following 200 cycles of convex/concave bending with a bending radius of 5 mm, the sheet resistance changed from 26 to 29 Ω sq(-1). This hybrid structure combined with the plasmonic welding process provided excellent stability, low resistance, and high transparency, and is suitable for highly flexible electronics applications, including touch panels, solar cells, and OLEDs.

  15. Oxidation-resistant hybrid metal oxides/metal nanodots/silver nanowires for high performance flexible transparent heaters.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Young; Kim, Min Kyu; Hudaya, Chairul; Park, Ji Hun; Byun, Dongjin; Lim, Jong Choo; Lee, Joong Kee

    2016-02-14

    Despite its excellent optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal performances, a silver nanowire (AgNW)-based transparent conducting heater (TCH) still demonstrates several drawbacks such as facile nanowire breakdown on application of a high DC voltage, easy oxidation when exposed to harsh environments, leading to increased surface resistivity, and high resistance among wire junctions causing nonhomogeneous temperature profiles. To overcome these issues, the AgNW was hybridized with other transparent heating materials made of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) thin films and NiCr nanodots (FTO/NiCr/AgNW). The dispersed NiCr nanodots (∼50 nm) and FTO thin films (∼20 nm) electrically bridge the nanowire junctions leading to a decreased sheet resistance and uniform temperature profiles. The hybrid transparent heater shows excellent optical transmittance (>90%) and high saturation temperature (162 °C) at low applied DC voltage (6 V). Moreover, the FTO/NiCr/AgNW heater exhibits a stable sheet resistance in a hostile environment, hence highlighting the excellent oxidation-resistance of the heating materials. These results indicate that the proposed hybrid transparent heaters could be a promising approach to combat the inherent problems associated with AgNW-based transparent heaters for various functional applications.

  16. High adhesion transparent conducting films using graphene oxide hybrid carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, Shi-Xun; Wang, Jie; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Jia, Song-Lin; Xu, Chun-Xia; Li, Lin-Ge; Shi, Pei-Pei; Li, Guangfen

    2017-01-01

    Flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted more and more attention for their wide range of potential applications. While, there are still some problems to be solved on several aspects. In this study, a graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (GO/CNT) hybrid TCF was fabricated through the simple spray coating method. GO sheets were introduced to form new electron transporting channels. It was found that the best optoelectronic property films were fabricated when the ratio of GO/CNT is 1.5:1.0, which the sheet resistance of the film was found to be 146 Ω/sq at the transmittance of 86.0%. Due to the two-dimensional structure and the oxidation groups of GO sheets, flatness and wettability of the electrode surface was improved obviously. Adhesion factor of the TCFs was calculated by the change of transparent and sheet resistance after trial test, the addition of GO sheets enhanced the adhesion dramatically and the mechanism was analyzed. Improvements of conductivity, flatness, wettability and adhesion above are all advantageous for the solution-based processing of organic electronics for spraying and printing.

  17. Plasmon-Induced Transparency by Hybridizing Concentric-Twisted Double Split Ring Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvinnezhad Hokmabadi, Mohammad; Philip, Elizabath; Rivera, Elmer; Kung, Patrick; Kim, Seongsin M.

    2015-10-01

    As a classical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency, plasmon induced transparency (PIT) has attracted great attention by mitigating otherwise cumbersome experimental implementation constraints. Here, through theoretical design, simulation and experimental validation, we present a novel approach to achieve and control PIT by hybridizing two double split ring resonators (DSRRs) on flexible polyimide substrates. In the design, the large rings in the DSRRs are stationary and mirror images of each other, while the small SRRs rotate about their center axes. Counter-directional rotation (twisting) of the small SRRs is shown to lead to resonance shifts, while co-directional rotation results in splitting of the lower frequency resonance and emergence of a PIT window. We develop an equivalent circuit model and introduce a mutual inductance parameter M whose sign is shown to characterize the existence or absence of PIT response from the structure. This model attempts to provide a quantitative measure of the physical mechanisms underlying the observed PIT phenomenon. As such, our findings can support the design of several applications such as optical buffers, delay lines, and ultra-sensitive sensors.

  18. Plasmon-Induced Transparency by Hybridizing Concentric-Twisted Double Split Ring Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Parvinnezhad Hokmabadi, Mohammad; Philip, Elizabath; Rivera, Elmer; Kung, Patrick; Kim, Seongsin M.

    2015-01-01

    As a classical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency, plasmon induced transparency (PIT) has attracted great attention by mitigating otherwise cumbersome experimental implementation constraints. Here, through theoretical design, simulation and experimental validation, we present a novel approach to achieve and control PIT by hybridizing two double split ring resonators (DSRRs) on flexible polyimide substrates. In the design, the large rings in the DSRRs are stationary and mirror images of each other, while the small SRRs rotate about their center axes. Counter-directional rotation (twisting) of the small SRRs is shown to lead to resonance shifts, while co-directional rotation results in splitting of the lower frequency resonance and emergence of a PIT window. We develop an equivalent circuit model and introduce a mutual inductance parameter M whose sign is shown to characterize the existence or absence of PIT response from the structure. This model attempts to provide a quantitative measure of the physical mechanisms underlying the observed PIT phenomenon. As such, our findings can support the design of several applications such as optical buffers, delay lines, and ultra-sensitive sensors. PMID:26507006

  19. Solution-processed silver nanowire/indium-tin-oxide nanoparticle hybrid transparent conductors with high thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Jei; Kim, Jong-Woong; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    In this study, solution-processed hybrid structure transparent conductors consisting of silver nanowires (AgNWs) and indium-tin-oxide nanoparticle (ITO-NP) layers are investigated. Fabricated transparent conductors had stacked structures of ITO-NP/AgNW and ITO-NP/AgNW/ITO-NP, and a successful integration was possible on glass substrates. Compared to a single-layered ITO-NP film which has a sheet resistance value of 1.31 k Ω/⟂, a remarkable enhancement in sheet resistance was achieved from the hybrid structures, showing sheet resistance values of 44.74 Ω/⟂ and 28.07 Ω/⟂ for ITO-NP/AgNW and ITO-NP/AgNW/ITO-NP structures, respectively. In addition, the ITO-NP/AgNW/ITO-NP triple-layered transparent conductor showed greatly enhanced thermal stability in terms of sheet resistance and transmittance against a high-temperature environment up to 300 degrees C. Based on these results, it can be suggested that the hybrid structure has advantages of enhancing both electrical properties of ITO-NP layer and thermal stability of AgNW layer, and we believe the hybrid structure transparent conductors can be a suitable option for applications which require high electrical conductivity, transmittance, and thermal stability.

  20. Facile fabrication of transparent, broadband photoresponse, self-cleaning multifunctional graphene-TiO2 hybrid films.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiayi; Cao, Yang; He, Junhui

    2014-04-15

    We reported a novel approach to fabricate graphene-TiO2 hybrid films by combination of the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly and the surface sol-gel (SSG) process. The reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets and films were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy, contact angle/interface system, and four-point probe. It was found that the graphene-TiO2 hybrid film showed enhanced photoresponse performance compared with RGO thin film and TiO2 thin film. The photoresponse properties of hybrid films could be manipulated by variation of the cycle numbers of RGO LbL assembly and titanium precursor SSG process. Photoinduced superhydrophility of the hybrid film was shown under broadband light illumination. The obtained transparent, superhydrophilic and conductive graphene-TiO2 hybrid film showed excellent photoresponse, antifogging, and antistatic behaviors.

  1. Local and nonlocal optically induced transparency effects in graphene-silicon hybrid nanophotonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Longhai; Zheng, Jiajiu; Xu, Yang; Dai, Daoxin; He, Sailing

    2014-11-25

    Graphene is well-known as a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms arrayed in a honeycomb structure. It has some unique and fascinating properties, which are useful for realizing many optoelectronic devices and applications, including transistors, photodetectors, solar cells, and modulators. To enhance light-graphene interactions and take advantage of its properties, a promising approach is to combine a graphene sheet with optical waveguides, such as silicon nanophotonic wires considered in this paper. Here we report local and nonlocal optically induced transparency (OIT) effects in graphene-silicon hybrid nanophotonic integrated circuits. A low-power, continuous-wave laser is used as the pump light, and the power required for producing the OIT effect is as low as ∼0.1 mW. The corresponding power density is several orders lower than that needed for the previously reported saturated absorption effect in graphene, which implies a mechanism involving light absorption by the silicon and photocarrier transport through the silicon-graphene junction. The present OIT effect enables low power, all-optical, broadband control and sensing, modulation and switching locally and nonlocally.

  2. Controlled Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Fano Resonances in Hybrid BEC-Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasir, Kashif Ammar; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Cavity-optomechanics, a tool to manipulate mechanical effects of light to couple optical field with other physical objects, is the subject of increasing investigations, especially with regards to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). EIT, a result of Fano interference among different atomic transition levels, has acquired a significant importance in many areas of physics, such as atomic physics and quantum optics. However, controllability of such multi-dimensional systems has remained a crucial issue. In this report, we investigate the controllability of EIT and Fano resonances in hybrid optomechanical system composed of cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), trapped inside high-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity with one vibrational mirror, driven by a single mode optical field and a transverse pump field. The transverse field is used to control the phenomenon of EIT. It is detected that the strength of transverse field is not only efficiently amplifying or attenuating out-going optical mode but also providing an opportunity to enhance the strength of Fano-interactions which leads to the amplification of EIT-window. To observe these phenomena in laboratory, we suggest a certain set of experimental parameters. The results provide a route for tunable manipulation of optical phenomena, like EIT, which could be a significant step in quantum engineering.

  3. Controlled Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Fano Resonances in Hybrid BEC-Optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yasir, Kashif Ammar; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cavity-optomechanics, a tool to manipulate mechanical effects of light to couple optical field with other physical objects, is the subject of increasing investigations, especially with regards to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). EIT, a result of Fano interference among different atomic transition levels, has acquired a significant importance in many areas of physics, such as atomic physics and quantum optics. However, controllability of such multi-dimensional systems has remained a crucial issue. In this report, we investigate the controllability of EIT and Fano resonances in hybrid optomechanical system composed of cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), trapped inside high-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity with one vibrational mirror, driven by a single mode optical field and a transverse pump field. The transverse field is used to control the phenomenon of EIT. It is detected that the strength of transverse field is not only efficiently amplifying or attenuating out-going optical mode but also providing an opportunity to enhance the strength of Fano-interactions which leads to the amplification of EIT-window. To observe these phenomena in laboratory, we suggest a certain set of experimental parameters. The results provide a route for tunable manipulation of optical phenomena, like EIT, which could be a significant step in quantum engineering. PMID:26955789

  4. Totally embedded hybrid thin films of carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires as flat homogenous flexible transparent conductors

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yilei; Sk, Md Moniruzzaman; Prakoso, Ari Bimo; Rusli; Chan-Park, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    There is a great need for viable alternatives to today’s transparent conductive film using largely indium tin oxide. We report the fabrication of a new type of flexible transparent conductive film using silver nanowires (AgNW) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks which are fully embedded in a UV curable resin substrate. The hybrid SWCNTs-AgNWs film is relatively flat so that the RMS roughness of the top surface of the film is 3 nm. Addition of SWCNTs networks make the film resistance uniform; without SWCNTs, sheet resistance of the surface composed of just AgNWs in resin varies from 20 Ω/sq to 107 Ω/sq. With addition of SWCNTs embedded in the resin, sheet resistance of the hybrid film is 29 ± 5 Ω/sq and uniform across the 47 mm diameter film discs; further, the optimized film has 85% transparency. Our lamination-transfer UV process doesn’t need solvent for sacrificial substrate removal and leads to good mechanical interlocking of the nano-material networks. Additionally, electrochemical study of the film for supercapacitors application showed an impressive 10 times higher current in cyclic voltammograms compared to the control without SWCNTs. Our fabrication method is simple, cost effective and enables the large-scale fabrication of flat and flexible transparent conductive films. PMID:27929125

  5. Totally embedded hybrid thin films of carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires as flat homogenous flexible transparent conductors.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yilei; Sk, Md Moniruzzaman; Prakoso, Ari Bimo; Rusli; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2016-12-08

    There is a great need for viable alternatives to today's transparent conductive film using largely indium tin oxide. We report the fabrication of a new type of flexible transparent conductive film using silver nanowires (AgNW) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks which are fully embedded in a UV curable resin substrate. The hybrid SWCNTs-AgNWs film is relatively flat so that the RMS roughness of the top surface of the film is 3 nm. Addition of SWCNTs networks make the film resistance uniform; without SWCNTs, sheet resistance of the surface composed of just AgNWs in resin varies from 20 Ω/sq to 10(7 )Ω/sq. With addition of SWCNTs embedded in the resin, sheet resistance of the hybrid film is 29 ± 5 Ω/sq and uniform across the 47 mm diameter film discs; further, the optimized film has 85% transparency. Our lamination-transfer UV process doesn't need solvent for sacrificial substrate removal and leads to good mechanical interlocking of the nano-material networks. Additionally, electrochemical study of the film for supercapacitors application showed an impressive 10 times higher current in cyclic voltammograms compared to the control without SWCNTs. Our fabrication method is simple, cost effective and enables the large-scale fabrication of flat and flexible transparent conductive films.

  6. Totally embedded hybrid thin films of carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires as flat homogenous flexible transparent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yilei; Sk, Md Moniruzzaman; Prakoso, Ari Bimo; Rusli; Chan-Park, Mary B.

    2016-12-01

    There is a great need for viable alternatives to today’s transparent conductive film using largely indium tin oxide. We report the fabrication of a new type of flexible transparent conductive film using silver nanowires (AgNW) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks which are fully embedded in a UV curable resin substrate. The hybrid SWCNTs-AgNWs film is relatively flat so that the RMS roughness of the top surface of the film is 3 nm. Addition of SWCNTs networks make the film resistance uniform; without SWCNTs, sheet resistance of the surface composed of just AgNWs in resin varies from 20 Ω/sq to 107 Ω/sq. With addition of SWCNTs embedded in the resin, sheet resistance of the hybrid film is 29 ± 5 Ω/sq and uniform across the 47 mm diameter film discs; further, the optimized film has 85% transparency. Our lamination-transfer UV process doesn’t need solvent for sacrificial substrate removal and leads to good mechanical interlocking of the nano-material networks. Additionally, electrochemical study of the film for supercapacitors application showed an impressive 10 times higher current in cyclic voltammograms compared to the control without SWCNTs. Our fabrication method is simple, cost effective and enables the large-scale fabrication of flat and flexible transparent conductive films.

  7. Transparent and hard zirconia-based hybrid coatings with excellent dynamic/thermoresponsive oleophobicity, thermal durability, and hydrolytic stability.

    PubMed

    Masheder, Benjamin; Urata, Chihiro; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2013-08-28

    Smooth, transparent, and extremely hard zirconia (ZrO2)-based inorganic-organic hybrid films showing excellent dynamic oleophobicity, thermal durability, and hydrolytic stability were successfully prepared through a simple combination of zirconium tetrapropoxide (Zr(O(CH2)2CH3)4) with stearic acids. In this study, we have particularly focused on the effects of stearic acid molecular architecture (linear-stearic acid (LSA) and branched-stearic acid (BSA)) on surface physical/chemical properties. Although, in each case, the resulting hybrid (Zr:LSA and Zr:BSA) films achieved by a simple spin-coating method were highly smooth and transparent, the final surface properties were markedly dependent on their molecular architectures. Thanks to the thermal stability of BSA, our Zr:BSA hybrid films displayed a greatly improved thermal effective range (maximum of 200 °C), while for Zr:LSA hybrid films, serious thermal damage to surface dewetting behavior was observed at less than 150 °C. The hardness of the Zr:BSA hybrid films were markedly increased by curing at 200 °C for 1 h (from 1.95 GPa to 3.03 GPa), while maintaining their dynamic dewettability toward n-hexadecane, when compared with Zr:LSA hybrid films (0.95-1.19 GPa). Small volume n-hexadecane droplets (5 μL) were easily set in motion, sliding across and off our best Zr:BSA hybrid film surfaces at low substrate tilt angles (<10°) without pinning. Moreover, they also showed thermoresponsive dynamic dewetting behavior, reasonable resistance to hydrolysis in an aqueous environment, and antifingerprint properties.

  8. Novel transparent zirconium-based hybrid material with multilayered nanostructures: studies of surface dewettability toward alkane liquids.

    PubMed

    Masheder, Benjamin; Urata, Chihiro; Cheng, Dalton F; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    We have successfully prepared unique inorganic-organic hybrid materials that demonstrate excellent transparency and dewettability toward various alkane liquids (n-hexadecane, n-dodecane and n-decane) without relying on conventional surface roughening and perfluorination. Such coatings were made using a novel family of hybrid materials generated by substituting carboxylic acids, with a range of alkyl chain lengths (CH(3)(CH(2))(x-2)COOH where x = total carbon number, i.e., 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 22, or 24, into zirconium (Zr) tetra-propoxide complexes. This precursor was then mixed with acetic acid and spincast to produce transparent thin Zr-carboxylic acid (ZrCA(x)) hybrid films using a nonhydrolytic sol-gel process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provided proof of Zr-O-Zr network formation in the films upon casting and also followed changes to the physical nature (liquid-like or solid-like) of the alkyl chain assemblies depending upon alkyl chain length. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the hybrid films prepared using the longer chain carboxylic acids (ZrCA(x≥18)) spontaneously self-assembled into lamella structures with d-spacings ranging from 29.5 to 32.7 Angstroms, depending on the length of the alkyl chain. On the other hand the remaining films (ZrCA(x<18)) showed no such ordering. Moreover, the dynamic dewetting behavior of our hybrid films with alkane liquids was also strongly affected by alkyl chain length. ZrCA(x) films with x = 12, 14, and 16 showed the best dynamic oleophobicity among the seven hybrid films. In particular, small volume alkane droplets (5 μL) could be easily set in motion to move across and off ZrCA(14) film surfaces without pinning at low tilt angles (~6°).

  9. A facile UV-curing method for the preparation of transparent and conductive carbon nanotube hybrid films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Ho; Jung, Jae Mok; Kwak, Jun Young; Hwang, Tai Kyung; Ganapathy, Hullathy Subban; Jeong, Yeon Tae; Lim, Kwon Taek

    2011-01-01

    A new method for preparing flexible, transparent, and conductive multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) hybrid films with scratch resistance through a facile UV-curing method is described herein. UV-curable urethane oligomers were used as the binder between the MWCNTs and the plastic substrates. The transparency and sheet resistance of MWCNT thin films can be easily tailored by controlling the number of bar coaters. Composite films with different binder ratios were prepared to evaluate and optimize the surface abrasion resistance and adhesion parameter. Two types of MWCNT films, those with a 56% (with a 586 komega/sq sheet resistance) and a 78% transmittance (with a 22 Momega/sq sheet resistance) were obtained using the UV-curable resin, and the conductive films showed distinguished abrasion resistance and good adhesion.

  10. Independently tunable dual-band plasmonically induced transparency based on hybrid metal-graphene metamaterials at mid-infrared frequencies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Dong, Zhewei; Si, Jiangnan; Deng, Xiaoxu

    2017-01-23

    A tunable dual-band plasmonically induced transparency (PIT) device based on hybrid metal-graphene nanostructures is proposed theoretically and numerically at mid-infrared frequencies, which is composed of two kinds of gold dolmen-like structures with different sizes placed on separate graphene interdigitated finger sets respectively. The coupled Lorentz oscillator model is used to explain the physical mechanism of the PIT effect at multiple frequency domains. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions are employed to simulate the characteristics of the hybrid metal-graphene dual-band PIT device. The simulated spectral locations of multiple transparency peaks are separately and dynamically modulated by varying the Fermi energy of corresponding graphene finger set, which is in good accordance with the theoretical analysis. Distinguished from the conventional metallic PIT devices, multiple PIT resonances in the hybrid metal-graphene PIT device are independently modulated by electrostatically changing bias voltages applied on corresponding graphene fingers, which can be widely applied in optical information processing as tunable sensors, switches, and filters.

  11. High performance hybrid rGO/Ag quasi-periodic mesh transparent electrodes for flexible electrochromic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. S.; Ivanchenko, F. S.; Simunin, M. M.; Shiverskiy, A. V.; Aleksandrovsky, A. S.; Nemtsev, I. V.; Fadeev, Y. V.; Karpova, D. V.; Khartov, S. V.

    2016-02-01

    A possibility of creating a stable hybrid coating based on the hybrid of a reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/Ag quasi-periodic mesh (q-mesh) coating has been demonstrated. The main advantages of the suggested method are the low cost of the processes and the technology scalability. The Ag q-mesh coating is formed by means of the magnetron sputtering of silver on the original template obtained as a result of quasi-periodic cracking of a silica film. The protective rGO film is formed by low temperature reduction of a graphene oxide (GO) film, applied by the spray-deposition in the solution of NaBH4. The coatings have low sheet resistance (12.3 Ω/sq) and high optical transparency (82.2%). The hybrid coatings are characterized by high chemical stability, as well as they show high stability to deformation impacts. High performance of the hybrid coatings as electrodes in the sandwich-system «electrode-electrochromic composition-electrode» has been demonstrated. The hybrid electrodes allow the electrochromic sandwich to function without any visible degradation for a long time, while an unprotected mesh electrode does not allow performing even a single switching cycle.

  12. Hybrid transparent conductive electrodes with copper nanowires embedded in a zinc oxide matrix and protected by reduced graphene oxide platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaozhao; Mankowski, Trent; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Shikoh, Ali Sehpar; Touati, Farid; Benammar, Mohieddine A.; Mansuripur, Masud; Falco, Charles M.

    2016-02-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) were fabricated by combining three emerging nano-materials: copper nanowires (CuNWs), zinc oxide (ZnO) nano-particulate thin films, and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) platelets. Whereas CuNWs are responsible for essentially all of the electrical conductivity of our thin-film TCEs, the ZnO matrix embeds and strengthens the CuNW network in its adhesion to the substrate, while the rGO platelets provide a protective overcoat for the composite electrode, thereby improving its stability in hot and humid environments. Our CuNW/ZnO/rGO hybrid electrodes deposited on glass substrates have low sheet resistance (Rs ˜ 20 Ω/sq) and fairly high optical transmittance (T550 ˜ 79%). In addition, our hybrid TCEs are mechanically strong and able to withstand multiple scotch-tape peel tests. Finally, these TCEs can be fabricated on rigid glass as well as flexible plastic substrates.

  13. Transparent capacitors with hybrid ZnO:Al and Ag nanowires as electrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guozhen; Wu, Hao; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Ti; Liu, Chang

    2016-03-11

    Transparent conducting films with a composite structure of AlZnO-Ag nanowires (AgNWs) have been prepared by atomic layer deposition. The sheet resistance was reduced from 120 to 9 Ω when the AgNW networks were involved. Transparent capacitors with Al2O3-TiO2-Al2O3 dielectrics were fabricated on the composite electrodes and demonstrated a capacitance density of 10.1 fF μm(-2), which was significantly higher than that of capacitors with AlZnO electrodes (8.8 fF μm(-1)). The capacitance density remained almost unchanged in a broad frequency range from 3 kHz to 1 MHz. Moreover, a low leakage current density of 2.4 × 10(-7) A cm(-2) at 1 V was achieved. Transparent and flexible capacitors were also fabricated using the composite electrodes, and demonstrated an improved bendability. The transparent capacitors showed an average optical transmittance over 70% in the visible range, and thus open the door to practical applications in transparent integrated circuits.

  14. Silver Nanowire-IZO-Conducting Polymer Hybrids for Flexible and Transparent Conductive Electrodes for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Ho Jun; Kim, Se Jung; Hwang, Ju Hyun; Shim, Yong Sub; Jung, Sun-Gyu; Park, Young Wook; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-10-01

    Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) has been considered as a promising material for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. However, despite the advantages of AgNWs, some of their intrinsic drawbacks, such as large surface roughness and poor interconnection between wires, limit their practical application in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Herein, we report a high-performance AgNW-based hybrid electrode composed of indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) and poly (3,4-ethylenediowythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) [PEDOT:PSS]. The IZO layer protects the underlying AgNWs from oxidation and corrosion and tightly fuses the wires together and to the substrate. The PEDOT:PSS effectively reduces surface roughness and increases the hybrid films’ transmittance. The fabricated electrodes exhibited a low sheet resistance of 5.9 Ωsq‑1 with high transmittance of 86% at 550 nm. The optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of the AgNW-based hybrid films were investigated in detail to determine the structure-property relations, and whether optical or electrical properties could be controlled with variation in each layer’s thickness to satisfy different requirements for different applications. Flexible OLEDs (f-OLEDs) were successfully fabricated on the hybrid electrodes to prove their applicability; their performance was even better than those on commercial indium doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes.

  15. Silver Nanowire-IZO-Conducting Polymer Hybrids for Flexible and Transparent Conductive Electrodes for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ho Jun; Kim, Se Jung; Hwang, Ju Hyun; Shim, Yong Sub; Jung, Sun-Gyu; Park, Young Wook; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) has been considered as a promising material for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. However, despite the advantages of AgNWs, some of their intrinsic drawbacks, such as large surface roughness and poor interconnection between wires, limit their practical application in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Herein, we report a high-performance AgNW-based hybrid electrode composed of indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) and poly (3,4-ethylenediowythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) [PEDOT:PSS]. The IZO layer protects the underlying AgNWs from oxidation and corrosion and tightly fuses the wires together and to the substrate. The PEDOT:PSS effectively reduces surface roughness and increases the hybrid films’ transmittance. The fabricated electrodes exhibited a low sheet resistance of 5.9 Ωsq−1 with high transmittance of 86% at 550 nm. The optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of the AgNW-based hybrid films were investigated in detail to determine the structure-property relations, and whether optical or electrical properties could be controlled with variation in each layer’s thickness to satisfy different requirements for different applications. Flexible OLEDs (f-OLEDs) were successfully fabricated on the hybrid electrodes to prove their applicability; their performance was even better than those on commercial indium doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. PMID:27703182

  16. Low vacuum annealing of cellulose acetate on nickel towards transparent conductive CNT-graphene hybrid films.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Dung; Tiwari, Rajanish N; Matsuoka, Yuki; Hashimoto, Goh; Rokuta, Eiji; Chen, Yu-Ze; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    2014-06-25

    We report a versatile method based on low vacuum annealing of cellulose acetate on nickel (Ni) surface for rapid fabrication of graphene and carbon nanotube (CNT)-graphene hybrid films with tunable properties. Uniform films mainly composed of tri-layer graphene can be achieved via a surface precipitation of dissociated carbon at 800 °C for 30 seconds under vacuum conditions of ∼0.6 Pa. The surface precipitation process is further found to be efficient for joining the precipitated graphene with pre-coated CNTs on the Ni surface, consequently, generating the hybrid films. As expected, the hybrid films exhibit substantial opto-electrical and field electron emission properties superior to their individual counterparts. The finding suggests a promising route to hybridize the graphene with diverse nanomaterials for constructing novel hybrid materials with improved performances.

  17. Fabrication of Ag nanowire and Al-doped ZnO hybrid transparent electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Sslimsearom; Park, Yong Seo; Choi, Hyung Wook; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Among the materials used as transparent electrodes, silver nanowires (AgNWs) have attracted attention because of their high transmittance and excellent conductivity. However, AgNWs have shortcomings, including their poor adhesion, oxidation by atmospheric oxygen, and unstable characteristics at high temperature. To overcome these shortcomings, multi-layer thin films with an aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO)/AgNW/AZO structure were fabricated using facing targets sputtering. The samples heated to 350 °C exhibited stable electrical characteristics. In addition, the adhesion to the substrate was improved compared with AgNWs layer. The AZO/AgNW/AZO thin films with multilayer structure overcame the shortcomings of AgNWs, and we propose their use as transparent electrodes with excellent properties for optoelectronic applications.

  18. Highly conductive and transparent silver grid/metal oxide hybrid electrodes for low-temperature planar perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihai; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Wei-er; Li, Jun; Wang, Duofa; Gu, Haoshuang; Wang, Xianbao; Li, Jinhua

    2017-01-01

    Recently, organometal halide perovskite solar cells have attracted great attention in photovoltaic research. However, the devices require high-temperature processing of up to 450 °C that hinders the applications in the low cost and large-area product of devices. Here, we reported the ITO/Ag grid/AZO hybrid electrodes for planar perovskite solar cells fabricated under the temperature of 150 °C. The planar perovskite solar cells do not require a mesoporous scaffold that need high-temperature annealing processing. The optimized ITO/Ag grid/AZO electrode which was fabricated as the sequence of ITO, Ag grid, AZO by magnetron sputtering exhibited an extreme low sheet resistance about 3.8 Ω/sq and a relative high transparency of 89.6% at the wavelength of 550 nm. The hybrid electrode could combine the electrical property of ITO and optical property of AZO. On the other hand, AZO has better energy level match with electron transport layer of ZnO than ITO. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 13.8% was obtained under the processing temperature of 150 °C by using ITO/Ag grid/AZO electrode. The high performances of the solar cells were attributed to the superior performances of ITO/Ag grid/AZO electrode and the good band energy match between ZnO and AZO.

  19. Transparent and flexible conducting hybrid film combined with 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane-coated polymer and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Daesung; Ko, Yong-Hun; Cho, Jumi; Adhikari, Prashanta Dhoj; Lee, Su Il; Kim, Yooseok; Song, Wooseok; Jung, Min Wook; Jang, Sung Won; Lee, Seung Youb; An, Ki-Seok; Park, Chong-Yun

    2015-12-01

    A simple approach to fabricate graphene hybrid film consisted of Graphene/3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)/polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is presented, using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for enhancement of conductivity. The SAMs of APTES was prepared on ultraviolet-ozone (UVO)-irradiated PET films via wet chemical technique. The density of APTES was saturated after UV treatment time of 1 h for PET films; the carrier density and the optical transmittance were 9.3 × 10 12/cm2 and 82% for pristine graphene and 1.16 × 1013/cm2 and 86% for graphene hybrid films, respectively, and experienced at inflection point at 30 min in UV treatment time. This behavior can be explained by surface morphology transition due to coalescence or clustering of mobile and low-molecular-weight oxidized components of PET.

  20. Photochromic dynamics of organic-inorganic hybrids supported on transparent and flexible recycled PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, R. P.; Nalin, M.; Ribeiro, S. J. L.; Molina, C.

    2017-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrids (OIH) synthesized by sol gel process containing phosphotungstic acid (PWA) entrapped have been attracted much attention for ultraviolet sensitive materials. However, the limitations for practical photochromic application of these materials are the poor interaction with flexible polymer substrates such as Poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET) and also photo response under ultraviolet radiation. This paper describes the use of the d-ureasil HOI, based on siliceous network grafted through linkages to both ends of polymer chain containing 2.5 poly(oxyethylene) units with PWA entrapped prepared as films on recycled PET. Films were characterized by IR-ATR, XRD, TG/DTG, UV-Vis and Contact angle. XRD patterns showed that both pristine hybrid matrix and those containing PWA are amorphous. IR showed that PWA structure is preserved in the matrix and interactions between them occur by intermolecular forces. Films are thermally stable up to 325 °C and contact angle of 25.1° showed a good wettability between substrate and hybrid matrix. Furthermore, films showed fast photochromic response after 1 min of ultraviolet exposure time. The bleaching process revealed that the relaxation process is dependent of the temperature and the activation energy of 47.2 kJ mol-1 was determined. The properties of these films make them potential candidates for applications in flexible photochromic materials.

  1. Highly transparent and flexible bio-based polyimide/TiO2 and ZrO2 hybrid films with tunable refractive index, Abbe number, and memory properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tzu-Tien; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Tateyama, Seiji; Kaneko, Tatsuo; Liou, Guey-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    The novel bio-based polyimide (4ATA-PI) and the corresponding PI hybrids of TiO2 or ZrO2 with excellent optical properties and thermal stability have been prepared successfully. The highly transparent 4ATA-PI containing carboxylic acid groups in the backbone could provide reaction sites for organic-inorganic bonding to obtain homogeneous hybrid films. These PI hybrid films showed a tunable refractive index (1.60-1.81 for 4ATA-PI/TiO2 and 1.60-1.80 for 4ATA-PI/ZrO2), and the 4ATA-PI/ZrO2 hybrid films revealed a higher optical transparency and Abbe's number than those of the 4ATA-PI/TiO2 system due to a larger band gap of ZrO2. By introducing TiO2 and ZrO2 as the electron acceptor into the 4ATA-PI system, the hybrid materials have a lower LUMO energy level which could facilitate and stabilize the charge transfer complex. Therefore, memory devices derived from these PI hybrid films exhibited tunable memory properties from DRAM, SRAM, to WORM with a different TiO2 or ZrO2 content from 0 wt% to 50 wt% with a high ON/OFF ratio (108). In addition, the different energy levels of TiO2 and ZrO2 revealed specifically unique memory characteristics, implying the potential application of the prepared 4ATA-PI/TiO2 and 4ATA-PI/ZrO2 hybrid films in highly transparent memory devices.The novel bio-based polyimide (4ATA-PI) and the corresponding PI hybrids of TiO2 or ZrO2 with excellent optical properties and thermal stability have been prepared successfully. The highly transparent 4ATA-PI containing carboxylic acid groups in the backbone could provide reaction sites for organic-inorganic bonding to obtain homogeneous hybrid films. These PI hybrid films showed a tunable refractive index (1.60-1.81 for 4ATA-PI/TiO2 and 1.60-1.80 for 4ATA-PI/ZrO2), and the 4ATA-PI/ZrO2 hybrid films revealed a higher optical transparency and Abbe's number than those of the 4ATA-PI/TiO2 system due to a larger band gap of ZrO2. By introducing TiO2 and ZrO2 as the electron acceptor into the 4ATA-PI system

  2. New approach for fabricating hybrid-structured metal mesh films for flexible transparent electrodes by the combination of electrospinning and metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jin Woo; Lee, Dong Kyu; Jeon, Hwan-Jin; Ahn, Chi Won

    2016-11-01

    In this study, hybrid-structured metal mesh (HMM) films as potential flexible transparent electrodes, composed of aligned micro-sized metal fibers integrated into random network of metal nanofibers, were fabricated by the combination of electrospinning and metal deposition. These naturally fiber-bridged HMMs, with a gold layer thickness of 85 nm, exhibited a high transmittance of around 90% and a sheet resistance of approximately 10 Ω sq-1, as well as favorable mechanical stability under bending stress. These results demonstrate that the approach employed herein is a simple, highly efficient, and facile process for fabricating, uniform, interconnected fiber networks with potential for producing high-performance flexible transparent electrodes.

  3. New approach for fabricating hybrid-structured metal mesh films for flexible transparent electrodes by the combination of electrospinning and metal deposition.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jin Woo; Lee, Dong Kyu; Jeon, Hwan-Jin; Ahn, Chi Won

    2016-11-25

    In this study, hybrid-structured metal mesh (HMM) films as potential flexible transparent electrodes, composed of aligned micro-sized metal fibers integrated into random network of metal nanofibers, were fabricated by the combination of electrospinning and metal deposition. These naturally fiber-bridged HMMs, with a gold layer thickness of 85 nm, exhibited a high transmittance of around 90% and a sheet resistance of approximately 10 Ω sq(-1), as well as favorable mechanical stability under bending stress. These results demonstrate that the approach employed herein is a simple, highly efficient, and facile process for fabricating, uniform, interconnected fiber networks with potential for producing high-performance flexible transparent electrodes.

  4. Highly transparent and flexible bio-based polyimide/TiO2 and ZrO2 hybrid films with tunable refractive index, Abbe number, and memory properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu-Tien; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Tateyama, Seiji; Kaneko, Tatsuo; Liou, Guey-Sheng

    2016-07-07

    The novel bio-based polyimide (4ATA-PI) and the corresponding PI hybrids of TiO2 or ZrO2 with excellent optical properties and thermal stability have been prepared successfully. The highly transparent 4ATA-PI containing carboxylic acid groups in the backbone could provide reaction sites for organic-inorganic bonding to obtain homogeneous hybrid films. These PI hybrid films showed a tunable refractive index (1.60-1.81 for 4ATA-PI/TiO2 and 1.60-1.80 for 4ATA-PI/ZrO2), and the 4ATA-PI/ZrO2 hybrid films revealed a higher optical transparency and Abbe's number than those of the 4ATA-PI/TiO2 system due to a larger band gap of ZrO2. By introducing TiO2 and ZrO2 as the electron acceptor into the 4ATA-PI system, the hybrid materials have a lower LUMO energy level which could facilitate and stabilize the charge transfer complex. Therefore, memory devices derived from these PI hybrid films exhibited tunable memory properties from DRAM, SRAM, to WORM with a different TiO2 or ZrO2 content from 0 wt% to 50 wt% with a high ON/OFF ratio (10(8)). In addition, the different energy levels of TiO2 and ZrO2 revealed specifically unique memory characteristics, implying the potential application of the prepared 4ATA-PI/TiO2 and 4ATA-PI/ZrO2 hybrid films in highly transparent memory devices.

  5. Water-resistant, transparent hybrid nanopaper by physical cross-linking with chitosan.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Matti S; Kurki-Suonio, Sauli; Schacher, Felix H; Hietala, Sami; Rojas, Orlando J; Ikkala, Olli

    2015-03-09

    One of the major, but often overlooked, challenges toward high end applications of nanocelluloses is to maintain their high mechanical properties under hydrated or even fully wet conditions. As such, permanent covalent cross-linking or surface hydrophobization are viable approaches, however, the former may hamper processability and the latter may have adverse effect on interfibrillar bonding and resulting material strength. Here we show a concept based on physical cross-linking of cellulose nanofibers (CNF, also denoted as microfibrillated cellulose, MFC, and, nanofibrillated cellulose, NFC) with chitosan for the aqueous preparation of films showing high mechanical strength in the wet state. Also, transparency (∼70-90% in the range 400-800 nm) is achieved by suppressing aggregation and carefully controlling the mixing conditions: Chitosan dissolves in aqueous medium at low pH and under these conditions the CNF/chitosan mixtures form easily processable hydrogels. A simple change in the environmental conditions (i.e., an increase of pH) reduces hydration of chitosan promoting multivalent physical interactions between CNF and chitosan over those with water, resulting effectively in cross-linking. Wet water-soaked films of CNF/chitosan 80/20 w/w show excellent mechanical properties, with an ultimate wet strength of 100 MPa (with corresponding maximum strain of 28%) and a tensile modulus of 4 and 14 GPa at low (0.5%) and large (16%) strains, respectively. More dry films of similar composition display strength of 200 MPa with maximum strain of 8% at 50% air relative humidity. We expect that the proposed, simple concept opens new pathways toward CNF-based material utilization in wet or humid conditions, which has still remained a challenge.

  6. Synthesis of organic-inorganic hybrid sols with nano silica particles and organoalkoxysilanes for transparent and high-thermal-resistance coating films using sol-gel reaction.

    PubMed

    Na, Moonkyong; Park, Hoyyul; Ahn, Myeongsang; Lee, Hyeonhwa; Chung, Ildoo

    2010-10-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid sols were synthesized from nano silica particles dispersed in water and from organoalkoxysilanes, using the sol-gel reaction. This work focuses on the effects of the three multifunctional organoalkoxysilanes dimethyldimethoxysilane (DMDMS), methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS), and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) to form a transparent and high-thermal-resistance coating film. The stability of the hybrid sol was evaluated as a function of the reaction time for 10 d through the variation of the viscosity. The viscosity of the silica/DMDMS and silica/MTMS sol was slightly increased for 10 d. The multifunctional organoalkoxysilanes formed dense silica networks through hydrolysis and condensation reaction, which enhanced the thermal resistance of the coating films. No thermal degradation of the silica/DMDMS sample occurred up to 600 degrees C, and none of the silica/MTMS and silica/TMOS samples occurred either up to 700 degrees C. The organic-inorganic hybrid sols were coated on the glass substrate using a spin-coating procedure. The organic-inorganic hybrid sols formed flat coating films without cracks. The transmittance of the hybrid sol coating films using MTMS and DMDMS was shown to be over 90%. The transmittance of the silica/TMOS sol coating film reacted for 10 d abruptly decreased due to faster gelation. The silica/DMDMS and silica/MTMS hybrid sols formed smooth coating films while the surface roughness of the silica/TMOS coating film markedly increased when the hybrid sol reacted for 10 d. The increase of the surface roughness of the silica/TMOS coating film can be attributed to the degradation of the stability of the hybrid sol and to the loss of transmittance of the coating film. It was confirmed in this study that the use of organic-inorganic hybrid sol can yield transparent and high-thermal-resistance coating films.

  7. Ultraviolet light stable and transparent sol-gel methyl siloxane hybrid material for UV light-emitting diode (UV LED) encapsulant.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jun-Young; Kim, YongHo; Kim, HweaYoon; Kim, YuBae; Jin, Jungho; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2015-01-21

    An ultraviolet (UV) transparent and stable methyl-siloxane hybrid material was prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The transparency and stability of a UV-LED encapsulant is an important issue because it affects UV light extraction efficiency and long-term reliability. We introduced a novel concept for UV-LED encapsulation using a thermally curable oligosiloxane resin. The encapsulant was fabricated by a hydrosilylation of hydrogen-methyl oligosiloxane resin and vinyl-methyl siloxane resin, and showed a comparable transmittance to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) in the UVB (∼300 nm) region. Most remarkably, the methyl-siloxane hybrid materials exhibited long-term UV stability under light soaking in UVB (∼300 nm) for 1000 h.

  8. Synthesis and luminescence properties of hybrid organic-inorganic transparent titania thin film activated by in-situ formed lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yige; Wang Li; Li Huanrong Liu Peng; Qin Dashan; Liu Binyuan; Zhang Wenjun; Deng Ruiping; Zhang Hongjie

    2008-03-15

    Stable transparent titania thin films were fabricated at room temperature by combining thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA)-modified titanium precursors with amphiphilic triblock poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO, P123) copolymers. The obtained transparent titania thin films were systematically investigated by IR spectroscopy, PL emission and excitation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. IR spectroscopy indicates that TTFA coordinates the titanium center during the process of hydrolysis and condensation. Luminescence spectroscopy confirms the in-situ formation of lanthanide complexes in the transparent titania thin film. TEM image shows that the in-situ formed lanthanide complexes were homogeneously distributed throughout the whole thin film. The quantum yield and the number of water coordinated to lanthanide metal center have been theoretically determined based on the luminescence data. - Graphical abstract: Novel stable luminescent organic-inorganic hybrid titania thin film with high transparency activated by in-situ formed lanthanide complexes have been obtained at room temperature via a simple one-pot synthesis approach by using TTFA-modified titanium precursor with amphiphilic triblock copolymer P123. The obtained hybrid thin film displays bright red (or green), near-monochromatic luminescence due to the in-situ formed lanthanide complex.

  9. Successful entrapment of carbon dots within flexible free-standing transparent mesoporous organic-inorganic silica hybrid films for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilakopoulou, Anastasia; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Vainos, Nikolaos; Koutselas, Ioannis

    2017-04-01

    The effective entrapment of Carbon dots (CDs) into a polymer-silica hybrid matrix, formed as free standing transparent flexible films, is presented. The composite's synthesis, characterization, device application and properties -mechanical, thermal and optical- are being provided and discussed. CDs of 3 nm mean size with strong photoluminescence are embedded into a silica matrix during the sol-gel procedure, using tetraethyl orthosilicate as the precursor and F127 triblock copolymer as the structure directing agent under acidic conditions. The final hybrid nanostructure forms free standing transparent films that show high flexibility and long term stable CDs luminescence indicating the protective character of the hybrid matrix. It is crucial that the photoluminescence of the hybrid's CDs is not seriously affected after thermal treatment at 550 °C for 30 min. Moreover, the herein reported hybrid is demonstrated to be suitable for the fabrication of advanced photonic structures using soft lithography processes due to its low shrinkage and distortion upon drying, both attributable to its porosity. Finally, it is reported that addition of F127 ethanolic solution in aqueous solution of CDs induces a blue-shift of their photoluminescence.

  10. High performance of carbon nanotubes/silver nanowires-PET hybrid flexible transparent conductive films via facile pressing-transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mao-Xiang; Han, Chong; Li, Min; Shen, Xiang-Qian

    2014-01-01

    To obtain low sheet resistance, high optical transmittance, small open spaces in conductive networks, and enhanced adhesion of flexible transparent conductive films, a carbon nanotube (CNT)/silver nanowire (AgNW)-PET hybrid film was fabricated by mechanical pressing-transfer process at room temperature. The morphology and structure were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), the optical transmittance and sheet resistance were tested by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) spectrophotometer and four-point probe technique, and the adhesion was also measured by 3M sticky tape. The results indicate that in this hybrid nanostructure, AgNWs form the main conductive networks and CNTs as assistant conductive networks are filled in the open spaces of AgNWs networks. The sheet resistance of the hybrid films can reach approximately 20.9 to 53.9 Ω/□ with the optical transmittance of approximately 84% to 91%. The second mechanical pressing step can greatly reduce the surface roughness of the hybrid film and enhance the adhesion force between CNTs, AgNWs, and PET substrate. This process is hopeful for large-scale production of high-end flexible transparent conductive films.

  11. A Novel Hybrid Ultramicrotomy/FIB-SEM Technique: Preparation of Serial Electron-Transparent Thin Sections of a Hayabusa Grain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2014-01-01

    the 'ribs' protruding from either side run parallel. Each rib indicates the location of a planned FIB section, and the spine contains the final two planned sections. We use a cap with a 4 micron-wide spine and 2micron-wide ribs that have ?3.5 micron of space between them (narrower cuts result in too much re-deposition of material inside the trenches). Using a 30kV, 3nA ion-beam we expose the front surface of the grain and commence milling trenches between sections. Rather than using the typical C-cut to prepare the sample for lift-out, an L-cut is used instead, leaving the sample connected by an interior tab. tab. Sections are lifted out, attached to TEM grids and thinned to electron transparency. TEM analyses show that our hybrid technique preserves both interior and edge features, including surface modifications from exposure to the space environment, such as damaged rims that form in response to solar wind implantation effects and adhering grains. In addition, the FIB sections provide larger areas that are free of fractures and chatter effects in comparison to the microtome thin sections, thus enabling more accurate measurements of solar flare particle track densities that are used to determine the surface exposure age of the particles.

  12. Very thin ITO/metal mesh hybrid films for a high-performance transparent conductive layer in GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Jung-Hong; Kwak, Hoe-Min; Kim, Kiyoung; Jeong, Woo-Lim; Lee, Dong-Seon

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce very thin Indium tin oxide (ITO) layers (5, 10, and 15 nm) hybridized with a metal mesh to produce high-performance transparent conductive layers (TCLs) in near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (NUV LEDs). Using UV-vis-IR spectrometry, Hall measurement, and atomic force microscopy, we found that 10 nm was the optimal thickness for the very thin ITO layers in terms of outstanding transmittance and sheet resistance values as well as stable contact properties when hybridized with the metal mesh. The proposed layers showed a value of 4.56 Ω/□ for sheet resistance and a value of 89.1% for transmittance. Moreover, the NUV LEDs fabricated with the hybrid TCLs achieved ˜140% enhanced light output power compared to that of 150 nm thick ITO layers. Finally, to verify the practical usage of the TCLs for industrial applications, we packaged the NUV LED chips and obtained improved turn-on voltage (3.48 V) and light output power (˜116%) performance.

  13. Very thin ITO/metal mesh hybrid films for a high-performance transparent conductive layer in GaN-based light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Min, Jung-Hong; Kwak, Hoe-Min; Kim, Kiyoung; Jeong, Woo-Lim; Lee, Dong-Seon

    2017-01-27

    In this paper, we introduce very thin Indium tin oxide (ITO) layers (5, 10, and 15 nm) hybridized with a metal mesh to produce high-performance transparent conductive layers (TCLs) in near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (NUV LEDs). Using UV-vis-IR spectrometry, Hall measurement, and atomic force microscopy, we found that 10 nm was the optimal thickness for the very thin ITO layers in terms of outstanding transmittance and sheet resistance values as well as stable contact properties when hybridized with the metal mesh. The proposed layers showed a value of 4.56 Ω/□ for sheet resistance and a value of 89.1% for transmittance. Moreover, the NUV LEDs fabricated with the hybrid TCLs achieved ∼140% enhanced light output power compared to that of 150 nm thick ITO layers. Finally, to verify the practical usage of the TCLs for industrial applications, we packaged the NUV LED chips and obtained improved turn-on voltage (3.48 V) and light output power (∼116%) performance.

  14. Hybrid elastin-like polypeptide-polyethylene glycol (ELP-PEG) hydrogels with improved transparency and independent control of matrix mechanics and cell ligand density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyuan; Cai, Lei; Paul, Alexandra; Enejder, Annika; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2014-09-08

    Hydrogels have been developed as extracellular matrix (ECM) mimics both for therapeutic applications and basic biological studies. In particular, elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) hydrogels, which can be tuned to mimic several biochemical and physical characteristics of native ECM, have been constructed to encapsulate various types of cells to create in vitro mimics of in vivo tissues. However, ELP hydrogels become opaque at body temperature because of ELP's lower critical solution temperature behavior. This opacity obstructs light-based observation of the morphology and behavior of encapsulated cells. In order to improve the transparency of ELP hydrogels for better imaging, we have designed a hybrid ELP-polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel system that rapidly cross-links with tris(hydroxymethyl) phosphine (THP) in aqueous solution via Mannich-type condensation. As expected, addition of the hydrophilic PEG component significantly improves the light transmittance. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy reveals that the hybrid ELP-PEG hydrogels have smaller hydrophobic ELP aggregates at 37 °C. Importantly, this hydrogel platform enables independent tuning of adhesion ligand density and matrix stiffness, which is desirable for studies of cell-matrix interactions. Human fibroblasts encapsulated in these hydrogels show high viability (>98%) after 7 days of culture. High-resolution confocal microscopy of encapsulated fibroblasts reveals that the cells adopt a more spread morphology in response to higher RGD ligand concentrations and softer gel mechanics.

  15. Solution-processed highly conductive PEDOT:PSS/AgNW/GO transparent film for efficient organic-Si hybrid solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiaojing; Song, Tao; Cui, Wei; Liu, Yuqiang; Xu, Weidong; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Sun, Baoquan

    2015-02-11

    Hybrid solar cells based on n-Si/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene- sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) heterojunction promise to be a low cost photovoltaic technology by using simple device structure and easy fabrication process. However, due to the low conductivity of PEDOT:PSS, a metal grid deposited by vacuum evaporation method is still required to enhance the charge collection efficiency, which complicates the device fabrication process. Here, a solution-processed graphene oxide (GO)-welded silver nanowires (AgNWs) transparent conductive electrode (TCE) was employed to replace the vacuum deposited metal grid. A unique "sandwich" structure was developed by embedding an AgNW network between PEDOT:PSS and GO with a figure-of-merit of 8.6×10(-3) Ω(-1), which was even higher than that of sputtered indium tin oxide electrode (6.6×10(-3) Ω(-1)). A champion power conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved, because of the decreased series resistance of the TCEs as well as the enhanced built-in potential (Vbi) in the hybrid solar cells. The TCEs were obtained by facile low-temperature solution process method, which was compatible with cost-effective mass production technology.

  16. Layer-by-Layer assembled hybrid multilayer thin film electrodes based on transparent cellulose nanofibers paper for flexible supercapacitors applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Gao, Kezheng; Shao, Ziqiang; Peng, Xiaoqing; Wu, Xue; Wang, Feijun

    2014-03-01

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) paper with low thermal expansion and electrolyte absorption properties is considered to be a good potential substrate for supercapacitors. Unlike traditional substrates, such as glass or plastic, CNFs paper saves surfaces pretreatment when Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly method is used. In this study, negatively charged graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene: poly(styrene sulfonate)) (PEDOT:PSS) nanoparticles are deposited onto CNFs paper with positively charged polyaniline (PANI) nanowires as agents to prepare multilayer thin film electrodes, respectively. Due to the different nanostructures of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and PEDOT:PSS, the microstructures of the electrodes are distinguishing. Our work demonstrate that CNFs paper/PANI/RGO electrode provides a more effective pathway for ion transport facilitation compared with CNFs paper/PANI/PEDOT:PSS electrode. The supercapacitor fabricated by CNFs/[PANI-RGO]8 (S-PG-8) exhibits an excellent areal capacitance of 5.86 mF cm-2 at a current density of 0.0043 mA cm-2, and at the same current density the areal capacitance of the supercapacitor fabricated by CNFs/[PANI-PEDOT:PSS]8 (S-PP-8) is 4.22 mF cm-2. S-PG-8 also exhibits good cyclic stability. This study provides a novel method using CNFs as substrate to prepare hybrid electrodes with diverse microstructures that are promising for future flexible supercapacitors.

  17. Electronic structure and defect properties of B6O from hybrid functional and many-body perturbation theory calculations: A possible ambipolar transparent conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, J. B.; Lordi, V.; Miglio, A.; Hautier, G.

    2014-07-01

    B6O is a member of icosahedral boron-rich solids known for their physical hardness and stability under irradiation bombardment, but it has also recently emerged as a promising high mobility p -type transparent conducting oxide. Using a combination of hybrid functional and many-body perturbation theory calculations, we report on the electronic structure and defect properties of this material. Our calculations identify B6O has a direct band gap in excess of 3.0 eV and possesses largely isotropic and low effective masses for both holes and electrons. Of the native defects, we identify no intrinsic origin to the reported p -type conductivity and confirm that p-type doping is not prevented by intrinsic defects such as oxygen vacancies, which we find act exclusively as neutral defects rather than hole-killing donors. We also investigate a number of common impurities and plausible dopants, finding that isolated acceptor candidates tend to yield deep states within the band gap or act instead as donors, and cannot account for p-type conductivity. Our calculations identify the only shallow acceptor candidate to be a complex consisting of interstitial H bonded to C substituting on the O site (CH)O. We therefore attribute the origins of p-type conductivity to these complexes formed during growth or more likely via isolated CO which later binds with H within the crystal. Lastly, we identify Si as a plausible n -type dopant, as it favorably acts as a shallow donor and does not suffer from self-compensation as may the C-related defects. Thus, in addition to the observed p-type conductivity, B6O exhibits promise of n -type dopability if the stoichiometry and both native and extrinsic sources of compensation can be sufficiently controlled.

  18. Color transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, B.K.; Miller, G.A.

    1993-11-01

    The anomously large transmission of nucleons through a nucleus following a hard collision is explored. This effect, known as color transparency, is believed to be a prediction of QCD. The necessary conditions for its occurrence and the effects that must be included a realistic calculation are discussed.

  19. Preparation of Transparent Bulk TiO2/PMMA Hybrids with Improved Refractive Indices via an in Situ Polymerization Process Using TiO2 Nanoparticles Bearing PMMA Chains Grown by Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Satoshi; Fujita, Masato; Idota, Naokazu; Matsukawa, Kimihiro; Sugahara, Yoshiyuki

    2016-12-21

    Transparent TiO2/PMMA hybrids with a thickness of 5 mm and improved refractive indices were prepared by in situ polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles bearing poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chains grown using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), and the effect of the chain length of modified PMMA on the dispersibility of modified TiO2 nanoparticles in the bulk hybrids was investigated. The surfaces of TiO2 nanoparticles were modified with both m-(chloromethyl)phenylmethanoyloxymethylphosphonic acid bearing a terminal ATRP initiator and isodecyl phosphate with a high affinity for common organic solvents, leading to sufficient dispersibility of the surface-modified particles in toluene. Subsequently, SI-ATRP of MMA was achieved from the modified surfaces of the TiO2 nanoparticles without aggregation of the nanoparticles in toluene. The molecular weights of the PMMA chains cleaved from the modified TiO2 nanoparticles increased with increases in the prolonging of the polymerization period, and these exhibited a narrow distribution, indicating chain growth controlled by SI-ATRP. The nanoparticles bearing PMMA chains were well-dispersed in MMA regardless of the polymerization period. Bulk PMMA hybrids containing modified TiO2 nanoparticles with a thickness of 5 mm were prepared by in situ polymerization of the MMA dispersion. The transparency of the hybrids depended significantly on the chain length of the modified PMMA on the nanoparticles, because the modified PMMA of low molecular weight induced aggregation of the TiO2 nanoparticles during the in situ polymerization process. The refractive indices of the bulk hybrids could be controlled by adjusting the TiO2 content and could be increased up to 1.566 for 6.3 vol % TiO2 content (1.492 for pristine PMMA).

  20. Phenomenological Transparency.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Morgan; Mara, Michael

    2017-01-20

    Translucent objects such as fog, clouds, smoke, glass, ice, and liquids are pervasive in cinematic environments because they frame scenes in depth and create visually-compelling shots. Unfortunately, they are hard to render in real-time and have thus previously been rendered poorly compared to opaque surfaces. This paper introduces the first model for a real-time rasterization algorithm that can simultaneously approximate the following transparency phenomena: wavelength-varying ("colored") transmission, translucent colored shadows, caustics, volumetric light and shadowing, partial coverage, diffusion, and refraction. All render efficiently with order-independent draw calls and low bandwidth. We include source code.

  1. Improved thermal oxidation stability of solution-processable silver nanowire transparent electrode by reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Youngu

    2012-12-01

    Solution-processable silver nanowire-reduced graphene oxide (AgNW-rGO) hybrid transparent electrode was prepared in order to replace conventional ITO transparent electrode. AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited high optical transmittance and low sheet resistance, which is comparable to ITO transparent electrode. In addition, it was found that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited highly enhanced thermal oxidation and chemical stabilities due to excellent gas-barrier property of rGO passivation layer onto AgNW film. Furthermore, the organic solar cells with AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode showed good photovoltaic behavior as much as solar cells with AgNW transparent electrode. It is expected that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode can be used as a key component in various optoelectronic application such as display panels, touch screen panels, and solar cells.

  2. Transparent electronics and prospects for transparent displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wager, John F.; Valencia, Melinda M.; Bender, Jeffrey P.; Norris, Benjamin J.; Chiang, Hai Q.; Hong, David; Norris, Luke N.; Harman, Taran V.; Park, Sangmoon; Anderson, Jeremy T.; Park, Cheol-Hee; Keszler, Douglas A.; Tate, Janet; Yanagi, Hiroshi; Price, Matthew F.; Hoffman, R. L.

    2003-09-01

    Transparent electronics is a nascent technology whose objective is the realization of invisible electronic circuits. Part of the impetus for the development of transparent electronics is the recent availability of p-type transparent conductive oxides (TCOs). With the emergence of p-type TCOs, in addition to conventional n-type TCOs such as indium-tin oxide, tin oxide, and zinc oxide, fabrication of transparent bipolar electronic devices becomes feasible. The first part of this paper reviews TCOs and discusses our work in the development of p-TCOs and alternative TC materials (e.g. sulfides). We have recently invented a novel, n-channel, accumulation-mode transparent thin-film transistor (TTFT). This TTFT is highly transparent, has very little light sensitivity, and exhibits electrical characteristics that appear to be suitable for implementation as a transparent select-transistor in each pixel of an active-matrix liquid-crystal display (AMLCD). Moreover, the processing technology used to fabricate this device is relatively simple and appears to be compatible with inexpensive glass substrate technology. The second part of this paper focuses on TTFTs. If transparent electronics is employed to realize transparent back-plane electronic drivers on transparent substrates, fabrication of a transparent display becomes feasible. The third part of this paper offers an approach for realization of a transparent display.

  3. Transparent screens.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, R J

    1988-01-01

    There is a kind of transitional phenomenon found among certain borderline patients which is quite distinct from Winnicott's transitional object. These are patients who are preoccupied with maintaining proper physical distance from their objects, in order to regulate anxieties about isolation on the one hand, and identity-annihilating closeness on the other. Since they believe the activity of looking to be intrusive and devouring, hence dangerous, transparent screens are interposed between self and other, and serve as protective barriers. These screens function intrapsychically as well, to split off or hide those aspects of the self felt to be unacceptable. The analyst may witness the failure of the screen in several ways: it may create too great a distance, isolating the individual and keeping him from life; it may become contaminated by projections and turn into a persecutor, or trap the individual, a state of intolerable claustrophobia; most dramatically, it may suddenly shatter. The latter is associated with psychosis and death, and its appearance may be a harbinger of suicide.

  4. Transparent switchboard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, H. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A tin oxide coating is formed on a plate of glass and the coating is then etched away from the glass in thin lines to form separate electrical conductors which extend to one end of the plate and connect to either a vertical (column) or horizontal (row) position sensing SCR circuit. A thin transparent insulating coating is formed over the oxide layer except at selected touch points which are positioned in a matrix pattern of vertical columns and horizontal rows. Touching one of these points with a finger bridges the thin line between adjacent conductors to activate trigger circuits in the particular row and column sensing circuits associated with the point touched. The row and column sensing circuits are similar and are powered with a low frequency, ac voltage source. The source for the row circuits is 180 out of phase with the source for the column circuits so that one circuit acts as ground for the other during half of the supply voltage cycle. The signals from the sensing circuits are input to a logic circuit which determines the presence of a valid touch, stores a binary matrix number associated with the touched point, signals a computer of the presence of a stored number and prevents storage of a new number before receiving an enable signal from the computer.

  5. Transparent and conductive PEDOT:PSS/Ag NW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid films prepared by spin-coating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingqing, Yue; Jinliang, Yan; Delan, Meng

    2015-12-01

    PEDOT:PSS/Ag NW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid films were deposited on PET substrates by the spin coating technique at room temperature. The optical transmittance, sheet resistance, crystallization and surface morphology were characterized by using the double beam spectrophotometer, Hall effect system, X-ray diffractometer and field emission scanning electron microscopy. XRD patterns of the hybrid films display characteristic diffraction peaks of Ag (111) and Ag (200), and the Ag NW networks have a polycrystalline structure with a Ag (111) preferred orientation. A high transmittance of 83.95% at the 550 nm wavelength and a low sheet resistance of 21.98 Ω/□ are achieved for 3-PEDOT:PSS/5-Ag NW/3-PEDOT:PSS hybrid films. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 10974077), and the Innovation Project of Shandong Graduate Education, China (No. SDYY13093).

  6. Fabrication of three-dimensional hybrid nanostructure-embedded ITO and its application as a transparent electrode for high-efficiency solution processable organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Won; Jeon, Hwan-Jin; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Ahn, Chi Won

    2017-03-02

    Well-aligned, high-resolution (10 nm), three-dimensional (3D) hybrid nanostructures consisting of patterned cylinders and Au islands were fabricated on ITO substrates using an ion bombardment process and a tilted deposition process. The fabricated 3D hybrid nanostructure-embedded ITO maintained its excellent electrical and optical properties after applying a surface-structuring process. The solution processable organic photovoltaic device (SP-OPV) employing a 3D hybrid nanostructure-embedded ITO as the anode displayed a 10% enhancement in the photovoltaic performance compared to the photovoltaic device prepared using a flat ITO electrode, due to the improved charge collection (extraction and transport) efficiency as well as light absorbance by the photo-active layer.

  7. Tunable Broadband Printed Carbon Transparent Conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue; Wan, Jiayu

    Transparent conductors have been widely applied in solar cells, transparent smart skins, and sensing/imaging antennas, etc. Carbon-based transparent conductor has attracted great attention for its low cost and broad range transparency. Ion intercalation has been known to highly dope graphitic materials, thereby tuning materials' optoelectronic properties. For the first time, we successfully tune the optical transmittance of a reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/CNT network from mid-IR range to visible range by means of Li-ion intercalation/deintercalation. We also observed a simultaneous increase of the electrical conductivity with the Li-ion intercalation. This printed carbon hybrid thin film was prepared through all solution processes and was easily scalable. This study demonstrates the possibility of using ion intercalation for low cost, tunable broadband transparent conductors.

  8. ZnO nanorods/graphene/Ni/Au hybrid structures as transparent conductive layer in GaN LED for low work voltage and high light extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun; Xie, Yiyang; Ma, Huali; Du, Yinxiao; Zeng, Fanguang; Ding, Pei; Gao, Zhiyuan; Xu, Chen; Sun, Jie

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, by virtue of one-dimensional ZnO nanorods and two-dimensional graphene film hybrid structures, both the enhanced current spreading and enhanced light extraction were realized at the same time. A 1 nm/1 nm Ni/Au layer was used as an interlayer between graphene and pGaN to form ohmic contact, which makes the device have a good forward conduction properties. Through the comparison of the two groups of making ZnO nanorods or not, it was found that the 30% light extraction efficiency of the device was improved by using the ZnO nanorods. By analysis key parameters of two groups such as the turn-on voltage, work voltage and reverse leakage current, it was proved that the method for preparing surface nano structure by hydrothermal method self-organization growth ZnO nanorods applied in GaN LEDs has no influence to device's electrical properties. The hybrid structure application in GaN LED, make an achievement of a good ohmic contact, no use of ITO and enhancement of light extraction at the same time, meanwhile it does not change the device structure, introduce additional process, worsen the electrical properties.

  9. Colorless and transparent copolyimide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hye-Jin; Kim, Yong Seok; Chang, Jin-Hae

    2014-12-01

    Copolyimides (Co-PIs) were synthesized from 2,2'-bis(trifluoromethyl) benzidine (TFB) and different ratios of 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) diphthalic anhydride (6FDA) and pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA). The Co-PI films were obtained from poly(amic acid) (PAA) by solution-casting through typical chemical and thermal imidizations. The thermal properties and optical transparency of the Co-PI films with various PMDA monomer contents were investigated. It was found that with increasing PMDA content, the thermal transition temperatures of the Co-PI films increased. Co-PI nanocomposites were prepared with various amounts of organically modified hectorite (STN) on a TFB:6FDA:PMDA = 1.0:0.9:0.1 mole ratio Co-PI hybrid film to examine the thermal properties, morphology, and optical transparency. The thermo-optical properties of the Co-PI hybrid films deteriorated with increasing clay content. However, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and oxygen barrier properties of the PI hybrid films improved with increasing clay content.

  10. Soils. Transparency Masters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This document is a collection of 43 overhead transparency masters to be used as teaching aids in a course of study involving soils such as geology, agronomy, hydrology, earth science, or land use study. Some transparencies are in color. Selected titles of transparencies may give the reader a better understanding of the graphic content. Titles are:…

  11. The art of transparency.

    PubMed

    Sayim, Bilge; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Artists throughout the ages have discovered a number of techniques to depict transparency. With only a few exceptions, these techniques follow closely the properties of physical transparency. The two best known properties are X-junctions and the luminance relations described by Metelli. X-junctions are seen where the contours of a transparent material cross contours of the surface behind; Metelli's constraints on the luminance relations between the direct and filtered portions of the surface specify a range of luminance values that are consistent with transparency. These principles have been used by artists since the time of ancient Egypt. However, artists also discovered that stimuli can be seen as transparent even when these physical constraints are not met. Ancient Greek artists, for example, were able to depict transparent materials in simple black-and-white line drawings. Artists also learned how to represent transparency in cases where neither X-junctions nor Metelli's constraints could apply: for example, where no portions of the objects behind the transparent material extend beyond it. Many painters convincingly portrayed transparency in these cases by depicting the effects the transparent medium would have on material or object properties. Here, we show how artists employed these and other techniques revealing their anticipation of current formalizations of perceived transparency, and we suggest new, as-yet-untested principles.

  12. The art of transparency

    PubMed Central

    Sayim, Bilge; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Artists throughout the ages have discovered a number of techniques to depict transparency. With only a few exceptions, these techniques follow closely the properties of physical transparency. The two best known properties are X-junctions and the luminance relations described by Metelli. X-junctions are seen where the contours of a transparent material cross contours of the surface behind; Metelli's constraints on the luminance relations between the direct and filtered portions of the surface specify a range of luminance values that are consistent with transparency. These principles have been used by artists since the time of ancient Egypt. However, artists also discovered that stimuli can be seen as transparent even when these physical constraints are not met. Ancient Greek artists, for example, were able to depict transparent materials in simple black-and-white line drawings. Artists also learned how to represent transparency in cases where neither X-junctions nor Metelli's constraints could apply: for example, where no portions of the objects behind the transparent material extend beyond it. Many painters convincingly portrayed transparency in these cases by depicting the effects the transparent medium would have on material or object properties. Here, we show how artists employed these and other techniques revealing their anticipation of current formalizations of perceived transparency, and we suggest new, as-yet-untested principles. PMID:23145252

  13. Induced transparency in optomechanically coupled resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhenglu; Fan, Bixuan; Stace, Thomas M.; Milburn, G. J.; Holmes, Catherine A.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we theoretically investigate a hybrid system of two optomechanically coupled resonators, which exhibits induced transparency. This is realized by coupling an optical ring resonator to a toroid. In the semiclassical analyses, the system displays bistabilities, isolated branches (isolas), and self-sustained oscillation dynamics. Furthermore, we find that the induced transparency window sensitively relies on the mechanical motion. Based on this fact, we show that the described system can be used as a weak force detector and the optimal sensitivity can beat the standard quantum limit without using feedback control or squeezing under available experimental conditions.

  14. Plasmonic transparent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liapis, Andreas C.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.

    2016-09-01

    Many of today's technological applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, displays, and touch screens, require materials that are simultaneously optically transparent and electrically conducting. Here we explore transparent conductors based on the excitation of surface plasmons in nanostructured metal films. We measure both the optical and electrical properties of films perforated with nanometer-scale features and optimize the design parameters in order to maximize optical transmission without sacrificing electrical conductivity. We demonstrate that plasmonic transparent conductors can out-perform indium tin oxide in terms of both their transparency and their conductivity.

  15. Talking about Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Rae

    2009-01-01

    In his inaugural address, U.S. President Barack Obama linked the need to demonstrate accountability and transparency to the earning of trust. His connection of these dots is not surprising, since taxpayers often expect accountability and transparency from their governments, just as governments, donors, alumni, and students expect accountability…

  16. Transparencies and Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the use of perspective, or showing things as the human eye sees them, when creating reflections and transparencies in works of art. Provides examples of artwork using transparency, reflection, and refraction by M. C. Escher, Richard Estes, and Janet Fish to give students an opportunity to learn about these three art techniques. (CMK)

  17. Hazy Transparent Cellulose Nanopaper

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Koga, Hirotaka; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Nogi, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify light scattering mechanism of hazy transparent cellulose nanopaper. Clear optical transparent nanopaper consists of 3–15 nm wide cellulose nanofibers, which are obtained by the full nanofibrillation of pulp fibers. At the clear transparent nanopaper with 40 μm thickness, their total transmittance are 89.3–91.5% and haze values are 4.9–11.7%. When the pulp fibers are subjected to weak nanofibrillation, hazy transparent nanopapers are obtained. The hazy transparent nanopaper consists of cellulose nanofibers and some microsized cellulose fibers. At the hazy transparent nanopaper with 40 μm thickness, their total transmittance were constant at 88.6–92.1% but their haze value were 27.3–86.7%. Cellulose nanofibers are solid cylinders, whereas the pulp fibers are hollow cylinders. The hollow shape is retained in the microsized cellulose fibers, but they are compressed flat inside the nanopaper. This compressed cavity causes light scattering by the refractive index difference between air and cellulose. As a result, the nanopaper shows a hazy transparent appearance and exhibits a high thermal durability (295–305 °C), and low thermal expansion (8.5–10.6 ppm/K) because of their high density (1.29–1.55 g/cm3) and crystallinity (73–80%). PMID:28128326

  18. Hazy Transparent Cellulose Nanopaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Koga, Hirotaka; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Nogi, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify light scattering mechanism of hazy transparent cellulose nanopaper. Clear optical transparent nanopaper consists of 3–15 nm wide cellulose nanofibers, which are obtained by the full nanofibrillation of pulp fibers. At the clear transparent nanopaper with 40 μm thickness, their total transmittance are 89.3–91.5% and haze values are 4.9–11.7%. When the pulp fibers are subjected to weak nanofibrillation, hazy transparent nanopapers are obtained. The hazy transparent nanopaper consists of cellulose nanofibers and some microsized cellulose fibers. At the hazy transparent nanopaper with 40 μm thickness, their total transmittance were constant at 88.6–92.1% but their haze value were 27.3–86.7%. Cellulose nanofibers are solid cylinders, whereas the pulp fibers are hollow cylinders. The hollow shape is retained in the microsized cellulose fibers, but they are compressed flat inside the nanopaper. This compressed cavity causes light scattering by the refractive index difference between air and cellulose. As a result, the nanopaper shows a hazy transparent appearance and exhibits a high thermal durability (295–305 °C), and low thermal expansion (8.5–10.6 ppm/K) because of their high density (1.29–1.55 g/cm3) and crystallinity (73–80%).

  19. Stretchable, transparent, ionic conductors.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, Christoph; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Foo, Choon Chiang; Rothemund, Philipp; Whitesides, George M; Suo, Zhigang

    2013-08-30

    Existing stretchable, transparent conductors are mostly electronic conductors. They limit the performance of interconnects, sensors, and actuators as components of stretchable electronics and soft machines. We describe a class of devices enabled by ionic conductors that are highly stretchable, fully transparent to light of all colors, and capable of operation at frequencies beyond 10 kilohertz and voltages above 10 kilovolts. We demonstrate a transparent actuator that can generate large strains and a transparent loudspeaker that produces sound over the entire audible range. The electromechanical transduction is achieved without electrochemical reaction. The ionic conductors have higher resistivity than many electronic conductors; however, when large stretchability and high transmittance are required, the ionic conductors have lower sheet resistance than all existing electronic conductors.

  20. Grayscale transparent metasurface holograms

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lei; Kruk, Sergey; Tang, Hanzhi; ...

    2016-12-16

    In this paper, we demonstrate transparent metaholograms based on silicon metasurfaces that allow high-resolution grayscale images to be encoded. Finally, the holograms feature the highest diffraction and transmission efficiencies, and operate over a broad spectral range.

  1. A Dictionary for Transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2001-11-15

    There are many terms that are used in association with the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Transparency Project associated with the Mayak Fissile Materials Storage Facility. This is a collection of proposed definitions of these terms.

  2. Zinc oxyfluoride transparent conductor

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.

    1991-02-05

    Transparent, electrically conductive and infrared-reflective films of zinc oxyfluoride are produced by chemical vapor deposition from vapor mixtures of zinc, oxygen and fluorine-containing compounds. The substitution of fluorine for some of the oxygen in zinc oxide results in dramatic increases in the electrical conductivity. For example, diethyl zinc, ethyl alcohol and hexafluoropropene vapors are reacted over a glass surface at 400.degree. C. to form a visibly transparent, electrically conductive, infrared reflective and ultraviolet absorptive film of zinc oxyfluoride. Such films are useful in liquid crystal display devices, solar cells, electrochromic absorbers and reflectors, energy-conserving heat mirrors, and antistatic coatings.

  3. Transparent conductive coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashok, S.

    1983-01-01

    Thin film transparent conductors are discussed. Materials with electrical conductivity and optical transparency are highly desirable in many optoelectronic applications including photovoltaics. Certain binary oxide semiconductors such as tin oxide (SnO2) and indium oxide (In2O3) offer much better performance tradeoff in optoelectronics as well as better mechanical and chemical stability than thin semitransparent films. These thin-film transparent conductors (TC) are essentially wide-bandgap degenerate semiconductors - invariably n-type - and hence are transparent to sub-bandgap (visible) radiation while affording high electrical conductivity due to the large free electron concentration. The principal performance characteristics of TC's are, of course, electrical conductivity and optical transmission. The TC's have a refractive index of around 2.0 and hence act as very efficient antireflection coatings. For using TC's in surface barrier solar cells, the photovoltaic barrier is of utmost importance and so the work function or electron affinity of the TC is also a very important material parameter. Fabrication processes are discussed.

  4. Transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Di; Liu, Zhe; Liang, Bo; Wang, Xianfu; Shen, Guozhen

    2012-05-01

    With the features of high mobility, a high electric on/off ratio and excellent transparency, metal oxide nanowires are excellent candidates for transparent thin-film transistors, which is one of the key technologies to realize transparent electronics. This article provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research activities that focus on transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors. It begins with the brief introduction to the synthetic methods for high quality metal oxide nanowires, and the typical nanowire transfer and printing techniques with emphasis on the simple contact printing methodology. High performance transparent transistors built on both single nanowires and nanowire thin films are then highlighted. The final section deals with the applications of transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors in the field of transparent displays and concludes with an outlook on the current perspectives and future directions of transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors.

  5. Transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Liu, Zhe; Liang, Bo; Wang, Xianfu; Shen, Guozhen

    2012-05-21

    With the features of high mobility, a high electric on/off ratio and excellent transparency, metal oxide nanowires are excellent candidates for transparent thin-film transistors, which is one of the key technologies to realize transparent electronics. This article provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research activities that focus on transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors. It begins with the brief introduction to the synthetic methods for high quality metal oxide nanowires, and the typical nanowire transfer and printing techniques with emphasis on the simple contact printing methodology. High performance transparent transistors built on both single nanowires and nanowire thin films are then highlighted. The final section deals with the applications of transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors in the field of transparent displays and concludes with an outlook on the current perspectives and future directions of transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors.

  6. Semi-transparent polymer solar cells with excellent sub-bandgap transmission for third generation photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Beiley, Zach M; Christoforo, M Greyson; Gratia, Paul; Bowring, Andrea R; Eberspacher, Petra; Margulis, George Y; Cabanetos, Clément; Beaujuge, Pierre M; Salleo, Alberto; McGehee, Michael D

    2013-12-23

    Semi-transparent organic photovoltaics are of interest for a variety of photovoltaic applications, including solar windows and hybrid tandem photovoltaics. The figure shows a photograph of our semi-transparent solar cell, which has a power conversion efficiency of 5.0%, with an above bandgap transmission of 34% and a sub-bandgap transmission of 81%.

  7. Stretchable and transparent electrodes based on in-plane structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kukjoo; Kim, Joohee; Hyun, Byung Gwan; Ji, Sangyoon; Kim, So-Yun; Kim, Sungwon; An, Byeong Wan; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-08-01

    Stretchable electronics has attracted great interest with compelling potential applications that require reliable operation under mechanical deformation. Achieving stretchability in devices, however, requires a deeper understanding of nanoscale materials and mechanics beyond the success of flexible electronics. In this regard, tremendous research efforts have been dedicated toward developing stretchable electrodes, which are one of the most important building blocks for stretchable electronics. Stretchable transparent thin-film electrodes, which retain their electrical conductivity and optical transparency under mechanical deformation, are particularly important for the favourable application of stretchable devices. This minireview summarizes recent advances in stretchable transparent thin-film electrodes, especially employing strategies based on in-plane structures. Various approaches using metal nanomaterials, carbon nanomaterials, and their hybrids are described in terms of preparation processes and their optoelectronic/mechanical properties. Some challenges and perspectives for further advances in stretchable transparent electrodes are also discussed.

  8. Electrospun assembly: a nondestructive nanofabrication for transparent photosensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuting; Shahid, Muhammad; Cheng, Jing; Nishijima, Hiroki; Pan, Wei

    2017-04-18

    Transparent electrodes based on a metal nanotrough network show superior electrical and optical properties. However, most metal networks fabricated by electrospinning are formed as film electrodes and are hard to pattern for the geometry shape of the device without any loss. Herein, we fabricate a highly transparent and flexible photodetector (PD) via a simple controlled electrospinning method. Owing to the trough- and belt-like geometry of Pt network electrodes, up to 83% transmittance can be obtained when the sheet resistances is 16 Ω sq(-1), which may be the best performance for Pt-based transparent electrodes at present. The benefit of this advantage, is that a wearable UV PD could be obtained by a facile electrospun assembly. This all-transparent device achieves an extraordinary transparency of 90% at 550 nm and an even superior response sensitivity compared with that of a Pt film-based sensor (14 Ω sq(-1) at 50% transparency). More importantly, this assembly approach has the versatility to enable us to fabricate highly transparent and flexible electronics in wearable applications, especially for the integration of oxide semiconductors and adhesive photoelectric hybrids.

  9. Electrospun assembly: a nondestructive nanofabrication for transparent photosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuting; Shahid, Muhammad; Cheng, Jing; Nishijima, Hiroki; Pan, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Transparent electrodes based on a metal nanotrough network show superior electrical and optical properties. However, most metal networks fabricated by electrospinning are formed as film electrodes and are hard to pattern for the geometry shape of the device without any loss. Herein, we fabricate a highly transparent and flexible photodetector (PD) via a simple controlled electrospinning method. Owing to the trough- and belt-like geometry of Pt network electrodes, up to 83% transmittance can be obtained when the sheet resistances is 16 Ω sq‑1, which may be the best performance for Pt-based transparent electrodes at present. The benefit of this advantage, is that a wearable UV PD could be obtained by a facile electrospun assembly. This all-transparent device achieves an extraordinary transparency of 90% at 550 nm and an even superior response sensitivity compared with that of a Pt film-based sensor (14 Ω sq‑1 at 50% transparency). More importantly, this assembly approach has the versatility to enable us to fabricate highly transparent and flexible electronics in wearable applications, especially for the integration of oxide semiconductors and adhesive photoelectric hybrids.

  10. Transparent Spinel Ceramic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    2009 NRL REVIEW 215 OPTICAL SCIENCES Transparent Spinel Ceramic J.S. Sanghera, G. Villalobos , W. Kim, S. Bayya, and I.D. Aggarwal Optical Sciences...Sponsored by NRL and ONR] Reference 1 G. Villalobos , J.S. Sanghera, S.B. Bayya, and I.D. Aggarwal, “Fluoride Salt Coated Magnesium Aluminate,” U.S. Patent 7,211,325, May 1, 2007.

  11. The most transparent research.

    PubMed

    Wenner, Melinda

    2009-10-01

    Biomedicine would be a breeze if organisms were transparent. With the ability to see through tissues, scientists could spot the development of tumors more easily in study animals. And biologists could study exactly how an animal's organs develop by observing them as they grow. In effect, the secrets of the body would be out there for everyone to see.The thought of peering into our tissues may sound like science fiction, but one day it could be science. Using ideas from genetics, electrical engineering, chemistry and solid-state physics, a handful of researchers are working on ways to render biological tissues transparent.Some have already succeeded: in 2007, Richard White, a biologist at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, used careful breeding techniques to create a transparent adult zebrafish named casper, evoking a reference to the famous cartoon ghost by the same name. Now, more than 100 labs around the world are using these transparent fish to study cancer pathology and development in real time. "The field of in vivo imaging-looking at things that are happening inside an actual organism-is growing rapidly," White says.Researchers are even making strides toward turning human tissue transparent. The primary reason we can't see what's inside of us is that light scatters when it passes through tissue. The body is densely packed with many types of substances, such as bone and fat, and light travels through them at different speeds because they have what physicists refer to as different refractive indices. The result is that light can't pass through biological tissues in a straight line, much as car headlights don't pass through dense fog. To fix this problem, scientists are working on developing ways to stop tissues from scattering light. Indeed, "if you take away the scattering properties of human tissues, we would look more or less like jellyfish," explains Changhuei Yang, an electrical engineer and bioengineer at the California Institute of Technology

  12. Perceptual transparency from image deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin’ya

    2015-01-01

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid’s surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of “invisible” transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation. PMID:26240313

  13. Transparent anti-stain coatings with good thermal and mechanical properties based on polyimide-silica nanohybrids.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myeon-Cheon; Sung, Giju; Nagappan, Saravanan; Han, Mi-Jeong; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we synthesized polyimide/silica hybrid materials via sol-gel method using a fluorinated poly(amic acid) silane precursor and a variety of perfluorosilane contents. We studied the influence of a hybrid coating film with the following characteristics; hydrophobicity, oleophobicity, optical transparency, and surface hardness of the coating films. The hybrid coatings with the fluorosilane contents up to 10 wt% are optically transparent and present good thermal stability with a degradation temperature of > 500 degrees C as well as a glass transition of > 300 degrees C. Both water contact angle and oil contact angle increase rapidly with introducing small amount of the fluorosilane in the hybrids and reaches the maximum of 115 degrees and 61 degrees, respectively. The hardness of the hybrid coatings increases up to 5H with an increase of the FTES content in the hybrids. These colorless, transparent, and thermally stable hybrid materials could be suitable for applications as anti-stain coatings.

  14. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  15. P-type transparent conducting oxides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kelvin H L; Xi, Kai; Blamire, Mark G; Egdell, Russell G

    2016-09-28

    Transparent conducting oxides constitute a unique class of materials combining properties of electrical conductivity and optical transparency in a single material. They are needed for a wide range of applications including solar cells, flat panel displays, touch screens, light emitting diodes and transparent electronics. Most of the commercially available TCOs are n-type, such as Sn doped In2O3, Al doped ZnO, and F doped SnO2. However, the development of efficient p-type TCOs remains an outstanding challenge. This challenge is thought to be due to the localized nature of the O 2p derived valence band which leads to difficulty in introducing shallow acceptors and large hole effective masses. In 1997 Hosono and co-workers (1997 Nature 389 939) proposed the concept of 'chemical modulation of the valence band' to mitigate this problem using hybridization of O 2p orbitals with close-shell Cu 3d (10) orbitals. This work has sparked tremendous interest in designing p-TCO materials together with deep understanding the underlying materials physics. In this article, we will provide a comprehensive review on traditional and recently emergent p-TCOs, including Cu(+)-based delafossites, layered oxychalcogenides, nd (6) spinel oxides, Cr(3+)-based oxides (3d (3)) and post-transition metal oxides with lone pair state (ns (2)). We will focus our discussions on the basic materials physics of these materials in terms of electronic structures, doping and defect properties for p-type conductivity and optical properties. Device applications based on p-TCOs for transparent p-n junctions will also be briefly discussed.

  16. P-type transparent conducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kelvin H. L.; Xi, Kai; Blamire, Mark G.; Egdell, Russell G.

    2016-09-01

    Transparent conducting oxides constitute a unique class of materials combining properties of electrical conductivity and optical transparency in a single material. They are needed for a wide range of applications including solar cells, flat panel displays, touch screens, light emitting diodes and transparent electronics. Most of the commercially available TCOs are n-type, such as Sn doped In2O3, Al doped ZnO, and F doped SnO2. However, the development of efficient p-type TCOs remains an outstanding challenge. This challenge is thought to be due to the localized nature of the O 2p derived valence band which leads to difficulty in introducing shallow acceptors and large hole effective masses. In 1997 Hosono and co-workers (1997 Nature 389 939) proposed the concept of ‘chemical modulation of the valence band’ to mitigate this problem using hybridization of O 2p orbitals with close-shell Cu 3d 10 orbitals. This work has sparked tremendous interest in designing p-TCO materials together with deep understanding the underlying materials physics. In this article, we will provide a comprehensive review on traditional and recently emergent p-TCOs, including Cu+-based delafossites, layered oxychalcogenides, nd 6 spinel oxides, Cr3+-based oxides (3d 3) and post-transition metal oxides with lone pair state (ns 2). We will focus our discussions on the basic materials physics of these materials in terms of electronic structures, doping and defect properties for p-type conductivity and optical properties. Device applications based on p-TCOs for transparent p-n junctions will also be briefly discussed.

  17. Corneal structure and transparency

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Keith M.; Knupp, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The corneal stroma plays several pivotal roles within the eye. Optically, it is the main refracting lens and thus has to combine almost perfect transmission of visible light with precise shape, in order to focus incoming light. Furthermore, mechanically it has to be extremely tough to protect the inner contents of the eye. These functions are governed by its structure at all hierarchical levels. The basic principles of corneal structure and transparency have been known for some time, but in recent years X-ray scattering and other methods have revealed that the details of this structure are far more complex than previously thought and that the intricacy of the arrangement of the collagenous lamellae provides the shape and the mechanical properties of the tissue. At the molecular level, modern technologies and theoretical modelling have started to explain exactly how the collagen fibrils are arranged within the stromal lamellae and how proteoglycans maintain this ultrastructure. In this review we describe the current state of knowledge about the three-dimensional stromal architecture at the microscopic level, and about the control mechanisms at the nanoscopic level that lead to optical transparency. PMID:26145225

  18. The transparency trap.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Ethan

    2014-10-01

    To promote accountability, productivity, and shared learning, many organizations create open work environments and gather reams of data on how individuals spend their time. A few years ago, HBS professor Ethan Bernstein set out to find empirical evidence that such approaches improve organizational performance. What he discovered is that this kind of transparency often has an unintended consequence: It can leave employees feeling vulnerable and exposed. When that happens, they conceal any conduct that deviates from the norm so that they won't have to explain it. Unrehearsed, experimental behaviors sometimes stop altogether. But Bernstein also discovered organizations that had established zones of privacy within open environments by setting four types of boundaries: around teams, between feedback and evaluation, between decision rights and improvement rights, and around periods of experimentation. Moreover, across several studies, the companies that had done all this were the ones that consistently got the most creative, efficient, and thoughtful work from their employees. Bernstein's conclusion? By balancing transparency and privacy, organizations can capture the benefits of both, and encourage just the right amount of "positive deviance" needed to increase innovation and productivity.

  19. Wetting transparency of graphene.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Javad; Mi, Xi; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Thomas, Abhay V; Yavari, Fazel; Shi, Yunfeng; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Koratkar, Nikhil A

    2012-01-22

    We report that graphene coatings do not significantly disrupt the intrinsic wetting behaviour of surfaces for which surface-water interactions are dominated by van der Waals forces. Our contact angle measurements indicate that a graphene monolayer is wetting-transparent to copper, gold or silicon, but not glass, for which the wettability is dominated by short-range chemical bonding. With increasing number of graphene layers, the contact angle of water on copper gradually transitions towards the bulk graphite value, which is reached for ~6 graphene layers. Molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical predictions confirm our measurements and indicate that graphene's wetting transparency is related to its extreme thinness. We also show a 30-40% increase in condensation heat transfer on copper, as a result of the ability of the graphene coating to suppress copper oxidation without disrupting the intrinsic wettability of the surface. Such an ability to independently tune the properties of surfaces without disrupting their wetting response could have important implications in the design of conducting, conformal and impermeable surface coatings.

  20. Colorless, Transparent, Aromatic Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Ezzell, K. S.; Ely, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    New process yields aromatic condensation polyimide films essentially colorless. Films between 90- and 100-percent transparent at visible wavelength of 500 nm. Optically transparent polyimide films made from variety of aromatic condensation polyimides. Range from very pale in color to colorless, compared to bright yellow color of conventional/ commercial aromatic polyimide film. Increased transparency achieved at no sacrifice in thermal stability, flexibility, toughness, or mechanical properties. These features extremely attractive as films or coating materials for aerospace applications or for any other applications where high optical transparency or thermal stability is required.

  1. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  2. Plasmonic graphene transparent conductors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guowei; Liu, Jianwei; Wang, Qian; Hui, Rongqing; Chen, Zhijun; Maroni, Victor A; Wu, Judy

    2012-03-08

    Plasmonic graphene is fabricated using thermally assisted self-assembly of silver nanoparticles on graphene. The localized surface-plasmonic effect is demonstrated with the resonance frequency shifting from 446 to 495 nm when the lateral dimension of the Ag nanoparticles increases from about 50 to 150 nm. Finite-difference time-domain simulations are employed to confirm the experimentally observed light-scattering enhancement in the solar spectrum in plasmonic graphene and the decrease of both the plasmonic resonance frequency and amplitude with increasing graphene thickness. In addition, plasmonic graphene shows much-improved electrical conductance by a factor of 2-4 as compared to the original graphene, making the plasmonic graphene a promising advanced transparent conductor with enhanced light scattering for thin-film optoelectronic devices.

  3. Air transparent soundproof window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-01

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  4. Air transparent soundproof window

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-15

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  5. Selectively reflective transparent sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waché, Rémi; Florescu, Marian; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Clowes, Steven K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to selectively reflect certain wavelengths while maintaining the optical properties on other spectral ranges. This is of particular interest for transparent materials, which for specific applications may require high reflectivity at pre-determined frequencies. Although there exist currently techniques such as coatings to produce selective reflection, this work focuses on new approaches for mass production of polyethylene sheets which incorporate either additives or surface patterning for selective reflection between 8 to 13 μ m. Typical additives used to produce a greenhouse effect in plastics include particles such as clays, silica or hydroxide materials. However, the absorption of thermal radiation is less efficient than the decrease of emissivity as it can be compared with the inclusion of Lambertian materials. Photonic band gap engineering by the periodic structuring of metamaterials is known in nature for producing the vivid bright colors in certain organisms via strong wavelength-selective reflection. Research to artificially engineer such structures has mainly focused on wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. However few studies to date have been carried out to investigate the properties of metastructures in the mid infrared range even though the patterning of microstructure is easier to achieve. We present preliminary results on the diffuse reflectivity using FDTD simulations and analyze the technical feasibility of these approaches.

  6. Infrared transparent conductive oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Linda F.; Moran, Mark B.

    2001-09-01

    A novel class of complex metal oxides that have potential as transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) for the electromagnetic-interference (EMI) shielding on IR-seeker windows and missile domes has been identified. These complex metal oxides exhibit the rhombohedral (R3m) crystalline structure of naturally occurring delafossite, CuFeO2. The general chemical formula is ABO2 where A is a monovalent metal (Me+1 such as Cu, Ag, Au, Pt or Pd, and B is a trivalent metal (Me3+) such as Al,Ti,Cr,Co,Fe,Ni,Cs,Rh,Ga,Sn,In,Y,La,Pr,Nd,Sm or Eu. By adjusting the oxygen content, the conductivity can be varied over a wide range so that the delafossites behave as insulators, semiconductors or metals. This paper presents results for films of p-type CuxAlyOz and n-type CuxCryOz deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering from high-purity-metal targets. Films have been deposited using conventional RF- and DC-power supplies, and a new asymmetric-bipolar-pulsed- DC-power supply. Similar to the high-temperature-copper- oxide superconductors, the presence of Cu-O bonds is critical for the unique properties. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) are used to understand the relationship between the optoelectornic properties and the molecular structure of the films. For example, FTIR absorption bands at 1470 and 1395cm-1 are present only in CuxAlyOz films that exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity. When these bands are absent, the CuxAlyOz films have high values of resistivity. In addition to the 1470 and 1395cm-1 bands observed in CuxAlyOz films, another pair of bands at 1040 and 970cm-1 is present in CuxCryOz films.

  7. Transparent conductive graphene textile fibers

    PubMed Central

    Neves, A. I. S.; Bointon, T. H.; Melo, L. V.; Russo, S.; de Schrijver, I.; Craciun, M. F.; Alves, H.

    2015-01-01

    Transparent and flexible electrodes are widely used on a variety of substrates such as plastics and glass. Yet, to date, transparent electrodes on a textile substrate have not been explored. The exceptional electrical, mechanical and optical properties of monolayer graphene make it highly attractive as a transparent electrode for applications in wearable electronics. Here, we report the transfer of monolayer graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil, to fibers commonly used by the textile industry. The graphene-coated fibers have a sheet resistance as low as ~1 kΩ per square, an equivalent value to the one obtained by the same transfer process onto a Si substrate, with a reduction of only 2.3 per cent in optical transparency while keeping high stability under mechanical stress. With this approach, we successfully achieved the first example of a textile electrode, flexible and truly embedded in a yarn. PMID:25952133

  8. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, Julius; Henesian, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    A low pressure gas electrode utilizing ionized gas in a glow discharge regime forms a transparent electrode for electro-optical switches. The transparent electrode comprises a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the electrode is a transparent electrode. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. The plasma can be created either by the main high voltage pulser used to charge up the crystal or by auxiliary discharges or external sources of ionization. A typical configuration utilizes 10 torr argon in the discharge region adjacent to each crystal face.

  9. Transparent conductive graphene textile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, A. I. S.; Bointon, T. H.; Melo, L. V.; Russo, S.; de Schrijver, I.; Craciun, M. F.; Alves, H.

    2015-05-01

    Transparent and flexible electrodes are widely used on a variety of substrates such as plastics and glass. Yet, to date, transparent electrodes on a textile substrate have not been explored. The exceptional electrical, mechanical and optical properties of monolayer graphene make it highly attractive as a transparent electrode for applications in wearable electronics. Here, we report the transfer of monolayer graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil, to fibers commonly used by the textile industry. The graphene-coated fibers have a sheet resistance as low as ~1 kΩ per square, an equivalent value to the one obtained by the same transfer process onto a Si substrate, with a reduction of only 2.3 per cent in optical transparency while keeping high stability under mechanical stress. With this approach, we successfully achieved the first example of a textile electrode, flexible and truly embedded in a yarn.

  10. Flexible Transparent Electronic Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Guo, Yunlong; Wan, Pengbo; Zhang, Han; Chen, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors capable of real-time, sensitive, and selective analysis at room-temperature, have gained immense popularity in recent years for their potential to be integrated into various smart wearable electronics and display devices. Here, recent advances in flexible transparent sensors constructed from semiconducting oxides, carbon materials, conducting polymers, and their nanocomposites are presented. The sensing material selection, sensor device construction, and sensing mechanism of flexible transparent sensors are discussed in detail. The critical challenges and future development associated with flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors are presented. Smart wearable gas sensors are believed to have great potential in environmental monitoring and noninvasive health monitoring based on disease biomarkers in exhaled gas.

  11. Lines that induce phenomenal transparency.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Alba; Roncato, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Three neighbouring opaque surfaces may appear split into two layers, one transparent and one opaque beneath, if an outline contour is drawn that encompasses two of them. The phenomenon was originally observed by Kanizsa [1955 Rivista di Psicologia 69 3-19; 1979 Organization in Vision: Essays on Gestalt Psychology (New York: Praeger)], for the case where an outline contour is drawn to encompass one of the two parts of a bicoloured figure and a portion of a background of lightest (or darkest) luminance. Preliminary observations revealed that the outline contour yields different effects: in addition to the stratification into layers described by Kanizsa, a second split, opposite in depth order, may occur when the outline contour is close in luminance to one of the three surfaces. An initial experiment was designed to investigate what conditions give rise to the two phenomenal transparencies: this led to the conclusion that an outline contour superimposed on an opaque surface causes this surface to emerge as a transparent layer when the luminances of the contour and the surface differ, in absolute value, by no more than 13.2 cd m(-2). We have named this phenomenon 'transparency of the intercepted surface', to distinguish it from the phenomenal transparency arising when the contour and surface are very different in luminance. When such a difference exists, the contour acts as a factor of surface definition and grouping: the portion of the homogeneous surface it bounds emerges as a fourth surface and groups with a nearby surface if there is one close in luminance. The transparency phenomena ('transparency of the contoured surface') perceived in this context conform to the constraints of Metelli's model, as demonstrated by a second experiment, designed to gather 'opacity' ratings of stimuli. The observer judgments conformed to the values predicted by Metelli's formula for perceived degree of transparency, alpha. The role of the outline contour in conveying figural and

  12. Transparency in Distributed File Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    and may be accessed and updated even if the primary is unavailable. I IBIS provides complete location transparency . Because of this, the IBIS...lack of actual location information in names allows his to be done transparently . Updates to replicated information are propagated using the mail system...isn’t possible to update the directory. In the case of migation by UID, a forwarding address with a reference count equal to i the link count of the

  13. Price transparency: building community trust.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    With the push from policymakers, payers, and consumers for hospitals to make their prices public, healthcare executives need to recognize two central issues related to price transparency: 1) meaningful price transparency involves helping patients and consumers understand their financial obligation for an episode of care, and 2) price transparency is key to the most critical success strategy for healthcare providers: building trust. This article reviews the history of pricing and billing practices and explores why price transparency is not easily achieved in today's environment. Pricing is a mystery even to those of us who work in the field, yet despite its complexity, the call for price transparency is not going to go away. For transparency, the goal should be to establish a rational pricing system that is easily explainable and justified to all stakeholders. Healthcare executives must make pricing a priority, understand cost, develop a pricing philosophy, understand the overall revenue requirements, examine market conditions and prices, and set up systems for review. A rational process of price setting should enhance community trust. In this matter there is nothing less at stake than the hearts of our community members.

  14. Semi-transparent solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Jasieniak, J. J.

    2017-03-01

    Semi-transparent solar cells are a type of technology that combines the benefits of visible light transparency and light-to-electricity conversion. One of the biggest opportunities for such technologies is in their integration as windows and skylights within energy-sustainable buildings. Currently, such building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) are dominated by crystalline silicon based modules; however, the opaque nature of silicon creates a unique opportunity for the adoption of emerging photovoltaic candidates that can be made truly semi-transparent. These include: amorphous silicon-, kesterite-, chalcopyrite-, CdTe-, dye-sensitized-, organic- and perovskite- based systems. For the most part, amorphous silicon has been the workhorse in the semi-transparent solar cell field owing to its established, low-temperature fabrication processes. Excitement around alternative classes, particularly perovskites and the inorganic candidates, has recently arisen because of the major efficiency gains exhibited by these technologies. Importantly, each of these presents unique opportunities and challenges within the context of BIPV. This topic review provides an overview into the broader benefits of semi-transparent solar cells as building-integrated features, as well as providing the current development status into all of the major types of semi-transparent solar cells technologies.

  15. Cu Mesh for Flexible Transparent Conductive Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Kyung; Lee, Seunghun; Hee Lee, Duck; Hee Park, In; Seong Bae, Jong; Woo Lee, Tae; Kim, Ji-Young; Hun Park, Ji; Chan Cho, Yong; Ryong Cho, Chae; Jeong, Se-Young

    2015-01-01

    Copper electrodes with a micromesh/nanomesh structure were fabricated on a polyimide substrate using UV lithography and wet etching to produce flexible transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs). Well-defined mesh electrodes were realized through the use of high-quality Cu thin films. The films were fabricated using radio-frequency (RF) sputtering with a single-crystal Cu target—a simple but innovative approach that overcame the low oxidation resistance of ordinary Cu. Hybrid Cu mesh electrodes were fabricated by adding a capping layer of either ZnO or Al-doped ZnO. The sheet resistance and the transmittance of the electrode with an Al-doped ZnO capping layer were 6.197 ohm/sq and 90.657%, respectively, and the figure of merit was 60.502 × 10–3/ohm, which remained relatively unchanged after thermal annealing at 200 °C and 1,000 cycles of bending. This fabrication technique enables the mass production of large-area flexible TCEs, and the stability and high performance of Cu mesh hybrid electrodes in harsh environments suggests they have strong potential for application in smart displays and solar cells. PMID:26039977

  16. Optically transparent semiconducting polymer nanonetwork for flexible and transparent electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kilho; Park, Byoungwook; Kim, Geunjin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Park, Sungjun; Kim, Jehan; Jung, Suhyun; Jeong, Soyeong; Kwon, Sooncheol; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Junghwan; Yoon, Myung-Han; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-12-01

    Simultaneously achieving high optical transparency and excellent charge mobility in semiconducting polymers has presented a challenge for the application of these materials in future “flexible” and “transparent” electronics (FTEs). Here, by blending only a small amount (˜15 wt %) of a diketopyrrolopyrrole-based semiconducting polymer (DPP2T) into an inert polystyrene (PS) matrix, we introduce a polymer blend system that demonstrates both high field-effect transistor (FET) mobility and excellent optical transparency that approaches 100%. We discover that in a PS matrix, DPP2T forms a web-like, continuously connected nanonetwork that spreads throughout the thin film and provides highly efficient 2D charge pathways through extended intrachain conjugation. The remarkable physical properties achieved using our approach enable us to develop prototype high-performance FTE devices, including colorless all-polymer FET arrays and fully transparent FET-integrated polymer light-emitting diodes.

  17. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-17

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  18. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  19. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions. PMID:28303948

  20. Transparent Memory For Harsh Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. H.; Retamal, J. R. Durán; Yang, P. K.; Lee, C. P.; Tsai, M. L.; Kang, C. F.; He-Hau, Jr.

    2017-03-01

    As a new class of non-volatile memory, resistive random access memory (RRAM) offers not only superior electronic characteristics, but also advanced functionalities, such as transparency and radiation hardness. However, the environmental tolerance of RRAM is material-dependent, and therefore the materials used must be chosen carefully in order to avoid instabilities and performance degradation caused by the detrimental effects arising from environmental gases and ionizing radiation. In this work, we demonstrate that AlN-based RRAM displays excellent performance and environmental stability, with no significant degradation to the resistance ratio over a 100-cycle endurance test. Moreover, transparent RRAM (TRRAM) based on AlN also performs reliably under four different harsh environmental conditions and 2 MeV proton irradiation fluences, ranging from 1011 to 1015 cm‑2. These findings not only provide a guideline for TRRAM design, but also demonstrate the promising applicability of AlN TRRAM for future transparent harsh electronics.

  1. Could Transparency Bring Economic Diversity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahlenberg, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    The Spellings Commission report calls for greater access to higher education for low- and moderate-income students, greater transparency in the way higher education works and greater accountability for producing results. These recommendations are all significant in their own right, but the three concepts also converge to provide powerful support…

  2. Making Diamondlike Films More Transparent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Kussmaul, Michael T.; Sovey, James S.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1994-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon films highly transparent to visible light made by dual-ion-beam deposition process. Hard, resistant to scratching, and hermetic. Used as protective coatings on eyeglasses, magnetic recording heads, computer hard disks, and windows in bar-code scanners. Amorphous diamondlike carbon films preferable to polycrystalline diamond films in these and other applications. Smooth and adherent and deposited at room temperature.

  3. Indium-cadmium-oxide films having exceptional electrical conductivity and optical transparency: clues for optimizing transparent conductors.

    PubMed

    Wang, A; Babcock, J R; Edleman, N L; Metz, A W; Lane, M A; Asahi, R; Dravid, V P; Kannewurf, C R; Freeman, A J; Marks, T J

    2001-06-19

    Materials with high electrical conductivity and optical transparency are needed for future flat panel display, solar energy, and other opto-electronic technologies. In(x)Cd(1-x)O films having a simple cubic microstructure have been grown on amorphous glass substrates by a straightforward chemical vapor deposition process. The x = 0.05 film conductivity of 17,000 S/cm, carrier mobility of 70 cm2/Vs, and visible region optical transparency window considerably exceed the corresponding parameters for commercial indium-tin oxide. Ab initio electronic structure calculations reveal small conduction electron effective masses, a dramatic shift of the CdO band gap with doping, and a conduction band hybridization gap caused by extensive Cd 5s + In 5s mixing.

  4. A simple method for preparation of transparent hydrophobic silica-based coatings on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiufang; Xie, Anjian; Shen, Yuhua; Duan, Wei; Zhang, Ye; Li, Jialin

    2012-01-01

    A facile, inexpensive, and general approach is explored for the fabrication of transparent silica/organic silicon hybrid sol, which could form transparent hydrophobic coatings on different substrates conveniently. The sol was prepared by using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as a surface-modifying agent and the source of base catalyst required for the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The resulting silica-based coatings on glass slide have shown an optical transmission over the visible range up to 89% (in reference to 100% transmission defined by a plain glass substrate) and high thermal stability. The water contact angle of the film reached 152○. Hydrophobic coatings with excellent optical transmittance were also successfully formed on writing paper and aluminum foils. The transparent hydrophobic silica-based hybrid sol will have potential applications in creating outdoor building glass, protecting paper files from moisture and preventing metals from corrosion.

  5. Transparent metals for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Peng, Ru-Wen; Huang, Xian-Rong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yongmin; Hu, Qing; Wang, Mu; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-04-17

    Making metals transparent, which could lead to fascinating applications, has long been pursued. Here we demonstrate that with narrow slit arrays metallic plates become transparent for extremely broad bandwidths; the high transmission efficiency is insensitive to the metal thickness. This work provides a guideline to develop novel devices, including transparent conducting panels, broadband metamaterials, and antireflective solar cells.

  6. Transparency and Oversight in Local Wellness Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chriqui, Jamie F.; Chaloupka, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Advocates have called for increased wellness policy transparency and oversight through the use of health advisory councils. This study examines (1) wellness policy transparency, (2) advisory council requirements, (3) factors associated with each, and (4) whether transparency or advisory council requirements are indicative of a stronger…

  7. Making It with Media. Transparency Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Augie E.; Palmer, Carolyn G.

    This guide to the design and production of overhead transparencies begins with a matching test of related terminology and definitions. Introductory materials include an outline of advantages and disadvantages of using transparencies; a list of recommended uses of the overhead and transparencies; tips for overhead presentations; general…

  8. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  9. A transparent nanostructured optical biosensor.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Li, Xiang; Que, Long

    2014-05-01

    Herein we report a new transparent nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) device. The unique features of the nanostructured optical device can be summarized as the following: (i) optically transparent nanostructured optical device; (ii) simple and inexpensive for fabrication; (iii) easy to be fabricated and scaled up as an arrayed format. These features overcome the existing barriers for the current nanopore-based interferometric optical biosensors by measuring the transmitted optical signals rather than the reflected optical signals, thereby facilitating the optical testing significantly for the arrayed biosensors and thus paving the way for their potential for high throughput biodetection applications. The optically transparent nanostructures (i.e., anodic aluminum oxide nanopores) inside the FPI devices are fabricated from 2.2 microm thick lithographically patterned Al thin film on an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate using a two-step anodization process. Utilizing the binding between Protein A and porcine immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a model, the detection of the bioreaction between biomolecules has been demonstrated successfully. Experiments found that the lowest detection concentration of proteins is in the range of picomolar level using current devices, which can be easily tuned into the range of femtomolar level by optimizing the performance of devices.

  10. Transparent Memory For Harsh Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, C. H.; Retamal, J. R. Durán; Yang, P. K.; Lee, C. P.; Tsai, M. L.; Kang, C. F.; He, Jr-Hau

    2017-01-01

    As a new class of non-volatile memory, resistive random access memory (RRAM) offers not only superior electronic characteristics, but also advanced functionalities, such as transparency and radiation hardness. However, the environmental tolerance of RRAM is material-dependent, and therefore the materials used must be chosen carefully in order to avoid instabilities and performance degradation caused by the detrimental effects arising from environmental gases and ionizing radiation. In this work, we demonstrate that AlN-based RRAM displays excellent performance and environmental stability, with no significant degradation to the resistance ratio over a 100-cycle endurance test. Moreover, transparent RRAM (TRRAM) based on AlN also performs reliably under four different harsh environmental conditions and 2 MeV proton irradiation fluences, ranging from 1011 to 1015 cm−2. These findings not only provide a guideline for TRRAM design, but also demonstrate the promising applicability of AlN TRRAM for future transparent harsh electronics. PMID:28290519

  11. "Bottom-up" transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Morag, Ahiud; Jelinek, Raz

    2016-11-15

    Transparent electrodes (TEs) have attracted significant scientific, technological, and commercial interest in recent years due to the broad and growing use of such devices in electro-optics, consumer products (touch-screens for example), solar cells, and others. Currently, almost all commercial TEs are fabricated through "top-down" approaches (primarily lithography-based techniques), with indium tin oxide (ITO) as the most common material employed. Several problems are encountered, however, in this field, including the cost and complexity of TE production using top-down technologies, the limited structural flexibility, high-cost of indium, and brittle nature and low transparency in the far-IR spectral region of ITO. Alternative routes based upon bottom-up processes, have recently emerged as viable alternatives for production of TEs. Bottom up technologies are based upon self-assembly of building blocks - atoms, molecules, or nanoparticles - generating thin patterned films that exhibit both electrical conductivity and optical transparency. In this Feature Article we discuss the recent progress in this active and exciting field, including bottom-up TE systems produced from carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene-oxide), silver, gold, and other metals. The current hurdles encountered for broader use of bottom-up strategies along with their significant potential are analyzed.

  12. Optically transparent/colorless polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, A. K.; Stclair, T. L.; Slemp, W.; Ezzell, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    Several series of linear aromatic polyimide films have been synthesized and characterized with the objective of obtaining maximum optical transparency. Two approaches have been used as part of this structure-property relationship study. The first approach is to vary the molecular structure so as to separate chromophoric centers and reduce electronic interactions between polymer chains to lower the intensity of color in the resulting polymer films. A second and concurrent approach is to perform polymerizations with highly purified monomers. Glass transition temperatures of thermally cured polyimide films are obtained by thermomechanical analysis and thermal decomposition temperatures are determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Transmittance UV-visible spectra of the polyimide films are compared to that of a commercial polyimide film. Fully imidized films are tested for solubility in common organic solvents. The more transparent films prepared in this study are evaluated for use on second-surface mirror thermal control coating systems. Lightly colored to colorless films are characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy before and after exposure to 300 equivalent solar hours UV irradiation and varying doses of 1 MeV electron irradiation. The effects of monomer purity, casting solvent and cure atmosphere on polyimide film transparency are also investigated.

  13. Perceptual transparency in neon color spreading displays.

    PubMed

    Ekroll, Vebjørn; Faul, Franz

    2002-08-01

    In neon color spreading displays, both a color illusion and perceptual transparency can be seen. In this study, we investigated the color conditions for the perception of transparency in such displays. It was found that the data are very well accounted for by a generalization of Metelli's (1970) episcotister model of balanced perceptual transparency to tristimulus values. This additive model correctly predicted which combinations of colors would lead to optimal impressions of transparency. Color combinations deviating slightly from the additive model also looked transparent, but less convincingly so.

  14. Transparent bulk-size nanocomposites with high inorganic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shi; Gaume, Romain

    2015-12-14

    With relatively high nanoparticle loading in polymer matrices, hybrid nanocomposites made by colloidal dispersion routes suffer from severe inhomogeneous agglomeration, a phenomenon that deteriorates light transmission even when the refractive indices of the inorganic and organic phases are closely matched. The dispersion of particles in a matrix is of paramount importance to obtain composites of high optical quality. Here, we describe an innovative, yet straightforward method to fabricate monolithic transparent hybrid nanocomposites with very high particle loading and high refractive index mismatch tolerance between the inorganic and organic constituents. We demonstrate 77% transmission at 800 nm in a 2 mm-thick acrylate polymer nanocomposite containing 61 vol. % CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles. Modeling shows that similar performance could easily be obtained with various inorganic phases relevant to a number of photonic applications.

  15. Enhanced tunability of plasmon induced transparency in graphene strips

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xi; Su, Xiaopeng; Yang, Yaping

    2015-04-14

    The approach of slow-light efficiency manipulation is theoretically investigated in graphene analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) system, which cannot be realized in conventional quantum regime. In this system, two graphene strips with different Fermi energies placed side by side as radiative elements have been discussed, and the coupling strength between radiative elements and dark elements is tuned by these radiative elements. Our proposed scheme exploits the tuning of coupling strength between the radiative elements and dark elements in contrast with the existing approaches that rely on tuning the damping rates of radiative or dark elements. The transparent window and group delays can be tuned by different coupling strength without changing the geometry of structure. This manipulation can be explained using a temporal coupled-mode theory. Furthermore, the hybridized states in this EIT-like system can be manipulated by tuning the Fermi energy of radiative elements. This kind of controllable electromagnetically induced transparency has many significant potential applications in optoelectronic, photodetectors, tunable sensors, and storage of optical data regimes.

  16. Modified silver nanowire transparent electrodes with exceptional stability against oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idier, J.; Neri, W.; Labrugère, C.; Ly, I.; Poulin, P.; Backov, R.

    2016-03-01

    We report an easy method to prepare thin, flexible and transparent electrodes that show enhanced inertness toward oxidation using modified silver nanowires (Ag NWs). Stabilization is achieved through the adsorption of triphenylphosphine (PPh3) onto the Ag NW hybrid dispersions prior to their 2D organization as transparent electrodes on polyethylene terephtalate (PET) films. After 110 days in air (20 °C) under atmospheric conditions, the transmittance of the PET/Ag NW/PPh3 based films is nearly unchanged, while the transmittance of the PET/Ag NW-based films decreases by about 5%. The sheet resistance increases for both materials as time elapses, but the rate of increase is more than four times slower for films stabilized by PPh3. The improved transmittance and conductivity results in a significantly enhanced stability for the figure of merit σ dc/σ op. This phenomenon is highlighted in highly oxidative nitric acid vapor. The tested stabilized films in such conditions exhibit a decrease to σ dc/σ op of only 38% after 75 min, whereas conventional materials exhibit a relative loss of 71%. In addition, by contrast to other classes of stabilizers, such as polymer or graphene-based encapsulants, PPh3 does not alter the transparency or conductivity of the modified films. While the present films are made by membrane filtration, the stabilization method could be implemented directly in other liquid processes, including industrially scalable ones.

  17. Omniphobic low moisture permeation transparent polyacrylate/silica nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Tu, Yu-Chieh; Tsai, Chieh-Ming; Su, Wei-Fang

    2013-04-24

    We report the development of low moisture permeation and transparent dense polyacrylate/silica nanocomposite material that can exhibit both superhydrophobic and oleophobic (omniphobic) properties. The material was prepared by a three-step process. The first step involved the preparation of UV polymerizable solventless hybrid resin and the fabrication of nanocomposite. The hybrid resin consisted of a mixture of acrylate monomer, initiator, and acrylate-modified different size silica nanoparticles. The second step was to roughen the surface of the nanocomposite with unique nanotexture by oxygen plasma. In the third step, we applied a low surface tension fluoro monolayer on the treated surface. The nanocomposite exhibits desired superhydrophobicity and oleophobicity with a water contact angle of 158.2° and n-1-octadecene contact angle of 128.5°, respectively; low moisture permeation of 1.44 g·mm/m(2)·day; and good transparency (greater than 82% at 450-800 nm for ~60 μm film). The material has potential applications in optoelectronic encapsulation, self-cleaning coating, etc.

  18. Is Every Transparent Liquid Water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-08-01

    The accepted description for water in schools worldwide is a transparent and colorless liquid. Since students in lower grades (ages 8-13) often see warning signs "Do not drink this liquid--it is not water", we believe that presenting experiments that demonstrate the inadequacy of the accepted description for water would be beneficial for teachers and their students to practice in their schools. These activities provide simple experiments that introduce students to important characteristics of different compounds that have similar external appearance. The characteristics presented here include polarity, electric conductivity, color change due to presence of an acid-base indicator, and electrolysis.

  19. p-Type Transparent Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-25

    semiconductor surface heavily doped ...successfully doped both n-type and p-type. 2.1.3 CuInO2 CuInO2 is a particularly interesting transparent conductor because it has been successfully doped ...integra- tion. CuInO2 is doped n-type by the replacement of In 3+ with Sn4+, and p-type by the replacement of In3+ with Ca2+. Neither n-CuInO2 nor p-CuInO2

  20. Conductivity in transparent oxide semiconductors.

    PubMed

    King, P D C; Veal, T D

    2011-08-24

    Despite an extensive research effort for over 60 years, an understanding of the origins of conductivity in wide band gap transparent conducting oxide (TCO) semiconductors remains elusive. While TCOs have already found widespread use in device applications requiring a transparent contact, there are currently enormous efforts to (i) increase the conductivity of existing materials, (ii) identify suitable alternatives, and (iii) attempt to gain semiconductor-engineering levels of control over their carrier density, essential for the incorporation of TCOs into a new generation of multifunctional transparent electronic devices. These efforts, however, are dependent on a microscopic identification of the defects and impurities leading to the high unintentional carrier densities present in these materials. Here, we review recent developments towards such an understanding. While oxygen vacancies are commonly assumed to be the source of the conductivity, there is increasing evidence that this is not a sufficient mechanism to explain the total measured carrier concentrations. In fact, many studies suggest that oxygen vacancies are deep, rather than shallow, donors, and their abundance in as-grown material is also debated. We discuss other potential contributions to the conductivity in TCOs, including other native defects, their complexes, and in particular hydrogen impurities. Convincing theoretical and experimental evidence is presented for the donor nature of hydrogen across a range of TCO materials, and while its stability and the role of interstitial versus substitutional species are still somewhat open questions, it is one of the leading contenders for yielding unintentional conductivity in TCOs. We also review recent work indicating that the surfaces of TCOs can support very high carrier densities, opposite to the case for conventional semiconductors. In thin-film materials/devices and, in particular, nanostructures, the surface can have a large impact on the total

  1. Price transparency for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Mark V; Burns, Lawton R

    2008-01-01

    Hospital buyers of medical devices contract with manufacturers with market power that sell differentiated products. The medical staff strongly influences hospitals' choice of devices. Sellers have sought to limit disclosure of transaction prices. Policy-makers have proposed legislation mandating disclosure, in the interest of greater transparency. We discuss why a manufacturer might charge different prices to different hospitals, the role that secrecy plays, and the consequences of secrecy versus disclosure. We argue that hospital-physician relationships are key to understanding what manufacturers gain from price discrimination. Price disclosure can catalyze a restructuring of those relationships, which, in turn, can improve hospital bargaining.

  2. Electric field modulation of thermopower for transparent amorphous oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Hirotaka; Nagao, Yuki; Koumoto, Kunihito; Takasaki, Yuka; Umemura, Tomonari; Kato, Takeharu; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Ohta, Hiromichi

    2010-11-01

    To clarify the electronic density of states (DOS) around the conduction band bottom for state of the art transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors (TAOSs), InGaZnO4 and In2MgO4, we fabricated TAOS-based transparent thin film transistors (TTFTs) and measured their gate voltage dependence of thermopower (S). TAOS-based TTFTs exhibit an unusual S behavior. The |S|-value abruptly increases but then gradually decreases as Vg increases, clearly suggesting the antiparabolic shaped DOS is hybridized with the original parabolic shaped DOS around the conduction band bottom.

  3. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  4. A Simple, Transparent Fume Hood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredericks, John

    1998-10-01

    An inexpensive transparent fume hood can be constructed from a clear-plastic two-liter soft drink bottle that is cut just above the base. A length of vacuum tubing is secured to the opening of the bottle using black electrical tape. The tubing is then connected to a water aspirator. Beakers or flasks easily fit inside the bottle, and the bottle may be secured with a clamp and ring stand for added stability. This device has been used to collect the noxious NO2 gas generated from the reaction of copper metal with nitric acid. It also may be used in the collection of other gases. It should not be used to collect gases that are not water-soluble or in experiments that involve open flames.

  5. Atomically Bonded Transparent Superhydrophobic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, Tolga

    2015-08-01

    Maintaining clarity and avoiding the accumulation of water and dirt on optically transparent surfaces such as US military vehicle windshields, viewports, periscope optical head windows, and electronic equipment cover glasses are critical to providing a high level of visibility, improved survivability, and much-needed safety for warfighters in the field. Through a combination of physical vapor deposition techniques and the exploitation of metastable phase separation in low-alkali borosilicate, a novel technology was developed for the fabrication of optically transparent, porous nanostructured silica thin film coatings that are strongly bonded to glass platforms. The nanotextured films, initially structurally superhydrophilic, exhibit superior superhydrophobicity, hence antisoiling ability, following a simple but robust modification in surface chemistry. The surfaces yield water droplet contact angles as high as 172°. Moreover, the nanostructured nature of these coatings provides increased light scattering in the UV regime and reduced reflectivity (i.e., enhanced transmission) over a broad range of the visible spectrum. In addition to these functionalities, the coatings exhibit superior mechanical resistance to abrasion and are thermally stable to temperatures approaching 500°C. The overall process technology relies on industry standard equipment and inherently scalable manufacturing processes and demands only nontoxic, naturally abundant, and inexpensive base materials. Such coatings, applied to the optical components of current and future combat equipment and military vehicles will provide a significant strategic advantage for warfighters. The inherent self-cleaning properties of such superhydrophobic coatings will also mitigate biofouling of optical windows exposed to high-humidity conditions and can help decrease repair/replacement costs, reduce maintenance, and increase readiness by limiting equipment downtime.

  6. Oboe Transparency Results - Oboes 1-9

    SciTech Connect

    Heinle, R A

    2002-10-15

    The motivation for the ''Transparency'' experiment is that DOE/DP would like to have data available to show to interested parties, such as the JASONs. The U1a subcritical experiments are consistent with U.S. policy on nuclear testing. This would be done in a spirit of ''Transparency'' if doubts should arise. Thus, the objective of the ''Transparency'' measurements on the Oboe series is to place an upper bound on the nuclear energy released in the subcritical experiments. Two separate experimental packages cover the transparency measurement issue thoroughly. These are: (1) Neutron Track-Etch Dosimetry. (2) Scintillator Fission Neutron/Gamma Rate Measurement. Because the containment barrier is only 1-inch steel, plus 6-inch shotcrete, it is quite transparent to fission neutrons and, thus, both experiments can be mounted outside the containment barrier and can be recovered post shot. An additional group of dosimeters was placed on the lid of the vessel for greater sensitivity.

  7. Copercolating Networks: An Approach for Realizing High-Performance Transparent Conductors using Multicomponent Nanostructured Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suprem R.; Sadeque, Sajia; Jeong, Changwook; Chen, Ruiyi; Alam, Muhammad A.; Janes, David B.

    2016-06-01

    Although transparent conductive oxides such as indium tin oxide (ITO) are widely employed as transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) for applications such as touch screens and displays, new nanostructured TCEs are of interest for future applications, including emerging transparent and flexible electronics. A number of twodimensional networks of nanostructured elements have been reported, including metallic nanowire networks consisting of silver nanowires, metallic carbon nanotubes (m-CNTs), copper nanowires or gold nanowires, and metallic mesh structures. In these single-component systems, it has generally been difficult to achieve sheet resistances that are comparable to ITO at a given broadband optical transparency. A relatively new third category of TCEs consisting of networks of 1D-1D and 1D-2D nanocomposites (such as silver nanowires and CNTs, silver nanowires and polycrystalline graphene, silver nanowires and reduced graphene oxide) have demonstrated TCE performance comparable to, or better than, ITO. In such hybrid networks, copercolation between the two components can lead to relatively low sheet resistances at nanowire densities corresponding to high optical transmittance. This review provides an overview of reported hybrid networks, including a comparison of the performance regimes achievable with those of ITO and single-component nanostructured networks. The performance is compared to that expected from bulk thin films and analyzed in terms of the copercolation model. In addition, performance characteristics relevant for flexible and transparent applications are discussed. The new TCEs are promising, but significant work must be done to ensure earth abundance, stability, and reliability so that they can eventually replace traditional ITO-based transparent conductors.

  8. Tailoring the multiple electrically resonant transparency through bi-layered metamaterial-induced coupling oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiaxin; Han, Song; Lin, Hai; Yang, Helin

    2015-11-01

    Metamaterials (MMs) can be tailored to support electromagnetic interference, which is the kernel for the material-based electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomena, alternatively transparency based on electric interference can be deemed as electrically resonant transparency (ERT). Here, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate two kinds of bi-layered MMs. The C3-C6 hybrid MM exhibits triple-mode ERT with transmission peaks of 0.84 at 9.6 GHz, 0.92 at 10.4 GHz, and 0.93 at 11.5 GHz for the horizontally polarized wave, and dual-mode ERT with transmission peaks of 0.84 at 8.8 GHz and 0.91 at 10.2 GHz for the vertically polarized wave. However, the C4-C8 hybrid MM, with two stable transparent peaks of 0.92 and 0.88 at 10.46 GHz and 11.61 GHz, is proven to be polarization independent. The measured results show excellent agreement with numerical simulations. A coupled oscillator model is employed to theoretically study the near field interference between the induced dipoles on the transmission properties. The results presented here will find their application value for multi-mode slow light devices, filters and attenuators, and so on.

  9. In-vitro corneal transparency measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; da Costa Vieira, Marcelo A.; Isaac, Flavio; Chiaradia, Caio; Faria de Sousa, Sidney J.

    2001-06-01

    A system for measuring the average corneal transparency of preserved corneas has been developed in order to provide a more accurate and standard report of the corneal tissue. The donated cornea transparency is one of the features to be analyzed previously to its indication for the transplant. The small portable system consists of two main parts: the optical and the electronic parts. The optical system consists of a white light, lenses and pin-holes that collimate white light beams that illuminates the cornea in its preservative medium. The light that passes through the cornea is detected by a resistive detector and the average corneal transparency is shown in a display. In order to obtain just the tissue transparency, the electronic circuit was built in a way that there is a baseline input of the preservative medium, previous to the measurement of the corneal transparency. Manipulating the system consists of three steps: (1) Adjusting the zero percentage in the absence of light (at this time the detectors in the dark); (2) Placing the preservative medium in the system and adjusting the 100% value (this is the baseline input); (3) Preserving the cornea and placing it in the system. The system provides the tissue transparency. The system is connected to an endothelium evaluation system for Slit Lamp, that we have developed, and statistics about the relationship of the corneal transparency and density of the endothelial cells will be provided in the next years. The system is being used in a public Eye Bank in Brasil.

  10. Preparation of properties of SWNT/graphene oxide type flexible transparent conductive films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Ho; Jung, Jae Mok; Kwak, Jun Young; Jeong, Jung Hyun; Choi, Byung Chun; Lim, Kwon Taek

    2011-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/graphene oxide (GO) hybrid films were prepared by a facile bar coating method on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate using a mixed solution of SWCNTs and GO. An acryl type polymer was employed as a dispersion agent to obtain SWCNT and GO suspension in ethyl alcohol. The SWCNT/GO hybrid films were highly transparent and electrically conductive, showing 80% transmittance and 1.8 x 10(3) ohm/sq surface resistance. The surface resistance of the SWCNT/GO film could be further improved to 750 ohm/sq by hydrazine vapor reduction.

  11. A germanate transparent conductive oxide

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Toshio; Matsuishi, Satoru; Hosono, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    Wide bandgap conductors such as In2O3 and ZnO are used as transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). To date, TCOs are realized using post transition metal cations with largely spread s-orbitals such as In3+, Sn4+, Zn2+ and Cd2+. On the other hand, no good electronic conductor has been realized in oxides of Al, Si and Ge. Here we report the conversion of an oxide of Ge into a good electronic conductor by employing the concept of superdegeneracy. We find that cubic SrGeO3, synthesized under high pressure, displays a direct bandgap of 3.5 eV, a carrier mobility of 12 cm2(Vs)−1, and conductivities of 3 Scm−1 (DC) and 400 Scm−1 (optical conductivity). This is the first Ge-based electronic conductive oxide, and expands the family of TCOs from ionic oxides to covalent oxides. PMID:21915112

  12. Flexible and transparent graphene-based loudspeakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. C.; Man, B. Y.; Jiang, S. Z.; Chen, C. S.; Yang, C.; Liu, M.; Gao, X. G.; Sun, Z. C.; Zhang, C.

    2013-04-01

    Flexible and transparent graphene films have been fabricated via chemical vapor deposition method, and an extremely thin and lightweight loudspeaker was obtained by transferring the graphene films on both side of the polyvinylidene fluoride film. Once fed by sound frequency electric field, the graphene-based acoustic actuator could emit loud sounds in a wide frequency range. Such film loudspeakers are transparent, flexible, magnet-free and can be tailored into any shape and size, which have wide potential applications in fabricating new type of transparent and flexible devices.

  13. Transparent Analogs for Alloy Phase Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Smith, James E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experiments to add information to data base supporting use of transparent, partially miscible liquids and solids as analogs in studies of alloy solidification. Behavior of these materials observed directly while they undergo liquid/liquid and liquid/solid phase transformations. Light-scattering techniques used to determine phase boundaries. Transparent analogs allow observation of both solidification patterns and processes leading to those patterns, whereas metal alloys require tedious post-solidification metallographic analyses because processes not generally observed. Experiments with transparent substances safer and cheaper since conducted at much lower temperatures.

  14. Demonstration of transparent solar array module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses the design, development, fabrication and testing of IR transparent solar array modules. Three modules, consisting of a baseline design using back surface reflector cells, and two modules using gridded back contact, IR transparent cells, were subjected to vacuum thermal balance testing to verify analytical predictions of lower operating emperature and increased efficiency. As a result of this test program, LMSC has verified that a significant degree of IR transparency can be designed into a flexible solar array. Test data correlates with both steady state and transient thermal analysis.

  15. Low-temperature-processed efficient semi-transparent planar perovskite solar cells for bifacial and tandem applications

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Fan; Feurer, Thomas; Jäger, Timo; Avancini, Enrico; Bissig, Benjamin; Yoon, Songhak; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.

    2015-01-01

    Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells are highly attractive for a wide range of applications, such as bifacial and tandem solar cells; however, the power conversion efficiency of semi-transparent devices still lags behind due to missing suitable transparent rear electrode or deposition process. Here we report a low-temperature process for efficient semi-transparent planar perovskite solar cells. A hybrid thermal evaporation–spin coating technique is developed to allow the introduction of PCBM in regular device configuration, which facilitates the growth of high-quality absorber, resulting in hysteresis-free devices. We employ high-mobility hydrogenated indium oxide as transparent rear electrode by room-temperature radio-frequency magnetron sputtering, yielding a semi-transparent solar cell with steady-state efficiency of 14.2% along with 72% average transmittance in the near-infrared region. With such semi-transparent devices, we show a substantial power enhancement when operating as bifacial solar cell, and in combination with low-bandgap copper indium gallium diselenide we further demonstrate 20.5% efficiency in four-terminal tandem configuration. PMID:26576667

  16. Low-temperature-processed efficient semi-transparent planar perovskite solar cells for bifacial and tandem applications.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fan; Feurer, Thomas; Jäger, Timo; Avancini, Enrico; Bissig, Benjamin; Yoon, Songhak; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N

    2015-11-18

    Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells are highly attractive for a wide range of applications, such as bifacial and tandem solar cells; however, the power conversion efficiency of semi-transparent devices still lags behind due to missing suitable transparent rear electrode or deposition process. Here we report a low-temperature process for efficient semi-transparent planar perovskite solar cells. A hybrid thermal evaporation-spin coating technique is developed to allow the introduction of PCBM in regular device configuration, which facilitates the growth of high-quality absorber, resulting in hysteresis-free devices. We employ high-mobility hydrogenated indium oxide as transparent rear electrode by room-temperature radio-frequency magnetron sputtering, yielding a semi-transparent solar cell with steady-state efficiency of 14.2% along with 72% average transmittance in the near-infrared region. With such semi-transparent devices, we show a substantial power enhancement when operating as bifacial solar cell, and in combination with low-bandgap copper indium gallium diselenide we further demonstrate 20.5% efficiency in four-terminal tandem configuration.

  17. A study of polaritonic transparency in couplers made from excitonic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mahi R.; Racknor, Chris

    2015-03-14

    We have studied light matter interaction in quantum dot and exciton-polaritonic coupler hybrid systems. The coupler is made by embedding two slabs of an excitonic material (CdS) into a host excitonic material (ZnO). An ensemble of non-interacting quantum dots is doped in the coupler. The bound exciton polariton states are calculated in the coupler using the transfer matrix method in the presence of the coupling between the external light (photons) and excitons. These bound exciton-polaritons interact with the excitons present in the quantum dots and the coupler is acting as a reservoir. The Schrödinger equation method has been used to calculate the absorption coefficient in quantum dots. It is found that when the distance between two slabs (CdS) is greater than decay length of evanescent waves the absorption spectrum has two peaks and one minimum. The minimum corresponds to a transparent state in the system. However, when the distance between the slabs is smaller than the decay length of evanescent waves, the absorption spectra has three peaks and two transparent states. In other words, one transparent state can be switched to two transparent states when the distance between the two layers is modified. This could be achieved by applying stress and strain fields. It is also found that transparent states can be switched on and off by applying an external control laser field.

  18. Performance enhancement of metal nanowire transparent conducting electrodes by mesoscale metal wires.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Wang, Shuang; Wu, Hui; Narasimhan, Vijay K; Kong, Desheng; Ryoung Lee, Hye; Cui, Yi

    2013-01-01

    For transparent conducting electrodes in optoelectronic devices, electrical sheet resistance and optical transmittance are two of the main criteria. Recently, metal nanowires have been demonstrated to be a promising type of transparent conducting electrode because of low sheet resistance and high transmittance. Here we incorporate a mesoscale metal wire (1-5 μm in diameter) into metal nanowire transparent conducting electrodes and demonstrate at least a one order of magnitude reduction in sheet resistance at a given transmittance. We realize experimentally a hybrid of mesoscale and nanoscale metal nanowires with high performance, including a sheet resistance of 0.36 Ω sq(-1) and transmittance of 92%. In addition, the mesoscale metal wires are applied to a wide range of transparent conducting electrodes including conducting polymers and oxides with improvement up to several orders of magnitude. The metal mesowires can be synthesized by electrospinning methods and their general applicability opens up opportunities for many transparent conducting electrode applications.

  19. High-performance, bare silver nanowire network transparent heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, Orcun; Coskun, Sahin; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Emrah Unalan, Husnu

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanowire (Ag NW) networks are one of the most promising candidates for the replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films in many different applications. Recently, Ag-NW-based transparent heaters (THs) showed excellent heating performance. In order to overcome the instability issues of Ag NW networks, researchers have offered different hybrid structures. However, these approaches not only require extra processing, but also decrease the optical performance of Ag NW networks. So, it is important to investigate and determine the thermal performance limits of bare-Ag-NW-network-based THs. Herein, we report on the effect of NW density, contact geometry, applied bias, flexing and incremental bias application on the TH performance of Ag NW networks. Ag-NW-network-based THs with a sheet resistance and percentage transmittance of 4.3 Ω sq-1 and 83.3%, respectively, and a NW density of 1.6 NW μm-2 reached a maximum temperature of 275 °C under incremental bias application (5 V maximum). With this performance, our results provide a different perspective on bare-Ag-NW-network-based transparent heaters.

  20. High-performance, bare silver nanowire network transparent heaters.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Orcun; Coskun, Sahin; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-11-04

    Silver nanowire (Ag NW) networks are one of the most promising candidates for the replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films in many different applications. Recently, Ag-NW-based transparent heaters (THs) showed excellent heating performance. In order to overcome the instability issues of Ag NW networks, researchers have offered different hybrid structures. However, these approaches not only require extra processing, but also decrease the optical performance of Ag NW networks. So, it is important to investigate and determine the thermal performance limits of bare-Ag-NW-network-based THs. Herein, we report on the effect of NW density, contact geometry, applied bias, flexing and incremental bias application on the TH performance of Ag NW networks. Ag-NW-network-based THs with a sheet resistance and percentage transmittance of 4.3 Ω sq(-1) and 83.3%, respectively, and a NW density of 1.6 NW μm(-2) reached a maximum temperature of 275 °C under incremental bias application (5 V maximum). With this performance, our results provide a different perspective on bare-Ag-NW-network-based transparent heaters.

  1. Solution-processed assembly of ultrathin transparent conductive cellulose nanopaper embedding AgNWs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Yaoquan; Shi, Liyi; Cao, Shaomei; Feng, Xin; Miao, Miao; Fang, Jianhui

    2015-08-01

    Natural biomass based cellulose nanopaper is becoming a promising transparent substrate to supersede traditional petroleum based polymer films in realizing future flexible paper-electronics. Here, ultrathin, highly transparent, outstanding conductive hybrid nanopaper with excellent mechanical flexibility was synthesized by the assembly of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) using a pressured extrusion paper-making technique. The hybrid nanopaper with a thickness of 4.5 μm has a good combination of transparent conductive performance and mechanical stability using bamboo/hemp NFC and AgNWs cross-linked by hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC). The heterogeneous fibrous structure of BNFC/HNFC/AgNWs endows a uniform distribution and an enhanced forward light scattering, resulting in high electrical conductivity and optical transmittance. The hybrid nanopaper with an optimal weight ratio of BNFC/HNFC to AgNWs shows outstanding synergistic properties with a transmittance of 86.41% at 550 nm and a sheet resistance of 1.90 ohm sq-1, equal to the electronic conductivity, which is about 500 S cm-1. The BNFC/HNFC/AgNW hybrid nanopaper maintains a stable electrical conductivity after the peeling test and bending at 135° for 1000 cycles, indicating remarkably strong adhesion and mechanical flexibility. Of importance here is that the high-performance and low-cost hybrid nanopaper shows promising potential for electronics application in solar cells, flexible displays and other high-technology products.Natural biomass based cellulose nanopaper is becoming a promising transparent substrate to supersede traditional petroleum based polymer films in realizing future flexible paper-electronics. Here, ultrathin, highly transparent, outstanding conductive hybrid nanopaper with excellent mechanical flexibility was synthesized by the assembly of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) using a pressured extrusion paper-making technique. The

  2. Induced Transparency and Absorption in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok

    2004-01-01

    We review the conditions for the occurrence of coherence phenomena in passive coupled optical microresonators. We derive the effective steady-state response and determine conditions for induced transparency and absorption in these systems.

  3. Coloured Rings Produced on Transparent Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhr, Wilfried; Schlichting, H. Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Beautiful colored interference rings can be produced by using transparent plates such as window glass. A simple model explains this effect, which was described by Newton but has almost been forgotten. (Contains 11 figures.)

  4. Transparency Film for Demonstration of Biaxial Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    Explains why transparency film demonstrates biaxial optical properties. Provides detailed descriptions of the procedure and equipment needed for large-scale optics demonstrations of the polarization interference pattern produced by biaxial crystals. (DDR)

  5. Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Public Law 109-282, the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 as amended (FFATA), requires disclosure of all entities and organizations receiving Federal funds through a single publicly accessible website.

  6. Transparent Soil for Imaging the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Downie, Helen; Holden, Nicola; Otten, Wilfred; Spiers, Andrew J.; Valentine, Tracy A.; Dupuy, Lionel X.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of soil processes is essential for addressing the global issues of food security, disease transmission and climate change. However, techniques for observing soil biology are lacking. We present a heterogeneous, porous, transparent substrate for in situ 3D imaging of living plants and root-associated microorganisms using particles of the transparent polymer, Nafion, and a solution with matching optical properties. Minerals and fluorescent dyes were adsorbed onto the Nafion particles for nutrient supply and imaging of pore size and geometry. Plant growth in transparent soil was similar to that in soil. We imaged colonization of lettuce roots by the human bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 showing micro-colony development. Micro-colonies may contribute to bacterial survival in soil. Transparent soil has applications in root biology, crop genetics and soil microbiology. PMID:22984484

  7. Absorption Transparencies for Efficient Nonlinear Optical Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Kenneth Kang-Hee

    The work presented in this thesis describes methods by which nonlinear optical generation of radiation can be enhanced with the use of absorption transparencies. Two experiments are discussed: (i) the use of a naturally occurring absorption transparency in zinc vapor for efficient generation of 104.8 nm radiation, and (ii) the creation of an induced transparency on a collisionally broadened resonance transition of lead, with which large enhancements in nonlinear optical processes may be possible. In both cases, the linear susceptibility is cancelled by a quantum interference. Since the nonlinear susceptibility does not cancel, large enhancements in nonlinear generation efficiency are possible. There is a naturally existing transparency in zinc, where two broad autoionizing levels are separated within a decay width. Because they decay predominantly to the same final continuum state, there is a sharp cancellation in both the absorption and the refractive index from the ground state. A correct choice of intermediate levels for the sum-frequency mixing process prevents a similar cancellation in the nonlinear susceptibility. We were able to generate 0.25 muJ per pulse of 104.8 nm radiation at 10 Hz using UV pump lasers with energies of about a mJ and pulse lengths of 5 ns. Unfortunately, such naturally existing transparencies are rare. However, electromagnetically induced transparencies can be created in a general manner and present the possibility of doing enhanced nonlinear optics in many systems. Especially of interest is the creation of induced transparencies on a resonance line at high densities, as such a transparency would be most useful for nonlinear optical applications. The effects of collisions need to be carefully considered, since collisional broadening is larger than lifetime broadening in such transitions. We create an induced transparency in the presence of collisions by using a strong field to couple the resonantly broadened state of lead to another

  8. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  9. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2014-06-10

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber. The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target in the process chamber to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  10. Transparent antennas for solar cell integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tursunjan

    Transparent patch antennas are microstrip patch antennas that have a certain level of optical transparency. Highly transparent patch antennas are potentially suitable for integration with solar panels of small satellites, which are becoming increasingly important in space exploration. Traditional patch antennas employed on small satellites compete with solar cells for surface area. However, a transparent patch antenna can be placed directly on top of solar cells and resolve the issue of competing for limited surface real estate. For such an integration, a high optical transparency of the patch antenna is required from the solar cells' point of view. On the other hand, the antenna should possess at least acceptable radiation properties at the same time. This dissertation focuses on some of the most important concerns from the perspective of small satellite applications. For example, an optimization method to simultaneously improve both optical transparency and radiation efficiency of the antenna is studied. Active integrated antenna design method is extended to meshed patch applications in an attempt to improve the overall power efficiency of the front end communication subsystem. As is well known, circular polarization is immune from Faraday rotation effect in the ionosphere and thus can avoid a 3-dB loss in geo-satellite communication. Therefore, this research also aims to present design methods for circularly polarized meshed patch antennas. Moreover, a meshed patch antenna capable of supporting a high communication data rate is investigated. Lastly, other types of transparent patch antennas are also analyzed and compared to meshed patches. In summary, many properties of transparent patch antennas are examined in order to meet different design requirements.

  11. High quality transparent conducting oxide thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Duenow, Joel N.; Barnes, Teresa; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2012-08-28

    A transparent conducting oxide (TCO) film comprising: a TCO layer, and dopants selected from the elements consisting of Vanadium, Molybdenum, Tantalum, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium, wherein the elements are n-type dopants; and wherein the transparent conducting oxide is characterized by an improved electron mobility of about 42 cm.sup.2/V-sec while simultaneously maintaining a high carrier density of .about.4.4e.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3.

  12. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Zeigler, J.M.

    1993-04-20

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  13. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Zeigler, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  14. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Zeigler, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  15. Lutetium oxide-based transparent ceramic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Seeley, Zachary; Cherepy, Nerine; Kuntz, Joshua; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-01-19

    In one embodiment, a transparent ceramic of sintered nanoparticles includes gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with europium having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YEu.sub.YO.sub.3, where X is any value within a range from about 0.05 to about 0.45 and Y is any value within a range from about 0.01 to about 0.2, and where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm. In another embodiment, a transparent ceramic scintillator of sintered nanoparticles, includes a body of sintered nanoparticles including gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with a rare earth activator (RE) having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YRE.sub.YO.sub.3, where RE is selected from the group consisting of: Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy, where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm.

  16. Transparency benchmarking on audio watermarks and steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraetzer, Christian; Dittmann, Jana; Lang, Andreas

    2006-02-01

    The evaluation of transparency plays an important role in the context of watermarking and steganography algorithms. This paper introduces a general definition of the term transparency in the context of steganography, digital watermarking and attack based evaluation of digital watermarking algorithms. For this purpose the term transparency is first considered individually for each of the three application fields (steganography, digital watermarking and watermarking algorithm evaluation). From the three results a general definition for the overall context is derived in a second step. The relevance and applicability of the definition given is evaluated in practise using existing audio watermarking and steganography algorithms (which work in time, frequency and wavelet domain) as well as an attack based evaluation suite for audio watermarking benchmarking - StirMark for Audio (SMBA). For this purpose selected attacks from the SMBA suite are modified by adding transparency enhancing measures using a psychoacoustic model. The transparency and robustness of the evaluated audio watermarking algorithms by using the original and modifid attacks are compared. The results of this paper show hat transparency benchmarking will lead to new information regarding the algorithms under observation and their usage. This information can result in concrete recommendations for modification, like the ones resulting from the tests performed here.

  17. Broadband Tunable Transparency in rf SQUID Metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng; Trepanier, Melissa; Mukhanov, Oleg; Jung, Philipp; Butz, Susanne; Ustinov, Alexey; Anlage, Steven

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a metamaterial with broadband tunable transparency in microwave electromagnetic fields. This metamaterial is made of Radio Frequency Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (rf SQUIDs). We show both experimentally and theoretically that the resonance of this metamaterial totally disappears when illuminated with electromagnetic waves of certain power ranges, so that waves can propagate through the metamaterial with little dissipation in a wide frequency spectrum. Unlike traditional electromagnetically induced transparency, high transmission through this metamaterial is due to the intrinsic nonlinearity of the rf SQUID. Transparency occurs when the metamaterial enters its bistability regime. We can control the metamaterial to be transparent or opaque by switching between the two states depending on the initial conditions and signal scanning directions. We also show that the degree of transparency can be tuned by temperature, power of the incident wave, and dc magnetic field and discuss analytical and numerical models that reveal how to systematically control the transparency regime. The metamaterial has potential application in fast tunable digital filter, power limiter and auto-cloaking. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE programs through grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  18. Highly thermostable, flexible, transparent, and conductive films on polyimide substrate with an AZO/AgNW/AZO structure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qijin; Shen, Wenfeng; Fang, Xingzhong; Chen, Guofei; Yang, Ye; Huang, Jinhua; Tan, Ruiqin; Song, Weijie

    2015-02-25

    Flexible transparent conductive films (TCFs) are used in a variety of optoelectronic devices. However, their use is limited due to poor thermostability. We report hybrid TCFs incorporation in both aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) and silver nanowires (AgNWs). The layered AZO/AgNWs/AZO structure was deposited onto a transparent polyimide (PI) substrate and displayed excellent thermostability. When heated to 250 °C for 1 h, the change in resistivity (Rc) was less than 10% (Rc of pure AgNW film > 500) while retaining good photoelectric properties (Rsh = 8.6 Ohm/sq and T = 74.4%). Layering the AgNW network between AZO films decreased the surface roughness (Rrms < 8 nm) and enhances the mechanical flexibility of the hybrid films. The combination of these characteristics makes the hybrid film an excellent candidate for substrates of novel flexible optoelectronic devices which require high-temperature processing.

  19. Stereo transparency and the disparity gradient limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKee, Suzanne P.; Verghese, Preeti

    2002-01-01

    Several studies (Vision Research 15 (1975) 583; Perception 9 (1980) 671) have shown that binocular fusion is limited by the disparity gradient (disparity/distance) separating image points, rather than by their absolute disparity values. Points separated by a gradient >1 appear diplopic. These results are sometimes interpreted as a constraint on human stereo matching, rather than a constraint on fusion. Here we have used psychophysical measurements on stereo transparency to show that human stereo matching is not constrained by a gradient of 1. We created transparent surfaces composed of many pairs of dots, in which each member of a pair was assigned a disparity equal and opposite to the disparity of the other member. For example, each pair could be composed of one dot with a crossed disparity of 6' and the other with uncrossed disparity of 6', vertically separated by a parametrically varied distance. When the vertical separation between the paired dots was small, the disparity gradient for each pair was very steep. Nevertheless, these opponent-disparity dot pairs produced a striking appearance of two transparent surfaces for disparity gradients ranging between 0.5 and 3. The apparent depth separating the two transparent planes was correctly matched to an equivalent disparity defined by two opaque surfaces. A test target presented between the two transparent planes was easily detected, indicating robust segregation of the disparities associated with the paired dots into two transparent surfaces with few mismatches in the target plane. Our simulations using the Tsai-Victor model show that the response profiles produced by scaled disparity-energy mechanisms can account for many of our results on the transparency generated by steep gradients.

  20. Transmission in Optically Transparent Core Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilper, Dan; Jensen, Rich; Petermann, Klaus; Karasek, Miroslav

    2007-03-01

    Call for Papers: Transmission in Optically Transparent Core Networks

    Guest Feature Editors

    Dan Kilper and Rich Jensen, Coordinating Associate Editors Klaus Petermann and Miroslav Karasek, Guest Feature Editors

    Submission deadline: 15 June 2007
    Optically transparent networks in which optical transport signals are routed uninterrupted through multiple nodes have long been viewed as an important evolutionary step in fiber optic communications. More than a decade of research and development on transparent network technologies together with the requisite traffic growth has culminated in the recent deployment of commercial optically transparent systems. Although many of the traditional research goals of optical transmission remain important, optical transparency introduces new challenges. Greater emphasis is placed on system efficiency and control. The goal of minimizing signal terminations, which has been pursued through increasing reach and channel capacity, also can be realized through wavelength routing techniques. Rather than bounding system operation by rigid engineering rules, the physical layer is controlled and managed by automation tools. Many static signal impairments become dynamic due to network reconfiguration and transient fault events. Recently new directions in transmission research have emerged to address transparent networking problems. This special issue of the Journal of Optical Networking will examine the technologies and theory underpinning transmission in optically transparent core networks, including both metropolitan and long haul systems.

    Scope of Submission

    The special issue editors are soliciting high-quality original research papers related to transmission in optically transparent core networks. Although this does not include edge networks such as access or enterprise networks, core networks that have access capabilities will be considered in scope as will topics

  1. Promoting Improved Ballistic Resistance of Transparent Armor

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Patel, P; Templeton, D W

    2011-01-01

    Transparent armor is a material or system of materials designed to be optically transparent, yet protect from fragmentation or ballistic impacts. Although engineered to defeat specific threats, or a range of threats, there are general requirements common to all of these designs. The primary requirement for a transparent armor system is to not only defeat the designated threat but also provide a multi-hit capability with minimized distortion of surrounding areas. Ground platforms have several parameters that must be optimized, such as weight, space efficiency, and cost versus performance. Glass exhibits tensile failure stress that is very much dependent on the amount of material being stressed, the side being tensile-stressed (i.e., air-versus tin-side if a float glass), and where it is being tensile stressed (i.e., in the middle or near an edge). An axiom arising from those effects is a greater amount of allowable deflection (i.e., higher failure stress) of a ballistically impacted transparent armor will result in improved ballistic resistance. Therefore, the interpretation and management of those tensile-failure-stress dependencies shall ultimately improve ballistic resistance and its predictability of transparent armor. Each of those three dependencies (size, side, and location) in a soda-lime silicate glass is described.

  2. Solution-processed Ag-nanowire/ZnO-nanoparticle composite transparent electrode for flexible organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bin; Pan, Saihu; Wang, Taohong; Tian, Zhenghao; Chen, Guo; Xu, Tao

    2016-12-16

    This paper demonstrates a hybrid transparent electrode composed of a solution-processed silver-nanowire (AgNW) film coated by zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) acting as a modified buffer layer. The effect of the ZnO-NPs' coating ratio on the performances of indium tin oxide (ITO)-free organic solar cells (OSCs) has been systematically investigated. The optimized ITO-free OSCs achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.85%, while flexible OSCs using the AgNW/ZnO-NP composite transparent electrode grown on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate showed a PCE of 2.2%.

  3. Solution-processed Ag-nanowire/ZnO-nanoparticle composite transparent electrode for flexible organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bin; Pan, Saihu; Wang, Taohong; Tian, Zhenghao; Chen, Guo; Xu, Tao

    2016-12-01

    This paper demonstrates a hybrid transparent electrode composed of a solution-processed silver-nanowire (AgNW) film coated by zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) acting as a modified buffer layer. The effect of the ZnO-NPs’ coating ratio on the performances of indium tin oxide (ITO)-free organic solar cells (OSCs) has been systematically investigated. The optimized ITO-free OSCs achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.85%, while flexible OSCs using the AgNW/ZnO-NP composite transparent electrode grown on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate showed a PCE of 2.2%.

  4. Parallel Computing by Xeroxing on Transparencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, Tom

    We illustrate a procedure for solving instances of the Boolean satisfiability (SAT) problem by xeroxing onto transparent plastic sheets. Suppose that m clauses are given in which n variables occur and that the longest clause contains k literals. The associated instance of the SAT problem can be solved by using a xerox machine to form only n+2k+m successive transparencies. The applicability of this linear time algorithm is limited, of course, by the increase in the information density on the transparencies when n is large. This same scheme of computation can be carried out by using photographic or other optical processes. This work has been developed as an alternate implementation of procedures previously developed in the context of aqueous (DNA) computing.

  5. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  6. [Transparency in public health decision-making].

    PubMed

    García-Altés, Anna; Argimon, Josep M

    2016-11-01

    Improving the quality and transparency of governmental healthcare decision-making has an impact on the health of the population through policies, organisational management and clinical practice. Moreover, the comparison between healthcare centres and the transparent feedback of results to professionals and to the wider public contribute directly to improved results. The "Results Centre" of the Catalan healthcare system measures and disseminates the results achieved by the different healthcare centres in order to facilitate a shared decision-making process, thereby enhancing the quality of healthcare provided to the population of Catalonia (Spain). This is a pioneering initiative in Spain and is aligned with the most advanced countries in terms of policies of transparency and accountability.

  7. Metamaterial with electromagnetic transparency under multiband absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Qi, Limei

    2017-02-01

    We propose a metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) metamaterial that has an electromagnetic (EM) transparency spectrum under multiband absorptions in the C and the X bands. The ground continuous metal film used in the conventional metamaterial absorber (MA) is replaced by a structured ground plane (SGP) in our design. The band-pass properties of the front patterned metal film and the SGP determine the EM transparency spectrum, while the magnetic and the electric resonances in the MDM structure contribute to the multiband absorptions. Due to the symmetric structure of the unit cell, the absorption bands and the EM transparency spectrum of the metamaterial have the property of polarization independency. Despite the normal incidence, the metamaterial can also be used for non-normal incidence.

  8. Nuclear transparencies from photoinduced pion production

    SciTech Connect

    W. Cosyn; M.C. Martinez; J. Ryckebusch; B. Van Overmeire

    2006-12-01

    We present a relativistic and cross-section factorized framework for computing nuclear transparencies extracted from A({gamma}, {pi} N) reactions at intermediate energies. The proposed quantum mechanical model adopts a relativistic extension to the multiple-scattering Glauber approximation to account for the final state interactions of the ejected nucleon and pion. The theoretical predictions are compared against the experimental {sup 4}He({gamma},p {pi}{sup -}) data from Jefferson Lab. For those data, our results show no conclusive evidence for the onset of mechanisms related to color transparency.

  9. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  10. Fused Silica and Other Transparent Window Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Several transparent ceramics, such as spinel and AlONs are now being produced in sufficient large areas to be used in space craft window applications. The work horse transparent material for space missions from Apollo to the International Space Station has been fused silica due in part to its low coefficient of expansion and optical quality. Despite its successful use, fused silica exhibits anomalies in its crack growth behavior, depending on environmental preconditioning and surface damage. This presentation will compare recent optical ceramics to fused silica and discuss sources of variation in slow crack growth behavior.

  11. Transparent Watercolor. Art Education: 6673.07.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenaway, Jean E.

    An introductory course designed to develop skills and techniques in transparent watercolor offers an exploration of a variety of techniques emphasizing drawing and composition and allowing the student to create and matt his own paintings. Students in grades 7 through 12 develop competencies in flat and graded wash and dry and stipple brush…

  12. Transparent superstrate terrestrial solar cell module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and testing of the transparent solar cell module were examined. Cell performance and material process characteristics were determined by extensive tests and design modifications were made prior to preproduction fabrication. These tests included three cell submodules and two full size engineering modules. Along with hardware and test activity, engineering documentation was prepared and submitted.

  13. Color transparency experiments at higher energies

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, B.W.

    1994-04-01

    The phenomena of Color Transparency has recently attracted a significant amount of theoretical (and experimental) interest. With an increase in the CEBAF beam energy to 8 - 10 GeV, important new data on the process could become available. The present status of the experiments and future prospects at CEBAF are discussed.

  14. Copper nanowires as fully transparent conductive electrodes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huizhang; Lin, Na; Chen, Yuanzhi; Wang, Zhenwei; Xie, Qingshui; Zheng, Tongchang; Gao, Na; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong; Cai, Duanjun; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2013-01-01

    In pondering of new promising transparent conductors to replace the cost rising tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), metal nanowires have been widely concerned. Herein, we demonstrate an approach for successful synthesis of long and fine Cu nanowires (NWs) through a novel catalytic scheme involving nickel ions. Such Cu NWs in high aspect ratio (diameter of 16.2 ± 2 nm and length up to 40 μm) provide long distance for electron transport and, meanwhile, large space for light transmission. Transparent electrodes fabricated using the Cu NW ink achieve a low sheet resistance of 1.4 Ohm/sq at 14% transmittance and a high transparency of 93.1% at 51.5 Ohm/sq. The flexibility and stability were tested with 100-timebending by 180°and no resistance change occurred. Ohmic contact was achieved to the p- and n-GaN on blue light emitting diode chip and bright electroluminescence from the front face confirmed the excellent transparency.

  15. Transparency Master: Planaria in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Lauritz A.; Allen, A. Lester

    1983-01-01

    Background information on the morphology and physiology of planarians and uses of the organism in schools is provided. Also provided is a transparency master demonstrating a planarian with an everted proboscis, two-headed/two-tailed planarians, and a planarian demonstrating the digestive tract. (JN)

  16. Transparency Master: The Annual Aphid Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sessions, Mary Lynne

    1983-01-01

    Aphids, often referred to as plant lice, can be found in great numbers on stems, leaves, and flowers of many plants. In many cases these organisms are potentially harmful to their plant hosts. Provided is a description of the annual life cycle of the aphid and an accompanying transparency master. (Author/JN)

  17. Situation Awareness-Based Agent Transparency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Initiative. 15. SUBJECT TERMS human-robot interaction, autonomous systems, transparency, trust, situation awareness (SA) 16. SECURITY...11 5. Example: Autonomous Squad Member 13 5.1 SAT Level 1...5 1 1. Introduction Autonomous agents have been increasingly used for military operations (e.g., casualty extraction

  18. 47 CFR 8.3 - Transparency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.3 Transparency. A person engaged in the provision of broadband Internet access service shall publicly disclose accurate information regarding the network management practices, performance, and commercial terms of its broadband...

  19. 47 CFR 8.3 - Transparency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.3 Transparency. A person engaged in the provision of broadband Internet access service shall publicly disclose accurate information regarding the network management practices, performance, and commercial terms of its broadband...

  20. 47 CFR 8.3 - Transparency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.3 Transparency. A person engaged in the provision of broadband Internet access service shall publicly disclose accurate information regarding the network management practices, performance, and commercial terms of its broadband...

  1. 47 CFR 8.3 - Transparency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.3 Transparency. A person engaged in the provision of broadband Internet access service shall publicly disclose accurate information regarding the network management practices, performance, and commercial terms of its broadband...

  2. Working toward Transparency in Library Automation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author argues the need for transparency with regard to the automation systems used in libraries. As librarians make decisions regarding automation software and services, they should have convenient access to information about the organizations it will potentially acquire technology from and about the collective experiences of…

  3. Making Usable, Quality Opaque or Transparent Soap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabrouk, Suzanne T.

    2005-01-01

    The experiment to make opaque and transparent soap, using cold and semi boiled processes respectively, and surfactant tests that measure the pH of the prepared soap, is introduced. The experiment shows an easy method to make soap by giving a choice to select oils and scents for the soap, which can be used at home.

  4. Dipolar exchange induced transparency with Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, David

    2017-03-01

    A three-level atomic medium can be made transparent to a resonant probe field in the presence of a strong control field acting on an adjacent atomic transition to a long-lived state, which can be represented by a highly excited Rydberg state. The long-range interactions between the Rydberg state atoms then translate into strong, non-local, dispersive or absorptive interactions between the probe photons, which can be used to achieve deterministic quantum logic gates and single photon sources. Here we show that long-range dipole–dipole exchange interaction with one or more spins—two-level systems represented by atoms in suitable Rydberg states—can play the role of control field for the optically dense medium of atoms. This induces transparency of the medium for a number of probe photons n p not exceeding the number of spins n s , while all the excess photons are resonantly absorbed upon propagation. In the most practical case of a single spin atom prepared in the Rydberg state, the medium is thus transparent only to a single input probe photon. For larger number of spins n s , all n p ≤ n s photon components of the probe field would experience transparency but with an n p -dependent group velocity.

  5. Semantic transparency affects memory conjunction errors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mungchen; Rotello, Caren M.

    2009-01-01

    Memory conjunction errors occur when aspects of two different events are falsely recognized or recalled as having occurred as parts of the same event. One theoretical account of conjunction errors is rooted in traditional dual-process models of recognition judgments, in which responses are based on an item’s familiarity or the retrieval of recollected details associated with the encoding of that item. We manipulated the familiarity of test probes by varying their semantic overlap with studied items, taking advantage of the inherent semantic transparency of compound words. Transparent compounds are those whose component parts (lexemes) are semantically related to the meaning of the entire word. In contrast, opaque compounds’ lexemes do not contribute directly to the meaning of the compound. We showed that the familiarity of semantically transparent assembly lures created from their lexemes (study dog and house, test on doghouse) is greater than the familiarity of opaque assembly lures (study back and draw, test on drawback). A response-signal experiment revealed no evidence for the use of a recall-to-reject process for either semantically transparent or opaque lures. PMID:19966238

  6. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

    1985-09-04

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40/sup 0/C instead of at about 270/sup 0/C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementary particles or cosmic rays.

  7. Lattice-induced transparency in planar metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Lattice modes are intrinsic to periodic structures and they can be easily tuned and controlled by changing the lattice constant of the structural array. Previous studies have revealed the excitation of sharp absorption resonances due to lattice mode coupling with the plasmonic resonances. Here, we report an experimental observation of a lattice-induced transparency (LIT) by coupling the first-order lattice mode (FOLM) to the structural resonance of a terahertz asymmetric split ring resonator. The observed sharp transparency is a result of the destructive interference between the bright mode and the FOLM assisted dark mode. As the FOLM is swept across the metamaterial resonance, the transparency band undergoes a large change in its bandwidth and resonance position. We propose a three-oscillator model to explain the underlying coupling mechanism in LIT system that shows good agreement with the observed results. Besides controlling the transparency behavior, LIT also shows a huge enhancement in its Q factor and exhibits a high group delay of 28 ps with an enhanced group index of 4.5 ×104 , which could be pivotal in ultrasensitive sensing and slow-light device applications.

  8. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Param H.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    1986-01-01

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO.sub.2, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO.sub.2, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40.degree. C. instead of at about 270.degree. C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementry particles or cosmic rays.

  9. Gender activation in transparent and opaque words.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Mabel; Domínguez, Alberto; Alvarez, Carlos J

    2009-02-01

    Two reaction time experiments were carried out to examine the morphological gender processing of Spanish words that were either transparent -that is, ending in o/a (e.g., banco - bank)-or opaque-that is, without superficial gender marking (e.g., virtud - virtue). In Experiment 1, participants categorized the gender of a transparent gender target preceded by a derived word of the same gender (e.g., banquillo-dock, masculine) or of different gender (e.g., banqueta-stool, feminine). A negative priming gender effect indicates the use of strategic-attentional mechanisms to decide the gender of the target, but also automatic computation of the prime gender. Experiment 2 used a lexical decision task with the stimuli of Experiment 1 in addition to opaque gender words. The results show longer reaction times for transparent gender words with regard to opaque items. This effect was possibly due to the lexical requirements of the task: lexical decision, and also because transparent words are morphologically more complex than opaque words. Finally, in both experiments, there was negative priming: when prime and target were of the same gender, reaction times were longer. This effect indicates that participants cannot ignore the gender of the prime when they respond to the target.

  10. III-V/Si wafer bonding using transparent, conductive oxide interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Tamboli, Adele C. Hest, Maikel F. A. M. van; Steiner, Myles A.; Essig, Stephanie; Norman, Andrew G.; Bosco, Nick; Stradins, Paul; Perl, Emmett E.

    2015-06-29

    We present a method for low temperature plasma-activated direct wafer bonding of III-V materials to Si using a transparent, conductive indium zinc oxide interlayer. The transparent, conductive oxide (TCO) layer provides excellent optical transmission as well as electrical conduction, suggesting suitability for Si/III-V hybrid devices including Si-based tandem solar cells. For bonding temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 350 °C, Ohmic behavior is observed in the sample stacks, with specific contact resistivity below 1 Ω cm{sup 2} for samples bonded at 200 °C. Optical absorption measurements show minimal parasitic light absorption, which is limited by the III-V interlayers necessary for Ohmic contact formation to TCOs. These results are promising for Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P/Si tandem solar cells operating at 1 sun or low concentration conditions.

  11. TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Glatkowski, P. J.; Landis, D. A.

    2013-04-16

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT

  12. Ultra-high aspect ratio copper nanowires as transparent conductive electrodes for dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaozhao; Mankowski, Trent; Shikoh, Ali Sehpar; Touati, Farid; Benammar, Mohieddine A.; Mansuripur, Masud; Falco, Charles M.

    2016-09-01

    We report the synthesis of ultra-high aspect ratio copper nanowires (CuNW) and fabrication of CuNW-based transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) with high optical transmittance (>80%) and excellent sheet resistance (Rs <30 Ω/sq). These CuNW TCEs are subsequently hybridized with aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin-film coatings, or platinum thin film coatings, or nickel thin-film coatings. Our hybrid transparent electrodes can replace indium tin oxide (ITO) films in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as either anodes or cathodes. We highlight the challenges of integrating bare CuNWs into DSSCs, and demonstrate that hybridization renders the solar cell integrations feasible. The CuNW/AZO-based DSSCs have reasonably good open-circuit voltage (Voc = 720 mV) and short-circuit current-density (Jsc = 0.96 mA/cm2), which are comparable to what is obtained with an ITO-based DSSC fabricated with a similar process. Our CuNW-Ni based DSSCs exhibit a good open-circuit voltage (Voc = 782 mV) and a decent short-circuit current (Jsc = 3.96 mA/cm2), with roughly 1.5% optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency.

  13. Methods and apparatus for transparent display using scattering nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Qiu, Wenjun; Zhen, Bo; Shapira, Ofer; Soljacic, Marin

    2016-05-10

    Transparent displays enable many useful applications, including heads-up displays for cars and aircraft as well as displays on eyeglasses and glass windows. Unfortunately, transparent displays made of organic light-emitting diodes are typically expensive and opaque. Heads-up displays often require fixed light sources and have limited viewing angles. And transparent displays that use frequency conversion are typically energy inefficient. Conversely, the present transparent displays operate by scattering visible light from resonant nanoparticles with narrowband scattering cross sections and small absorption cross sections. More specifically, projecting an image onto a transparent screen doped with nanoparticles that selectively scatter light at the image wavelength(s) yields an image on the screen visible to an observer. Because the nanoparticles scatter light at only certain wavelengths, the screen is practically transparent under ambient light. Exemplary transparent scattering displays can be simple, inexpensive, scalable to large sizes, viewable over wide angular ranges, energy efficient, and transparent simultaneously.

  14. A high-performance, flexible and robust metal nanotrough-embedded transparent conducting film for wearable touch screen panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hyeon-Gyun; An, Byeong Wan; Jin, Jungho; Jang, Junho; Park, Young-Geun; Park, Jang-Ung; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    We report a high-performance, flexible and robust metal nanotrough-embedded transparent conducting hybrid film (metal nanotrough-GFRHybrimer). Using an electro-spun polymer nanofiber web as a template and vacuum-deposited gold as a conductor, a junction resistance-free continuous metal nanotrough network is formed. Subsequently, the metal nanotrough is embedded on the surface of a glass-fabric reinforced composite substrate (GFRHybrimer). The monolithic composite structure of our transparent conducting film allows simultaneously high thermal stability (24 h at 250 °C in air), a smooth surface topography (Rrms < 1 nm) and excellent opto-electrical properties. A flexible touch screen panel (TSP) is fabricated using the transparent conducting films. The flexible TSP device stably operates on the back of a human hand and on a wristband.We report a high-performance, flexible and robust metal nanotrough-embedded transparent conducting hybrid film (metal nanotrough-GFRHybrimer). Using an electro-spun polymer nanofiber web as a template and vacuum-deposited gold as a conductor, a junction resistance-free continuous metal nanotrough network is formed. Subsequently, the metal nanotrough is embedded on the surface of a glass-fabric reinforced composite substrate (GFRHybrimer). The monolithic composite structure of our transparent conducting film allows simultaneously high thermal stability (24 h at 250 °C in air), a smooth surface topography (Rrms < 1 nm) and excellent opto-electrical properties. A flexible touch screen panel (TSP) is fabricated using the transparent conducting films. The flexible TSP device stably operates on the back of a human hand and on a wristband. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07657a

  15. Novel epoxy-silicone thermolytic transparent packaging adhesives chemical modified by ZnO nanowires for HB LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ying; Wang, Jun-An; Pei, Chang-Long; Song, Ji-Zhong; Zhu, Di; Chen, Jie

    2010-10-01

    A novel high transparent thermolytic epoxy-silicone for high-brightness light-emitting diode (HB-LED) is introduced, which was synthesized by polymerization using silicone matrix via diglycidyl ether bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) as reinforcing agent, and filling ZnO nanowires to modify thermal conductivity and control refractive index of the hybrid material. The interactions of ZnO nanowires with polymers are mediated by the ligands attached to the nanoparticles. Thus, the ligands markedly influence the properties of ZnO nanowires/epoxy-silicone composites. The refractive indices of the prepared hybrid adhesives can be tuned by the ZnO nanowires from 1.4711 to 1.5605. Light transmittance can be increased by 20% from 80 to 95%. The thermal conductivity of the transparent packaging adhesives is 0.89-0.90 W/mK.

  16. Transparent Laser Ceramics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, T

    2007-06-28

    LLNL has been using the largest transparent laser ceramics for the last two years in the solid-state heat capacity laser (SSHCL). The lab is very interested in extending the use of transparent ceramics to other laser applications. In this talk we will discuss work at the laboratory aimed at better understanding the sintering and the criteria needed for good ceramic transparency, the application of transparent ceramics in the SSHCL laser and possible new applications of tailored ceramics.

  17. Structural and mechanical properties of Laponite-PEG hybrid films.

    PubMed

    Shikinaka, Kazuhiro; Aizawa, Kazuto; Murakami, Yoshihiko; Osada, Yoshihito; Tokita, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Junji; Shigehara, Kiyotaka

    2012-03-01

    Inorganic/organic hybrids were obtained by the sol-gel type organic modification reaction of Laponite sidewalls with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) bearing alkoxysiloxy terminal functionality. By casting an aqueous dispersion of the hybrid, the flexible and transparent hybrid films were obtained. Regardless of the inorganic/organic component ratio, the hybrid film had the ordered structure of Laponite in-plane flat arrays. The mechanical strength of hybrid films was drastically improved by the presence of cross-linking among alkoxysilyl functionalities of PEG terminals and the absence of PEG crystallines. Hybrid films, especially those that consisted of PEG with short chain, showed good mechanical properties that originate from quasi-homogeneous dispersion of components due to anchoring of PEG terminal to Laponite sidewall and interaction of PEG to Laponite surface.

  18. Stellarator hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Ludescher, C.

    1984-08-01

    The present paper briefly reviews the subject of tokamak-stellarator and pinch-stellarator hybrids, and points to two interesting new possibilities: compact-torus-stellarators and mirror-stellarators.

  19. Competing Triggers: Transparency and Opacity in Vowel Harmony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimper, Wendell A.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation takes up the issue of transparency and opacity in vowel harmony--that is, when a segment is unable to undergo a harmony process, will it be skipped over by harmony (transparent) or will it prevent harmony from propagating further (opaque)? I argue that the choice between transparency and opacity is best understood as a…

  20. Space-Derived Transparency: Players, Policies, Implications, and Synergies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Dr. Florini�s idealistic definition, transparency today is at best a mix of � legislated � voluntary and involuntary disclosure by states, private...SPACE-DERIVED TRANSPARENCY : PLAYERS, POLICIES, IMPLICATIONS, AND SYNERGIES BY C. J. KINNAN A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE...to) - Title and Subtitle Space-Derived Transparency : Players, Policies, Implicatons, and Synergies Contract Number Grant Number Program Element

  1. Transparent Information Systems through Gateways, Front Ends, Intermediaries, and Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Martha E.

    1986-01-01

    Provides overview of design requirements for transparent information retrieval (implies that user sees through complexity of retrieval activities sequence). Highlights include need for transparent systems; history of transparent retrieval research; information retrieval functions (automated converters, routers, selectors, evaluators/analyzers);…

  2. Flexible transparent conductive films combining flexographic printed silver grids with CNT coating.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lixin; Ran, Jun; Yang, Li; Fang, Yi; Zhai, Qingbin; Li, Luhai

    2016-02-12

    A high-performance ITO-free transparent conductive film (TCF) has been made by combining high resolution Ag grids with a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating. Ag grids printed with flexography have a 20 μm line width at a grid interval of 400 μm. The Ag grid/CNT hybrid film exhibits excellent overall performance, with a typical sheet resistance of 14.8 Ω/□ and 82.6% light transmittance at room temperature. This means a 23.98% reduction in sheet resistance and only 2.52% loss in transmittance compared to a pure Ag grid film. Analysis indicates that filling areas between the Ag grids and interconnecting the silver nanoparticles with the CNT coating are the primary reasons for the significantly improved conductivity of the hybrid film that also exhibits excellent flexibility and mechanical strength compared to an ITO film. The hybrid film may fully satisfy the requirements of different applications, e.g. use as the anode of polymer solar cells (PSCs). The J-V curve shows that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSCs using the Ag grid/CNT hybrid anode is 0.61%, which is 24.5% higher than that of the pure Ag grids with a PCE of 0.49%. Further investigations to improve the performance of the solar cells based on the printed hybrid TCFs are ongoing.

  3. Flexible transparent conductive films combining flexographic printed silver grids with CNT coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Lixin; Ran, Jun; Yang, Li; Fang, Yi; Zhai, Qingbin; Li, Luhai

    2016-02-01

    A high-performance ITO-free transparent conductive film (TCF) has been made by combining high resolution Ag grids with a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating. Ag grids printed with flexography have a 20 μm line width at a grid interval of 400 μm. The Ag grid/CNT hybrid film exhibits excellent overall performance, with a typical sheet resistance of 14.8 Ω/□ and 82.6% light transmittance at room temperature. This means a 23.98% reduction in sheet resistance and only 2.52% loss in transmittance compared to a pure Ag grid film. Analysis indicates that filling areas between the Ag grids and interconnecting the silver nanoparticles with the CNT coating are the primary reasons for the significantly improved conductivity of the hybrid film that also exhibits excellent flexibility and mechanical strength compared to an ITO film. The hybrid film may fully satisfy the requirements of different applications, e.g. use as the anode of polymer solar cells (PSCs). The J-V curve shows that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSCs using the Ag grid/CNT hybrid anode is 0.61%, which is 24.5% higher than that of the pure Ag grids with a PCE of 0.49%. Further investigations to improve the performance of the solar cells based on the printed hybrid TCFs are ongoing.

  4. Atom-membrane cooling and entanglement using cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Genes, Claudiu; Ritsch, Helmut; Drewsen, Michael; Dantan, Aurelien

    2011-11-15

    We investigate a hybrid optomechanical system composed of a micromechanical oscillator as a movable membrane and an atomic three-level ensemble within an optical cavity. We show that a suitably tailored cavity field response via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the atomic medium allows for strong coupling of the membrane's mechanical oscillations to the collective atomic ground-state spin. This facilitates ground-state cooling of the membrane motion, quantum state mapping, and robust atom-membrane entanglement even for cavity widths larger than the mechanical resonance frequency.

  5. Transparent ceramics and methods of preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hollingsworth, Joel P.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Soules, Thomas F.

    2011-10-18

    According to one embodiment, a method for forming a transparent ceramic preform includes forming a suspension of oxide particles in a solvent, adding the suspension to a mold of a desired shape, and uniformly curing the suspension in the mold for forming a preform. The suspension includes a dispersant but does not include a gelling agent. In another embodiment, a method includes creating a mixture without a gelling agent, the mixture including: inorganic particles, a solvent, and a dispersant. The inorganic particles have a mean diameter of less than about 2000 nm. The method also includes agitating the mixture, adding the mixture to a mold, and curing the mixture in the mold at a temperature of less than about 80.degree. C. for forming a preform. Other methods for forming a transparent ceramic preform are also described according to several embodiments.

  6. Transparent conducting materials: overview and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Deelen, Joop; Illiberi, Andrea; Hovestad, Arjan; Barbu, Ionut; Klerk, Lennaert; Buskens, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    An overview of different transparent conductors is given. In addition, atmospheric pressure CVD of ZnO resulted in conductivities below 1 mΩ cm for a temperature of 480°C, whereas at a process temperature of 200°C a value of 2 mΩ cm was obtained. Also atmospheric pressure spatial ALD was used to make conductive ZnO. Furthermore, the properties of transparent conductive oxides (TCO) can be enhanced by application of metallic grids. This way, sheet resistances of below 0.1 Ω/sq and transmittances above 85 % can be achieved. Modeling indicates that the performance of thin film cells can be enhanced by18% using a grid/TCO combination. Light scattering is a vital element of thin film solar cells and both texturization and multimaterial approaches for advanced light management such as plasmonics are discussed.

  7. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  8. Legislation for trial registration and data transparency.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Wu, Tai-Xiang

    2010-05-26

    Public confidence in clinical trials has been eroded by data suppression, misrepresentation and manipulation. Although various attempts have been made to achieve universal trial registration- e.g., Declaration of Helsinki, WHO clinical Trial Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors requirement- they have not succeeded, probably because they lack the enough power of enforcement.Legislation appears to be the most efficient and effective means to ensure that all researchers register their trials and disseminate their data accurately and in a timely manner. We propose that a global network be established. This could be accomplished in two steps. The first step is to legislate about trial registration and data transparency, such as USA's FDAAA Act 2007; and the second step to establish a global network to ensure uniform, international consistency in policy and enforcement of trial registration and data transparency.

  9. Environmentally benign processing of YAG transparent wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Yiquan

    2015-12-01

    Transparent yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) wafers were successfully produced via aqueous tape casting and vacuum sintering techniques using a new environmentally friendly binder, a copolymer of isobutylene and maleic anhydride with the commercial name ISOBAM (noted as ISOBAM). Aqueous YAG slurries were mixed by ball-milling, which was followed by de-gassing and tape casting of wafers. The final YAG green tapes were homogenous and flexible, and could be bent freely without cracking. After the drying and sintering processes, transparent YAG wafers were achieved. The microstructures of both the green tape and vacuum-sintered YAG ceramic were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Phase compositions were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical transmittance was measured in UV-VIS regions with the result that the transmittance is 82.6% at a wavelength of 800 nm.

  10. Transparent data service with multiple wireless access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Richard A.; Levesque, Allen H.

    1993-01-01

    The rapid introduction of digital wireless networks is an important part of the emerging digital communications scene. The introduction of Digital Cellular, LEO and GEO Satellites, and Personal Communications Services poses both a challenge and an opportunity for the data user. On the one hand wireless access will introduce significant new portable data services such as personal notebooks, paging, E-mail, and fax that will put the information age in the user's pocket. On the other hand the challenge of creating a seamless and transparent environment for the user in multiple access environments and across multiple network connections is formidable. A summary of the issues associated with developing techniques and standards that can support transparent and seamless data services is presented. The introduction of data services into the radio world represents a unique mix of RF channel problems, data protocol issues, and network issues. These problems require that experts from each of these disciplines fuse the individual technologies to support these services.

  11. Antireflective Coatings for Glass and Transparent Polymers.

    PubMed

    Buskens, Pascal; Burghoorn, Marieke; Mourad, Maurice Christian Danho; Vroon, Zeger

    2016-07-12

    Antireflective coatings (ARCs) are applied to reduce surface reflections. We review coatings that reduce the reflection of the surface of the transparent substrates float glass, polyethylene terephthalate, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polycarbonate. Three main coating concepts exist to lower the reflection at the interface of a transparent substrate and air: multilayer interference coatings, graded index coatings, and quarter-wave coatings. We introduce and discuss these three concepts, and zoom in on porous quarter-wave coatings comprising colloidal particles. We extensively discuss the four routes for introducing porosity in quarter-wave coatings through the use of colloidal particles, which have the highest potential for application: (1) packing of dense nanospheres, (2) integration of voids through hollow nanospheres, (3) integration of voids through sacrificial particle templates, and (4) packing of nonspherical nanoparticles. Finally, we address the remaining challenges in the field of ARCs, and elaborate on potential strategies for future research in this area.

  12. Theory of absorption-induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, Sergio G.; García-Vidal, F. J.; Martín-Moreno, L.

    2013-10-01

    Recent experiments [Hutchison, O’Carroll, Schwartz, Genet, and Ebbesen, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.1433-785110.1002/anie.201006019 50, 2085 (2011)] have demonstrated that optical transmission through an array of subwavelength holes in a metal film can be enhanced by the intentional presence of dyes in the system. As the transmission maximum occurs spectrally close to the absorption resonances of the dyes, this phenomenon was christened “absorption induced transparency”. Here, a theoretical study on absorption induced transparency is presented. The results show that the appearance of transmission maxima requires that the absorbent fills the holes and that it occurs also for single holes. Furthermore, it is shown that the transmission process is nonresonant, being composed by a sequential passage of the electromagnetic field through the hole. Finally, the physical origin of the phenomenon is demonstrated to be nonplasmonic, which implies that absorption induced transparency should also occur at the infrared or terahertz frequency regimes.

  13. Zen Mountains: An Illusion of Perceptual Transparency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The human visual system is usually very successful in segmenting complex natural scenes. During a trip to the Nepalese Himalayas, we observed an impossible example of Nature's beauty: “transparent” mountains. The scene is captured in a photograph in which a pair of mountain peaks viewed in the far distance appear to be transparent. This illusion results from a fortuitous combination of lighting and scene conditions, which induce an erroneous integration of multiple segmentation cues. The illusion unites three classic principles of visual perception: Metelli's constraints for perceptual transparency, the Gestalt principle of good continuation, and depth from contrast and atmospheric scattering. This real-world “failure” of scene segmentation reinforces how ingeniously the human visual system typically integrates complex sources of perceptual information using heuristics based on likelihood as shortcuts to veridical perception. PMID:28299170

  14. Highly catalytic carbon nanotube/Pt nanohybrid-based transparent counter electrode for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Liao, Jin-Yun; Lei, Bing-Xin; Kuang, Dai-Bin; Fang, Yueping; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2012-08-01

    Low-cost transparent counter electrodes (CEs) for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are prepared by using nanohybrids of carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported platinum nanoparticles as highly active catalysts. The nanohybrids, synthesized by an ionic-liquid-assisted sonochemical method, are directly deposited on either rigid glass or flexible plastic substrates by a facile electrospray method for operation as CEs. Their electrochemical performances are examined by cyclic voltammetry, current density-voltage characteristics, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The CNT/Pt hybrid films exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for I(-)/I(3)(-) with a weak dependence on film thickness. A transparent CNT/Pt hybrid CE film about 100 nm thick with a transparency of about 70% (at 550 nm) can result in a high power conversion efficiency (η) of over 8.5%, which is comparable to that of pyrolysis platinum-based DSSCs, but lower cost. Furthermore, DSSC based on flexible CNT/Pt hybrid CE using indium-doped tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate as the substrate also exhibits η=8.43% with J(sc)=16.85 mA cm(-2), V(oc)=780 mV, and FF=0.64, and this shows great potential in developing highly efficient flexible DSSCs.

  15. Highly efficient fully transparent inverted OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; Winkler, T.; Hamwi, S.; Schmale, S.; Kröger, M.; Görrn, P.; Johannes, H.-H.; Riedl, T.; Lang, E.; Becker, D.; Dobbertin, T.; Kowalsky, W.

    2007-09-01

    One of the unique selling propositions of OLEDs is their potential to realize highly transparent devices over the visible spectrum. This is because organic semiconductors provide a large Stokes-Shift and low intrinsic absorption losses. Hence, new areas of applications for displays and ambient lighting become accessible, for instance, the integration of OLEDs into the windshield or the ceiling of automobiles. The main challenge in the realization of fully transparent devices is the deposition of the top electrode. ITO is commonly used as transparent bottom anode in a conventional OLED. To obtain uniform light emission over the entire viewing angle and a low series resistance, a TCO such as ITO is desirable as top contact as well. However, sputter deposition of ITO on top of organic layers causes damage induced by high energetic particles and UV radiation. We have found an efficient process to protect the organic layers against the ITO rf magnetron deposition process of ITO for an inverted OLED (IOLED). The inverted structure allows the integration of OLEDs in more powerful n-channel transistors used in active matrix backplanes. Employing the green electrophosphorescent material Ir(ppy) 3 lead to IOLED with a current efficiency of 50 cd/A and power efficiency of 24 lm/W at 100 cd/m2. The average transmittance exceeds 80 % in the visible region. The on-set voltage for light emission is lower than 3 V. In addition, by vertical stacking we achieved a very high current efficiency of more than 70 cd/A for transparent IOLED.

  16. Research Studies on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-20

    ns and linewidths smaller than the natural linewidth of target atoms . We have demonstrated the use of telecommunication light modulators to modulate...induced transparency, photon interactions with atoms , nonclassical states of the electromagnetic field, including entangled photon states, quantum...either the amplitude or phase of the anti-stokes photon. The technique therefore provides the technology for studying the response of atoms to shaped

  17. Transparent heat-spreader for optoelectronic applications

    DOEpatents

    Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo

    2014-11-04

    An optoelectronic cooling system is equally applicable to an LED collimator or a photovoltaic solar concentrator. A transparent fluid conveys heat from the optoelectronic chip to a hollow cover over the system aperture. The cooling system can keep a solar concentrator chip at the same temperature as found for a one-sun flat-plate solar cell. Natural convection or forced circulation can operate to convey heat from the chip to the cover.

  18. Semi-transparent inverted organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, H.; Winkler, T.; Tilgner, M.; Flügge, H.; Schmale, S.; Bülow, T.; Meyer, J.; Johannes, H.-H.; Riedl, T.; Kowalsky, W.

    2009-08-01

    We will present efficient semi-transparent bulk-heterojunction [regioregular of poly(3-hexylthiophene): (6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester] solar cells with an inverted device architecture. Highly transparent ZnO and TiO2 films prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition are used as cathode interlayers on top of ITO. The topanode consists of a RF-sputtered ITO layer. To avoid damage due to the plasma deposition of this layer, a sputtering buffer layer of MoO3 is used as protection. This concept allows for devices with a transmissivity higher than 60 % for wavelengths 650 nm. The thickness of the MoO3 buffer has been varied in order to study its effect on the electrical properties of the solar cell and its ability to prevent possible damage to the organic active layers upon ITO deposition. Without this buffer or for thin buffers it has been found that device performance is very poor concerning the leakage current, the fill factor, the short circuit current and the power conversion efficiencies. As a reference inverted solar cells with a metal electrode (Al) instead of the ITO-top contact are used. The variation between the PCE of top versus conventional illumination of the semi-transparent cells was also examined and will be interpreted in view of the results of the optical simulation of the dielectric device stack with and without reflection top electrode. Power conversion efficiencies of 2-3 % for the opaque inverted solar cells and 1.5-2.5 % for the semi-transparent devices were obtained under an AM1.5G illumination.

  19. Price Transparency in the Online Age.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Jonathan L; Mills, Parker H

    2016-05-01

    Plastic surgeons are sometimes hesitant to provide their pricing information online, due to several concerns. However, if implemented right, price transparency can be used as a lead generation tool that provides consumers with the pricing information they want and gives the physician the consumer's contact information for follow-up. This study took place during the author's first year in private practice in a new city. An interactive price transparency platform (ie, cost estimator) was integrated into his website, allowing consumers to submit a "wishlist" of procedures to check pricing on these procedures of interest. However, the consumer must submit their contact information to receive the desired breakdown of costs that are tailored based on the author's medical fees. During that first year, without any advertising expenditure, the author's website received 412 wishlists from 208 unique consumers. Consumers (17.8%) that submitted a wishlist came in for a consultation and 62% of those booked a procedure. The average value of a booked procedure was over US $4000 and cumulatively, all of the leads from this one lead source in that first year generated over US $92,000 in revenue. When compared with non-price-aware patients, price-aware patients were 41% more likely to book a procedure. Price transparency led to greater efficiency and reduced consultations that ended in "sticker shock." When prudently integrated into a medical practice, price transparency can be a great lead generation source for patients that are (1) paying out of pocket for medically necessary services due to a high-deductible health plan or (2) paying for services not typically covered by insurance, such as cosmetic services.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lens transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    Transparency of normal lens cytoplasm and loss of transparency in cataract were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Phosphorus ({sup 31}P) NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the {sup 31}P constituents and pH of calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates and intact lenses as a function of time after lens enucleation and in opacification produced by calcium. Transparency was measured with laser spectroscopy. Despite complete loss of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within 18 hrs of enucleation, the homogenates and lenses remained 100% transparent. Additions of calcium to ATP-depleted cortical homogenates produced opacification as well as concentration-dependent changes in inorganic phosphate, sugar phosphates, glycerol phosphorylcholine and pH. {sup 1}H relaxation measurements of lens water at 200 MHz proton Larmor frequency studied temperature-dependent phase separation of lens nuclear homogenates. Preliminary measurements of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} with non-equilibrium temperature changes showed a change in the slope of the temperature dependence of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} at the phase separation temperature. Subsequent studies with equilibrium temperature changes showed no effect of phase separation on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2}, consistent with the phase separation being a low-energy process. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) studies (measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the water proton 1/T{sub 1} relaxation rates) were performed on (1) calf lens nuclear and cortical homogenates (2) chicken lens homogenates, (3) native and heat-denatured egg white and (4) pure proteins including bovine {gamma}-II crystallin bovine serum albumin (BSA) and myoglobin. The NMRD profiles of all samples exhibited decreases in 1/T{sub 1} with increasing magnetic field.

  1. Experiments On Transparent Conductive Films For Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; De Groh, Kim K.; Hung, Ching-Cheh; Malave-Sanabria, Tania; Hambourger, Paul; Roig, David

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experiments on thin, transparent, electrically conductive films made, variously, of indium tin oxide covered by magnesium fluoride (ITO/MgF2), aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO), or pure zinc oxide (ZnO). Films are candidates for application to such spacecraft components, including various optoelectronic devices and window surfaces that must be protected against buildup of static electric charge. On Earth, such films useful on heat mirrors, optoelectronic devices, gas sensors, and automotive and aircraft windows.

  2. Electromagnetically induced transparency and quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. E.

    2016-11-01

    We describe how electromagnetically induced transparency may be used to construct a nontraditional near-ideal quantum heat engine as constrained by the second law. The engine is pumped by a thermal reservoir that may be either hotter or colder than that of an exhaust reservoir, and also by a monochromatic laser. As output, it produces a bright narrow emission at line center of an otherwise absorbing transition.

  3. Transparent conducting oxides: A -doped superlattice approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Valentino R; Seo, Sung Seok A.; Lee, Suyoun; Kim, Jun Sung; Choi, Woo Seok; Okamoto, Satoshi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at the interface of oxide heterostructures have been the subject of recent experiment and theory, due to the intriguing phenomena that occur in confined electronic states. However, while much has been done to understand the origin of 2DEGs and related phenomena, very little has been explored with regards to the control of conduction pathways and the distribution of charge carriers. Using first principles simulations and experimental thin film synthesis methods, we examine the effect of dimensionality on carrier transport in La delta-doped SrTiO3 (STO) superlattices, as a function of the thickness of the insulating STO spacer. Our computed Fermi surfaces and layer-resolved carrier density proles demonstrate that there is a critical thickness of the STO spacer, below which carrier transport is dominated by three-dimensional conduction of interface charges arising from appreciable overlap of the quantum mechanical wavefunctions between neighboring delta-doped layers. We observe that, experimentally, these superlattices remain highly transparent to visible light. Band structure calculations indicate that this is a result of the appropriately large gap between the O 2p and Ti d states. The tunability of the quantum mechanical wavefunctions and the optical transparency highlight the potential for using oxide heterostructures in novel opto-electronic devices; thus providing a route to the creation of novel transparent conducting oxides.

  4. Omnidirectionally Stretchable and Transparent Graphene Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Kim, Wook; Choi, Dukhyun; Kong, Jing; Park, Ho Seok

    2016-10-04

    Stretchable and transparent electrodes have been developed for applications in flexible and wearable electronics. For customer-oriented practical applications, the electrical and optical properties of stretchable electrodes should be independent of the directions of the applied stress, and such electrodes are called omnidirectionally stretchable electrodes. Herein, we report a simple and cost-effective approach for the fabrication of omnidirectionally stretchable and transparent graphene electrodes with mechanical durability and performance reliability. The use of a Fresnel lens-patterned electrode allows multilayered graphene sheets to achieve a concentric circular wavy structure, which is capable of sustaining tensile strains in all directions. The as-prepared electrodes exhibit high optical transparency, low sheet resistance, and reliable electrical performances under various deformation (e.g., bending, stretching, folding, and buckling) conditions. Furthermore, computer simulations have also been carried out to investigate the response of a Fresnel lens-patterned structure on the application of mechanical stresses. This study can be significant in a large variety of potential applications, ranging from stretchable devices to electronic components in various wearable integrated systems.

  5. Transparent and conformal 'piezoionic' touch sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    us Sarwar, Mirza S.; Dobashi, Yuta; Scabeni Glitz, Ettore F.; Farajollahi, Meisam; Mirabbasi, Shahriar; Naficy, Sina; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Madden, John D. W.

    2015-04-01

    A polyurethane hydrogel based touch sensor with high transparency and conformability is demonstrated. Polyurethane hydrogels swollen with various electrolytes were compressed at a pressure of 30 kPa, simulating a fingertap on a conventional touch screen device. Unlike ionic polymer metal composite and conducting polymer trilayer sensors, where electrodes render the sensors opaque and relatively rigid, the electrodes used in this work are metal wires or strips, separated from each other by regions of transparent film, enabling transparency and compliance. The voltages and currents observed when the perturbation is above one electrode are on the order of 10-2 V and 10-7 A, relative to a second electrode that is approximately 1 cm away. The sign of voltage and current signals detected from perturbations made between electrodes is determined by relative proximity to each electrode, and the magnitude appears to decrease with increasing distance from the electrodes. These observations suggest that it may be possible to discriminate the location of touch based on signals transmitted to the edges of an ionically conductive film. A model to describe the inhomogeneous ionic distribution and predict the resultant voltage and current is presented to qualitatively explain the sensing, based on the Donnan potential.

  6. Transparent organic photodiodes stacked with electroluminescence devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Takahiro; Sakanoue, Kei; Fujita, Katsuhiko; Tsutsui, Tetsuo

    2005-10-01

    Stacked devices that consisted of transparent organic photodiodes (TOPDs) and organic electroluminescence devices (OELs) were demonstrated. TOPDs were prepared by poly-(2-methoxy-5- (2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene (MEH-PPV) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend films as an active layer and transparent Au cathode (10 nm thick). These TOPDs showed about 45 % transmittance on average in visible light region (380-780 nm) and good correlation between incident light intensity and output photocurrent. Based on these results, the stacked devices were prepared by introducing OELs on TOPDs through a SiO insulating layer. The structure of OELs was ITO/Carbon/TPD/Alq3/LiF/Al. These stacked devices work as light emitting devices and also photo diodes. Since TOPDs have transparency, OELs can illuminate a paper put on the glass substrate through TOPDs and TOPDs can receive reflective light from the paper. Although the TOPDs also absorb light from OELs directly, the output signals from TOPDs changed according to the black and white pattern of the paper. These results show that the devices act as an image sensor having light emitting layer and light receiving layer in a same area.

  7. Rapid Dissolving-Debonding Strategy for Optically Transparent Paper Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinbo; Han, Xiaogang; Fang, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Fan; Zhao, Bin; Lu, Pengbo; Li, Jun; Dai, Jiaqi; Lacey, Steven; Elspas, Raphael; Jiang, Yuhao; Liu, Detao; Hu, Liangbing

    2015-01-01

    Transparent paper is an alternative substrate for electronic devices due to its unique properties. However, energy-intensive and/or time-consuming procedures currently limit the scalable production of transparent paper. In this report, we demonstrate a rapid process to fabricate optically transparent paper with regenerative cellulose fibers (RCFs) by employing a dissolving-debonding strategy. The RCFs have an average width of 19.3 μm and length of several hundred microns and are prepared into transparent paper by vacuum filtration. This new dissolving-debonding approach enables high production efficiency while creating transparent paper with excellent optical and mechanical properties. PMID:26657809

  8. Method of forming macro-structured high surface area transparent conductive oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Forman, Arnold J.; Chen, Zhebo; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-01-05

    A method of forming a high surface area transparent conducting electrode is provided that includes depositing a transparent conducting thin film on a conductive substrate, where the transparent conducting thin film includes transparent conductive particles and a solution-based transparent conducting adhesive layer which serves to coat and bind together the transparent conducting particles, and heat treating the transparent conducting adhesion layer on the conductive substrate, where an increased surface area transparent conducting electrode is formed.

  9. Interplay between transparency and efficiency in dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tagliaferro, Roberto; Colonna, Daniele; Brown, Thomas M; Reale, Andrea; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2013-02-11

    In this paper we analyze the interplay between transparency and efficiency in dye sensitized solar cells by varying fabrication parameters such as the thickness of the nano-crystalline TiO(2) layer, the dye loading and the dye type. Both transparency and efficiency show a saturation trend when plotted versus dye loading. By introducing the transparency-efficiency plot, we show that the relation between transparency and efficiency is linear and is almost independent on the TiO(2) thickness for a certain thickness range. On the contrary, the relation between transparency and efficiency depends strongly on the type of the dye. Moreover, we show that co-sensitization techniques can be effectively used to access regions of the transparency-efficiency space that are forbidden for single dye sensitization. The relation found between transparency and efficiency (T&E) can be the general guide for optimization of Dye Solar Cells in building integration applications.

  10. Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogi, Masaya; Karakawa, Makoto; Komoda, Natsuki; Yagyu, Hitomi; Nge, Thi Thi

    2015-11-01

    Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells.

  11. Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nogi, Masaya; Karakawa, Makoto; Komoda, Natsuki; Yagyu, Hitomi; Nge, Thi Thi

    2015-01-01

    Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells. PMID:26607742

  12. Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Masaya; Karakawa, Makoto; Komoda, Natsuki; Yagyu, Hitomi; Nge, Thi Thi

    2015-11-26

    Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells.

  13. Visibly transparent polymer solar cells produced by solution processing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chao; Dou, Letian; Zhu, Rui; Chung, Choong-Heui; Song, Tze-Bin; Zheng, Yue Bing; Hawks, Steve; Li, Gang; Weiss, Paul S; Yang, Yang

    2012-08-28

    Visibly transparent photovoltaic devices can open photovoltaic applications in many areas, such as building-integrated photovoltaics or integrated photovoltaic chargers for portable electronics. We demonstrate high-performance, visibly transparent polymer solar cells fabricated via solution processing. The photoactive layer of these visibly transparent polymer solar cells harvests solar energy from the near-infrared region while being less sensitive to visible photons. The top transparent electrode employs a highly transparent silver nanowire-metal oxide composite conducting film, which is coated through mild solution processes. With this combination, we have achieved 4% power-conversion efficiency for solution-processed and visibly transparent polymer solar cells. The optimized devices have a maximum transparency of 66% at 550 nm.

  14. Blown Bubble Assembly of Graphene Oxide Patches for Transparent Electrodes in Carbon-Silicon Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiting; Yang, Yanbing; Li, Yitan; Wang, Chunhui; Xu, Wenjing; Shi, Enzheng; Zou, Mingchu; Yang, Liusi; Yang, Xiangdong; Li, Yan; Cao, Anyuan

    2015-12-30

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets have a strong tendency to aggregate, and their interfaces can impose limitations on the electrical conductivity, which would hinder practical applications. Here, we present a blown bubble film method to assemble GO sheets with a uniform distribution over a large area and further interconnect individual GO sheets by transforming the bubble film into graphitized carbon. A conventional polymer was used to facilitate the bubble blowing process and disperse GO sheets in the bubble. Then, the bubble film was annealed on a Cu substrate, resulting in a highly transparent reduced GO (RGO)-carbon hybrid structure consisting of RGO patches well adhered to the carbon film. We fabricated RGO-carbon/Si solar cells with power conversion efficiencies up to 6.42%, and the assembled RGO patches hybridized with carbon film can form an effective junction with Si, indicating potential applications in thin film electronic devices and photovoltaics.

  15. Transparent ambipolar organic thin film transistors based on multilayer transparent source-drain electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Li, Yantao; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-08-01

    A fabrication method for transparent ambipolar organic thin film transistors with transparent Sb2O3/Ag/Sb2O3 (SAS) source and drain electrodes has been developed. A pentacene/N,N'-ditridecylperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic di-imide (PTCDI-C13) bilayer heterojunction is used as the active semiconductor. The electrodes are deposited by room temperature electron beam evaporation. The devices are fabricated without damaging the active layers. The SAS electrodes have high transmittance (82.5%) and low sheet resistance (8 Ω/sq). High performance devices with hole and electron mobilities of 0.3 cm2/V s and 0.027 cm2/V s, respectively, and average visible range transmittance of 72% were obtained. These transistors have potential for transparent logic integrated circuit applications.

  16. Laser Processed Silver Nanowire Network Transparent Electrodes for Novel Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spechler, Joshua Allen

    Silver nanowire network transparent conducting layers are poised to make headway into a space previously dominated by transparent conducting oxides due to the promise of a flexible, scaleable, lab-atmosphere processable alternative. However, there are many challenges standing in the way between research scale use and consumer technology scale adaptation of this technology. In this thesis we will explore many, and overcome a few of these challenges. We will address the poor conductivity at the narrow nanowire-nanowire junction points in the network by developing a laser based process to weld nanowires together on a microscopic scale. We address the need for a comparative metric for transparent conductors in general, by taking a device level rather than a component level view of these layers. We also address the mechanical, physical, and thermal limitations to the silver nanowire networks by making composites from materials including a colorless polyimide and titania sol-gel. Additionally, we verify our findings by integrating these processes into devices. Studying a hybrid organic/inorganic heterojunction photovoltaic device we show the benefits of a laser processed electrode. Green phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes fabricated on a solution phase processed silver nanowire based electrode show favorable device metrics compared to a conductive oxide electrode based control. The work in this thesis is intended to push the adoption of silver nanowire networks to further allow new device architectures, and thereby new device applications.

  17. Synthesis of biocompatible hydrophobic silica-gelatin nano-hybrid by sol-gel process.

    PubMed

    Smitha, S; Shajesh, P; Mukundan, P; Nair, T D R; Warrier, K G K

    2007-03-15

    Silica-biopolymer hybrid has been synthesised using colloidal silica as the precursor for silica and gelatin as the biopolymer counterpart. The surface modification of the hybrid material has been done with methyltrimethoxysilane leading to the formation of biocompatible hydrophobic silica-gelatin hybrid. Here we are reporting hydrophobic silica-gelatin hybrid and coating precursor for the first time. The hybrid gel has been evaluated for chemical modification, thermal degradation, hydrophobicity, particle size, transparency under the UV-visible region and morphology. FTIR spectroscopy has been used to verify the presence of CH(3) groups which introduce hydrophobicity to the SiO2-MTMS-gelatin hybrids. The hydrophobic property has also been tailored by varying the concentration of methyltrimethoxysilane. Contact angle by Wilhelmy plate method of transparent hydrophobic silica-gelatin coatings has been found to be as high as approximately 95 degrees . Oxidation of the organic group which induces the hydrophobic character occurs at 530 degrees C which indicates that the surface hydrophobicity is retained up to that temperature. Optical transmittance of SiO2-MTMS-gelatin hybrid coatings on glass substrates has been found to be close to 100% which will enable the hybrid for possible optical applications and also for preparation of transparent biocompatible hydrophobic coatings on biological substrates such as leather.

  18. Printed optically transparent graphene cellulose electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinar, Dogan; Knopf, George K.; Nikumb, Suwas; Andrushchenko, Anatoly

    2016-02-01

    Optically transparent electrodes are a key component in variety of products including bioelectronics, touch screens, flexible displays, low emissivity windows, and photovoltaic cells. Although highly conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) films are often used in these electrode applications, the raw material is very expensive and the electrodes often fracture when mechanically stressed. An alternative low-cost material for inkjet printing transparent electrodes on glass and flexible polymer substrates is described in this paper. The water based ink is created by using a hydrophilic cellulose derivative, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), to help suspend the naturally hydrophobic graphene (G) sheets in a solvent composed of 70% DI water and 30% 2-butoxyethanol. The CMC chain has hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional sites which allow adsorption on G sheets and, therefore, permit the graphene to be stabilized in water by electrostatic and steric forces. Once deposited on the functionalized substrate the electrical conductivity of the printed films can be "tuned" by decomposing the cellulose stabilizer using thermal reduction. The entire electrode can be thermally reduced in an oven or portions of the electrode thermally modified using a laser annealing process. The thermal process can reduce the sheet resistance of G-CMC films to < 100 Ω/sq. Experimental studies show that the optical transmittance and sheet resistance of the G-CMC conductive electrode is a dependent on the film thickness (ie. superimposed printed layers). The printed electrodes have also been doped with AuCl3 to increase electrical conductivity without significantly increasing film thickness and, thereby, maintain high optical transparency.

  19. Fano Transparency in Rounded Nanocube Dimers Induced by Gap Plasmon Coupling.

    PubMed

    Pellarin, Michel; Ramade, Julien; Rye, Jan Michael; Bonnet, Christophe; Broyer, Michel; Lebeault, Marie-Ange; Lermé, Jean; Marguet, Sylvie; Navarro, Julien R G; Cottancin, Emmanuel

    2016-12-27

    Homodimers of noble metal nanocubes form model plasmonic systems where the localized plasmon resonances sustained by each particle not only hybridize but also coexist with excitations of a different nature: surface plasmon polaritons confined within the Fabry-Perot cavity delimited by facing cube surfaces (i.e., gap plasmons). Destructive interference in the strong coupling between one of these highly localized modes and the highly radiating longitudinal dipolar plasmon of the dimer is responsible for the formation of a Fano resonance profile and the opening of a spectral window of anomalous transparency for the exciting light. We report on the clear experimental evidence of this effect in the case of 50 nm silver and 160 nm gold nanocube dimers studied by spatial modulation spectroscopy at the single particle level. A numerical study based on a plasmon mode analysis leads us to unambiguously identify the main cavity mode involved in this process and especially the major role played by its symmetry. The Fano depletion dip is red-shifted when the gap size is decreasing. It is also blue-shifted and all the more pronounced that the cube edge rounding is large. Combining nanopatch antenna and plasmon hybridization descriptions, we quantify the key role of the face-to-face distance and the cube edge morphology on the spectral profile of the transparency dip.

  20. Wearable, wireless gas sensors using highly stretchable and transparent structures of nanowires and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jihun; Kim, Joohee; Kim, Kukjoo; Kim, So-Yun; Cheong, Woon Hyung; Park, Kyeongmin; Song, Joo Hyeb; Namgoong, Gyeongho; Kim, Jae Joon; Heo, Jaeyeong; Bien, Franklin; Park, Jang-Ung

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we report the fabrication of a highly stretchable, transparent gas sensor based on silver nanowire-graphene hybrid nanostructures. Due to its superb mechanical and optical characteristics, the fabricated sensor demonstrates outstanding and stable performances even under extreme mechanical deformation (stable until 20% of strain). The integration of a Bluetooth system or an inductive antenna enables the wireless operation of the sensor. In addition, the mechanical robustness of the materials allows the device to be transferred onto various nonplanar substrates, including a watch, a bicycle light, and the leaves of live plants, thereby achieving next-generation sensing electronics for the `Internet of Things' area.Herein, we report the fabrication of a highly stretchable, transparent gas sensor based on silver nanowire-graphene hybrid nanostructures. Due to its superb mechanical and optical characteristics, the fabricated sensor demonstrates outstanding and stable performances even under extreme mechanical deformation (stable until 20% of strain). The integration of a Bluetooth system or an inductive antenna enables the wireless operation of the sensor. In addition, the mechanical robustness of the materials allows the device to be transferred onto various nonplanar substrates, including a watch, a bicycle light, and the leaves of live plants, thereby achieving next-generation sensing electronics for the `Internet of Things' area. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01468b

  1. Triplet absorption spectroscopy and electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, F.; Nazmitdinov, R. G.

    2016-09-01

    Coherence phenomena in a four-level atomic system, cyclically driven by three coherent fields, are investigated thoroughly at zero and weak magnetic fields. Each strongly interacting atomic state is converted to a triplet due to a dynamical Stark effect. Two dark lines with a Fano-like profile arise in the triplet absorption spectrum with anomalous dispersions. We provide conditions to control the widths of the transparency windows by means of the relative phase of the driving fields and the intensity of the microwave field, which closes the optical system loop. The effect of Doppler broadening on the results of the triplet absorption spectroscopy is analysed in detail.

  2. Biophysical aspects of corneal and lenticular transparency.

    PubMed

    Lerman, S

    1984-01-01

    The chemical composition and morphology of the cornea and lens can provide significant information regarding what wavelengths of nonionizing radiation these two tissue should absorb and transmit. Such data, including a variety of parameters determined by biophysical techniques, can provide us with information regarding the molecular basis for corneal and lenticular transparency and the subtle changes occurring with aging and ambient radiation exposure during our lifetime. The biophysical approach (fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy) has already provided new clinical tools for studying and delineating the initial events responsible for eventual opacification in these two tissues, months to years before they become manifest by current conventional clinical methods of examination.

  3. Space radiation resistant transparent polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, C.; Yamauchi, T.

    1977-01-01

    A literature search in the field of ultraviolet and charged particle irradiation of polymers was utilized in an experimental program aimed at the development of radiation stable materials for space applications. The rationale utilized for material selection and the synthesis, characterization and testing performed on several selected materials is described. Among the materials tested for ultraviolet stability in vacuum were: polyethyleneoxide, polyvinylnaphthalene, and the amino resin synthesized by the condensation of o-hydroxybenzoguanamine with formaldehyde. Particularly interesting was the radiation behavior of poly(ethyleneoxide), irradiation did not cause degradation of optical properties but rather an improvement in transparency as indicated by a decrease in solar absorptance with increasing exposure time.

  4. Transparent Seismic Mitigation for Community Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, C. D.; Pekelnicky, R.

    2008-12-01

    Healthy communities continuously grow by leveraging their intellectual capital to drive economic development while protecting their cultural heritage. Success, in part, depends on the support of a healthy built environment that is rooted in contemporary urban planning, sustainability and disaster resilience. Planners and policy makers are deeply concerned with all aspects of their communities, including its seismic safety. Their reluctance to implement the latest plans for achieving seismic safety is rooted in a misunderstanding of the hazard they face and the risk it poses to their built environment. Probabilistic lingo and public debate about how big the "big one" will be drives them to resort to their own experience and intuition. There is a fundamental lack of transparency related to what is expected to happen, and it is partially blocking the policy changes that are needed. The solution: craft the message in broad based, usable terms that name the hazard, defines performance, and establishes a set of performance goals that represent the resiliency needed to drive a community's natural ability to rebound from a major seismic event. By using transparent goals and measures with an intuitive vocabulary for both performance and hazard, earthquake professionals, working with the San Francisco Urban Planning and Research Association (SPUR), have defined a level of resiliency that needs to be achieved by the City of San Francisco to assure their response to an event will be manageable and full recovery achievable within three years. Five performance measures for buildings and three for lifeline systems have been defined. Each declares whether people will be safe inside, whether the building will be able to be repaired and whether they will be usable during repairs. Lifeline systems are further defined in terms of the time intervals to restore 90%, 95%, and full service. These transparent categories are used in conjunction with the expected earthquake level to describe

  5. Electromagnetically induced transparency with noisy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Yanhong; Wang Tun; Baryakhtar, Maria; Jiang Liang; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Van Camp, Mackenzie; Crescimanno, Michael; Hohensee, Michael; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Phillips, David F.; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2009-10-15

    We demonstrate and characterize two coherent phenomena that can mitigate the effects of laser phase noise for electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT): a laser-power-broadening-resistant resonance in the transmitted intensity cross correlation between EIT optical fields, and a resonant suppression of the conversion of laser phase noise to intensity noise when one-photon noise dominates over two-photon-detuning noise. Our experimental observations are in good agreement with both an intuitive physical picture and numerical calculations. The results have wide-ranging applications to spectroscopy, atomic clocks, and magnetometers.

  6. Nanostructured transparent conducting oxide electrochromic device

    DOEpatents

    Milliron, Delia; Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Llordes, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-05-17

    The embodiments described herein provide an electrochromic device. In an exemplary embodiment, the electrochromic device includes (1) a substrate and (2) a film supported by the substrate, where the film includes transparent conducting oxide (TCO) nanostructures. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes (a) an electrolyte, where the nanostructures are embedded in the electrolyte, resulting in an electrolyte, nanostructure mixture positioned above the substrate and (b) a counter electrode positioned above the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a conductive coating deposited on the substrate between the substrate and the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a second substrate positioned above the mixture.

  7. 76 FR 1180 - FDA Transparency Initiative: Improving Transparency to Regulated Industry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... memorandum on Transparency and Open Government calling for an ``unprecedented level of openness in Government'' and directing the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to issue an Open Government... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  8. An innovative transparent cranial window based on skull optical clearing An innovative transparent cranial window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T. H.; Luo, Q. M.; Zhu, D.

    2012-06-01

    Noninvasive optical methods for viewing the structural and functional organization of cortex have been playing important roles in brain research, which usually suffer from turbid skull. Various cranial window models based on surgical operation have been proposed, but have respective limitations. Here, an innovative transparent cranial window of mouse was established by topically treatment with a skull optical clearing solution (SOCS), rather than by craniotomy. Based on the experiment of optical clearing efficacy of skull in vitro, we found that the turbid skull became transparent within 25 min after application of SOCS. The USAF target is visible through the treated skull, and the calculated resolution can achieve 8.4 μm. After the in vivo skull was topically treated with SOCS, the cortical micro-vessels can be visible clearly. The quantitative analysis indicated that the minimum resolution diameter of micro-vessels in 14.4±0.8 μm through the transparent cranial window closed to that in 12.8±0.9 μm of the exposed cortical micro-vessels. Further, preliminary results from Laser Speckle Imaging demonstrated that there was no influence on cortical blood flow distribution of mouse after topically treatment with SOCS on skull. This transparent cranial window will provide a convenient model for cortex imaging in vivo, which is very significant for neuroscience research.

  9. Tunable Broadband Transparency of Macroscopic Quantum Superconducting Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng; Trepanier, Melissa; Mukhanov, Oleg; Anlage, Steven M.

    2015-10-01

    Narrow-band invisibility in an otherwise opaque medium has been achieved by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic systems. The quantum EIT behavior can be classically mimicked by specially engineered metamaterials via carefully controlled interference with a "dark mode." However, the narrow transparency window limits the potential applications that require a tunable wideband transparent performance. Here, we present a macroscopic quantum superconducting metamaterial with manipulative self-induced broadband transparency due to a qualitatively novel nonlinear mechanism that is different from conventional EIT or its classical analogs. A near-complete disappearance of resonant absorption under a range of applied rf flux is observed experimentally and explained theoretically. The transparency comes from the intrinsic bistability of the meta-atoms and can be tuned on and off easily by altering rf and dc magnetic fields, temperature, and history. Hysteretic in situ 100% tunability of transparency paves the way for autocloaking metamaterials, intensity-dependent filters, and fast-tunable power limiters.

  10. Making metals transparent: a circuit model approach.

    PubMed

    Molero, Carlos; Medina, Francisco; Rodríguez-Berral, Rauĺ; Mesa, Francisco

    2016-05-16

    Solid metal films are well known to be opaque to electromagnetic waves over a wide frequency range, from low frequency to optics. High values of the conductivity at relatively low frequencies or negative values of the permittivity at the optical regime provide the macroscopic explanation for such opacity. In the microwave range, even extremely thin metal layers (much smaller than the skin depth at the operation frequency) reflect most of the impinging electromagnetic energy, thus precluding significant transmission. However, a drastic resonant narrow-band enhancement of the transparency has recently been reported. The quasi-transparent window is opened by placing the metal film between two symmetrically arranged and closely spaced copper strip gratings. This letter proposes an analytical circuit model that yields a simple explanation to this unexpected phenomenon. The proposed approach avoids the use of lengthy numerical calculations and suggests how the transmissivity can be controlled and enhanced by manipulating the values of the electrical parameters of the associated circuit model.

  11. Additive and subtractive transparent depth displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Frank L.; Toet, Alexander

    2003-09-01

    Image fusion is the generally preferred method to combine two or more images for visual display on a single screen. We demonstrate that perceptual image separation may be preferable over perceptual image fusion for the combined display of enhanced and synthetic imagery. In this context image separation refers to the simultaneous presentation of images on different depth planes of a single display. Image separation allows the user to recognize the source of the information that is displayed. This can be important because synthetic images are more liable to flaws. We have examined methods to optimize perceptual image separation. A true depth difference between enhanced and synthetic imagery works quite well. A standard stereoscopic display based on convergence is less suitable since the two images tend to interfere: the image behind is masked (occluded) by the image in front, which results in poor viewing comfort. This effect places 3D systems based on 3D glasses, as well as most autostereoscopic displays, at a serious disadvantage. A 3D display based on additive or subtractive transparency is acceptable: both the perceptual separation and the viewing comfort are good, but the color of objects depends on the color in the other depth layer(s). A combined additive and subtractive transparent display eliminates this disadvantage and is most suitable for the combined display of enhanced and synthetic imagery. We suggest that the development of such a display system is of a greater practical value than increasing the number of depth planes in autostereoscopic displays.

  12. Fabrication of transparent yttrium aluminum garnet ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of Nd-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) spherical nano-crystallites was investigated by using the solvothermal method, and the optimum processing conditions for processing the transparent ceramic preparation was determined. Powder consisting of nanosized particles obtained by the solvothermal method displays significantly less crystallite agglomeration, indicating a high degree of sinterability. The phase structure and the morphology of the YAG crystallites were depended on the reaction conditions, the optimum temperature is 300 centigrade for 1h, at which the pure phase of spherically shaped YAG nanoparticles can be obtained. Microstructure evolution at different sintering stages demonstrated that fully transparent YAG ceramic can be fabricated by vacuum sintering at 1750 centigrade for 5h by using the as-synthesized powders. The ceramic has a relative density of about 99.98% of the theoretical value, and an average grain size of about 3-5μm. The transmittance of the ceramic is 55% in the visible range, and 70% in the infrared range.

  13. Transparent, Weakly Conductive Films for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, John; Morgan, Ashraf; Hambourger, Paul

    2004-10-01

    Electrically insulating spacecraft surfaces are vulnerable to nonuniform charge buildup due to particles emitted by the sun. On Mars, insulating surfaces of exploration vehicles and structures will be affected by dust coatings possibly held in place by triboelectric surface charge. Application of a conductive film may be a solution to the charging problem, but the coating must be highly transparent if used on solar panels, lenses, etc. Sheet resistivity requirements depend on the application and are in the range 10^2-10^8 ohms/square. Co-deposited indium tin oxide (ITO) and MgF2 is promising, with high transparency, tailorable electrical properties, and durability to atomic oxygen.(Joyce A. Dever et al., NASA TM 1998-208499 (August 1998).) Due to ITO's relatively narrow bandgap ( ˜3.5 eV), the film might absorb enough ultraviolet to protect polymeric substrates. Recent work on dual-magnetron-sputtered ITO-MgF2 showed that a variety of polymeric substrates can be coated at room temperature.(Thomas Cashman et al., Vacuum Technology & Coating, September 2003, p. 38.) However, the sheet resistivity is very sensitive to composition, suggestive of a percolation transition. This could be a serious problem for large-scale coating production. We will report on attempts to control film composition by plasma emission monitoring of the ITO and MgF2 guns. Supported by NASA Glenn Research Center, Cooperative Agreements NCC3-1033 and NCC3-1065.

  14. Transparent conducting thin films for spacecraft applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Davis, M.E.; Malave-Sanabria, T.; Hambourger, P.; Rutledge, S.K.; Roig, D.; Degroh, K.K.; Hung, C.

    1994-01-01

    Transparent conductive thin films are required for a variety of optoelectronic applications: automotive and aircraft windows, and solar cells for space applications. Transparent conductive coatings of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-magnesium fluoride (MgF2) and aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) at several dopant levels are investigated for electrical resistivity (sheet resistance), carrier concentration, optical properties, and atomic oxygen durability. The sheet resistance values of ITO-MgF2 range from 10[sup 2] to 10[sup 11] ohms/square, with transmittance of 75 to 86 percent. The AZO films sheet resistances range from 10[sup 7] to 10[sup 11] ohms/square with transmittances from 84 to 91 percent. It was found that in general, with respect to the optical properties, the zinc oxide (ZnO), AZO, and the high MgF2 content ITO-MgF2 samples, were all durable to atomic oxygen plasma, while the low MgF2 content of ITO-MgF2 samples were not durable to atomic oxygen plasma exposure.

  15. TRANSPARENT HELIUM IN STRIPPED ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  16. Transparent self-cleaning dust shield

    DOEpatents

    Mazumder, Malay K.; Sims, Robert A.; Wilson, James D.

    2005-06-28

    A transparent electromagnetic shield to protect solar panels and the like from dust deposition. The shield is a panel of clear non-conducting (dielectric) material with embedded parallel electrodes. The panel is coated with a semiconducting film. Desirably the electrodes are transparent. The electrodes are connected to a single-phase AC signal or to a multi-phase AC signal that produces a travelling electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field produced by the electrodes lifts dust particles away from the shield and repels charged particles. Deposited dust particles are removed when the electrodes are activated, regardless of the resistivity of the dust. Electrostatic charges on the panel are discharged by the semiconducting film. When used in conjunction with photovoltaic cells, the power for the device may be obtained from the cells themselves. For other surfaces, such as windshields, optical windows and the like, the power must be derived from an external source. One embodiment of the invention employs monitoring and detection devices to determine when the level of obscuration of the screen by dust has reached a threshold level requiring activation of the dust removal feature.

  17. Transparent conducting thin films for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Malave-Sanabria, Tania; Hambourger, Paul; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Roig, David; Degroh, Kim K.; Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1994-01-01

    Transparent conductive thin films are required for a variety of optoelectronic applications: automotive and aircraft windows, and solar cells for space applications. Transparent conductive coatings of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-magnesium fluoride (MgF2) and aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) at several dopant levels are investigated for electrical resistivity (sheet resistance), carrier concentration, optical properties, and atomic oxygen durability. The sheet resistance values of ITO-MgF2 range from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 11) ohms/square, with transmittance of 75 to 86 percent. The AZO films sheet resistances range from 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 11) ohms/square with transmittances from 84 to 91 percent. It was found that in general, with respect to the optical properties, the zinc oxide (ZnO), AZO, and the high MgF2 content ITO-MgF2 samples, were all durable to atomic oxygen plasma, while the low MgF2 content of ITO-MgF2 samples were not durable to atomic oxygen plasma exposure.

  18. Missile Defense: Actions Needed to Improve Transparency and Accountability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Improve Transparency and Accountability March 2011 GAO-11-372 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting...AND SUBTITLE Missile Defense: Actions Needed to Improve Transparency and Accountability 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT... Transparency and Accountability Why GAO Did This Study Since 2002, Congress has directed GAO to assess the Missile Defense Agency’s (MDA) annual fiscal

  19. Fabrication of Transparent Multilayer Circuits by Inkjet Printing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jieke; Bao, Bin; Li, Mingzhu; Sun, Jiazhen; Zhang, Cong; Li, Yang; Li, Fengyu; Yao, Xi; Song, Yanlin

    2016-02-17

    Conductive microcables embedded in a transparent film are fabricated by inkjet printing silver-nanoparticle ink into a liquid poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) precursor substrate. By controlling the spreading of the ink droplet and the rheological properties of the liquid substrate, transparent multilayer circuits composed of high-resolution embedded cables are achieved using a commercial inkjet printer. This facile strategy provides a new avenue for inkjet printing of highly integrated and transparent electronics.

  20. Flexible vanadium oxide film for broadband transparent photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hong-Sik; Chauhan, Khushbu R.; Kim, Joondong; Choi, Eun Ha

    2017-03-01

    A High-performing transparent and flexible photodetector was achieved by reactive sputtering method. Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) thin films were deposited on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates at room temperature. The transparent and flexible photodetectors with the configurations V2O5/ZnO/ITO/PET showed high-performing photoresponse with a quick response time (4.9 ms) and high detectivity of 1.45 × 1012 Jones, under a light intensity of 1 mW/m2. We demonstrated high-performing V2O5 film-based transparent and flexible broadband photodetectors which may provide a promising approach for transparent electronic applications.

  1. Dipole-dipole interaction in a quantum dot and metallic nanorod hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Schindel, Daniel G.; Hatef, Ali

    2011-10-01

    We have studied quantum coherence and interference phenomena in a quantum dot (QD)-metallic nanorod (MNR) hybrid system. Probe and control laser fields are applied to the hybrid system. Induced dipole moments are created in the QD and the MNR, and they interact with each other via the dipole-dipole interaction. Using the density matrix method, it was found that the power spectrum of MNR has two transparent, states and they can be switched to one transparent state by the control field. Ultrafast switching and sensing nanodevices could be produced using this model.

  2. Novel stable hard transparent conductors in TiO2-TiC system: Design materials from scratch

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangying; Liu, Dongyan; Dai, Xuefeng; Pan, Haijun; Wen, Xiaohong; Zuo, Liang; Qin, Gaowu

    2014-01-01

    Two new ternary compounds in the TiO2-TiC system, Ti5C2O6 and Ti3C2O2, are reported for the first time based on ab initio evolutionary algorithm. Ti5C2O6 has a tube-structure in which sp1 hybridized carbon chains run through the lattice along the b-axis; while in the Ti3C2O2 lattice, double TiO6 polyhedral are separated by the non-coplanar sp2 hybridized hexagon graphite layers along the c-axis, forming a sandwich-like structure. At ambient conditions, the two compounds are found to be mechanically and dynamically stable and intrinsic transparent conductors with high hardness (about twice harder than the conventional transparent conducting oxides). These mechanical, electronic, and optical properties make Ti5C2O6 and Ti3C2O2 ternary compounds be promising robust, hard, transparent, and conductive materials. PMID:25511583

  3. Fabrication of Transparent Nanohybrids with Heat Resistance Using High-Density Amorphous Formation and Uniform Dispersion of Nanodiamond.

    PubMed

    Al Mamun, Muhammad Abdullah; Soutome, Youichi; Kasahara, Yusuke; Meng, Qi; Akasaka, Shuichi; Fujimori, Atsuhiro

    2015-08-19

    A new technology for the production of transparent material using a "crystalline" polymer is proposed in the present study. Further, transparent and flexible crystalline polymer nanohybrid film containing well-dispersed nanodiamond filler was fabricated. Partially fluorinated crystalline polymer with switchboard-type lamellae results in high transparency as a consequence of the formation of a high-density amorphous structure based on high-temperature drawing just below the melting point at 110 °C. Although the formation of nanohybrid materials composed of fluorinated-polymer/organo-modified nanocarbon is generally difficult, we confirmed the formation, via melt-compounding, using atomic force microscopy and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. Even though the polymer matrix/nanodiamond hybrid has remarkable aggregation properties, a well-dispersed state was achieved because of improvement in wettability obtained through surface modification of filler. The resulting nanohybrid demonstrates transparency, increased thermal degradation temperature, and enhanced mechanical properties, which seem to be derived from the nucleation effect caused by the adsorption of the terminal polymer chain onto the organic modifier.

  4. Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine-Functionalized Graphene as a Conductive Adhesion Promoter and Protective Layer for Silver Nanowire Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jinlei; Liu, Haihui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xingxiang

    2016-05-31

    For the scalable fabrication of transparent electrodes and optoelectronic devices, excellent adhesion between the conductive films and the substrates is essential. In this work, a novel mussel-inspired polydopamine-functionalized graphene/silver nanowire hybrid nanomaterial for transparent electrodes was fabricated in a facile manner. Graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized and reduced by polydopamine while remaining stable in water without precipitation. It is shown that the polydopamine-functionalized GO (PFGO) film adhered to the substrate much more easily and more uniformly than the GO film. The PFGO film had a sheet resistance of ∼3.46 × 10(8) Ω/sq and a transparency of 78.2%, with excellent thermal and chemical stability; these characteristics are appropriate for antistatic coatings. Further reduced PFGO (RPFGO) as a conductive adhesion promoter and protective layer for the Ag nanowire (AgNW) significantly enhanced the adhesion force between AgNW networks and the substrate. The RPFGO-AgNW electrode was found to have a sheet resistance of 63 Ω/sq and a transparency of 70.5%. Moreover, the long-term stability of the RPFGO-AgNW electrode was greatly enhanced via the effective protection of the AgNW by RPFGO. These solution-processed antistatic coatings and electrodes have tremendous potential in the applications of optoelectronic devices as a result of their low production cost and facile processing.

  5. Graphene Transparent Conductive Electrodes for Next- Generation Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary; Sultana, Mahmooda; Hess, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Graphene is a single atomic layer of graphite. It is optically transparent and has high electron mobility, and thus has great potential to make transparent conductive electrodes. This invention contributes towards the development of graphene transparent conductive electrodes for next-generation microshutter arrays. The original design for the electrodes of the next generation of microshutters uses indium-tin-oxide (ITO) as the electrode material. ITO is widely used in NASA flight missions. The optical transparency of ITO is limited, and the material is brittle. Also, ITO has been getting more expensive in recent years. The objective of the invention is to develop a graphene transparent conductive electrode that will replace ITO. An exfoliation procedure was developed to make graphene out of graphite crystals. In addition, large areas of single-layer graphene were produced using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) with high optical transparency. A special graphene transport procedure was developed for transferring graphene from copper substrates to arbitrary substrates. The concept is to grow large-size graphene sheets using the LPCVD system through chemical reaction, transfer the graphene film to a substrate, dope graphene to reduce the sheet resistance, and pattern the film to the dimension of the electrodes in the microshutter array. Graphene transparent conductive electrodes are expected to have a transparency of 97.7%. This covers the electromagnetic spectrum from UV to IR. In comparison, ITO electrodes currently used in microshutter arrays have 85% transparency in mid-IR, and suffer from dramatic transparency drop at a wavelength of near-IR or shorter. Thus, graphene also has potential application as transparent conductive electrodes for Schottky photodiodes in the UV region.

  6. Highly stretchable, transparent ionic touch panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chong-Chan; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Sun, Jeong-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Because human-computer interactions are increasingly important, touch panels may require stretchability and biocompatibility in order to allow integration with the human body. However, most touch panels have been developed based on stiff and brittle electrodes. We demonstrate an ionic touch panel based on a polyacrylamide hydrogel containing lithium chloride salts. The panel is soft and stretchable, so it can sustain a large deformation. The panel can freely transmit light information because the hydrogel is transparent, with 98% transmittance for visible light. A surface-capacitive touch system was adopted to sense a touched position. The panel can be operated under more than 1000% areal strain without sacrificing its functionalities. Epidermal touch panel use on skin was demonstrated by writing words, playing a piano, and playing games.

  7. Transparent ceramics and methods of preparation thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Joel P.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Soules, Thomas F.

    2012-12-25

    A method for forming a transparent ceramic preform in one embodiment includes forming a suspension of oxide particles in a solvent, wherein the suspension includes a dispersant, with the proviso that the suspension does not include a gelling agent; and uniformly curing the suspension for forming a preform of gelled suspension. A method according to another embodiment includes creating a mixture of inorganic particles, a solvent and a dispersant, the inorganic particles having a mean diameter of less than about 2000 nm; agitating the mixture; adding the mixture to a mold; and curing the mixture in the mold for gelling the mixture, with the proviso that no gelling agent is added to the mixture.

  8. Assuring data transparency through design methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Allen

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of design methodologies and practices in the assurance of technology transparency. The development of several subsystems on large, long life cycle government programs was analyzed to glean those characteristics in the design, development, test, and evaluation that precluded or enabled the insertion of new technology. The programs examined were Minuteman, DSP, B1-B, and space shuttle. All these were long life cycle, technology-intensive programs. The design methodologies (or lack thereof) and design practices for each were analyzed in terms of the success or failure in incorporating evolving technology. Common elements contributing to the success or failure were extracted and compared to current methodologies being proposed by the Department of Defense and NASA. The relevance of these practices to the design and deployment of Space Station Freedom were evaluated. In particular, appropriate methodologies now being used on the core development contract were examined.

  9. Tunable lenses using transparent dielectric elastomer actuators.

    PubMed

    Shian, Samuel; Diebold, Roger M; Clarke, David R

    2013-04-08

    Focus tunable, adaptive lenses provide several advantages over traditional lens assemblies in terms of compactness, cost, efficiency, and flexibility. To further improve the simplicity and compact nature of adaptive lenses, we present an elastomer-liquid lens system which makes use of an inline, transparent electroactive polymer actuator. The lens requires only a minimal number of components: a frame, a passive membrane, a dielectric elastomer actuator membrane, and a clear liquid. The focal length variation was recorded to be greater than 100% with this system, responding in less than one second. Through the analysis of membrane deformation within geometrical constraints, it is shown that by selecting appropriate lens dimensions, even larger focusing dynamic ranges can be achieved.

  10. Noise filtering via electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Taek; Bae, In-Ho; Moon, Han Seb

    2017-01-01

    We report on the intensity-noise reduction of pseudo-thermal light via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the Λ-type system of the 5S1/2-5P1/2 transition in 87Rb. Noise filtering of the pseudo-thermal probe light was achieved via an EIT filter and measured according to the degree of intensity noise of the pseudo-thermal probe light. Reductions in the intensity and spectral noise of the pseudo-thermal probe light with the EIT filter were observed using the direct intensity fluctuation and heterodyne detection technique, respectively. Comparison of the intensity noise of the pseudo-thermal probe light before and after passing through the EIT filter revealed a significant reduction in the intensity noise.

  11. Achieving transparency in implementing abortion laws.

    PubMed

    Cook, R J; Erdman, J N; Dickens, B M

    2007-11-01

    National and international courts and tribunals are increasingly ruling that although states may aim to deter unlawful abortion by criminal penalties, they bear a parallel duty to inform physicians and patients of when abortion is lawful. The fear is that women are unjustly denied safe medical procedures to which they are legally entitled, because without such information physicians are deterred from involvement. With particular attention to the European Court of Human Rights, the UN Human Rights Committee, the Constitutional Court of Colombia, the Northern Ireland Court of Appeal, and the US Supreme Court, decisions are explained that show the responsibility of states to make rights to legal abortion transparent. Litigants are persuading judges to apply rights to reproductive health and human rights to require states' explanations of when abortion is lawful, and governments are increasingly inspired to publicize regulations or guidelines on when abortion will attract neither police nor prosecutors' scrutiny.

  12. Large-Strain Transparent Magnetoactive Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses polymer nano - composite superparamagnetic actuators that were prepared by the addition of organically modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles to the polymer matrix. The nanocomposite films exhibited large deformations under a magnetostatic field with a low loading level of 0.1 wt% in a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer (TPU) matrix. The maximum actuation deformation of the nanocomposite films increased exponentially with increasing nanoparticle concentration. The cyclic deformation actuation of a high-loading magnetic nanocomposite film was examined in a low magnetic field, and it exhibited excellent reproducibility and controllability. Low-loading TPU nanocomposite films (0.1-2 wt%) were transparent to semitransparent in the visible wavelength range, owing to good dispersion of the magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetoactuation phenomena were also demonstrated in a high-modulus, high-temperature polyimide resin with less mechanical deformation.

  13. Femtosecond transparency in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarana, Michal; Greene, Chris H.

    2012-06-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency-like behavior in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) is studied theoretically, including the effect of intense 800nm laser dressing of He 2s2p(^1P^o) and 2p^2(^2S^e) autoionizing states. We present an ab initio solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation in an LS-coupling configuration interaction basis set. The method enables a rigorous treatment of optical field ionization of these coupled autoionizing states into the N = 2 continuum in addition to N = 1. Our calculated transient absorption spectra show the formation of the Autler-Townes doublet in the presence of the dressing laser field. The presented results are in encouraging agreement with experiment [1]. [4pt] [1] Z.H. Loh, C.H. Greene, and S. R. Leone, Chem. Phys. 350, 7 (2008)

  14. Carbon Nanotube Assemblies for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Matthew P; Gerhardt, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce readers to the fundamental and practical aspects of nanotube assemblies made into transparent conducting networks and discuss some practical aspects of their characterization. Transparent conducting coatings (TCC) are an essential part of electro-optical devices, from photovoltaics and light emitting devices to electromagnetic shielding and electrochromic widows. The market for organic materials (including nanomaterials and polymers) based TCCs is expected to show a growth rate of 56.9% to reach nearly 20.3billionin2015,whilethemarketfortraditionalinorganictransparentelectronicswillexperiencegrowthwithratesof6.7103 billion in 2015. Emerging flexible electronic applications have brought additional requirements of flexibility and low cost for TCC. However, the price of indium (the major component in indium tin oxide TCC) continues to increase. On the other hand, the price of nanomaterials has continued to decrease due to development of high volume, quality production processes. Additional benefits come from the low cost, nonvacuum deposition of nanomaterials based TCC, compared to traditional coatings requiring energy intensive vacuum deposition. Among the materials actively researched as alternative TCC are nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes with high aspect ratio as well as their composites. The figure of merit (FOM) can be used to compare TCCs made from dissimilar materials and with different transmittance and conductivity values. In the first part of this manuscript, we will discuss the seven FOM parameters that have been proposed, including one specifically intended for flexible applications. The approach for how to measure TCE electrical properties, including frequency dependence, will also be discussed. We will relate the macroscale electrical characteristics of TCCs to the nanoscale parameters of conducting networks. The fundamental aspects of nanomaterial assemblies in conducting networks will also be addressed

  15. Effects of Agent Transparency on Multi-Robot Management Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    war” with its inherent complex, ambiguous, and time -challenged conditions. Mission effectiveness will rely on rapid identification and management of...ARL-TR-7466 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Effects of Agent Transparency on Multi-Robot Management Effectiveness by...SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Effects of Agent Transparency on Multi-Robot Management Effectiveness by Joseph E Mercado Oak

  16. High carrier concentration p-type transparent conducting oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Yan, Yanfa; Zhang, Shengbai

    2005-06-21

    A p-type transparent conducting oxide film is provided which is consisting essentially of, the transparent conducting oxide and a molecular doping source, the oxide and doping source grown under conditions sufficient to deliver the doping source intact onto the oxide.

  17. Transparency and Opacity: Levinasian Reflections on Accountability in Australian Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas to consider, from an ethical perspective, the current transparency and accountability agenda in Australian schooling. It focuses on the case of the "My School" website and the argument that transparent publication of comparative performance data via the website provides a basis for…

  18. Transparency in the ePortfolio Creation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Stephanie A.; Downs, Elizabeth; Jenkins, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study examining the effect of transparency on the ePortfolio creation process. The purpose of the study was to examine whether increased awareness of other students' ePortfolios through the implementation of transparency and peer review would positively affect the quality of performance of school library media…

  19. Effects of motion and configural complexity on color transparency perception.

    PubMed

    Gerardin, Peggy; Roud, Philippe; Süsstrunk, Sabine; Knoblauch, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    We tested whether motion and configural complexity affect perceived transparency. A series of five coherent chromatic transformations in color space was applied across a figure: translation, convergence, shear, divergence and rotation. The stimuli consisted of a bipartite or a checkerboard configuration (10 x 10 degrees), with a central static or moving overlay (5 x 5 degrees). Three different luminance conditions (the plane of chromatic transformation oriented toward higher, lower, or equal luminances) were also tested for each of three modulation depths. For each stimulus, the observer judged whether the overlay appeared transparent or not. The main results indicated an interaction between the type of chromatic transformation and stimulus motion and complexity. For example, convergences are judged to appear transparent significantly more often when motion is added for bipartite configurations, or when they are generated in a checkerboard configuration. Surprisingly, shears that have been reported to appear opaque, are more frequently reported to appear transparent with short vector lengths and when combined with motion. Other transformations are also affected by motion, although the effectiveness of figural complexity on transparency seems to depend on both the type of color shifts and the presence of motion. The results indicate that adding motion and stimulus complexity are not necessarily neutral with respect to the chromatic shifts evoking transparency. Thus, studies that have used motion to enhance transparency may yield different results about the color shifts supporting transparency perception from those that did not. The same might be supposed for stimulus complexity under some conditions.

  20. Phase separation in transparent liquid-liquid miscibility gap systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Bhat, B. N.; Laub, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A program to be carried out on transparent liquid-phase miscibility gap materials was developed for the purpose of acquiring additional insight into the separation process occurring in these systems. The transparency feature allows the reaction to be viewed directly through light scattering and holographic methods.

  1. ALON optical ceramic transparencies for window, dome, and transparent armor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Twedt, Rich; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Sastri, Suri

    2011-06-01

    Surmet continues to invest in and expand its manufacturing capability for ALON® Optical Ceramic, as the market demand for this material increases. The biggest demand and opportunity continues to be in the area of transparent armor, however, the market for sensor domes and windows, made from ALON, continues to grow at an impressive rate as well. ALON® Transparent Armor's unsurpassed ballistic performance, combined with the robustness of ALON's manufacturing process and reproducibly high material quality make ALON the leading candidate for many future armor systems. Recent results for ALON armor windows will be presented. Advances being made in Surmet's production capability to support the very large quantities of material required by the transparent armor market also benefit the sensor market. Improvements in quality, quantity and manufacturability of ALON material, combined with improvements being made in optical quality, ensure a robust supply of high quality material for high volume window and dome applications. Recent advancement in ALON® window and dome blanks, as well as in optical fabrication will be presented.

  2. Semantic transparency and masked morphological priming: An ERP investigation

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Joanna; Frank, Tiffany; Grainger, Jonathan; Holcomb, Phillip J.

    2009-01-01

    The role of semantics in the segmentation of morphologically complex words was examined using event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded to target words primed by semantically transparent (hunter–hunt,) opaque (corner–corn), and orthographically related (scandal–scan) masked primes. Behavioral data showed that only transparent items gave rise to priming. The ERP data showed both N250 and the N400 effects with transparent items generating greater priming than orthographic or opaque. Furthermore, priming effects across conditions revealed the existence of a significant linear trend, with transparent items showing the greatest effects and orthographic items the smallest, suggesting that these priming effects vary as a function of morphological structure and semantic transparency. The results are discussed in terms of a model of morphological processing. PMID:17498223

  3. Nonperiodic metallic gratings transparent for broadband terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiao-Ping; Fan, Ren-Hao; Peng, Ru-Wen; Huang, Xian-Rong; Xu, Di-Hu; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Mu

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that nonperiodic metallic gratings can become transparent for broadband terahertz waves. It is shown that broadband high transmission appears in aperiodic metallic gratings (including quasiperiodic and disordered ones), which originates from the nonresonant excitations in the grating system. Quasiperiodic and disordered metallic gratings effectively weaken and even eliminate Wood's anomalies, which are the diffraction-related characters of periodic gratings. Consequently, both the transparence bandwidth and transmission efficiency are significantly increased due to the structural aperiodicity. An optimal condition is also achieved for broadband high transparency in aperiodic metallic gratings. Experimental measurements at the terahertz regime reasonably agree with both analytical analysis and numerical simulations. Furthermore, we show that for a specific light source, for example, a line source, a corresponding nonperiodic transparent grating can be also designed. We expect that our findings can be applied for transparent conducting panels, perfect white-beam polarizers, antireflective conducting solar cells, and beyond.

  4. [Design of a multifunctional and transparent urinary system model].

    PubMed

    Hu, Wengang; Huang, Chibing; Feng, Jiayu; Zhang, Yinfu; Wang, Jin; Xu, Xiaoting; Song, Yajun; Sun, Zhen; Chen, Yirong

    2014-04-01

    This article describes a novel Multifunctional and Transparent Urinary System Model (MTUSM), which can be applied to anatomy teaching, operational training of clinical skills as well as simulated experiments in vitro. This model covers kidneys, ureters, bladder, prostate, male and female urethra, bracket and pedestal, etc. Based on human anatomy structure and parameters, MTUSM consists of two transparent layers i. e. transparent organic glass external layer, which constraints the internal layer and maintains shape of the model, and transparent silica gel internal layer, which possesses perfect elasticity and deformability. It is obvious that this model is preferable in simulating the structure of human urinary system by applying hierarchical fabrication. Meanwhile, the transparent design, which makes the inner structure, internal operations and experiments visual, facilitates teaching instruction and understanding. With the advantages of simple making, high-findelity, unique structure and multiple functions, this model will have a broad application prospect and great practical value.

  5. Highly transparent, conductive, flexible resin films embedded with silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yaqiu; Xi, Jun; Wu, Zhaoxin; Dong, Hua; Zhao, Zhixu; Jiao, Bo; Hou, Xun

    2015-05-05

    In this article, a low sheet resistance and highly transparent silver nanowire (AgNW) resin composite film was demonstrated, which was prepared by a simple and efficacious two-step spin-coating method. By burying the AgNWs below the surface of the transparent resin matrix which was cured at 150 °C in air, we achieved a uniform, highly transparent, conductive, flexible film. Compared to the reported transparent electrodes, this composite transparent and conductive film showed 10 Ω/□ sheet resistance and nearly 90% mean optical transmittance over the UV-visible range simultaneously. Undergoing hundreds of cycles of tensile and compression folding, the composite film slightly increased its sheet resistance by less than 5%, displaying good electromechanical flexibility. These characteristics of the composite AgNW-resin films were expected to be used in applications of flexible optoelectronics.

  6. Self-Powered Human-Interactive Transparent Nanopaper Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Junwen; Zhu, Hongli; Zhong, Qize; Dai, Jiaqi; Li, Wenbo; Jang, Soo-Hwan; Yao, Yonggang; Henderson, Doug; Hu, Qiyi; Hu, Liangbing; Zhou, Jun

    2015-07-28

    Self-powered human-interactive but invisible electronics have many applications in anti-theft and anti-fake systems for human society. In this work, for the first time, we demonstrate a transparent paper-based, self-powered, and human-interactive flexible system. The system is based on an electrostatic induction mechanism with no extra power system appended. The self-powered, transparent paper device can be used for a transparent paper-based art anti-theft system in museums or for a smart mapping anti-fake system in precious packaging and documents, by virtue of the advantages of adding/removing freely, having no impairment on the appearance of the protected objects, and being easily mass manufactured. This initial study bridges the transparent nanopaper with a self-powered and human-interactive electronic system, paving the way for the development of smart transparent paper electronics.

  7. Hybrid Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F. (Inventor); Roberts, Gary D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid gear consisting of metallic outer rim with gear teeth and metallic hub in combination with a composite lay up between the shaft interface (hub) and gear tooth rim is described. The composite lay-up lightens the gear member while having similar torque carrying capability and it attenuates the impact loading driven noise/vibration that is typical in gear systems. The gear has the same operational capability with respect to shaft speed, torque, and temperature as an all-metallic gear as used in aerospace gear design.

  8. High strength, flexible and transparent nanofibrillated cellulose-nanoclay biohybrid films with tunable oxygen and water vapor permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulin, Christian; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Lindström, Tom

    2012-09-01

    A novel, technically and economically benign procedure to combine vermiculite nanoplatelets with nanocellulose fibre dispersions into functional biohybrid films is presented. Nanocellulose fibres of 20 nm diameters and several micrometers in length are mixed with high aspect ratio exfoliated vermiculite nanoplatelets through high-pressure homogenization. The resulting hybrid films obtained after solvent evaporation are stiff (tensile modulus of 17.3 GPa), strong (strength up to 257 MPa), and transparent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the hybrid films consist of stratified nacre-like layers with a homogenous distribution of nanoplatelets within the nanocellulose matrix. The oxygen barrier properties of the biohybrid films outperform commercial packaging materials and pure nanocellulose films showing an oxygen permeability of 0.07 cm3 μm m-2 d-1 kPa-1 at 50% relative humidity. The oxygen permeability of the hybrid films can be tuned by adjusting the composition of the films. Furthermore, the water vapor barrier properties of the biohybrid films were also significantly improved by the addition of nanoclay. The unique combination of excellent oxygen barrier behavior and optical transparency suggests the potential of these biohybrid materials as an alternative in flexible packaging of oxygen sensitive devices such as thin-film transistors or organic light-emitting diode displays, gas storage applications and as barrier coatings/laminations in large volume packaging applications.

  9. "On Cloud Nine" and "On All Fours": Which Is More Transparent? Elements in EFL Learners' Transparency Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Crystal Jia-yi

    2015-01-01

    Idiom transparency refers to how speakers think the meaning of the individual words contributes to the figurative meaning of an idiom as a whole (Gibbs, Nayak, & Cutting, 1989). However, it is not clear how speakers or language learners form their assumptions about an idiom's transparency level. This study set out to discover whether there are…

  10. Hybrid Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, David J.; Sridharan, Srikesh; Weinstock, Irvin

    2005-10-15

    HybSim (short for Hybrid Simulator) is a flexible, easy to use screening tool that allows the user to quanti the technical and economic benefits of installing a village hybrid generating system and simulates systems with any combination of —Diesel generator sets —Photovoltaic arrays -Wind Turbines and -Battery energy storage systems Most village systems (or small population sites such as villages, remote military bases, small communities, independent or isolated buildings or centers) depend on diesel generation systems for their source of energy. HybSim allows the user to determine other "sources" of energy that can greatly reduce the dollar to kilo-watt hour ratio. Supported by the DOE, Energy Storage Program, HybSim was initially developed to help analyze the benefits of energy storage systems in Alaskan villages. Soon after its development, other sources of energy were added providing the user with a greater range of analysis opportunities and providing the village with potentially added savings. In addition to village systems, HybSim has generated interest for use from military institutions in energy provisions and USAID for international village analysis.

  11. Enhanced electromechanical behaviors of cellulose ZnO hybrid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Seongchoel; Min, Seung-Ki; Kim, Hyun Chan; Im, Jongbeom; Geddis, Demetris L.; Kim, Jaehwan

    2015-04-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid composite has attracted as its combined synergistic properties. Cellulose based inorganicorganic hybrid composite was fabricated with semiconductive nanomaterials which has functionality of nanomaterial and biocompatibility piezoelectricity, high transparency and flexibility of cellulose electro active paper namely EAPap. ZnO is providing semiconductive functionality to EAPap for hybrid nanocomposite by simple chemical reaction. Cellulose- ZnO hybrid nanocomposite (CEZOHN) demonstrates novel electrical, photoelectrical and electromechanical behaviors. This paper deals with methods to improve electromechanical property of CEZOHN. The fabrication process is introduced briefly, charging mechanism and evaluation is studied with measured piezoelectric constant. And its candidate application will be discussed such as artificial muscle, energy harvester, strain sensor, flexible electrical device.

  12. 77 FR 31377 - U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Tribal Consultation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Office of the Secretary U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Tribal Consultation AGENCY...) announces a tribal consultation meeting regarding the United States Extractive Industries Transparency... announced the United States' commitment to the global Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative...

  13. 77 FR 5027 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Exploratory Program To Increase Access to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative... announcing the availability of a report entitled ``Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative... Transparency Initiative. This report includes eight initiatives adopted by the Commissioner of Food and...

  14. 78 FR 57409 - U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Public Outreach

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Public Outreach AGENCY: Office of the Secretary.... Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (USEITI) candidacy application. By this notice, Interior is... announced the United States' commitment to participate in the Extractive Industries Transparency...

  15. 78 FR 6342 - U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Office of the Secretary U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Advisory Committee AGENCY... status in the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI). The Committee includes... effort designed to increase transparency, strengthen the accountability of natural resource...

  16. Replica mold for nanoimprint lithography from a novel hybrid resin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bong Kuk; Hong, Lan-Young; Lee, Hea Yeon; Kim, Dong-Pyo; Kawai, Tomoji

    2009-10-06

    The use of durable replica molds with high feature resolution has been proposed as an inexpensive and convenient route for manufacturing nanostructured materials. A simple and fast duplication method, involving the use of a master mold to create durable polymer replicas as imprinting molds, has been demonstrated using both UV- and thermal nanoimprinting lithography (NIL). To obtain a high-durability replicating material, a dual UV/thermal-curable, organic-inorganic hybrid resin was synthesized using a sol-gel-based combinatorial method. The cross-linked hybrid resin exhibited high transparency to UV light and resistance to organic solvents. Molds made of this material showed good mechanical properties (Young's modulus=1.76 GPa) and gas permeability. The low viscosity of the hybrid resin (approximately 29 cP) allowed it to be easily transferred to relief nanostructures on transparent glass substrates using UV-NIL at room temperature and low pressure (0.2 MPa) over a relatively short time (80 s). A low surface energy release agent was successfully coated onto the hybrid mold surface without destroying the imprinted nanostructures, even after O2 plasma treatment. Nanostructures with feature sizes down to 80 nm were successfully reproduced using these molds in both UV- and thermal-NIL processes. After repeating 10 imprinting cycles at relatively high temperature and pressure, no detectable collapse or contamination of the replica surface was observed. These results indicate that the hybrid molds could tolerate repeated UV- and thermal-NIL processes.

  17. Metal oxide-based transparent conducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillispie, Meagen Anne

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are important materials widely used for transparent contacts in flat panel displays, light emitting diodes, and solar cells. While Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) continues to be the TCO of choice, the increasing cost of raw In has resulted in an increasing interest in developing In-free alternatives to ITO. In this work, two metal oxide systems were investigated for their viability as In-free TCO materials. First, Nb- or Ta-doped anatase TiO2 was selected due to the recent reports of high conductivity in pulse laser deposited (PLD) films. Thin films doped with either 15 mol% Nb or 20 mol% Ta were deposited on glass and SrTiO3 (STO) substrates using RF magnetron sputtering techniques. In all cases, maximum conductivity was achieved when the films crystallized in the anatase structure of TiO2. Films sputtered on STO possessed similar electrical and optical properties as PLD films on STO, yet at a much lower deposition temperature while films deposited on glass had much lower conductivity, due to dramatically reduced mobility. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction analysis showed that doped TiO2 films sputter deposited on STO were biaxially textured along the (004) direction. This texturing was not observed in films deposited on glass, which were composed of randomly-oriented crystalline anatase. Biaxial texturing in the film helps to reduce grain boundary resistance, thereby increasing carrier mobility and further enhancing conductivity. The Cu-based delafossite system (CuBO2, B is a 3+ metal cation) was selected as the second TCO material system due to its natural p-type conductivity, a rarity among existing TCOs. Study of this system was two-pronged: (1) application of codoping techniques to achieve bipolar conductivity; and (2) investigate stability of mixed B cation delafossites. CuAlO2 and CuGaO2 were both codoped with varying ratios of donors and acceptors in an attempt to achieve bipolar conductivity. Very little change in the electrical

  18. EDITORIAL: On display with transparent conducting films On display with transparent conducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-03-01

    Transparent conducting films were already featuring in scientific literature over one hundred years ago. In 1894 Aryton and Mather described a conducting varnish for coating the screens of electric apparatus so they would not charge when accidentally brushed by a coat sleeve or other material [1]. Their method began with a similar approach to that used to make savoury jellies; by dissolving gelatine in vinegar, after which less palatable ingredients were incorporated including sulphuric acid and an antisulphuric enamel. While the search for transparent conducting films continued to attract other researchers, the same problem remained: the transparency would be compromised if the film was too thick, and the conductivity would be compromised if the film was too thin. In the early 1950s Gillham and Preston reported that thin gold films sputtered on bismuth oxide and heated resulted in a material that successfully combined the previously mutually exclusive properties of transparency and conductivity [2]. Other oxide films were also found to favourably combine these properties, including tin oxide, as reported by Ishiguro and colleagues in Japan in 1958 [3]. Today tin oxide doped with indium (ITO) has become the industry standard for transparent conducting films in a range of applications including photovoltaic technology and displays. It is perhaps the mounting ubiquity of electronic displays as a result of the increasingly digitised and computerised environment of the modern day world that has begun to underline the main drawback of ITO: expense. In this issue, a collaboration of researchers in Korea present an overview of graphene as a transparent conducting material with the potential to replace ITO in a range of electronic and optoelectronic applications [4]. One of the first innovations in optical microscopy was the use of dyes. This principle first came into practice with the use of ultraviolet light to reveal previously indistinguishable features. As explained

  19. 2011 Annual Health Physics Report for the HEU transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R

    2012-04-30

    During the 2008 calendar year, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program for external and internal radiation protection. They also provided technical expertise related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2008, there were 158 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 158 person-trips, 148 person-trips were SMVs and 10 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. There were 6 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 8 to UEIE itself. There were three monitoring visits (source changes) that were back-to-back with a total of 24 monitors. LLNL's Hazard Control Department laboratories provided the dosimetry services for the HEU Transparency monitors. In 2008, the HEU Transparency activities in Russia were conducted in a radiologically safe manner for the HEU Transparency monitors in accordance with the expectations of the HEU Transparency staff, NNSA and DOE. The HEU Transparency now has thirteen years of successful experience in developing and providing health and safety support in meeting its technical objectives.

  20. 2009 Annual Health Physics Report for the HEU Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R

    2010-04-14

    During the 2009 calendar year, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program for external and internal radiation protection. LLNL also provided technical expertise related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2009, there were 159 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 159 person-trips, 149 person-trips were SMVs and 10 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. There were 4 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 10 to UEIE itself. LLNL's Hazard Control Department laboratories provided the dosimetry services for the HEU Transparency monitors. In 2009, the HEU Transparency activities in Russia were conducted in a radiologically safe manner for the HEU Transparency monitors in accordance with the expectations of the HEU Transparency staff, NNSA and DOE. The HEU Transparency Program now has over fifteen years of successful experience in developing and providing health and safety support in meeting its technical objectives.

  1. Scattering properties and transparency characterization of human corneal grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadessus, Olivier; Georges, Ga"lle; Siozade-Lamoine, Laure; Deumié, Carole; Conrath, John; Hoffart, Louis

    2011-06-01

    The cornea is the single human tissue being transparent. This unique property may be explained by the particular structure of the cornea, but the precise role of each of its constituents remains unsolved. On other matter, prior to corneal transplant, graft must be evaluated during a sorting procedure where a technician assesses of its transparency quality. Nevertheless, this criterion remains subjective and qualitative. This study proposes to combine 3D imagery using Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography jointly with angular resolved scattering measurement to achieve a quantitative transparency characterization of the cornea. The OCT provides micrometric resolution structural information about the cornea, and we observe the evolution occurring when oedema develops within the tissue. Scattering properties are evaluated and compared parallely, as the transparency of the graft. A close link between the scattering intensity level of the cornea and its thickness is highlighted through this study. Furthermore, the three-dimensional imagery offers a view over the structural modifications leading to a change in transparency, and the combination with scattering properties measurement provides clues over the characteristic scale of scatterers to consider for a better understanding of corneal transparency evolution. Achieving an objective and quantified parameter for the transparency would be helpful for a more efficient corneal graft sorting, and may be able to detect the presence of localized wounds as the ones related to a previous refractive surgery. However, the study of graft nearly eligible for corneal transplant would be needed to confirm the results this study presents.

  2. Transient birefringence effects in electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Parshkov, O M

    2015-11-30

    We report the results of numerical modelling of transient birefringence that arises as a result of electromagnetically induced transparency on degenerate quantum transitions between the states with J = 0, 1 and 2 in the presence of the Doppler broadening of spectral lines. It is shown that in the case of a linearly polarised control field, the effect of transient birefringence leads to a decay of the input circularly polarised probe pulse into separate linearly polarised pulses inside a medium. In the case of a circularly polarised control field, the effect of transient birefringence manifests itself in a decay of the input linearly polarised probe pulse into separate circularly polarised pulses. It is shown that the distance that a probe pulse has to pass in a medium before decaying into subpulses is considerably greater in the first case than in the second. The influence of the input probe pulse power and duration on the process of spatial separation into individual pulses inside a medium is studied. A qualitative analysis of the obtained results is presented. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  3. Copper nanowire arrays for transparent electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tongchuan; Leu, Paul W.

    2013-08-01

    Metallic nanowires have demonstrated high optical transmission and electrical conductivity with potential for application as transparent electrodes that may be used in flexible devices. In this paper, we systematically investigated the electrical and optical properties of 1D and 2D copper nanowire (Cu NW) arrays as a function of diameter and pitch and compared their performance to that of Cu thin films and our recent results on silver (Ag) NW arrays. Cu NWs exhibit enhanced transmission over thin films due to propagating resonance modes between NWs. For the same geometry, the transmission of Cu NW arrays is about the same as that of Ag NW arrays since the dispersion relation of propagating modes in metal nanowire arrays are independent of the metal permittivity. The sheet resistance is also comparable since the conductivity of Cu is about the same as that of Ag. Just as in Ag NWs, larger Cu NW diameters and pitches are favored for achieving higher solar transmission at a particular sheet resistance. Cu NW arrays may achieve solar transmission >90% with sheet resistances <10 Ω/sq and figure of merit σDC/σop>1000. One of the primary concerns with the use of Cu is oxidation and we also investigated the impact of a nickel (Ni) coating, which can serve as an anti-oxidation layer, on the electrical and optical properties.

  4. Verification and transparency in future arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, J.F.

    1996-09-01

    Verification`s importance has changed dramatically over time, although it always has been in the forefront of arms control. The goals and measures of verification and the criteria for success have changed with the times as well, reflecting such factors as the centrality of the prospective agreement to East-West relations during the Cold War, the state of relations between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the technologies available for monitoring. Verification`s role may be declining in the post-Cold War period. The prospects for such a development will depend, first and foremost, on the high costs of traditional arms control, especially those associated with requirements for verification. Moreover, the growing interest in informal, or non-negotiated arms control does not allow for verification provisions by the very nature of these arrangements. Multilateral agreements are also becoming more prominent and argue against highly effective verification measures, in part because of fears of promoting proliferation by opening sensitive facilities to inspectors from potential proliferant states. As a result, it is likely that transparency and confidence-building measures will achieve greater prominence, both as supplements to and substitutes for traditional verification. Such measures are not panaceas and do not offer all that we came to expect from verification during the Cold war. But they may be the best possible means to deal with current problems of arms reductions and restraints at acceptable levels of expenditure.

  5. Transparent Conveyor of Dielectric Liquids or Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Mantovani, James G.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of a transparent conveyor of small loose dielectric parti cles or small amounts of dielectric liquids has emerged as an outgro wth of an effort to develop efficient, reliable means of automated re moval of dust from solar cells and from windows of optical instrumen ts. This concept is based on the previously reported concept of an e lectrodynamic screen, according to which a grid-like electric field is established on and near a surface and is moved along the surface p erpendicularly to the grid lines. The resulting electrodynamic force s on loose dielectric particles or dielectric liquid drops in the vic inity would move the particles or drops along the surface. In the or iginal dust-removal application, dust particles would thus be swept out of the affected window area. Other potential applications may occ ur in nanotechnology -- for example, involving mixing of two or more fluids and/or nanoscale particles under optical illumination and/or optical observation.

  6. Highly transparent and flexible nanopaper transistors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia; Zhu, Hongli; Chen, Yuchen; Preston, Colin; Rohrbach, Kathleen; Cumings, John; Hu, Liangbing

    2013-03-26

    Renewable and clean "green" electronics based on paper substrates is an emerging field with intensifying research and commercial interests, as the technology combines the unique properties of flexibility, cost efficiency, recyclability, and renewability with the lightweight nature of paper. Because of its excellent optical transmittance and low surface roughness, nanopaper can host many types of electronics that are not possible on regular paper. However, there can be tremendous challenges with integrating devices on nanopaper due to its shape stability during processing. Here we demonstrate for the first time that flexible organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with high transparency can be fabricated on tailored nanopapers. Useful electrical characteristics and an excellent mechanical flexibility were observed. It is believed that the large binding energy between polymer dielectric and cellulose nanopaper, and the effective stress release from the fibrous substrate promote these beneficial properties. Only a 10% decrease in mobility was observed when the nanopaper transistors were bent and folded. The nanopaper transistor also showed excellent optical transmittance up to 83.5%. The device configuration can transform many semiconductor materials for use in flexible green electronics.

  7. Transparent conductor-Si pillars heterojunction photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Joondong; Park, Yun Chang

    2014-08-14

    We report a high-performing heterojunction photodetector by enhanced surface effects. Periodically, patterned Si substrates were used to enlarge the photo-reactive regions and yield proportionally improved photo-responses. An optically transparent indium-tin-oxide (ITO) was deposited on a Si substrate and spontaneously formed an ITO/Si heterojunction. Due to an electrical conductive ITO film, ITO/Si heterojunction device can be operated at zero-bias, which effectively suppresses the dark current, resulting in better performances than those by a positive or a negative bias operation. This zero-bias operating heterojunction device exhibits a short response time (∼ 22.5 ms) due to the physical reaction to the incident light. We revealed that the location of the space charge region (SCR) is crucial for a specific photon-wavelength response. The SCR space has the highest collection efficiency of the photo-generated carriers. The photo-response can be maximized when we design the photodetector by superposing the SCR space over a corresponding photon-absorption length. The surface enhanced Si pillar devices significantly improved the photo-responses ratios from that of a planar Si device. According to this design scheme, a high photo-response ratio of 5560% was achieved at a wavelength of 600 nm. This surfaced-enhanced heterojunction design scheme would be a promising approach for various photoelectric applications.

  8. Nanostructured Transparent Conducting Oxides for Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Titas

    2011-12-01

    Research on transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) has attracted a lot of attention due to the serious concern related to cost and chemical stability of indium tin oxide. The primary aim of this research is to develop low cost alternative transparent conducting oxides with an eye towards (1) increasing the organic solar cell efficiency and (2) fabricating transparent electronic devices utilizing p-type TCOs. To investigate the fundamental properties, the novel TCO films have been grown on sapphire and economical glass substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. The films were also grown under different deposition conditions in order to understand the effect of processing parameters on the film properties. The characteristics of the thin films have been investigated in detail using (X-ray diffraction, TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV- photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), four probe resistivity and UV-Vis transmittance measurements) in order to establish processing-structure-property correlation. ZnO doped with group III elements is a promising candidate because of its superior stability in hydrogen environment, benign nature and relatively inexpensive supply. However, ZnO based TCO films suffer from low work function (4.4 eV, compared to that of 4.8 eV for ITO), which increases the energy barrier and affects the carrier transport across ZnGa0.05O/organic layer interface. To overcome this issue of ZnO based TCOs, the growth of bilayered structure consisting of very thin MoOx (2.0 < x < 2.75), and/or p-Li xNi1-xO (0 ≤ x≤ 0.07) over layer on Zn0.95Ga 0.05O (GZO) film by pulsed laser ablation is proposed. The multiple oxidation states present in the over layers (Mo4+, Mo 5+ and Mo6+ in MoOx and Ni2+ and Ni3+ in NiO1+x), which result in desired TCO characteristics were determined and controlled by growth parameters and optimal target composition. These optimized bilayer films exhibited good optical

  9. Electromagnetically induced transparency with amplification in superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jaewoo; Bourassa, Jérôme; Blais, Alexandre; Sanders, Barry C

    2010-08-13

    We show that controlling relative phases of electromagnetic fields driving an atom with a Δ-configuration energy-level structure enables optical susceptibility to be engineered in novel ways. In particular, relative-phase control can yield electromagnetically induced transparency but with the benefit that the transparency window is sandwiched between an absorption and an amplification band rather than between two absorption bands in typical electromagnetically induced transparency. We show that this new phenomenon is achievable for a microwave field interacting with a fluxonium superconducting circuit.

  10. Optically Transparent Microwave Polarizer Based On Quasi-Metallic Graphene.

    PubMed

    Grande, Marco; Bianco, Giuseppe Valerio; Vincenti, Maria Antonietta; de Ceglia, Domenico; Capezzuto, Pio; Scalora, Michael; D'Orazio, Antonella; Bruno, Giovanni

    2015-11-25

    In this paper, we report on the engineering and the realization of optically transparent graphene-based microwave devices using Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) graphene whose sheet resistance may be tailored down to values below 30 Ω/sq. In particular, we show that the process was successfully used to realize and characterize a simple, optically transparent graphene-based wire-grid polarizer at microwave frequencies (X band). The availability of graphene operating in a quasi-metallic region may allow the integration of graphene layers in several microwave components, thus leading to the realization of fully transparent (and flexible) microwave devices.

  11. Organic devices based on nickel nanowires transparent electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongmo; da Silva, Wilson Jose; Bin Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid; Jang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we demonstrate a facile approach to synthesize long nickel nanowires and discuss its suitability to replace our commonly used transparent electrode, indium-tin-oxide (ITO), by a hydrazine hydrate reduction method where nickel ions are reduced to nickel atoms in an alkaline solution. The highly purified nickel nanowires show high transparency within the visible region, although the sheet resistance is slightly larger compared to that of our frequently used transparent electrode, ITO. A comparison study on organic light emitting diodes and organic solar cells, using commercially available ITO, silver nanowires, and nickel nanowires, are also discussed.

  12. Organic devices based on nickel nanowires transparent electrode

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmo; da Silva, Wilson Jose; bin Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid; Jang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we demonstrate a facile approach to synthesize long nickel nanowires and discuss its suitability to replace our commonly used transparent electrode, indium-tin-oxide (ITO), by a hydrazine hydrate reduction method where nickel ions are reduced to nickel atoms in an alkaline solution. The highly purified nickel nanowires show high transparency within the visible region, although the sheet resistance is slightly larger compared to that of our frequently used transparent electrode, ITO. A comparison study on organic light emitting diodes and organic solar cells, using commercially available ITO, silver nanowires, and nickel nanowires, are also discussed. PMID:26804335

  13. Fabrication of anatase precipitated glass-ceramics possessing high transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Masai, Hirokazu; Toda, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2009-04-13

    Transparent anatase precipitated glass-ceramics were fabricated using ZnO as a component. The particle size of precipitated anatase is several nanometers enough to possess high transparency. The preparation of the Bi-free transparent TiO{sub 2} glass-ceramic was attained by substitution of two different kinds of oxides for bismuth oxide. It is also noteworthy that we have demonstrated the crystallization of metastable anatase in the glass-ceramics as a main phase. The present bulk anatase glass-ceramics will open up an application field for a TiO{sub 2}-containing photocatalyst.

  14. Optically Transparent Microwave Polarizer Based On Quasi-Metallic Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Marco; Bianco, Giuseppe Valerio; Vincenti, Maria Antonietta; de Ceglia, Domenico; Capezzuto, Pio; Scalora, Michael; D’Orazio, Antonella; Bruno, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the engineering and the realization of optically transparent graphene-based microwave devices using Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) graphene whose sheet resistance may be tailored down to values below 30 Ω/sq. In particular, we show that the process was successfully used to realize and characterize a simple, optically transparent graphene-based wire-grid polarizer at microwave frequencies (X band). The availability of graphene operating in a quasi-metallic region may allow the integration of graphene layers in several microwave components, thus leading to the realization of fully transparent (and flexible) microwave devices. PMID:26603112

  15. Quasiparticle energies, excitonic effects, and dielectric screening in transparent conducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleife, André

    Using the power of high-performance super computers, computational materials scientists nowadays employ highly accurate quantum-mechanical approaches to reliably predict materials properties. In particular, many-body perturbation theory is an excellent framework for performing theoretical spectroscopy on novel materials including transparent conducting oxides, since this framework accurately describes quasiparticle and excitonic effects.We recently used hybrid exchange-correlation functionals and an efficient implementation of the Bethe-Salpeter approach to investigate several important transparent conducting oxides. Despite their exceptional potential for applications in photovoltaics and optoelectronics their optical properties oftentimes remain poorly understood: Our calculations explain the optical spectrum of bixbyite indium oxide over a very large photon energy range, which allows us to discuss the importance of quasiparticle and excitonic effects at low photon energies around the absorption onset, but also for excitations up to 40 eV. We show that in this regime the energy dependence of the electronic self energy cannot be neglected. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of excitonic effects on optical absorption for lanthanum-aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide. Their complicated conduction band structures require an accurate description of quasiparticle energies and we find that for these strongly polar materials, a contribution of the lattice polarizability to dielectric screening needs to be taken into account. We discuss how this affects the electron-hole interaction and find a strong influence on excitonic effects.The deep understanding of electronic excitations that can be obtained using these modern first-principles techniques, eventually will allow for computational materials design, e.g. of band gaps, densities of states, and optical properties of transparent conducting oxides and other materials with societally important applications.

  16. Robust multispectral transparency in continuous metal film structures via multiple near-field plasmon coupling by a finite-difference time-domain method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gui-qiang; Hu, Ying; Liu, Zheng-qi; Chen, Yuan-hao; Cai, Zheng-jie; Zhang, Xiang-nan; Huang, Kuan

    2014-03-07

    We propose a robust multispectral transparent plasmonic structure and calculate its transparency response by using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The proposed structure is composed of a continuous ultrathin metal film sandwiched by double two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal non-close-packed metal-dielectric multilayer core-shell nanoparticle arrays. The top and bottom plasmonic arrays in such a structure, respectively, act as the light input and output couplers to carry out the efficient trapping and release of light. Near-perfect multispectral optical transparency in the visible and near-infrared regions is achieved theoretically. The calculated electric field distribution patterns show that the near-perfect multispectral optical transparency mainly originates from the excitation and hybridization of shell and core plasmon modes, strong near-field coupling of dipole plasmon modes between adjacent nanoparticles as well as the excitation of surface plasmon waves of the metal film. The robust transparency bands can be efficiently tuned in a large range by varying the structural parameters and the surrounding dielectric environment. The proposed structure also shows additional merits such as a deep sub-wavelength size and fully retained electrical and mechanical properties of the natural metal. These features might provide promising applications in highly integrated optoelectronic devices including plasmonic filters, nanoscale multiplexers, and non-linear optics.

  17. Fano resonances and electromagnetically induced transparency in silicon waveguides loaded with plasmonic nanoresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortuño, Rubén; Cortijo, Mario; Martínez, Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental electric dipolar resonance of metallic nanostrips placed on top of a dielectric waveguide can be excited via evanescent wave coupling, thus giving rise to broad dips in the transmission spectrum of the waveguide. Here we show via numerical simulations that narrower and steeper Fano-like resonances can be obtained by asymmetrically coupling in the near field a larger nanostrip—supporting an electric quadrupole in the frequency regime of interest—to the original, shorter nanostrip. Under certain conditions, the spectral response corresponding to the electromagnetically induced transparency phenomenon is observed. We suggest that this hybrid plasmonic-photonic approach could be especially relevant for sensing or all-optical switching applications in a photonic integrated platform such as silicon photonics.

  18. Gyromagnetically induced transparency of metasurfaces (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Gennady B.; Mousavi, Hossein; Khanikaev, Alexander; Allen, Jeffery W.; Allen, Monica

    2015-09-01

    The concept of symmetry pervades modern physics. Through the conservation laws derived from various symmetries, high-level restrictions and selection rules can be derived for a variety of physical systems without any need for detailed investigations of their specific properties. The spatial symmetries of electric charge distribution on the metamaterial's surface determine whether the EM resonance is "bright" (radiatively coupled to) or "dark" (radiatively de-coupled from) the EM continuum. As we demonstrate in this talk, other (non-spatial) symmetries and their breaking can also be crucial to determine the properties of EM resonances and enable their mutual coupling, which in turn can give rise to EM Fano interferences. I will consider a meta-surface formed by a two-dimensional array of double-antenna meta-molecules resting on a gyromagnetic ferrite substrate. In conclusion, I will use simple symmetry considerations to predict and numerically demonstrate two phenomena that occur in meta-surfaces when symmetry of the system is reduced by a gyromagnetic substrate: gyromagnetically induced transparency and nonreciprocal Fano interference. These phenomena hold significant promise for practical applications such as the dynamic control of resonant EM interactions using magnetic fields produced by the external currents, mitigation of co-site interference and improving isolation. Spectral positions, radiative lifetimes and quality factors of Fano resonances can be controlled by the magnitude of the external magnetic field. This class of effects may lead to a new generation of tunable and nonreciprocal Fano resonant systems for various applications where strong field enhancement, tunability and nonreciprocity are simultaneously required.

  19. Transparent Conducting Oxides as Potential Thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) in their less-doped semiconducting states have potential as thermoelectric oxides or TEOs. They are attractive as TEOs owing to: 1) their good thermochemical stability, 2) their n-type character (to complement existing p-type TEOs), and 3) their high electronic mobilities. The numerator of the TE figure of merit (Z), also known as the ``power factor'' (PF), is the product of the electronic conductivity and the square of the Seebeck coefficient. An experimental procedure named after its developer, ``Jonker'' analysis plots Seebeck coefficient vs. the natural logarithm of the electronic conductivity. Data for bulk ceramic specimens just prior to the onset of degeneracy tend to fall on a line of slope, k/e (k =Boltzmann constant, e =charge of the electron). From this line, the doping composition corresponding to the highest power factor can be determined and the PF optimized, based upon data from a few carefully chosen compositions. Subsequently, following a procedure originally derived by Ioffe, the zero-thermopower intercept of these Jonker lines can be directly related to the maximum achievable power factor for a given TEO. So-called ``Ioffe'' plots allow for meaningful comparisons between candidate TEO materials, and also indicate the minimum thermal conductivity required to achieve a target ZT value at the temperature of measurement. Results for TCO-based TEOs will be discussed for both simple and compound (including layered) materials. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as part of an Energy Frontier Research Center under grant no. DE-SC0001059.

  20. Electromagnetically induced transparency in modulated laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yuechun; Yang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Linjie; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2017-02-01

    We study electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a room-temperature cesium vapor cell using wavelength-modulated probe laser light. In the utilized cascade level scheme, the probe laser drives the lower transition 6S {}1/2(F = 4) → 6P {}3/2 (F’ = 5), while the coupling laser drives the Rydberg transition 6P {}3/2 → 57S {}1/2. The probe laser has a fixed average frequency and is modulated at a frequency of a few kHz, with a variable modulation amplitude in the range of tens of MHz. The probe transmission is measured as a function of the detuning of the coupling laser from the Rydberg resonance. The first-harmonic demodulated EIT signal has two peaks that are, in the case of large modulation amplitude, separated by the peak-to-peak modulation amplitude of the probe laser times a scaling factor {λ }{{p}}/{λ }{{c}}, where {λ }{{p}} and {λ }{{c}} are the probe- and coupling-laser wavelengths. The scaling factor is due to Doppler shifts in the EIT geometry. Second-harmonic demodulated EIT signals, obtained with small modulation amplitudes, yield spectral lines that are much narrower than corresponding lines in the modulation-free EIT spectra. The resultant spectroscopic resolution enhancement is conducive to improved measurements of radio-frequency (RF) fields based on Rydberg-atom EIT, an approach in which the response of Rydberg atoms to RF fields is exploited to characterize RF fields. Here, we employ wavelength modulation spectroscopy to reduce the uncertainty of atom-based frequency and field measurement of an RF field in the VHF radio band.

  1. Synthesis of inorganic-organic hybrids from metal alkoxides and silanol-terminated polydimethylsiloxane

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Shingo; Yoshinaga, Ikuko; Yamada, Noriko

    1996-12-31

    Inorganic-organic hybrids have been synthesized by reaction of Ti(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4} and Ta(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 5} with silanol-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The chemical modification of the metal alkoxides with ethyl acetoacetate (EAcAc) was carried out in order to obtain a transparent and uniform hybrid. The hydrolysis behavior of Ti(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4} modified with EAcAc in the presence of PDMS and the formation of the Ti-O-Si bond in a Ti-O-PDMS hybrid were revealed by FT-IR experiments. Dynamic mechanical measurements showed that a Ta-O-PDMS hybrid was harder than a Ti-O-PDMS hybrid, indicating the effect of metal on the storage modulus of hybrids.

  2. Nuclear Transparency in Large Momentum Transfer Quasielastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardor, I.; Durrant, S.; Aclander, J.; Alster, J.; Barton, D.; Bunce, G.; Carroll, A.; Christensen, N.; Courant, H.; Gushue, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Kosonovsky, E.; Mardor, Y.; Marshak, M.; Makdisi, Y.; Minor, E. D.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Piasetzky, E.; Roser, T.; Russell, J.; Sutton, C. S.; Tanaka, M.; White, C.; Wu, J.-Y.

    1998-12-01

    We measured simultaneously pp elastic and quasielastic \\(p,2p\\) scattering in hydrogen, deuterium, and carbon for momentum transfers of 4.8 to 6.2 \\(GeV/c\\)2 at incoming momenta of 5.9 and 7.5 GeV/c and center-of-mass scattering angles in the range θc.m. = 83.7°-90°. The nuclear transparency is defined as the ratio of the quasielastic cross section to the free pp cross section. At incoming momentum of 5.9 GeV/c, the transparency of carbon decreases by a factor of 2 from θc.m.~=85° to θc.m.~=89°. At the largest angle the transparency of carbon increases from 5.9 to 7.5 GeV/c by more than 50%. The transparency in deuterium does not depend on incoming momentum nor on θc.m..

  3. Transparent Plastic Incubator for the Anaerobic Glove Box

    PubMed Central

    Balish, Edward; Brown, James F.; Wilkins, Tracy D.

    1977-01-01

    An incubator designed for use inside an anaerobic glove box is described. The incubator is made of transparent plastic material, has sliding plastic doors, and can be made in various sizes from readily available materials. Images PMID:16345202

  4. Polarization-independent transparency window induced by complementary graphene metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei Bing; Liu, Ji Long; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhen Guo

    2017-01-01

    A fourfold symmetric graphene-based complementary metasurface featuring a polarization-independent transparency window is proposed and numerically analysed in this paper. The unit cell of the metamaterial consists of a monolayer graphene perforated with a cross and four identical split-ring resonators deposited on a substrate. Our analysis shows that the transparency window can be interpreted as a plasmonic analogy of Autler-Townes splitting. The polarization independence is achieved due to the fourfold symmetry of graphene’s complementary structure. In addition, the frequency range of the transparency window can be dynamically tuned over a broad band by changing the chemical potential of graphene, and the width of the transparency window can also be controlled by changing the split-gap orientation. This work may lead to potential applications in many area, such as slow-light devices and optical sensing.

  5. An Electrochemical Experiment Using an Optically Transparent Thin Layer Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAngelis, Thomas P.; Heineman, William R.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a unified experiment in which an optically transparent thin layer electrode is used to illustrate the techniques of thin layer electrochemistry, cyclic voltammetry, controlled potential coulometry, and spectroelectrochemistry. (MLH)

  6. Electron beam irradiated silver nanowires for a highly transparent heater.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chan-Hwa; Oh, Seung Kyu; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cha, Yu-Jung; Kwak, Joon Seop; Shin, Jae-Heon; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Cheong, Woo-Seok

    2015-12-07

    Transparent heaters have attracted increasing attention for their usefulness in vehicle windows, outdoor displays, and periscopes. We present high performance transparent heaters based on Ag nanowires with electron beam irradiation. We obtained an Ag-nanowire thin film with 48 ohm/sq of sheet resistance and 88.8% (substrate included) transmittance at 550 nm after electron beam irradiation for 120 sec. We demonstrate that the electron beam creates nano-soldering at the junctions of the Ag nanowires, which produces lower sheet resistance and improved adhesion of the Ag nanowires. We fabricated a transparent heater with Ag nanowires after electron beam irradiation, and obtained a temperature of 51 °C within 1 min at an applied voltage of 7 V. The presented technique will be useful in a wide range of applications for transparent heaters.

  7. Anti-scratch and transparency properties of transparent conductive carbon nanotube films improved by incorporating polyethoxysiloxane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo-Tau; Hsu, Chao-Hsiang

    2011-07-15

    Transparent conductive films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were fabricated by a simple method to significantly enhance anti-scratch and transparency properties by the incorporation of polyethoxysiloxane (PES). The reasons for changes in the mechanical properties and transmittance were investigated through the reflection property and morphology of thin films. With the incorporation of PES, the sheet resistance of the SWCNT thin film remained unchanged after the anti-scratch test. It was found that the transmittance of the thin films suddenly increased when the thickness of the PES layer was ca 100 nm. Although the PES incorporation resulted in a slight increase in the sheet resistance, the experimental results revealed that the sheet resistance of the SWCNT thin films with PES was lower than that of films without PES for the same transmittance due to the increase of the transmittance caused by the PES incorporation. We have demonstrated that the sheet resistance was halved at a transmittance of ∼86% due to PES incorporation. SWCNT thin films with PES showed better electrical properties than those without PES after a bend test.

  8. Feasibility Study of Optically Transparent Microstrip Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a feasibility study on optically transparent patch antennas with microstrip line and probe feeds. The two antennas operate at 2.3 GHz and 19.5 GHz respectively. They are constructed from a thin sheet of clear polyester with an AgHT-8 optically transparent conductive coating. The experimental results show good radiation patterns and input impedance match. The antennas have potential applications in mobile wireless communications.

  9. Improved Low-Cost Multi-Hit Transparent Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    MD Aberdeen Proving Ground , MD 21005-5069 ABSTRACT Operation Iraqi Freedom has clearly demonstrated the criticality of transparent armor in...Motyka at ARL) A polymer backing acts as a spall shield and holds fractured armor in place. Interlayer between polycarbonate and ceramics is...Hsieh, Gary A. Gilde U.S. Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground , MD IMPROVED LOW-COST MULTI-HIT TRANSPARENT ARMOR Distribution A

  10. A Transparent and Flexible Graphene-Piezoelectric Fiber Generator.

    PubMed

    Fuh, Yiin Kuen; Kuo, Chien Cheng; Huang, Zih Ming; Li, Shan Chien; Liu, En Rui

    2016-04-13

    Piezoelectric fiber-based generators are prepared by combining two distinctive materials - poly(vinlyidene fluoride) fibers and monolayer/bilayer graphene. Novelty lies in the replacement of opaque metal electrodes with transparent graphene electrodes which enable the graphene-piezoelectric fiber generator to exhibit high flexibility and transparency as well as a great performance with an achievable output of voltage/current about 2 V/200 nA.

  11. Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Md. Iftekhar; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites with low thermal expansion of 15 ppm/k are prepared by hot pressing vacuum-filtered Pickering emulsions of hydrophobic acrylic resin monomer, hydrophilic chitin nanofibers and water. The coalescence of acrylic monomer droplets in the emulsion is prevented by the chitin nanofibers network. This transparent composite has 3D shape moldability, making it attractive for optical precision parts.

  12. Aircraft Transparency Optical Quality: New Methods of Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    AFAMRL.TR-1-21 X AIRCRAFT TRANSPARENCY OPTICAL QUALITY: NEW METHODS OF MEASUREMENT LOUIS V. GENCO , O.D., Lt. Colonel HARRY L. TASK, Ph.D. FEBRUARY...aircraft transparency with simple modifications of a positioning fixture ( Genco , 1979). DESIRABLE CHARACTERISTICS The ideal field evaluation unit for...34Windscreen Angular Deviation Measurement Device," U.S. Air Force Invention No. 13647, Patent Pending. Task, Harry L., Louis V. Genco , and Kenneth L. Smith

  13. Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Md. Iftekhar; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites with low thermal expansion of 15 ppm/k are prepared by hot pressing vacuum-filtered Pickering emulsions of hydrophobic acrylic resin monomer, hydrophilic chitin nanofibers and water. The coalescence of acrylic monomer droplets in the emulsion is prevented by the chitin nanofibers network. This transparent composite has 3D shape moldability, making it attractive for optical precision parts. PMID:26552990

  14. Slip casting nano-particle powders for making transparent ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Soules, Thomas F.; Landingham, Richard Lee; Hollingsworth, Joel P.

    2011-04-12

    A method of making a transparent ceramic including the steps of providing nano-ceramic powders in a processed or unprocessed form, mixing the powders with de-ionized water, the step of mixing the powders with de-ionized water producing a slurry, sonifing the slurry to completely wet the powder and suspend the powder in the de-ionized water, separating very fine particles from the slurry, molding the slurry, and curing the slurry to produce the transparent ceramic.

  15. LEARNING NONADJACENT DEPENDENCIES IN PHONOLOGY: TRANSPARENT VOWELS IN VOWEL HARMONY.

    PubMed

    Finley, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Nonadjacent dependencies are an important part of the structure of language. While the majority of syntactic and phonological processes occur at a local domain, there are several processes that appear to apply at a distance, posing a challenge for theories of linguistic structure. This article addresses one of the most common nonadjacent phenomena in phonology: transparent vowels in vowel harmony. Vowel harmony occurs when adjacent vowels are required to share the same phonological feature value (e.g. V+F C V+F). However, transparent vowels create a second-order nonadjacent pattern because agreement between two vowels can 'skip' the transparent neutral vowel in addition to consonants (e.g. V+F C V(T)-F C V+F). Adults are shown to display initial learning biases against second-order nonadjacency in experiments that use an artificial grammar learning paradigm. Experiments 1-3 show that adult learners fail to learn the second-order long-distance dependency created by the transparent vowel (as compared to a control condition). In experiments 4-5, training in terms of overall exposure as well as the frequency of relevant transparent items was increased. With adequate exposure, learners reliably generalize to novel words containing transparent vowels. The experiments suggest that learners are sensitive to the structure of phonological representations, even when learning occurs at a relatively rapid pace.

  16. Tunable phonon-induced transparency in bilayer graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hugen; Low, Tony; Guinea, Francisco; Xia, Fengnian; Avouris, Phaedon

    2014-08-13

    In the phenomenon of plasmon-induced transparency, which is a classical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic gases, the coherent interference between two plasmon modes results in an optical transparency window in a broad absorption spectrum. With the requirement of contrasting lifetimes, typically one of the plasmon modes involved is a dark mode that has limited coupling to the electromagnetic radiation and possesses relatively longer lifetime. Plasmon-induced transparency not only leads to light transmission at otherwise opaque frequency regions but also results in the slowing of light group velocity and enhanced optical nonlinearity. In this article, we report an analogous behavior, denoted as phonon-induced transparency (PIT), in AB-stacked bilayer graphene nanoribbons. Here, light absorption due to the plasmon excitation is suppressed in a narrow window due to the coupling with the infrared active Γ-point optical phonon, whose function here is similar to that of the dark plasmon mode in the plasmon-induced transparency. We further show that PIT in bilayer graphene is actively tunable by electrostatic gating and estimate a maximum slow light factor of around 500 at the phonon frequency of 1580 cm(-1), based on the measured spectra. Our demonstration opens an avenue for the exploration of few-photon nonlinear optics and slow light in this novel two-dimensional material.

  17. A reinterpretation of transparency perception in terms of gamut relativity.

    PubMed

    Vladusich, Tony

    2013-03-01

    Classical approaches to transparency perception assume that transparency constitutes a perceptual dimension corresponding to the physical dimension of transmittance. Here I present an alternative theory, termed gamut relativity, that naturally explains key aspects of transparency perception. Rather than being computed as values along a perceptual dimension corresponding to transmittance, gamut relativity postulates that transparency is built directly into the fabric of the visual system's representation of surface color. The theory, originally developed to explain properties of brightness and lightness perception, proposes how the relativity of the achromatic color gamut in a perceptual blackness-whiteness space underlies the representation of foreground and background surface layers. Whereas brightness and lightness perception were previously reanalyzed in terms of the relativity of the achromatic color gamut with respect to illumination level, transparency perception is here reinterpreted in terms of relativity with respect to physical transmittance. The relativity of the achromatic color gamut thus emerges as a fundamental computational principle underlying surface perception. A duality theorem relates the definition of transparency provided in gamut relativity with the classical definition underlying the physical blending models of computer graphics.

  18. Critical dimension measurement of transparent film layers by multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonyang; Kim, Namyoon; Jo, Taeyong; Pahk, Heui Jae

    2014-07-14

    An optical microscopy system as a non-destructive method for measuring critical dimension (CD) is widely used for its stability and fastness. In case of transparent thin film measurement, it is hard to recognize the pattern under white light illumination due to its transparency and reflectance characteristics. In this paper, the optical measurement system using multispectral imaging for CD measurement of transparent thin film is introduced. The measurement system utilizes an Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) to illuminate the specimen with various monochromatic lights. The relationship between spectral reflectance and CD measurement are deduced from series of measurement experiments with two kinds of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) patterned samples. When the difference of spectral reflectance between substrate and thin film layers is large enough to yield a large image intensity difference, the thin film layer can be distinguished from substrate, and it is possible to measure the CD of transparent thin films. This paper analyzes CD measurement of transparent thin film with reflectance theory and shows that the CD measurement of transparent thin film can be performed successfully with the proposed system within a certain wavelength range filtered by AOTF.

  19. Enhanced nonlinear susceptibility via double-double electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaibi, Hessa M. M.; Sanders, Barry C.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the nonlinear optical susceptibility of an alkali-metal atom with tripod electronic configuration responsible for generating cross-phase modulation and self-phase modulation under the condition of double-double electromagnetically induced transparency. Our investigation demonstrates an enhancement in the nonlinear optical susceptibility of an alkali-metal atom by a factor of 1000 in the region of the second transparency window. This enhancement is in comparison with the atom's susceptibility in the first transparency window for the same parameters under the same conditions. Nonlinear-absorption enhancement arises by canceling Raman-gain generation, which arises when the probe and signal fields have equal intensities. At the center of the second transparency window, we obtain the condition required to attain a nonvanishing nonlinear optical susceptibility. In the bare-state picture, the coupling field must be off resonant from a bare-to-bare-state transition, while working in the semiclassical dressed picture required the signal field to be tuned off resonantly with a bare-to-dressed-state transition. The relation that governs the values of coupling- and signal-field detuning are also obtained. Our scheme exhibits the fact that the second transparency window has advantages over the first transparency window with respect to obtaining an enhanced Kerr effect, and our calculation includes simulation of both low-temperature and Doppler-broadened regimes.

  20. Hybrid mimics and hybrid vigor in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Greaves, Ian K; Groszmann, Michael; Wu, Li Min; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Peacock, W James

    2015-09-01

    F1 hybrids can outperform their parents in yield and vegetative biomass, features of hybrid vigor that form the basis of the hybrid seed industry. The yield advantage of the F1 is lost in the F2 and subsequent generations. In Arabidopsis, from F2 plants that have a F1-like phenotype, we have by recurrent selection produced pure breeding F5/F6 lines, hybrid mimics, in which the characteristics of the F1 hybrid are stabilized. These hybrid mimic lines, like the F1 hybrid, have larger leaves than the parent plant, and the leaves have increased photosynthetic cell numbers, and in some lines, increased size of cells, suggesting an increased supply of photosynthate. A comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the F1 hybrid with those of eight hybrid mimic lines identified metabolic pathways altered in both; these pathways include down-regulation of defense response pathways and altered abiotic response pathways. F6 hybrid mimic lines are mostly homozygous at each locus in the genome and yet retain the large F1-like phenotype. Many alleles in the F6 plants, when they are homozygous, have expression levels different to the level in the parent. We consider this altered expression to be a consequence of transregulation of genes from one parent by genes from the other parent. Transregulation could also arise from epigenetic modifications in the F1. The pure breeding hybrid mimics have been valuable in probing the mechanisms of hybrid vigor and may also prove to be useful hybrid vigor equivalents in agriculture.

  1. Nuclear waste repository transparency technology test bed demonstrations at WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    BETSILL,J. DAVID; ELKINS,NED Z.; WU,CHUAN-FU; MEWHINNEY,JAMES D.; AAMODT,PAUL

    2000-01-27

    Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, has stated that one of the nuclear waste legacy issues is ``The challenge of managing the fuel cycle's back end and assuring the safe use of nuclear power.'' Waste management (i.e., the back end) is a domestic and international issue that must be addressed. A key tool in gaining acceptance of nuclear waste repository technologies is transparency. Transparency provides information to outside parties for independent assessment of safety, security, and legitimate use of materials. Transparency is a combination of technologies and processes that apply to all elements of the development, operation, and closure of a repository system. A test bed for nuclear repository transparency technologies has been proposed to develop a broad-based set of concepts and strategies for transparency monitoring of nuclear materials at the back end of the fuel/weapons cycle. WIPP is the world's first complete geologic repository system for nuclear materials at the back end of the cycle. While it is understood that WIPP does not currently require this type of transparency, this repository has been proposed as realistic demonstration site to generate and test ideas, methods, and technologies about what transparency may entail at the back end of the nuclear materials cycle, and which could be applicable to other international repository developments. An integrated set of transparency demonstrations was developed and deployed during the summer, and fall of 1999 as a proof-of-concept of the repository transparency technology concept. These demonstrations also provided valuable experience and insight into the implementation of future transparency technology development and application. These demonstrations included: Container Monitoring Rocky Flats to WIPP; Underground Container Monitoring; Real-Time Radiation and Environmental Monitoring; Integrated level of confidence in the system and information provided. As the world's only operating deep geologic

  2. Physical process in OLED architectures with transparent carbon nanotube sheets as electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovalle Robles, Raquel

    There has been a great deal of activity in the development of organic light emitting diodes (OLED's) and polymeric light emitting diodes (PLED's). Research in OLEDs and PLEDs have been having a significant development over the last few years towards commercialization, extended life time, stability, efficiency and new fabrication processes suitable for mass production are some of the topics. The potential for commercialization is high due to their low operating voltage (typically between 2.5 to 5 volts), their high brightness and their ease to process. They are light weight and can be flexible. Furthermore, these devices can be easily color tune to produce red, green and blue colors. Research in this type of electroluminescence devices has advanced rapidly and device prototypes now meet realistic specifications for applications. By proper device engineering these devices can achieve high electroluminescence efficiencies and lifetimes. In this research project we present several methods and procedures that we developed and use to produce OLEDs and PLEDs. We have incorporated quantum dots into OLEDs as emissive dopants that contribute to the control of the spectral distribution of emitted light allowing the production of white OLEDs using both a multilayer structure with emission from multiple layers and a bilayer structure with emission from only the quantum dots. We have also produced PLED devices with a new family of novel PPV polymers achieving high bright efficient devices. OLED structures with transparent carbon nanotube sheets, obtained by dry drawing from a CVD-grown forest have been produced. The devices shown to be very bright and the MCNT sheets are efficient hole-injecting anodes for OLEDs Also, for flexible display applications, there is a need for high strength, flexible materials which can be deposited as transparent films and can act as hole injectors for organic films. By using a hybrid ITO/MWCNT anode onto flexible substrates an enhancement of the

  3. Color Transparency in Quasi-Elastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, William Ross

    The role of Color Transparency (CT) in high momentum transfer knockout reactions is explored. The main focus of this study is the escape process of the ejectile from the nucleus. We use a hadronic basis to describe the struck proton as a wavepacket of physical baryon resonances. The ideas of CT are embedded into the usual Glauber treatment. We first ignore the effects of spin and consider the resulting ejectile-nucleus scattering cross sections. We assume two representative forms for the ejectile-nucleon interaction. Explicit forms for the distorted waves are presented in the context of a multiple scattering formalism. New approximation techniques are developed and applied to predict the production of nucleons and N^*'s in (e,e^' p) experiments. The consequences of the non-zero size of the wavepacket are examined. Next, we replace the assumption of a specific form for the interaction with the ansatz that a zero-size wavepacket does not interact. As the wavepacket expands, the nuclear interactions grow. Exact solutions to the scattering equation are obtained. The resulting sum rules are rendered semi-realistic by demanding consistency with pp and pd data. We also use the sum rule method to analyze double scattering events from ^3He. These events are of particular interest since the effects of CT may be easier to see experimentally. Finally, we upgrade our model and consider the full effects of photon and proton spin and polarization. The polarization of the ejected proton is interesting because, due to general symmetry principles, it must vanish in the limit of full CT. These are the first calculations of the spin observables to include CT. Several new effects, due exclusively to the relativistic Dirac structure, are described. Explicit forms for the distorted waves are presented. We apply these wavefunctions to predict total cross sections, normal polarizations and other differential distributions. We also examine the effects of non-zero wavepacket size and of

  4. Space-Derived Transparency: Players, Policies, Implications, and Synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnan, C. J.

    2001-06-01

    Space-derived transparency will become a common means of monitoring, preventing, and mitigating crises, verifying compliance with treaties and law, and enabling confidence and security building measures. Democratization and globalization, the proliferation of information technologies, the availability of commercial space high-resolution imagery, and the growing influence of NGOs invite this question: What is (space-derived) transparency and what effect does it have on US security policy? Three camps have emerged in the debate -Horaeists who seek to build a transnational society through complete transparency; Preservationists, mostly military, who fear the threat to national security, want to deny most space-derived information to non-traditional/non-state actors; and Synergists who seek to capitalize on the best of both camps. There is evidence suggesting that space-derived transparency is an inevitable trend and will resist even the best means of preservationist control. Space-derived transparency may change the dynamic of the security environment by introducing new players into the policy fomentation and implementation process. These players, if not properly schooled in imagery analysis or the potential effects of their use of misinterpreted space-derived imagery, could force policy makers to make fast, ill-considered decisions in order to respond to incidents. In some cases this fast response will defuse potential crises and in other situations these rushed decisions might result in policies without considering the potential consequences, which could turn incidents into crises. Space-derived transparency is a step forward into the future for each camp . . . the challenge for the United States lies in forging synergies in an increasingly transparent world while maintaining the balance between openness and security.

  5. Efficient photovoltaic conversion of graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid films grown from solid precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Xin; Lv, Ruitao; Bai, Junfei; Zhang, Zexia; Wei, Jinquan; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Zhu, Hongwei; Kang, Feiyu; Terrones, Mauricio

    2015-09-01

    Large-area (e.g. centimeter size) graphene sheets are usually synthesized via pyrolysis of gaseous carbon precursors (e.g. methane) on metal substrates like Cu using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), but the presence of grain boundaries and the residual polymers during transfer deteriorates significantly the properties of the CVD graphene. If carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be covalently bonded to graphene, the hybrid system could possess excellent electrical conductivity, transparency and mechanical strength. In this work, conducting and transparent CNT-graphene hybrid films were synthesized by a facile solid precursor pyrolysis method. Furthermore, the synthesized CNT-graphene hybrid films display enhanced photovoltaic conversion efficiency when compared to devices based on CNT membranes or graphene sheets. Upon chemical doping, the graphene-CNT/Si solar cells reveal power conversion efficiencies up to 8.50%.

  6. Transparent Global Seismic Hazard and Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Anselm; Schneider, John; Pinho, Rui; Crowley, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Vulnerability to earthquakes is increasing, yet advanced reliable risk assessment tools and data are inaccessible to most, despite being a critical basis for managing risk. Also, there are few, if any, global standards that allow us to compare risk between various locations. The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) is a unique collaborative effort that aims to provide organizations and individuals with tools and resources for transparent assessment of earthquake risk anywhere in the world. By pooling data, knowledge and people, GEM acts as an international forum for collaboration and exchange, and leverages the knowledge of leading experts for the benefit of society. Sharing of data and risk information, best practices, and approaches across the globe is key to assessing risk more effectively. Through global projects, open-source IT development and collaborations with more than 10 regions, leading experts are collaboratively developing unique global datasets, best practice, open tools and models for seismic hazard and risk assessment. Guided by the needs and experiences of governments, companies and citizens at large, they work in continuous interaction with the wider community. A continuously expanding public-private partnership constitutes the GEM Foundation, which drives the collaborative GEM effort. An integrated and holistic approach to risk is key to GEM's risk assessment platform, OpenQuake, that integrates all above-mentioned contributions and will become available towards the end of 2014. Stakeholders worldwide will be able to calculate, visualise and investigate earthquake risk, capture new data and to share their findings for joint learning. Homogenized information on hazard can be combined with data on exposure (buildings, population) and data on their vulnerability, for loss assessment around the globe. Furthermore, for a true integrated view of seismic risk, users can add social vulnerability and resilience indices to maps and estimate the costs and benefits

  7. Novel Smart Windows Based on Transparent Phosphorescent OLEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D'Andrade; Stephen Forest

    2006-09-15

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation (UDC) and Princeton University developed the use of white transparent phosphorescent organic light emitting devices (PHOLEDs{trademark}) to make low-cost ''transparent OLED (TOLED) smart windows'', that switch rapidly from being a highly efficient solid-state light source to being a transparent window. PHOLEDs are ideal for large area devices, and the UDC-Princeton team has demonstrated white PHOLEDs with efficiencies of >24 lm/W at a luminance of 1,000 cd/m{sup 2}. TOLEDs have transparencies >70% over the visible wavelengths of light, but their transparency drops to less than 5% for wavelengths shorter than 350 nm, so they can also be used as ultraviolet (UV) light filters. In addition to controlling the flow of UV radiation, TOLEDs coupled with an electromechanical or electrically activated reflecting shutter on a glass window can be employed to control the flow of heat from infrared (IR) radiation by varying the reflectance/transparency of the glass for wavelengths greater than 800nm. One particularly attractive shutter technology is reversible electrochromic mirrors (REM). Our goal was therefore to integrate two innovative concepts to meet the U.S. Department of Energy goals: high power efficiency TOLEDs, plus electrically controlled reflectors to produce a ''smart window''. Our efforts during this one year program have succeeded in producing a prototype smart window shown in the Fig. I, below. The four states of the smart window are pictured: reflective with lamp on, reflective with lamp off, transparent with lamp on, and transparent with lamp off. In the transparent states, the image is an outdoor setting viewed through the window. In the reflective states, the image is an indoor setting viewed via reflection off the window. We believe that the integration of our high efficiency white phosphorescent TOLED illumination source, with electrically activated shutters represents an innovative low-cost approach to

  8. Design, fabrication and characterization of transparent retro-reflective screen.

    PubMed

    Soomro, Shoaib R; Urey, Hakan

    2016-10-17

    A transparent retro-reflective screen, which can be used as head-up-display (HUD) or a see-through screen for head mounted projection displays (HMPD) is proposed. The high optical gain of screen enables the use of low power projectors to produce very bright content. The screen assembly is based on retro-reflective microspheres, patterned on an optically clear substrate using steel stencil as a shadow mask. The incident light is retro-reflected as a narrow angular cone to create an eyebox for the viewer. The optical gain and transparency of screen is varied by changing the fill factor of the mask. The optical design and fabrication of the screen is presented. The retro-reflective and transmission characteristics of screen are evaluated. The impact of fill factor on screen luminance and transparency is studied. The screen provides high luminance (up to 280cd/m2 with 50% transparency) from about 40cm to >3m when used with a low power (15 lumen) mobile projector. Unlike regular diffusers, luminance remains nearly constant with projection distance. Furthermore, the screen offers prominent see-through capability with small degradation in modulation transfer function for transmitted light. For a particular camera and imaging configuration, MTF10 (10% cutoff) for 50% transparent screen is reduced from 37 cyc/deg to 30 cyc/deg when screen is inserted at an intermediate distance.

  9. A transparent electrode based on a metal nanotrough network.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Kong, Desheng; Ruan, Zhichao; Hsu, Po-Chun; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Zongfu; Carney, Thomas J; Hu, Liangbing; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2013-06-01

    Transparent conducting electrodes are essential components for numerous flexible optoelectronic devices, including touch screens and interactive electronics. Thin films of indium tin oxide-the prototypical transparent electrode material-demonstrate excellent electronic performances, but film brittleness, low infrared transmittance and low abundance limit suitability for certain industrial applications. Alternatives to indium tin oxide have recently been reported and include conducting polymers, carbon nanotubes and graphene. However, although flexibility is greatly improved, the optoelectronic performance of these carbon-based materials is limited by low conductivity. Other examples include metal nanowire-based electrodes, which can achieve sheet resistances of less than 10Ω □(-1) at 90% transmission because of the high conductivity of the metals. To achieve these performances, however, metal nanowires must be defect-free, have conductivities close to their values in bulk, be as long as possible to minimize the number of wire-to-wire junctions, and exhibit small junction resistance. Here, we present a facile fabrication process that allows us to satisfy all these requirements and fabricate a new kind of transparent conducting electrode that exhibits both superior optoelectronic performances (sheet resistance of ~2Ω □(-1) at 90% transmission) and remarkable mechanical flexibility under both stretching and bending stresses. The electrode is composed of a free-standing metallic nanotrough network and is produced with a process involving electrospinning and metal deposition. We demonstrate the practical suitability of our transparent conducting electrode by fabricating a flexible touch-screen device and a transparent conducting tape.

  10. Conveying the 3D Shape of Transparent Surfaces Via Texture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Fuchs, Henry; Pizer, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Transparency can be a useful device for depicting multiple overlapping surfaces in a single image. The challenge is to render the transparent surfaces in such a way that their three-dimensional shape can be readily understood and their depth distance from underlying structures clearly perceived. This paper describes our investigations into the use of sparsely-distributed discrete, opaque texture as an 'artistic device' for more explicitly indicating the relative depth of a transparent surface and for communicating the essential features of its 3D shape in an intuitively meaningful and minimally occluding way. The driving application for this work is the visualization of layered surfaces in radiation therapy treatment planning data, and the technique is illustrated on transparent isointensity surfaces of radiation dose. We describe the perceptual motivation and artistic inspiration for defining a stroke texture that is locally oriented in the direction of greatest normal curvature (and in which individual strokes are of a length proportional to the magnitude of the curvature in the direction they indicate), and discuss several alternative methods for applying this texture to isointensity surfaces defined in a volume. We propose an experimental paradigm for objectively measuring observers' ability to judge the shape and depth of a layered transparent surface, in the course of a task relevant to the needs of radiotherapy treatment planning, and use this paradigm to evaluate the practical effectiveness of our approach through a controlled observer experiment based on images generated from actual clinical data.

  11. Hybrid rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzman, Allen L.

    1993-01-01

    Topics addressed are: (1) comparison of the theoretical impulses; (2) comparison of the density-specific impulses; (3) general propulsion system features comparison; (4) hybrid systems, booster applications; and (5) hybrid systems, upper stage propulsion applications.

  12. From hybrid swarms to swarms of hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introgression of modern humans (Homo sapiens) with Neanderthals 40,000 YBP after a half-million years of separation, may have led to the best example of a hybrid swarm on earth. Modern trade and transportation in support of the human hybrids has continued to introduce additional species, genotyp...

  13. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  14. 2007 Annual Health Physics Report for the HEU Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R

    2008-04-09

    During the 2007 calendar year, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program for external and internal radiation protection and technical expertise related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2007, there were 172 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 172 person-trips, 160 person-trips were SMVs and 12 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. There were 12 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 10 to UEIE itself. There were two monitoring visits (source changes) that were back to back with 14 monitors. LLNL's Hazard Control Division laboratories provided the dosimetry services for the HEU Transparency monitors.

  15. Laser structuring of conducting films on transparent substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Račiukaitis, G.; Brikas, M.; Darčianovas, G.; Ruthe, D.; Zimmer, K.

    2007-06-01

    The fast growing market of organic electronics, including organic light-emitting devices (OLED), Solar cells and radio-frequency identification devices (RFID), stimulates development of versatile technologies for patterning the thin-film materials on rigid and flexible substrates. Thin films of the transparent conducting oxides (TCO) are important materials for making transparent contacts, conductors or antennas in such devices. High repetition rate lasers with a short, picosecond pulse duration offer new possibilities for high efficiency structuring of transparent conductors on glass and other substrates. The results of ablation of the indium-tin oxide (ITO) layer on glass and ITO and ZnO layers on polymers with picosecond lasers at various wavelengths are presented. Laser radiation initiated ablation of the material, forming trenches in TCO. UV radiation at the 266 nm provided the widest working window for TCO ablation without damage of the substrate. Subcomponents of the thin-film devices were made in order to test the structuring technology.

  16. Investigations of Carbon Nanotube Networks for use as Transparent Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topinka, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Recently there has been increasing interest in the physics of conduction through carbon nanotube networks and the possibility of using carbon nanotube networks as transparent conducting layers for solar cells and other optoelectronic applications(1). Conductivities as high as 30 ohm/square with transparencies of about 80% have been reported(2). Here we present results of our work on understanding the underlying physics behind the real-world behavior of these systems and identifying the bottlenecks which are currently limiting their performance. We focus in particular on their possible use in solar cells as a low-cost alternative to more expensive transparent conductor technologies such as Indium Tin Oxide (ITO). We include numerical simulations of conduction through nanotube networks and scanning probe microscopy studies of transport through these systems. (1) L.Hu, D.S.Hecht, G.Gruner, NanoLetters 4, 2513 (2) Z.Wu, et al, Science 305, 1273

  17. Rapid microfabrication of transparent materials using filamented femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkus, S.; Gaižauskas, E.; Paipulas, D.; Viburys, Ž.; Kaškelyė, D.; Barkauskas, M.; Alesenkov, A.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2014-01-01

    Microfabrication of transparent materials using femtosecond laser pulses has showed good potential towards industrial application. Maintaining pulse energies exceeding the critical self-focusing threshold by more than 100-fold produced filaments that were used for micromachining purposes. This article demonstrates two different micromachining techniques using femtosecond filaments generated in different transparent media (water and glass). The stated micromachining techniques are cutting and welding of transparent samples. In addition, cutting and drilling experiments were backed by theoretical modelling giving a deeper insight into the whole process. We demonstrate cut-out holes in soda-lime glass having thickness up to 1 mm and aspect ratios close to 20, moreover, the fabrication time is of the order of tens of seconds, in addition, grooves and holes were fabricated in hardened 1.1 mm thick glass (Corning Gorilla glass). Glass welding was made possible and welded samples were achieved after several seconds of laser fabrication.

  18. Transparency and selfhood: Utopia and the informed body.

    PubMed

    Chrysanthou, Marc

    2002-02-01

    One aspect of the development of a health-orientated consumer culture is the growth of self-screening and self-diagnosis among the lay public--e.g. over-the-counter diagnostic tests, computerized health assessments. DIY genetic tests. This trend is interpreted as the expression of a distinctively postmodern 'utopian' impulse. Postmodernity's inwardly directed gaze has replaced the communitarian vision of modernity. In the absence of overarching visions, the postmodern utopian telos becomes the attainment of a perfect. imperishable body. Somatopia is the collective expression of these privatized and personalized body projects. The accomplishment and authentication of these body projects necessitates the creation of a 'transparent body'. This 'transparent body' is enabled and constructed by developments in information and medical technologies. The political and health implications of the transparent, 'informed' body are explored.

  19. Hot-rolling nanowire transparent electrodes for surface roughness minimization.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Khaligh, Hadi; Goldthorpe, Irene A

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanowire transparent electrodes are a promising alternative to transparent conductive oxides. However, their surface roughness presents a problem for their integration into devices with thin layers such as organic electronic devices. In this paper, hot rollers are used to soften plastic substrates with heat and mechanically press the nanowires into the substrate surface. By doing so, the root-mean-square surface roughness is reduced to 7 nm and the maximum peak-to-valley value is 30 nm, making the electrodes suitable for typical organic devices. This simple process requires no additional materials, which results in a higher transparency, and is compatible with roll-to-roll fabrication processes. In addition, the adhesion of the nanowires to the substrate significantly increases.

  20. Transparent Electrode and Magnetic Permalloy Made from Novel Nanopaper.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinbo; Akin, Meriem; Yang, Lei; Jiao, Li; Cheng, Fan; Lu, Pengbo; Chen, Liao; Liu, Detao; Zhu, Hongli

    2016-10-12

    We report a novel partial dissolution strategy to liberate uniform cellulose nanofibers with diameter of 5-10 nm from macroscopic cellulose fibers and promote separation of nanofibers in an aqueous environment by forming water-soluble sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) through heterogeneous sodium acetoxylation of cellulose. With the obtained cellulose nanofibers, we fabricated nanopapers which exhibit high optical transparency of 90.5% (@550 nm) with promising mechanical properties and high thermal stability. By directly depositing Ag nanowires on a wet nanofiber sheet, we fabricated a flexible transparent electrode with 86.5% (@550 nm) transparency and 26.2 Ω/sq sheet resistance (Rs). Meanwhile, we studied the magnetic properties of sputter deposited thin film of permalloy on nanopaper which exhibited a similar magnetic coercivity and a close saturation magnetization to conventional silicon dioxide-based permalloy.

  1. Novel transparent electrodes allow sustainable production of electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Constant, Kristen

    2010-12-27

    A novel technique for fabricating inexpensive, transparent electrodes from common metals has been developed by engineers and scientists at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. They exhibit very high transparency and are very good electrical conductors. This is a combination of properties that is difficult to achieve with common materials. The most frequently used transparent electrode in today's high-technology devices (such as LCD screens) is indium tin oxide (ITO). While ITO performs well in these applications, the supply of indium is very limited. In addition, it is rapidly decreasing as consumer demand for flat-panel electronics is skyrocketing. According to a 2004 US Geological Survey report, as little as 14 years exploitation of known indium reserves remains. In addition to increasing prices, the dwindling supply of indium suggests its use is not sustainable for future generations of electronics enthusiasts. Solar cells represent another application where transparent electrodes are used. To make solar-energy collection economically feasible, all parts of solar photovoltaics must be made more efficient and cost-effective. Our novel transparent electrodes have the potential to do both. In addition, there is much interest in developing more efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly lighting. Incandescent light bulbs are very inefficient, because most of their energy consumption is wasted as heat. Fluorescent lighting is much more efficient but still uses mercury, an environmental toxin. An attractive alternative is offered by LEDs, which have very high efficiencies and long lifetimes, and do not contain mercury. If made bright enough, LED use for general lighting could provide a viable alternative. We have fabricated electrodes from more commonly available materials, using a technique that is cost effective and environmentally friendly. Most of today's electronic devices are made in specialized facilities equipped with low

  2. Price and quality transparency: how effective for health care reform?

    PubMed

    Nyman, John A; Li, Chia-Hsuan W

    2009-07-01

    Many in Minnesota and the United States are promoting price and quality transparency as a means for reforming health care. The assumption is that with such information, consumers and providers would be motivated to change their behavior and this would lead to lower costs and higher-quality care.This article attempts to determine the extent to which publicizing information about the cost and quality of medical care does, in fact, improve quality and lower costs, and thus should be included in any reform strategy. The authors reviewed a number of studies and concluded that there is a general lack of empirical evidence on the effect of price transparency on health care costs and that the evidence on the effectiveness of quality transparency is mixed.

  3. Toward transparent and self-activated graphene harmonic transponder sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiyu Harry; Sakhdari, Maryam; Hajizadegan, Mehdi; Shahini, Ali; Akinwande, Deji; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2016-04-01

    We propose the concept and design of a transparent, flexible, and self-powered wireless sensor comprising a graphene-based sensor/frequency-modulator circuitry and a graphene antenna. In this all-graphene device, the multilayered-graphene antenna receives the fundamental tone at C band and retransmits the frequency-modulated sensed signal (harmonic tone) at X band. The frequency orthogonality between the received/re-transmitted signals may enable high-performance sensing in severe interference/clutter background. Here, a fully passive, quad-ring frequency multiplier is proposed using graphene field-effect transistors, of which the unique ambipolar charge transports render a frequency doubling effect with conversion gain being chemically sensitive to exposed gas/molecular/chemical/infectious agents. This transparent, light-weight, and self-powered system may potentially benefit a number of wireless sensing and diagnosis applications, particularly for smart contact lenses/glasses and microscope slides that require high optical transparency.

  4. All-solution processed transparent organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Höfle, Stefan; Czolk, Jens; Mertens, Adrian; Colsmann, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we report on indium tin oxide-free, all-solution processed transparent organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with inverted device architecture. Conductive polymer layers are employed as both transparent cathodes and transparent anodes, with the top anodes having enhanced conductivities from a supporting stochastic silver nanowire mesh. Both electrodes exhibit transmittances of 80-90% in the visible spectral regime. Upon the incorporation of either yellow- or blue-light emitting fluorescent polymers, the OLEDs show low onset voltages, demonstrating excellent charge carrier injection from the polymer electrodes into the emission layers. Overall luminances and current efficiencies equal the performance of opaque reference OLEDs with indium tin oxide and aluminium electrodes, proving excellent charge carrier-to-light conversion within the device.

  5. OPTIMIZING TRANSPARENT ARMOR DESIGN SUBJECT TO PROJECTILE IMPACT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Lai, Canhai; Gorsich, Tara; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2009-03-01

    Design and manufacturing of transparent armor have been historically carried out using experimental approaches. In this study, we use advanced computational modeling tools to perform virtual design evaluations of transparent armor systems under different projectile impact conditions. AHPCRC developed modeling software EPIC’06 [1] is used in predicting the penetration resistance of transparent armor systems. LaGrangian-based finite element analyses combined with particle dynamics are used to simulate the damage initiation and propagation process for the armor system under impact conditions. It is found that a 1-parameter single state model can be used to predict the impact penetration depth with relatively good accuracy, suggesting that the finely comminuted glass particles follow the behavior similar to a viscous fluid. Even though the intact strength of borosilicate and soda lime glass are different, the same fractured strength can be used for both glasses to capture the penetration depth.

  6. Facile method to prepare a transparent superhydrophobic PET film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Hong; Wang, Xian; Yuan, Zhiqing

    2016-11-01

    A simple method to fabricate a transparent superhydrophobic coating was developed by spraying PDMS/SiO2 nanoparticles suspension on a hydrophilic PET film. This PDMS/SiO2 nanoparticles suspension was prepared by fully diluting and properly stirring. When this suspension was sprayed on the surface of PET film at a distance of about 30 cm for 2 s, a porous micro-nano-binary structure was formed, which endowed the hydrophilic PET film superhydrophobicity, while the PET film maintained transparent after spraying with a SiO2 nanoparticle layer. The as-prepared superhydrophobic PET film exhibited a high water contact angle of about 155° ± 1.9° and a low water sliding angle of about 7°. The formation mechanism of this transparent superhydrophobic coating on PET film was also discussed in detail in this paper.

  7. Parameters of Sporadic E Layers and Transparency For Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencze, P.

    Two frequency parameters of sporadic E layers are included into the scaling of verti- cal incidence ionograms, foEs and fbEs. They are called critical and blanketing fre- quency, respectively. On the basis of results of incoherent scatter measurements at mid-latitudes referring to the structure of sporadic E layers, the critical frequency is considered representing the mean electron density of patches imbedded in the back- ground electron density. The blanketing frequency would correspond to the back- ground electron density. Thus, the difference between critical and blanketing frequen- cies foEs-fbEs could indicate the transparency of sporadic E layers. Comparison of temporal and spatial variations of the transparency with corresponding variations of the vertical shear of the horizontal wind shows that the transparancy can be due to the wind-shear and patches would indicate eddies in the layer.

  8. Transparent Democratic Foresight Strategies in the California EMF Program.

    PubMed

    Neutra, Raymond Richard; Delpizzo, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    A California Department of Health Services program dealt with possible health effects from Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) from power lines. With the advice of stakeholders, and well before any risk determinations were made, transparent policy analyses about the power grid and schools asked the question, "How confident must one be of how big an effect before one would adopt cheap or expensive EMF avoidance measures?" A risk evaluation was carried out with features that promoted transparency. It was formatted to provide a policy-neutral "degree of certainty of causality" to adherents of utilitarian, environmental justice, and libertarian policy frameworks. Though the program had many features advocated by adherents of the precautionary principle, it might be better characterized as following "Transparent Democratic Foresight Strategies," since no single principle justifies the strategies used in this participatory program, and it examined the pros and cons of options but made no recommendations, precautionary or otherwise.

  9. Pulse shortening via Relativistic Transparency of Nanometer Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Wu, H.-C.; Gautier, D. C.; Jung, D.; Hoerlein, R.; Offermann, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Letzring, S.; Yin, L.; Albright, B.; Fernandez, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2010-11-01

    Intense lasers drive plasma electrons to velocities approaching light-speed. Increase of the electron mass causes optical transparency in otherwise classically over-dense plasma. Simulations indicate relativistic transparency can produce near-single-cycle rise time light pulses. It also lies enables a new mechanism for laser-based ion-acceleration yielding energy increases over earlier approaches. A direct signature of transparency is pulse-shortening thru over-dense plasmas in which relativistic intensity induces transmission. Using nm C foils (LMU) and the high-contrast Trident laser (LANL) we have made auto-correlation measurements showing >2x transmitted pulse duration reduction at intensities corresponding to ˜20-fold increase in electron mass. Spectral measurements agree with pulse shortening thru the target, and 1-D particle-in-cell simulations support the measurements.

  10. Hybrid armature projectile

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Asay, James R.; Hall, Clint A.; Konrad, Carl H.; Sauve, Gerald L.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Susoeff, Allan R.

    1993-01-01

    A projectile for a railgun that uses a hybrid armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the hybrid plasma brush. In addition, the hybrid armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasama blowby.

  11. Intraply Hybrid Composite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Several theoretical approaches combined in program. Intraply hybrid composites investigated theoretically and experimentally at Lewis Research Center. Theories developed during investigations and corroborated by attendant experiments used to develop computer program identified as INHYD (Intraply Hybrid Composite Design). INHYD includes several composites micromechanics theories, intraply hybrid composite theories, and integrated hygrothermomechanical theory. Equations from theories used by program as appropriate for user's specific applications.

  12. Hybrid armature projectile

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Sauve, G.L.; Shahinpoor, M.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1993-03-02

    A projectile for a railgun that uses a hybrid armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the hybrid plasma brush. In addition, the hybrid armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasma blowby.

  13. Hybrid quantum information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Furusawa, Akira

    2014-12-04

    I will briefly explain the definition and advantage of hybrid quantum information processing, which is hybridization of qubit and continuous-variable technologies. The final goal would be realization of universal gate sets both for qubit and continuous-variable quantum information processing with the hybrid technologies. For that purpose, qubit teleportation with a continuousvariable teleporter is one of the most important ingredients.

  14. Homoploid hybrid expectations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homoploid hybrid speciation occurs when a stable, fertile, and reproductively isolated lineage results from hybridization between two distinct species without a change in ploidy level. Reproductive isolation between a homoploid hybrid species and its parents is generally attained via chromosomal re...

  15. Semitransparent inverted organic solar cell with improved absorption and reasonable transparency perception based on the nanopatterned MoO3/Ag/MoO3 anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ximin; Zhang, Ye; Hao, Yuying; Cui, Yanxia; Wang, Wenyan; Shi, Fang; Wang, Hua; Wei, Bin; Huang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an inverted low bandgap semitransparent organic solar cell with improved absorption as well as reasonable transparency perception based on a nanopatterned MoO3/Ag/MoO3 (MAM) multilayer film as the transparent anode under illumination from the MAM side. The integrated absorption efficiency of the active layer at normal hybrid-polarized incidence considering an AM 1.5G solar spectrum is up to 51.69%, increased by 18.53% as compared to that of the equivalent planar device (43.61%) and reaching 77.3% of that of the corresponding opaque nanopatterned device (66.90%). Detailed investigations reveal that the excitation of plasmonic waveguide modes (at transverse magnetic polarization) and photonic modes (at transverse electric polarization) are responsible for the observed enhancement in absorption. Importantly, the proposed device exhibits an average transmittance of up to 28.4% and an average transparency perception of 26.3% for the human eyes under hybrid-polarized light illumination along with a good color rendering property. Additionally, our proposal works very well over a fairly wide angular range.

  16. Transparent sound screens. [and their noise control efficiency in buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizo, F.; Draghici, R.

    1974-01-01

    Transparent sound screens consisting of glass (organic glass) plates placed at fixed angles with respect to the floor are considered. Noise levels in the screened area depend on the cumulative effect of direct, reverberated and refracted components of sound energy radiated by the source. This effect is analyzed on the analogy of the summation of electrical impedances. Inasmuch as under given circumstances sufficient noise control can be obtained, transparent screens seem to solve the problem of unimpeded supervision of installations in noisy workshops and power plants; in administrative buildings, computing centers, design bureaus, etc., they ensure acoustic comfort without space losses and without inspiring claustrophobia.

  17. Casimir force between δ -δ' mirrors transparent at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Alessandra N.; Silva, Jeferson Danilo L.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate, in the context of a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions, models of partially reflecting mirrors simulated by Dirac δ -δ' point interactions. In the literature, these models do not exhibit full transparency at high frequencies. In order to provide a more realistic feature for these models, we propose a modified δ -δ' point interaction that enables full transparency in the limit of high frequencies. Taking this modified δ -δ' model into account, we investigate the Casimir force, comparing our results with those found in the literature.

  18. Magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency analogy of dielectric metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fuli He, Xuan; Zhao, Qian; Lan, Chuwen; Zhou, Ji; Zhang, Weihong Qiu, Kepeng

    2014-03-31

    In this manuscript, we experimentally demonstrate magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) analogy effect inside dielectric metamaterial. In contrast to previous studies employed different metallic topological microstructures to introduce dissipation loss change, barium strontium titanate, and calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) are chosen as the bright and dark EIT resonators, respectively, due to their different intrinsic dielectric loss. Under incident magnetic field excitation, dielectric metamaterial exhibits an EIT-type transparency window around 8.9 GHz, which is accompanied by abrupt change of transmission phase. Numerical calculations show good agreement with experiment spectra and reveal remarkably increased group index, indicating potential application in slow light.

  19. Polarization and incidence insensitive dielectric electromagnetically induced transparency metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuli; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Ji; Wang, Shengxiang

    2013-08-26

    In this manuscript, we demonstrate numerically classical analogy of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with a windmill type metamaterial consisting of two dumbbell dielectric resonator. With proper external excitation, dielectric resonators serve as EIT bright and dark elements via electric and magnetic Mie resonances, respectively. Rigorous numerical analyses reveal that dielectric metamaterial exhibits sharp transparency peak characterized by large group index due to the destructive interference between EIT bright and dark resonators. Furthermore, such EIT transmission behavior keeps stable property with respect to polarization and incidence angles.

  20. On the graphite-induced UV transparency in phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, José A.

    2016-12-01

    In this Communication, the origin of the graphite-induced UV transparency in phosphate glasses is scrutinized beyond the commonly accepted reduction of metal impurities. A systematic study was carried out by melting phosphate glasses with increasing amounts of graphite powder. Subsequent characterizations were performed by UV/Vis transmission, photoluminescence, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. The data points to a structural modification accompanying the enhanced UV transparency. A model accounting for Psbnd Osbnd C bond formation and the generation of reactive oxygen species is proposed in line with the new structural view suggested.

  1. Rain droplet erosion mechanisms in transparent plastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, G. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the damaging effects of rain erosion on optically transparent materials. The rotating arm test equipment used for the tests is described. Typical transparent materials such as those found in windshields, infrared windows, lasers, and television systems were tested. Nominal velocities of 400, 500, and 600 miles per hour and rainfall conditions of one inch per hour simulated rainfall were used in the tests. It was determined that an 80 percent reduction in laser transmittance can occur in plastics submitted to rain erosion. Significant results of the environmental tests are explained.

  2. Optical and Spectral Studies on β Alanine Metal Halide Hybrid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetlin, M. Daniel; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.; Ramalingom, S.

    2011-10-01

    We have synthesized and grown β alanine metal halide hybrid crystals viz. β alanine cadmium chloride (BACC), an amino acid transition metal halide complex crystal and β alanine potassium chloride (BAPC), an amino acid alkali metal halide complex crystal by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were found to be transparent and have well defined morphology. The optical characteristics of the grown crystals were carried out with the help of UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The optical transmittances of the spectrums show that BAPC is more transparent than BACC. The Photoluminescence of the materials were determined by the Photoluminescent Spectroscopy

  3. Solution-Processed Transparent Nickel-Mesh Counter Electrode with in-Situ Electrodeposited Platinum Nanoparticles for Full-Plastic Bifacial Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arshad; Huang, Yu-Ting; Miyasaka, Tsutomu; Ikegami, Masashi; Feng, Shien-Ping; Li, Wen-Di

    2017-03-08

    A new type of embedded metal-mesh transparent electrode (EMTE) with in-situ electrodeposited catalytic platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) is developed as a high-performance counter electrode (CE) for lightweight flexible bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The thick but narrow nickel micromesh fully embedded in a plastic film provides superior electrical conductivity, optical transmittance, and mechanical stability to the novel electrode. PtNPs decorated selectively on the nickel micromesh surface provide catalytic function with minimum material cost and without interfering with optical transparency. Facile and fully solution-processed fabrication of the novel CE is demonstrated with potential for scalable and cost-effective production. Using this PtNP-decorated nickel EMTE as the CE and titanium foil as the photoanode, unifacial flexible DSSCs are fabricated with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.91%. By replacing the titanium foil with a transparent ITO-PEN photoanode, full-plastic bifacial DSSCs are fabricated and tested, demonstrating a remarkable PCE of 4.87% under rear-side illumination, which approaches 85% of the 5.67% PCE under front-side illumination, among the highest ratio in published results. These promising results reveal the enormous potential of this hybrid transparent CE in scalable production and commercialization of low-cost and efficient flexible DSSCs.

  4. GO@CuSilicate nano-needle arrays hierarchical structure: a new route to prepare high optical transparent, excellent self-cleaning and anticorrosion superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ping; Chen, Jingyi; Yang, Jintao; Chen, Feng; Zhong, Mingqiang

    2017-02-01

    Transparent superhydrophobic coatings, which are highly desired for the protection of material surfaces, have been limited to particular kinds of materials, e.g. silicon dioxide. In this work, a hybrid compound of graphene oxide and copper silicate with hierarchical structure was developed and was used to fabricate coatings. Due to the high transparency of graphene oxide and the nanoscopic roughness created by nanoneedles of CuSilicate, with very low compound loading (0.052 mg/cm2), the as-prepared coating was found not only showing superhydrophobic properties with a water contact angle (CA) of ˜152° and a near zero sliding angle (SA) of 0.5 but also showing high optical transparent (light transmittance is as high as 94.5 % at 500 nm). Furthermore, this surface also showed efficient anticorrosion properties and excellent self-cleaning ability. This study not only fabricated a new surface with transparency and surperhydrophobicity based on graphene materials, but also hopefully offers a method for the fabrication of multifunctional coatings.

  5. Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of polymer/clay nanocomposites has been invented in an attempt to develop transparent, lightweight, durable materials for a variety of aerospace applications. As their name suggests, polymer/ clay nanocomposites comprise organic/ inorganic hybrid polymer matrices containing platelet-shaped clay particles that have sizes of the order of a few nanometers thick and several hundred nanometers long. Partly because of their high aspect ratios and high surface areas, the clay particles, if properly dispersed in the polymer matrix at a loading level of 1 to 5 weight percent, impart unique combinations of physical and chemical properties that make these nanocomposites attractive for making films and coatings for a variety of industrial applications. Relative to the unmodified polymer, the polymer/ clay nanocomposites may exhibit improvements in strength, modulus, and toughness; tear, radiation, and fire resistance; and lower thermal expansion and permeability to gases while retaining a high degree of optical transparency.

  6. An electromagnetic induced transparency-like scheme for wireless power transfer using dielectric resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnaggar, Sameh Y.

    2017-02-01

    Similar to the hybridization of three atoms, three coupled resonators interact to form bonding, anti-bonding, and non-bonding modes. The non-bonding mode enables an electromagnetic induced transparency like transfer of energy. Here, the non-bonding mode, resulting from the strong electric coupling of two dielectric resonators and an enclosure, is exploited to show that it is feasible to transfer power over a distance comparable to the operating wavelength. In this scheme, the enclosure acts as a mediator. The strong coupling permits the excitation of the non-bonding mode with high purity. This approach is different from resonant inductive coupling, which works in the sub-wavelength regime. Optimal loads and the corresponding maximum efficiency are determined using two independent methods: Coupled Mode Theory and Circuit modelling. It is shown that, unlike resonant inductive coupling, the figure of merit depends on the enclosure quality and not on the load, which emphasizes the role of the enclosure as a mediator. Briefly after the input excitation is turned on, the energy in the receiver builds up via all coupled and spurious modes. As time elapses, all modes except the non-bonding cease to sustain. Due to the strong coupling between the dielectrics and the enclosure, such systems have unique properties such as high and uniform efficiency over large distances and minimal fringing fields. These properties suggest that electromagnetic induced transparency like schemes that rely on the use of dielectric resonators can be used to power autonomous systems inside an enclosure or find applications when exposure to the fields needs to be minimal. Finite Element computations are used to verify the theoretical predictions by determining the transfer efficiency, field profile, and coupling coefficients for two different systems. It is shown that the three resonators must be present for efficient power transfer; if one or more are removed, the transfer efficiency reduces

  7. Alloying ZnS in the hexagonal phase to create high-performing transparent conducting materials.

    PubMed

    Faghaninia, Alireza; Bhatt, Kunal Rajesh; Lo, Cynthia S

    2016-08-10

    Alloyed zinc sulfide (ZnS) has shown promise as a relatively inexpensive and earth-abundant transparent conducting material (TCM). Though Cu-doped ZnS has been identified as a high-performing p-type TCM, the corresponding n-doped ZnS has, to date, been challenging to synthesize in a controlled manner; this is because the dopant atoms compete with hole-inducing zinc vacancies near the conduction band minimum as the most thermodynamically stable intrinsic point defects. We thus aim to identify the most promising n-type ZnS-based TCM, with the optimal combination of physical stability, transparency, and electrical conductivity. Using a relatively new method for calculating the free energy of both the sphalerite (cubic) and wurtzite (hexagonal) phases of undoped and doped ZnS, we find that doped ZnS is more stable in the hexagonal structure. This, for the first time, fundamentally explains previous experimental observations of the coexistence of both phases in doped ZnS; hence, it profoundly impacts future work on sulfide TCMs. We also employ hybrid density functional theory calculations and a new carrier transport model, AMSET (ab initio model for mobility and Seebeck coefficient using the Boltzmann transport equation), to analyze the defect physics and electron mobility of the different cation- (B, Al, Ga, In) and anion-doped (F, Cl, Br, I) ZnS, in both the cubic and hexagonal phases, at various dopant compositions, temperatures, and carrier concentrations. Among all doped ZnS candidates, Al-doped ZnS (AZS) exhibits the highest dopant solubility, largest electronic band gap, and highest electrical conductivity of 3830, 1905, and 321 S cm(-1), corresponding to the possible carrier concentrations of n = 10(21), 10(20), and 10(19) cm(-3), respectively, at the optimal 6.25% dopant concentration of Al and the temperature of 300 K.

  8. Regulation of responsiveness of phosphorescence toward dissolved oxygen concentration by modulating polymer contents in organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuo; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2014-06-15

    Platinum(II) octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP)-loaded organic-inorganic hybrids were obtained via the microwave-assisted sol-gel condensation with methyltrimethoxysilane and poly(vinylpyrrolidone). From transparent and homogeneous hybrid films, the strong phosphorescence from PtOEP was observed. Next, the resulting hybrids were immersed in the aqueous buffer, and the emission intensity was monitored by changing the dissolved oxygen level in the buffer. When the hybrid with relatively-higher amount of the silica element, the strong phosphorescence was observed even under the aerobic conditions. In contrast, the emission from the hybrids with lower amounts of the silica element was quenched under the hypoxic conditions. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first example to demonstrate that the responsiveness of the phosphorescence intensity of PtOEP in hybrid films to the dissolved oxygen concentration in water can be modulated by changing the percentage of the contents in the material.

  9. Transparent electrodes for organic optoelectronic devices: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Weiran; Li, Jian; Chen, Hongzheng; Xue, Jiangeng

    2014-01-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes are one of the essential components for organic optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaic cells and light-emitting diodes. Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is the most common transparent electrode in these devices due to its excellent optical and electrical properties. However, the manufacturing of ITO film requires precious raw materials and expensive processes, which limits their compatibility with mass production of large-area, low-cost devices. The optical/electrical properties of ITO are strongly dependent on the deposition processes and treatment conditions, whereas its brittleness and the potential damage to underlying films during deposition also present challenges for its use in flexible devices. Recently, several other transparent conductive materials, which have various degrees of success relative to commercial applications have been developed to address these issues. Starting from the basic properties of ITO and the effect of various ITO surface modification methods, here we review four different groups of materials, doped metal oxides, thin metals, conducting polymers, and nanomaterials (including carbon nanotubes, graphene, and metal nanowires), that have been reported as transparent electrodes in organic optoelectronic materials. Particular emphasis is given to their optical/electrical and other material properties, deposition techniques, and applications in organic optoelectronic devices.

  10. Truth, Transparency and Trust: Treasured Values in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The words "truth," "transparency," and "trust" recently have taken on renewed importance in higher education. The reporting and handling of sexual assaults, athletic cheating scandals, Muslim student deaths, the intrusion into the admissions process by college/university presidents forcing acceptance of new students…

  11. Transparent conductive grids via direct writing of silver nanoparticle inks.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Bok Yeop; Lorang, David J; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2011-07-01

    Transparent conductive grids are patterned by direct writing of concentrated silver nanoparticle inks. This maskless, etch-free patterning approach is used to produce well-defined, two-dimensional periodic arrays composed of conductive features with center-to-center separation distances of up to 400 µm and an optical transmittance as high as 94.1%.

  12. Understanding Solar Energy Systems, Instructional Modules and Transparency Masters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keaton, Laurie; Edington, Everett

    This instructional package was designed to develop a basic understanding of solar energy systems. It consists of seven instructional units, a glossary and a collection of transparency masters for use with the units. Each unit presents: (1) unit objective and specific objectives; (2) background material for student reading; (3) student assignment…

  13. Fatigue-free, superstretchable, transparent, and biocompatible metal electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuan Fei; Liu, Qihan; Wang, Guohui; Wang, Yecheng; Shi, Zhengzheng; Suo, Zhigang; Chu, Ching-Wu; Ren, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation flexible electronics require highly stretchable and transparent electrodes. Few electronic conductors are both transparent and stretchable, and even fewer can be cyclically stretched to a large strain without causing fatigue. Fatigue, which is often an issue of strained materials causing failure at low strain levels of cyclic loading, is detrimental to materials under repeated loads in practical applications. Here we show that optimizing topology and/or tuning adhesion of metal nanomeshes can significantly improve stretchability and eliminate strain fatigue. The ligaments in an Au nanomesh on a slippery substrate can locally shift to relax stress upon stretching and return to the original configuration when stress is removed. The Au nanomesh keeps a low sheet resistance and high transparency, comparable to those of strain-free indium tin oxide films, when the nanomesh is stretched to a strain of 300%, or shows no fatigue after 50,000 stretches to a strain up to 150%. Moreover, the Au nanomesh is biocompatible and penetrable to biomacromolecules in fluid. The superstretchable transparent conductors are highly desirable for stretchable photoelectronics, electronic skins, and implantable electronics. PMID:26392537

  14. Radiation-transparent windows, method for imaging fluid transfers

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Wang, Jin

    2011-07-26

    A thin, x-ray-transparent window system for environmental chambers involving pneumatic pressures above 40 bar is presented. The window allows for x-ray access to such phenomena as fuel sprays injected into a pressurized chamber that mimics realistic internal combustion engine cylinder operating conditions.

  15. Seeing through Transparency in Education Reform: Illuminating the "Local"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyama, Jill; Kania, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing "assemblage," a notion associated with Actor-Network Theory (ANT), we explore what discourses of transparency can, and cannot, accomplish in a network of education reform that includes schools, government agencies, and community organizations. Drawing on data collected between July 2011 and March 2013 in an…

  16. Fatigue-free, superstretchable, transparent, and biocompatible metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuan Fei; Liu, Qihan; Wang, Guohui; Wang, Yecheng; Shi, Zhengzheng; Suo, Zhigang; Chu, Ching-Wu; Ren, Zhifeng

    2015-10-06

    Next-generation flexible electronics require highly stretchable and transparent electrodes. Few electronic conductors are both transparent and stretchable, and even fewer can be cyclically stretched to a large strain without causing fatigue. Fatigue, which is often an issue of strained materials causing failure at low strain levels of cyclic loading, is detrimental to materials under repeated loads in practical applications. Here we show that optimizing topology and/or tuning adhesion of metal nanomeshes can significantly improve stretchability and eliminate strain fatigue. The ligaments in an Au nanomesh on a slippery substrate can locally shift to relax stress upon stretching and return to the original configuration when stress is removed. The Au nanomesh keeps a low sheet resistance and high transparency, comparable to those of strain-free indium tin oxide films, when the nanomesh is stretched to a strain of 300%, or shows no fatigue after 50,000 stretches to a strain up to 150%. Moreover, the Au nanomesh is biocompatible and penetrable to biomacromolecules in fluid. The superstretchable transparent conductors are highly desirable for stretchable photoelectronics, electronic skins, and implantable electronics.

  17. Natural Decompositions of Perceived Transparency: Reply to Albert (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Barton L.; Singh, Manish; O'Vari, Judit

    2008-01-01

    In M. Singh and B. L. Anderson, the authors proposed a model based on ratios of Michelson contrasts to explain how human observers quantitatively scale the perceived opacity of transparent surfaces. In subsequent work by B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, & J. Meng, the authors found that this model failed to generalize to other contexts and replaced it…

  18. Flexible transparent and free-standing silicon nanowires paper.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chunlei; Cui, Hao; Yang, Guowei; Wang, Chengxin

    2013-10-09

    If the flexible transparent and free-standing paper-like materials that would be expected to meet emerging technological demands, such as components of transparent electrical batteries, flexible solar cells, bendable electronics, paper displays, wearable computers, and so on, could be achieved in silicon, it is no doubt that the traditional semiconductor materials would be rejuvenated. Bulk silicon cannot provide a solution because it usually exhibits brittleness at below their melting point temperature due to high Peierls stress. Fortunately, when the silicon's size goes down to nanoscale, it possesses the ultralarge straining ability, which results in the possibility to design flexible transparent and self-standing silicon nanowires paper (FTS-SiNWsP). However, realization of the FTS-SiNWsP is still a challenging task due largely to the subtlety in the preparation of a unique interlocking alignment with free-catalyst controllable growth. Herein, we present a simple synthetic strategy by gas flow directed assembly of a unique interlocking alignment of the Si nanowires (SiNWs) to produce, for the first time, the FTS-SiNWsP, which consisted of interconnected SiNWs with the diameter of ~10 nm via simply free-catalyst thermal evaporation in a vertical high-frequency induction furnace. This approach opens up the possibility for creating various flexible transparent functional devices based on the FTS-SiNWsP.

  19. Controllable motion of optical vortex arrays using electromagnetically induced transparency.

    PubMed

    Shwa, David; Shtranvasser, Evgeny; Shalibo, Yoni; Katz, Nadav

    2012-10-22

    We demonstrate control of the collective motion of an optical vortex array using an electromagnetically induced transparency media. Scanning the frequency detuning between the pump and probe fields changes the susceptibility of the media, producing a unique effective diffraction of the vortex array for each detuning. We measure several experimental configurations and compare them to numerical simulations.

  20. Transparent conductive grids via direct writing of silver nanoparticle inks

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Bok Y; Lorang, David J; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2011-01-01

    Transparent conductive grids are patterned by direct writing of concentrated silver nanoparticle inks. This maskless, etch-free patterning approach is used to produce well-defined, two-dimensional periodic arrays composed of conductive features with center-to-center separation distances of up to 400 µm and an optical transmittance as high as 94.1%.

  1. One-piece transparent shell improves design of helmet assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. L.; Okane, J. H.

    1966-01-01

    One-piece transparent helmet shell made of polycarbonate is equipped with a helmet protection pad, a visor assembly, a communications skull cap, and an emergency oxygen supply. This design offers improvements over previous designs in weight, visual field, comfort and protection.

  2. An Illustrated Guide of Optical Characteristics of Aircraft Transparencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Standard Test Method for Measuring Angular Displacement of Multiple Images in Transparent Farts, October 1988. 27 [9] Louis V. Genco and Harry L. Task...Lecture Series No. 156. [15] Harry L. Task and Louis V. Genco . The measurement of aircraft windscreen haze and its effect on visual performance. Technical

  3. Transparency Masters for Crop and Weed Identification. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dwane G.; And Others

    Instructional aids produced from these transparency masters and the accompanying narrative may be used by vocational agriculture teachers in presenting courses in plant science. They were developed by subject matter specialists and teacher educators as part of a project designed to test effects of involving vocational agriculture teachers in…

  4. Homogeneous bilayer graphene film based flexible transparent conductor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Kyunghoon; Liu, Chang-Hua; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2012-01-21

    Graphene is considered as a promising candidate to replace conventional transparent conductors due to its low opacity, high carrier mobility and flexible structure. Multi-layer graphene or stacked single layer graphenes have been investigated in the past but both have their drawbacks. The uniformity of multi-layer graphene is still questionable, and single layer graphene stacks require many transfer processes to achieve sufficiently low sheet resistance. In this work, bilayer graphene film grown with low pressure chemical vapor deposition was used as a transparent conductor for the first time. The technique was demonstrated to be highly efficient in fabricating a conductive and uniform transparent conductor compared to multi-layer or single layer graphene. Four transfers of bilayer graphene yielded a transparent conducting film with a sheet resistance of 180 Ω(□) at a transmittance of 83%. In addition, bilayer graphene films transferred onto the plastic substrate showed remarkable robustness against bending, with sheet resistance change less than 15% at 2.14% strain, a 20-fold improvement over commercial indium oxide films.

  5. Flexible Silk-Inorganic Nanocomposites: From Transparent to Highly Reflective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-16

    assembly. The organized assembly of the silk fibroin with clay ( montmorillonite ) nanosheets results in highly transparent nanoscale films with...mechanical and optical properties of the nanocomposites. For that purpose we utilized individually dispersed, aluminosilicate layers of montmorillonite (MMT...to the thickness of an individual aluminosilicate layer of montmorillonite ,[43] and indicates that monolayer formation occurs upon adsorption (Fig. 2a

  6. Nonperiodic metallic gratings transparent for broadband terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Ren, Xiao-Ping; Peng, Ru-Wen; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    Recently, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that nonperiodic metallic gratings can become transparent for broadband terahertz waves. Quasiperiodic and disordered metallic gratings effectively weaken and even eliminate Wood's anomalies, which are the diffraction-related characters of periodic gratings. Consequently, both the transparence bandwidth and transmission efficiency are significantly increased due to the structural aperiodicity. Furthermore, we show that for a specific light source, for example, a line source, a corresponding nonperiodic transparent grating can be also designed. We expect that our findings can be applied for transparent conducting panels, perfect white-beam polarizers, antireflective conducting solar cells, and beyond. References: X. P. Ren, R. H. Fan, R. W. Peng, X. R. Huang, D. H. Xu, Y. Zhou, and Mu Wang, Physical Review B, 91, 045111 (2015); R. H. Fan, R. W. Peng, X. R. Huang, J. Li, Y. Liu, Q. Hu, Mu. Wang, and X. Zhang, Advanced Materials, 24, 1980 (2012); and X. R. Huang, R. W. Peng, and R. H. Fan. Physical Review Letters, 105, 243901 (2010).

  7. Biomimetic transparent and superhydrophobic coatings: from nature and beyond nature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shen; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2015-02-04

    It is well known that high optical transparency is one of the most crucial criteria for the overwhelming majority of optical devices and correlative functions, including smart windows, camera lenses, solar cell systems and optoelectronic devices. With the frequent exposure of this equipment to all sorts of environments, such as outdoor conditions, a surface with self-cleaning properties can guard against fouling, humidity, bacterial growth and so forth. That is one type of application of the big family of superhydrophobic coatings. Therefore, integrating high transparency with self-cleaning characteristics is of great importance for such applications. In this review, the recent developments in designing, synthesizing and manufacturing transparent and superhydrophobic surfaces are reviewed. Firstly, the established theoretical aspects of surface wetting properties are summarized and then several natural and bio-inspired superhydrophobic surfaces of diverse microcosmic structures are presented as representative examples. With a focus on distinctively employed materials and the corresponding fabrication of superhydrophobic coatings with high transparency, the promising research directions and application prospects of this rapidly developing field are briefly addressed as well.

  8. Low velocity impact testing and nondestructive evaluation of transparent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R. E.; Green, W. H.

    2011-06-23

    Advanced transparent materials are used in protective systems for enhancing the survivability of ground vehicles, air vehicles, and personnel in applications such as face shields, riot gear, and vehicle windows. Low velocity impact damage can limit visibility and compromise the structural integrity of a transparent system, increasing the likelihood of further damage or penetration from a high velocity impact strike. For this reason, it is critical to determine damage tolerance levels of transparent systems to indicate whether or not a component should be replaced. In this study, transparent laminate systems will be tested by comparing baseline conditions to experimentally controlled damage states. Destructive testing including air gun and sphere impact testing will be used to replicate low velocity impacts in the field. Characterization of the damaged state will include basic visual inspection as well as nondestructive techniques including cross-polarization, x-ray, and ultrasound. The combination of destructive testing and characterization of the resulting damage can help to establish a damage acceptance criterion for materials used in protective systems.

  9. Monolithic F-16 Uniform Thickness Stretched Acrylic Canopy Transparency Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Thermoforming Finite Strain Analysis Finite Element Modeling Mooney Formulation Tensile Testing Acrylic Material Properties F-16 Transparency Thinning Uniform...OF ACRYLIC TENSILE SPECIMEN ...... 8 MARC ANALYSIS OF ACRYLIC HEMISPHERE ............ 12 IV ACRYLIC MATERIAL PROPERTIES AT THERMOFORMING TEMPERATURES...properties (necessary for finite element stress analysis work) were generated at temperatures in the range of thermoforming . A finite element code

  10. A rate-transparent, self-clocking line code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prucnal, Paul R.; Perrier, Philippe A.

    1987-01-01

    A reliable and economical new transmission code is presented with the following properties: zero dc content, baseband bandwidth conservation, self-clocking capability, and data-rate-transparent decoding and synchronization. Simple encoder/decoder and clock extractor circuits are given. The code is demonstrated in a wavelength-multiplexed fiber-optic communication system.

  11. Man-machine communication - A transparent switchboard for computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1971-01-01

    Device uses pattern of transparent contact touch points that are put on cathode ray tube screen. Touch point system compels more precise and unambiguous communication between man and machine than is possible with any other means, and speeds up operation responses.

  12. Application and Testing of Transparent Plastics Used in Airplane Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riechers, K; Olms, J

    1938-01-01

    This report concerns the efforts being made to remove the source of danger to passengers arising from the fracturing of silicate glass. Some of the alternatives presented include: single-layer safety glass, multi-layer safety glass, transparent plastic resins. Some of the resins considered are celluloid, cellulose acetates, and mixtures of polymers.

  13. Transparent capacitors based on nanolaminate Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with H{sub 2}O and O{sub 3} as oxidizers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, G. Z.; Wu, H. Chen, C.; Wang, T.; Yue, J.; Liu, C.; Wang, P. Y.; Mai, L. Q.

    2014-04-21

    Transparent capacitors with nanolaminate Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (ATA) hybrid dielectrics have been prepared on quartz glass by atomic layer deposition. The maximal capacitance density of 14 fF/μm{sup 2} at 1 kHz was obtained. Moreover, an ultralow leakage current density of 2.1 × 10{sup −9} A/cm{sup 2} at 1 V was realized by using O{sub 3} as the oxidizer. Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is the main mechanism of the leakage current at high fields, while several conduction mechanisms coexist at low fields. The AlZnO/ATA/AlZnO transparent capacitors exhibit an average optical transmittance of more than 80% in the visible range, which serve as good candidates for integration in transparent circuits.

  14. Recognition and Transparency of Vocational Qualifications; The Way Forward. Discussion Paper = Anerkennung und Transparenz von beruflichen Befahigungsnachweisen; Neue Wege. Diskussionspapier = Reconnaissance et transparence des qualifications professionelles; La voie a suivre. Document de discussion. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjornavold, Jens; Sellin, Burkart

    The European Union's most important challenge is to establish permanent, reliable methodologies and systems that support transparency and recognition of vocational qualifications. The concept of "transparency of qualifications" has replaced "recognition" and "comparability.""Transparency" points to the need…

  15. One-Step Process for High-Performance, Adhesive, Flexible Transparent Conductive Films Based on p-Type Reduced Graphene Oxides and Silver Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Ting; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2015-08-26

    This work demonstrates a one-step process to synthesize uniformly dispersed hybrid nanomaterial containing silver nanowires (AgNWs) and p-type reduced graphene (p-rGO). The hybrid nanomaterial was coated onto a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate for preparing high-performance flexible transparent conductive films (TCFs). The p-rGO plays the role of bridging discrete AgNWs, providing more electron holes and lowering the resistance of the contacted AgNWs; therefore, enhancing the electrical conductivity without sacrificing too much transparence of the TCFs. Additionally, the p-rGO also improves the adhesion between AgNWs and substrate by covering the AgNWs on the substrate tightly. The study shows that coating of the hybrid nanomaterials on the PET substrate demonstrates exceptional optoelectronic properties with a transmittance of 94.68% (at a wavelength of 550 nm) and a sheet resistance of 25.0 ± 0.8 Ω/sq. No significant variation in electric resistance can be detected even when the film was subjected to a bend loading with a radius of curvature of 5.0 mm or the film was loaded with a reciprocal tension or compression for 1000 cycles. Furthermore, both chemical corrosion resistance and haze effect were improved when p-rGO was introduced. The study shows that the fabricated flexible TCFs have the potential to replace indium tin oxide film in the optoelectronic industry.

  16. 76 FR 78741 - Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs; Transparency Reports and Reporting of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... 42 CFR Parts 402 and 403 Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs; Transparency..., Children's Health Insurance Programs; Transparency Reports and Reporting of Physician Ownership or... medical supplies covered by Medicare, Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to...

  17. HEU Transparency Implementation Program and its Radiation Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R

    2002-01-31

    In February 1993, the Governments of the United States (U.S.) and the Russian Federation (R.F.) signed a bilateral Agreement for the U.S. purchase of low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from 500 metric tons (MT) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) resulting from the dismantlement of Russian nuclear weapons. The HEU Purchase Agreement serves important national security and nonproliferation policy imperatives for both countries since its implementation reduces the quantity of surplus Russian HEU that could be stolen and diverted for weapons use. In return, Russia receives much needed U.S. dollars over a 20-year delivery period. In 2001, Russia received over half a billion US dollars from the purchase of the LEU blended from 30 MT HEU. As part of this Agreement, transparency rights were agreed upon that provide confidence to both governments that the nonproliferation objectives of the Agreement are being fulfilled. While the U.S. Department of State, in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is responsible negotiating transparency rights associated with this nuclear material, the NNSA is responsible for implementing those rights. These rights allow U.S. and R.F., personnel (called ''monitors'') to visit the processing facilities and observe the steps for processing the HEU into fuel for nuclear reactors. In this fashion, the processing of HEU to LEU is made ''transparent.'' For DOE, there are three transparency objectives: (1) that the HEU is extracted from nuclear weapons, (2) that this same HEU is oxidized, and (3) that the HEU is blended into LEU. For MINATOM, the transparency objective is: (1) that the LEU is fabricated into fuel for commercial nuclear power reactors: The transparency is based on visits by designated transparency monitors (100 preapproved U.S. and Russian monitors) with specific rights to monitor and to access storage and processing areas to provide confidence that the nonproliferation goals

  18. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  19. Requirements for Hybrid Cosimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-16

    hybrid cosimulation version of the Functional Mockup Interface ( FMI ) standard. A cosimulation standard de nes interfaces that enable diverse simulation...This hybrid mixture is not well supported by existing cosimulation standards, and speci cally not by FMI 2.0, for reasons that are explained in this...cosimulation standards, and specifically provides guidance for development of a hybrid cosimulation version of the Functional Mockup Interface ( FMI ) standard

  20. 75 FR 11893 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Task Force; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Task Force... transparent, collaborative, and participatory government. FDA has formed an internal Transparency Task Force..., the Task Force has held two public meetings, on June 24, 2009, and November 3, 2009, and established...

  1. A Novel Supercritical Fluid-Assisted Fabrication Technique for Producing Transparent Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-03

    Contractors (DD882) Inventions (DD882) Scientific Progress Three types of studies were conducted : 1. Transparent nanocomposites based on poly(methyl...methacrylate) (PMMA) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) nanocomposites 2. Transparent green polymer blends based on polylactic acid (PLA) and polypropylene ...carbonate (PPC) 3. Transparent green nanocomposites based on polylactic acid (PLA), polypropylene carbonate (PPC) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC

  2. 76 FR 61366 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Draft Proposals for Public Comment to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Draft Proposals for Public Comment to Increase Transparency By Promoting Greater Access to the Agency's Compliance... availability; request for comments. SUMMARY: As part of the Transparency Initiative, the Food and...

  3. 75 FR 35632 - Transparency Provisions of Section 23 of the Natural Gas Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 260 Transparency Provisions of Section 23 of the Natural Gas Act... and purchases annually. \\2\\ Transparency Provisions of Section 23 of the Natural Gas Act, Order No... information on Form No. 552: \\5\\ Transparency Provisions of Section 23 of the Natural Gas Act, Order No....

  4. Solid state, transparent, cadmium sulfide-polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothurkar, Nikhil K.

    This dissertation deals with the preparation and characterization of solid state, transparent CdS-polymer nanocomposites for potential applications in optical limiting, lenses and photovoltaics. The focus of this research was controlling CdS aggregation to obtain 1 mm thick, films with a transmittance >85%. CdS-polysulfone nanocomposites gave transparent sols using thiol-capping agents however solid films obtained, were translucent to opaque. CdS-epoxy nanocomposites gave 1 mm thick films with >85% transmittance. Oligomeric polyoxypropylene diamine stabilizers were used to shield the inter particle forces and increase the viscosity of the medium to give air stable sols. Films were obtained by curing the CdS sols with an epoxy resin system. The band edge of the nanocomposites showed a shoulder corresponding to the absorption from the CdS particles. A majority of small amorphous and non-stoichiometric (richer in Cd) particles <5 nm were observed in TEM micrographs. Relatively fewer CdS aggregates in the range of tens to hundreds of nanometers were also detected. Aggregates were generally more numerous in films as compared to sols. The two-photon absorption coefficient of the CdS particles in the films showed a 30-fold reduction compared to bulk CdS. This was attributed to the lack of crystallinity of particles. The films were stable up to 300°C. CdS aggregation in the CdS-epoxy system depends on a number of factors including temperature, stabilizer concentration, stabilizer molar mass and US concentration. Effective aggregation control yields transparent films. Factors affecting the band edge and transparency of the films were detected and regression models were fitted to the data. Temperature, stabilizer concentration and CdS concentration had significant effects on the band edge and transparency. Interactions between temperature-stabilizer concentration and temperature-CdS concentration had significant effects on the band edge. Band edge tunability with

  5. Managing hybrid marketing systems.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, R T; Moran, U

    1990-01-01

    As competition increases and costs become critical, companies that once went to market only one way are adding new channels and using new methods - creating hybrid marketing systems. These hybrid marketing systems hold the promise of greater coverage and reduced costs. But they are also hard to manage; they inevitably raise questions of conflict and control: conflict because marketing units compete for customers; control because new indirect channels are less subject to management authority. Hard as they are to manage, however, hybrid marketing systems promise to become the dominant design, replacing the "purebred" channel strategy in all kinds of businesses. The trick to managing the hybrid is to analyze tasks and channels within and across a marketing system. A map - the hybrid grid - can help managers make sense of their hybrid system. What the chart reveals is that channels are not the basic building blocks of a marketing system; marketing tasks are. The hybrid grid forces managers to consider various combinations of channels and tasks that will optimize both cost and coverage. Managing conflict is also an important element of a successful hybrid system. Managers should first acknowledge the inevitability of conflict. Then they should move to bound it by creating guidelines that spell out which customers to serve through which methods. Finally, a marketing and sales productivity (MSP) system, consisting of a central marketing database, can act as the central nervous system of a hybrid marketing system, helping managers create customized channels and service for specific customer segments.

  6. High Refractive Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Films Prepared by Low Water Sol-Gel and UV-Irradiation Processes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hsiao-Yuan; Wang, Tzong-Liu; Chang, Pei-Yu; Yang, Chien-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid sols (Ti–O–Si precursor) were first synthesized by the sol-gel method at low addition of water, and were then employed to prepare a highly refractive hybrid optical film. This film was obtained by blending the Ti–O–Si precursor with 2-phenylphenoxyethyl acrylate (OPPEA) to perform photo-polymerization by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Results show that the film transparency of poly(Ti–O–Si precursor-co-OPPEA) film is higher than that of a pure poly(Ti–O–Si precursor) film, and that this poly(Ti–O–Si precursor-co-OPPEA) hybrid film exhibits a high transparency of ~93.7% coupled with a high refractive index (n) of 1.83 corresponding to a thickness of 2.59 μm.

  7. Cell culture monitoring for drug screening and cancer research: a transparent, microfluidic, multi-sensor microsystem.

    PubMed

    Weltin, Andreas; Slotwinski, Kinga; Kieninger, Jochen; Moser, Isabella; Jobst, Gerhard; Wego, Marcus; Ehret, Ralf; Urban, Gerald A

    2014-01-07

    We present a novel, multiparametric microphysiometry system for the dynamic online monitoring of human cancer cell metabolism. The optically transparent, modular, hybrid microsystem is based on a glass chip and combines a cell cultivation chamber, microfluidics and metabolic monitoring with fully integrated chemo- and biosensors. pH and oxygen are measured in the cell culture area, and biosensors for lactate and glucose are connected downstream by microfluidics. The wafer-level fabrication features thin-film platinum and iridium oxide microelectrodes on a glass chip, microfluidics in an epoxy resist, a hybrid assembly and an on-chip reference electrode. The reliable analytical performance of the sensors in cell culture medium was demonstrated. The pH sensors exhibit a long-term stable, linear response. The oxygen sensors show a linear behaviour, which is also observed for low oxygen concentrations. Glucose and lactate measurements show a linear, long-term stable, selective and reversible behaviour in the desired range. T98G human brain cancer cells were cultivated and cell culture metabolism was measured on-chip. Stop/flow cycles were applied and extracellular acidification, respiration, glucose consumption and lactate production were quantified. Long-term metabolic rates were determined and all parameters could be measured in the outlet channel. A placement downstream of the cell cultivation area for biosensors was realised. A highly effective medium exchange and undiluted sampling from the cell culture chamber with low flow rates (2 μl min(-1)) and low volumes (15 μl per cycle) were achieved. The drug screening application was demonstrated by detecting alteration and recovery effects of cellular metabolism induced by the addition of substances to the medium.

  8. From hybrid swarms to swarms of hybrids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Szalanski, Allen L; Gaskin, John F.; Young, Nicholas E.; West, Amanda; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Tripodi, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Science has shown that the introgression or hybridization of modern humans (Homo sapiens) with Neanderthals up to 40,000 YBP may have led to the swarm of modern humans on earth. However, there is little doubt that modern trade and transportation in support of the humans has continued to introduce additional species, genotypes, and hybrids to every country on the globe. We assessed the utility of species distributions modeling of genotypes to assess the risk of current and future invaders. We evaluated 93 locations of the genus Tamarix for which genetic data were available. Maxent models of habitat suitability showed that the hybrid, T. ramosissima x T. chinensis, was slightly greater than the parent taxa (AUCs > 0.83). General linear models of Africanized honey bees, a hybrid cross of Tanzanian Apis mellifera scutellata and a variety of European honey bee including A. m. ligustica, showed that the Africanized bees (AUC = 0.81) may be displacing European honey bees (AUC > 0.76) over large areas of the southwestern U.S. More important, Maxent modeling of sub-populations (A1 and A26 mitotypes based on mDNA) could be accurately modeled (AUC > 0.9), and they responded differently to environmental drivers. This suggests that rapid evolutionary change may be underway in the Africanized bees, allowing the bees to spread into new areas and extending their total range. Protecting native species and ecosystems may benefit from risk maps of harmful invasive species, hybrids, and genotypes.

  9. Growth and characterization of a multi-dimensional ZnO hybrid structure on a glass substrate by using metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Sik; Lee, Dohan; Lee, Je-Haeng; Byun, Dongjin

    2014-05-01

    A multi-dimensional zinc oxide (ZnO) hybrid structure was successfully grown on a glass substrate by using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The ZnO hybrid structure was composed of nanorods grown continuously on the ZnO film without any catalysts. The growth mode could be changed from a two-dimensional (2D) film to one-dimensional (1D) nanorods by simply controlling the substrate's temperature. The ZnO with a hybrid structure showed improved electrical and optical properties. The ZnO hybrid structure grown by using MOCVD has excellent potential for applications in opto-electronic devices and solar cells as anti-reflection coatings (ARCs), transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) and transparent thin-film transistors (TTFTs).

  10. 2004 Annual Health Physics Report for the HEU Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R

    2005-04-01

    During the 2004 calendar year, LLNL provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Implementation Program (HEU-TIP) in external and internal radiation protection and technical expertise into matters related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2004, there were 200 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 200 person-trips, 183 person-trips were SMVs and 17 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. Eight person-trips from the SMV trips were continuation trips of TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIP. The LLNL Safety Laboratories' Division provided the dosimetry services for the HEU-TIP monitors.

  11. 2005 Annual Health Physics Report for HEU Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R

    2006-04-21

    During the 2005 calendar year, LLNL provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program (HEU-TP) in external and internal radiation protection and technical expertise into matters related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2005, there were 161 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 161 person-trips, 149 person-trips were SMVs and 12 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. Additionally, there were 11 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 3 to UEIE itself. There were two monitoring visits (source changes) that were back to back with 16 monitors. Each of these concurring visits were treated as single person-trips for dosimetry purposes. Counted individually, there were 191 individual person-visits in 2005. The LLNL Safety Laboratories Division provided the dosimetry services for the HEU-TP monitors.

  12. Manipulation of electromagnetically induced transparency by planar metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Helin; Hu, Sen; Liu, Dan; Lin, Hai; Xiao, Boxun; Chen, Jiao

    2016-02-01

    The transmission characteristics of a planar metamaterial, composed of a metal ring and a regular trigonometry-star-rod (TSR), have been numerically and experimentally investigated in this paper. By rotating the TSR with different angles, this structure will appear to be symmetric or asymmetric toward the incident waves and then finely controls the coupling between the ring and the TSR. Thus, the transmission spectrum of our proposed structure can exhibit an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like spectral response in microwave region. Owing to the C3 rotational symmetry of the structure, an on-to-off active modulation of the EIT-like transparency window can be realized, and it may serve as the base for a microwave optical switching. Equivalent electric dipole moments couplings are employed to explain the transmission properties. In all, our work provides a way to obtain EIT-like effect, and it may achieve potential applications in filters, sensing and some other microwave devices.

  13. Ag Nanowire Based Transparent Conductor for CIGS PV

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, L. M.; Wolk, J.; Smith, M.; Davande, H.; Ribelin, R. M.; Perkins, C. L.

    2011-01-01

    Coated silver nanowires (AgNW) have been considered as a replacement for transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) in CIGS based photovoltaic devices. The advantages of AgNW over TCOs are discussed, and optical and electrical characteristics of AgNWs on glass are presented. Similarly fabricated AgNWs with varying sheet resistance on CIGS devices were tested against ITO transparent conductor controls. The CIGS was produced using a roll-to-roll technique on a flexible polymer substrate. Variations in the ZnO layer resistivity that are adjacent to the AgNW layer in the CIGS device were also tested. Device results indicate similar Jsc, but a reduced FF for cells made with the AgNWs, and Voc dependence on the resistivity of the coated AgNW and ZnO window layers. FF and Voc losses associated with the use of AgNWs are discussed.

  14. Space charge neutralization by electron-transparent suspended graphene.

    PubMed

    Srisonphan, Siwapon; Kim, Myungji; Kim, Hong Koo

    2014-01-20

    Graphene possesses many fascinating properties originating from the manifold potential for interactions at electronic, atomic, or molecular levels. Here we report measurement of electron transparency and hole charge induction response of a suspended graphene anode on top of a void channel formed in a SiO2/Si substrate. A two-dimensional (2D) electron gas induced at the oxide interface emits into air and makes a ballistic transport toward the suspended graphene. A small fraction (>~0.1%) of impinging electrons are captured at the edge of 2D hole system in graphene, demonstrating good transparency to very low energy (<3 eV) electrons. The hole charges induced in the suspended graphene anode have the effect of neutralizing the electron space charge in the void channel. This charge compensation dramatically enhances 2D electron gas emission at cathode to the level far surpassing the Child-Langmuir's space-charge-limited emission.

  15. All-Wet Metallization Process for Transparent Polyimide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Fujiwara, Y.; Akamatsu, K.; Nawafune, H.

    2013-03-01

    Electrically conductive Ag thin films were successfully formed onto optically transparent polyimide films via all-wet chemical process. The process involves alkaline-induced surface modification of polyimide films, subsequent incorporation of Ag+ ions through ion exchange reaction followed by reduction of incorporated Ag+ ions. Initial alkaline treatment time determines thickness (depth) of surface-modified layer and amount of Ag+ ions loading consequently. Higher Ag+ ions loading result in forming electrically conductive Ag thin films and its granular interfacial structure. Cu electroplating is able to be conducted on the resulting Ag thin films directly, and adhesive strength between the Cu(/Ag) film and transparent polyimide substrate reached up to 2 kN m-1.

  16. Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity of Transparent Adhesives by Photoacoustic Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Yoshiaki; Minamide, Akiyuki; Nakada, Naotaka

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a method by which thermal diffusivity of transparent epoxy adhesive on a substrate can easily be measured from the frequency dependence of a photoacoustic (PA) signal. In order to eliminate the influence of the substrate, the phase difference between a PA signal of the adhesive on the substrate and a PA signal of only the substrate was measured. This method was tested for cases of thermally thin and thick graphite (high thermal conductivity) substrates and a polypropylene (low thermal conductivity) substrate. It has the advantage that the thermal diffusivity of a transparent adhesive on a substrate can be measured regardless of the thickness and the thermal properties of the substrate.

  17. Exploring Electro-active Functionality of Transparent Oxide Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hideo

    2013-09-01

    Ceramics, one of the earliest materials used by humans, have been used since the Stone Age and are also one of the core materials supporting modern society. In this article, I will review the features of transparent oxides, the main components of ceramics, and the progress of research on their electro-active functionalities from the viewpoint of material design. Specifically, the emergence of the functionality of the cement component 12CaO.7Al2O3, the application of transparent oxide semiconductors to thin-film transistors for flat panel displays, and the design of wide-gap p-type semiconductors are introduced along with the progress in their research. In addition, oxide semiconductors are comprehensively discussed on the basis of the band lineup.

  18. Compound transparent ceramics and methods of preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hollingsworth, Joel P.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Soules, Thomas F.; Landingham, Richard L.

    2012-12-11

    According to one embodiment, a method for forming a composite transparent ceramic preform includes forming a first suspension of oxide particles in a first solvent which includes a first dispersant but does not include a gelling agent, adding the first suspension to a first mold of a desired shape, and uniformly curing the first suspension in the first mold until stable. The method also includes forming a second suspension of oxide particles in a second solvent which includes a second dispersant but does not include a gelling agent, adding the second suspension to the stable first suspension in a second mold of a desired shape encompassing the first suspension and the second suspension, and uniformly curing the second suspension in the second mold until stable. Other methods for forming a composite transparent ceramic preform are also described according to several other embodiments. Structures are also disclosed.

  19. Transparent Electrodes Printed with Nanocrystal Inks for Flexible Smart Devices.

    PubMed

    Song, Jizhong; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-08-17

    Transparent electrodes (TEs) are crucial in a wide range of modern electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, traditional TEs cannot meet the requirements of smart devices under development in unique fields, such as electronic skins, wearable electronics, robotic skins, flexible and stretchable displays, and solar cells. Emerging TEs printed with nanocrystal (NC) inks are inexpensive and compatible with solution processes, and have huge potential in flexible, stretchable, and wearable devices. Every development in ink-based electrodes makes them more competitive for practical applications in various smart devices. Herein, we provide an overview of emergent ink-based electrodes, such as transparent conducting oxides, metal nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes, and their application in solution-based flexible and stretchable devices.

  20. Ultrahigh electrical conductivity in solution-sheared polymeric transparent films

    PubMed Central

    Worfolk, Brian J.; Andrews, Sean C.; Park, Steve; Reinspach, Julia; Liu, Nan; Toney, Michael F.; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-01

    With consumer electronics transitioning toward flexible products, there is a growing need for high-performance, mechanically robust, and inexpensive transparent conductors (TCs) for optoelectronic device integration. Herein, we report the scalable fabrication of highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) thin films via solution shearing. Specific control over deposition conditions allows for tunable phase separation and preferential PEDOT backbone alignment, resulting in record-high electrical conductivities of 4,600 ± 100 S/cm while maintaining high optical transparency. High-performance solution-sheared TC PEDOT:PSS films were used as patterned electrodes in capacitive touch sensors and organic photovoltaics to demonstrate practical viability in optoelectronic applications. PMID:26515096

  1. A Fully Transparent Resistive Memory for Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Po-Kang; Ho, Chih-Hsiang; Lien, Der-Hsien; Durán Retamal, José Ramón; Kang, Chen-Fang; Chen, Kuan-Ming; Huang, Teng-Han; Yu, Yueh-Chung; Wu, Chih-I; He, Jr-Hau

    2015-01-01

    A fully transparent resistive memory (TRRAM) based on Hafnium oxide (HfO2) with excellent transparency, resistive switching capability, and environmental stability is demonstrated. The retention time measured at 85 °C is over 3 × 104 sec, and no significant degradation is observed in 130 cycling test. Compared with ZnO TRRAM, HfO2 TRRAM shows reliable performance under harsh conditions, such as high oxygen partial pressure, high moisture (relative humidity = 90% at 85 °C), corrosive agent exposure, and proton irradiation. Moreover, HfO2 TRRAM fabricated in cross-bar array structures manifests the feasibility of future high density memory applications. These findings not only pave the way for future TRRAM design, but also demonstrate the promising applicability of HfO2 TRRAM for harsh environments. PMID:26455819

  2. Dynamically tunable plasmon induced transparency in graphene metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guang-Lai; Zhai, Xiang; Li, Hong-Ju; Xia, Sheng-Xuan; Wang, Ling-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Plasmon induced transparency (PIT) with graphene metamaterials is investigated with the finite-difference time-domain method. Interestingly, the modulation of the PIT transparency window can be achieved by changing not only the gap distance between the two resonators but also the polarization angle of the excitation light. The three-level plasmonic system is employed to clearly explain the formation mechanism of the PIT effect. The analytical results show good consistency with the numerical calculations. Moreover, the PIT resonant wavelength and group delays of incident waves can be dynamically tuned by varying the Fermi energy of the graphene. Our designed graphene nanostructure is promising for the development of compact elements such as tunable sensors, switches and slow-light devices.

  3. Fabrication of large thick panels of transparent spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Mark; Gilde, Gary A.; Roy, Donald W.

    2001-11-01

    The use of magnesium aluminate spinel for optical windows, domes and armor has previously been investigated for a wide range of specific applications. The material properties rival that of ALON and sapphire, although there exists the potential for the fabrication of larger parts at significantly lower costs. The ability to fabricate transparent spinel by hot-pressing into large plates has gained interest for the fabrication of low-cost transparent armor for a range of applications. The present paper describes development efforts that are underway to fabricate spinel panels up to 22 inches in diameter and 0.5 inches thick. A 600 ton press is being installed at a facility in Millersville, MD that will be able to fabricate 22 inch diameter parts by late 2002. In the future, this press will potentially be able to fabricate 40 inch diameter plates with minimal changes. There is additional interest in these plates for large IR windows.

  4. Subgap conductivity in SIN-junctions of high barrier transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotkhov, S. V.; Balashov, D. V.; Khabipov, M. I.; Buchholz, F.-I.; Zorin, A. B.

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the current-voltage characteristics of high-transparency superconductor-insulator-normal metal (SIN) junctions with the specific tunnel resistance ρ ≲ 30 Ω μm2. The junctions were fabricated from different superconducting and normal conducting materials, including Nb, Al, AuPd and Cu. The subgap leakage currents were found to be appreciably larger than those given by the standard tunnelling model. We explain our results using the model of two-electron tunnelling in the coherent diffusive transport regime. We demonstrate that even in the high-transparency SIN-junctions, a noticeable reduction of the subgap current can be achieved by splitting a junction into several submicron sub-junctions. These structures can be used as nonlinear low-noise shunts in rapid-single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) circuitry for controlling Josephson qubits.

  5. Leakage radiation microscope for observation of non-transparent samples.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Juan M; Ye, Fan; Burns, Michael J; Naughton, Michael J

    2014-09-22

    We describe a leakage radiation microscope technique that can be used to extend the leakage radiation microscopy to optically non-transparent samples. In particular, two experiments are presented, first to demonstrate that acquired images with our configuration correspond to the leakage radiation phenomenon and second, to show possible applications by directly imaging a plasmonic structure that previously could only be imaged with a near-field scanning optical microscope. It is shown that the measured surface plasmon wavelength and propagation length agree with theoretically-calculated values. This configuration opens the possibility to study important effects where samples are optically non-transparent, as in plasmonic cavities and single hole plasmonic excitation, without the use of time-consuming near-field scanning optical microscopy.

  6. DebtRank-transparency: Controlling systemic risk in financial networks

    PubMed Central

    Thurner, Stefan; Poledna, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Nodes in a financial network, such as banks, cannot assess the true risks associated with lending to other nodes in the network, unless they have full information on the riskiness of all other nodes. These risks can be estimated by using network metrics (as DebtRank) of the interbank liability network. With a simple agent based model we show that systemic risk in financial networks can be drastically reduced by increasing transparency, i.e. making the DebtRank of individual banks visible to others, and by imposing a rule, that reduces interbank borrowing from systemically risky nodes. This scheme does not reduce the efficiency of the financial network, but fosters a more homogeneous risk-distribution within the system in a self-organized critical way. The reduction of systemic risk is due to a massive reduction of cascading failures in the transparent system. A regulation-policy implementation of the proposed scheme is discussed. PMID:23712454

  7. Carbon nanotube based transparent conductive films: progress, challenges, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Azumi, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Developments in the manufacturing technology of low-cost, high-quality carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are leading to increased industrial applications for this remarkable material. One of the most promising applications, CNT based transparent conductive films (TCFs), are an alternative technology in future electronics to replace traditional TCFs, which use indium tin oxide. Despite significant price competition among various TCFs, CNT-based TCFs have good potential for use in emerging flexible, stretchable and wearable optoelectronics. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the fabrication, properties, stability and applications of CNT-based TCFs. The challenges of current CNT-based TCFs for industrial use, in comparison with other TCFs, are considered. We also discuss the potential of CNT-based TCFs, and give some possible strategies to reduce the production cost and improve their conductivity and transparency. PMID:27877899

  8. Optically transparent frequency selective surfaces on flexible thin plastic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Dewani, Aliya A. O’Keefe, Steven G.; Thiel, David V.; Galehdar, Amir

    2015-02-15

    A novel 2D simple low cost frequency selective surface was screen printed on thin (0.21 mm), flexible transparent plastic substrate (relative permittivity 3.2). It was designed, fabricated and tested in the frequency range 10-20 GHz. The plane wave transmission and reflection coefficients agreed with numerical modelling. The effective permittivity and thickness of the backing sheet has a significant effect on the frequency characteristics. The stop band frequency reduced from 15GHz (no backing) to 12.5GHz with polycarbonate. The plastic substrate thickness beyond 1.8mm has minimal effect on the resonant frequency. While the inner element spacing controls the stop-band frequency, the substrate thickness controls the bandwidth. The screen printing technique provided a simple, low cost FSS fabrication method to produce flexible, conformal, optically transparent and bio-degradable FSS structures which can find their use in electromagnetic shielding and filtering applications in radomes, reflector antennas, beam splitters and polarizers.

  9. Optically Transparent Ferromagnetic Nanogranular Films with Tunable Transmittance

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Nobukiyo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2016-01-01

    Developing optically transparent magnets at room temperature is an important challenge. They would bring many innovations to various industries, not only for electronic and magnetic devices but also for optical applications. Here we introduce FeCo-(Al-fluoride) nanogranular films exhibiting ferromagnetic properties with high optical transparency in the visible light region. These films have a nanocomposite structure, in which nanometer-sized FeCo ferromagnetic granules are dispersed in an Al-fluoride crystallized matrix. The optical transmittance of these films is controlled by changing the magnetization. This is a new type of magneto-optical effect and is explained by spin-dependent charge oscillation between ferromagnetic granules due to quantum-mechanical tunneling. PMID:27677710

  10. Evolution of optical links toward full-optical transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opoka, Tomasz; Szczot, Feliks

    2003-10-01

    In this paper we review issues of evolution of optical networks towards their full optical transparency and present sequence of eliminating non-transparent elements out of optical links (networks). Architectures of optical commutators with electrical and optical cores have been presented, as well as a structure of OMO (optical-millimeter wave-optical) switching fabric. An example of pure al-optical switch, made by Luxcore, utilizing dispersion compensating elements, wavelength converters and and variable optical attenuators (VOA) operating entirely in optical domain without optical-electrical-optical (OEO) conversions, was quoted. We brought up an issue of all-optical 3R signal regeneration for long-haul networks and reviewed two different approaches: a regeneration of a single channel and simultaneous regeneration of four channels without converting WDM signal to basic channels.

  11. High conductivity transparent carbon nanotube films deposited from superacid.

    PubMed

    Hecht, David S; Heintz, Amy M; Lee, Roland; Hu, Liangbing; Moore, Bryon; Cucksey, Chad; Risser, Steven

    2011-02-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited from a chlorosulfonic superacid solution onto PET substrates by a filtration/transfer method. The sheet resistance and transmission (at 550 nm) of the films were 60 Ω/sq and 90.9% respectively, which corresponds to a DC conductivity of 12,825 S cm(-1) and a DC/optical conductivity ratio of 64.1. This is the highest DC conductivity reported for CNT thin films to date, and attributed to both the high quality of the CNT material and the exfoliation/doping by the superacid. This work demonstrates that CNT transparent films have not reached the conductivity limit; continued improvements will enable these films to be used as the transparent electrode for applications in solid state lighting, LCD displays, touch panels, and photovoltaics.

  12. Laminated Graphene Films for Flexible Transparent Thin Film Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Park, Min-Ho; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kwon, Sung-Joo; Jeong, Su-Hun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-06-15

    We introduce a simple, inexpensive, and large-area flexible transparent lamination encapsulation method that uses graphene films with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) buffer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The number of stacked graphene layers (nG) was increased from 2 to 6, and 6-layered graphene-encapsulation showed high impermeability to moisture and air. The graphene-encapsulated polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) had stable operating characteristics, and the operational lifetime of encapsulated PLEDs increased as nG increased. Calcium oxidation test data confirmed the improved impermeability of graphene-encapsulation with increased nG. As a practical application, we demonstrated large-area flexible organic light emitting diodes (FOLEDs) and transparent FOLEDs that were encapsulated by our polymer/graphene encapsulant.

  13. Color transparency in incoherent electroproduction of {rho} mesons off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nemchik, J.; Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.

    2013-04-15

    Color transparency (CT) phenomena in elastic electroproduction of vector mesons off nuclei are usually infected by the onset of coherence length (CL) effects. However, at low energies corresponding to the CLAS experiment at Jefferson Lab (JLab), one can study practically the net CT effects, since CL is much shorter than the nuclear radius. We investigate various manifestations of CT effects using rigorous quantum mechanical approach based on the path integral technique. We include also the effects of {rho} meson decay inside the nucleus leading to a rise of the nuclear suppression towards small values of Q{sup 2}. Motivated by the last CLAS data we predict the A, Q{sup 2} and l{sub c} dependence of nuclear transparency for {rho}{sup 0} mesons produced incoherently off nuclei. We also perform predictions for expected signal of CT corresponding to the planned JLab upgrade to 12 GeV electron beam.

  14. A novel approach to Hugoniot measurements utilizing transparent crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J. H.; Akin, M. C.; Chau, R.; Holmes, N. C.

    2013-01-01

    A new absolute equation of state measurement technique is described and demonstrated measuring the shock state and the refractive index of MgO up to 226GPa. This technique utilizes steady shock waves and the high-pressure transparency of MgO under dynamic shock compression and release. Hugoniot measurements performed using this technique are consistent with the previous measurements. A linear dependence of the shocked refractive index and density is observed up to 226GPa, over a magnitude greater in pressure that previous studies. The transparency of MgO along the principal Hugoniot is higher than any other material reported to date. We observe a significant change in the refractive index of MgO as the Hugoniot elastic limit is exceeded due to the transition from uniaxial to hydrostatic strain. Measurements of the elastic-plastic two-wave structure in MgO indicate a nucleation time for plastic deformation.

  15. Electrically conductive, optically transparent polymer/carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effective dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into polymer matrices. The nanocomposites are prepared using polymer matrices and exhibit a unique combination of properties, most notably, high retention of optical transparency in the visible range (i.e., 400-800 nm), electrical conductivity, and high thermal stability. By appropriate selection of the matrix resin, additional properties such as vacuum ultraviolet radiation resistance, atomic oxygen resistance, high glass transition (T.sub.g) temperatures, and excellent toughness can be attained. The resulting nanocomposites can be used to fabricate or formulate a variety of articles such as coatings on a variety of substrates, films, foams, fibers, threads, adhesives and fiber coated prepreg. The properties of the nanocomposites can be adjusted by selection of the polymer matrix and CNT to fabricate articles that possess high optical transparency and antistatic behavior.

  16. Toner concentration monitoring apparatus located behind a transparent photoconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W. L.

    1985-03-26

    A copier/duplicator has transparent photoconductor with a first surface on which a latent electrostatic image is formed. The latent image is developed by toner particles applied as the photoconductor is moved through a development station. A toner concentration monitor includes an emitting element and a detector. The emitting element directs a beam of radiation through the photoconductor from a second surface thereof toward an area of the development station where a developer mixture including toner particles is being provided to the first surface of the photoconductor. The detector is located adjacent the second surface of the photoconductor to receive rays emitted by the element and reflected from the developer mixture through the transparent photoconductor.

  17. Combinatorial Optimization of Transparent Conducting Oxides (TCOS) for PV

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J. D.; Taylor, M. P.; van Hest, M.F.A.M.; Teplin, C. W.; Alleman, J. L.; Dabney, M. S.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Keyes, B. M.; To, B.; Readey, D. W.; Delahoy, A. E.; Guo, S.; Ginley, D. S.

    2005-02-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) can serve a variety of important functions in thin-film photovoltaics such as transparent electrical contacts, antireflection coatings, and chemical barriers. Two areas of particular interest are TCOs that can be deposited at low temperatures and TCOs with high carrier mobilities. We have employed combinatorial high-throughput approaches to investigate both these areas. Conductivities of s = 2500 W-1-cm-1 have been obtained for In-Zn-O (IZO) films deposited at 100 C and s > 5000 W-1-cm-1 for In-Ti-O (ITiO) and In-Mo-O (IMO) films deposited at 550 C. The highest mobility obtained was 83 cm2/V-s for ITiO deposited at 550 C.

  18. Optically Transparent Ferromagnetic Nanogranular Films with Tunable Transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Nobukiyo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2016-09-01

    Developing optically transparent magnets at room temperature is an important challenge. They would bring many innovations to various industries, not only for electronic and magnetic devices but also for optical applications. Here we introduce FeCo-(Al-fluoride) nanogranular films exhibiting ferromagnetic properties with high optical transparency in the visible light region. These films have a nanocomposite structure, in which nanometer-sized FeCo ferromagnetic granules are dispersed in an Al-fluoride crystallized matrix. The optical transmittance of these films is controlled by changing the magnetization. This is a new type of magneto-optical effect and is explained by spin-dependent charge oscillation between ferromagnetic granules due to quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  19. Composition for forming an optically transparent, superhydrophobic coating

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, John T.; Lewis, Linda A.

    2015-12-29

    A composition for producing an optically clear, well bonded superhydrophobic coating includes a plurality of hydrophobic particles comprising an average particle size of about 200 nm or less, a binder at a binder concentration of from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.5 wt. %, and a solvent. The hydrophobic particles may be present in the composition at a particle concentration of from about 0.1 wt. % to about 1 wt. %. An optically transparent, superhydrophobic surface includes a substrate, a plurality of hydrophobic particles having an average particle size of about 200 nm or less dispersed over the substrate, and a discontinuous binder layer bonding the hydrophobic particles to the substrate, where the hydrophobic particles and the binder layer form an optically transparent, superhydrophobic coating.

  20. The Transformative Nature of Transparency in Research Funding

    PubMed Central

    Mietchen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Central to research funding are grant proposals that researchers send in to potential funders for review, in the hope of approval. A survey of policies at major research funders found that there is room for more transparency in the process of grant review, which would strengthen the case for the efficiency of public spending on research. On that basis, debate was invited on which transparency measures should be implemented and how, with some concrete suggestions at hand. The present article adds to this discussion by providing further context from the literature, along with considerations on the effect size of the proposed measures. The article then explores the option of opening to the public key components of the process, makes the case for pilot projects in this area, and sketches out the potential that such measures might have to transform the research landscape in those areas in which they are implemented. PMID:25549343